WorldWideScience

Sample records for dolomite

  1. Dolomitic lime containing hydraulic additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagzdina, S.; Sedmalis, U.; Bidermanis, L.; Liepins, J.; Grosvalds, I.

    1997-01-01

    To obtain qualitative dolomitic lime the optimum calcination temperature of dolomite containing about 9 % of clayey substances is 900 deg C. The mechanical strength of dolomitic lime containing 30 % of brick waste additive after 6-9 months of hardening is 1.4-1.5 times higher than that of samples without hydraulic additive, for calcium lime - 2.2-2.6 times higher. Generally the mechanical strength of dolomitic lime is higher than that one of calcium lime. It can be explained by the active role of MgO in the hydration and hardening processes of dolomitic lime. Xray diffraction phase analysis was performed by X-ray diffractometer DPON-3M with Cu-K α emission filter

  2. Dolomite decomposition under CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerfa, F.; Bensouici, F.; Barama, S.E.; Harabi, A.; Achour, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Dolomite (MgCa (CO 3 ) 2 is one of the most abundant mineral species on the surface of the planet, it occurs in sedimentary rocks. MgO, CaO and Doloma (Phase mixture of MgO and CaO, obtained from the mineral dolomite) based materials are attractive steel-making refractories because of their potential cost effectiveness and world wide abundance more recently, MgO is also used as protective layers in plasma screen manufacture ceel. The crystal structure of dolomite was determined as rhombohedral carbonates, they are layers of Mg +2 and layers of Ca +2 ions. It dissociates depending on the temperature variations according to the following reactions: MgCa (CO 3 ) 2 → MgO + CaO + 2CO 2 .....MgCa (CO 3 ) 2 → MgO + Ca + CaCO 3 + CO 2 .....This latter reaction may be considered as a first step for MgO production. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) are used to control dolomite decomposition and the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) was used to elucidate thermal decomposition of dolomite according to the reaction. That required samples were heated to specific temperature and holding times. The average particle size of used dolomite powders is 0.3 mm, as where, the heating temperature was 700 degree celsius, using various holding times (90 and 120 minutes). Under CO 2 dolomite decomposed directly to CaCO 3 accompanied by the formation of MgO, no evidence was offered for the MgO formation of either CaO or MgCO 3 , under air, simultaneous formation of CaCO 3 , CaO and accompanied dolomite decomposition

  3. Metal Sorption to Dolomite Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.; Kelly, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Potential human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) might release actinides into the Culebra Dolomite where sorption reactions will affect of radiotoxicity from the repository. Using a limited residence time reactor the authors have measured Ca, Mg, Nd adsorption/exchange as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. By the same approach, but using as input radioactive tracers, adsorption/exchange of Am, Pu, U, and Np on dolomite were measured as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. Metal adsorption is typically favored at high pH. Calcium and Mg adsorb in near-stoichiometric proportions except at high pH. Adsorption of Ca and Mg is diminished at high ionic strengths (e.g., 0.5M NaCl) pointing to association of Na + with the dolomite surface, and the possibility that Ca and Mg sorb as hydrated, outer-sphere complexes. Sulfate amplifies sorption of Ca and Mg, and possibly Nd as well. Exchange of Nd for surface Ca is favored at high pH, and when Ca levels are low. Exchange for Ca appears to control attachment of actinides to dolomite as well, and high levels of Ca 2+ in solution will decrease Kds. At the same time, to the extent that high P CO2 increase Ca 2+ levels, JK d s will decrease with CO 2 levels as well, but only if sorbing actinide-carbonate complexes are not observed to form (Am-carbonate complexes appear to sorb; Pu-complexes might sorb as well; U-carbonate complexation leads to desorption). This indirect CO 2 effect is observed primarily at, and above, neutral pH. High NaCl levels do not appear to affect to actinide K d s

  4. Petrography, trace element geochemistry, and dolomitization model - Jhimpir dolomite, Sindh, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naseem, S.; Sheikh, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Dolomites of Jhimpir area have been examined petrographically and geochemically to observe and characterize the process and extent of dolomitization. These are petrographically classified as calcitic dolomite and dolomitic limestones. The texture of dolomite is idiotopic. Most of the dolomite rhombohedrons are fine to medium gained and zoned. The replacement of biomicritic carbonate rocks (Laki Limestone of Early Eocene age) by Mg and Fe-rich solutions is observed in thin section. Major and trace elements have been analyzed in order to assess the compatibility of these elements with dolomite. The average MgO content in the samples close to small fault is between 16 and 17 % and decreases from the fault outwards, down to 5 to 4 %. The Fe, Mn, Na and K contents exhibit a positive correlation with increasing dolomitization, whereas, it correlates inversely with Sr. This paper provides evidence that the dolomites of the Jhimpir area are derived from epigenetic replacement. (author)

  5. Weathering of dolomite in industrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauri, K.L.; Tambe, S.S.; Caner-Saltik, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    To the exclusion of other major atmospheric pollutants, sulfur dioxide is mainly responsible for attack upon dolomite. This article characterizes Laurel Dolomite on the basis of composition, texture, and porosity; describes the mechanism of the SO 2 reaction with dolomite; and develops two equations for the prediction of the rate of decay of dolomite. Over a period of 120 yr nearly 3.57 mm surface reduction at protected areas and 0.915 mm surface reduction at unprotected surfaces of a building in Louisville was calculated. However, these values could not be verified because measurement of these quantities in the field cannot be made

  6. The Tonian Beck Spring Dolomite: Marine dolomitization in a shallow, anoxic sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Alice Mary; Wallace, Malcolm William; van Smeerdijk Hood, Ashleigh; Jiang, Ganqing

    2018-06-01

    The reason for the abundance of dolomite lithologies in Earth's early geological record compared to modern environments remains contentious. This study provides new insight into this Precambrian "dolomite problem" by revisiting one of the most controversial dolomite localities, the Beck Spring Dolomite, of Death Valley, USA. Consistent with some previous studies, petrographic evidence indicates that although the Beck Spring Dolomite now consists almost entirely of dolomite, it was originally precipitated largely as aragonite and high-Mg calcite. Depositional constituents (microbialites and ooids) were likely originally aragonitic, and early marine length-fast cements (now dolomite) are suggested to have precipitated as high-Mg calcite then replaced syntaxially by dolomite. Based on petrographic and geochemical evidence, we suggest that marine dolomitization was the dominant synsedimentary diagenetic process in the unit, and for the most part, involved syntaxial and mimetic replacement. Further, a length-slow fibrous dolomite generation was precipitated during the later stages of marine diagenesis as a primary marine dolomite cement. This is indicated by the length-slow crystallographic structure of the cement and from its preserved geochemical and cathodoluminescence growth zonation. This new evidence for Tonian marine dolomite precipitation reinforces the idea of Precambrian marine environmental conditions, including the chemical composition of seawater, promoting dolomite formation at this time. The trace metal geochemical composition of well-preserved marine components, especially dolomite marine cements, reveals information about redox conditions in this Tonian shallow seawater. In terms of rare earth element geochemistry, the Beck Spring Dolomite has no significant Ce anomaly, and a ubiquitous positive Eu anomaly, consistent with widespread oceanic anoxia during deposition. Furthermore, the relatively low levels of iron and chalcophile elements Co, Cu, Pb and

  7. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  8. Wetting behavior of magnesite and dolomite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gence, Nermin

    2006-03-01

    Magnesite and dolomite are salt-type minerals that show similar chemical composition and flotation behavior due to same crystal structure, and sparingly soluble nature. The surface properties of minerals play a major role in determining their separation from each other in processes such as flotation. During flotation process, selectivity problem arises between magnesite and associated gangue minerals such as dolomite. There is a close relationship between floatability of minerals and their contact angles. Therefore, surface hydrophobicity of magnesite and dolomite minerals was investigated by contact angle measurements in the absence and presence of flotation reagents. Magnesite and dolomite show hydrophilic properties and they have got a small contact angle (magnesite ˜10.4° and dolomite ˜6.6°) in distilled water in the absence of any surfactant. The contact angle values at the magnesite and dolomite surfaces remained at 9.7°-10.9° in the presence of petroleum sulphonates (R825 and R840) while sodium oleate affected hydrophobicity of magnesite, and the contact angle value increased up to 79°. The contact angle value of 39° at dolomite surface was obtained in the solution of sodium oleate, respectively.

  9. Fabric Preserving and Fabric Destroying Dolomitization: A case of Seawater Dolomitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alham Jassim Al-Langawi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on field, petrographic and geochemical investigations of Hajar Supergroup autochthonous rocks: Ruus Al Jibal Group- Musandam Peninsula, and Akhdar Group- Jebel Akhdar, Oman and U.A.E., and para-autochthonous Maqam Formation-Sumeini Group-Jebel Sumeini-U.A.E.  Petrographic evidence indicates that the rocks were deposited in a shallow marine shelf environment, particularly tidal flat, lagoon, reef, back-reef and shoal environments that were part of the Arabian Platform during Permian and Triassic times. However, they are almost entirely dolomitized and the rocks show different petrographic features ranging from perfect preservation of original texture by mimetic dolomitization to complete obliteration and destruction of the original limestones giving rise to inequicrystalline and equicrystalline fabrics.  Dolomites analyzed by geochemical methods were categorized on the basis of textural variations; crystal size, shape and impurity or inclusion distribution within crystals, and whether these crystals are found as rock forming (replacive or cements. The dolomites display variations in stoichiometry, ordering and trace element concentrations indicating differences in dolomitizing fluid chemistry and recrystallization stages that prevailed through time. It indicates also that although dolomitization is pervasive, dolomites are petrographically and chemically immature. All the petrographic and geochemical evidence strongly indicates seawater and/or mixing zone dolomitization which may have been initiated soon after deposition of the host sediments.  Rocks showing preservation of allochems as well as the marine cements by mimetic dolomite crystals, suggest that dolomitization was early (at shallow depths with very active marine-water circulation and occurred in a relatively short time.  Evidence from crystalline dolomites indicates several crystallization events at shallow burial depths, under marine waters modified by increased

  10. First description of Phanerozoic radiaxial fibrous dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D. K.; Heinrich, F.; Geske, A.; Neuser, R. D.; Gies, H.; Immenhauser, A.

    2014-05-01

    The petrographic analysis and crystallographic analysis of concretionary carbonate cements ("coal balls") from Carboniferous paralic swamp deposits reveal the presence of (length fast) radiaxial fibrous dolomite (RFD), a fabric not previously reported from the Phanerozoic. This finding is of significance as earlier reports of Phanerozoic radiaxial fibrous carbonates are exclusively of calcite mineralogy. Dolomite concretions described here formed beneath marine transgressive intervals within palustrine coal seams. This is of significance as seawater was arguably the main source of Mg2 + ions for dolomite formation. Here, data from optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence, electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction and geochemical analyses are presented to characterize three paragenetic dolomite phases and one calcite phase in these concretions. The main focus is on the earliest diagenetic, non-stoichiometric (degree of order: 0.41-0.46) phase I, characterized by botryoidal dolomite constructed of fibres up to 110 μm wide with a systematic undulatory extinction and converging crystal axes. Petrographic and crystallographic evidence clearly qualifies phase I dolomite as radiaxial fibrous. Conversely, fascicular optical fabrics were not found. Carbon-isotope ratios (δ13C) are depleted (between - 11.8 and - 22.1‰) as expected for carbonate precipitation from marine pore-fluids in organic-matter-rich, paralic sediment. Oxygen isotope (δ18O) ratios range between - 1.3 and - 6.0‰. The earliest diagenetic nature of these cements is documented by the presence of ubiquitous, non-compacted fossil plant remains encased in phase I dolomite as well as by the complex zoned luminescence patterns in the crystals and is supported by crystallographic and thermodynamic considerations. It is argued that organic matter, and specifically carboxyl groups, reduced thermodynamic barriers for dolomite formation and facilitated Mg/CaCO3 precipitation. The data shown here

  11. Geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1989-12-01

    The major goal of the carbonate research program at Stony Brook is to better understand the conditions and processes leading to regional diagenesis of carbonate rocks. Our research focuses on studies of ancient, massive dolostones, but we are also studying limestone diagenesis for its own importance, and as it relates to dolomitization. Our approach has been to carry out a very detailed petrographic and geochemical case study to the Mississippian Burlington-Keokuk Fms. of Iowa, Illinois and Missouri, and to develop this as a testing ground for new geochemical and modelling techniques, and for testing various models for regional dolomitization in epicontinental carbonates. The ideas and techniques developed in our Burlington-Keokuk studies are being expanded and applied to carbonate sequences of other ages (Devonian to Neogene), and other tectono-sedimentary settings. The emphasis of this report will be on new developments and results on the Burlington-Keokuk studies and on our diagenetic studies of other strata. Recent research on Burlington-Keokuk rocks include development and application of boron isotopes and the U--Th--Pb system to dolomite studies, investigations of porosity and permeability in the dolostones. Projects on other strata include dolomitization and limestones diagenesis of Devonian carbonates of Alberta and Western Australia, Miocene reefal carbonates of Spain, Neogene carbonates of Curacao and Bonaire, Waulsortian limestones of Ireland, modelling of trace elements and stable isotopes, and experimental growth of calcites to investigate crystallographic controls of trace element incorporation. 118 refs., 46 figs

  12. Aerobic microbial dolomite at the nanometer scale : Implications for the geologic record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Vasconcelos, Crisógono; Schmid, Thomas; Dittrich, Maria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Zenobi, Renato; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial experiments are the only proven approach to produce experimental dolomite under Earth's surface conditions. Although microbial metabolisms are known to induce dolomite precipitation by favoring dolomite growth kinetics, the involvement of microbes in the dolomite nucleation process is

  13. Chemical composition and strength of dolomite geopolymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizat, E. A.; Al Bakri, A. M. M.; Liew, Y. M.; Heah, C. Y.

    2017-09-01

    The chemical composition of dolomite and the compressive strength of dolomite geopolymer composites were studied. The both composites prepared with mechanical mixer manufactured by with rotor speed of 350 rpm and curing in the oven for 24 hours at 80˚C. XRF analysis showThe dolomite raw materials contain fewer amounts of Si and Al but high Ca in its composition. Dolomite geopolymer composites with 20M of NaOH shows greater and optimum compressive strength compared to dolomite geopolymer with other NaOH molarity. This indicated better interaction of dolomite raw material and alkaline activator need high molarity of NaOH in order to increase the reactivity of dolomite.

  14. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy utilizing authigenic dolomites in hemipelagic sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Kastner, M. (Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Elderfield, H. (Univ. of Cambridge (England))

    1990-05-01

    Authigenic dolomites commonly occur in organic-rich, continental margin marine sediments. These dolomites play a key role in the age dating of stratigraphic sections. The dolomites often are the only lithology amenable to paleomagnetic stratigraphy; they preserve siliceous microfossils against diagenetic; recrystallization, and provide useful strontium isotopic stratigraphic ages. Several potential sources of error frequently are unique to the use of authigenic dolomites in the strontium isotope methods. (1) The dolomites occur as cements of the host lithology, hence, they are not a pure phase. Potentially important contaminants during analysis include gypsum clay minerals, feldspars, and iron and manganese oxides. Strontium may occur as a structural substituent ion in these minerals or as a surface-adsorbed ion. Various leaching techniques have been tested to isolate dolomitic strontium. Purer dolomites and strontium-enriched dolomites often can be selected to ease these problems. (2) The dolomites form after the deposition of the host sediment, therefore, they record the diagenetic age not the depositional age. The stable isotopic composition of the dolomites can aid in selection of early formed samples. (3) The dolomites record pore-water strontium isotope compositions, not seawater isotopic compositions. This problem is also minimized by choosing dolomites formed near the sediment-water interface. (4) The dolomites formed near the sediment-water interface originated as rotodolomites and undergo subsequent burial diagenesis, creating a potential for later strontium isotope exchange. This problem is minimized by selecting fresh samples from the interior of nearly impermeable beds and nodules. Results from the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and from the Eocene through Pliocene Pisco basin of Peru show that authigenic dolomites can provide useful strontium isotopic age estimates.

  15. A urolith of biogenic dolomite - another clue in the dolomite mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Charles F.

    1980-06-01

    A male Dalmatian, Canis familiaris, produced uroliths of almost pure dolomite, 3-8 mm across, in his urinary bladder in less than 8 months at 38°C and about 1 atm. The X-ray diffractogram identified the predominant mineral as dolomite, and the sharp (01.5) peak showed it is ordered dolomite, not the disordered form, protodolomite. Geochemically and biologically plausible causes include (1) renal, respiratory, or metabolic alkalosis, (2) infection by urease-producing (urea-splitting) fungi or bacteria and (3) infection by uric acid-fermenting bacteria. Hematological, bacteriological, urological and geochemical considerations most strongly implicate infection by either anaerobic, urease-producing bacteria or anaerobic, uric acid-fermenting bacteria. The physical and chemical conditions of this urinary system more closely approximate modern and inferred ancient carbonate depositional settings than most previous laboratory experiments, especially in terms of temperature, pressure, total salinity and, possibly, biota. The presence of urease-producing and/or uric acid-fermenting bacteria in urea- and/or acid-containing sediment, such as fecal pellets and algal mats, could promote formation of authigenic dolomite or other carbonates.

  16. Multiple episodes of dolomitization and dolomite recrystallization during shallow burial in Upper Jurassic shelf carbonates: eastern Swabian Alb, southern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, C.

    1998-10-01

    The Upper Jurassic of the eastern Swabian Alb is composed of oolitic platform sands with associated microbe-siliceous sponge mounds at the platform margins. They are surrounded by argillaceous or calcareous mudstones and marl-limestone alternations, deposited in adjacent marl basins. Partial to complete dolomitization is predominantly confined to the mound facies. Six types of dolomite, as well as one type of ankerite, document a complex diagenetic history during shallow burial with multiple episodes of dolomite formation and recrystallization. The earliest massive matrix dolomitization is Ca-rich, has slightly depleted oxygen isotope values relative to Late Jurassic seawater, and carbon isotopic values in equilibrium with Late Jurassic seawater. This initial massive matrix dolomitization occurred during latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous and is related to pressure dissolution during very shallow burial at temperatures of at least 50°C. Hydrologic conditions and mass-balance calculations indicate that burial compaction provided sufficient fluids for dolomitization. Mg is derived from negligibly modified seawater, that was expelled from the adjacent off-reef strata into the mound facies. Position of the mounds along the platform margins controlled the distribution of the shallow-burial dolomite. Covariant trends between textural modification, increasing stoichiometry, partial changes in trace element content (Mn, Fe, Sr) and depletion in stable isotopes as well as distinctive CL pattern illustrate two recrystallization phases of the precursor matrix dolomite during further burial at elevated temperatures. Strong Sr enrichment of the second phase of recrystallized dolomite is ascribed to Sr-rich meteoric waters descending from overlying aragonite-bearing reef limestones or evaporite-bearing peritidal carbonates. Late-stage coarsely crystalline dolomite cements occur as vug and fracture fillings and formed during burial. Ankerite, associated with sulphide and

  17. Cyclic, Early Diagenetic Dolomite Formation in Alkaline Lake Van

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, J.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Immenhauser, A.; Kwiecien, O.

    2017-12-01

    Modern dolomite-forming environments are commonly constrained to evaporitic marine or marginal marine settings such as lagoons and sabkhas. Beside microbial mediation, high temperatures and Mg2+ concentrations in solution are factors considered important in aiding dolomite formation. Accordingly, previous studies associate the presence of dolomite within deep sediments of alkaline Lake Van (Turkey) with periods of enhanced evaporation, low lake levels and high Mg/Ca ratio. We systematically studied dolomite within the sedimentary record of Lake Van by means of XRD, SEM and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) mass spectrometry. First, we considered the origin of the dolomite; next, we focused on the wider implication of its presence. SEM imaging documents large dolomite crystals interwoven with clay minerals and individual crystals with different crystallographic orientations grown together, indicating space-limited growth within the sediment. According to recent climatic reconstructions for the same sequence (ICDP PALEOVAN project), the water depth of the coring site - today at 350 m - unlikely fell below 200 m. Consequently, dolomite formed below a thick water column at constantly low temperatures (supported by heavy δ18O signature). Within this environment, variations in Mg/Ca ratio, pH and alkalinity, which are constantly high, have no effect on the episodic nature of dolomite precipitation. These observations call for a re-evaluation of the palaeoenvironments often invoked to interpret intervals rich in dolomite within ancient sedimentary sequences (e.g., periods of enhanced aridity and evaporation). Further, and in contrast to previous interpretations, our dolomite concentration data backed up by ICDP PALEOVAN reconstructions suggest that intervals rich in dolomite coincide with periods of high lake level and increased humidity. High dolomite concentrations (20 - 85 % relative carbonate content) occur cyclically within the last glacial period and coincide with

  18. Review of Dolomite as Precursor of Geopolymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an environmentally friendly cementitious binder that does not require the existence of ordinary Portland cement (OPC. Geopolymer has many excellent advantages, including high early strength, low shrinkage, good thermal resistance and good chemical resistance. Previous commonly used materials include fly ash, clay and slag. The used of dolomite as precursor material in geopolymer field is still new and at the early stage of study. Only a few researchers have done studies on dolomite in geopolymer. Dolomite (CaMg(CO32 is abundant and generally inexpensive natural minerals. The possible use of these bulk calcium carbonate materials in improving the mechanical properties of geopolymers will therefore be of great interest. This paper summarizes some research outcomes on dolomite in geopolymer along with the potential of dolomite as geopolymer composites.

  19. Nanotoxicity of dolomite mineral of commercial importance in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Govil; Khan, Mohd Imran; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ashquin, Mohd; Sultana, Sarwat; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2011-02-01

    The risk of occupational exposure to dolomite, an important mineral exists both in organized as well as unorganized sectors. Toxicological profiles of bulk dolomite are meagerly known in general and its nanotoxicity in particular. Effects of micro- and nano particles on cell viability, LDH leakage and markers of oxidative stress were observed. The study indicated that cytotoxicity of dolomite nanoparticles is significantly higher than the microparticles. The study thus suggests for the prescription of exposure limit for nanodolomite in the best interest of health of workers at risk of exposure under mining, milling and industrial environment.

  20. Microbial dolomite crusts from the carbonate platform off western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Krumbein, W.E.; Krajewski, K.P.; Schneider, R.J.

    Association of Sedimentologists, Sedimentology, 50, 819-830 Microbial dolomite crusts off western India 821 dolomite crusts [2 x 2·5 em to 3 x 0'5 em) and pebbles occur within these sediments. METHODS Thin sections of the crusts were studied petro graphically....E. (19S7) Holocene dolomitization Df supr

  1. Rheology of cement mixtures with dolomite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez de la Cuesta, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental program has studied the behavior of fresh paste made up from cements mixed with dolomite filler. Through prior experiments the starting point is obtained for the designs 22 and 23 factorials. With these designs the governing equations are established that influence the specific surface of the filler, the filler percentage and the ratio water/(cement + filler, used as objective functions: test probe penetration, flow on table and shear stress in viscometer. Also the type of rheological conduct is determined and the influence over initial and final setting is observed.

    Este programa experimental estudia el comportamiento de las pastas frescas fabricadas a partir de cementos mezclados con filler dolomítico. En los experimentos previos se obtiene el punto central para los diseños 22 y 23 factoriales. Con estos diseños se establecen las ecuaciones que rigen la influencia de la superficie específica del filler, el porcentaje de filler y la relación agua/(cemento + filler, utilizando como funciones objetivos la penetración de sonda, la mesa de sacudidas y la tensión de corte en el viscosímetro. También se determina el tipo de conducta reológica y la influencia sobre el principio y fin de fraguado.

  2. Controls on Cyclic Formation of Quaternary Early Diagenetic Dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, J.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Immenhauser, A.; Kwiecien, O.

    2018-04-01

    The origin of sedimentary dolomite and the factors that control its formation within the geological record remain speculative. In most models, dolomite formation is linked to evaporative conditions, high water temperature, increasing Mg/Ca ratio, increasing alkalinity, and high amounts of biomass. Here we challenge these archetypal views, by documenting a case example of Quaternary dolomite which formed in Lake Van at constantly low temperature (stress, resulting from reventilation of the water-sediment interface. Independently from the validity of this hypothesis, our results call for a reevaluation of the paleoenvironmental conditions often invoked for early diagenetic dolomite-rich intervals within sedimentary sequences and for caution when interpreting time series of subrecent lacustrine carbonates.

  3. Dissolution Kinetics of Icel-Aydincik Dolomite in Hydrochloric Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Department of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Cukurova University, Balcali, ... 65 °C. It was observed that heterogeneous chemical reactions ..... Dolomite, Ph.D. thesis, Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey, 2004.

  4. Mountain geomorphosites in Odle Group (Dolomites, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coratza, Paola; Ghinoi, Alessandro; Marchetti, Mauro; Soldati, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The area, considered in the present study, is located in the north-eastern sector of the Gardena valley, in the Odle Group, a popular destination of summer and winter tourism (more than 3000 m a.s.l.). The area has a strong hiking-tourism vocation thanks to its spectacular high-mountain landscape and a dense network of hiking tracks. The well-developed network of hiking paths and slopes for many different climbing skills offers a lot of possibilities for high-mountain excursions. Permanent dwelling-places are absent with the exceptions of a few tourist structures nearby opened during certain periods of the year. This area, as all Dolomites, which became UNESCO Word Heritage Site in 2009, represent landscape mosaics, which express the summation of landscape histories and processes offering an almost complete educational open-air laboratory due to the variety and complexity of phenomena and processes taking place during present climate conditions and during recent geological periods. These mountains, due to the aggregation of relict, recent and active landforms constitute an outstanding geoheritage, suitable for educational and tourist purposes. Landforms typical of past morphoclimatic conditions (inherited geomorphosites) share the stage with forms and processes active in the current morphoclimatic conditions (active geomorphosites); their spatial and geometrical relationships may be sufficient to trace a relative time-line of the geomorphological history of the area. Several glacial landforms testify for the presence and the activity of a glacial tongue hosted in the valley during the Lateglacial, mainly located in the northern sector of the area, where altitudes range from about 2000 m to about 2300 m a.s.l. Among these, worth of note are the well-preserved glacial cirques of Val dla Roa and those located at the southern margin of the Odle Group. Quite well preserved moraine ridges are present at a mean altitude of some 2000 m at the Alpe di Cisles as well as

  5. Effects of ancient porosity and permeability on formation of sedimentary dolomites: Devonian Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), south-central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.M.; Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    Petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that multiple dolomitization and dolomite stabilization events affected the Devonian Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) in south-central Montana. Several types of dolomite occur, defined by cathodoluminescence: nonzoned, dully luminescent subhedral-anhedral mosaics (most common), euhedral nonzoned and zoned dolomites, zoned dolomite cements, and irregularly luminescent dolomites (dully luminescent with irregularly luminescent regions). The irregularly luminescent fabrics probably represent partial replacement of early dolomite phases with later dolomite phases. Nonzoned, Ca-enriched, euhedral dolomites occur in calcite-cemented, coarse-grained limestone layers. These permeable layers probably were conduits for early meteoric waters, that occluded porosity in the limestones and prevented later dolomite stabilization. Irregularly luminescent dolomites are interpreted as intermediate fabrics in the dolomite stabilization process. Later calcite cements which occlude intercrystalline porosity prevented further dolomite replacement. Total recrystallization of remaining dolomites and formation of final dully luminescent mosaics occurred prior to brecciation and stylolitization.

  6. The magnesium isotope (δ26Mg) signature of dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, A.; Goldstein, R. H.; Mavromatis, V.; Richter, D. K.; Buhl, D.; Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Immenhauser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dolomite precipitation models and kinetics are debated and complicated due to the complex and temporally fluctuating fluid chemistry and different diagenetic environments. Using well-established isotope systems (δ18O, δ13C, 87Sr/86Sr), fluid inclusions and elemental data, as well as a detailed sedimentological and petrographic data set, we established the precipitation environment and subsequent diagenetic pathways of a series of Proterozoic to Pleistocene syn-depositional marine evaporative (sabkha) dolomites, syn-depositional non-marine evaporative (lacustrine and palustrine) dolomites, altered marine ("mixing zone") dolomites and late diagenetic hydrothermal dolomites. These data form the prerequisite for a systematic investigation of dolomite magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mgdol). Dolomite δ26Mg ratios documented here range, from -2.49‰ to -0.45‰ (δ26Mgmean = -1.75 ± 1.08‰, n = 42). The isotopically most depleted end member is represented by earliest diagenetic marine evaporative sabkha dolomites (-2.11 ± 0.54‰ 2σ, n = 14). In comparing ancient compositions to modern ones, some of the variation is probably due to alteration. Altered marine (-1.41 ± 0.64‰ 2σ, n = 4), and earliest diagenetic lacustrine and palustrine dolomites (-1.25 ± 0.86‰ 2σ, n = 14) are less negative than sabkha dolomites but not distinct in composition. Various hydrothermal dolomites are characterized by a comparatively wide range of δ26Mg ratios, with values of -1.44 ± 1.33‰ (2σ, n = 10). By using fluid inclusion data and clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) to represent temperature of precipitation for hydrothermal dolomites, there is no correlation between fluid temperature (∼100 to 180 °C) and dolomite Mg isotope signature (R2 = 0.14); nor is there a correlation between δ26Mgdol and δ18Odol. Magnesium-isotope values of different dolomite types are affected by a complex array of different Mg sources and sinks, dissolution/precipitation and non

  7. Ferroan Dolomitization by Seawater Interaction with Mafic Igneous Dikes and Carbonate Host Rock at the Latemar Platform, Dolomites, Italy: Numerical Modeling of Spatial, Temporal, and Temperature Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Blomme

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous publications address the petrogenesis of the partially dolomitized Latemar carbonate platform, Italy. A common factor is interpretation of geochemical data in terms of heating via regional igneous activity that provided kinetically favorable conditions for replacement dolomitization. New field, petrographic, XRD, and geochemical data demonstrate a spatial, temporal, and geochemical link between replacement dolomite and local mafic igneous dikes that pervasively intrude the platform. Dikes are dominated by strongly altered plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Significantly, where ferroan dolomite is present, it borders dikes. We hypothesize that seawater interacted with mafic minerals, causing Fe enrichment in the fluid that subsequently participated in dolomitization. This hypothesis was tested numerically through thermodynamic (MELTS, Arxim-GEM and reactive flow (Arxim-LMA simulations. Results confirm that seawater becomes Fe-enriched during interaction with clinopyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite and plagioclase (anorthite-albite-orthoclase solid solutions. Reaction of modified seawater with limestone causes ferroan and nonferroan replacement dolomitization. Dolomite quantities are strongly influenced by temperature. At 40 to 80°C, ferroan dolomite proportions decrease with increasing temperature, indicating that Latemar dolomitization likely occurred at lower temperatures. This relationship between igneous dikes and dolomitization may have general significance due to the widespread association of carbonates with rifting-related igneous environments.

  8. Influence of deformation on dolomite rim growth kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, Vanessa; Rybacki, Erik; Grafulha Morales, Luiz Fernando; Dresen, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Using a gas-deformation apparatus stacks of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals were deformed at T = 750° C and P = 400 MPa to examine the influence of stress and strain on magnesio-calcite and dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) growth kinetics. Triaxial compression and torsion tests performed at constant stresses between 7 and 38 MPa and test durations between 4 and 171 hours resulted in bulk strains of 0.03-0.2 and maximum shear strains of 0.8-5.6, respectively. The reaction rims consist of fine-grained (2-7 μm) dolomite with palisade-shaped grains growing into magnesite reactants and equiaxed granular dolomite grains next to calcite. In between dolomite and pure calcite, magnesio-calcite grains evolved with an average grain size of 20-40 μm. Grain boundaries tend to be straighter at high bulk strains and equilibrium angles at grain triple junctions are common within the magnesio-calcite layer. Transmission electron microscopy shows almost dislocation free palisades and increasing dislocation density within granular dolomite towards the magnesio-calcite boundary. Within magnesio-calcite grains, dislocations are concentrated at grain boundaries. Variation of time at fixed stress (˜17 MPa) yields a parabolic time dependence of dolomite rim width, indicating diffusion-controlled growth, similar to isostatic rim growth behavior. In contrast, the magnesio-calcite layer growth is enhanced compared to isostatic conditions. Triaxial compression at given time shows no significant change of dolomite rim thickness (11±2 μm) and width of magnesio-calcite layers (33±5 μm) with increasing stress. In torsion experiments, reaction layer thickness and grain size decrease from the center (low stress/strain) to the edge (high strain/stress) of samples. Chemical analysis shows nearly stoichiometric composition of dolomite palisades, but enhanced Ca content within granular grains, indicating local disequilibrium with magnesio-calcite, in particular for twisted

  9. Dolomitization and over-dolomitization in the Vajont limestone (Dolomiti Bellunesi, Italy) controlled by Mesozoic normal faults: a microstructural and diagenesis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Silvia; Swennen, Rudy; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The Vajont Gorge (Dolomiti Bellunesi, Italy) provides spectacular outcrops of Jurassic limestones (Vajont Limestone Formation) in which Mesozoic faults and fracture corridors are continuously exposed. Some of these faults acted as conduits for Mg-enriched hydrothermal fluids resulting in structurally-controlled dolomitization of the limestone. The dolomitization resulted in several dolomite bodies (100-200 m thick and several hundreds of meters along fault strike) that are particularly interesting as reservoir analogues for hydrocarbon, CO2, or water-bearing systems. The dolomitization process occurred after deposition and compaction of the oolitic limestone (dolomitization post-dates a dissolution event that affected the internal parts of the oolites), but before the Alpine contractional deformation. In fact, the meso-structural data collected in the Vajont Gorge allowed the reconstruction of a 3D model showing that the circulation of the dolomitizing fluids into the limestone host rock, but also the late stage of porosity reduction (strong pore filling due to over-dolomitization) were controlled by normal faults and fracture corridors interpreted as Pre-Alpine (Jurassic or Cretaceous). Later on, the influence of Alpine (Tertiary) deformation have been very limited in the studied volume. For instance dolomite veins are sometimes overprinted by bed-inclined stylolites consistent with Alpine shortening axes, but no large Alpine fault is present in the studied outcrops. Cathodoluminescence microscopy allowed recognizing different growth stages saddle dolomite crystals, which point to varying precipitation conditions during three main stages of dolomitization. Dolomite and calcite crystal twinning suggests deformation under increasing temperature conditions, consistent with intracrystalline plasticity deformation mechanisms. The presence of cataclasites composed of hydrothermal dolostone clasts, in turn cemented by dolomite, or of dolomite veins and compaction

  10. First discovery of dolomite and magnesite in living coralline algae and its geobiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Nash

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dolomite is a magnesium-rich carbonate mineral abundant in fossil carbonate reef platforms but surprisingly rare in modern sedimentary environments, a conundrum known as the "Dolomite Problem". Marine sedimentary dolomite has been interpreted to form by an unconfirmed, post-depositional diagenetic process, despite minimal experimental success at replicating this. Here we show that dolomite, accompanied by magnesite, forms within living crustose coralline alga, Hydrolithon onkodes, a prolific global tropical reef species. Chemical micro-analysis of the coralline skeleton reveals that not only are the cell walls calcitised, but that cell spaces are typically filled with magnesite, rimmed by dolomite, or both. Mineralogy was confirmed by X-ray Diffraction. Thus there are at least three mineral phases present (magnesium calcite, dolomite and magnesite rather than one or two (magnesium calcite and brucite as previously thought. Our results are consistent with dolomite occurrences in coralline algae rich environments in fossil reefs of the last 60 million years. We reveal that the standard method of removing organic material prior to Xray Diffraction analysis can result in a decrease in the most obvious dolomite and magnesite diffraction patterns and this may explain why the abundant protodolomite and magnesite discovered in this study has not previously been recognized. This discovery of dolomite in living coralline algae extends the range of palaeo-environments for which biologically initiated dolomite can be considered a possible source of primary dolomite.

  11. Nanometer-scale features in dolomite from Pennsylvanian rocks, Paradox Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gournay, Jonas P.; Kirkland, Brenda L.; Folk, Robert L.; Lynch, F. Leo

    1999-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy reveals an association between early dolomite in the Pennsylvanian Desert Creek (Paradox Fm.) and small (approximately 0.1 μm) nanometer-scale textures, termed `nannobacteria'. Three diagenetically distinct dolomites are present: early dolomite, limpid dolomite, and baroque dolomite. In this study, only the early dolomite contained nanometer-scale features. These textures occur as discrete balls and rods, clumps of balls, and chains of balls. Precipitation experiments demonstrate that these textures may be the result of precipitation in an organic-rich micro-environment. The presence of these nanometer-scale textures in Pennsylvanian rocks suggests that these early dolomites precipitated in organic-rich, bacterial environments.

  12. A thermoluminescence study of vempalle dolomites and its depositional environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.K.; Rao, C.N.; Kaul, I.K.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt has been made to interpret the depositional environment of Vempalle dolomites (India) by thermoluminescence method. It has been demonstrated that glow curve patterns reflect the environmental condition of deposition for carbonate sediments. The glow curves were obtained for natural samples as well as samples irradiated by Co 60 and compared. A majority of the samples were concluded to be diagenetic. (A.K.)

  13. Diagenetic modification of Knox evaporative-dolomite geochemistry by middle Ordovician paleoaquifer/burial fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanez, I.P.; Read, J.F.

    1986-05-01

    Early Ordovician upper Knox cyclic carbonates (100,000-year periods) were deposited on a ramp in a semiarid setting. Inner ramp facies are completely dolomitized, whereas only cycle caps on the outer ramp are dolomite. Laminite caps on leading edges of prograding flats were dolomitized by evaporative, storm-recharged marine waters that precipitated CoCO/sub 3/ and minor amounts of CaSO/sub 4/. Subtidal facies beneath interiors of supratidal flats (up to 200 km wide)were dolomitized by shallow subsurface brines as the flats prograded. Inner ramp areas existed as supretidal flats for as long as 100,000 years, hence only there are sequences completely dolomitized. Tidal-flat dolomites consist of euhedral to subhedral fabric preservation mosaics (crystals 5-50 ..mu..m, and up to 300 ..mu..m in replaced pelletal layers). Dolomitized subtidal sediments are composed of 20-200 ..mu..m dolomite crystals. Most of the early dolomites are fabric retentive initially, becoming more fabric destructive with increasing exposure to dolomitizing fluids. Fe values are up to 2000 ppm, and Mn values are up to 500 ppm. delta/sup 18/O values show strong geographic control, with samples depleted (up to - 7 per thousand) relative to pristine evaporative dolomites derived from concentrated Ordovician seawater. Burial dolomites are enriched in Fe (up to 14,000 ppm) and depleted in delta/sup 18/O, suggesting precipitation from basinal brines at elevated temperatures. Geochemical data suggest that evaporative dolomites have undergone modification by isotopically lighter fluids. Alteration most likely occurred within a Middle Ordovician meteoric aquifer system or less likely by later Paleozoic basinal brines. Regional geologic data for Knox Group carbonates throughout the eastern US are vital in constraining dolomitization models.

  14. Effect of SO2 Dry Deposition on Porous Dolomitic Limestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Doroftei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is concerned with the assessment of the relative resistance of a monumental dolomitic limestone (Laspra – Spain used as building material in stone monuments and submitted to artificial ageing by SO2 dry deposition in the presence of humidity. To investigate the protection efficiency of different polymeric coatings, three commercially available siloxane-based oligomers (Lotexan-N, Silres BS 290 and Tegosivin HL 100 and a newly synthesized hybrid nanocomposite with silsesquioxane units (TMSPMA were used. A comparative assessment of the data obtained in this study underlines that a better limestone protection was obtained when treated with the hybrid nanocomposite with silsesquioxane units.

  15. Interface waves propagating along tensile fractures in dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Elastic interface waves have been observed in induced tensile fractures in dolomite rock cores. Multiscaling wavelet analysis distinguishes the interface wave from bulk shear waves, quantifies the interface wave spectral content, and determines the arrival time of peak energy. The dominant seismic energy is concentrated in the slow interface wave, with little or no detectable energy in the fast wave. As stress across the fracture increases, the slow interface wave velocity increases, and the frequency of the spectral peak shifts to higher frequencies. The shear dynamic specific stiffness of the fracture was calculated from the peak energy arrival time as a function of stress. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Malaysian Dolomites as a Tar Cracking Catalyst in Biomass Gasification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. A. Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three types of local Malaysian dolomites were characterized to investigate their suitability for use as tar-cracking catalysts in the biomass gasification process. The dolomites were calcined to examine the effect of the calcination process on dolomite’s catalytic activity and properties. The modifications undergone by dolomites consequent to thermal treatment were investigated using various analytical methods. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses indicated that the dolomites underwent two stages of decomposition during the calcination process. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectra analyses showed that thermal treatment of dolomite played a significant role in the disappearance of the CaMg(CO32 phase, producing the MgO-CaO form of dolomite. The scanning electron microscopy microphotographs of dolomite indicated that the morphological properties were profoundly affected by the calcination process, which led to the formation of a highly porous surface with small spherical particles. In addition, the calcination of dolomite led to the elimination of carbon dioxide and increases in the values of the specific surface area and average pore diameter, as indicated by surface area analysis. The results showed that calcined Malaysian dolomites have great potential to be applied as tar-cracking catalysts in the biomass gasification process based on their favorable physical properties.

  17. High salinity facilitates dolomite precipitation mediated by Haloferax volcanii DS52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Wang, Hongmei; Yao, Yanchen; Duan, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Although most modern dolomites occur in hypersaline environments, the effects of elevated salinity on the microbial mediation of dolomite precipitation have not been fully evaluated. Here we report results of dolomite precipitation in association with a batch culture of Haloferax volcanii DS52, a halophilic archaeon, under various salinities (from 120‰ to 360‰) and the impact of salinity on microbe-mediated dolomite formation. The mineral phases, morphology and atomic arrangement of the precipitates were analyzed by XRD, SEM and TEM, respectively. The amount of amino acids on the archaeal cell surface was quantified by HPLC/MS. The XRD analysis indicated that disordered dolomite formed successfully with the facilitation of cells harvested from cultures with relatively high salinities (200‰ and 280‰) but was not observed in association with cells harvested from cultures with lower salinity (120‰) or the lysates of cells harvested from extremely high salinity (360‰). The TEM analysis demonstrated that the crystals from cultures with a salinity of 200‰ closely matched that of dolomite. Importantly, we found that more carboxyl groups were presented on the cell surface under high salinity conditions to resist the high osmotic pressure, which may result in the subsequent promotion of dolomite formation. Our finding suggests a link between variations in the hydro-chemical conditions and the formation of dolomite via microbial metabolic activity and enhances our understanding about the mechanism of microbially mediated dolomite formation under high salinity conditions.

  18. Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Dolomite with Implications for the Earth's Deep Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze. The fate of these carbonates in subduction zones is not well understood. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down into two carbonates at 2-7 GPa, which may further decompose to oxides and CO2-bearing fluid. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize dolomite I to high pressures, allowing the transformation to dolomite II at 17 GPa and subsequently to dolomite III at 35 GPa [1][2]. Such phases may be a principal host for deeply subducted carbon. The structure and equation of state of these high-pressure phases is debated and the effect of varying concentrations of iron is unknown, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Here we compare calculated dolomite structures to experimentally observed phases. Using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), a monoclinic phase with space group 5 ("dolomite sg5") was found for pure end-member dolomite. Dolomite sg5 has a lower energy than reported dolomite structures and an equation of state that resembles that of dolomite III. It is possible that dolomite sg5 is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. Due to the complex energy landscape for candidate high-pressure dolomite structures, it is likely that several competing polymorphs exist. Determining the behavior of high-pressure Ca-Mg-Fe(-Mn) dolomite phases in subduction environments is critical for our understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and supercell calculations with Fe substitution are in progress. [1] Mao, Z., Armentrout, M., Rainey, E., Manning, C. E., Dera, P., Prakapenka, V. B., and Kavner, A

  19. Identification of Oxide Compound in Dolomite Mineral from Aceh Tamiang Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Sari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has abundant mineral especially carbonate-based mineral, ike dolomite. Particularly in Aceh province's, the largest dolomite deposits is available in Aceh Tamiang district around 1.9 billion tons. Unfortunately, current use of dolomite in the industry and other applications is still limited. In this work we report the advanced preparation of dolomite using calcinations method. Whereas, with this method, the dolomite mineral can be processed into calcium and magnesium oxide which has a very wide field of application and higher values. To obtain optimal results, we also identify the effect of temperature on the formation of oxide compounds. Preliminary study using XRF founded that dolomite in village Selamat is known as the highest concentration of CaO (61.20% followed by MgO (25.28%. It is also showed that the main phase obtained by XRD is dolomite (CaMg(CO32. Furthermore, after the calcinations process at 700 °C, it was founded that the formation of dolomite were CaCO3 and MgO, whereas at temperatures of 900 °C mostly the CaCO3 has decomposed into CaO. SEM observations showed that dolomite has the composition of particles distributed homogeneously along the particle agglomerate when it calcinations.

  20. Hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in the Sinian Dengying Fm, central Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiang Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Sinian Dengying Fm is the focus of natural gas exploration in the central part of the Sichuan Basin (central Sichuan Basin in recent years. Especially, epigenic karstification and its resulted reservoir-seepage spaces have always been the focal points in researches. Based on the petrographic characteristics of drilling cuttings and core samples, and through experimental analysis by using trace elements, isotopes, and cathodoluminescence, the Dengying Fm dolomite was demonstrated to have matrix recrystallized dolomite (MRD, filled saddle dolomite (FSD (the mean homogenization temperature of inclusion: 178.5 °C, high concentrations of Fe & Mn, slightly positive 87Sr/86Sr value and hydrothermal minerals combination (including sphalerite, galena, pyrite, and quartz, etc.. Thus, it was proposed that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies (HDRF exist in the Dengying Fm dolomite, in other words, the dolomite reservoir is composed of hydrothermal dissolved pores, intercrystalline pores of hydrothermal origin, hydrothermal caverns and expanded fractures, and was formed due to the reworking of hydrothermal fluid on tight matrix dolomite. Identification marks are presented in terms of petrography and geochemistry so that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies can be effectively recognized and identified. It is concluded that the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in this area are preliminary controlled by deep and large basement faults and the strength of hydrothermal fluids.

  1. Dolomitization and sedimentary cyclicity of the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian rocks in South Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallaste, Toivo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and composition of dolomitized rocks and stoichiometry of dolomite in southern Estonia in the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian were studied on the background of the facies, sedimentary cyclicity (nine shallowing-up cycles, and evolution of the palaeobasins. The composition of rocks and lattice parameters of dolomite were investigated using the X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, titration and gravimetric analyses, and porosity measurements. The formation of dolostones is directly determined by the cyclic evolution of palaeobasins. Dolomitized rocks belong to the shallow-water inner shelf or tidal/lagoonal facies belt of regressive phases of sedimentary cycles. Sediments of the deep shelf/transitional environment and transgressive phases are not dolomitized. The most stoichiometric is secondary replacive dolomite of Silurian and upper Ordovician dolostones, formed during the early diagenesis of normal-marine (saline shallow-shelf calcitic sediments. The content of insoluble residue does not affect the stoichiometry. The changes in lattice parameters are induced by the Ca/Mg ratio in the dolomite lattice. The dolomite of the dolostones contacting limestone or containing calcite has an expanded lattice. The primary (syngenetic dolostone of the lagoonal or tidal flat belt has also an expanded lattice. No dolomitizing effect of the waters of the Devonian palaeobasin on the underlying rocks was revealed. The whole data set of the studied dolostones is consistent with the marine water environment in the palaeobasin at the corresponding time and shows no sign of the inflow of external fluids. It suggests that the microbial model of dolomite formation may characterize the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian in southern Estonia. The occurrence of dolostones between undolomitized rocks limits the time of dolomitization to the early diagenetic stage.

  2. Tectonics of the crystalline Basement of the Dolomites in North Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, F.P.

    1961-01-01

    The present thesis deals with a number of crystalline regions around the Dolomites in North Italy. The geographic position is shown on sheet I, which is depicted in fig. 105. The Dolomites proper consist mainly of Permotriassic, overlying a transgression plane, which cuts off the

  3. Tectonics of the crystalline Basement of the Dolomites in North Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, F.P.

    1961-01-01

    The present thesis deals with a number of crystalline regions around the Dolomites in North Italy. The geographic position is shown on sheet I, which is depicted in fig. 105. The Dolomites proper consist mainly of Permotriassic, overlying a transgression plane, which cuts off the studied crystalline

  4. Substrate pH and butterfly bush response to dolomitic lime or steel slag amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel slag is a fertilizer amendment with a high concentration of calcium oxide, and thus capable of raising substrate pH similar to dolomitic lime. Steel slag, however, contains higher concentrations of some nutrients, such as iron, manganese, and silicon, compared to dolomitic lime. The objectiv...

  5. Order–disorder–reorder process in thermally treated dolomite samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zucchini, Azzurra; Comodi, Paola; Katerinopoulou, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] heated to 1,200oC at 3 GPa was made to study the order–disorder–reorder process. The order/disorder transition is inferred to start below 1,100oC, and complete disorder is attained at approximately 1,200o......C. Twinned crystals characterized by high internal order were found in samples annealed over 1,100oC, and their fraction was found to increase with temperature. Evidences of twinning domains combined with probable remaining disordered portions of the structure imply that reordering processes occur during...

  6. Acidizing of Zechstein Main Dolomite in the Polish lowlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierdzychi, W

    1966-07-01

    The first acidizing of Zechstein Dolomite in the Polish Lowlands was carried out in 1961. In the initial stage, a tendency existed toward multistage acidizing, and preheated acidizing fluid was used. In a preliminary operation, an acid having the concentration 12-36% was used for washing out the borehole. No additives were utilized except formalin for corrosion inhibition. In order to increase the absorption capacity, hydraulic perforations were used. The composition of acidizing fluid was determined in a preliminary study for any individual reservoir. From laboratory study, it was concluded also that the required time of 3-4 hr was sufficient for the exhaustion of acid. The pre-heating of the acid at the bottom of the hole by exothermic reaction with metallic magnesium was abandoned in the later stage of operations.

  7. Dolomite clumped isotope constraints on the oxygen isotope composition of the Phanerozoic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryb, U.; Eiler, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The δ18O value of the Phanerozoic Sea has been debated several decades, largely motivated by an 8‰ increase in δ18O of sedimentary carbonates between the Cambrian and the present. Some previous studies have interpreted this increase to be a primary depositional signal, resulting from an increase in the 18O content of ocean water over time, or from a decrease in ocean temperature increasing the oxygen isotope fractionation between seawater and carbonates. In contrast, other studies have interpreted lower δ18O compositions as the products of diagenetic alteration at elevated burial temperatures. Here, we show that the Phanerozoic dolomite δ18O record overlaps with that of well-preserved calcite fossils, and use carbonate clumped isotope measurements of Cambrian to Pleistocene dolomites to calculate their formation temperatures and the isotopic compositions of their parent-waters. The observed variation in dolomite δ18O is largely explained by dolomite formation at burial temperatures of up to 158°C. The δ18O values of dolomite parent-waters range -2 to +12‰ and are correlated with formation temperatures. Such correlation is consistent with the modification of seawater (0±2‰, VSMOW) toward isotopically heavier compositions through water-rock reactions at elevated burial temperatures. The similarity between the dolomite and calcite δ18O records, and published clumped isotope-based calculations of water compositions, suggests that like dolomite, temporal variations of the calcite δ18O record may also be largely driven by diagenetic alteration. Finally, the relationship we observe between temperature of dolomitization and d18O of dolomite suggests platform carbonates generally undergo dolomitization through reaction with modified marine waters, and that there is no evidence those waters were ever significantly lower in d18O than the modern ocean.

  8. Optimasi Dosis Pupuk Dolomit pada Tanaman Kelapa Sawit (Elaeis Guineensis Jacq. Belum Menghasilkan Umur Satu Tahun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Sudradjat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kelapa sawit merupakan komoditi perkebunan utama karena sebagai sumber devisa negara dan menyediakan lapangan kerja. Indonesia adalah negara produsen terbesar kelapa sawit di dunia dengan luas areal mencapai 10.1 juta hektar. Peningkatan produktivitas dicapai dengan intensifikasi antara lain dengan melakukan rasionalisasi pemupkan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan dosis optimum pupuk dolomit pada tanaman kelapa sawit belum menghasilkan umur satu tahun. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di Kebun Pendidikan dan Penelitian Kelapa Sawit IPB-Cargill, Jonggol, Bogor dari bulan Maret 2013 sampai Maret 2014. Rancangan yang digunakan adalah Faktorial Tunggal,  dosis pupuk dolomit,  yang disusun dalam lingkungan Acak Kelompok dengan tiga ulangan. Dosis pupuk dolomit yang diuji  terdiri atas 0, 200, 400, dan 600 g tanaman-1 tahun-1. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pupuk dolomit meningkatkan secara nyata terhadap peubah tinggi tanaman, diameter batang, jumlah daun, dan kandungan khlorofil daun, namun tidak berpengaruh terhadap kandungan Mg dalam jaringan daun. Berdasarkan tanggap peubah tinggi tanaman, dosis optimum pupuk dolomit untuk tanaman kelapa sawit pada umur satu tahun adalah 306.4 g dolomit tanaman-1tahun -1. Kata kunci: dolomit, dosis optimum, kelapa sawit, respons fisiologi, respons morfologi.

  9. Reaction Sintering of Mexican Dolomite – Zircon Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Galicia, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work has been conducted aiming to develop additional phase [Ca3SiO5, Ca2SiO4 and/or Ca3Mg(SiO42]-bonded magnesia refractory materials via reaction sintering of dolomite-zircon mixtures, employing a Mexican dolomite containing an excess of 3 wt% of CaCO3. The study was based on phase equilibrium data extracted from the quaternary system CaO – MgO – SiO2 – ZrO2, to put it more precisely, base on the projection from the MgO-apex of the liquidus surface of the primary crystallization volume of MgO onto the opposite face of the above mentioned quaternary system. The refractory materials designed within this system were obtained by attrition milling, followed by cold isostatic pressing and high temperature reaction sintering. All initial and produced materials were characterized by ICP-AES, XRF, XRD, SEM-EDX, DTA and TG analyses. The results obtained indicated that reaction sintering of dolomite-zircon mixtures is an interesting route to produce MgO-CaZrO3-additional phase refractory materials.

    El propósito de este trabajo ha sido obtener materiales refractarios de magnesia, aglomerados con una fase adicional [Ca3SiO5, Ca2SiO4 y/o Ca3Mg(SiO42], mediante la sinterización reactiva de mezclas de dolomita-circón, empleando para ello una dolomita mexicana que contiene un exceso de 3% en peso de CaCO3. El estudio se basa en la información relativa al equilibrio de fases del sistema CaO – MgO – SiO2 – ZrO2. En concreto se usa la proyección, desde el vértice del MgO, de la superficie de liquidus del volumen de cristalización primaria de este, hacia la cara opuesta de sistema cuaternario. Los materiales refractarios diseñados se han obtenido por molienda de atrición, seguida de un prensado isostático en frío y sinterización reactiva a alta temperatura. Todos los materiales, iniciales y finales, han sido caracterizados mediante ICPAES, FRX, DRX, MEB-EDX, ATD y TG. Los resultados obtenidos indican que la sinterizaci

  10. Ecological indices of manufacture of Portland cement clinker and production of the dolomite clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnichenko Varvara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the production of dolomite clinker in comparison with that of Portland cement is environmentally appropriate. When calcining dolomite for cementitious binder, the pollution of the atmosphere by carbon dioxide is reduced due to its isolation during decarbonization reactions of calcium carbonates. Reducing fuel consumption for clinker burning provides less carbon dioxide emissions from combustion products. Reducing the firing temperature creates obstacles to the formation of nitrogen oxides. The production of binders from dolomite in comparison with the production of Portland cement helps to protect the environment from contamination

  11. Using enteric pathogens to assess sources of fecal contamination in the Silurian Dolomite Aquifer: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Maureen A; Borchardt, Mark A.; Spencer, Susan K.; Hunt, Randall J.; Owens, David

    2018-01-01

    The fractured Silurian dolomite aquifer is an important, but vulnerable, source of drinking water in northeast Wisconsin (Sherrill in Geology and ground water in Door County, Wisconsin, with emphasis on contamination potential in the Silurian dolomite, 1978; Bradbury and Muldoon in Hydrogeology and groundwater monitoring of fractured dolomite in the Upper Door Priority Watershed, Door County, Wisconsin, 1992; Muldoon and Bradbury in Assessing seasonal variations in recharge and water quality in the Silurian aquifer in areas with thicker soil cover. p 45, 2010). Areas underlain by the Silurian dolomite aquifer are extremely vulnerable to groundwater contamination from various land-use activities, especially the disposal of human wastewater and dairy manure. Currently there is no consensus as to which source of wastewater generates the greater impact to the aquifer.

  12. Presence of sulfate does not inhibit low-temperature dolomite precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; McKenzie, Judith A.; de Luca Rebello Wagener, Angela; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.; Vasconcelos, Crisógono

    2009-01-01

    The hypothesis that sulfate inhibits dolomite formation evolved from geochemical studies of porewaters from deep-sea sedimentary sequences and has been tested with hydrothermal experiments. We examined the sulfate inhibition factor using aerobic culture experiments with Virgibacillus marismortui and

  13. Dolomitization in the diagenetic history of the Štramberg limestones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lintnerová, O.; Knietl, M.; Reháková, D.; Skupien, P.; Vašíček, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 3/1 (2008), s. 191-192 ISSN 0138-0974 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Štramberk Limestone * dolomitization * dedolomitization Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  14. Geology of dolomite-hosted uranium deposits at the Pitch Mine, Saguache County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Newly documented uranium ore in the Pitch mine occurs chiefly in brecciated Mississippian Leadville Dolomite along the Chester upthrust zone, and to a lesser extent in sandstone, siltstone, and carbonaceous shale of the Pennsylvanian Belden Formation and in Precambrian granitic rocks and schist. Uranium-mineralized zones are generally thicker, more consistent, and of higher grade in dolomite than in other hosts, and roughly 50 percent of the new reserves are in dolomite. Strong physical control by dolomite is evident, as this is the only rock type that is pervasively brecciated within the fault slices that make up the footwall of the reverse-fault zone. Other rocks tended to either remain unbroken or undergo ductile deformation. Chemical controls on uranium deposition are subtle and appear chiefly to involve coprecipitation of FeS 2 as pyrite and marcasite, suggesting that sulfide ion may be the reductant

  15. Ab Initio Study of the Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Iron-Bearing Dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze, all of which often contain dolomite. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down upon compression into two carbonates at 5-6 GPa in the temperature range of 800-1200 K [1]. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize high-pressure dolomite over single-cation carbonates above 35 GPa [2,3]. The structure and equation of state of high-pressure dolomite phases have been debated, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Using density functional theory interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), we have found a monoclinic phase with space group C2/c. The C2/c structure has a lower energy than previously reported dolomite structures at relevant pressures. It is possible that this phase is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. We calculate the equation of state of trigonal dolomite, dolomite III and monoclinic C2/c dolomite to 80 GPa with 0 and 50 mol% CaFe(CO3)2 and compare their enthalpies to single-carbonate assemblages. Although end-member C2/c CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite is not stable relative to single-cation carbonates, C2/c CaMg0.5Fe0.5(CO3)2 is preferred over single-cation carbonates at high pressures. Thus, iron-bearing C2/c dolomite may be an important host phase for carbon in slabs subducted into the lower mantle. [1] Shirasaka, M., et al. (2002) American Mineralogist, 87, 922-930. [2] Mao, Z. et al. (2011) Geophysical Research Letters, 38. [3] Merlini, M. et al. (2012) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109, 13509-13514.

  16. Impact of diagenesis and low grade metamorphosis on Triassic sabkha dolomite δ26Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Geske, A.; Richter, D.; Buhl, D.; Niedermayr, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dolomite is a common rock forming mineral in the geological record but its value as archive of ancient seawater δ26Mg signatures and their variations in time are at present underexplored. Unknown factors include the sensitivity of δ26Mg ratio to processes in the diagenetic and low grade metamorphic domain. Here, we document and discusses the first detailed δ26Mg data set from early diagenetic and burial dolomites. Samples come from the Upper Triassic Hauptdolomit (Dolomia Principale; The Dolomites, Italy) and include coeval dolmicrites that underwent differential burial diagenesis in a temperature range between about 100 and more than 350°C. As indicated by dolmicrite 87/86Sr ratios, sabkha calcian D1 dolomites precipitated from evaporated seawater and stabilized at an early diagenetic stage to D2 dolomites analysed here. With increasing burial temperature, dolomite δ26Mg ratio scatter in the data set decreases with increasing Mg/Ca ratio and degree of order. Specifically, δ26Mg ratio variability is reduced from ~0.7‰ at burial temperatures beneath 100°C to about ~0.2‰ at temperatures in excess of 350°C, respectively, with mean δ26Mg values ranging constantly near -1.9‰. This suggests that, at least for the rock buffered system investigated here, dolmicrite δ26Mg proxy data are conservative and preserve near pristine values even at elevated burial temperatures. At present, the main element of uncertainty is the Mg-isotope fractionation factor between (evaporated) seawater and dolomite. A possible solution to this problem includes the compilation of a data from modern sabkha environments including pore water and calcian dolomite δ26Mg isotope signatures.

  17. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors.

  18. Can Mn–S redox cycling drive sedimentary dolomite formation? A hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, Daniel A.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; González-Arismendi, Gabriela; Gordon, Robert A.; Méndez, José A.; Gingras, Murray K.; Konhauser, Kurt O. (CLS); (UCV-Venezuela); (CNRS-UMR); (Alberta)

    2016-06-10

    The formation of dolomite in modern peritidal environments is linked to the degradation of buried microbial mats, with complexation of Ca and Mg by extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and alkalinity generation through organic carbon respiration facilitating the nucleation of dolomite precursors. In the past two decades, microbial sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methanotrophy have all been considered as potential drivers of the nucleation process, but it remains unclear why dolomite formation could not also occur in suboxic sediments where abundant alkalinity is produced by processes linked to Mn(IV) and/or Fe(III) reduction coupled with the diffusion and reoxidation of reduced sulfur species. Here we report the interstitial occurrence of spheroidal aggregates of nanometer-scale Ca-rich dolomite rhombohedra within suboxic sediments associated with remnant microbial mats that developed in the peritidal zone of the Archipelago Los Roques, Venezuela. Multiple analytical tools, including EPMA, ICP-MS, synchrotron-based XRF and XRD, and spatially resolved XANES microanalyses, show that the dolomite-cemented interval exhibits depleted bulk iron concentrations, but is interstitially enriched in Mn and elemental sulfur (S⁰). Manganese occurs in several oxidation states, indicating that the dolomite-cemented interval was the locus of complex biological redox transformations characterized by coupled Mn and S cycling. The tight correspondence between sedimentary Mn and MgCO₃ concentrations further hints at a direct role for Mn during dolomitization. While additional studies are required to confirm its relevance in natural settings, we propose a model by which coupled Mn–S redox cycling may promote alkalinity generation and thus dolomite formation in manner similar to, or even more efficiently, than bacterial sulfate reduction alone.

  19. DOLOMITE THERMAL-DECOMPOSITION MACROKINETIC MODELS FOR EVALUATION OF THE GASGENERATORS SORBENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing dolomite in the capacity of a sorbent for generator gas purification is of considerable interest nowadays, as it is the impurity of generator gas that causes the major problem for creating cheep and effective co-generator plants. Designing gas purification systems employs simple but physically adequate macrokinetic models of dolomite thermal decomposition.  The  paper  analyzes  peculiarities  of  several  contemporaneous  models  of  dolomite and calcite thermal decomposition and infers on reasonable practicality for creating compact engineering dolomite-decomposition macrokinetic models and universal techniques of these models parameter reconstruction for specific dolomite samples. Such technics can be founded on thermogravimetric data and standard approximation error minimizing algorithms.The author assumes that CO2  evacuation from the reaction zone within the particle may proceed by diffusion mechanism and/or by the Darcy filtration and indicates that functional dependence of the thermal-decomposition rate from the particle sizes and the temperature differs for the specified mechanisms. The paper formulates four macrokinetic models whose correspondence verification is grounded on the experimental data. The author concludes that further work in this direction should proceed with the dolomite samples investigation and selecting the best approximation model describing experimental data in wide range of temperatures, warming up rates and the particle sizes.

  20. Production of biodiesel from palm oil using modified Malaysian natural dolomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajaratun Nur, Z.A.; Taufiq-Yap, Y.H.; Rabiah Nizah, M.F.; Teo, Siow Hwa; Syazwani, O.N.; Islam, Aminul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Transesterification was carried out using modified Malaysian natural dolomite catalyst. • Characterizations of the catalyst were performed by using XRD, TPD-CO 2 , BET and SEM. • Maximum biodiesel conversion of 100% was achieved from SnO 2 /dolomite catalyst. • The yield was affected by the surface are as well as the basicity of catalyst. • The transesterification reaction gave significant conversion with relatively lower amount of catalyst. - Abstract: Calcined dolomite (AD), produced by calcination of Malaysian dolomite (UD) promotes a potential natural catalyst for biodiesel production from palm oil with the conversion of 99.98%. The catalysts were characterized by using X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) of CO 2 . All catalysts were then employed for transesterification reaction under different conditions (time, methanol to oil molar ratio and amount of catalyst). SnO 2 doped on activated dolomite (SD) shows an optimum conversion (99.98%) at conditions, i.e. 15:1 methanol to oil molar ratio in 4 h compared to ZnO doped on activated dolomite (ZD) and AD. The catalytic activities of these catalysts were found to be depending on the basicity as well as the surface area of the catalyst used

  1. The influence of solution composition and grain boundaries on the replacement of calcite by dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraila Martinez, Teresita de Jesus; Putnis, Christine V.; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dolomite formation is a mineral replacement reaction that affects extensive rock volumes and comprises a large fraction of oil and gas reservoirs [1,2]. The most accepted hypothesis is the 'dolomitization' of limestone by Mg-rich fluids [3]. The objective of this research is to study the replacement mechanism of calcite by dolomite, the role of grain boundaries, highlighted by Etschmann et al. (2014), and the possible influence of solutions in dolomite formation under the presence of ions that are normally in crustal aqueous fluids. To accomplish this purpose, we performed hydrothermal experiments using Carrara marble cubes of ~1.5 mm size and 7-9 mg weight as starting material, reacted with 1M (Mg,Ca)Cl2 aqueous solutions, with Mg/Ca ratios of 3 and 5 at 200°C, for different reaction times. Additional experiments were performed adding 1mM of Na2SO4, NaCl or NaF to the previous solutions. After the reaction, the product phases were identified using Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray powder diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and the textural evolution was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples reacted with aqueous solutions resulted in the replacements of the calcite rock into magnesite and dolomite. The amount and type of reaction strongly depends on the Mg/Ca ratio. Samples reacted with a Mg/Ca ratio of 5 resulted in an almost complete replacement reaction and more favorable for magnesite formation than for dolomite. When the Mg/Ca ratio was 3 dolomite formed but the replacement was located in the core of the sample. We show that grain boundaries are very important for the infiltration of solution and the progress of a replacement reaction, acting as fluid pathways. Solution composition controls the nature of the replacement product. Acknowledgment: This work is funded within a Marie Curie EU Initial Training Network- CO2-React. 1. Etschmann B., Brugger J., Pearce M.A., Ta C., Brautigan D., Jung M., Pring A. (2014). Grain boundaries as

  2. Effects of dicyandiamide and dolomite application on N2O emission from an acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Yupeng; Peng, Qi-an; Lin, Shan; Mo, Yongliang; Wu, Lei; Hu, Ronggui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Soil acidification is a major problem for sustainable agriculture since it limits productivity of several crops. Liming is usually adopted to ameliorate soil acidity that can trigger soil processes such as nitrification, denitrification, and loss of nitrogen (N) as nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The loss of N following liming of acidic soils can be controlled by nitrification inhibitors (such as dicyandiamide). However, effects of nitrification inhibitors following liming of acidic soils are not well understood so far. Here, we conducted a laboratory study using an acidic soil to examine the effects of dolomite and dicyandiamide (DCD) application on N2O emissions. Three levels of DCD (0, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1); DCD0, DCD10, and DCD20, respectively) were applied to the acidic soil under two levels of dolomite (0 and 1 g kg(-1)) which were further treated with two levels of N fertilizer (0 and 200 mg N kg(-1)). Results showed that N2O emissions were highest at low soil pH levels in fertilizer-treated soil without application of DCD and dolomite. Application of DCD and dolomite significantly (P ≤ 0.001) reduced N2O emissions through decreasing rates of NH4 (+)-N oxidation and increasing soil pH, respectively. Total N2O emissions were reduced by 44 and 13% in DCD20 and dolomite alone treatments, respectively, while DCD20 + dolomite reduced N2O emissions by 54% when compared with DCD0 treatment. The present study suggests that application of DCD and dolomite to acidic soils can mitigate N2O emissions.

  3. Biolaminoid facies in a peritidal sabkha: Permian Platy Dolomite of northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Ulrike; Gasiewicz, Andreij; Gerdes, Giesela; Krumbein, Wolfgang

    The Platy Dolomite, a carbonate unit in the Zechstein Formation (Upper Permian) of the Leba Elevation, Poland, was deposited in a semi-closed or completely separated back-barrier sabkha environment. This arid, hypersaline zone is comparable to the recent Gavish Sabkha, Sinai. The processes which formed the modern Gavish Sabkha are similar to those responsible for the biolaminoid formation in the Platy Dolomite series. The deposition of this Platy Dolomite was mainly the result of microbial activity building extensive microbial mats. The Platy Dolomite is characterized by loosely packed microbial biolaminoids (a less significantly laminated build-up of biogenetic sediments) with horizontally or obliquely to vertically orientated filaments. Intermediary coated grains occur. Densely packed, flat laminated stromatolitic rocks, pure oolites, and bioclastic sedimentary strata are rarely intercalated with the biolaminoid beds. Laboratory and field investigations indicate that carbonate formation was induced by the chemoorganotrophic bacterial decay of cyanobacterial mats. Magnesium was bound and absorbed by organic matter and later liberated by anaerobic decay. Early diagenetic processes formed Mg2+- and Ca2+-enriched solutions in which carbonates precipitated biologically and chemically. A system of biogenic carbonate formation of the Platy Dolomite microbiolite series is proposed and supported by the results of microbiological laboratory studies.

  4. Extraction of magnesium from calcined dolomite ore using hydrochloric acid leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royani, Ahmad; Sulistiyono, Eko; Prasetiyo, Agus Budi; Subagja, Rudi

    2018-05-01

    Magnesium is widely used in varieties industrial sector. Dolomite is one source of magnesium besides seawater. The extraction of magnesium from dolomite ores can be done by leaching process. In this work, the dolomite leaching to extract magnesium by hydrochloric acid was investigated. The leaching experiments were performed in a spherical glass batch reactor having a capacity of 1000 ml. The effects of the stirring speed, acid concentration, reaction temperature and liquid-solid ratio for each reaction time of 1; 2; and 3 h on the Mg leaching have been evaluated. 5 ml of solution sample were collected from the leached solutions, then it was filtered prior to analysis by ICP OES. The experimental results show that the magnesium extraction increases along with the increase of acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio and temperature. The optimum conditions for magnesium extraction were achieved at temperature 75 °C, extraction time 3 h, the HCl concentration of 2 M, the liquid-solid ratio 20 ml/g and stirring speed of 400 rpm. At this condition 98, 82 % of magnesium were extracted from dolomite. The conclusion obtained from this leaching process is that the magnesium can be extracted from dolomite by using hydrochloric acid solutions.

  5. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, σ, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (≈ 2 -5 μm grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 μm diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 μm thick granular dolomite layer

  6. Paleoenvironmental and paleohydrochemical conditions of dolomite formation within a saline wetland in arid northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Caroline C.; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Dogramaci, Shawan; Grierson, Pauline F.

    2018-04-01

    Groundwater dolocrete occurring within the Fortescue Marsh, a large inland wetland in the Pilbara region of northwest Australia, has been investigated to provide paleoenvironmental and paleohydrological records and further the understanding of low temperature dolomite formation in terrestrial settings over the Quaternary Period. Two major phases of groundwater dolocrete formation are apparent from the presence of two distinct units of dolocrete, based on differences in depth, δ18O values and mineral composition. Group 1 (G1) occurs at depth 20-65 m b.g.l. (below ground level) and contains stoichiometric dolomite with δ18O values of -4.02-0.71‰. Group 2 (G2) is shallower (0-23 m b.g.l.), occurring close to the current groundwater level, and contains Ca-rich dolomite ± secondary calcite with a comparatively lower range of δ18O values (-7.74 and -6.03‰). Modelled δ18O values of paleogroundwater from which older G1 dolomite precipitated indicated highly saline source water, which had similar stable oxygen isotope compositions to relatively old brine groundwater within the Marsh, developed under a different hydroclimatic regime. The higher δ18O values suggest highly evaporitic conditions occurred at the Marsh, which may have been a playa lake to saline mud flat environment. In contrast, G2 dolomite precipitated from comparatively fresher water, and modelled δ18O values suggested formation from mixing between inflowing fresher groundwater with saline-brine groundwater within the Marsh. The δ18O values of the calcite indicates formation from brackish to saline groundwater, which suggests this process may be associated with coeval gypsum dissolution. In contrast to the modern hydrology of the Marsh, which is surface water dependent and driven by a flood and drought regime, past conditions conducive to dolomite precipitation suggest a groundwater dependent system, where shallow groundwaters were influenced by intensive evaporation.

  7. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.; Molenaar, Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    The conditions and timing of carbonate cementation in Cambrian sandstones of the Baltic sedimentary basin were determined by oxygen and carbon stable isotope and chemical data in combination with optical and cathodoluminescence petrographic studies. Studied samples represent a range in present...... burial depth from 340 to 2150 m. The carbonate cement is dominantly ferroan dolomite that occurs as dispersed patches of poikilotopic crystals. Temperatures of dolomite precipitation, based on delta O-18 values, range from 27 degrees C in the shallow buried to 95 degrees C in the deep buried sandstones...

  8. Ferroan dolomites in Miocene sediments of the Xisha Islands and their genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Zhang, Weiwei; Wei, Kai; He, Qingkun; Jiang, Yunshui; Xu, Tingting; Jiang, Xuejun; Yan, Guijing; Song, Hongying; Wang, Jianghai

    2018-01-01

    Carbonate rocks are important reservoirs for global petroleum exploration. The largest oilfield in the South China Sea, Liuhua 11-1, is distributed in the massive carbonate reef area of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Mouth Basin. Previous studies showed that one 802.17-m-long core from well Xichen-1 in the South China Sea mainly consisted of white and light gray-white organic reefs. Recently, a Miocene whole core (161.9 m long) of well Xiyong-2, near well Xichen-1, was found to contain six layers of yellowish brown, light yellowish gray, iron black, or light yellowish gray-white organic reefs. Scanning electron microscope images of these layers reveal a typical ferroan dolomite rich in Fe (up to 29%), with the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, W, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Co. Systematic X-ray powder diffraction analysis yields a 1.9-6.1 match in phase ratio with ankerite, 5.4-26.9 with dolomite, and zero with calcite, which indicate that the samples can be classified as ferroan dolomite. The iron and heavy metals are inferred to be originated from multiple volcanic eruptions of Gaojianshi Island in the Dongdao Atoll during the middle-late Miocene. These elements were dissolved in seawater, likely as a sol, and carried to Yongxing Island in the Xuande Atoll by sea currents and tides enhanced by prevailing winds, and deposited as a part of the sedimentation process in the study area. The ferroan dolomite has Sr content of (125-285)×10-6, which is lower than the accepted Sr boundary value of dolomite. This finding suggests that dolomitization occurred during large-scale global glacial regression in the late Miocene. The isolated Xisha carbonate platform, exposed to air, underwent freshwater leaching and dolomitization induced by mixed water, and caused the extensive Fe-Mg exchange along the organic reef profile to form ankerite and ferroan dolomite. These results may help to understand paleoceanographic environmental changes in the South China Sea during the Miocene.

  9. Origins and Geochemistry of Oolitic Dolomite of the Feixianguan Formation from the Yudongzi Outcrop, Northwest Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of dolomite formation has long presented a challenge to researchers. In this study, the origin of widely occurring oolitic dolomites from the Yudongzi outcrop in the lower Triassic Feixianguan formation in northwest Sichuan, China, was investigated through petrographic observations, and mineralogical and geochemical analysis. Analytical methods used include cathodoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, stable isotopes, and electronic microprobe characterization. The dolomites were categorized into three major genetic types according to their textural and structural characteristics, which reflect their various origins. The first genetic type of these dolomites, seepage reflux dolomitization, occurs in marly to microcrystalline dolomite during the penecontemporaneous stage, and displays negatively skewed δ18Ο (−2.83‰ Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB, positively skewed δ13C (2.71‰ PDB, a low degree of order (0.48, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.707509–0.707634, indicating involvement of a Mg-rich brine fluid in an open evaporative environment. The second type, shallow burial dolomitization, is the most significant genetic type of dolomite reservoir in this area. This process produced dominantly silty to fine crystalline dolomite in a platform-margin oolitic beach facies with negatively skewed δ18Ο (−3.26‰ PDB, positively skewed δ13C (1.88‰ PDB, a high degree of order (0.70, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.707318–0.707661, which are related to seawater-derived fluids in a shallow burial environment. The third type is moderate to deep burial dolomitization, and is the main process responsible for zoned dolomite and dolomite with cloudy cores and clear rims (CCCR dolomite, which have the most strongly negatively skewed δ18Ο (−7.32‰ PDB, positively skewed δ13C (3.02‰ PDB, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.707217–0.707855, representing diagenetic alteration and fluid flow in a closed environment. These findings indicate that dolomite was likely

  10. Influence of ameliorating soil acidity with dolomite on the priming of soil C content and CO2 emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Lei; Peng, Qi-An; van Zwieten, Lukas; Chhajro, Muhammad Afzal; Wu, Yupeng; Lin, Shan; Ahmed, Muhammad Mahmood; Khalid, Muhammad Salman; Abid, Muhammad; Hu, Ronggui

    2017-04-01

    Lime or dolomite is commonly implemented to ameliorate soil acidity. However, the impact of dolomite on CO 2 emissions from acidic soils is largely unknown. A 53-day laboratory study was carried out to investigate CO 2 emissions by applying dolomite to an acidic Acrisol (rice-rapeseed rotation [RR soil]) and a Ferralsol (rice-fallow/flooded rotation [RF soil]). Dolomite was dosed at 0, 0.5, and 1.5 g 100 g -1 soil, herein referred to as CK, L, and H, respectively. The soil pH (H2O) increased from 5.25 to 7.03 and 7.62 in L and H treatments of the RR soil and from 5.52 to 7.27 and 7.77 in L and H treatments of the RF soil, respectively. Dolomite application significantly (p ≤ 0.001) increased CO 2 emissions in both RR and RF soils, with higher emissions in H as compared to L dose of dolomite. The cumulative CO 2 emissions with H dose of dolomite were greater 136% in the RR soil and 149% in the RF soil as compared to CK, respectively. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) increased and reached at 193 and 431 mg kg -1 in the RR soil and 244 and 481 mg kg -1 in the RF soil by H treatments. The NH 4 - -N and NO 3 - -N were also increased by dolomite application. The increase in C and N contents stimulated microbial activities and therefore higher respiration in dolomite-treated soil as compared to untreated. The results suggest that CO 2 release in dolomite-treated soils was due to the priming of soil C content rather than chemical reactions.

  11. New explanation for extreme u-234 u-238 disequilibria in a dolomitic aquifer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kronfeld, J

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available High U-234/U-238 activity ratios are found in the shallow groundwater of the phreatic Transvaal Dolomite Aquifer. The aquifer is uranium poor, while the waters are oxygen rich and young. Tritium and C-14 are used to show that the disequilibrium...

  12. Effects of Metal Ions on the Flotation of Apatite, Dolomite and Quartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoyang Ruan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Ca2+, Mg2+, Al3+, and Fe3+ on the flotation behaviors of apatite, dolomite and quartz were investigated through a micro-flotation test, and the influence of calcium ions on the flotation of these minerals was further elucidated by solution chemistry study, zeta potential measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analyses. The results indicate that an appropriate amount of Ca2+ and Mg2+ can improve the floatability of apatite but had a negligible effect on the flotation performance of dolomite, whereas Al3+, Fe3+, and excessive amounts of Ca2+ decreased the recovery of apatite and dolomite. The studied metal cations can activate quartz at a particular pH. It can be inferred from solution chemistry and zeta potential measurement that the influence of metal ions on the flotation of different minerals should be attributed to the adsorption of various hydrolysis species on the mineral surfaces. XPS analyses reveal that calcium ions can enhance the adsorption of anionic collector on apatite and quartz surfaces, and there are no apparent changes to be observed on the surface of dolomite in the absence and presence of calcium ions at a concentration of 2.5 × 10−3 M, which was in good agreement with the micro-flotation results.

  13. Model study of initial adsorption of SO{sub 2} on calcite and dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaga-Starzec, Katarina; Panas, Itai; Lindqvist, Oliver

    2004-01-30

    The rate of calcareous stone degradation is to a significant extent controlled by their surface chemistry with SO{sub 2}. Initial surface sulphite is converted to a harmful gypsum upon, e.g. NO{sub 2} catalysed oxidation. However, it has been observed by scanning electron microscopy that the lateral distributions of gypsum crystals differ between calcitic and dolomitic marbles. The first-principles density functional theory is employed to understand the origin of these fundamentally different morphologies. Here, the stability differences of surface sulphite at calcite CaCO{sub 3} (s) and dolomite Ca{sub x}Mg{sub 1-x}CO{sub 3} (s) are determined. A qualitative difference in surface sulphite stability, favouring the former, is reported. This is taken to imply that calcitic micro-crystals embedded in a dolomitic matrix act as sinks in the surface sulphation process, controlled by SO{sub 2} diffusion. The subsequent formation of gypsum under such conditions will not require SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) ion transport. This explains the homogeneous distribution of gypsum observed on the calcitic micro-crystals in dolomite. In contrast, sulphation on purely calcitic marbles never reaches such high SO{sub 2} coverage. Rather, upon oxidation, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) transport to nucleation centres, such as grain boundaries, is required for the growth of gypsum crystals.

  14. Simple, simultaneous gravimetric determination of calcite and dolomite in calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literature pertaining to determination of calcite and dolomite is not modern and describes slow methods that require expensive specialized apparatus. The objective of this paper was to describe a new method that requires no specialized equipment. Linear regressions and correlation coefficients for...

  15. Model study of initial adsorption of SO2 on calcite and dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaga-Starzec, Katarina; Panas, Itai; Lindqvist, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    The rate of calcareous stone degradation is to a significant extent controlled by their surface chemistry with SO 2 . Initial surface sulphite is converted to a harmful gypsum upon, e.g. NO 2 catalysed oxidation. However, it has been observed by scanning electron microscopy that the lateral distributions of gypsum crystals differ between calcitic and dolomitic marbles. The first-principles density functional theory is employed to understand the origin of these fundamentally different morphologies. Here, the stability differences of surface sulphite at calcite CaCO 3 (s) and dolomite Ca x Mg 1-x CO 3 (s) are determined. A qualitative difference in surface sulphite stability, favouring the former, is reported. This is taken to imply that calcitic micro-crystals embedded in a dolomitic matrix act as sinks in the surface sulphation process, controlled by SO 2 diffusion. The subsequent formation of gypsum under such conditions will not require SO 4 2- (aq) ion transport. This explains the homogeneous distribution of gypsum observed on the calcitic micro-crystals in dolomite. In contrast, sulphation on purely calcitic marbles never reaches such high SO 2 coverage. Rather, upon oxidation, SO 4 2- (aq) transport to nucleation centres, such as grain boundaries, is required for the growth of gypsum crystals

  16. Geology and permian paleomagnetism of the Val-di-Non area W. Dolomites, N. Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hilten, D.

    1960-01-01

    During the summers of 1957 till 1959 geological investigations were carried out in the western part of the Dolomites (southern Alps), where these are separated from the central Alps by the Judicaria fault. A long time before the principal displacements occurred along this fault - late oligocene -

  17. Geology and permian paleomagnetism of the Val-di-Non area W. Dolomites, N. Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilten, D. van

    1960-01-01

    During the summers of 1957 till 1959 geological investigations were carried out in the western part of the Dolomites (southern Alps), where these are separated from the central Alps by the Judicaria fault. A long time before the principal displacements occurred along this fault - late oligocene

  18. Messinian Salinity Crisis' Primary Evaporites: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, G. J.; Krijgsman, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, resulting in deposition of 1-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable, long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation, including the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions at a precessional rhythm. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal- and dolomite formation at deeper settings. A range of potential explanations was given, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are commonly neglected but may explain that different deposits formed in shallow vs deep environments without exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. A unifying mechanism is presented in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing deep-basin anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes result in dolomite formation. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process linking the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, ongoing OM-degradation may result in reducing the sulphate and enhancing the dissolved carbonate content. Such low-sulphate / high carbonate conditions in MSC deepwater are. unfavorable for gypsum preservation and favorable for dolomite formation, and always coincide with anoxic, i.e. oxygen-free conditions. Including dynamic biogeochemical processes in the thusfar static

  19. Experimental observation and numerical simulation of permeability changes in dolomite at CO2 sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Injecting surface temperature CO2 into geothermally warm reservoirs for geologic storage or energy production may result in depressed temperature near the injection well and thermal gradients and mass transfer along flow paths leading away from the well. Thermal gradients are particularly important to consider in reservoirs containing carbonate minerals, which are more soluble at lower temperatures, as well as in CO2-based geothermal energy reservoirs where lowering heat exchanger rejection temperatures increases efficiency. Additionally, equilibrating a fluid with cation-donating silicates near a low-temperature injection well and transporting the fluid to higher temperature may enhance the kinetics of mineral precipitation in such a way as to overcome the activation energy required for mineral trapping of CO2. We have investigated this process by subjecting a dolomite core to a 650-hour temperature series experiment in which the fluid was saturated with CO2 at high pressure (110-126 bars) and 21°C. This fluid was recirculated through the dolomite core, increasing permeability from 10-16 to 10-15.2 m2. Subsequently, the core temperature was raised to 50° C, and permeability decreased to 10-16.2 m2 after 289 hours, due to thermally-driven CO2 exsolution. Increasing core temperature to 100°C for the final 145 hours of the experiment caused dolomite to precipitate, which, together with further CO2 exsolution, decreased permeability to 10-16.4 m2. Post-experiment x-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscope imagery of the dolomite core reveals abundant matrix dissolution and enlargement of flow paths at low temperatures, and subsequent filling-in of the passages at elevated temperature by dolomite. To place this experiment within the broader context of geologic CO2 sequestration, we designed and utilized a reactive transport simulator that enables dynamic calculation of CO2 equilibrium constants and fugacity and activity coefficients by incorporating

  20. Important geosites and parks in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Dolomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nossing, L.; Forti, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the geological complexity of the south Tyrol, the Dolomites play a fundamental role, as they are now included in the UNESCO World Heritage (2009) because of their exceptional beauty and unique landscape, together with numerous scientific discoveries. The name of Dolomite comes from the famous mineral dolomite (double calcium magnesium carbonate) discovered by Déodat De Dolomieu in 1789. The dolomitic rocks constitute a large area of the Triassic mountains and many studies have contributed to the discovery of the fundamental stratotypes for the signature of the Permian/Triassic boundary. The steep walls of the Permian volcanic formations and the Sciliar Mountain have always been a great attraction for scientists from all over the world to study the open book of nature in the Dolomites. We will illustrate three sites: 1. The Bula Geotrail. A geological trail through one of the best-preserved sedimentary series in which we can observe one of the most important stratotypes to touch the Permian/Triassic boundary. 2. The Siusi-Alpe di Siusi Geological Trail. This trail starts just above the Permian/Triassic boundary and is characterized by some unique basaltic columnar formations and other significant outcrops of Lower and Medium Triassic. 3. The Bletterbach Geopark. In this sequence the stratotype, which represents the boundary, is a dark coloured continuous layer (organic matter) 5cm thick, and contains some paleobotanical evidence which is unique in the world. The preservation and added value of the natural and geological patrimony of a region through guided and documented trails are at the origin of a new kind of tourism: geotourism. The modern tourist is more and more interested and stimulated by getting to knowing nature in depth. The trails are the best instruments for scientific divulgation and education, allowing a better understanding of the landscape and stimulating new discoveries. (Author)

  1. Important geosites and parks in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Dolomites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossing, L.; Forti, S.

    2016-10-01

    In the geological complexity of the south Tyrol, the Dolomites play a fundamental role, as they are now included in the UNESCO World Heritage (2009) because of their exceptional beauty and unique landscape, together with numerous scientific discoveries. The name of Dolomite comes from the famous mineral dolomite (double calcium magnesium carbonate) discovered by Déodat De Dolomieu in 1789. The dolomitic rocks constitute a large area of the Triassic mountains and many studies have contributed to the discovery of the fundamental stratotypes for the signature of the Permian/Triassic boundary. The steep walls of the Permian volcanic formations and the Sciliar Mountain have always been a great attraction for scientists from all over the world to study the open book of nature in the Dolomites. We will illustrate three sites: 1. The Bula Geotrail. A geological trail through one of the best-preserved sedimentary series in which we can observe one of the most important stratotypes to touch the Permian/Triassic boundary. 2. The Siusi-Alpe di Siusi Geological Trail. This trail starts just above the Permian/Triassic boundary and is characterized by some unique basaltic columnar formations and other significant outcrops of Lower and Medium Triassic. 3. The Bletterbach Geopark. In this sequence the stratotype, which represents the boundary, is a dark coloured continuous layer (organic matter) 5cm thick, and contains some paleobotanical evidence which is unique in the world. The preservation and added value of the natural and geological patrimony of a region through guided and documented trails are at the origin of a new kind of tourism: geotourism. The modern tourist is more and more interested and stimulated by getting to knowing nature in depth. The trails are the best instruments for scientific divulgation and education, allowing a better understanding of the landscape and stimulating new discoveries. (Author)

  2. Formation of fine crystalline dolomites in lacustrine carbonates of the Eocene Sikou Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qiang Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genesis of the fine crystalline dolomites that exhibit good to excellent reservoir properties in the upper fourth member of the Eocene Shahejie Formation (Es 4 s around the Sikou Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, is uncertain. This paper investigates the formation mechanisms of this fine crystalline dolomite using XRD, SEM, thin section analysis and geochemical data. The stratigraphy of the Sikou lacustrine carbonate is dominated by the repetition of metre-scale, high-frequency deposition cycles, and the amount of dolomite within a cycle increases upward from the cycle bottom. These dolomite crystals are 2–30 μm in length, subhedral to anhedral in shape and typically replace both grains and matrix. They also occur as rim cement and have thin lamellae within ooid cortices. Textural relations indicate that the dolomite predates equant sparry calcite cement and coarse calcite cement. The Sr concentrations of dolomites range from 900 to 1200 ppm. Dolomite δ18O values (−11.3 to −8.2 ‰ PDB are depleted relative to calcite mudstone (−8.3 to −5.4 ‰ PDB that precipitated from lake water, while δ13C values (0.06–1.74 ‰ PDB are within the normal range of calcite mudstone values (−2.13 to 1.99 ‰ PDB. High 87Sr/86Sr values (0.710210–0.710844 indicate that amounts of Ca2+ and Mg2+ have been derived from the chemical weathering of Palaeozoic carbonate bedrocks. The high strontium concentration indicates that hypersaline conditions were maintained during the formation of the dolomites and that the dolomites were formed by the replacement of precursor calcite or by direct precipitation.

  3. Reconstruction of the pre-compactional thickness of the Zechstein Main Dolomite in northwest Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semyrka Grażyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our reconstruction of the pre-compactional thickness of the Main Dolomite strata from the so-called Grotów Peninsula (northwest Poland was based on macroscopic observations of drill cores from three wells: Mokrzec-1, Sieraków-4 and Międzychód-5. These wells are located in various palaeogeographical zones of the Main Dolomite and cored rocks represent a range of microfacies. The amount of compactional reduction in thickness of the Main Dolomite was estimated by summing the total heights (Wst of all stylolites encountered in logs of these wells. For calculations, a generalised model of a drill core was developed, which embraced all types of stylolite seams present in the Main Dolomite succession studied. Also the method of stylolite dimensioning was demonstrated. The number of stylolites in the drill cores studied varied from 511 in the Sieraków-4 well to 1,534 in the Międzychód-5 well. In all cores studied low-amplitude macrostylolites predominated, but the reduction of thickness was controlled mostly by the low- and medium-amplitude macrostylolites. The largest number of stylolites was found in the grainstone/packstone microfacies. The turnout of stylolites depends of microfacies. The highest density of stylolites was documented in mudstones/wackestones (24 stylolites per metre of rock thickness and the lowest in boundstones (14 stylolites per metre of rock thickness. The low-amplitude stylolites appear most frequently in the mudstone/wackestone microfacies (15 stylolites per metre of rock thickness; in grainstones/packstones, rudstones/floatstones and boundstones middle-amplitude stylolites are rare (3 stylolites per metre of rock thickness. The degree of compaction of the Main Dolomite succession studied varied from 6 to 10%; hence, its calculated initial thickness also varied in the wells studied: from 41.3 m in the Sieraków-4 well to 56.9 m in the Mokrzec-1 well and to 97.1 m in the Międzychód-5 well. The volumes of reservoir

  4. Transport of barium through dolomite rocks under the presence of guar gum and brine salinities of hydraulic fracturing wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, P.; Vilcaez, J.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing wastewater (HFW) containing high concentrations of Ba, is commonly disposed into the deep saline aquifers. We investigate the effect of brine salinity, competing cations (Ca and Mg), and guar gum (most common fracturing viscosifier) on the sorption and transport of Ba through dolomite rocks. To this aim, we have conducted batch sorption and core-flooding experiments at both ambient (22°C) and deep subsurface (60°C) temperature conditions. The effect of mineral composition is assessed by comparing batch and core-flooding experimental results obtained with sandstone and dolomite rocks. Batch sorption experiments conducted using powdered dolomite rocks (500-600 µm particle size) revealed that Ba sorption on dolomite greatly decreases with increasing brine salinity (0 - 180,000 mg-NaCl/L), and that at brine salinities of HFW, chloro-complexation reactions between Ba and Cl ions and changes in pH (that results from dolomite dissolution) are the controlling factors of Ba sorption on dolomite. Organo-complexation reactions between Ba and guar gum, and competition of Ba with common cations (Ca and Mg) for hydration sites of dolomite, play a secondary role. This finding is in accordance with core-flooding experimental results, showing that the transport of Ba through synthetic dolomite rocks of high flow properties (25-29.6% porosity, 9.6-13.7 mD permeability), increases with increasing brine salinity (0-180,000 mg-NaCl/L), while the presence of guar gum (50-500 mg/L) does not affect the transport of Ba. On the other hand, core-flooding experiments conducted using natural dolomite core plugs (6.5-8.6% porosity, 0.06-0.3 mD permeability), indicates that guar gum can clog the pore throats of tight dolomite rocks retarding the transport of Ba. Results of our numerical simulation studies indicate that the mechanism of Ba sorption on dolomite can be represented by a sorption model that accounts for both surface complexation reactions on three distinct

  5. Olivine, dolomite and ceramic filters in one vessel to produce clean gas from biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapagnà, Sergio; Gallucci, Katia; Foscolo, Pier Ugo

    2018-01-01

    Heavy organic compounds produced during almond shells gasification in a steam and/or air atmosphere, usually called tar, are drastically reduced in the product gas by using simultaneously in one vessel a ceramic filter placed in the freeboard and a mixture of olivine and dolomite particles in the fluidized bed of the gasifier. The content of tar in the product gas during a reference gasification test with air, in presence of fresh olivine particles only, was 8600mg/Nm 3 of dry gas. By gasifying biomass with steam at the same temperature level of 820°C in a bed of olivine and dolomite (20% by weight), and in the presence of a catalytic ceramic filter inserted in the freeboard of the fluidized bed gasifier, the level of tar was brought down to 57mg/Nm 3 of dry producct gas, with a decrease of more than two orders of magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zengotita, Frances [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Emerson, Hilary Palmer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The chemical behavior of actinide series elements and fission products is a concern for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository due to their uncertain mobility in the subsurface salt formation. In this work, we are observing the behavior of the halophilic bacterium, Chromohalobacter, and its effect on the mobility of lanthanides and cesium in the presence of dolomite. Batch and minicolumn experiments were conducted with Cs+ and lanthanides (Nd3+, Eu3+) to quantify potential transport with bacteria. Preliminary results show that Cs does not interact strongly with dolomite or Chromohalobacter, while the lanthanides can interact strongly with both minerals and bacteria depending on which the Ln contacts first.

  7. Subsurface example of a dolomitized middle Guadalupian (Permian) reef from west Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    A middle Guadalupian organic buildup was cored in the North McElroy Unit (NMU No. 3713 well) in Upton County, W. Texas. Fusulinid control indicates the buildup is equivalent to the Goat Seep reef that crops out in the Guadalupe Mt. The organic buildup at North McElroy consists of boundstones and associated flank grainstones. The reef biota is dominated by ramose and encrusting bryozoans, numerous types of calcareous sponges, the problematic encrusting organism Tubiphytes, encrusting algae, crinoids, brachiopods, and trilobites. Among the more significant aspects of diagenesis are mechanical degradation and biologic degradation, leaching, gypsum-anhydrite transformations, cementation, replacement of all calcite by dolomite, cementation and replacement by baroque dolomite, fracturing, and replacement of carbonate by anhydrite. 17 references.

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of Greek dolomitic marble surface interacted with uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godelitsas, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Misaelides, P.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of a typical Greek (Thassian) dolomitic marble was studied after interaction with U- and Th-containing aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L, free-drift experiments for 1 week at atmospheric P CO 2 ), using 12 C-RBS and Laser μ-Raman spectroscopy. Powder-XRD and SEM-EDS were also applied to investigate the phases deposited on the surface of the interacted samples. The obtained results indicated a considerable removal of U from the aqueous medium mainly due to massive surface precipitation of amorphous UO 2 -hydroxide phases forming a relatively thick (μm-sized) coating on the carbonate substrate. The interaction of Th with dolomitic marble surface is also intense leading to a formation of an amorphous Th-hydroxide layer of similar thickness but of significantly lower elemental atomic proportion

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of Greek dolomitic marble surface interacted with uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godelitsas, A. [Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, University of Athens, 15784 Zographou, Athens (Greece)], E-mail: agodel@geol.uoa.gr; Kokkoris, M. [School of Applied Mathematics and Physics, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zographou, Athens (Greece); Chatzitheodoridis, E. [School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zographou, Athens (Greece); Misaelides, P. [Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-05-15

    The surface of a typical Greek (Thassian) dolomitic marble was studied after interaction with U- and Th-containing aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L, free-drift experiments for 1 week at atmospheric P{sub CO{sub 2}}), using {sup 12}C-RBS and Laser {mu}-Raman spectroscopy. Powder-XRD and SEM-EDS were also applied to investigate the phases deposited on the surface of the interacted samples. The obtained results indicated a considerable removal of U from the aqueous medium mainly due to massive surface precipitation of amorphous UO{sub 2}-hydroxide phases forming a relatively thick ({mu}m-sized) coating on the carbonate substrate. The interaction of Th with dolomitic marble surface is also intense leading to a formation of an amorphous Th-hydroxide layer of similar thickness but of significantly lower elemental atomic proportion.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of Greek dolomitic marble surface interacted with uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godelitsas, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Misaelides, P.

    2008-05-01

    The surface of a typical Greek (Thassian) dolomitic marble was studied after interaction with U- and Th-containing aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L, free-drift experiments for 1 week at atmospheric PCO2), using 12C-RBS and Laser μ-Raman spectroscopy. Powder-XRD and SEM-EDS were also applied to investigate the phases deposited on the surface of the interacted samples. The obtained results indicated a considerable removal of U from the aqueous medium mainly due to massive surface precipitation of amorphous UO2-hydroxide phases forming a relatively thick (μm-sized) coating on the carbonate substrate. The interaction of Th with dolomitic marble surface is also intense leading to a formation of an amorphous Th-hydroxide layer of similar thickness but of significantly lower elemental atomic proportion.

  11. Evaluation of dolomitic resources of Uruguay (Minas - Pan de Azucar Region)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrighetti, R; Pirelli, H.; Gianotti, V.; humberto.pirelli@dinamige.miem.gub.uy

    2007-01-01

    This investigation tries - through Phase I and Phase II stages - to get and estimation of the volume of dolomite resources by means of prospecting the region between the city of Minas and the Pan de Azucar hill, Uruguay; with the objective of achieve a reactivation of this area, increasing job offer, commerce, industrial production and construction activities. Phase I is intended to add valuable information about the precise location of calcareous bodies, their basic features, its geochemical characterization and definition of bodies to be studied with higher detail in Phase II. This second stage points to get an evaluation of the Inferred Resources using 1:10 000 maps and lithological sampling networks to obtain a geochemical characterization of the rocky bodies and the core samples extracted by drilling.Keywords: dolomite, exploration, evaluation, Uruguay. (author)

  12. EPR, UV-Visible, and Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Characterization of Dolomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lakshmi Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dolomite mineral samples having white and light green colors of Indian origin have been characterized by EPR, optical, and NIR spectroscopy. The optical spectrum exhibits a number of electronic bands due to presence of Fe(III ions in the mineral. From EPR studies, the parameters of g for Fe(III and g,A, and D for Mn(II are evaluated and the data confirm that the ions are in distorted octahedron. Optical absorption studies reveal that Fe(III is in distorted octahedron. The bands in NIR spectra are due to the overtones and combinations of water molecules. Thus EPR and optical absorption spectral studies have proven useful for the study of the solid state chemistry of dolomite.

  13. Criteria for selection of dolomites and catalysts for tar elimination from biomass gasification gas. Kinetic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J; Narvaez, I; Orio, A [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1997-12-31

    Calcined dolomites and commercial steam reforming catalysts are used downstream biomass gasifiers for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. To further compare these solids under a rigorous basis, a reaction network and a kinetic model are presented. The apparent kinetic constant for the tar reduction is here proposed as a basis of comparison. Tar sampling and analysis, and the units used for the space-time in the catalytic reactor affect the kinetic constants observed. (author) (2 refs.)

  14. Attrition of Dolomitic Lime in a Fluidized-Bed at High Temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Šyc, Michal; Jeremiáš, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 2 (2013), s. 164-172 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720701; GA MŠk(CZ) 7C11009 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2010-00009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : attrition * catalytic gasification * dolomitic lime Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.193, year: 2013

  15. THE EFFECT OF FISSURES IN DOLOMITE ROCK MASS ON BLASTING PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock fractures in the form of fissures are one of more important geological features of a tectonic system. They have an effect on mechanical behaviour of rook masses exposed to the actions of surface forces. For exploitation in dolomite quarries carried out by blasting of deep shot holes it is important to know the system of fissures within a rock mass for the rock brakes along already weakened planes (the paper is published in Croatian.

  16. Criteria for selection of dolomites and catalysts for tar elimination from biomass gasification gas. Kinetic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    Calcined dolomites and commercial steam reforming catalysts are used downstream biomass gasifiers for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. To further compare these solids under a rigorous basis, a reaction network and a kinetic model are presented. The apparent kinetic constant for the tar reduction is here proposed as a basis of comparison. Tar sampling and analysis, and the units used for the space-time in the catalytic reactor affect the kinetic constants observed. (author) (2 refs.)

  17. Methodology for the study of the dolomite porosity in essay of interrupted sulfation

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila, Ivonete; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a methodology to evaluate the evolution of the pore blockage of limestone during the sulfation reaction. The experiments were performed for a national limestone (dolomite) with average particle size of 545 μm in interrupted sulfation tests were conducted at seven different times and at three different temperatures of the process. The empirical data were obtained from porosimetry tests to establish BET surface area, volume and average size of pore and di...

  18. Early diagenetic dolomitization and dedolomitization of Late Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous platform carbonates: A case study from the Jura Mountains (NW Switzerland, E France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameil, Niels

    2008-12-01

    Early diagenetic dolomitization is a common feature in cyclic shallow-water carbonates throughout the geologic record. After their generation, dolomites may be subject to dedolomitization (re-calcification of dolomites), e.g. by contact with meteoric water during emersion. These patterns of dolomitization and subsequent dedolomitization frequently play a key role in unravelling the development and history of a carbonate platform. On the basis of excellent outcrops, detailed logging and sampling and integrating sedimentological work, high-resolution sequence stratigraphic interpretations, and isotope analyses (O, C), conceptual models on early diagenetic dolomitization and dedolomitization and their underlying mechanisms were developed for the Upper Jurassic / Lower Cretaceous Jura platform in north-western Switzerland and eastern France. Three different types of early diagenetic dolomites and two types of dedolomites were observed. Each is defined by a distinct petrographic/isotopic signature and a distinct spatial distribution pattern. Different types of dolomites are interpreted to have been formed by different mechanisms, such as shallow seepage reflux, evaporation on tidal flats, and microbially mediated selective dolomitization of burrows. Depending on the type of dolomite, sea water with normal marine to slightly enhanced salinities is proposed as dolomitizing fluid. Based on the data obtained, the main volume of dolomite was precipitated by a reflux mechanism that was switched on and off by high-frequency sea-level changes. It appears, however, that more than one dolomitization mechanism was active (pene)contemporaneously or several processes alternated in time. During early diagenesis, percolating meteoric waters obviously played an important role in the dedolomitization of carbonate rocks that underlie exposure surfaces. Cyclostratigraphic interpretation of the sedimentary succession allows for estimates on the timing of early diagenetic (de)dolomitization

  19. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO 2 release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800 0 C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete

  20. Dating of aragonite and dolomite from Devil's cave - SP, by dosimetric thermoluminescent method (DTL) and ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatumi, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated TL (Thermoluminescence) and ESR (electron spin resonance) properties of aragonite and dolomite found at ''Caverna do Diabo (Devil's cave)'' in the state of Sao Paulo to determine the ages of these geological materials. The aragonite, which is not a thermoluminescent material, shows one ESR signal whit g = 2.003. We obtained the age of 1.1 x 10 5 years and the growth rate of 1 μ m/year by the sample calibration with additional Y irradiation. The dolomite gives a TL glow curve with three distinct peaks at 261, 334 and 395 0 C. We found that the fit for the TL glow curve to second-order kinetics can be considerered as very acceptable. Using the second TL peak we obtained the age of 9.4 x 10 5 years and the compatible values of the activation energy (1.90 ± 0,07 eV) by the following methods: Hyperbolic heating, isothermal decay and fractional glow technique. We observed many ESR absorption signals in the dolomite. Three principal signal com g = 2.002, 2.003 and 2.005 were studied. We found that the first and second ESR signals were atributed to the CO 2 - and/or CO 3 3- centers and the last to the CO 3 - centers, and observed that the first ESR signal might related with the second TL peak and the TL sensitivity were associated with the concentration of Mn 2+ [pt

  1. Experimental observation of permeability changes in dolomite at CO2 sequestration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutolo, Benjamin M; Luhmann, Andrew J; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Saar, Martin O; Seyfried, William E

    2014-02-18

    Injection of cool CO2 into geothermally warm carbonate reservoirs for storage or geothermal energy production may lower near-well temperature and lead to mass transfer along flow paths leading away from the well. To investigate this process, a dolomite core was subjected to a 650 h, high pressure, CO2 saturated, flow-through experiment. Permeability increased from 10(-15.9) to 10(-15.2) m(2) over the initial 216 h at 21 °C, decreased to 10(-16.2) m(2) over 289 h at 50 °C, largely due to thermally driven CO2 exsolution, and reached a final value of 10(-16.4) m(2) after 145 h at 100 °C due to continued exsolution and the onset of dolomite precipitation. Theoretical calculations show that CO2 exsolution results in a maximum pore space CO2 saturation of 0.5, and steady state relative permeabilities of CO2 and water on the order of 0.0065 and 0.1, respectively. Post-experiment imagery reveals matrix dissolution at low temperatures, and subsequent filling-in of flow passages at elevated temperature. Geochemical calculations indicate that reservoir fluids subjected to a thermal gradient may exsolve and precipitate up to 200 cm(3) CO2 and 1.5 cm(3) dolomite per kg of water, respectively, resulting in substantial porosity and permeability redistribution.

  2. Removal of Phosphate from Synthetic Aqueous Solution by Adsorption with Dolomite from Padalarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadjari Lucia Nugroho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of phosphate in wastewaters can cause eutrophication of surface water bodies leading to algal-blooming in the aquatic environment and degradation of water quality. Phosphate removal from wastewaters by conventional biological treatment removes only 10-30% of the phosphate, whilst chemical treatment using precipitants such as calcium or iron salts, although effective, is expensive and produces water-rich sludge which must be further treated. Hence, phosphate removal by adsorption in the form of Ca -phosphate has been proposed as an alternative to the more traditional methods. This study investigated the feasibility of using dolomite–a common sedimentary rock–from Padalarang, West Java, Indonesia as the adsorbent for the removal of phosphate from synthetic aqueous solution. Chemical analysis revealed that the Padalarang dolomite contains 33.6-36.2% CaO. Batch experiments at room temperature indicated that optimum removal of phosphate was achieved at pH 9. At 25°C , where increasing concentrations of phosphate (10–100 mg/L increased phosphate adsorption (2.15-31.3 mg/g by the dolomite. The adsorption of phosphate could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with constants Qm= 476.19 mg/g, K L= 0,00106 L/mg and equilibrium parameter (R L: 0.904 – 0.989. Phosphate adsorption by dolomite not only permits its removal but also its potential recovery for reuse.

  3. Magnesium production from Asian Abe-Gram dolomite in pidgeon-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabi, B.; Abdellatifi, M.; Masoudi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ore mineral characterization and various experimental test work were carried out on Asian Abe-Garm dolomite, Qazvin province, Iran. The test work consisted of calcining, chemical characterization, LOI determination, and reduction tests on the calcined dolomite (doloma), using Semnan ferrosilicon. Calcining of dolomite sample was carried out at about 1400 d egree C in order to remove the contained CO 2 , moisture, and other easily volatilised impurities. The doloma was milled, thoroughly mixed with 21 p ercent S emnan ferrosilicon and briquetted in hand press applying 30 MPa pressure. The briquettes were heated at 1125-1150 d egree C and 500 Pa in a Pidgeon-type tube reactor for 10-12 hours to extract the magnesium. Ferrosilicon addition, relative to doloma, was determined based on the chemical analysis of the two reactants using Mintek's Pyrosim software package. Magnesium extraction calculated as 77.97 p ercent a nd Mg purity of 96.35 p ercent . The level of major impurities in the produced magnesium crown is similar to those in the crude metal production.

  4. Primary Evaporites for the Messinian Salinity Crisis: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Krijgsman, Wout

    2014-05-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, and resulted in the deposition of 0.3-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable and long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation. During the CIESM Almeria Workshop a consensus was reached on several aspects. In addition, remaining issues to be solved were identified, such as for the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal settings, while dolomite containing rocks have been reported from deeper settings. A range of potential explanations have been reported, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are poorly understood and commonly neglected. These may, however, explain that different deposits formed in shallow versus deep environments without needing exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. We present here a unifying mechanism in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is mostly limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes in the deep basin result in the formation of dolomite. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always largely oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is thought to be inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus the conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for the formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process that links the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, oxygen is rapidly depleted through OM degradation, then sulphate becomes the main oxidant for OM

  5. Krypton-81 in groundwater of the Culebra Dolomite near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C; Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Yokochi, Reika; Probst, Peter C; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Yang, Guo-Min

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico is the first geologic repository for disposal of transuranic nuclear waste from defense-related programs of the US Department of Energy. It is constructed within halite beds of the Permian-age Salado Formation. The Culebra Dolomite, confined within Rustler Formation evaporites overlying the Salado Formation, is a potential pathway for radionuclide transport from the repository to the accessible environment in the human-disturbed repository scenario. Although extensive subsurface characterization and numerical flow modeling of groundwater has been done in the vicinity of the WIPP, few studies have used natural isotopic tracers to validate the flow models and to better understand solute transport at this site. The advent of Atom-Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) has enabled routine measurement of cosmogenic (81)Kr (half-life 229,000 yr), a near-ideal tracer for long-term groundwater transport. We measured (81)Kr in saline groundwater sampled from two Culebra Dolomite monitoring wells near the WIPP site, and compared (81)Kr model ages with reverse particle-tracking results of well-calibrated flow models. The (81)Kr model ages are ~130,000 and ~330,000 yr for high-transmissivity and low-transmissivity portions of the formation, respectively. Compared with flow model results which indicate a relatively young mean hydraulic age (~32,000 yr), the (81)Kr model ages imply substantial physical attenuation of conservative solutes in the Culebra Dolomite and provide limits on the effective diffusivity of contaminants into the confining aquitards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagenesis of a drapery speleothem from Castañar Cave: from dissolution to dolomitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Pérez A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A drapery speleothem (DRA-1 from Castañar Cave in Spain was subjected to a detailed petrographical study in order to identify its primary and diagenetic features. The drapery’s present day characteristics are the result of the combined effects of the primary and diagenetic processes that DRA-1 underwent. Its primary minerals are calcite, aragonite and huntite. Calcite is the main constituent of the speleothem, whereas aragonite forms as frostwork over the calcite. Huntite is the main mineral of moonmilk which covers the tips of aragonite. These primary minerals have undergone a set of diagenetic processes, which include: 1 partial dissolution or corrosion that produces the formation of powdery matt-white coatings on the surface of the speleothem. These are seen under the microscope as dark and highly porous microcrystalline aggregates; 2 total dissolution produces pores of few cm2 in size; 3 calcitization and dolomitization of aragonite result in the thickening and lost of shine of the aragonite fibres. Microscopically, calcitization is seen as rhombohedral crystals which cover and replace aragonite forming mosaics that preserve relics of aragonite precursor. Dolomitization results in the formation of microcrystalline rounded aggregates over aragonite fibres. These aggregates are formed by dolomite crystals of around 1 μm size. The sequence of diagenetic processes follows two main pathways. Pathway 1 is driven by the increase of saturation degree and Mg/Ca ratio of the karstic waters and is visible in the NW side of the drapery. This sequence of processes includes: 1 aragonite and huntite primary precipitation and 2 dolomitization. Pathway 2 is driven by a decrease in the degree of saturation of calcite and aragonite and Mg/Ca ratio of the cave waters, and it is observed in the SE side of the drapery. The diagenetic processes of the second pathway include: 1 calcitization of aragonite; 2 incomplete dissolution (micritization of both

  7. Intensify dodecylamine adsorption on magnesite and dolomite surfaces by monohydric alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Wengang; Han, Cong; Wei, Dezhou

    2018-06-01

    The flotation of magnesite and dolomite were investigated with the presence of single dodecylamine (DDA) and combined mixtures of DDA and monohydric alcohols, respectively. The adsorption behavior of DDA, butanol, hexanol and octanol on the surface of the two minerals were shown by molecular dynamics simulation, and the results were corresponding with the analysis of zeta potential, measurements of the contact angle and adsorption. Flotation results indicated that part of DDA could be replaced by the three alcohols (butanol, hexanol, octanol) to get better flotation results. Molecular dynamics simulation and the results of zeta potential and contact angle measurements indicated that adsorption of DDA on mineral surfaces could be strengthened by monohydric alcohols.

  8. The behaviour of water discharged into the subsoil in a dolomitic mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jesus, A.S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Water extracted from the underground works, at a depth of approximately 1 000 m, in a mine situated in a dolomitic area was being discharged into a series of boreholes on the surface. It was, however, presumed, that some recirculation was occurring. A tracer investigation was carried out to assess whether at least some of the water was reaching the underground works and the transit times involved. Since indium can be determined by means of neutron activation analysis at concentration levels as low as 10 -11 g/l water, this element was selected as tracer. The results are discussed. 9 refs., 5 figs

  9. Mill tailings based composites as paste backfill in mines of U-bearing dolomitic limestone ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Panchal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on the development of paste backfill using mill tailings generated during the processing of a uranium ore deposit hosted in dolomitic limestone. The tailings have been characterized in terms of the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties. Time-dependent rheological behaviors and geotechnical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB are also determined. The studies show that the mill tailing has the potential to form paste and the CPB has adequate strength to provide support to mine pillars, roofs, and walls. Keywords: Mining engineering, Uranium ore deposit, Tailings, Cemented paste backfill (CPB, Rheology, Compressive strength

  10. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  11. Origin of dolomites in a downslope biostrome, Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), central Idaho: evidence from REE patterns, stable isotopes, and petrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    A completely dolomitized coral-stromatoporoid biostrome occurs at the top of the Dark Dolomite member of the Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) at Grandview Canyon, Lost River Range, central Idaho. The biostrome overlies a thick sequence of dolostones that were deposited in slope to deep ramp settings. The biostrome, therefore, formed in an open marine setting after shallowing of deep water environments. Zoned dolospar cement fills dissolution vugs and tectonic fractures. Stable isotopes for zoned dolospar are -13.1 to -6.5 per thousand delta/sup 18/O (average - 11.5) and -1.5 to -0.1 per thousand delta/sup 13/C (average -0.4). REE patterns for zoned dolospar have positive Ce anomalies, but total REE abundance is similar to REE abundance for replacive dolomites. Stratigraphic occurrence in an open marine setting, stable isotopes, and REE patterns suggest replacive dolomite phases formed during shallow burial diagenesis with significant involvement of nonevaporated sea water. More negative Ce anomalies near the top of the biostrome suggest a diagenetic overprint by oxidizing meteoric waters. Zoned dolospar probably formed from warmer, reducing burial fluids. Carbon for zoned dolospar probably was recycled from preexisting dolomite. These data may be useful for interpreting the origin of other anomalous platform dolostones.

  12. Full-scale laboratory drilling tests on sandstone and dolomite. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, A. D.; Green, S. J.; Rogers, L. A.

    1977-08-01

    Full-scale laboratory drilling experiments were performed under simulated downhole conditions to determine what effect changing various drilling parameters has on penetration rate. The two rock types, typical of deep oil and gas reservoirs, used for the tests were Colton Sandstone and Bonne Terre Dolomite. Drilling was performed with standard 7/sup 7///sub 8/ inch rotary insert bits and water base mud. The results showed the penetration rate to be strongly dependent on bit weight, rotary speed and borehole mud pressure. There was only a small dependence on mud flow rate. The drilling rate decreased rapidly with increasing borehole mud pressure for borehole pressures up to about 2,000 psi. Above this pressure, the borehole pressure and rotary speeds had a smaller effect on penetration rate. The penetration rate was then dependent mostly on the bit weight. Penetration rate per horsepower input was also shown to decrease at higher mud pressures and bit weights. The ratio of horizontal confining stress to axial overburden stress was maintained at 0.7 for simulated overburden stresses between 0 and 12,800 psi. For this simulated downhole stress state, the undrilled rock sample was within the elastic response range and the confining pressures were found to have only a small or negligible effect on the penetration rate. Visual examination of the bottomhole pattern of the rocks after simulated downhole drilling, however, revealed ductile chipping of the Sandstone, but more brittle behavior in the Dolomite.

  13. Crystal structure study of a cobaltoan dolomite from Kolwezi, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale Perchiazzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A structural study has been undertaken on a cobaltoan dolomite, with chemical formula CaMg0.83Co0.17(CO32 (calcium magnesium cobalt dicarbonate, from Kolwezi, Democratic Republic of Congo. Pale-pink euhedral cobaltoan dolomite was associated with kolwezite [(Cu1.33Co0.67(CO3(OH2] and cobaltoan malachite [(Cu,Co2(CO3(OH2]. A crystal with a Co:Mg ratio of 1:5.6 (SEM/EDAX measurement, twinned on (11 -2 0 was used for crystal structural refinement. The refinement of the structural model of Reeder & Wenk [Am. Mineral. (1983, 68, 769–776; Ca at site 3a with site symmetry -3; Mg site at site 3b with site symmetry -3; C at site 6c with site symmetry 3; O at site 18f with site symmetry 1] showed that Co is totally incorporated in the Mg site, with refined occupancy Mg0.83Co0.17, which compares with Mg0.85Co0.15 from chemical data. The Co substitution reflects in the expansion of the cell volume, with a pronounced increasing of the c cell parameter.

  14. Temporal occurrence and activity of landslides in the area of Cortina d'Ampezzo (Dolomites, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Mario; Pasuto, Alessandro; Silvano, Sandro; Soldati, Mauro

    1996-04-01

    This article shows the results of research on landslides carried out in the area of Cortina d'Ampezzo (Dolomites, Italy) within the framework of the EPOCH Project of the European Community. The investigated area, where tourism activities and infrastructures are highly developed, has been affected by several landslides since the retreat of the Würnian glaciers and is at present still affected by active slides and flows which endanger some villages. After a geological and geomorphological description, the distribution in space and time of landslides which occurred in the surroundings of Cortina d'Ampezzo is presented. The type, activity, frequency and, when possible, the age of mass movements have been outlined. Furthermore, special attention is focused on the landslides active at present which are reactivations of ancient movements. The results from the monitoring systems, which were installed in order to survey kinematic and hydrogeologic parameters and define the movement rate, are shown. The research enables the reconstruction of the post-Würmian geomorphological evolution of a site in the Dolomites that appears to be very peculiar both on account of the wide distribution of landslides and the intense human activity.

  15. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.C.; He, Z.L.; Stoffella, P.J.; Yang, X.E.; Yu, S.; Calvert, D.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils. - Fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil

  16. Paleokarst and reservoir porosity in the Ordovician Beekmantown Dolomite of the central Appalachian basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smosna, R.; Bruner, K.R.; Riley, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    A karst-unconformity play at the top of the Ordovician Beekmantown Dolomite is judged to have great petroleum potential in Ohio and adjacent states; wells have high ultimate reserves and large areas remain untested. To better understand the origin, development, and distribution of Beekmantown porosity, we conducted a petrologic-stratigraphic study of cores and thin sections from 15 oil and gas wells. The massive dolomite, characterized by a hypidiotopic-idiotopic texture, formed by the replacement of stacked peritidal carbonate cycles. Secondary porosity occurs at two scales: (1) mesoscopic - breccia porosity, solution-enlarged fractures, large vugs, and caverns, and (2) microscopic - intercrystalline, intracrystalline, molds, small vugs, and microfractures. Mesoscopic pores (providing the major storage capacity in this reservoir) were produced by intrastratal solution and collapse of carbonate layers, whereas microscopic pores (connecting the larger pores) generally formed by the leaching of individual carbonate grains and crystals. Most pore types developed during periods of subaerial exposure across the carbonate bank, tied to either the numerous, though brief falls of relative sea level during Beekmantown deposition or more importantly the prolonged Knox unconformity at the close of sedimentation. The distribution of reservoir-quality porosity is quite heterogeneous, being confined vertically to a zone immediately below the unconformity and best developed laterally beneath buried hills and noses of this erosion surface. The inferred, shallow flow of ground water in the Beekmantown karst, primarily below topographic highs and above a diagenetic base level close to the water table, led to this irregular distribution of porosity.

  17. Magnetite-apatite-dolomitic rocks of Ust-Chulman (Aldan shield, Russia): Seligdar-type carbonatites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopyev, Ilya R.; Doroshkevich, Anna G.; Redina, Anna A.; Obukhov, Andrey V.

    2018-04-01

    The Ust-Chulman apatite ore body is situated within the Nimnyrskaya apatite zone at the Aldan shield in Russia. The latest data confirm the carbonatitic origin of the Seligdar apatite deposit (Prokopyev et al. in Ore Geol Rev 81:296-308, 2017). The results of our investigations demonstrate that the magnetite-apatite-dolomitic rocks of the Ust-Chulman are highly similar to Seligdar-type dolomitic carbonatites in terms of the mineralogy and the fluid regime of formation. The ilmenite and spinel mineral phases occur as solid solutions with magnetite, and support the magmatic origin of the Ust-Chulman ores. The chemical composition of REE- and SO3-bearing apatite crystals and, specifically, monazite-(Ce) mineralisation and the formation of Nb-rutile, late hydrothermal sulphate minerals (barite, anhydrite) and haematite are typical for carbonatite complexes. The fluid inclusions study revealed similarities to the evolutionary trend of the Seligdar carbonatites that included changes of the hydrothermal solutions from highly concentrated chloride to medium-low concentrated chloride-sulphate and oxidized carbonate-ferrous.

  18. Thermal and catalytic cracking of ethylene in presence of CaO, MgO, zeolite and calcined dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taralas, G; Sjoestroem, K; Jaeraas, S; Bjoernbom, E [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1994-12-31

    The subject of the present work is to study the effect of catalysts such as calcined dolomite (CaO.MgO), CaO (quicklime), MgO and Zeolite (EKZ-4) on the cracking of ethylene in the presence and absence of steam. N-heptane, toluene, naphthalene, thiophene have been some suitable model compounds for studies of the thermal and catalytic decomposition of tar. Previous results showed that the reaction scheme of the thermal decomposition of n-heptane was consistent with the high yield of ethylene observed in thermal decomposition of n-heptane. The effect of the reactor wall and the ferric impurities in the dolomite are also subjects of the research in this study. The results may also throw some additional light on the nature of the gas-phase thermal and catalytic reactions occurring in the use of dolomite as tar cracking catalysts. 28 refs

  19. Common Ion Effects In Zeoponic Substrates: Dissolution And Cation Exchange Variations Due to Additions of Calcite, Dolomite and Wollastonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, R. E.; Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    c1inoptilolite-rich tuff-hydroxyapatite mixture (zeoponic substrate) has the potential to serve as a synthetic soil-additive for plant growth. Essential plant macro-nutrients such as calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, ammonium and potassium are released into solution via dissolution of the hydroxyapatite and cation exchange on zeolite charged sites. Plant growth experiments resulting in low yield for wheat have been attributed to a Ca deficiency caused by a high degree of cation exchange by the zeolite. Batch-equilibration experiments were performed in order to determine if the Ca deficiency can be remedied by the addition of a second Ca-bearing, soluble, mineral such as calcite, dolomite or wollastonite. Variations in the amount of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite resulted in systematic changes in the concentrations of Ca and P. The addition of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite to the zeoponic substrate resulted in an exponential decrease in the phosphorous concentration in solution. The exponential rate of decay was greatest for calcite (5.60 wt. % -I), intermediate for wollastonite (2.85 wt.% -I) and least for dolomite (1.58 wt.% -I). Additions of the three minerals resulted in linear increases in the calcium concentration in solution. The rate of increase was greatest for calcite (3.64), intermediate for wollastonite (2.41) and least for dolomite (0.61). The observed changes in P and Ca concentration are consistent with the solubilities of calcite, dolomite and wollastonite and with changes expected from a common ion effect with Ca. Keywords: zeolite, zeoponics, common-ion effect, clinoptilolite, hydroxyapatite

  20. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  1. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.; Budd, David A.; Clayton, Edward A.; Missimer, Thomas M.; Dickson, John Anthony D

    2011-01-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  2. The influence of mineralization on the phase composition and properties of low-burned clay-dolomited composition materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirin-zade, I.N.; Ganbarov, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    With aim of acceleration of dissociation of carbonates in clay-dolomited compositions Na 2 SiF 6 was added. Addition mineralization raise stability of composition reaches 20-30 MPa. Na 2 SiF 6 mineralization makes more active decomposition of dolomite and accelerate appearance of new creations. It was experimentally proved that adding of mineralization of Na 2 SiF 6 promote to appearance in mixture of intermediate double salts which are bring down temperature of dissociation of carbonates. Accelerated action of mineralization Na 2 SiF 6 accepted by x-ray, DTA and x-ray spectroscopy

  3. Effects of the dolomite from Irati formation as additive in a refractory clay used as raw material in Santa Gertrudes ceramic cluster (SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.H.O.; Gaspar Junior, L.A.; Moreno, M.M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of addition of carbonates in clays used as floor tiles have been intensively studied, but the focus usually is the pure calcite or calcitic limestone, which has nobler uses in industry, especially for cement production. However, in the important area known as Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Cluster, in Sao Paulo State, occurs mainly the dolomitic limestone, which is little studied as a potential additive which could be used in order to improve the properties of the floor tiles. This work aimed to check out the potentiality of dolomitic limestone as additive in ceramic products, especially floor tiles. Using as ingredients dolomitic limestones and refractory clay collected inside the area of the referred cluster, ceramic bodies were obtained with different dolomitic limestones contents incorporated to the refractory clay, and these ceramic bodies were mineralogically, chemically and physically analyzed. The conclusions are the dolomitic limestone can be particularly useful when incorporated to refractory clays, due to its fluxing properties. (author)

  4. A NEW LEPIDOSAUROMORPH REPTILE FROM THE MIDDLE TRIASSIC OF THE DOLOMITES (NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIO RENESTO

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and species of diapsid reptile is described. The specimen was collected from the Anisian (Middle Triassic succession of Monte Prà della Vacca (Kühwiesenkopf in the Dolomites of Braies (Bolzano/Bozen, Northern Italy. Despite being incomplete, the specimen shows enough characters to allow its placement within Lepidosauriformes, close to the Middle Jurassic genus Marmoretta. The importance of this find lies in the great rarity of lepidosauriforms of Anisian age, an epoch approximating the appearance of the first members of the true Lepidosauria (rhyncocephalians and squamates. The new genus may thus add knowledge to the diversity of early lepidosaurians. Some characters of the skeleton, mainly of the forelimb, suggest a terrestrial, perhaps arboreal life style. 

  5. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MEIGS, LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM, RICHARD L.; JONES, TOYA L.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low ( -6 m 2 /s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10 -6 m 2 /s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow

  6. Stability of an anaerobic single reactor filled with dolomitic limestone with increased organic load of sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Ribas Döll

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic single-stage reactor was evaluated to treat vinasse and to evaluate its stability. This bench reactor was filled with dolomitic limestone with a horizontal plug flow to simulate a drainage channel. The experiment lasted 129 days while the reactor was submitted to different applied organic concentrations (chronologically applied: 3.0; 5.0; 12.0; 9.0 and 7.5 g L-1 as COD, chemical oxygen demand. COD removals were 50% and 9% with 3.0 and 7.5 g L-1, respectively. With 12.0 g L-1, reactor efficiency increased to 33%, with an abrupt drop to 3% on the 84th day. Therefore, in order to avoid reactor collapse, a remedial measure was necessary. The system remained in batch without feeding for 19 days (from the 85th to the 104th day with 9.0 g L-1. Afterwards, it was observed that the performance of the system tended to stabilize, reaching 47% with 7.5 g L-1 in the 118th day. At the end of the experiment, the potassium content of the wastewater decreased from 800 mg L-1 to 594 mg L-1 (on an average 25% and calcium and magnesium increased within the reactor liquor. The dissolution of the limestone inside the liquor reactor probably caused this result. After the treatment with limestone, the average pH value of the effluent increased from 4.9 to over 6.0 in all organic concentrations. It could be concluded that the reactor filled with dolomitic limestone in these operational conditions assured a low efficiency in COD removal, potassium reduction, increasing values of pH, alkalinity, calcium and magnesium. The instability was observed when there was increase in organic load to 12 g L-1 with subsequent recovery.

  7. Recent slope failures in the Dolomites (Northeastern Italian Alps) in a context of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarle, Marta; Paranunzio, Roberta; Laio, Francesco; Nigrelli, Guido; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Climate change in the Greater Alpine Region is seriously affecting permafrost distribution, with relevant consequences on slope stability. In the Italian Alps, the number of failures from rockwalls at high elevation markedly increased in the last 20-30 years: the consistent temperature increase, which warmed twice than the global average, may have seriously influenced slope stability, in terms of glaciers retreat and permafrost degradation. Moreover, the growing number of tourists and activities in alpine regions (in particular in the Dolomites) made these areas particularly critical in relation to natural hazards. In this light, an integrated short-term geomorphological and climatic analysis was performed, in order to better comprehend the impact of main climate elements (especially temperature and precipitation) on slope failures in high mountain areas. In this contribution, we focus on three recent slope failures occurred at high elevation sites in the Dolomites (Northeastern Italian Alps), declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in August 2009. We describe here three important rock falls occurred in the autumn 2013: 1) the Sorapiss rock fall, on 30 September 2013; 2) the Monte Civetta rock fall, on 16 November 2013; 3) the Monte Antelao rock fall, on 22 November 2013. The Monte Civetta rock fall damaged some climbing routes, while the other two landslides did not cause any damage or injury. Despite the limited volume involved, these three events represent an important warning sign in the context of ongoing climate change. Geomorphological information about the rock fall sites were combined with the climatic data acquired from the meteorological stations surrounding the slope failure areas. A short-term climatic analysis was performed, with the aim of understanding the role of the main climatic elements in the triggering of natural instability events in this area and in the Alps in general.

  8. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  9. Dolomitic lime amendment affects pine bark substrate pH, nutrient availability, and plant growth: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is one of the most commonly used fertilizer amendments in nursery container substrates. It is used to adjust pH of pine bark substrates from their native pH, 4.1 to 5.1, up to about pH 6. Additions of DL have been shown to be beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental dependin...

  10. The effect of dolomite type and Al2O3 content on the phase composition in aluminous cements containing spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Naghizadeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of dolomite type and Al2O3 content on the phase composition in aluminous cements containing MA spinel is investigated. For this reason, the raw and calcined dolomites are used as raw materials along with calcined alumina in the preparation of the cement. Then, different compositions are prepared at 1350°C using the sintering method and their mineralogical compositions are investigated using the diffractometric technique. Also, their microstructures arre evaluated. The results indicate that raw materials used have great effect on the type and amount of formed phases in cement composition. Independently of the dolomite type used, a mixed phase product consisting of spinel accompanied by CA and CA2 is obtained. The content of CA phase in the cement composition is decreased with increasing of Al2O3 in the raw materials composition. On the other hand, the content of CA2 phase is increased with the addition of Al2O3. In addition, the results show that the formation of C12A7 is favored by use of calcined dolomite.

  11. Effect of dolomite and biochar addition on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Aung Zaw; Sudo, Shigeto; Akiyama, Hiroko; Win, Khin Thuzar; Shibata, Akira; Yamamoto, Akinori; Sano, Tomohito; Hirono, Yuhei

    2018-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to study the effects of liming and different biochar amendments on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil. The first experiment was done with three different rates of N treatment; N 300 (300 kg N ha-1), N 600 (600 kg N ha-1) and N 900 (900 kg N ha-1) and four different rates of bamboo biochar amendment; 0%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% biochar. The second experiment was done with three different biochars at a rate of 2% (rice husk, sawdust, and bamboo) and a control and lime treatment (dolomite) and control at two moisture levels (50% and 90% water filled pore space (WFPS)). The results showed that dolomite and biochar amendment significantly increased soil pH. However, only biochar amendment showed a significant increase in total carbon (C), C/N (the ratio of total carbon and total nitrogen), and C/IN ratio (the ratio of total carbon and inorganic nitrogen) at the end of incubation. Reduction in soil NO3--N concentration was observed under different biochar amendments. Bamboo biochar with the rates of 0.5, 1 and 2% reduced cumulative N2O emission by 38%, 48% and 61%, respectively, compare to the control soil in experiment 1. Dolomite and biochar, either alone or combined significantly reduced cumulative N2O emission by 4.6% to 32.7% in experiment 2. Reduction in N2O production under biochar amendment was due to increases in soil pH and decreases in the magnitude of mineral-N in soil. Although, both dolomite and biochar increased cumulative CO2 emission, only biochar amendment had a significant effect. The present study suggests that application of dolomite and biochar to acidic tea field soil can mitigate N2O emissions.

  12. Hydrothermal dolomitization of the Bekhme formation (Upper Cretaceous), Zagros Basin, Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Record of oil migration and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurbeg, Howri; Morad, Daniel; Othman, Rushdy; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Al-Aasm, Ihsan; Kolo, Kamal; Spirov, Pavel; Proust, Jean Noel; Preat, Alain; Koyi, Hemin

    2016-07-01

    The common presence of oil seepages in dolostones is widespread in Cretaceous carbonate successions of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. This integrated field, petrographic, chemical, stable C, O and Sr isotopes, and fluid inclusion study aims to link dolomitization to the origin and geochemical evolution of fluids and oil migration in the Upper Cretaceous Bekhme carbonates. Flux of hot basinal (hydrothermal) brines, which is suggested to have occurred during the Zagros Orogeny, resulted in dolomitization and cementation of vugs and fractures by coarse-crystalline saddle dolomite, equant calcite and anhydrite. The saddle dolomite and host dolostones have similar stable isotopic composition and formed prior to oil migration from hot (81-115 °C) basinal NaCl-MgCl2-H2O brines with salinities of 18-22 wt.% NaCl eq. The equant calcite cement, which surrounds and hence postdates saddle dolomite, has precipitated during oil migration from cooler (60-110 °C) NaCl-CaCl2-H2O brines (14-18 wt.% NaCl eq). The yellowish fluorescence color of oil inclusions in the equant calcite indicates that the oil had API gravity of 15-25° composition, which is lighter than present-day oil in the reservoirs (API of 10-17°). This difference in oil composition is attributed to oil degradation by the flux of meteoric water, which is evidenced by the low δ13C values (- 8.5‰ to - 3.9‰ VPDB) as well as by nil salinity and low temperature in fluid inclusions of late columnar calcite cement. This study demonstrates that linking fluid flux history and related diagenesis to the tectonic evolution of the basin provides important clues to the timing of oil migration, degradation and reservoir evolution.

  13. An integrated approach for hazard assessment and mitigation of debris flows in the Italian Dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasuto, Alessandro; Soldati, Mauro

    2004-07-01

    This paper shows the results of research on a debris flow occurring on 4 September 1997 in the territory of Cortina d'Ampezzo (Dolomites, Italy) where it caused a significant threat owing to the intense urban development, typical of several Alpine valleys. The event, which affected the talus fans at the foot of Mt. Pomagagnon near the village of Fiames, blocked the state road no. 51 "Alemagna" and, after sparing some houses, barred the course of the Torrent Boite and formed an impoundment. This debris flow aroused great concern among local authorities and the Belluno Civil Engineers Board; therefore, the construction of embankments for protecting the buildings threatened by the debris flow was started immediately. This area was studied in detail during this research in order to identify the hazard situations of the whole slope. The investigations made use of an integrated approach including historical, geomorphological, geostructural, meteorological, pedological, and forest-management aspects. Furthermore, assessments of the debris volumes potentially removable in the source area were carried out. The geomorphological evolution of the area was reconstructed, pinpointing the morphological changes occurring in the past 45 years. Taking into account the increased frequency and magnitude of recent events and considering the location of roads and buildings in the accumulation area, the risk conditions were analysed in order to identify a risk zonation and to propose mitigation measures.

  14. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E.; Brown, G.O.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with 3 H, 22 Na, 241 Am, 239 Np, 228 Th, 232 U and 241 Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The 3 H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics

  15. Infrared and ultraviolet laser removal of crustose lichens on dolomite heritage stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano (IQFR), CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ascaso, Carmen; Ríos, Asunción de los; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio [Museo Nacional de Ciencia Naturales (MNCN), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Souza-Egipsy, Virginia [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wierzchos, Jacek; Speranza, Mariela [Museo Nacional de Ciencia Naturales (MNCN), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cañamares, Maria Vega [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (ICEM), CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano (IQFR), CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Laser irradiation at 1064 nm (IR) or 355 nm (UV) partially removes epilithic lichens on dolostone. • Irradiation in a sequential, dual IR–UV mode efficiently eliminates lichen thalli. • Dual IR–UV irradiation mode induces severe damage on endolithic colonizers of dolostone. - Abstract: Laser removal of biodeteriogen layers warrants detailed studies due to the advantages it brings with respect to mechanical elimination or the use of biocides. We have investigated elimination of biological crusts on dolomite stones from heritage sites in central Spain. The samples were colonized by epilithic crustose lichens of different species, such as Caloplaca sp. and Verrucaria nigrescens. A comparative study was carried out by applying infrared (1064 nm) and ultraviolet (355 nm) nanosecond laser pulses and sequences pulses of the two wavelengths using a Q-switched Nd:YAG system. To detect anatomical and ultrastructural damage to the lichens, and to assess possible morphological and chemical changes on the underlying stone induced by laser irradiation, we used stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The optimal conditions for removal of the colonization crust, while ensuring preservation of the lithic substrate, were obtained for dual infrared-ultraviolet sequential irradiation.

  16. DOLOMITE DESULFURIZATION BEHAVIOR IN A BUBBLING FLUIDIZED BED PILOT PLANT FOR HIGH ASH COAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. F. Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Although fluidized bed in situ desulphurization from coal combustion has been widely studied, there are aspects that remain under investigation. Additionally, few publications address Brazilian coal desulphurization via fluidized beds. This study used a 250 kWth bubbling fluidized bed pilot plant to analyze different aspects of the dolomite desulphurization of two Brazilian coals. Superficial velocities of 0.38 and 0.46 m/s, flue gas recycling, Ca/S molar ratios and elutriation were assessed. Results confirmed the influence of the Ca/S molar ratio and superficial velocity - SO2 conversion up to 60.5% was achieved for one coal type, and 70.9% was achieved for the other type. A recycling ratio of 54.6% could increase SO2 conversion up to 86.1%. Elutriation and collection of ashes and Ca-containing products did not present the same behavior because a lower wt. % of CaO was collected by the gas controlled mechanism compared to the ash.

  17. Analysis of conditions and the concept of multidirectional revitalization of the dolomite quarry in Siewierz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    The development of mining of rock raw materials in Poland has significantly contributed to economic growth and the quality of life of local communities. However, mining activity, besides a number of positive effects, also implies broadly understood changes in the environment and the formation of brownfields. Reclamation and redevelopment of post-industrial areas, and especially post-mining areas, is currently a huge environmental and socio-economic challenge. Revitalization of post-mining areas is particularly important for small towns and municipalities, where mining was one of the main pillars of development and prosperity. An example of such a municipality is Siewierz in Silesian Voivodship. In the paper analysis the conditions have been conducted and the concept of revitalization of dolomite quarry Górnicze Zakłady Dolomitowe S.A. has been proposed. The AHP method has been used to analyse and select the optimal method of revitalization. As a result of the analysis, the concept of multidirectional revitalization with socially, economically and environmentally beneficial functions has been created, maximizing the potential of the quarry.

  18. Chemical and radiochemical characteristics of groundwater in the Culebra Dolomite, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapmen, J.B.

    1988-03-01

    The nation's first geologic repository for radioactive waste is being excavated in southeastern New Mexico at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Post-closure radioactive release scenarios from WIPP often involve hydrologic transport of radionuclides through the overlying Rustler Formation, in the Culebra Dolomite Member. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has conducted an investigation of the chemistry of culebra groundwater. Analysis revealed the following: salinities in Culebra groundwater generally increase from west to east; a Na-Cl type water dominates over most of the sampled area with a Ca-SO 4 type occurring in the southern to southwestern area; exclusive of the low-salinity southern area, most wells located on the same general flow path have similar ion ratios; dissolved uranium content in Culebra groundwater is relatively high, with marked disequilibrium between U-238 and U-234 activities; Ra-226 and Ra-228 are sometimes present in relatively large amounts; Th-228 was detected in samples from 5 wells; and Cs-137 was detected in several samples. 39 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model

  20. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  1. Dolomitized bryozoan bioherms from the Lower Silurian Manitoulin Formation, Bruce Peninsula, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, A S; Coniglo, M [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    1992-06-01

    Several small, previously undescribed bioherms are present in the shallow shelf dolostones of the Manitoulin Formation at the Cabot Head and Wingfield Basin localities in the northernmost portion of the Bruce Peninsula region of southern Ontario. The bioherms, commonly associated with carbonate tempestites, range from 0.3 to 1.0 m in height and 0.9 to 2.5 m in width and are composed of bafflestones-floatstones and minor bindstones. The chief components of the bioherms are dolomitized lime mud and branching bryozoans. Bioherm building by bryozoans, although common in the ancient record, represents a great divergence from the mostly accessory frame encrusting role of bryozoans in modern environments. Minor skeletal components of the bioherms include echinoderms, rugose and tabulate corals and brachiopods. Laminar encrusting bryozoans exist in the top 10 cm of one of the bioherms. Some of the bioherms show evidence of water agitation that may be the result of current action induced by storm or tidal processes. The occurrence of the bioherms stretches the already known Llandoverian reef complex on Manitoulin Island further to the south. The reason why these bioherms did not reach sizes comparable to large Llandoverian or Wenlockian reefs and did not make the shift to coral-stromaporoid community is probably related to a complex interaction of factors such as community development, bathymetry, clasticity and salinity. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Chabazite and dolomite formation in a dolocrete profile: An example of a complex alkaline paragenesis in Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Zarza, Ana M.; Bustamante, Leticia; Huerta, Pedro; Rodríguez-Berriguete, Álvaro; Huertas, María José

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the weathering and soil formation processes operating on detrital sediments containing alkaline volcanic rock fragments of the Mirador del Río dolocrete profile. The profile consists of a lower horizon of removilised weathered basalts, an intermediate red sandy mudstones horizon with irregular carbonate layers and a topmost horizon of amalgamated carbonate layers with root traces. Formation occurred in arid to semiarid climates, giving place to a complex mineralogical association, including Mg-carbonates and chabazite, rarely described in cal/dolocretes profiles. Initial vadose weathering processes occurred in the basalts and in directly overlying detrital sediments, producing (Stage 1) red-smectites and dolomicrite. Dominant phreatic (Stage 2) conditions allowed precipitation of coarse-zoned dolomite and chabazite filling porosities. In Stages 3 and 4, mostly pedogenic, biogenic processes played an important role in dolomite and calcite accumulation in the profile. Overall evolution of the profile and its mineralogical association involved initial processes dominated by alteration of host rock, to provide silica and Mg-rich alkaline waters, suitable for chabazite and dolomite formation, without a previous carbonate phase. Dolomite formed both abiogenically and biogenically, but without a previous carbonate precursor and in the absence of evaporites. Dominance of calcite towards the profile top is the result of Mg/Ca decrease in the interstitial meteoric waters due to decreased supply of Mg from weathering, and increased supply of Ca in aeolian dust. Meteoric origin of the water is confirmed by C and O isotope values, which also indicate lack of deep sourced CO2. The dolocrete studied and its complex mineral association reveal the complex interactions that occur at surface during weathering and pedogenesis of basalt-sourced rocks.

  3. THE ANISIAN MACROFLORA FROM THE NORTHERN DOLOMITES (KÜHWIESENKOPF/ MONTE PRÀ DELLA VACCA, BRAIES: A FIRST REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN BROGLIO LORIGA

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of Triassic macroflora from the Dolomites mostly concerns the Ladinian, while literature data on Anisian plants are scarce. This gap is filled by the discovery, reported here, of a rich plant deposit from Kühwiesenkopf / Monte Prà della Vacca (Prags/Braies Dolomites. The fossils occur in a horizon, about 1 m thick, from the lower part of the Dont Formation, a basinal unit mostly constituted by hemipelagic, terrigenous-carbonatic sediments of Pelsonian - Illyrian age. The stratigrafic interval with the plant horizon is Pelsonian in age. A preliminary systematic analysis of the numerous and well preserved specimens has allowed the identification of at least 17 genera. The taxa belong primarily to the Pteridophyta (Anomopteris, Neuropteridium, Cladophlebis, Crematopteris, ?Marattiopsis, subordinately to the Cycadophyta (Bjuvia, Taeniopteris, Dioonitocarpidium, Pterophyllum / Nilssonia. Coniferophyta are represented by Voltzia, ?Voltzia and Albertia; the latter genus is recorded herein for the first time in the Middle Triassic of the Dolomites. Besides, two Lycophyta genera (?Isoetites, Lycophyta new taxon, three Pteridospermae genera (?Sagenopteris, Scytophyllum and Peltaspermum, and one Sphenophyta genus (Equisetites have also been recognized.   

  4. Porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone, Bear Creek Valley and Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstrand, P.M.; Menefee, L.S.; Dreier, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    Matrix porosity data from deep core obtained in Bear Creek Valley indicate that porosities in the Maynardville Limestone are lithology and depth dependent. Matrix porosities are greater in the Cooper Ridge Dolomite than in the Maynardville Limestone, yet there is no apparent correlation with depth. Two interrelated diagenetic processes are the major controlling factors on porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; dissolution of evaporate minerals and dedolomitization. Both of these diagenetic processes produce matrix porosities between 2.1 and 1.3% in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and upper part of the Maynardville Limestone (Zone 6) to depths of approximately 600 ft bgs. Mean matrix porosities in Zones 5 through 2 of the Maynardville Limestone range from 0.8 to 0.5%. A large number of cavities have been intersected during drilling activities in nearly all zones of the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley. Therefore, any maynardville Limestone zone within approximately 200 ft of the ground surface is likely to contain cavities that allow significant and rapid flow of groundwater. Zone 6 could be an important stratigraphic unit in the Maynardville Limestone for groundwater flow and contaminant transport because of the abundance of vuggy and moldic porosities. There are large variations in the thickness and lithology in the lower part of the Maynardville (Zones 2, 3, and 4 in the Burial Grounds region). The direction and velocity of strike-parallel groundwater flow may be altered in this area within the lower Maynardville Limestone

  5. The stratigraphy of the Malmani dolomite subgroup in the Carletonville area, Transvaal: genetic implications for lead-zinc mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The geological setting of a borehole intersection of lead-zinc mineralization in the Malmani Dolomite Subgroup in the Carletonville area is discussed. It is suggested that the lead and zinc ions were derived from the overlying shales, transported as bisulphide complexes in silica-enriched, alkaline solutions, and deposited during silicification in the upper part of the dolomite succession which contains relic evaporites. Lead isotope data suggests that the known lead-zinc deposits in the Transvaal sequence are not of major importance. However, the dolomites are regarded as very probable hosts for Mississippi Valley type base metal deposits and offer important exploration targets. This study includes lead isotopic data. Lead isotope compositions and model lead ages for galenas in the zinc deposits are shown. It is concluded that the leads have undergone either a two-stage evolution process, or have mixed with 206 Pb-enriched ores. Model ages suggest that the lead was derived from an approximate 2,7 Ga source and that mineralization took place at 1,7 Ga

  6. The effects of dolomitization on petrophysical properties and fracture distribution within rift-related carbonates (Hammam Faraun Fault Block, Suez Rift, Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneva, I.; Bastesen, E.; Corlett, H.; Eker, A.; Hirani, J.; Hollis, C.; Gawthorpe, R. L.; Rotevatn, A.; Taylor, R.

    2018-03-01

    Petrographic and petrophysical data from different limestone lithofacies (skeletal packstones, matrix-supported conglomerates and foraminiferal grainstones) and their dolomitized equivalents within a slope carbonate succession (Eocene Thebes Formation) of Hammam Faraun Fault Block (Suez Rift, Egypt) have been analyzed in order to link fracture distribution with mechanical and textural properties of these rocks. Two phases of dolomitization resulted in facies-selective stratabound dolostones extending up to two and a half kilometers from the Hammam Faraun Fault, and massive dolostones in the vicinity of the fault (100 metres). Stratabound dolostones are characterized by up to 8 times lower porosity and 6 times higher frequency of fractures compared to the host limestones. Precursor lithofacies type has no significant effect on fracture frequency in the stratabound dolostones. At a distance of 100 metres from the fault, massive dolostones are present which have 0.5 times porosity of precursor limestones, and lithofacies type exerts a stronger control on fracture frequency than the presence of dolomitization (undolomitized vs. dolomitized). Massive dolomitization corresponds to increased fracture intensity in conglomerates and grainstones but decreased fracture intensity in packstones. This corresponds to a decrease of grain/crystal size in conglomerates and grainstones and its increase in packstones after massive dolomitization. Since fractures may contribute significantly to the flow properties of a carbonate rock, the work presented herein has significant applicability to hydrocarbon exploration and production from limestone and dolostone reservoirs, particularly where matrix porosities are low.

  7. Lower Cretaceous Puez key-section in the Dolomites - towards the mid-Cretaceous super-greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, A.; Halásová, E.; Rehákova, D.; Józsa, Š.; Soták, J.; Kroh, A.; Jovane, L.; Florindo, F.; Sprovieri, M.; Giorgioni, M.; Lukeneder, S.

    2012-04-01

    Investigations on different fossil groups in addition to isotopic, paleomagnetic and geochemical analysis are combined to extract the Early Cretaceous history of environmental changes, as displayed by the sea level and climate changes. Results on biostratigraphy are integrated with other dating methods as magnetostraigraphy, correlation and cyclostratigraphy. The main investigation topics of the submitted project within the above-described framework are the biostratigraphic (Lukeneder and Aspmair, 2006, 2012), palaeoecological (Lukeneder, 2008, 2012), palaeobiogeographic, lithostratigraphic (Lukeneder, 2010, 2011), cyclostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic development of the Early Cretaceous in the Puez area. The main sections occur in expanded outcrops located on the southern margin of the Puez Plateau, within the area of the Puez-Geisler Natural Park, in the northern part of the Dolomites (South Tyrol, North Italy). The cephalopod, microfossil and nannofossil faunas and floras from the marly limestones to marls here indicates Hauterivian to Albian/Cenomanian age. Oxygen isotope values from the Lower Cretaceous Puez Formation show a decreasing trend throughout the log, from -1.5‰ in the Hauterivian to -4.5‰ in the Albian/Cenomanian. The decreasing values mirror an increasing trend in palaeotemperatures from ~ 15-18°C in the Hauterivian up to ~25-30 °C in the Albian/Cenomanian. The trend probably indicates the positive shift in temperature induced by the well known Mid Cretaceous Ocean warming (e.g., Super-Greenhouse). The cooperative project (FWF project P20018-N10; 22 international scientists): An integrative high resolution project. Macro- and microfossils, isotopes, litho-, cyclo-, magneto-and biostratigraphy as tools for investigating the Lower Cretaceous within the Dolomites (Southern Alps, Northern Italy) -The Puez area as a new key region of the Tethyan Realm), is on the way since 2008 by the Natural History Museum in Vienna and the 'Naturmuseum S

  8. Experimental plan for tracer testing in the Culebra Dolomite at the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.; Davies, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This Experimental Plan provides a conceptual description of a proposed series of tracer tests to be conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The new tracer tests are intended to address deficiencies that have been identified both in the performance and interpretation of previously conducted tracer tests' Tracer tests were conducted at the H-2 hydropad in 1980, at the H-6 hydropad in 1981, 1982, and 1983, at the H-4 hydropad from 1982 to 1984, at the H-3 hydropad in 1984, and at the H-11 hydropad in 1988. These tests were all performed over the entire 7-m thickness of the Culebra and, therefore, provided no information on the effects of vertical heterogeneity within the Culebra on transport. In addition, each of the previous tracer tests provided data only from 1 to 3 flow paths, allowing calibration of interpretive models but not validation of those models. The tracer tests at the H-3, H-6, and H-11 hydropads have been interpreted using a double-porosity continuum model (SWIFT 11) in which advective transport occurs through a uniform network of fractures while diffusion of tracer from the fractures to the porosity in the rock matrix causes a physical retardation of the transport. External reviewers, particularly participants in the international INTRAVAL program, have suggested that alternative mechanisms, such as fracture channeling, could explain the observed physical retardation and have recommended that additional tracer tests be designed and performed to distinguish among these mechanisms. The previous tracer tests also provided no information on chemical-retardation processes within the Culebra, which have been shown through performance-assessment calculations to have a large impact on cumulative releases of radionuclides from the WIPP to the accessible environment

  9. Wood ash or dolomite treatment of catchment areas - effects of mercury in runoff water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkman, H; Munthe, J [Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    A future increased use of biomass as a source of energy, and the planned restoration of mineral nutrient balance in the forest soils by returning the wood ashes, has led to concern for new environmental disturbances. The objectives of the present study were to investigate if the outflow of total mercury (TotHg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) from catchment areas treated with granulated wood ash (1988, 2.2 tons/ha, `ashed area`) or dolomite (1985, 5 tons/ha, `limed area`) differed from the outflow from an untreated (reference) area, and if variations in Hg outflow were correlated with changes in the outflow of organic substances or pH. The study areas are situated in Vaermland, Sweden. Samples of run-off water were taken weekly or monthly (depending on water-flow) during on year (1993-94). The outflow of MeHg, TotHg as well as H+ and dissolved organic material (DOC) was lower from the limed area compared to the other two areas, which did not differ significantly. There was a strong covariation between concentrations of DOC and MeHg and a weaker relation between DOC and TotHg in the run-off waters. MeHg also covaried with temperature while TotHg covaried with pH and water-supply. No difference was found when comparing Hg-data from the limed area before, directly after and eight years after the liming event. 13 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  10. Compound-Specific Isotope Analyses to Assess TCE Biodegradation in a Fractured Dolomitic Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Justin A; Stotler, Randy L; Frape, Shaun K; Illman, Walter A

    2017-01-01

    The potential for trichloroethene (TCE) biodegradation in a fractured dolomite aquifer at a former chemical disposal site in Smithville, Ontario, Canada, is assessed using chemical analysis and TCE and cis-DCE compound-specific isotope analysis of carbon and chlorine collected over a 16-month period. Groundwater redox conditions change from suboxic to much more reducing environments within and around the plume, indicating that oxidation of organic contaminants and degradation products is occurring at the study site. TCE and cis-DCE were observed in 13 of 14 wells sampled. VC, ethene, and/or ethane were also observed in ten wells, indicating that partial/full dechlorination has occurred. Chlorine isotopic values (δ 37 Cl) range between 1.39 to 4.69‰ SMOC for TCE, and 3.57 to 13.86‰ SMOC for cis-DCE. Carbon isotopic values range between -28.9 and -20.7‰ VPDB for TCE, and -26.5 and -11.8‰ VPDB for cis-DCE. In most wells, isotopic values remained steady over the 15-month study. Isotopic enrichment from TCE to cis-DCE varied between 0 and 13‰ for carbon and 1 and 4‰ for chlorine. Calculated chlorine-carbon isotopic enrichment ratios (ϵ Cl /ϵ C ) were 0.18 for TCE and 0.69 for cis-DCE. Combined, isotopic and chemical data indicate very little dechlorination is occurring near the source zone, but suggest bacterially mediated degradation is occurring closer to the edges of the plume. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  11. Norovirus outbreak caused by a new septic system in a dolomite aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Alexander, E.C.; Kolberg, R.J.; Alexander, S.C.; Archer, John R.; Braatz, L.A.; Forest, B.M.; Green, J.A.; Spencer, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Septic systems that are built in compliance with regulations are generally not expected to be the cause of groundwater borne disease outbreaks, especially in areas with thick vadose zones. However, this case study demonstrates that a disease outbreak can occur in such a setting and outlines the combination of epidemiological, microbiological, and hydrogeological methods used to confirm the source of the outbreak. In early June 2007, 229 patrons and employees of a new restaurant in northeastern Wisconsin were affected by acute gastroenteritis; 6 people were hospitalized. Epidemiological case-control analysis indicated that drinking the restaurant's well water was associated with illness (odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 0.9 to 11.4, P = 0.06). Microbiological analysis (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) measured 50 genomic copies per liter of norovirus genogroup I in the well water. Nucleotide sequencing determined the genotype as GI.2 and further showed the identical virus was present in patrons' stool specimens and in the septic tank. Tracer tests using dyes injected at two points in the septic system showed that effluent was traveling from the tanks (through a leaking fitting) and infiltration field to the well in 6 and 15 d, respectively. The restaurant septic system and well (85-m deep, in a fractured dolomite aquifer) both conformed to state building codes. The early arrival of dye in the well, which was 188 m from the septic field and located beneath a 35-m thick vadose zone, demonstrates that in highly vulnerable hydrogeological settings, compliance with regulations may not provide adequate protection from fecal pathogens.

  12. Geodermatophilus poikilotrophi sp. nov.: A Multitolerant Actinomycete Isolated from Dolomitic Marble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Montero-Calasanz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel Gram-reaction-positive, aerobic actinobacterium, tolerant to mitomycin C, heavy metals, metalloids, hydrogen peroxide, desiccation, and ionizing- and UV-radiation, designated G18T, was isolated from dolomitic marble collected from outcrops in Samara (Namibia. The growth range was 15–35°C, at pH 5.5–9.5 and in presence of 1% NaCl, forming greenish-black coloured colonies on GYM Streptomyces agar. Chemotaxonomic and molecular characteristics of the isolate matched those described for other representatives of the genus Geodermatophilus. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diaminoacid. The main phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and small amount of diphosphatidylglycerol. MK-9(H4 was the dominant menaquinone and galactose was detected as diagnostic sugar. The major cellular fatty acids were branched-chain saturated acids iso-C16:0 and iso-C15:0 and the unsaturated C17:1ω8c and C16:1ω7c. The 16S rRNA gene showed 97.4–99.1% sequence identity with the other representatives of genus Geodermatophilus. Based on phenotypic results and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G18T is proposed to represent a novel species, Geodermatophilus poikilotrophi. Type strain is G18T (= DSM 44209T = CCUG 63018T. The INSDC accession number is HF970583. The novel R software package lethal was used to compute the lethal doses with confidence intervals resulting from tolerance experiments.

  13. Stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow: An example from the Copper Ridge Dolomite in East Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.; Ketelle, D.

    1987-01-01

    The Copper Ridge Dolomite of the Upper Cambrian Knox Group underlies a site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for a below ground waste disposal facility. The Copper Ridge was studied for DOE to understand the influence of lithology on deep groundwater flow. Three facies types are distinguished which comprise laterally continuous, 1 to 4 m thick rock units interpreted to represent upward-shallowing depositional cycles having an apparently significant effect on groundwater flow at depth. Rock core observations indicate one of the recurring facies types is characterized by thin to medium-bedded, fine-grained dolostone with planar cryptalgal laminae and thin shaley partings. Distinctive fracturing in this facies type, that may have resulted from regional structural deformation, it considered to be responsible for weathering at depth and the development of stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow. In addition, geophysical data suggest that one occurrence of this weathered facies type coincides with an apparent geochemical interface at depth. Geophysical data also indicate the presence of several fluid invasion horizons, traceable outside the study area, which coincide with the unweathered occurrence of this fine-grained facies type. The subcropping of recurrent zones of preferred groundwater flow at the weathered/unweathered interface may define linear traces of enhanced aquifer recharge paralleling geologic strike. Vertical projection of these zones from the weathered/unweathered rock interface to the ground surface may describe areas of enhanced infiltration. Tests to determine the role of stratigraphic controls on groundwater flow are key components of future investigations on West Chestnut Ridge. 14 refs., 13 figs

  14. Muddy and dolomitic rip-up clasts in Triassic fluvial sandstones: Origin and impact on potential reservoir properties (Argana Basin, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henares, Saturnina; Arribas, Jose; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Viseras, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    The significance of rip-up clasts as sandstone framework grains is frequently neglected in the literature being considered as accessory components in bulk sandstone composition. However, this study highlights the great value of muddy and dolomitic rip-up clast occurrence as: (a) information source about low preservation potential from floodplain deposits and (b) key element controlling host sandstone diagenetic evolution and thus ultimate reservoir quality. High-resolution petrographic analysis on Triassic fluvial sandstones from Argana Basin (T6 and T7/T8 units) highlights the significance of different types of rip-up clasts as intrabasinal framework components of continental sediments from arid climates. On the basis of their composition and ductility, three main types are distinguished: (a) muddy rip-up clasts, (b) dolomitic muddy rip-up clasts and (c) dolomite crystalline rip-up clasts. Spatial distribution of different types is strongly facies-related according to grain size. Origin of rip-up clasts is related to erosion of coeval phreatic dolocretes, in different development stages, and associated muddy floodplain sediments. Cloudy cores with abundant inclusions and clear outer rims of dolomite crystals suggest a first replacive and a subsequent displacive growth, respectively. Dolomite crystals are almost stoichiometric. This composition is very similar to that of early sandstone dolomite cement, supporting phreatic dolocretes as dolomite origin in both situations. Sandstone diagenesis is dominated by mechanical compaction and dolomite cementation. A direct correlation exists between: (1) muddy rip-up clast abundance and early reduction of primary porosity by compaction with irreversible loss of intergranular volume (IGV); and (2) occurrence of dolomitic rip-up clasts and dolomite cement nucleation in host sandstone, occluding adjacent pores but preserving IGV. Both processes affect reservoir quality by generation of vertical and 3D fluid flow baffles and

  15. SEDIMENTOLOGY, MINERALOGY AND ORIGIN OF THE FIRST DISCOVER MAGNESITE-DOLOMITE BELT IN MA'RIB DISTRICT, SW ARABIAN PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa’ad Zeki A.kader AL-MASHAIKIE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnesite mineralization of high purity was discovered and described herein for the first time from metamorphosed folded belt from Al-Thanyiah locality in Rub’Al-Khali sector, 360 km east of Sana’a City, northwest Yemen. The magnesite-metamorphic belt, belonging to the Precambrian/Neoproterozoic age? comprises thrust belt, which trends generally N-S direction.Magnesite mineralization was identified in an extended carbonate-metamorphic belt for several tens of kilometers cf. 31 km and occurred in association with 8 stratigraphic units. The thicknesses of pure magnesite bearing units are variable and ranges from 20 to 60 m. associated with dark green chlorite-schist with intersecting huge ultrabasic intrusions.Geochemical, mineralogical and petrographic analysis show that the magnesite concentrations in the stratigraphic units are ranging from 78% up to high purity of 99.6% cf. 35 to 48.9% MgO, with minor dolomite and calcite respectively. Little to rare content of talc and brucite were also recognized. Two thick, productive and high purity magnesite beds, the first is of 40 m thick and the second is 60 m in thickness, which reveals more than 95% MgCO3 and considered to be economic. The suggested origin of the magnesite mineralization is coming from high stress of regional metamorphism associated with ultramafic intrusions cf. amphibolite and harzburgite associated with diagenetic solutions rich in Mg2+, associated with the heat of magma. The alteration of dolomite to magnesite was formed by multiple phases to transform calcite and/or dolomite to magnesite.

  16. Preliminary magnetostratigraphy and environmental magnetism of the Lower Cretaceous from the Italian Dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savian, J. F.; Jovane, L.; Florindo, F.; Lukeneder, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous (~146 to 100 Ma) represents an enigmatic time interval for paleoclimatic, paleogeography and paleomagnetic evolution of the Earth's history. The climatic changes include global oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), biotic changes, global excursions of carbon and strontium isotopes, rises in eustatic sea level and paleotemperature. Paleoceanography was marked by a rapid rate of ocean spreading in the Atlantic. The opening of the Atlantic Ocean was wide enough to allow significant circulation of masses of waters across the equator. This period is furthermore important for the oceanographic events occurring at the base of the Aptian (Selli Level). This period also present one of the most intriguing geomagnetic events: the long normal Cretaceous superchron, lasted for almost 40 million years. We study here the lower Cretaceous deposits of the Puez section in the Dolomites (northern Italy) which represents a continuous section during this period. The samples collected represent marine sedimentary materials of the Biancone and Puez formations. The Puez section consists essentially of green-grey to red limestones and calcareous marls. We present preliminary results of integrated magnetostratigraphic analysis, including a detailed lithostratigraphy and environmental magnetism. We recognize magnetic behavior that are relative to normal polarity (the normal Cretaceous superchron), with a short reverse interval that might represent the M-1r event. We also recognize a series of normal and reverse polarities (below the normal Cretaceous superchron) which can be referred to the magnetozones M1/M5. The environmental magnetic data consists of magnetic susceptibility (χ), natural remanent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) at 900 mT and backfield isothermal remanent magnetization (BIRM) at 100 mT and 300 mT. Derived parameters, such as S-ratio (S300=BIRM300/IRM900) and hard isothermal remanent

  17. Three dimensional modeling of depositional geometries. A case study from Tofane Group (Dolomites, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattolin, G.; Franceschi, M.; Breda, A.; Teza, G.; Preto, N.

    2012-04-01

    At the end of the Early Carnian, the Carnian Pluvial Event (CPE) resulted in a major crisis of carbonate factories. The sharp change in carbonate production lead to a dramatic modifications in depositional geometries. Steep clinoforms of the high-relief pre-crisis carbonate platforms were replaced by low-angle ramps. Spatial characters of depositional geometries can be decisive in identifying the genesis of geological bodies. We here show how 3D modeling techniques can be applied to help in quantifying and highlighting their variations. As case study we considered two outcrops in the Tofane Group (Dolomites, Italy). The first outcrop (bottom of southern walls of Tofana di Rozes) exposes a platform-to-basin transect of pre- and post-crisis platforms, the second (Dibona hut) a clinostratified carbonate body deposited during the Carnian crisis. Outcrop conditions at both sites, with vertical and hardly accessible walls, make the field tracing of depositional geometries particularly challenging. Line drawing on high resolution pictures can help (e.g. for clinoforms), but its use for quantification is hampered by perspective deformation. Three dimensional acquisition and modeling allow to retrieve the true spatial characters of sedimentary bodies in these outcrops. The geometry of the carbonate body at Dibona (~ 15000 sqm) was acquired with terrestrial LiDAR, while for Tofana photogrammetric techniques were applied because of the extension of the outcrop itself (~ 240000 sqm) and the lack of suitable points of view for terrestrial laser scanning. At Tofana, field observations reveal the presence of tens-hundreds m large carbonate mounds grown on a pre-existing inclined surface, intercalated with skeletal carbonates and siltites-arenites. This system rapidly evolves into a carbonate-clastic ramp. Photogrammetric topography acquisition permitted to place and visualize geological features in a three dimensional frame, thus obtaining a conceptual sedimentological model. A 3

  18. In Developping a Bench-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor to Burn High Ash Brazilian Coal-Dolomites Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Behainne, Jhon Jairo; Hory, Rogério Ishikawa; Goldstein, Leonardo; Bernárdez Pécora, Araí Augusta

    This work considers some of the questions in burning high ash Brazilian coal-dolomite mixtures in a bench-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). Experimental tests were performed with the CE4500 coal from Santa Catarina State, in southern Brazil, with a Sauter mean diameter d p =43 μm. The coal particles were mixed with dolomite particles of d p = 111 μm and this fuel mixture was fed into the circulating fluidized reactor, previously loaded with quartz sand particles of d p =353 μm. This inert material was previously heated by the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas up to the ignition temperature of the fuel mixture. The CFBC unit has a 100mm internal diameter riser, 4.0m high, as well as a 62.8mm internal diameter downcomer. The loop has a cyclone, a sampling valve to collect particles and a 62.8mm internal diameter L-valve to recirculate the particles in the loop. A screw feeder with a rotation control system was used to feed the fuel mixture to the reactor. The operational conditions were monitored by pressure taps and thermocouples installed along the loop. A data acquisition system showed the main operational conditions to control. Experimental tests performed put in evidence the problems found during bed operation, with special attention to the solids feed device, to the L-valve operation, to particle size, solids inventory, fluidized gas velocity, fuel mixture and recirculated solids feeding positions.

  19. POTENTIALLY UNSTABLE SLOPE ABOVE ORE PROCESSING PLANT IN THE "OČURA" DOLOMITE QUARRY (LEPOGLAVA, NORTH CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Braun

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex engineering investigation, in the nearest surroun-dig of the conditionally stable high slope, close to ore processing facilities in the dolomite quarry »Očura« near Lepoglava (North Croatia, was carried out. Studying the tectonic features of the rock mass, discontinuities referent to the slope stability, was found out. Rock fragment size was measured and data processed using statistical design. According to rock fragment mean values, velocity of the longitudinal seismic waves was predicted. This values was compared with velocities of the longitudinal seismic waves, determined using gcophisical refraction seismic method. Physical and mechanical properties of the dolomite rock mass, considering longitudinal and transversal seismic wave velocities, and »RMR«-classification was assesed. All the results indicate, that the slope above the ore processing facilities should be consider as conditionally stable, with real probability to get unstable under the vibrations caused by blasting, during the exploitation in the field, close behind the investigated slope (the paper is published in Croatian.

  20. Ocean acidification does not affect magnesium composition or dolomite formation in living crustose coralline algae, Porolithon onkodes in an experimental system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, M. C.; Uthicke, S.; Negri, A. P.; Cantin, N. E.

    2015-09-01

    There are concerns that Mg-calcite crustose coralline algae (CCA), which are key reef builders on coral reefs, will be most susceptible to increased rates of dissolution under higher pCO2 and ocean acidification. Due to the higher solubility of Mg-calcite, it has been hypothesised that magnesium concentrations in CCA Mg-calcite will decrease as the ocean acidifies, and that this decrease will make their skeletons more chemically stable. In addition to Mg-calcite, CCA Porolithon onkodes, the predominant encrusting species on tropical reefs, can have dolomite (Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3) infilling cell spaces which increases their stability. However, nothing is known about how bio-mineralised dolomite formation responds to higher pCO2. Using P. onkodes grown for 3 and 6 months in tank experiments, we aimed to determine (1) if mol % MgCO3 in new crust and new settlement was affected by increasing CO2 levels (365, 444, 676 and 904 μatm), (2) whether bio-mineralised dolomite formed within these time frames, and (3) if so, whether this was effected by CO2. Our results show that there was no significant effect of CO2 on mol % MgCO3 in any sample set, indicating an absence of a plastic response under a wide range of experimental conditions. Dolomite within the CCA cells formed within 3 months and dolomite abundance did not vary significantly with CO2 treatment. While evidence mounts that climate change will impact many sensitive coral and CCA species, the results from this study indicate that reef-building P. onkodes will continue to form stabilising dolomite infill under near-future acidification conditions, thereby retaining its higher resistance to dissolution.

  1. Age and geochemistry of the Newania dolomite carbonatites, India: implications for the source of primary carbonatite magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Shukla, Anil D.; Rai, Vinai K.; Kumar, Alok; Awasthi, Neeraj; Smitha, R. S.; Panda, Dipak K.

    2013-12-01

    The Newania carbonatite complex of India is one of the few dolomite-dominated carbonatites of the world. Intruding into Archean basement gneisses, the rocks of the complex have undergone limited diversification and are not associated with any alkaline silicate rock. Although the magmatic nature of the complex was generally accepted, its age of emplacement had remained equivocal because of the disturbed nature of radioisotope systems. Many questions about the nature of its mantle source and mode of origin had remained unanswered because of lack of geochemical and isotopic data. Here, we present results of our effort to date the complex using 147Sm-143Nd, 207Pb-206Pb and 40Ar-39Ar dating techniques. We also present mineral chemistry, major and trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic ratio data for these carbonatites. Our age data reveal that the complex was emplaced at ~1,473 Ma and parts of it were affected by a thermal event at ~904 Ma. The older 207Pb-206Pb ages reported here (~2.4 Ga) and by one earlier study (~2.3 Ga; Schleicher et al. Chem Geol 140:261-273, 1997) are deemed to be a result of heterogeneous incorporation of crustal Pb during the post-emplacement thermal event. The thermal event had little effect on many magmatic signatures of these rocks, such as its dolomite-magnesite-ankerite-Cr-rich magnetite-magnesio-arfvedsonite-pyrochlore assemblage, mantle like δ13C and δ18O and typical carbonatitic trace element patterns. Newania carbonatites show fractional crystallization trend from high-Mg to high-Fe through high-Ca compositions. The least fractionated dolomite carbonatites of the complex possess very high Mg# (≥80) and have similar major element oxide contents as that of primary carbonatite melts experimentally produced from peridotitic sources. In addition, lower rare earth element (and higher Sr) contents than a typical calcio-carbonatite and mantle like Nb/Ta ratios indicate that the primary magma for the complex was a magnesio

  2. Identification of spatial variability and heterogeneity of the Culebra dolomite at the waste isolation pilot plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Culebra dolomite is an heterogeneous, locally fractured medium whose transmissivity varies over seven orders of magnitude in the vicinity of the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico, USA. The spatial distribution of hydraulic properties within the Culebra has been defined by performing 150 hydraulic tests at 41 well locations. Different scales of tests are performed to provide data for different purposes. Small-scale tests such as drillstem tests and slug tests, and intermediate-scale pumping tests provide point data useful in developing initial parameters for numerical modeling. Large-scale pumping tests provide information on the distribution of fractures between widely spaced wells, and also provide data for model calibration. Tracer tests provide data on transport mechanisms needed for transport modeling. 7 figs.; 16 refs

  3. Cyclic platform dolomites and platform-to-basin transition of Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), southwest Montana and east-central Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    The Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) in southwestern Montana consists of cyclic sequences of shallow marine platformal dolomites that grade westward into slope/basinal facies in east-central Idaho. Regional sedimentologic characteristics of slope facies in Idaho indicate that the Jefferson platform resembled a distally steepened ramp. Slope facies consist of slope laminites with local small scale slumps and slope breccias. Shallow water platform-derived clasts are lacking in the slope breccias. Individual shallowing upward platform cycles are 25 m to < 1 m thick and consists of, in descending order: local solution-collapse breccia caps; cryptalgal dolomudstone; rare ooid dolograinstone; thin-bedded Amphipora dolowackestone; coarsely crystalline dolostones with abundant lenticular to domal stromatoporoids; and basal thin-bedded, fine-grained, shale dolostones with closely spaced hard-grounds that grade upward into burrow-homogenized, irregularly bedded dolostones.

  4. Identification of spatial variability and heterogeneity of the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Culebra dolomite is a heterogeneous, locally fractured medium whose transmissivity varies over seven orders of magnitude in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in southeastern New Mexico, USA. The spatial distribution of hydraulic properties within the Culebra has been defined by performing 150 hydraulic tests at 41 well locations. Different scales of tests are performing 150 hydraulic tests at 41 well locations. Different scales of tests are performed to provide data for different purposes. Small-scale tests such as drillstem tests and slug tests, and short, intermediate-scale pumping tests provide point data useful in developing initial parameters for numerical modeling. Large-scale pumping tests provide information on the distribution of fractures between widely spaced wells, and also provide data for model calibration. Tracer tests provide data on transport mechanisms needed for transport modeling. 16 refs., 7 figs

  5. Hydrothermal zebra dolomite in the Great Basin, Nevada--attributes and relation to Paleozoic stratigraphy, tectonics, and ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Hofstra, A.H.; Koenig, A.E.; Emsbo, P.; Christiansen, W.; Johnson, Chad

    2010-01-01

    In other parts of the world, previous workers have shown that sparry dolomite in carbonate rocks may be produced by the generation and movement of hot basinal brines in response to arid paleoclimates and tectonism, and that some of these brines served as the transport medium for metals fixed in Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) and sedimentary exhalative (Sedex) deposits of Zn, Pb, Ag, Au, or barite. Numerous occurrences of hydrothermal zebra dolomite (HZD), comprised of alternating layers of dark replacement and light void-filling sparry or saddle dolomite, are present in Paleozoic platform and slope carbonate rocks on the eastern side of the Great Basin physiographic province. Locally, it is associated with mineral deposits of barite, Ag-Pb-Zn, and Au. In this paper the spatial distribution of HZD occurrences, their stratigraphic position, morphological characteristics, textures and zoning, and chemical and stable isotopic compositions were determined to improve understanding of their age, origin, and relation to dolostone, ore deposits, and the tectonic evolution of the Great Basin. In northern and central Nevada, HZD is coeval and cogenetic with Late Devonian and Early Mississippian Sedex Au, Zn, and barite deposits and may be related to Late Ordovician Sedex barite deposits. In southern Nevada and southwest California, it is cogenetic with small MVT Ag-Pb-Zn deposits in rocks as young as Early Mississippian. Over Paleozoic time, the Great Basin was at equatorial paleolatitudes with episodes of arid paleoclimates. Several occurrences of HZD are crosscut by Mesozoic or Cenozoic intrusions, and some host younger pluton-related polymetallic replacement and Carlin-type gold deposits. The distribution of HZD in space (carbonate platform, margin, and slope) and stratigraphy (Late Neoproterozoic Ediacaran-Mississippian) roughly parallels that of dolostone and both are prevalent in Devonian strata. Stratabound HZD is best developed in Ediacaran and Cambrian units, whereas

  6. Effectiveness factors for a commercial steam reforming (Ni) catalyst and for a calcined dolomite used downstream biomass gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J; Narvaez, I; Orio, A [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1997-12-31

    A commercial steam reforming catalyst from BASF, the G1-25 S one, and a calcined dolomite, Norte-1, from Cantabria-Spain, have been used, once crushed and sieved to different particle fractions between 1.0 and 4.0 mm. The materials have been tested downstream small pilot biomass gasifiers, bubbling fluidized bed type, gasifying with air and with steam. The Thiele modulus and the effectiveness factor have been calculated at temperatures of 750-850 deg C. It is experimentally shown that diffusion control plays an important part when particle size is larger than ca. 0.5 mm. This has to be taken into account when comparing the quality of the solids for tar elimination. (author) (5 refs.)

  7. Effectiveness factors for a commercial steam reforming (Ni) catalyst and for a calcined dolomite used downstream biomass gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    A commercial steam reforming catalyst from BASF, the G1-25 S one, and a calcined dolomite, Norte-1, from Cantabria-Spain, have been used, once crushed and sieved to different particle fractions between 1.0 and 4.0 mm. The materials have been tested downstream small pilot biomass gasifiers, bubbling fluidized bed type, gasifying with air and with steam. The Thiele modulus and the effectiveness factor have been calculated at temperatures of 750-850 deg C. It is experimentally shown that diffusion control plays an important part when particle size is larger than ca. 0.5 mm. This has to be taken into account when comparing the quality of the solids for tar elimination. (author) (5 refs.)

  8. Representation of spatial variability for modelling of flow and transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite at the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigs, L.C.; Beauheim, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a proposed repository for transuranic wastes constructed in bedded Permian-acre halite deposits in southeastern New Mexico, USA. Site-characterization studies at the WIPP site identified groundwater flow in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation as the most likely Geologic pathway for radio nuclide transport to the accessible environment in the event of a breach of the WIPP repository through inadvertent human intrusion. The Culebra is a 7-m-thick, variably fractured dolomite with massive and layers. Detailed studies at all scales demonstrated that the Culebra is a heterogeneous medium. Heterogeneity in Culebra properties was incorporated into numerical simulations used for data interpretation and PA calculations in different ways, depending on the amount of data available, the certainty with which the effects of a given approach could be evaluated, and the purpose of the study. When abundant, spatially distributed data were available, the heterogeneity was explicitly included. For example, a stochastic approach was used to generate numerous, equally likely, heterogeneous transmissivity fields conditioned on head and transmissivity data. In other cases, constant parameter values were applied over the model domain. These constant values were selected and applied in two different ways. In simple cases where a conservative bounding value could be identified that would not lead to unrealistically conservative results, that value was used for all calculations. In more complex cases, parameter distributions were developed and single values of the parameters were sampled from the distributions and applied across the entire model domain for each of the PA Monte Carlo simulations. We are currently working to refine our understanding of the multiple rates of diffusion attributable to small-scale spatial variability

  9. The genesis of the ore hosting 'dolomitic marble' in the Bayan Obo deposit, Inner Mongolia, China: constrained by isotopic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Tiping; Tian Shihong; Wang Defang; Jiang Shaoyong; Bai Ruimei

    2003-01-01

    The Bayan Obo Fe-REE-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, China is a super large REE deposit. This deposit attracts attentions of many geologists and geochemists for its unique geological characters and geotectonic background. However, there are quite a number of controversies on various aspects of its genesis, such as when the ore deposit was formed, where the ore forming materials came from and what conditions and geotectonic environment the deposit was formed. Among them, the genesis of ore bearing 'dolomitic marble' is a focus point of debating. isotopic methods are important tools for study on ore deposits. Therefore, supplemental stable isotope investigation was undertaken in this study to reach more information on the forming conditions of 'dolomitic marble'. The high contents of REE and Nb, the REE distribution pattern, the low initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio and low δ 30 Si values of trace silica in 'dolomitic marble' all indicate its magmatic origin. The high δ 18 O values of carbonate and silicate minerals, and the relatively high δ 34 S values indicate that this rock had experienced isotopic exchange with sea water, implying their submarine volcanic origin. The δ 13 C values observed in carbonate and silicate minerals can also be explained by carbonatite assimilated by oceanic carbonate. Therefore, based on its isotopic characters, the 'dolomitic marble' is more likely of volcanic carbonatite rock formed during middle Proterozoic era. (authors)

  10. Petrophysical characterization of the Dolomitic Member of the Boñar Formation (Upper Cretaceous; Duero Basin, Spain) as a potential CO2 reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Gonzalez, A.; Kovacs, C.; Herrero-Hernandez, A.; Gomez-Fernandez, F.

    2016-07-01

    Boñar Formation (Upper Cretaceous) is a mainly carbonate succession, which outcrops in the North of Duero Basin (Spain). According to the existing data, the Dolomitic Member of this formation appears to be the most suitable for geological storage of CO2. The main objective of this study is to find evidence to support, clarify and specify –at an initial level– the potential of the Dolomitic Member of the Boñar Formation as a geological reservoir. The study covers density, porosity and permeability tests on samples obtained from the outcrop of the succession near the village of Boñar (León). According to the analysis and interpretation of the mentioned petrophysical properties, the porosity of the Dolomitic Member is within the acceptable range for CO2 geological storage, but the permeability values are far too low. This minimizes the possibilities of the Dolomitic Member –and probably of the whole Boñar Formation– to become an appropriate CO2 reservoir. (Author)

  11. Examining the interplay of climate and low amplitude sea-level change on the distribution and volume of massive dolomitization: Zebbag Formation, Cretaceous, Southern Tunisia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newport, Richard; Hollis, Cathy; Bodin, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    During the Cretaceous, a humid global climate, calcitic seas, high relative sea-level and low amplitude changes in relative sea-level largely prevented large-scale dolomitization in many carbonate successions. However, the well-exposed shallow-water carbonate sediments of the Upper Albian–Lower T...

  12. Siliciclastics in the Upper Triassic dolomite formations of the Krizna Unit (Maid Fatra Mountains, Western Carpathians): constraints for the Carnian Pluvial Event in the Fatric Basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, M.; Siblík, Miloš; Soták, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2011), s. 121-138 ISSN 1335-0552 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Carnian event * Upper Triassic dolomites * Western Carpathians * Krizna Unit * shaly interbeds * lingulids * conchostracans Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.787, year: 2011

  13. Cyclic carbonation calcination studies of limestone and dolomite for CO{sub 2} separation from combustion flue gases - article no. 011801

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthoorselvan, S.; Gleis, S.; Hartmut, S.; Yrjas, P.; Hupa, M. [TUM, Garching (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Naturally occurring limestone and dolomite samples, originating from different geographical locations, were tested as potential sorbents for carbonation/calcination based CO{sub 2} capture from combustion flue gases. Samples have been studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer under simulated flue gas conditions at three calcination temperatures, viz., 750{sup o}C, 875{sup o}C, and 930{sup o}C for four carbonation calcination reaction (CCR) cycles. The dolomite sample exhibited the highest rate of carbonation than the tested limestones. At the third cycle, its CO{sub 2} capture capacity per kilogram of the sample was nearly equal to that of Gotland, the highest reacting limestone tested. At the fourth cycle it surpassed Gotland, despite the fact that the CaCO{sub 3} content of the Sibbo dolomite was only 2/3 of that of the Gotland. Decay coefficients were calculated by a curve fitting exercise and its value is lowest for the Sibbo dolomite. That means, most probably its capture capacity per kilogram of the sample would remain higher well beyond the fourth cycle. There was a strong correlation between the calcination temperature, the specific surface area of the calcined samples, and the degree of carbonation. It was observed that the higher the calcination temperature, the lower the sorbent reactivity. For a given limestone/dolomite sample, sorbents CO{sub 2} capture capacity depended on the number of CCR cycles and the calcination temperature. According to the equilibrium thermodynamics, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the calciner should be lowered to lower the calcination temperature. This can be achieved by additional steam supply into the calciner. Steam could then be condensed in an external condenser to single out the CO{sub 2} stream from the exit gas mixture of the calciner. A calciner design based on this concept is illustrated.

  14. Empirical Calibration for Dolomite Stoichiometry Calculation: Application on Triassic Muschelkalk- Lettenkohle Carbonates (French Jura Calibration empirique pour le calcul de la stoechiométrie de la dolomite : application aux carbonates triasiques du Muschelkalk-Lettenkohle (Jura français

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turpin M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns an approach for dolomite quantification and stoichiometry calculation by using X-ray diffractometry coupled with cell and Rietveld refinements and equipped with a newly substantial database of dolomite composition. A greater accuracy and precision are obtained for quantifying dolomite as well as other mineral phases and calculating dolomite stoichiometry compared to the classical “Lumsden line” and previous methods. The applicability of this approach is verified on dolomite reference material (Eugui and on Triassic (Upper Muschelkalk-Lettenkohle carbonates from the French Jura. The approach shown here is applicable to bulk dolostones as well as to specific dolomite cements and was combined with petrographical and isotopic analyses. Upper Muschelkalk dolomites were formed during burial dolomitization under fluids characterized by increased temperature and variable isotopic composition through burial. This is clear from their Ca content in dolomites which gradually approaches an ideal stoichiometry (from 53.16% to 51.19% through increasing dolomitization. Lettenkohle dolostones consist of near-ideal stoichiometric (51.06%Ca and well-ordered dolomites associated with anhydrite relicts. They originated through both sabkha and burial dolomitization. This contribution gives an improved method for the characterization of different dolomite types and their distinct traits in sedimentary rocks, which allows a better evaluation of their reservoir potential. Cette étude propose une approche pour la quantification de la dolomite et le calcul de sa stoechiométrie grâce à l’utilisation de la diffraction des rayons X couplée aux affinements de maille et de Rietveld et complétée par de nombreuses données issues de la littérature. Elle permet d’obtenir une meilleure justesse et précision pour la quantification de la dolomite (et des autres phases minérales ainsi que pour le calcul de sa stoechiométrie par rapport à l

  15. Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2006-09-30

    This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point

  16. Reactivity of dolomite in water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide: Significance for carbon capture and storage and for enhanced oil and gas recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuyu; Alvarado, Vladimir; Swoboda-Colberg, Norbert; Kaszuba, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dolomite reactivity with wet and dry supercritical CO 2 were evaluated. ► Dolomite does not react with dry CO 2 . ► H 2 O-saturated supercritical CO 2 dissolves dolomite and precipitates carbonate mineral. ► Temperature/reaction time control morphology and extent of carbonate mineralization. ► Reaction with wet CO 2 may impact trapping, caprock integrity, and CCS/EOR injectivity. - Abstract: Carbon dioxide injection in porous reservoirs is the basis for carbon capture and storage, enhanced oil and gas recovery. Injected carbon dioxide is stored at multiple scales in porous media, from the pore-level as a residual phase to large scales as macroscopic accumulations by the injection site, under the caprock and at reservoir internal capillary pressure barriers. These carbon dioxide saturation zones create regions across which the full spectrum of mutual CO 2 –H 2 O solubility may occur. Most studies assume that geochemical reaction is restricted to rocks and carbon dioxide-saturated formation waters, but this paradigm ignores injection of anhydrous carbon dioxide against brine and water-alternating-gas flooding for enhanced oil recovery. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to evaluate the reactivity of the common reservoir mineral dolomite with water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide. Experiments were conducted at reservoir conditions (55 and 110 °C, 25 MPa) and elevated temperature (220 °C, 25 MPa) for approximately 96 and 164 h (4 and 7 days). Dolomite dissolves and new carbonate mineral precipitates by reaction with water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide. Dolomite does not react with anhydrous supercritical carbon dioxide. Temperature and reaction time control the composition, morphology, and extent of formation of new carbonate minerals. Mineral dissolution and re-precipitation due to reaction with water-saturated carbon dioxide may affect the contact line between phases, the carbon dioxide contact angle, and the

  17. Effective porosity and density of carbonate rocks (Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite) within Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation based on modern petrophysical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsch, J.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide quantitative data on effective porosity of carbonate rock from the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite within Bear Creek Valley based on modern petrophysical techniques. The data will be useful for groundwater-flow and contaminant-flow modeling in the vicinity of the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Furthermore, the data provides needed information on the amount of interconnected pore space potentially available for operation of matrix diffusion as a transport process within the fractured carbonate rock. A second aspect of this study is to compare effective porosity data based on modern petrophysical techniques to effective porosity data determined earlier by Goldstrand et al. (1995) with a different technique. An added bonus of the study is quantitative data on the bulk density and grain density of dolostone and limestone of the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite which might find use for geophysical modeling on the ORR

  18. Removal of SO2 with particles of dolomite limestone powder in a binary fluidized bed reactor with bubbling fluidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pisani Jr.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, SO2 was treated by reaction with dolomite limestone (24 µm in a fluidized bed reactor composed of 500-590 µm sand particles. The influence of operating temperature (500, 600, 700 and 800ºC, superficial gas velocity (0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 m/s and Ca/S molar ratio (1, 2 and 3 on SO2 removal efficiency for an inlet concentration of 1000 ppm was examined. Removal of the pollutant was found to be dependent on temperature and Ca/S molar ratio, particularly at 700 and 800ºC. A maximum removal of 76% was achieved at a velocity of 0.8 m/s, a temperature of 800°C and a Ca/S of 3. The main residence time of the powder particles was determined by integrating normalized gas concentration curves as a function of time; the values found ranged from 4.1 to 14.4 min. It was concluded that the reactor operated in bubbling fluidization under every operational condition.

  19. Changes in ground beetle assemblages above and below the treeline of the Dolomites after almost 30 years (1980/2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzolotto, Roberto; Gobbi, Mauro; Brandmayr, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the changes of ground beetle assemblages in the last few decades in the Alps, and different responses to climate change of animal populations living above and below the treeline have not been estimated yet. This study focuses on an altitudinal habitat sequence from subalpine spruce forest to alpine grassland in a low disturbance area of the southeastern Dolomites in Italy, the Paneveggio Regional Park. We compared the ground beetle (Carabidae) populations sampled in...

  20. Scrap tire pyrolysis using a new type two-stage pyrolyzer: Effects of dolomite and olivine on producing a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Gyung-Goo; Oh, Seung-Jin; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Scrap tire pyrolysis was performed using a two-stage pyrolyzer consisting of an auger reactor and a fluidized bed reactor to produce a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the effect of the residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor was investigated at ∼300 (auger reactor) and 500 °C (fluidized bed reactor). In addition, natural dolomite and olivine and calcined dolomite and olivine were used as the fluidized bed materials to examine their effects on reducing the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the yields of the oil from the auger reactor were 1.4–3.7 wt%, and it was enriched with DL-limonene whose content in the oil was 40–50 wt%. The yields of the oil from the fluidized bed reactor were 42–46 wt%. The optimum residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor turned out to be 3.5 min. Calcined dolomite and olivine significantly decreased the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. Metal oxides of the additives appeared to react with H_2S to form metal sulfides. The sulfur content of pyrolysis oil obtained with calcined olivine was 0.45 wt%. - Highlights: • Scrap tires were successfully pyrolyzed in a new type two-stage pyrolyzer. • The two-stage pyrolyzer is composed of an auger and fluidized bed reactors. • Calcination of olivine and dolomite led to a strong decrease in sulfur. • The lowest sulfur content of pyrolysis oil was 0.45 wt%. • Pyrolysis oil yields from the fluidized bed reactor were 43–46 wt%.

  1. Investigation of the interaction of Greek dolomitic marble with metal aqueous solutions using Rutherford backscattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godelitsas, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Misaelides, P.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of dolomitic marble from Thassos Island (northern Aegean sea, Greece) with Co 2+ -, Cd 2+ -, Pb 2+ - and Cr 3+ - aqueous solutions (metal concentration: 1000 mgL -1 ) was investigated using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The initial material as well as the interaction products were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), radioisotope induced X-ray fluorescence analysis (RI-XRFA), powder X-ray diffraction (Powder-XRD) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). The contact time of the samples with the aqueous solutions was one week and took place under ambient temperature. To our knowledge, the sorption of the above mentioned metals with dolomite (CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 ) has not yet been presented in the literature and the only data available concern the adsorption of Ca, Mg and Nd from NaCl solutions. The Thassos island dolomitic marble is a snow-white homogeneous carbonate metamorphic rock, with fine physicochemical and mechanical properties, currently used as natural building stone in many parts of the world (see http://www.thassosmarble.com), This dolomite-bearing material was also extensively used in the past as construction material of many .classical Greek and Roman sculptures and architectural elements; in 301 AD the Roman emperor Diocletian included 'Thassian marble' in the list of the 19 most expensive and important 'marbles' produced in the imperial quarries. Previous literature presented the isotopic analysis(δ 13 C, δ 18 O) and EPR studies (Mn 2+ and Fe 3+ ) of this stone. The obtained results indicated a limited Cd 2+ - and Co 2+ -sorption on the dissolved surface of the carbonate substrate, whereas, under the same experimental conditions, the Pb 2+ - and Cr 3+ -interaction is more intense leading to extended overgrowth of crystalline Pb-carbonates and surface precipitation of amorphous Cr-hydroxides/oxyhydroxides.

  2. Fault-related dolomitization in the Vajont Limestone (Southern Alps, Italy): photogrammetric 3D outcrop reconstruction, visualization with textured surfaces, and structural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio; Mozafari, Mahtab; Swennen, Rudy; Solum, John; Taberner, Conxita

    2013-01-01

    The Vajont Gorge (Dolomiti Bellunesi, Italy) provides spectacular outcrops of Jurassic limestones (Vajont Limestone Formation) in which Mesozoic and Alpine faults and fracture corridors are continuously exposed. Some of these faults acted as conduits for fluids, resulting in structurally-controlled dolomitization of the Vajont Limestone, associated with significant porosity increase. We carried out a 3D surface characterization of the outcrops, combining high resolution topography and imaging...

  3. Application, advantages and limitations of high-density gravimetric surveys compared with three-dimensional geological modelling in dolomite stability investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Breytenbach, I J; Bosch, P J A

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the nature of the gravimetric survey as applied and used in dolomite stability investigations on areas underlain by the Chuniespoort Group in South Africa. A short discussion is given on the gravimetric survey procedure along with its uses and alternative methods. Finally, two case studies illustrate the application of the method on a high-density survey grid spacing in comparison with three-dimensional geological modelling based on the lithology and karst weathering hor...

  4. Effect of H{sub 2}S on the catalytic decomposition of tar and ammonia with dolomite and sintered iron ore in synthetic gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepola, J [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The toluene-decomposing activity of calcined dolomite was not affected by the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas. Iron was active with respect to toluene and ammonia at metallic state. The increase of the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas (0 - 500 ppmv) decreased the tar-decomposing activity but not the ammonia- decomposing activity of sintered iron ore. (author) (12 refs.)

  5. Effect of H{sub 2}S on the catalytic decomposition of tar and ammonia with dolomite and sintered iron ore in synthetic gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepola, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The toluene-decomposing activity of calcined dolomite was not affected by the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas. Iron was active with respect to toluene and ammonia at metallic state. The increase of the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas (0 - 500 ppmv) decreased the tar-decomposing activity but not the ammonia- decomposing activity of sintered iron ore. (author) (12 refs.)

  6. The issue of personal safety on dolomite: A probability-based evaluation with respect to transient passage in a city centre

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsten, H A D; Heath, G J; Venter, I S; Oosthuizen, A C

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT For the past fifty years empirical knowledge guided the development of rules regarding population density on dolomite land. The insatiable demand for land, the improvement in transportation infrastructure and the associated need for improving the functionality of towns require that these rules on the risk of personal injury and damage to assets are revisited from a more scientific perspective. Probability theory provides a basis for decision-making in this regard. SANS 1936:2012 defi...

  7. Optimal processing conditions for a dolomite cracker for cracking of tar from gasification of biomass fuels. Optimale procesbetingelser for en dolomitkrakker til krakning af tjaere fra forgasning af biobraendsler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fjellerup, J.

    1989-08-15

    Gasification of fuels derived from biomass is of interest in connection with combined cycle systems. During gasification tar compounds can be produced, and these can block further stages of the process. As gas turbines are very sensitive to tar compounds it is necessary to remove the tar completely from the gas. The most effective method appears to be catalytic cracking and it is suggested that dolomite is an effective and cheap catalysator. Based on a survey of relevant literature, the aim was to discover optimal conditions for the process of dolomite cracking. It is concluded that it is important to decarbonate the dolomite before use, that dolomite is not suitable for use in fluidized beds as it can become eroded and is subsequently very quickly blown out, and that it is important to hold the temperature at a level of ca. 800 deg. C. Conditions for fixed bed cracking both with and without steam are also desderibed. (AB) 15 refs.

  8. Strontium geochemistry and carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of Lower Proterozoic dolomite and calcite marbles from the Marmorilik Formation, West Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garde, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Marmorilik Formation, Rinkian mobile belt, West Greenland, is a large, Lower Proterozoic carbonate-rock sequence, deformed and metamorphosed under greenschist to amphibolite facies conditions. The pre-deformation thickness of the sequence is at least 2000 m, with about 1400 m of dolomite marble and 350 m of calcite marble. Strontium contents of forty-two dolomite and calcite marbles range from 30 to 100 ppm and 300 to 800 ppm, respectively, whereas samples with calcite of secondary origin have strontium contents between 80 ppm and 200 ppm. Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were determined for forty calcite and dolomite marbles as -0.2+-1.0 per 1000 delta 13 C and -9.9+-1.5 per 1000 delta 18 O (vs. PDB) and are compatible with the isotopic compositions of unmetamorphosed carbonates of similar age. Calcite from eight calciumsilicate rocks, breccias and calcite veins is significantly more negative in delta 13 C and delta 18 O. Five 13 C analyses of graphite in marble range from -9.6 to -14 per 1000. Possible post-depositional changes in the strontium content and carbon and oxygen isotope compositions are discussed. It is concluded that (a) the calcite marbles are not dedolomites and are therefore of primary origin, (b) the delta 13 C and delta 18 O values of the marbles are primary or diagenetic (i.e., pre-metamorphic), and (c) the isotopic composition of the graphite is compatible with, though not necessarily evidence for, a biogenic origin. (Auth.)

  9. The determination of lead, zinc, and magnesium in dolomite and its benefication products by use of x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken on the development of fast, simple, and accurate methods of analysis for lead and zinc in tailings and middlings from dolomite, and for lead, zinc, and magnesium in concentrates obtained from dolomite. A pressed-powder technique and X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) were used. Good agreement was found between the XRFS values for lead and zinc in low concentrations and the values obtained by other techniques of analysis when the calibration for the XRFS method was effected by the use of synthetic standards comprising lead and zinc oxides in a dolomite matrix. For high concentrations of the analytes, all the oxides and sulphides of lead and zinc in the samples had to be converted to the sulphate form, and a matrix correction had to be applied to the assigned values of the oxide calibration standards. The lower limits of detection for lead, zinc, and magnesium were 0,004, 0,003, and 0,18 per cent respectively. The recommended methods are detailed in two appendices

  10. Dolomitization of carbonated reservoirs of platforms. From geologic data to modeling. Example of the great Bahama bank; La dolomitisation des reservoirs carbonates de plate-forme. Des donnees geologiques a la modelisation. Exemple du Grand Banc des Bahamas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspard, E.

    2002-09-01

    Dolomitization has long been one of the most studied geological processes because of its economic interest (dolomitic rocks form a significant share of hydrocarbon reservoirs) as well as its academic interest, based on the fact that dolomite scarcely forms in current and recent marine environments whereas seawater is highly over-saturated; and that it is still not possible to synthesize it in laboratory under the same conditions. We used data collected by the University of Miami (Bahamas Drilling Project, ODP Leg 166) to understand the geological context of complete dolomitization of a Messinian 60 m thick reef unit. Classical methods of petrographic analysis of thin sections (optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, in situ isotopic analyze using ionic microprobe) showed that the intensity of dolomitization is not controlled by the initial texture of the sediment, that the key parameter for dolomitization is the conservation of the initial mineralogy of magnesian bio-clasts, and that redox conditions, salinity and/or temperature of the precipitation fluid varied significantly during the process. Hydrodynamic modelling showed that during periods of high sea-level, Kohout thermal convection is a viable mechanism for driving marine fluids through the sediments. The key parameter for fluid circulations is the permeability anisotropy on the platform scale. Geochemical modelling showed that seawater is able to induce a complete dolomitization over durations of around one million years. Sensitivity tests showed that the critical parameter (as well as one of the less well-known) to describe diagenetic processes in carbonates is the water/rock reactions kinetics and in particular the precipitation kinetics of carbonate minerals. We finally propose that the dolomitization of the reef unit of the Unda well took place during the high sea-level period which extended over 1,1 My in the early Pliocene, according to the Kohout thermal convection

  11. Evaluation of hybrid neutralization/biosorption process for zinc ions removal from automotive battery effluent by dolomite and fish scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, C; Scheufele, F B; Alves, H J; Kroumov, A D; Espinoza-Quiñones, F R; Módenes, A N; Borba, C E

    2018-02-26

    This work focused in the evaluation of Oreochromis niloticus fish scales (FS) as biosorbent material in the removal of Zn from a synthetic effluent based on automotive battery industry effluent and, further, a hybrid neutralization/biosorption process, aiming at a high-quality treated effluent, by a cooperative use of dolomite and FS. For this, a physicochemical and morphological characterization (i.e. SEM-EDX, FTIR, XRD, and TXRF) was performed, which helped to clarify a great heterogeneity of active sites (phosphate, carbonate, amide, and hydroxyl) on the biosorbent; also the inorganic constituents (apatites) leaching from the FS was identified. Biosorption results pointed out to a pH-dependent process due to changes in the functional group's anionic character (i.e. electrostatic interactions), where an initial pH = 3 favored the Zn uptake. Kinetic and equilibrium studies confirmed the heterogeneous surface and cooperative sorption, wherein experimental data were described by Generalized Elovich kinetic model and the favorable isotherm profile by Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm ([Formula: see text] = 15.38 mg g -1 and [Formula: see text]). Speciation diagram of Zn species along with the leached species demonstrated that, for the studied pH range, the biosorption was the most likely phenomena rather than precipitation. Finally, the hybrid neutralization/biosorption process showed great potential since both the Zn concentration levels and the pH reached the legislation standards (C Zn  = 4 mg L -1 ; pH = 5). Hence, based on the characterization and biosorption results, a comprehensive evaluation of the involved mechanisms in such complex system helped to verify the prospective of FS biosorbent for the Zn treatment from solution, in both individual and hybrid processes.

  12. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts

  13. Analysis of pumping tests of the Culebra dolomite conducted at the H-11 hydropad at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation was hydrologically evaluated in a series of pumping tests conducted at the H-11 hydropad at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. At H-11, the Culebra dolomite is a 25-ft thick argillaceous dolomite with 0.1- to 0.5-foot thick layers with a high density of vugs. The vugs range in size from 0.1 to 0.5 inches in diameter; most are 0.1 to 0.2 inches in diameter. The thin vuggy layers alternate with thicker, more competent layers which have few vugs, but which do contain high-angle fractures. Some of the vugs and fractures are gypsum-filled. Three pumping tests consisted of 12- to 21-hour pumping periods at each of the three wells, while using the other two wells at the hydropad as observation wells. An additional pumping test was conducted at H-11b3 with H-11b1 and H-11b2 as observation wells. The test was a 32-day multirate test with four pumping and recovery periods. The original tests were conducted by lowering a submersible pump and pressure transducers in the boreholes. The additional test added a downhole packer with feed-through assembly designed to isolate the test interval and reduce or minimize the effect of wellbore storage. The data from all tests were recorded and stored on floppy disks. The pumping tests at the H-11 hydropad were analyzed with the INTERPRET reservoir-analysis software. 46 refs., 46 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Nitrogen Dynamics Along a Headwater Stream Draining a Fen, Swamp, and Marsh in a Fractured Dolomite Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, T. P.; Waddington, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Stream-wetland interaction has been shown to have a significant effect on nutrient cycling and downstream water quality. Additionally, connection to regional groundwater systems can dilute or enrich stream water with a number of dissolved constituents. This study demonstrates the resultant downstream change in dissolved nitrogen species as a hardwater stream emerges from a calcareous aquifer and traverses a calcareous fen, a cedar swamp, and a cattail marsh over two growing seasons, a very dry 2006 and a very wet 2007. Upon emergence at a number of groundwater seeps, the water contained appreciable nitrate levels averaging 2.72±0.42 mg NO3-N L-1, minimal organic nitrogen, and ammonium below detectable levels. Through the gently sloping calcareous fen, with a stream residence time of ~ 5 hours, NO3-N concentration decreases of 0.35 mg L-1 were observed. Concomitantly, stream recharge into the dolomite bedrock depressed stream discharge values significantly, further removing nitrate from the stream system. This resulted in the fen-bedrock system acting as an estimated net sink of 432 kg of NO3-N in the early summer of 2007, for example. In contrast, the hydrological-biogeochemical systems became decoupled through the swamp during the same period, where concentrations increased from 2.58±0.34 mg L-1 entering the swamp to 2.65±0.58 mg L-1 exiting, but streamflow decreased in general by 5 L s- 1. This resulted in the swamp, with its large depression storage, acting as a small net sink of nitrate (75 kg through the early summer), which would not be detected simply from concentration changes. The concentration-discharge relation realigned through the marsh, where significant groundwater entered the wetland, increasing both concentration and discharge, yielding a small export of 93 kg over the same time period. A series of tracer injections in each wetland type will be presented to compare the streamflow- concentration patterns with the measured nutrient spiralling

  15. THE PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONVIRONMENT OF THE UPPER TRIASSIC DOLOMITIC-MARLY SEQUENCE OF DOGNA VALLEY (UDINE, FRIULI-VENEZIA GIULIA, NE ITALY WITH REPTILE TRACKWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUIDO ROGHI

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available New data and considerations about the biostratigraphy and the palaeoenvironment of a section in the Late Triassic dolomitic-marly sequence which crops out in the Dogna valley (Udine, Friuli, NE Italy are reported. In particular a unit with a surface bearing tracks of archosauromorph terrestrial reptiles has been investigated. In the layer immediately overlaying the track-bearing one, a rich palynological assemblage with Enzonalasporites vigens; Vallasporites ignacii, Patinasporites densus, Zonalasporites cinctus, Pseudoenzonalasporites summus, Samaropollenites speciosus, Camerosporites secatus and Partitisporites spp. was found, indicating a Tuvalian age (Late Carnian . Microfloral and sedimentological evidence indicate a dry climate and a coastal depositional environment subject to repeated emersions.   

  16. INFLUENCE OF THE TECTONIC FABRIC ON THE OPEN PIT DESING IN THE ¨ZAPREŠIČKI IVANEC¨ NEAR ZAGREB DOLOMITE QUARRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Braun

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available In the »Zaprešički Ivanec« dolomite open pit near Zagreb, exploitation is carried out according to data obtained by analysis of the tectonic fabric of the rock massif, by measurement of the longitudinal seismic waves velocity, and effects of the seismic waves provoked blasting. In this article the fundamental data obtained by structural analysis and measurements with their influence on the pit design and the optimization of blasting conditions, are reviewed. Results of the longtime exploitation verify such complex aproach to deposit work-out (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Investigation of the interaction of Greek dolomitic marble with metal aqueous solutions using rutherford backscattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godelitsas, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Misaelides, P.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of Greek dolomitic marble (from Thassos island, northern Greece) with Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cr 3+ containing aqueous solutions was studied by characterizing the surface of the solid experimental samples, using a combination of spectroscopic, microscopic, and diffraction techniques (RBS, XPS, SEM-EDS, FT-IR, powder-XRD). The obtained results indicated a considerable Cd 2+ and Co 2+ sorption on the dissolved surface of the carbonate substrate, whereas, under the same experimental conditions, the Pb 2+ and Cr 3+ interaction is more intense leading to extended overgrowth of crystalline Pb 2+ carbonates and massive surface precipitation of amorphous Cr 3+ hydroxide/oxyhydroxide. (author)

  18. The Ranero Hydrothermal Dolomites (Albian, Karrantza Valley, Northwest Spain: Implications on Conceptual Dolomite Models Les dolomies hydrothermales de Ranero (Albien, vallée de la Karrantza, nord-ouest de l’Espagne : conséquences sur les modèles génétiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader F.H.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Field characteristics, petrographic and geochemical signatures, as well as some petrophysical aspects of fault-related dolomite bodies in the Ranero area (Karrantza Valley, NW Spain are presented in this paper. These dolomite bodies are hosted by Albian slope to platform carbonates, which were deposited in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin. Replacive and void-filling dolomite phases – postdating palaeo- and hypogene karstification – are interpreted to have originated from hydrothermal fluid pulses, and are spatially related with faults and fractures. Hydrothermal calcite cements pre- and postdate dolomitization. Mineralogical and geochemical investigations (XRD, ICP-MS/OES, XRF, stable and Sr isotopes helped in distinguishing various dolomite and calcite phases. Dolomite phases can be grouped into ferroan (early and non-ferroan (late. Dolomites are generally stoichiometric and exhibit a broad range of depleted δ18O values (–18.7 to –10.5‰ V-PDB, which advocate for multiphase dolomitization and/or recrystallization at relatively high temperatures (150-200°C. The observation that bed-parallel stylolites pre- and post-date dolomites suggests that dolomitization occurred during the Late Albian regional tectonic activity and related fluid expulsions. Based on carbonate chemistry, authigenic silicate chemistry and replacement relationships, two contrasting types of dolomitizing fluids are inferred. Both arguably may have initiated as sulphatedominated brines and/or basin compactional fluids, but they seemingly undergo sulphate reduction in contact with host rocks of contrasting compositions (Fe-rich silicate vs Fe-poor carbonate thus evolving either to acidic and ferroan (limestone replacive or to neutral, Fe-poor and sulfidic (Fe-dolomite replacive. Fluid drives are not well constrained by our data, but both fluid types are focused along major faults that cross cut the platform edge and are associated with diapir tectonics. Les modalités de

  19. Radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAMSEY, JAMES L.; BLAINE,R.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SMITH,L.N.; WALLACE,M.

    2000-05-22

    The following topics related to radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, and (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty. The presented results indicate that radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite does not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, no radionuclide transport to the boundary with the accessible environment was observed; thus the associated CCDFs for comparison with the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194) are degenerate in the sense of having a probability of zero of exceeding a release of zero.

  20. Analysis of holding time variations to Ni and Fe content and morphology in nickel laterite limonitic reduction process by using coal-dolomite bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Fakhreza; Pintowantoro, Sungging; Yuwandono, Ridwan Bagus

    2018-04-01

    With the depletion of nickel sulfide ore resources, the nickel laterit processing become an attention to fulfill nickel world demans. Reducing laterite nickel by using a low cost carbonaceous reductan has proved produces high grade ferronickel alloy. In this research, reduction was carried out to low grade laterite nickel (limonite) with 1.25% nikel content by using CO gas reductant formed by reaction between coal and dolomite. Reduction process preceded by forming brickets mixture from limonit ore, coal, and Na2SO4, then the brickets placed inside crucible bed together with dolomit and reduced at temperature 1400 °C with holding time variations 4, 6, and 8 hours. EDX, XRD, and SEM test were carried out to find out the Ni and nickel grade after reduced, the phases that formed, and the morphology brickets after reduced. The reduction results shows that the highest increase on nickel grade was obtained by 8 hours holding time increasing 5.84 % from initial grade, and the highest recovery was obtained by 6 hours holding time with recovery 88.51 %. While the higest increase on Fe grade was obtained by 4 hours holding time, and the highest recovery Fe was obtained by 4 hours holding time with recovery 85.41%.

  1. Assessing the effects of soil liming with dolomitic limestone and sugar foam on soil acidity, leaf nutrient contents, grape yield and must quality in a Mediterranean vineyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olego, M.A.; Visconti, F.; Quiroga, M.J.; Paz, J.M. De; Garzón-Jimeno, E.

    2016-11-01

    Aluminium toxicity has been recognized as one of the most common causes of reduced grape yields in vineyard acid soils. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two liming materials, i.e. dolomitic lime and sugar foam, on a vineyard cultivated in an acid soil. The effects were studied in two soil layers (0-30 and 30-60 cm), as well as on leaf nutrient contents, must quality properties and grape yield, in an agricultural soil dedicated to Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Mencía’ cultivation. Data management and analysis were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). As liming material, sugar foam was more efficient than dolomitic limestone because sugar foam promoted the highest decrease in soil acidity properties at the same calcium carbonate equivalent dose. However, potassium contents in vines organs, including leaves and berries, seemed to decrease as a consequence of liming, with a concomitant increase in must total acidity. Soil available phosphorus also decreased as a consequence of liming, especially with sugar foam, though no effects were observed in plants. For these reasons fertilization of this soil with K and P is recommended along with liming. Grape yields in limed soils increased, although non-significantly, by 30%. This research has therefore provided an important opportunity to advance in our understanding of the effects of liming on grape quality and production in acid soils. (Author)

  2. Carbonatitic liquids and COH fluids from epidote-dolomite eclogites at 3.7 - 4.6 GPa: new perspectives on carbon transfer at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, S.

    2013-12-01

    Current knowledge on the solidus temperature for carbonate-bearing rocks suggests that carbonatitic liquids should not form in a subducted oceanic lithosphere, unless anomalous thermal relaxation occurs. For a mildly warm subduction path, COH-bearing basaltic eclogites are expected to loose all H2O component at epidote breakdown, located at approx. 2.8-3.0 GPa. Above this pressure limit, the solidus is that of a carbonated basaltic eclogite which shows a minimum temperature of 1020 °C at 4.0-4.5 GPa (Dasgupta et al. 2004). However, the oceanic crust includes a range of gabbroic rocks, altered on rifts and transforms, with large amounts of An-rich plagioclase. It has been shown that epidote disappearance with pressure depend on the normative anorthite content of the bulk composition considered (Poli et al. 2009); we therefore expect that altered gabbros might display a much wider pressure range where epidote persists, potentially affecting the solidus relationships. Notably, this applies to epidosite rocks formed in hydrothermal environments at oceanic settings, then recovered in high-pressure and ultra-high pressure terrains. New experimental data from 3.7 to 4.6 GPa, 750°C to 1000 °C are intended to unravel the effect of variable bulk and volatile compositions in model eclogites, enriched in the normative anorthite component (An37 and An45). Experiments are performed in piston cylinder and multianvil machines apparatus, using both single and, buffered, double capsule techniques. Garnet, clinopyroxene and coesite form in all syntheses. Lawsonite was found to persist at 3.7 GPa, 750 °C, with both dolomite and magnesite; at 3.8 GPa, 775-800 °C, fluid saturated conditions, epidote coexists with kyanite, dolomite and magnesite. The anhydrous assemblage garnet, omphacite, aragonite, kyanite is found at 4.2 GPa, 850 °C. At 900 °C, fluid-rich conditions, a silicate fluid/melt of granitoid composition, a carbonatitic melt and Na-carbonate are observed. Close to

  3. Polyphase tertiary fold-and-thrust tectonics in the Belluno Dolomites: new mapping, kinematic analysis, and 3D modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistolini, Filippo; Bistacchi, Andrea; Massironi, Matteo; Consonni, Davide; Cortinovis, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The Belluno Dolomites are comprised in the eastern sector of the Southern Alps, which corresponds to the fold-and-thrust belt at the retro-wedge of the Alpine collisional orogen. They are characterized by a complex and polyphase fold-and-thrust tectonics, highlighted by multiple thrust sheets and thrust-related folding. We have studied this tectonics in the Vajont area where a sequence of Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary units have been involved in multiple deformations. The onset of contractional tectonics in this part of the Alps is constrained to be Tertiary (likely Post-Eocene) by structural relationships with the Erto Flysch, whilst in the Mesozoic tectonics was extensional. We have recognized two contractional deformation phases (D1 and D2 in the following), of which only the second was mentioned in previous studies of the area and attributed to the Miocene Neoalpine event. D1 and D2 are characterized by roughly top-to-WSW (possibly Dinaric) and top-to-S (Alpine) transport directions respectively, implying a 90° rotation of the regional-scale shortening axis, and resulting in complex thrust and fold interference and reactivation patterns. Geological mapping and detailed outcrop-scale kinematic analysis allowed us to characterize the kinematics and chronology of deformations. Particularly, relative chronology was unravelled thanks to (1) diagnostic fold interference patterns and (2) crosscutting relationships between thrust faults and thrust-related folds. A km-scale D1 syncline, filled with the Eocene Erto Flysch and "decapitated" by a D2 thrust fault, provides the best map-scale example of crosscutting relationships allowing to reconstruct the faulting history. Due to the strong competence contrast between Jurassic carbonates and Tertiary flysch, in this syncline spectacular duplexes were also developed during D2. In order to quantitatively characterize the complex interference pattern resulting from two orthogonal thrusting and folding events, we

  4. Hydrothermal Dolomites in the Early Albian (Cretaceous Platform Carbonates (NW Spain: Nature and Origin of Dolomites and Dolomitising Fluids Dolomies hydrothermales présentes dans les carbonates de la plate-forme albienne précoce (Crétacé; NO de l’Espagne : nature et origine des dolomies et des fluides dolomitisants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M.M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the temporal and lateral variation in petrographic and geochemical signatures of fault-related dolomite bodies in the Ranero and El-Moro areas (Karrantza valley, Cantabrian mountains; NW Spain. These dolomite bodies are hosted in Albian carbonates, which were deposited in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin as a result of an intense rift-related subsidence with associated faulting along various orientations. Fluid circulations generated replacive and cement dolomites, paragenetically followed by various calcite cements. Petrography, mineralogical and geochemical investigations (XRD, ICP, XRF, stable and Sr isotopes helped in distinguishing hydrothermal stages. Two major dolomite facies were observed according to their Fe-content. Early dolomites are ferroan and replace limestone more significantly than the later, non ferroan dolomites. Dolomites are generally stoichiometric (49.76 to 51.59 M% CaCO3 and exhibit a broad range of depleted δ18O values (–18.7 to –10.5‰ V-PDB, which may indicate multiphase dolomitisation and/or different degrees of recrystallisation. Decreasing δ18O values correlate with decreasing Fe content in dolomites. In the Ranero area, dolomites show less slightly depleted δ13C values (–0.15 to +2.13‰ V-PDB relative to the host limestone δ13C signature, while these values are substantially more depleted in El-Moro area (down to –2.18‰ V-PDB. Hydrothermal calcites predating dolomitisation show less depleted δ18O values (–14.15 to –12.1‰ V-PDB than postdolomitisation calcite (–18.1‰ V-PDB. Sr isotope data suggest that the fluids interacted with siliciclastic lithologies (sandstone, shale. The dolomite fabric is variably altered through dedolomitisation and cataclastic deformation. Dolomitisation occurred in at least two main episodes. A first episode of pervasive ferroan dolomitisation probably resulted from compactional dewatering of basinal fluids from the nearby Basque trough and

  5. Late-stage anhydrite-gypsum-siderite-dolomite-calcite assemblages record the transition from a deep to a shallow hydrothermal system in the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burisch, Mathias; Walter, Benjamin F.; Gerdes, Axel; Lanz, Maximilian; Markl, Gregor

    2018-02-01

    The majority of hydrothermal vein systems of economic interest occur at relatively shallow crustal levels, although many of them formed at significantly greater depths. Their present position is a consequence of uplift and erosion. Although, many aspects of their formation are well constrained, the temporal chemical evolution of such systems during uplift and erosion is still poorly understood. These vein minerals comprise calcite, dolomite-ankerite, siderite-magnesite, anhydrite and gypsum forming the last gangue assemblages in Jurassic and Tertiary sulphide-fluorite-quartz-barite veins of the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany. Mineral textures of samples from nine localities reveal that in these sequences, mineral precipitation follows a recurring pattern: early calcite is followed by anhydrite or gypsum, siderite and/or dolomite. This succession may repeat up to three times. In-situ (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb age dating of 15 carbonates from three subsequent generations of the late-stage vein assemblage yield robust ages between 20 and 0.6 Ma. Each mineral sequence forms in a distinctive period of about 2-5 Ma. These ages clearly relate these late-stage mineral phases to the youngest geological episode of the Schwarzwald, which is associated with the Cenozoic Rhine Graben rifting and basement uplift. Based on thermodynamic modelling, the formation of the observed mineral assemblages required an deeply sourced Mg-, Fe- and SO4-rich fluid (b), which was episodically mixed with a shallow crustal HCO3-rich fluid (a). As a consequence of fluid mixing, concentrations of Mg, Fe and SO4 temporarily increased and initiated the formation of the observed sulphate-carbonate mineral sequences. This discontinuous large-scale vertical fluid mixing was presumably directly related to episodes of active tectonics associated with the Cenozoic strike-slip regime of the Upper Rhine Graben. Analogously, episodic fluid mixing is a major key in the formation of older (Jurassic to early

  6. Differences in the rheological properties of calcitic and dolomitic lime slurries: influence of particle characteristics and practical implications in lime-based mortar manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizzi, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the rheological properties of lime suspensions is a useful means to evaluate the workability of lime mortars. In this work, we studied the flow behaviour of two industrial hydrated limes, one of calcitic and the other of dolomitic composition, by means of two types of rheometer with different geometry and setup mode. The obtained results were interpreted taking into account the differences in microstructure and surface properties of the suspended particles. Calcitic lime dry particles are formed by angular and polydisperse clusters and, once dispersed in water, they behave like thixotropic materials. On the other hand, the dolomitic lime is formed by nanoparticles and small round cluster and it shows a pronounced plastic behaviour in suspension. This fundamental difference between the two materials explains the traditional preference for dolomitic lime mortars for plastering and rendering applications.

    El estudio de las propiedades reológicas de suspensiones de cal es una herramienta muy útil para evaluar la trabajabilidad de morteros de cal. En este trabajo se ha estudiado el comportamiento en suspensión de dos cales hidratadas, de composición calcítica y dolomítica, mediante dos tipos de reómetros con geometría y modalidades distintas de medida. Los resultados obtenidos se han interpretado teniendo en cuenta las diferencias en la microestructura y las propiedades de superficie de las partículas en suspensión. Las partículas de cal calcítica están formadas por aglomerados angulares y polidispersos y, una vez dispersadas en agua, presentan un comportamiento tixotrópico. Por su parte, la cal dolomítica está formada por nanopartículas y pequeños agregados redondeados y muestra en suspensión un pronunciado comportamiento plástico. Esta importante diferencia entre las dos cales explica la preferencia tradicional de morteros de cal dolomítica para aplicaciones en revocos.

  7. Impact of shallowly deposited ore-bearing dolomites on local soil pollution aureoles of As, Cd, Pb, and Zn in an old mining area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabijanczyk, Piotr; Zawadzki, Jaroslaw [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Environmental Engineering Faculty

    2012-10-15

    The study area, located in Upper Silesian Industrial Region, was rich in significant amounts of ores that were classified of Mississippi Valley type. Being these ores especially rich in Pb and Zn, an intense development of mining and ore extraction industry was verified in this area. The goal of this study was to investigate how local pollution aureoles of As, Cd, Pb, and Zn were influenced by the presence of shallowly deposited ore-bearing dolomites. Very extensive sampling campaign was carried out, and over 1,000 samples were collected in the area of about 150 km{sup 2}. Local aureoles of investigated metals were calculated for two soil layers. The first one covered the part of soil core from the soil surface to the depth of 20 cm and the second one from the depth of 40 cm to the depth of 60 cm. All spatial distributions of particular metals in soil were calculated by means of ordinary kriging using free softwares QGIS and SAGA. Maximum concentrations of Pb and Zn in soil in study area were very high, reaching over 24,000 and 77,000 mg/kg, respectively. Maximum concentrations of As and Cd were also very high, reaching about 1,000 mg/kg. Those maximum values were observed in the direct vicinity of the Boles?aw mine and its mine dumps. Almost all local aureoles were located within the range of ore-bearing dolomites. It was especially visible for Pb and Zn, minerals very common in ore deposits. Otherwise, local aureoles of As and Cd were more related with the vicinity of mines and other pollution sources, being more associated to the anthropogenic pollution than to the presence of ore-bearing dolomites. The aureoles of Pb and Zn, and in moderate degree of As, were associated with a mineral composition of ores. Differently, the location, the shape, and spatial pattern of Cd aureoles suggest that they were mostly influenced by anthropogenic pollution. Anthropogenic factors were dominating over the lithogenic ones and masking the influence of the shallowly deposited

  8. Analysis of hydraulic tests of the Culebra and Magenta Dolomites and Dewey Lake Redbeds conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.; Ruskauff, G.J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted at 15 well locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico between 1980 and 1996. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes arising form the nation`s defense programs. The WIPP repository lies within bedded halite of the Salado Formation, 2,155 ft below ground surface. The tests reported herein were, with two exceptions, conducted in the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation, which overlies the Salado Formation. The remaining tests were conducted in the Magenta Member of the Rustler and in the overlying formation, the Dewey Lake Redbeds. This report completes the documentation of hydraulic-test interpretations used as input to the WIPP Compliance Certification Application (US DOE, 1996).

  9. Patterns of traffic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollution in mountain areas can be revealed by lichen biomonitoring: a case study in the Dolomites (Eastern Italian Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbene, Juri; Tretiach, Mauro; Corana, Federica; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Kodnik, Danijela; Dainese, Matteo; Mannucci, Barbara

    2014-03-15

    In mountain areas of touristic interest the evaluation of the impact of human activities is crucial for ensuring long-term conservation of ecosystem biodiversity, functions and services. This study aimed at verifying the biological impact of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions due to traffic along the roads leading to seven passes of the Dolomites (SE Alps), which were recently declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Thalli of the epiphytic lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea, collected at increasing distances from the roads, were used as biomonitors. Our study revealed a gradient of decreasing PAH pollution within 300 m from the roads. Differences among passes were evident mainly for samples collected nearest to the roads, but PAH concentrations at 300 m were almost always higher than those of undisturbed reference sites, indicating that traffic PAH pollution may impact natural ecosystems and lichen diversity at relatively long distances from the emission source. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Order-disorder-reorder process in thermally treated dolomite samples: a combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, A.; Comodi, P.; Katerinopoulou, A.; Balic-Zunic, T.; McCammon, C.; Frondini, F.

    2012-04-01

    A combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] heated to 1,200°C at 3 GPa was made to study the order-disorder-reorder process. The order/disorder transition is inferred to start below 1,100°C, and complete disorder is attained at approximately 1,200°C. Twinned crystals characterized by high internal order were found in samples annealed over 1,100°C, and their fraction was found to increase with temperature. Evidences of twinning domains combined with probable remaining disordered portions of the structure imply that reordering processes occur during the quench. Twin domains are hereby proposed as a witness to thermally induced intra-layer-type cation disordering.

  11. Analysis of hydraulic tests of the Culebra and Magenta Dolomites and Dewey Lake Redbeds conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted at 15 well locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico between 1980 and 1996. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes arising form the nation's defense programs. The WIPP repository lies within bedded halite of the Salado Formation, 2,155 ft below ground surface. The tests reported herein were, with two exceptions, conducted in the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation, which overlies the Salado Formation. The remaining tests were conducted in the Magenta Member of the Rustler and in the overlying formation, the Dewey Lake Redbeds. This report completes the documentation of hydraulic-test interpretations used as input to the WIPP Compliance Certification Application (US DOE, 1996)

  12. Analogue modelling on the interaction between shallow magma intrusion and a strike-slip fault: Application on the Middle Triassic Monzoni Intrusive Complex (Dolomites, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Coltorti, Massimo; Gianolla, Piero; Riva, Alberto; Rosenau, Matthias; Bonadiman, Costanza; Galland, Olivier; Guldstrand, Frank; Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rudolf, Michael; Schmiedel, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    The southwestern part of the Dolomites in Northern Italy has undergone a short-lived Ladinian (Middle Triassic) tectono-magmatic event, forming a series of significant magmatic features. These intrusive bodies deformed and metamorphosed the Permo-Triassic carbonate sedimentary framework. In this study we focus on the tectono-magmatic evolution of the shallow shoshonitic Monzoni Intrusive Complex of this Ladinian event (ca 237 Ma), covering an area of 20 km^2. This NW-SE elongated intrusive structure (5 km length) shows an orogenic magmatic affinity which is in contrast to the tectonic regime at the time of intrusion. Strain analysis shows anorogenic transtensional displacement in accordance with the ENE-WSW extensional pattern in the central Dolomites during the Ladinian. Field interpretations led to a detailed description of the regional stratigraphic sequence and the structural features of the study area. However, the geodynamic context of this magmatism and the influence of the inherited strike-slip fault on the intrusion, are still in question. To better understand the specific natural prototype and the general mechanisms of magma emplacement in tectonically active areas, we performed analogue experiments defined by, but not limited to, first order field observations. We have conducted a systematic series of experiments in different tectonic regimes (static conditions, strike-slip, transtension). We varied the ratio of viscous to brittle stresses between magma and country rock, by injecting Newtonian fluids both of high and low viscosity (i.e. silicone oil/vegetable oil) into granular materials of varying cohesion (sand, silica flour, glass beads). The evolving surface and side view of the experiments were monitored by photogrammetric techniques for strain analyses and topographic evolution. In our case, the combination of the results from field and analogue experiments brings new insights regarding the tectonic regime, the geometry of the intrusive body, and

  13. Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2005-11-09

    This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault

  14. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Sorption Enhanced Steam Reforming of Woodgas Containing TAR over a Commercial Ni Catalyst and Calcined Dolomite as CO2 Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Naso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the catalytic steam reforming of a gaseous fuel obtained by steam biomass gasification to convert topping atmosphere residue (TAR and CH4 and to produce pure H2 by means of a CO2 sorbent. This experimental work deals with the demonstration of the practical feasibility of such concepts, using a real woodgas obtained from fluidized bed steam gasification of hazelnut shells. This study evaluates the use of a commercial Ni catalyst and calcined dolomite (CaO/MgO. The bed material simultaneously acts as reforming catalyst and CO2 sorbent. The experimental investigations have been carried out in a fixed bed micro-reactor rig using a slipstream from the gasifier to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. The reforming/sorption tests were carried out at 650 °C while regeneration of the sorbent was carried out at 850 °C in a nitrogen environment. Both combinations of catalyst and sorbent are very effective in TAR and CH4 removal, with conversions near 100%, while the simultaneous CO2 sorption effectively enhances the water gas shift reaction producing a gas with a hydrogen volume fraction of over 90%. Multicycle tests of reforming/CO2 capture and regeneration were performed to verify the stability of the catalysts and sorbents to remove TAR and capture CO2 during the duty cycle.

  15. Evaluation of cross borehole tests at selected wells in the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite at the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevenell, L.A.; McMaster, B.W.; Desmarais, K.M.

    1995-05-01

    Several waste disposal sites are located on or adjacent to the karstic Maynardville Limestone (Cmn) and the Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ccr) at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant. These formations receive contaminants from nearby disposal sites, and transport of these contaminants through the formations can be quite rapid due to the karst flow system. Groups of wells, aligned perpendicular to strike, were drilled to investigate the characteristics of the Cmn, and these wells are identified as Pickets. In order to evaluate transport processes through the karst aquifer, the formations must be characterized. As one component of this characterization effort, cross borehole tests were conducted where water was injected into one well at a site, and water level responses were monitored in nearby wells to determine the directions in which quick flow is more dominant. The ultimate objective of the studies of the Cmn is to characterize the hydrologic characteristics of the karst aquifer and to identify the generalized configuration of the conduit systems and portions subject to a significant quick flow component (i.e., higher hydraulic conductivity zones). The resultant conceptual model will be useful in constructing numerical models to be used to predict flow paths

  16. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs

  17. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Development of multi-purposes procedures and service tools for GNSS data processing finalized to monitor a deep-seated earthslide in the Dolomites (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Mattia; Fratarcangeli, Francesca; Mazzoni, Augusto; Nascetti, Andrea; Monsorno, Roberto; Schloegel, Romy; Corsini, Alessandro; Mulas, Marco; Mair, Volkmar

    2017-04-01

    The Corvara landslide is an active, large-scale, deep-seated and slow moving earthslide of about 30 Mm3 located in the Dolomites (Italy). It is frequently damaging a national road and, occasionally, isolated buildings and recreational ski facilities. In this work we present the analysis performed on data acquired thank to the installation of 3 DualFrequency GPS in permanent acquisition installed in the accumulation, track and source zone of the active portion of the landslide. In particular two years (2014 and 2015) of data were processed with several approaches and goals: daily time series were produced through Precise Point Positioning and Differential Positioning using both scientific packages and automatic on line tool based on open source libraries, specifically developed in order to provide a prototypal service. The achievable results based on single frequency (L1) data processing were also investigated in order to pave the way to the deployment of lowcost GPS receiver for this kind of application. Moreover, daily and sub-daily phenomena were analyzed. Different strategies were investigated in order to describe the kinematics on the basis of 0.2 Hz data collected by the 3 permanent receivers. For particular events also the variometric approach, through the recent advances of VADASE, was applied, to detect significant movements. Finally, tropospheric parameters were estimated over the whole period in order to give a contribution to the SAR interferometry techniques. Also for this specific purpose and application, the possibilities of single frequency use were assessed.

  19. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Spadotti Amaral Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The experimental design was a complete randomized block with sixteen replicates. Plots were treated with one of two materials for acidity correction (dolomitic lime and calcium/magnesium silicate or with no soil correction, as a control. Silicate corrected soil acidity and increased exchangeable base levels in soil at greater depths faster than does liming. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased N, Ca and Mg leaf concentrations, and all yield components and grain yield in soybean; but in maize, just silicate also increased N and Si when compared with lime, whereas both acidity-correcting increased just two yield components: grains per ear and mass of 100 grains, resulting in highest grain yield. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased dry matter production of green manures, but for pigeon pea the silicate provided the best result in this dry-winter region.

  20. Validation of landslide hazard assessment by means of GPS monitoring technique – a case study in the Dolomites (Eastern Alps, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tagliavini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years a research project aimed at the assessment of the landslide hazard and susceptibility in the high Cordevole river basin (Eastern Dolomites, Italy have been carried out. The hazard map was made adopting the Swiss Confederation semi-deterministic approach that takes into account parameters such as velocity, geometry and frequency of landslides. Usually these parameters are collected by means of geological and morphological surveys, historical archive researches, aerophotogrammetric analysis etc. In this framework however the dynamics of an instable slope can be difficult to determine. This work aims at illustrating some progress in landslide hazard assessment using a modified version of the Swiss Confederation semi-deterministic approach in which the values of some parameters have been refined in order to accomplish more reliable results in hazard assessment. A validation of the accuracy of these new values, using GPS and inclinometric measurements, has been carried out on a test site located inside the high Cordevole river basin.

  1. Early diagenetic high-magnesium calcite and dolomite indicate that coal balls formed in marine or brackish water: Stratigraphic and paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Coal balls are carbonate and pyrite permineralizations of peat that contain three-dimensional plant fossils preserved at the cellular level. Coal balls, which occur in Pennsylvanian and earliest Permian equatorial coals, provide a detailed record of terrestrial ecology and tropical climate during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age; yet their depositional environment remains controversial. The exquisite preservation of some coal-ball fossils, e.g. pollen with pollen tubes and leaves with mesophyll, indicates rapid formation. The presence of abundant, cement-filled, void spaces within and between the plant debris in most coal balls indicates that they formed in uncompacted peat, near the surface of the mire. Botanical, taphonomic and isotopic evidence point to a freshwater origin for coal balls. The nearest living relatives of coal ball plants (modern lycopsids, sphenopsids, marratialean ferns and conifers) grow in fresh water. Coal-ball peat contains a high percentage of aerial debris, similar to modern freshwater peat. The stable oxygen isotopes of coal-ball carbonate (δ18O = 16 to 3 per mil) suggest a freshwater origin. However, the widespread occurrence of marine invertebrates and early diagenetic framboidal pyrite in coal balls suggests that many formed in close proximity to marine water. Indeed, carbonate petrology points to a marine or brackish water origin for the first-formed carbonate cements in coal balls. Petrographic and geochemical (microprobe) analysis of coal-ball carbonates in Pennsylvanian coals from the midcontinent of North America (Western Interior Basin, West Pangaea) and the Ruhr and Donets Basins (East Pangaea) indicate that the first formed carbonate is either radaxial, nonstochiometric dolomite or high magnesium calcite (9 - 17 mol % MgCO3, indicating precipitation in marine or brackish water. Although both primary dolomite and high magnesium calcite can form in lacustrine settings, the lakes in which these minerals form occur in carbonate terranes

  2. Changes in ground beetle assemblages above and below the treeline of the Dolomites after almost 30 years (1980/2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolotto, Roberto; Gobbi, Mauro; Brandmayr, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    Very little is known about the changes of ground beetle assemblages in the last few decades in the Alps, and different responses to climate change of animal populations living above and below the treeline have not been estimated yet. This study focuses on an altitudinal habitat sequence from subalpine spruce forest to alpine grassland in a low disturbance area of the southeastern Dolomites in Italy, the Paneveggio Regional Park. We compared the ground beetle (Carabidae) populations sampled in 1980 in six stands below and above the treeline (1650-2250 m a.s.l.) with those sampled in the same sites almost 30 years later (2008/9). Quantitative data (species richness and abundance) have been compared by means of several diversity indexes and with a new index, the Index of Rank-abundance Change (IRC). Our work shows that species richness and abundance have changed after almost 30 years as a consequence of local extinctions, uphill increment of abundance and uphill shift of distribution range. The overall species number dropped from 36 to 27, while in the sites above the treeline, species richness and abundance changed more than in the forest sites. Two microtherm characteristic species of the pioneer cushion grass mats, Nebria germari and Trechus dolomitanus, became extinct or showed strong abundance reduction. In Nardetum pastures, several hygrophilic species disappeared, and xerophilic zoophytophagous elements raised their population density. In forest ecosystems, the precipitation reduction caused deep soil texture and watering changes, driving a transformation from Sphagnum-rich (peaty) to humus-rich soil, and as a consequence, soil invertebrate biomass strongly increased and thermophilic carabids enriched the species structure. In three decades, Carabid assemblages changed consistently with the hypothesis that climate change is one of the main factors triggering natural environment modifications. Furthermore, the level of human disturbance could enhance the

  3. Fluidization Characteristics of Dolomite and Calcined Dolomite Particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Trnka, Otakar; Svoboda, Karel

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 24 (2000), s. 6269-6274 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA ČR GA203/98/0101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.053, year: 2000

  4. Thermal decomposition of natural dolomite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    calcite reported by Garcia Calvo et al (1990) indicates that the presence of impurities is a cause of variation of kinetic parameters obtained. The impurities could func- tion as catalysts owing to their influence in the crystalline structure. 3.3 X-ray diffraction analysis. Figure 2 depicts the powder X-ray diffraction pattern of.

  5. Interpretation of Actinide-Distribution Data Obtained from Non-Destructive and Destructive Post-Test Analyses of an Intact-Core Column of Culebra Dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUCERO, DANIEL A.; PERKINS, W. GEORGE

    1999-01-01

    The US DOE, with technical assistance from Sandia National Laboratories, has successfully received EPA certification and opened the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a nuclear waste disposal facility located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. Performance assessment analyses indicate that human intrusions by inadvertent, intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for releases of radionuclides from the disposal system. In modeling long-term brine releases, subsequent to a drilling event, potential migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado formation were analyzed. Major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer overlying the WIPP site. In order to help quantify parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been earned out using intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the WIPP site. This paper deals primarily with results of analyses for 241 Pu and 241 Am distributions developed during transport experiments in one of these cores. Transport experiments were done using a synthetic brine that simulates Culebra brine at the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft--AIS). Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for intact-core columns were obtained via experiments using the conservative tracer 22 Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers 232 U and 239 Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of the species. Elution experiments with tracers 241 Pu and 241 Am were attempted, but no elution of either species has been observed to date, including experiments of many months' duration. In order to quantify retardation of the non-eluted species 241 Pu and 241 Am after a period of brine flow, non-destructive and

  6. Metodologia para o estudo da porosidade de dolomita em ensaio de sulfatação interrompida Methodology for the study of the dolomite porosity in essay of interrupted sulfation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonete Ávila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to propose a methodology to evaluate the evolution of the pore blockage of limestone during the sulfation reaction. The experiments were performed for a national limestone (dolomite with average particle size of 545 μm in interrupted sulfation tests were conducted at seven different times and at three different temperatures of the process. The empirical data were obtained from porosimetry tests to establish BET surface area, volume and average size of pore and distribution of pore sizes of the sulfated samples. Thermogravimetric tests were performed to evaluate the preparation methodology of the samples used in the porosimetry tests.

  7. Tracing high-pressure metamorphism in marbles: Phase relations in high-grade aluminous calcite-dolomite marbles from the Greek Rhodope massif in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2-CO 2 and indications of prior aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proyer, A.; Mposkos, E.; Baziotis, I.; Hoinkes, G.

    2008-08-01

    Four different types of parageneses of the minerals calcite, dolomite, diopside, forsterite, spinel, amphibole (pargasite), (Ti-)clinohumite and phlogopite were observed in calcite-dolomite marbles collected in the Kimi-Complex of the Rhodope Metamorphic Province (RMP). The presence of former aragonite can be inferred from carbonate inclusions, which, in combination with an analysis of phase relations in the simplified system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2-CO 2 (CMAS-CO 2) show that the mineral assemblages preserved in these marbles most likely equilibrated at the aragonite-calcite transition, slightly below the coesite stability field, at ca. 720 °C, 25 kbar and aCO 2 ~ 0.01. The thermodynamic model predicts that no matter what activity of CO 2, garnet has to be present in aluminous calcite-dolomite-marble at UHP conditions.

  8. Role of Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3} on the physical–chemical properties and cyclic CO{sub 2} capture performance of dolomite by two-step calcination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke; Han, Dongtai, E-mail: handongtai@cumt.edu.cn; Zhao, Pengfei, E-mail: zhaopfcumt@163.com; Hu, Xiumeng; Yin, Zeguang; Wu, Di

    2015-08-20

    Highlights: • Two-step calcination treated dolomite sorbent was prepared and characterized. • An intermediate phase (Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3}) was observed by TG and XRD results. • Mg-calcite hindered the de-mixing of Ca and Mg. • Smaller grains, larger specific surface area and pore volume were obtained. • This favorable structure resulted in a high and stable CO{sub 2} capture performance. - Abstract: Two-step calcination (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} atmospheres) was used to modify the microstructure of natural dolomite for high-temperature CO{sub 2} capture. Two other one-step calcinations (CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2} atmosphere) were provided for comparison. Different morphological characterizations (thermal decomposition, phase composition, morphology, and nitrogen adsorption) were performed, followed by an analysis of 30 carbonation/calcination cycles in a fixed bed reactor. During primary calcination in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere, an intermediate phase (Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3}) was observed by TG and XRD results, which hindered the de-mixing of CaO and MgO in the secondary calcination in a N{sub 2} atmosphere. Therefore, two-step calcination produced smaller grains (CaO: 45.2 nm; MgO: 32.6 nm), larger specific surface area (21.08 m{sup 2}/g) and pore volume (0.082 cm{sup 3}/g) and uniform distribution of CaO and MgO, which resulted in a higher and more stable uptake of CO{sub 2} compared to the results from one-step calcinations.

  9. A comparison of Rh/CeO2/SiO2 catalysts with steam reforming catalysts, dolomite and inert materials as bed materials in low throughput fluidized bed gasification systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Miyazawa, Tomohisa; Ito, Shin-ichi; Kunimori, Kimio; Koyama, Shuntarou; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    The gasification of cedar wood in the presence of Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 has been conducted in the laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor using air as a gasifying agent at low temperatures (823-973 K) in order to produce high-quality fuel gas for gas turbine for power generation. The performance of the Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 catalyst has been compared with conventional catalysts such as commercial steam reforming catalyst G-91, dolomite and noncatalyst systems by measurements of the cold gas efficiency, tar concentration, carbon conversion to gas and gas composition. The tar concentration was completely negligible in the Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 -catalyzed product gas whereas it was about 30, 113, and 139 g/m 3 in G-91, dolomite and noncatalyzed product gas, respectively. Since the carbon conversion to useful gas such as CO, H 2 , and CH 4 are much higher on Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 catalyst than others at 873 K, the cold gas efficiency is much higher (71%) in this case than others. The hydrogen content in the product gas is much higher (>24 vol%) than the specified level (>10 vol%) for efficient combustion in the gas turbine engine. The char and coke formation is also very low on Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 catalyst than on the conventional catalysts. Although the catalyst surface area was slightly decreased after using the same catalyst in at least 20 experiments, the deactivation problem was not severe

  10. Reduction of H{sub 2} S during the mineral coal gasification by using dolomite addition in a fluidized bed reactor; Diminuicao de H{sub 2} S na gaseificacao de carvao mineral mediante adicao de dolomita em reator de leito fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behanie, John Jairo Ramirez [Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Medellin (Colombia). Centro de Investigaciones para el Desarrollo Integral. Grupo de Investigaciones Ambientales]. E-mail: jbehaine@logos.upb.edu.co; Sanches, Caio Glauco [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos]. E-mail: caio@fem.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Brazilian mineral coal from Candiota mine (Rio Grande do Sul State) was gasified with air in a atmospheric fluidized bed reactor at laboratory scale. Experimental essays carried out in a 0.2 m internal diameter reactor permitted both, to evaluate the gasifier operation at different air factors without dolomite particles addition, and to study the effect adsorbent on the capture hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), contained in the generated gas. Test were done with and without the use of dolomite. Without using dolomite, the maximum gas lower heating value was 2.2 MJ/N m3 and the cold gas thermal efficiency was close to 43%, operating at an air factor between 0.45 and 0.60. During the experimental test with dolomite , a maximum reduction of 58% for H2 S was attained using a molar ratio of Ca/S equal to 4. Literature review showed higher capture efficiencies, even at lower molar ratio (Ca/S). Variances were probably caused by low residence times in the gas-solid interaction, considering the used bubble fluidization regime. (author)

  11. Groundwater levels and dolomite - nuisance or necessity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hobbs, PJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The significance and importance of groundwater level data in a karst environment, whilst acknowledged by geotechnical engineers and engineering geologists, is often not afforded the recognition it deserves. Within the ambit of a geotechnical site...

  12. Extreme 13Ccarb enrichment in ca. 2.0 Ga magnesite-stromatolite-dolomite-`red beds' association in a global context: a case for the world-wide signal enhanced by a local environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Victor A.; Fallick, Anthony E.; Medvedev, Pavel V.; Makarikhin, Vladimir V.

    1999-12-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic positive excursion of δ 13Ccarb is now considered as three positive shifts of δ 13Ccarb separated by returns to 0‰, which all occurred between 2.40 and 2.06 Ma. This isotopic event is unique in terms of both duration (>300 Ma) and 13C enrichment (up to +18‰). The mechanism responsible for one of the most significant carbon isotopic shifts in Earth history remains highly debatable. To date, δ 13C of +10‰ to +15‰ cannot be balanced by organic carbon burial ( forg) as there is no geological evidence for an enhanced C org accumulation prior to or synchronous with the excursion. Instead, termination of these excursions is followed by formation of a vast reservoir of 13C-depleted organic material (-45‰ at Shunga) and by one of the earliest known oil-generation episodes at 2.0 Ga. None of the three positive excursions of δ 13Ccarb is followed by a negative isotopic shift significantly below 0‰, as has always been observed in younger isotopic events, reflecting an overturn of a major marine carbon reservoirs. This may indicate that forg was constant: implying that the mechanism involved in the production of C org was different. Onset of intensive methane cycling resulting in Δc change is another possibility. The majority of sampled 13Ccarb-rich localities represents shallow-water stromatolitic dolostones, `red beds' and evaporites formed in restricted intracratonic basins, and may not reflect global δ 13Ccarb values. Closely spaced drill core samples ( n=73) of stromatolitic dolostones from the >1980±27 Ma Tulomozerskaya Formation in the Onega palaeobasin, Russian Karelia, have been analysed for δ 13Ccarb and δ 18Ocarb in order to demonstrate that different processes were involved in the formation of 13Ccarb-rich carbonates. The 800 m-thick magnesite-stromatolite-dolomite-`red beds' succession formed in a complex combination of environments on the Karelian craton: peritidal shallow marine, low-energy protected bights, barred

  13. Integration of X-band SAR interferometry, continuous and periodic D-GPS and in-place inclinometers to characterize and monitor a deep-seated earthslide in the Dolomites (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulas, Marco; Corsini, Alessandro; Soldati, Mauro; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro; Crespi, Mattia; Mazzoni, Augusto; Benedetti, Elisa; Branzanti, Mara; Manunta, Michele; Ojha, Chandrakanta; Chinellato, Giulia; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Costa, Armin; Monsorno, Roberto; Thiebes, Benni; Piantelli, Elena; Magnani, Massimo; Meroni, Marco; Mair, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    The Corvara landslide is an active, large-scale, deep-seated and slow moving earthslide of about 30 Mm3 located in the Dolomites (Italy). It is frequently damaging a national road and, occasionally, isolated buildings and recreational ski facilities. Since the mid '90s it has been mapped, dated and monitored thanks to field surveys, boreholes, radiocarbon dating, inclinometers, piezometers and periodic D-GPS measurements, carried out by the Geology and the Forestry Planning offices of the Autonomous Province of Bolzano, the Municipality of Corvara in Badia, the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, the IRPI-CNR of Padua. In 2013, a new phase of characterization and monitoring has started which also involves the EURAC's Institute for Applied Remote Sensing, the geodesy group of University La Sapienza, the CNR-IREA of Naples and the Leica Geosystems office in Italy. This new phase of characterization and monitoring is meant to investigate the opportunities of innovative SAR interferometry, D-GPS and in-place inclinometers techniques to provide for a high frequency monitoring of the study site in support to the analysis of the investigation of forcing factors leading unsteady, nonuniform landslide motion through different seasons of the year. Monitoring results are also expected to provide a validation of innovative interferometric techniques so to fully evaluate their conformity to be used as a long-term monitoring system in land-use planning and risk management procedures. The monitoring infrastructure now integrates: 16 Corner Reflector for satellite X-Band SAR interferometric products, 13 benchmarks for D-GPS periodic surveys, three on-site GPS receivers for continuous positioning and remote ftp data pushing, two in-place inclinometers and a pressure transducer to record pore-pressure variations. The coupling of SAR-based products with GPS records is achieved using especially designed Corner Reflectors having an appendix dedicated to hold Dual-Frequency GPS

  14. Simulation of the self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    A test procedure was set up to reproduce laboratory self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens. After a few months of testing, during which time the specimens were submitted to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared and observed using

  15. Simulation of self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present research a test procedure was set up to reproduce self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens in laboratory. After few months testing, during which the specimens were subjected to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared

  16. DURABILITY OF ASPHALT CONCRETE MIXTURES USING DOLOMITE AGGREGATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Al-Shalout

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the durability of asphalt concrete, including the effects of different gradations, compaction temperatures and immersion time on the durability potential of mixtures. The specific objectives of this study are: to investigate the effect of compaction temperature on the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mixtures; investigate the effect of bitumen content and different aggregate gradations on the durability potential of bituminous mixtures.

  17. Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... slimes dams include the establishment of a large game reserve on donated land as well as ... capitalise on existing infrastructure and former expertise and benefit from the ...

  18. Dolomite addition effects on the thermal expansion of ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Luis Fernando Bruno; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega

    1997-01-01

    The thermal expansion of ceramic tiles is of greater importance in engineering applications because the ceramics are relatively brittle and cannot tolerate large internal strain imposed by thermal expansion. When ceramic bodies are produced for glazed ties the compatibility of this property of the components should be considered to avoid damage in the final products. Carbonates are an important constituent of ceramic wall-title bodies and its presence in formulations and the reactions that occur between them and other components modify body properties. The influence in expansivity by additions of calcium magnesium carbonate in a composition of wall tile bodies has been investigated. The relative content of mineralogical components was determined by X-ray diffraction and thermal expansion by dilatometric measurements. The results was indicated that with the effect of calcium-magnesium phases and porosity on thermal expansion of wall tile bodies. (author)

  19. Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... This uncertainty is exacerbated by the long time periods required for pro-active ... The loss of 'institutional memory' and local expertise has been identified as .... being lost, Potchefstroom may suffer from extended water short-.

  20. Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mining-related impacts such as large-scale land degradation associated with dewatering of karstic aquifers and widespread pollution of surface water and groundwater systems are discussed. Based on this, potential threats and opportunities for post-mining scenarios are identified in a series of 3 papers. Part 1 of this series ...

  1. Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owing to the pivotal role of water in the semi-arid area and the fact that some of the most important groundwater resources of South Africa were impacted on by deep-level mining, this paper in 3 parts adopted a largely hydraulic perspective. The loss of 'institutional memory' and local expertise has been identified as the ...

  2. Evaluation of barium hydroxide treatment efficacy on a dolomitic marble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniolo, L; Colombo, C; Realini, M; Peraio, A; Positano, M

    2001-01-01

    The Arch of Peace, by Luigi Cagnola, is one of the most famous neoclassical monuments in Milan. It has been subjected to conservative intervention in 1998. In the present paper the efficacy of the consolidation by means of barium hydroxide has been evaluated. The stone material showed severe degradation phenomena as: erosion, pulverisation, exfoliation. The analytical data acquired through X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), allowed to compare the conditions of stone before and after the treatment with barium hydroxide. The presence of barium has been put in evidence mainly on the surface as barium sulphate, whereas barium is only sporadically present within the thickness of the decayed material. The treatment was judged not satisfying and its inefficacy is, most probably, due to a not suitable cleaning procedure carried out before the consolidation.

  3. Advantage of uranium contained in low grade dolomite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, A.L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate a technological route to recover uranium from a lean mineral ore. The experimental work includes studies concerning calcination, carbonate leaching, settling, filtration and resin-ion-exchange. Experimental data confirm the technological feasibility of the proposed process and two different preliminary flowsheets of a pilot plant were suggested. (author) [pt

  4. Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large-scale environmental degradation in the form of sinkholes and widespread radioactive pollution exacerbate such fears. ... Possibilities for using waste land such as sinkhole areas and slimes dams include the establishment of a large game reserve on donated land as well as using tailings for biofuel production and ...

  5. MIDDLE TRIASSIC FORAMINIFERA FROM THE SECEDA CORE (DOLOMITES, NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIAN MAURER

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The assemblage of foraminifera in turbidite beds in Middle Triassic basinal deposits straddling the Anisian/Ladinian boundary interval was studied in 224 thin sections. The fauna consists mainly of shallow-water inhabitants, associated with calcareous hyaline foraminifera (Lagenina of open marine environment. Due to a well established  biostratigraphy in the studied interval, the first and last appearance of some shallow water, benthic foraminifera can be assigned to the Mid Triassic ammonoid stratigraphy. The species Meandrospira dinarica Kochansky-Devidè & Pantic and Arenovidalina chialingchiagensis Ho are limited to the Reitzi ammonoid zone. The species Variostoma alta Kristan and Hoyenella gr. sinensis both do not superate the Curionii zone in age in the studied succession.  The biostratigraphic most important event occurs at the base of the Gredleri zone,  with the appearance of the family Involutinidae Bütschli, represented by the genera Lamelliconus and Aulotortus. The faunal composition is similar to those of neighbouring paleoprovinces, but generally a lower faunistical diversification compared to foraminiferal assemblages in the Anisian or Carnian is observed.   

  6. Porosity, permeability and 3D fracture network characterisation of dolomite reservoir rock samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorn, Maarten; Exner, Ulrike; Barnhoorn, Auke; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    With fractured rocks making up an important part of hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide, detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks is essential. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) however suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this paper, we therefore explore the use of an additional method - non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) - to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. We process the 3D μCT data in this study by a Hessian-based fracture filtering routine and can successfully extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations - in bulk as well as locally. Additionally, thin sections made from selected plug samples provide 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) towards more realistic reservoir conditions. This study shows that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that although there are limitations, several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these and other methods can therefore be a powerful approach in microstructural analysis of reservoir rocks, especially when applying the concepts that we present (on a small set of samples) in a larger study, in an automated and standardised manner.

  7. Distributed Fracturing Affecting the Isolated Carbonate Platforms, the Latemar Platform (Dolomites, North Italy).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boro, H.; Bertotti, G.V.; Hardebol, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Isolated carbonate platforms are highly heterogeneous bodies and are typically composed of laterally juxtaposed first order domains with different sedimentological composition and organization, i.e. a well-stratified platform interior, a massive margin and a slope with steeply dipping and poorly

  8. Sensitivity analysis of solute transport in fractures and determination of anisotropy within the Culebra dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehfeldt, K.

    1984-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy facility for demonstrating the disposal of defense transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The WIPP is located approximately 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. It lies in the northern part of the Delaware Basin, an oval shaped sedimentary trough nearly surrounded by the Capitan reef. The basin is composed primarily of a thick sequence of evaporites with overlying clastic sedimentary rocks. The major formations of interest in the Delaware Basin at the WIPP site consist, in stratigraphially ascending order, the Castile, Salado, and Rustler Formations and the Dewey Lake Redbeds. The Castile Formation is the basal unit in the evaporite sequence and consists of thick layers of anhydrite and halite. The Castile has been termed anhydrite-rich and is differentiated on this basis from the overlying halite-rich Salado Formation. 23 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Catalytic decomposition of biomass tars: Use of dolomite and untreated olivine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devi, L.; Ptasinski, K.J.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Paasen, van S.V.B.; Bergman, P.C.A.; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Although biomass is getting increased attention as a renewable energy source, one of the remaining problems still to be solved is the reduction of the high level of tar present in the product gas from gasification of biomass. The purpose of the present work is to study the activity of olivine and

  10. Assessment of the Dose from Radon and Its Decay Products in the Bozkov Dolomite Cave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rovenská, K.; Thinová, L.; Ždímal, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 1 (2008), s. 34-37 ISSN 0144-8420. [Conference on Protection Against Radon at Home and at Work /5./. Prague, 07.09.09-07.09.15] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : radon * aerosol size distribution * cave factor Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.951, year: 2008

  11. Radon concentrations in homes in an area of dolomite bedrock: Door County, Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, K.; Stieglitz, R.D.; Norman, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A statewide survey by the Wisconsin Department of Health and Social Services with U.S.E.P.A. assistance reported an anomalously high percentage of homes in Door County with radon concentrations in excess of 20 pCi/L. The results were of interest because the county is underlain by marine sedimentary rocks rather than the igneous and metamorphic crystalline types usually associated with elevated radon concentrations. A voluntary population of 55 homes was tested for radon using activated charcoal canisters. This population was also asked to provide questionnaire response data on family, home, and socioeconomic aspects. The data were separated into socioeconomic, energy efficiency, radon access, and karst level categories and statistically analyzed. A subpopulation was selected from the larger population for detailed site investigation, which included additional in-home air testing and, at some sites, water supply analysis and in-ground testing for radon. The field investigations collected information on the geology, soil, topography, and home construction and use. The results of the investigation verified and characterized the radon occurrences in Door County. The presence or absence of karst features is shown to be statistically significant to radon levels. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Transient Catalytic Activity of Calcined Dolomitic Limestone in a Fluidized Bed during Gasification of Woody Biomass.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohořelý, Michael; Jeremiáš, Michal; Skoblia, S.; Beňo, Z.; Šyc, Michal; Svoboda, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2016), s. 4065-4071 ISSN 0887-0624 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-09692J Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluidized- bed gasification * woody biomass * limestone Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.091, year: 2016

  13. Analysis and Remediation of the Salinized, Damour Coastal (Dolomitic) Limestone Aquifer in Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khadra, W.M.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal aquifer management has recently emerged as a main scope in groundwater hydrology, especially in arid and semi-arid zones. About two thirds of the human population are currently gathered close to shorelines relying on coastal groundwater resources. Worldwide, these systems are subject to

  14. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  15. An Exercise on Calibration: DRIFTS Study of Binary Mixtures of Calcite and Dolomite with Partially Overlapping Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi Pezzolo, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most spectroscopic calibrations that are based on the study of well-separated features ascribable to the different components, this laboratory experience is especially designed to exploit spectral features that are nearly overlapping. The investigated system consists of a binary mixture of two commonly occurring minerals, calcite and…

  16. Distribution of trace elements in the natural waters of Bacino del Cordevole (Dolomite Alps, Agordo, Belluno, Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brondi, M.; De Cassan, M.; Gragnani, R.; Orlandi, C.; Paganin, G.

    1989-12-01

    This work deals with (the study of the) distribution and circulation of trace elements in Italian aquifers corresponding to a wide range of environmental conditions, such as water chemism, lithology, hydrogeology, geochemical conditions as well as level of contamination. During 1985 the hydrogeochemical study was carried out on springs and surface waters from an area located in the East-Alpine- Range (Agordo, BL). The waters salinity is generally low (100+200 mg/1 of t.d.s.). Some springs, leaching levels of gypsum in the Bellerophon formation, present salinity values higher than 1 g/1. In the studied area the chemisa of the water is widely influenced by lithology. In fact different percentage ratios of principal cations and anions were observed for groups of samples: waters leaching carbonatic-rocks show the highest in Ca/Mg and HCO 3 ratios; waters coming from volcanic or metamorphic formations have the lowest Ca+Mg ratio; waters leaching gypsum horizons show the highest sulphates ratio. The content of trace elements are generally very low and show non significant contamination of the examined area. The high Zn contents of the springs 36 and 37 are due to the presence of heavy metal mineralization near the sampling sites. Vanadium reaches relative high contents in the samples 22 (11μg/l) and 35 (9 μg/1), that flow in volcanic rocks. In general, the higher vanadium contents correspond to waters in volcanites. Uranium and molybdenum exhibit significant correlation coefficient with the electric conductance, respectively r=0,87 and r=0,51. These two elements are characterized by high geochemical mobility and generally their concentrations increase with increasing salinity if precipitation processes do not occur. The geochemical characteristics of elements and peculiar geochemical processes effect trace concentrations element more than lithology. In fact only vanadium contents show a significant correlation with volcanic rocks. (author)

  17. Effect of Dolomite as Expansive Agent and Shrinkage Reducing Admixture in Self-Compacting Shrinkage – Compensating Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Qosai Sahib Radi Marshdi; Ahlam Hamid Jasim; Haider Abass Obeed

    2018-01-01

    The principle of using expansive agents has been recommended to manufacture shrinkage compensating concrete provided that an adequate wet curing is carried out. On the other hand, shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA) in the concrete mixes, has been more recently suggested to reduce the risk of cracking in concrete structures caused by drying shrinkage. This paper is devoted to the study of the influence of complex modifier in the form of superplasticizer, shrinkage reducing admixture and e...

  18. Dolomitic vegetation of the Sterkfontein Caves World Heritage Site and its importance in the conservation of Rocky Highveld Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siebert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the vegetation of the Sterkfontein Caves (i.e. the natural area surrounding the caves is presented. Releves were compiled in 24 stratified random sample plots. A TWINSPAN classification, refined by Braun-Blanquet procedures, revealed six plant communities, also referred to as vegetation units. For each of these vegetation units the species richness was determined. Plant communities of conservation importance were identified and new associations were formally described.

  19. Frictional properties and slip stability of active faults within carbonate-evaporite sequences: The role of dolomite and anhydrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scuderi, M.M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Collettini, C.; Marone, C.

    2013-01-01

    Seismological observations show that many destructive earthquakes nucleate within, or propagate through, thick sequences of carbonates and evaporites. For example, along the Apennines range (Italy) carbonate and evaporite sequences are present at hypocentral depths for recent major earthquakes

  20. Mowgli dans les Dolomites. Représentations paysagère et ethnographique du front italien par Rudyard Kipling en 1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Galliano-Valdiserra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The British writer Rudyard Kipling left an extremely striking testimony of his visit to the Italian-Austrian front in May 1917. In the form of five articles of propaganda, published in English and American newspapers, the famous writer described the conditions of life and battle of Italian soldiers waging a ‘vertical’ war in the mountains. Indeed the writer-reporter, immersed in this strange mountainous landscape far away from his Indian homeland, combines the power of realistic writing, elements of natural history and zoological metaphors to describe the different protagonists in this war (the visual land scape, its smells (olfactory landscape and its sounds (soundscape. Kipling also took the opportunity to build a history of representations of a fictitious Italianity.

  1. Plant–insect interactions from Middle Triassic (late Ladinian of Monte Agnello (Dolomites, N-Italy—initial pattern and response to abiotic environmental perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Wappler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic–Mesozoic transition is characterized by the most massive extinction of the Phanerozoic. Nevertheless, an impressive adaptive radiation of herbivorous insects occurred on gymnosperm-dominated floras not earlier than during the Middle to Late Triassic, penecontemporaneous with similar events worldwide, all which exhibit parallel expansions of generalized and mostly specialized insect herbivory on plants, expressed as insect damage on a various plant organs and tissues. The flora from Monte Agnello is distinctive, due to its preservation in subaerially deposited pyroclastic layers with exceptionally preserved details. Thus, the para-autochthonous assemblage provides insights into environmental disturbances, caused by volcanic activity, and how they profoundly affected the structure and composition of herbivory patterns. These diverse Middle Triassic biota supply extensive evidence for insect herbivore colonization, resulting in specific and complex herbivory patterns involving the frequency and diversity of 20 distinctive damage types (DTs. These DT patterns show that external foliage feeders, piercer-and-suckers, leaf miners, gallers, and oviposition culprits were intricately using almost all tissue types from the dominant host plants of voltzialean conifers (e.g., Voltzia, horsetails, ferns (e.g., Neuropteridium, Phlebopteris, Cladophlebis and Thaumatopteris, seed ferns (e.g., Scytophyllum, and cycadophytes (e.g., Bjuvia and Nilssonia.

  2. Authigenic minerals from the continental margins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    . Chemistry and environment of dolomitization – a reappraisal. Earth-Sci. Reviews, 23, 175-222. Melim, LA., Scholle, PA., 2002. Dolomitization of the Capitan formation forereef facies (Permian, west Texas and New Mexico): seepage reflux revisited...

  3. Relationship between fracturing and porogenesis in a carbonate reservoir: Example from the Middle Turonian Bireno Member in Jebel M'rhila, Central Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Ali, Hajer; Belghithi, Hanen; Ouali, Jamel Abdennaceur; Touir, Jamel

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the Middle Turonian carbonate Bireno Member in Jebel M'rhila area (Central Tunisia). This member mainly consists of dolostones. The sampling of the dolomitic rocks was carried out on both sides of the several fractures affecting the Bireno Member. We also measured the directions and dips of the fractures. The Studied dolomites basically consist of subhedral to euhedral dolospar. The porosity associated to the dolomites show a gradual variation both laterally and vertically. In fact, porosity increases respectively, laterally while going toward the fractures and vertically from the bottom to the top of the dolomitic member. The mineralogical and geochemical analyses of dolomite, carried out respectively by X-Ray Diffraction and Atomic Absorption, show that the studied dolomites broadly range from a sub-stoechiometric dolomite (48% CaCO3) far from the fractures to a dolomitic calcite (84% CaCO3) near the fractures. In the same way, the MgCO3 contents vary from 35% to 11%. Such high contents in Ca against low contents in Mg could probably related to the dilution of the dolomitizing marine waters by meteoric waters which would have been introduced within the platform during the Middle Turonian sea-level fall and the subsequent subaerial exposure of the Bireno platform. The Sr and Na contents (respectively, 4 ppm and 15 ppm in average) are rather low and they gradually decrease while approaching the fractures. Such a gradual decrease in Sr and Na concentrations may be the result of salinity lowering caused by the meteoric waters that would have circulated through the existing fractures networks. The previous analyses were supplemented by the SEM examination of the dolomite and the measurement of porosity and permeability. The SEM allowed us to identify the dolomite petrographic phases and the associated diagenetic products (solution, cementing, dedolomitization.), whereas the porosity and permeability evaluation highlights the

  4. 40 CFR 60.671 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... following minerals: (1) Crushed and Broken Stone, including Limestone, Dolomite, Granite, Traprock, Sandstone, Quartz, Quartzite, Marl, Marble, Slate, Shale, Oil Shale, and Shell. (2) Sand and Gravel. (3...

  5. Authigenic carbonates in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botz, R.; Brooks, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diagenetic dolomite and calcite in some sediments of the Gulf of Mexico varies between 'normal-marine' (δ 13 C ca. 0per mille) and - 14.6per mille which suggests that biogenic CO 2 contributed to the carbonate formations. The δ 18 O values of dolomite and coexisting calcite are very similar but variable down-core. Dolomite and calcite precipitated early from pore water where SO 4 2- was not reduced. However, during (and after?) SO 4 2- reduction dolomite and calcite still formed and there are at least two generations of carbonate minerals present. (orig.)

  6. 40 CFR 98.190 - Definition of the source category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Lime manufacturing plants (LMPs) engage in the manufacture of a lime product (e.g., calcium oxide, high-calcium quicklime, calcium hydroxide, hydrated lime, dolomitic quicklime, dolomitic hydrate, or... kraft pulp mill, soda pulp mill, sulfite pulp mill, or only processes sludge containing calcium...

  7. Diagenesis of sedimentary phosphorite deposits in Djebel Onk basin, Algeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redjehimi, Hacène; Friis, Henrik; Boutaleb, Abdelhak

    affecting the Upper Paleocene phosphorites of the Djebel Onk include: (1) accumulation of phosphate grains, (2) compaction, (3) dolomite cementation, (3) minor amount of other diagenetic mineral cements: opal-CT, K-feldspar overgrowth, clinoptinolite and pyrite, (4) dissolution of dolomite crystals...

  8. The Fossil Fauna of the Islands Region of Western Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Lulu M., Comp.

    The islands of western Lake Erie are rock-bound isles that abound in rocky outcrops and quarries. The rocks of these islands are of two distinct types, Silurian dolomites and Devonian limestones. The dolomites, exposed in the Bass Islands and Sister Islands are virtually devoid of fossils. Conversely, the limestones of Johnson Island, Marblehead,…

  9. Location of quarries of magnesian lime used as raw material of Roman plasters in western Lombardy (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bugini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lime as building material was widely diffused in Roman architecture of western Lombardy. The presence of magnesite (magnesium carbonate was detected in painted plasters coming from roman sites of Milano: magnesite indicates the use of dolomite to make the lime. Dolomite rocks widely outcrop in the Lombard Prealps: light grey dolomites and dolomitic limestones (Dolomia del Salvatore, Ladinian-Anisian; grey dolomites, sometimes with cyclothemes (Dolomia Principale, Norian. There is no evidence of Roman lime quarries or kilns in this area; the Romans probably exploited the same dolomite outcrops, located along the eastern shore of lake Maggiore, where lime was produced from the Middle Ages onwards. The glacio-fluvial deposits of the middle course of the river Adda (cobbles, pebbles of siliceous limestone together with limestone and dolomite outcropping in the river basin were another medieval and modern source of raw material, mainly to make a moderately hydraulic lime (called “calce forte”, but this kind of lime is lacking in Roman plasters.

  10. Impact of recycled gravel obtained from low or medium concrete grade on concrete properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Abdelghany Fawzy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of recycled gravel obtained from low (Gl or medium (Gm concrete grade on fresh property of concrete (slump, mechanical properties (compressive-splitting tensile strength and mass transport properties (ISAT-sorptivity of concrete containing dolomite as a natural coarse aggregate. Concrete specimens were prepared with cement, water, sand and dolomite admixed with recycled gravel. The percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite was 0:100, 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at w/c = 0.50, 0.55 and 0.60. The effect of silica fume and bonding admixture at w/c = 0.55 on concrete properties were also considered. The results indicated that, increasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite led to decreasing the slump. All mechanical properties of concrete discussed were inversely affected by increasing percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite from low and medium concrete. Adding 10% SF or bonding admixture increased the mechanical properties of concrete. Mass transport properties of concrete (ISAT-sorptivity were enhanced by decreasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite. The optimum percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite = 25%. Keywords: Recycled gravel, Concrete, Silica fume, Compressive strength, Mass transport

  11. National Dam Safety Program. Eaton Dam (MO 31163), Mississippi - Kaskaskia - St. Louis Basin, St. Francois County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    located near the north end of the Simms Mountain Fault System. The site is actually within this system which is about 5 mi wide and 40 mi long, in a...oLegon I V Roubidoux Formation u aleA "Z.Gasconade Dolomite Gunter Sandstone Member Of Eminence Dolomite m~neY, jrk-Potosi Dolomite Derby-Doerufl...westnMsoui Vow" Lamotte Sandstone Diabese (dikes and sills) St. Francois Mountains Intrusive Suite St. Francois Mountains Volcanic Supergiroup 0 10 20

  12. Petrography and diagensis of Padeha Formation sandstones (Lower-Middle Devonian at Bujhan section, Binalud Basin, NE Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Reza Poursoltani

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on petrological and geochemical studies, minor diagenetic events in the eodiagenetic stage include cementation (calcite, dolomite and iron oxide and rarely fracturing. Mesodiagenetic events were dominated by cementation (silica, dolomite, calcite, iron oxide components, clay minerals, compaction, intra-grain microfractures, alteration of unstable clasts, dissolution and replacement, pressure solution, and rarely formation of apatite. Minor telodiagenetic events include dissolution and cementation (dolomite, ankerite, siderite, iron oxide and rarely kaolinite. The bulk of the porosity is secondary, with an average of 4.7%, which is the result of dissolution and fractures

  13. 40 CFR 63.7081 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate from water softening processes. (1) An LMP is an establishment engaged in the manufacture of lime product (calcium oxide, calcium oxide with magnesium oxide, or dead burned dolomite) by...

  14. Effect of elevated temperature on the properties of silica fume and recycled rubber-filled high strength concretes (RHSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda I. Mousa

    2017-04-01

    The results obtained show high resistance to fire with increasing SF content up to 20% replacement of cement. Additional improvement was obtained with using dolomite and 3% of recycled rubber (2 mm, 5 mm.

  15. Detection of sinkholes using 2D electrical resistivity imaging

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Sinkholes in dolomitic areas are notoriously difficult geophysical targets, and selecting an appropriate geophysical solution is not straightforward. Electrical resistivity imaging or tomography (RESTOM) is well suited to mapping sinkholes because...

  16. Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic gold mining areas of the West Rand and Far West Rand (South Africa) – a hydraulic view Part 3: Planning and uncertainty – lessons from history.

  17. Sinkholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Sinkholes are a common feature in Missouri where limestone and dolomite outcrop. Though often considered a benign nuisance, sudden, catastrophic collapses can destroy property, delay construction projects, and contaminate ground water resources.

  18. Potential of sinkhole precursor detection through interferometric SAR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, Andre

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sinkholes are an unpredictable geohazard that endangers life and structures in susceptible areas globally. Subsidence sinkholes occur above cavernous bedrock comprised of highly soluble evaporates or calcium carbonates such as dolomite or limestone...

  19. Highway runoff in areas of karst topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Karst terrain is characterized by sinkholes, depressions, caves, and underground drainage, generally underlain by soluble rocks such as limestone and dolomite. Because natural filtration through soil is limited in karst areas, pollutants in highway s...

  20. Use of natural isotopes and groundwater quality for improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-07-21

    Jul 21, 2006 ... Use of natural isotopes and groundwater quality for improved recharge ..... the environmental impact and the effectiveness of clean-up measures is ..... VEGTER JR and FOSTER MBJ (1990) The Hydrogeology of Dolomitic.

  1. Jäädvustati metseenid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    17. IV avati Porkuni mõisas Concerto Grosso ja barokkansambli Corelli Consort heategeva kontserdisarja "Eesti mõisad 2001" ideed toetanud metseenide nimedega paetahvel, mille valmistas metseenina Gildemann Dolomite Designs

  2. Kuwaiti dolocrete: petrology, geochemistry and groundwater origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, M. I.; Fairchild, I. J.; Spiro, B.

    1991-09-01

    Near-surface sediments in southern Kuwait show extensive development of duricrusts. The host materials are siliciclastic sandstones of the post-Eocene Kuwait Group. Inland, the duricrusts are dominantly pedogenic calcrete (with some silcrete and gypcrete), whereas within 10-20 km of the coast, dolomite is the dominant duricrust mineral. Both these dolocretes and the inland calcretes display a similar maturation sequence in which carbonate-rich nodules develop and coalesce, carbonate progressively replacing and displacing detrital grains. The dolomite of the dolocretes forms mosaics of crystals typically 10-70 μm in size, varying from simple rhombs to spherulites. An intermediate morphology, named artichoke dolomite from its appearance in SEM, is particularly abundant. Authigenic palygorskite is associated with the dolomite. Dissolution of cores or zones within dolomite crystals has occurred. Calcite is present as sparry crystals (always post-dating dolomite) and is the expected precipitate from present-day soil and groundwaters. Chemical analyses of dolomite show highly negative values of δ13C (- to - 10.7‰ PDB) and δ18O varying from + 0.6 to + 3.3‰ PDB. The oxygen isotope values are interpreted as reflecting evaporation of a marine-based fluid. Manganese values of around 1000 ppm show that this fluid was reducing. Strontium data show variability reflecting mineral-fluid reactions. The general absence of metastable carbonates and presence of zoning in dolomite crystals suggests that meteoric dilution of seawater also occurred. Given that the duricrusts lack biogenic features, the light carbon isotope values are taken to indicate oxidation of seeping hydrocarbons. The dolocretes are interpreted as groundwater precipitates near the water table of a brackish water body formed at a time of higher relative sea level than today.

  3. Analysis of the Erosion Law of Karst Groundwater Using Hydrogeochemical Theory in Liulin Spring Area, North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuqing Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical model of the Liulin karstic spring area in the eastern limb of the Ordos syncline was established by a combination of chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and hydrogeology. The study area was divided into four zones based on the saturation indices of calcite, dolomite and gypsum, which were computed by the groundwater-chemical simulation software PHREEQC (a computer program for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations, with consideration of the geological and hydrogeological conditions and hydro-geochemical reactions. The weight and volume modulus of carbonate rocks and sulphate rocks in each zone were calculated by the method of correlation analysis to evaluate the dissolution law of karst groundwater. The results showed that in the zone I (saturation index of calcite βc ≤ 1 the dissolution of calcite was the major geochemical reaction, the weight modulus of calcite was higher than that of dolomite and gypsum, and the pore space generated by the dissolution of calcite was one order of magnitude larger than that of dolomite and gypsum. In zone II (saturation index of calcite βc > 1 to saturation index of dolomite βd ≤ 1 the corrosion moduli were all smaller than that in zone I, the solubility of dolomite and gypsum increased, and calcite reached saturation. The space occupied by the calcite sediment was less than that dissolved by dolomite and gypsum. In zone III (saturation index of dolomite βd > 1 to saturation index of gypsum βg ≤ 1, calcite and dolomite had reached saturation, accompanied by dedolomitization, and the amount of gypsum dissolution increased obviously. The conclusions indicate that the hydrogeochemical environment plays an important role in mineral dissolution.

  4. Tritium migration from a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Chicago, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, J.R.; Healy, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study to determine the geologic and hydrologic factors that control migration of tritium from a closed, low-level radioactive-waste disposal site. The disposal site, which operated from 1943 to mid1949, contains waste generated by research activities at the world's first nuclear reactors. Tritium has migrated horizontally at least 1,300 feet northward in glacial drift and more than 650 feet in the underlying dolomite. Thin, gently sloping sand layers in an otherwise clayey glacial drift are major conduits for ground-water flow and tritium migration in a perched zone beneath the disposal site. Tritium concentrations in the drift beneath the disposal site exceed 100,000 nanocuries per liter. Regional horizontal joints in the dolomite are enlarged by solution and are the major conduits for ground-water flow and tritium migration in the dolomite. A weathered zone at the top of the dolomite also is a pathway for tritium migration. The maximum measured tritium concentration in the dolomite is 29.4 nanocuries per liter. Fluctuations of tritium concentration in the dolomite are the result of dilution by seasonal recharge from the drift.

  5. Types and characteristics of carbonate reservoirs and their implication on hydrocarbon exploration: A case study from the eastern Tarim Basin, NW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate rocks are deposited in the Ordovician, Cambrian, and Sinian of eastern Tarim Basin with a cumulative maximum thickness exceeding 2000 m. They are the main carriers of oil and gas, and a great deal of natural gas has been found there in the past five years. Based on lithofacies and reservoir differences, natural gas exploration domains of eastern Tarim Basin can be classified into five types: Ordovician platform limestone; Ordovician platform dolomite; Cambrian platform margin mound shoal; Cambrian slope gravity flow deposits, and; Sinian dolomite. Carbonate reservoir characteristics of all the types were synthetically analyzed through observation on drilling core and thin sections, porosity and permeability measurement, and logging data of over 10 drilling wells. We find distribution of part of good fracture and cave reservoir in carbonate platform limestone of Ordovician. In the Ordovician, platform facies dolomite is better than limestone, and in the Cambrian, platform margin mound shoal dolomite has large stacking thickness. Good quality and significantly thick carbonate gravity deposit flow can be found in the Cambrian slope, and effective reservoir has also been found in Sinian dolomite. Commercial gas has been found in the limestone and dolomite of Ordovician in Shunnan and Gucheng areas. Exploration experiences from these two areas are instructive, enabling a deeper understanding of this scene.

  6. Efektivitas Amelioran pada Lahan Gambut Terdegradasi untuk Meningkatkan Pertumbuhan dan Serapan NPK Tanaman Jagung Manis (Zea mays L. var. saccharata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Maftu’ah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of several of ameliorant formulas to increase plant growthand NPK uptake on sweet corn (Zea mays L. var. saccharata on degraded peatlands. The research was conducted in thegreenhouse of Balittra during May to July 2011. Sweet corn was planted in pot with soil taken from previously burnt peatin Kalampangan, Palangkaraya. The treatment consisted of two factors, i.e., combination of ameliorant (A1=80% chicken manure + 20% dolomite, A2=80% agricultural weeds + 20% dolomite, A3=80% mineral soil (Spodosol + 20% dolomite,A4=20% chicken manure + 20% agricultural weeds + 20% Eleocharis dulcis + 20% mineral soil + 20% dolomite, andA5=19% chicken manure + 71.5% mineral soil + 9.5% dolomite and application rates at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 ton ha-1, arranged in a randomized complete block design, with 3 replications. The results showed that ameliorants and application rates affected growth and NPK uptake of sweet corn. Application of 20 ton ameliorant (80% chicken manure + 20% dolomite ha-1 produced the highest dry weight of root and shoot, and NPK uptake.Keywords: ameliorants, degraded peatland, nitrogen, phosphate, potassium

  7. Application and Mechanism of Anionic Collector Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS in Phosphate Beneficiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate ore is a valuable strategic resource. Most phosphate ore in China is collophane. Utilization of mid-low grade collophane is necessary to maintain social sustainable development. The gravity-flotation combination separation process can be utilized to separate mid-low grade collophane, but the process consumes a large quantity of acid in the reverse stage. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS was used as a dolomite collector in this study to reduce the acid consumption of collophane flotation. SDS effectively removed dolomite from the gravity concentrate when no other reagents were present. Flotation test results showed that, compared to the conventional gravity-flotation process, the proposed SDS-based process reduced phosphoric acid dosage from 6.1 kg/t to 3.9 kg/t with similar separation results. The SDS action mechanisms on dolomite were further investigated by zeta potential analysis, single mineral flotation tests, infrared spectrum detection, and theoretical analysis. The results indicate that the SDS adsorption on dolomite is mainly physical adsorption, and that favorable separation effects between collophane and dolomite may be attributed to physical adsorption and entrainment. In addition, it also indicates that the physical adsorption can be utilized to remove dolomite from phosphate on account of zeta potential differences when the separate feed is coarse.

  8. A new genetic mechanism of natural gas accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengyu; Ni, Zhiyong; Wang, Tieguan; Chen, Zhonghong; Hong, Haitao; Wen, Long; Luo, Bing; Wang, Wenzhi

    2018-05-29

    Natural gas of organic origin is primarily biogenic or thermogenic; however, the formation of natural gas is occasionally attributed to hydrothermal activity. The Precambrian dolomite reservoir of the Anyue gas field is divided into three stages. Dolomite-quartz veins were precipitated after two earlier stages of dolomite deposition. Fluid inclusions in the dolomite and quartz are divided into pure methane (P-type), methane-bearing (M-type), aqueous (W-type), and solid bitumen-bearing (S-type) inclusions. The W-type inclusions within the quartz and buried dolomite homogenized between 107 °C and 223 °C. Furthermore, the trapping temperatures and pressures of the fluid (249 °C to 319 °C and 1619 bar to 2300 bar, respectively) are obtained from the intersections of the isochores of the P-type and the coeval W-type inclusions in the quartz. However, the burial history of the reservoir indicates that the maximum burial temperature did not exceed 230 °C. Thus, the generation of the natural gas was not caused solely by the burial of the dolomite reservoir. The results are also supported by the presence of paragenetic pyrobitumen and MVT lead-zinc ore. A coupled system of occasional invasion by hydrothermal fluids and burial of the reservoir may represent a new genetic model for natural gas accumulation in this gas field.

  9. Soil Preferences in Germination and Survival of Limber Pine in the Great Basin White Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian V. Smithers

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Great Basin, limber pine is a sub-alpine tree species that is colonizing newly available habitat above treeline in greater numbers than treeline-dominating Great Basin bristlecone pine, especially on dolomite soil, where few plants are able to grow and where limber pine adults are rare. To examine the role of soil type on germination and establishment of limber pine, I sowed limber pine seeds in containers of the three main White Mountains soil types in one location while measuring soil moisture and temperature. I found that dolomite soil retains water longer, and has higher soil water content, than quartzite and granite soils and has the coolest maximum growing season temperatures. Limber pine germination and survival were highest in dolomite soil relative to quartzite and granite where limber pine adults are more common. While adult limber pines are rare on dolomite soils, young limber pines appear to prefer them. This indicates that limber pine either has only recently been able to survive in treeline climate on dolomite or that bristlecone pine has some long-term competitive advantage on dolomite making limber pine, a species with 1500 year old individuals, an early succession species in Great Basin sub-alpine forests.

  10. An evaluation and geochemical survey of the Farah Garan East Prospect, Southeast Asir, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.; El Komi, Mohamed; Christian, Ralph P.; Bazzari, Maher A.

    1990-01-01

    The Farah Garan East prospect (MODS 4886) is located in the southeastern part of the Precambrian Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia, about 15 km east-northeast of Zahran Al Janub and 1 km northeast of the ancient mines at Farah Garan. Ore minerals at the Farah Garan East prospect are pyrite, tennantite, galena, and sphalerite. These are sparsely and erratically distributed in west-dipping beds of dolomite, dolomite-talc breccia, and carbonate-sericite phyllite, and in associated breccias and zones of carbonate-altered mafic metavolcanic rocks, all of Precambrian age. Concordant beds of dolomite and carbonate-sericite phyllite are interlayered with metavolcanic rocks and are interpreted as volcanic-related submarine hydrothermal deposits of Precambrian age. Funnel-shaped bodies of dolomite-talc breccia that crop out near the north and south ends of the dolomite beds are interpreted as submarine hot-spring vent breccias. Aprons of exhalative dolomite thin laterally outward from these vents. Discordant and concordant zones of carbonate-altered metavolcanic rocks, east of and structurally below the hot-spring vents, probably represent pathways of hydrothermal circulation along networks of fractures in volcanic rocks, subjacent to these Precambrian submarine hot-spring vents.

  11. Low temperature geothermal systems in carbonate-evaporitic rocks: Mineral equilibria assumptions and geothermometrical calculations. Insights from the Arnedillo thermal waters (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Mónica; Gimeno, María J; Auqué, Luis F

    2018-02-15

    Geothermometrical calculations in low-medium temperature geothermal systems hosted in carbonate-evaporitic rocks are complicated because 1) some of the classical chemical geothermometers are, usually, inadequate (since they were developed for higher temperature systems with different mineral-water equilibria at depth) and 2) the chemical geothermometers calibrated for these systems (based on the Ca and Mg or SO 4 and F contents) are not free of problems either. The case study of the Arnedillo thermal system, a carbonate-evaporitic system of low temperature, will be used to deal with these problems through the combination of several geothermometrical techniques (chemical and isotopic geothermometers and geochemical modelling). The reservoir temperature of the Arnedillo geothermal system has been established to be in the range of 87±13°C being the waters in equilibrium with respect to calcite, dolomite, anhydrite, quartz, albite, K-feldspar and other aluminosilicates. Anhydrite and quartz equilibria are highly reliable to stablish the reservoir temperature. Additionally, the anhydrite equilibrium explains the coherent results obtained with the δ 18 O anhydrite - water geothermometer. The equilibrium with respect to feldspars and other aluminosilicates is unusual in carbonate-evaporitic systems and it is probably related to the presence of detrital material in the aquifer. The identification of the expected equilibria with calcite and dolomite presents an interesting problem associated to dolomite. Variable order degrees of dolomite can be found in natural systems and this fact affects the associated equilibrium temperature in the geothermometrical modelling and also the results from the Ca-Mg geothermometer. To avoid this uncertainty, the order degree of the dolomite present in the Arnedillo reservoir has been determined and the results indicate 18.4% of ordered dolomite and 81.6% of disordered dolomite. Overall, the results suggest that this multi

  12. Effect of the calcium, boron and sulphur in pre harvest applications over the severity of anthracnose(Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz.) and the fruit's quality of two papaya's varieties in Perez Zeledon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montealegre Perez, Eduardo Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This research established the effect of the calcium, boron and sulphur in pre harvest applications over the severity of anthracnosis (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz.) and the fruit's quality of two papaya's varieties, one creole and a hibrido in Perez Zeledon. The treatments were the folloguings: oxide of calcium plus dolomite, oxide of calcium plus boric acid plus dolomite, boric acid plus sulphate of potassium and dolomite, boric acid less dolomite and witness. The utilized sources were nitrate of calcium, boric acid and sulphate of potassium. The evaluations were realized both in the rainy season like in the dry season. There were evaluated: severity of anthracnosis, weight of the fruits, total soluble solids, shell's hardness, and stability of the flesh. The experimental design utilized was a complete block at random. There were got that the applications of oxide of calcium and boric acid less dolomite decreased the severity of the disease in the papaya's fruits, while that the boric acid plus sulphate tend to increase the disease. The treatment of boric acid plus sulphate decreased the weight of the fruits both in the rainy and dry season. Besides this treatment decreased the hardness of the shell, while that the treatments with boron increased that. Also the treatments with boric acid plus dolomite and boric acid less dolomite, increased the levels of total soluble solids in the papaya's fruits in the two varieties. Finally; the treatments: oxide of calcium plus boric acid and boric acid plus sulphate decreased the stability of the flesh in both varieties and both evaluated seasons, while the treatment with oxide of calcium increased the stability of the flesh in the hibrido during the dry season. (Author) [es

  13. Two new solid solutions in calcite-magnesite system identified in a sample from coral reefs in the northern Perth basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.Y.; O'Connor, B.H.; Zhu, Z.R.; Collins, L.B.; Hunter, B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Dolomite, CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 , is an economically important mineral, being of particular significance in petroleum geology. Carbonate rocks have long been a focus of investigation because these rocks contain an estimated 60 percent of the world's recoverable petroleum, and include most of the world's largest reservoirs. Correct phase identification in carbonates has concerned sedimentologists and petroleum geologists for decades. A new type of solid solution in the calcite (CaCO 3 ) - magnesite (MgCO 3 ) system has been identified at Curtin University by Rietveld XRD and neutron diffraction data analysis in a sample from late Pleistocene reefs in the northern Perth Basin. It is known that the structure of calcite (space group R3C) will be transformed to dolomite (R3), which has an ordered distribution of Ca and Mg in the structure, if 50% of its Ca atoms are substituted by Mg in terms of the Ca-Mg atomic ratio. However, the upper limit of Mg substitution for Ca in calcite under sedimentary-geological conditions without there being a change in structure to dolomite is still unknown. Two carbonates examined at Curtin showed Mg substitution for Ca in calcite under coral reef sedimentary conditions of 18.1% and 37.7%, whereas Bragg peak shifts for a 'dolomite, line for these samples were interpreted by geologists as indicative of dolomite with a certain extent of order-disorder distribution between Ca and Mg atoms. The observations have provided an opportunity to re-examine the origins of dolomite and aspects of dolomitization in a coral reef environment in the Quaternary

  14. Neogene biogenic sediments of onshore Peru. Part 2. Geochemistry and diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.A.; Dunbar, R.B.; Marty, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Neogene sediments of coastal Peru are comprised in part of biogenic silica, phosphorites, and authigenic dolomites. The authors have studied these sediments in the Pisco Basin of southern Peru. In this region the sediments have escaped large-scale post-depositional structural or thermal overprinting. The phosphorites of the Middle Member of the Miocene Pisco Formation occur as 5 to 10 cm. thick beds of phosphatic sediments separated by meters of siliceous, tuffaceous, or dolomitic muds and silts. The phosphatic grains are usually colitic and the depositions are often channeled and reworked on a small scale. Many of these colitic beds disconformably overlie phosphatized dolomitic beds. The dolomites of the Pisco Formation occur as authigenic beds and nodules a few centimeters to over one meter in diameter. They occur at intervals of one to tens of meters. The dolomites are well-ordered and calcite-free. The mole percent calcium varies from 47.3 to 57.4, iron from 0.12 to 2.18, and manganese from 0.03 to 0.62. Strontium varies from 90 to 837 ppm, zinc from 12 to 124 ppm, and sulfate from 100 to 2000 ppm. The carbon isotopic composition of the Pisco dolomites is usually negative, varying from +7.05 to -21.86 per mil PDB. The oxygen isotopic compositions vary from -0.18 to +4.16 per mil PDB. These chemical signatures are consistent with rapid authigenic formation of the dolomite: (1) within a few meters of the sea floor, (2) at shallow water depths, (3) in sediments undergoing microbial sulfate reduction but in the presence of some dissolved sulfate, and (4) in the absence of thermal or fresh water diagenetic overprinting.

  15. Stratigraphy of the cambo-ordovician succession in Illnois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasemi, Yaghoob; Khorasgani, Zohreh; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Upper Cambrian through Lower Ordovician succession (Sauk II-III sequences) in the Illinois Basin covers the entire state of Illinois and most of the states of Indiana and Kentucky. To determine lateral and vertical lithologic variations of the rocks within the Cambro-Ordovician deposits that could serve as reservoir or seal for CO2 storage, detailed subsurface stratigraphic evaluation of the succession in Illinois was conducted. The Cambro-Ordovician succession in the Illinois Basin consists of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic deposits. Its thickness ranges from nearly 800 feet in the extreme northwest to nearly 8000 feet in the Reelfoot Rift in the extreme southeastern part of the state. In northern and central Illinois, the Cambro-Ordovician rocks are classified as the Cambrian Knox and the Ordovician Prairie du Chien Groups, which consist of alternating dolomite and siliciclastic units. In the southern and deeper part of the Illinois Basin, the Cambro-Ordovician deposits consist chiefly of fine to coarsely crystalline dolomite capped by the Middle Ordovician Everton Formation. Detailed facies analysis indicates that the carbonate units consist mainly of mudstone to grainstone facies (fossiliferous/oolitic limestone and dolomite) with relics of bioclasts, ooids, intraclasts and peloids recording deposition on a shallow marine ramp setting. The dominant lithology of the Knox and the overlying Prairie du Chien Group is fine to coarsely crystalline, dense dolomite. However, porous and permeable vugular or fractured/cavernous dolomite intervals that grade to dense fine to coarsely crystalline dolomite are present within the dolomite units. Several hundred barrels of fluid were lost in some of these porous intervals during drilling, indicating high permeability. The sandstone intervals are porous and permeable and are texturally and compositionally mature. The permeable sandstone and porous dolomite intervals are laterally extensive and could serve as important

  16. Mineralogical and chemical characteristics of marble of Bela Pola deposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Boev, Blazho; Panov, Zoran; Pavlov, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents mineralogical characteristics of marbles from the Bela Pola deposit. We have made mineralogical-chemical analyses of marbles and associated minerals in them. The investigation was carried out at the Faculty of natural and technical sciences - Shtip. Marbles from Bela Pola are dolomite and dolomite-calcite types. Microscope investigations have shown that marbles from Bela Pola have granoblastic structure but at some places it can be found with porphyroblastic structures. Percentage on calcite and dolomite is: 94.08% dolomite, 6.25% is calcite in white marbles. On the other hand calcite is present with 93% in gray marbles. Except dolomite and calcite also appear the following accessoring minerals: quartz, fluorite, corundum and paragonite. In general, after summarizing all the facts, which have resulted from this research we could say that, the Bela Pola marbles are massive, compact and white with high quality. In accordance to all formerly mentioned features, this marbles can be classified in the commercial group of marbles suitable for external application or internal design

  17. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO TREES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONE RODRIGUES DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Root rot (Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is one of the most restrictive factors to avocado growing in main producing regions worldwide. In Brazil, scientific reports on the effectiveness of control methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of gypsum applications and dolomitic limestone to the soil and potassium phosphite sprays in controlling this disease in ‘Hass’ avocado, grown without irrigation. The application of dolomitic limestone or gypsum alone is not effective to recover plants affected by root rot. The application of potassium phosphite, combined or not with dolomitic lime or gypsum enables the partial recovery ‘Hass’ avocado plants affected by the disease.

  18. Characterization of Qatar's surface carbonates for CO2 capture and thermochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.; Al-Haddad, Ghadeer; Sakellariou, Kyriaki G.; Pagkoura, Chrysa; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2017-06-01

    Samples of surface carbonates were collected from three different areas of the Qatar peninsula. We employed material characterization techniques to examine the morphology and composition of the samples, while their CO2 capture capacity was assessed via multiple successive calcination-carbonation cycles. Our samples were mainly calcite and dolomite based. Calcite samples showed higher initial capacity of around 11 mmol CO2 g-1 which decayed rapidly to less than 2 mmol CO2 g-1. On the other hand, dolomite samples showed an excellent stability (˜15 cycles) with a capacity of 6 mmol CO2 g-1. The performance of the dolomite samples is better compared to other similar natural samples, from literature. A promising result for future studies towards improving their performance by physical and chemical modification.

  19. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-3 (C-2949)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-20

    SNL-3 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2949) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation within a dissolution reentrant north of the WIPP site and well east of Livingston Ridge. SNL-3 is located in the southeast quarter of section 34, T21S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-3 was drilled to a total depth of 970 ft below ground level (bgl). Below surface dune sand, SNL-3 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatuna, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and upper Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Meda?os Members and into the uppermost Salado.

  20. Terahertz lens made out of natural stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Hong, Sei Sun; Kim, Young Kie; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-12-20

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy probes the optical properties of naturally occurring solid aggregates of minerals, or stones, in the THz frequency range. Refractive index and extinction coefficient measurement reveals that most natural stones, including mudstone, sandstone, granite, tuff, gneiss, diorite, slate, marble, and dolomite, are fairly transparent for THz frequency waves. Dolomite in particular exhibits a nearly uniform refractive index of 2.7 over the broad frequency range from 0.1 to 1 THz. The high index of refraction allows flexibility in lens designing with a shorter accessible focal length or a thinner lens with a given focal length. Good agreement between the experiment and calculation for the THz beam profile confirms that dolomite has high homogeneity as a lens material, suggesting the possibility of using natural stones for THz optical elements.

  1. Effect of soil-rock system on speleothems weathering in Bailong Cave, Yunnan Province, China*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Song, Lin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Bailong Cave with its well-developed Middle Triassic calcareous dolomite’s system was opened as a show cave for visitors in 1988. The speleothem scenery has been strongly weathered as white powder on the outer layers. Study of the cave winds, permeability of soil-rock system and the chemical compositions of the dripping water indicated: (1) The cave dimension structure distinctively affects the cave winds, which were stronger at narrow places. (2) Based on the different soil grain size distribution, clay was the highest in composition in the soil. The response sense of dripping water to the rainwater percolation was slow. The density of joints and other openings in dolomite make the dolomite as mesh seepage body forming piles of thin and high columns and stalactites. (3) Study of 9 dripping water samples by HYDROWIN computer program showed that the major mineral in the water was dolomite. PMID:15682505

  2. Optimization Method of a Low Cost, High Performance Ceramic Proppant by Orthogonal Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Tian, Y. M.; Wang, K. Y.; Li, G.; Zou, X. W.; Chai, Y. S.

    2017-09-01

    This study focused on optimization method of a ceramic proppant material with both low cost and high performance that met the requirements of Chinese Petroleum and Gas Industry Standard (SY/T 5108-2006). The orthogonal experimental design of L9(34) was employed to study the significance sequence of three factors, including weight ratio of white clay to bauxite, dolomite content and sintering temperature. For the crush resistance, both the range analysis and variance analysis reflected the optimally experimental condition was weight ratio of white clay to bauxite=3/7, dolomite content=3 wt.%, temperature=1350°C. For the bulk density, the most important factor was the sintering temperature, followed by the dolomite content, and then the ratio of white clay to bauxite.

  3. Tracer tests performed in the field for WIPP in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.D.; Hill, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    A two-well recirculating tracer test began in October, 1979, to define as accurately as possible the hydraulic character of a fractured carbonate aquifer, the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site in Eddy and Lee Counties, New Mexico. The Culebra dolomite overlies a zone planned for isolation of transuranic contaminated waste generated by the United States defense programs. The storage zone of the proposed facility is in nearly pure halite and about 1400 feet (427 meters) below the Culebra dolomite, the most likely pathway for the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere in the event the repository is breached by groundwater. Included in the definition of the hydraulic character of the Culebra aquifer are natural groundwater velocities, aquifer porosity and components of dispersivity. The proposed tracer test using sodium benzoate, a homologous series of chlorofluoromethanes and pentafluorobenzoic acid as tracers is described. Results of the test will be reported at a later date

  4. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-3 (C-2949) (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    2005-01-01

    SNL-3 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2949) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation within a dissolution reentrant north of the WIPP site and well east of Livingston Ridge. SNL-3 is located in the southeast quarter of section 34, T21S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-3 was drilled to a total depth of 970 ft below ground level (bgl). Below surface dune sand, SNL-3 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatuna, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and upper Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Medanos Members and into the uppermost Salado.

  5. Sedimentology of the Shangoluwe breccias and timing of the Cu mineralisation (Katanga Supergroup, D. R. of Congo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambwe, Pascal; Kipata, Louis; Chabu, Mumba; Muchez, Philippe; Lubala, Toto; Jébrak, Michel; Delvaux, Damien

    2017-08-01

    The origin of breccias in the Neoproterozoic Katanga Supergroup in D.R of Congo is still a matter of debate. At the Shangoluwe Cu deposit located in the Kambove mining district (central part of the Lufilian arc), the sedimentary breccias bearing Cu mineralisation have been investigated for lithological and sedimentological study, quantitative analysis of the breccias fragments and fault kinematic analysis in order to understand the origin of the breccias, their lithostratigraphic position and the timing of mineralisation. At Shangoluwe, three sedimentary breccias sequentially deposited within the Kundelungu rocks can be identified on the basis of the nature of the matrix and fragments; from bottom to the top, the Ferruginous Breccias, the Dolomitic Breccias and the Siliceous Breccias. These breccias were deposited as lenses. The presence of debris and grain flows, a finely laminated matrix, pseudo-stratification, normal and reverse graded-bedding, and the presence of interbedded siltstone, sandy shale, dolomitic shale, shale and dolomite, are considered as evidence of a sedimentary origin of the breccias. The log normal distribution of the fragments indicates that gravity flow was the main deposition mechanism. The Ferruginous and Dolomitic Breccias are regarded as contemporaneous with the Kundelungu Group. They were deposited as lenses interbedded in the Kanianga and Mongwe formations, both affected by the Lufilian orogeny (D1 - Kolwezian and D2 - Monwezian phases). The Siliceous Breccias are post-orogenic as shown by the presence of an erosional and angular unconformity respectively on the Dolomitic Breccias and the Kundelungu formations. Therefore, the Siliceous Breccias are attributed to the Lower Palaeozoic Biano Subgroup and the lithostratigraphy of the Biano Subgroup is proposed for revision accordingly. Copper mineralisation post-dates the deposition of the breccias, the dissolution of dolomite fragments and in-situ fragmentation. This mineralisation

  6. EFFECTS OF AMELIORANT COMPOSITIONS ON NITROGEN MINERALIZATION AND UPTAKE BY SWEET CORN IN DEGRADED PEATLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Maftu’ah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Peat soil is characterized by poor nitrogen (N availability. Ameliorants are expected to rectify this problem. This research  aimed to study the effect of ameliorant on N availability and N uptake by sweet corn plant in degraded peatland. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse in May-July 2011 and on peatland of Kalampangan Village, Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan in September-December 2011. Burnt peat soil of Kalampangan was used in the greenhouse experiment and sweet corn was used as an indicator plant. The treatments consisted of two factors, i.e. compositions of ameliorants by weight (A1 = 80% chicken manure + 20% dolomite; A2 = 80% local farm weed + 20% dolomite; A3 = 80% mineral soil + 20% dolomite; A4 = 20% chicken manure + 20% local farm weed + 20% residue of Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis + 20% mineral soil + 20% dolomite; and A5 = 19% chicken manure + 71.5% mineral soil + 9.5% dolomite and rates of those ameliorants (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 t ha-1. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized block design with three replications. Data were collected every two weeks for five times. Observations were made on soil pH, available N (NH4+, NO3-, plant height, and N uptake in root and shoot. The results showed that  treatment A1 increased soil pH and availability of NH4+ and NO3-  in peat soils at the maximum vegetative stage. Treatment A1 provided the highest N availability and N uptake by the plant. Field experiment showed that N uptake increased  with the plant yield. Optimum yield of fresh corn cob was obtained from treatment A1 at the rate of 20 t ha-1. This research reconfirms the effectiveness of chicken manure and dolomite as peat soil ameliorant.

  7. The effect of mixed liming and NPK fertilizer to yield of some rice varieties on new openings of acid sulfate tidal swamp land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmad, A.; Dewi, W. S.; Sagiman, S.; Suntoro

    2018-03-01

    The strategies to meet the staple food needs in Indonesia is to open new paddy fields in the sub-optimal land. The research aims to get adaptive rice varieties with the highest yield on new openings of the acid sulfate tidal swamp applying mixed liming and NPK fertilizer. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse at the Faculty of Agriculture, Tanjungpura University, Pontianak. The trials used a factorial completely randomized block design consisting of two factors. The first factor is a mixture of dolomite with NPK fertilizer, consisting of 3 levels (1 ton/ha dolomite and 60 kg/ha NPK; 2 ton/ha dolomite and 90 kg/ha of NPK, and 3 ton/ha dolomite and 120 kg/ha NPK). The second factor is rice varieties, consisting of 6 levels (Ciherang, Situ Bagendit, Inpara, Mira, Si Randah and Ringkak Janggut). Each treatment replicated four times. The results showed that the application of a mixture of 3 ton/ha dolomite and 120 kg/ha of NPK fertilizer showed the best results to improve rice yield on new opening of the acid sulfate tidal swap. Local rice varieties, Ringkak Janggut, applied 3 ton/ha dolomite and 120 kg/ha NPK fertilizer showed the best result of 1000 seed weight, i.e., 28.19 g, and total grain amount per panicle is 110.75 grains, with the lowest number of empty grains. Local rice varieties Ringkak Janggut potential to be developed as superior varieties on new opening acid sulfate tidal swamps by applying liming and fertilizer.

  8. Application of k0-based NAA for multielement determination in serpentines and associated minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagendra Kumar, P.V.; S.V. University, Tirupati; Suresh Kumar, N.; King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam; Acharya, R.; Krishna Reddy, L.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2014-01-01

    The k 0 -based neutron activation analysis method was applied for multielement determination in black and yellow serpentines along with two associated minerals namely altered and unaltered dolomites and intrusive rock dolerite, obtained from the asbestos mines of Cuddapah basin, Andhra Pradesh, India. Concentrations of 20 elements were determined and they were used to predict the process of formation of fibrous chrysotile asbestos. Majority of elements as well as REEs reveal the contribution of elements from both dolerite and dolomite during the process of contact metamorphism in forming the mineral serpentine. (author)

  9. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  10. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  11. Diagenetic history of the Swan Hills Simonette Oil Reservoir (Givetian-Frasnian), deep basin of west-central Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, J.P.; Mountjoy, E.W. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1997-05-01

    The geology and diagenetic history of the Swan Hills Simonette oil field of west-central Alberta basin was described. Present-day burial depth is 3900 m; formation temperature is 93 degrees C. Highest porosites (20 per cent) occur in dolostones of the lagoon, ref, and fore-reef depositional environments but limestones still retain porosities up to five per cent. Hydrocarbons are present in saddle dolomite fluid inclusions. Oxygen isotopes for replacement dolomites and late calcite suggest that the carbonate-precipitating fluids were derived from the Precambrian basement or Paleozoic clastics sourced from the basement. Faults may have acted as vertical conduits for fluid migration.

  12. Nagylengyel: an interesting reservoir. [Yugoslovia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedinszky, J

    1971-04-01

    The Nagylengyel oil field, discovered in 1951, has oil-producing formations mostly in the Upper-Triassic dolomites, in the Norian-Ractian transition formations, in the Upper-Cretaceous limestones and shales, and in the Miocene. The formation of the reservoir space occurred in many stages. A porous, cavernous fractured reservoir is developed in the Norian principal dolomite. A cavernous fractured reservoir exists in the Cretaceous limestone and in the Cretaceous shale and porous fractured reservoir is developed in the Miocene. The derivation of the model of the reservoir, and the conservative evaluation of the volume of the reservoir made it possible to use secondary recovery.

  13. Modèle de formation du gisement d'argent d'Imiter (Anti-Atlas oriental, Maroc). Nouveaux apports de l'analyse structurale et minéralogique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuduri, Johann; Chauvet, Alain; Ennaciri, Aomar; Barbanson, Luc

    2006-03-01

    Based on a combined geometrical and mineralogical analysis, a three-stage model of formation of the mineralized veins of the giant Imiter silver deposit (Anti-Atlas, Morocco) is herein proposed. A first episode is characterized by the development of quartz, pink dolomite and Ag-rich minerals veins formed during a dextral transpressive event. The second episode is associated with a normal left-lateral motion that re-opens previous structures, filled by pink dolomite gangue. Alteration stages contribute to a local Ag enrichment. To cite this article: J. Tuduri et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2005).

  14. Textural and isotopic evidence for Ca-Mg carbonate pedogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Hernandez, J. L.; Sánchez-Navas, A.; Delgado, A.; Yepes, J.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2018-02-01

    Models for evaluating the terrestrial carbon cycle must take into account not only soil organic carbon, represented by a mixture of plant and animal remains, but also soil inorganic carbon, contained in minerals, mainly in calcite and dolomite. Thick soil caliches derived from weathering of mafic and ultramafic rocks must be considered as sinks for carbon storage in soils. The formation of calcite and dolomite from pedogenic alteration of volcanic tephras under an aridic moisture regime is studied in an unusually thick 3-m soil profile on Gran Canaria island (Canary Islands, Spain). The biological activity of the pedogenic environment (soil respiration) releases CO2 incorporated as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in waters. It drives the formation of low-magnesian calcite and calcian dolomite over basaltic substrates, with a δ13C negative signature (-8 to -6‰ vs. V-PDB). Precipitation of authigenic carbonates in the soil is accompanied by the formation of Mg-rich clay minerals and quartz after the weathering of basalts. Mineralogical, textural, compositional, and isotopic variations throughout the soil profile studied indicate that dolomite formed at greater depths and earlier than the calcite. The isotopic signatures of the surficial calcite and deeper dolomite crusts are primary and resulted from the dissolution-precipitation cycles that led to the formation of both types of caliches under different physicochemical conditions. Dolomite formed within a clay-rich matrix through diffusive transport of reactants. It is precipitated from water with more negative δ18O values (-1.5 to -3.5‰ vs. V-SMOW) in the subsoil compared to those of water in equilibrium with surficial calcite. Thus, calcite precipitated after dolomite, and directly from percolating solutions in equilibrium with vadose water enriched in δ18O (-0.5 to +1.5‰) due to the evaporation processes. The accumulation of inorganic carbon reaches 586.1 kg m-2 in the soil studied, which means that the

  15. Anisian and Ladinian Beds in the Cross-Section above Srednik Valley at Križna Gora,Central Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matevž Demšar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The Križna Gora and wider surroundings are built of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. Pretty extended among them are the carbonate Anisian and heterogeneously developed variegated Ladinian rocks wedging out laterally and vertically already at short distances as a result of active volcanism, tectonics and the fact that this region is situated on the margin between the Dinaric Carbonate Platform and the Slovenian Basin. The Ladinian rocks lie discordantly upon the Anisian dolomite. In the Ladinian sediments pelecypods Daonella lommeli (Wissmann are rather extended. The Ladinian beds are overlain by theCordevolian dolomite. The boundary between them in the Srednik Valley is strongly tektonized.

  16. Vibrational and Thermal Properties of Oxyanionic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabel'nikov, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    The vibrational and thermal properties of dolomite and alkali chlorates and perchlorates were studied in the gradient approximation of density functional theory using the method of a linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). Long-wave vibration frequencies, IR and Raman spectra, and mode Gruneisen parameters were calculated. Equation-of-state parameters, thermodynamic potentials, entropy, heat capacity, and thermal expansion coefficient were also determined. The thermal expansion coefficient of dolomite was established to be much lower than for chlorates and perchlorates. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity at T > 200 K was shown to be generally governed by intramolecular vibrations.

  17. Diagenetic evolution and stable isotopes of Lower Permian platform marginal carbonates (Trogkofel Limestone, Carnic Alps, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Maria; Krainer, Karl; Sanders, Diethard Gerald; Spötl, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    The Trogkofel massif in the Carnic Alps, Austria/Italy, consists of a succession up to 400 m thick of limestones deposited along a platform margin (Trogkofel Limestone; Artinskian). The top of the Trogkofel Limestone is erosively overlain by the Tarvis Breccia. Up-section, the Trogkofel Limestone consists of well-bedded shallow-water bioclastic limestones with intercalated mud mounds, overlain by thick-bedded to unbedded limestones (bioclastic grainstones, packstones, rudstones) and cementstone mounds rich in phylloid algae, Tubiphytes, bryozoans and Archaeolithoporella. In the cementstone mounds, bioclasts are coated by thick fringes and botryoids of fibrous calcite, and of calcite spar that probably represents calcitized aragonite. Primary and intrinsic pores are filled by microbialite, and/or by mudstone to bioclastic wackestone. Shallow-water bioclastic grainstones are cemented by isopachous fringes of fibrous calcite, or by sparry calcite. Throughout the succession, evidence for meteoric-vadose dissolution is present. The Trogkofel Limestone is riddled by palaeokarstic dykes and caverns filled by (a) isopachous cement fringes up to a few decimetres thick, and/or (b) by red, geopetally-laminated lime mudstone to bio-lithoclastic wackestone; geopetal laminasets locally display convolute bedding. Small dissolution cavities are filled by grey internal sediment, or by crystal silt. Brecciated internal sediments overlain by unbrecciated, geopetally-laminated infillings record deformation during or after deposition of the Trogkofel Limestone. Polyphase fractures cemented by calcite may cross-cut both internal sediments and host rock. In the Trogkofel Limestone, local dolomitization is common. Replacement dolomites show a wide range of shapes and fabrics, including: (a) fine-crystalline anhedral xenotopic fabric, (b) coarse-crystalline subhedral to euhedral, hypidiotopic to idiotopic fabric of turbid or optically zoned crystals, and (c) saddle dolomite as replacement

  18. Heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn) in mudfish and sediments from three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The percentage of uranium present in sediment samples (analysed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) from the three dams was 9.0 % (SD 2.1%). In sediment it was found that cation exchange capacity measurements and the dolomitic hard water and high pH of the Mooi River water effectively \\'detoxified\\' Cd and Pb, ...

  19. EFFECT OF ULTRASOUND ACTIVATION OF SHS-CHARGE ON THE FINAL PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klubovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the effect of ultrasound activation of dolomite, which is used for producing refractory material by the SHS method, on the final product. X-ray investigation has demonstrated that ultrasound activation of the initial charge brings about changes in the phase composition of the synthesized product.

  20. Reduction in soil N2O emissions by pH manipulation and enhanced nosZ gene transcription under different water regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Yupeng; Khalid, Muhammad Salman; Peng, Qi-An; Xu, Xiangyu; Wu, Lei; Younas, Aneela; Bashir, Saqib; Mo, Yongliang; Lin, Shan; Zafar-Ul-Hye, Muhammad; Abid, Muhammad; Hu, Ronggui

    2018-04-01

    Several studies have been carried out to examine nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from agricultural soils in the past. However, the emissions of N 2 O particularly during amelioration of acidic soils have been rarely studied. We carried out the present study using a rice-rapeseed rotation soil (pH 5.44) that was amended with dolomite (0, 1 and 2 g kg -1 soil) under 60% water filled pore space (WFPS) and flooding. N 2 O emissions and several soil properties (pH, NH 4 + N, NO 3 - -N, and nosZ gene transcripts) were measured throughout the study. The increase in soil pH with dolomite application triggered soil N transformation and transcripts of nosZ gene controlling N 2 O emissions under both water regimes (60% WFPS and flooding). The 60% WFPS produced higher soil N 2 O emissions than that of flooding, and dolomite largely reduced N 2 O emissions at higher pH under both water regimes through enhanced transcription of nosZ gene. The results suggest that ameliorating soil acidity with dolomite can substantially mitigate N 2 O emissions through promoting nosZ gene transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Super absorbent hydrogel composites as water retentive in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Antonio Savio G.; Almeida Neto, Manuel P.; Bezerra, Maslandia N.; Feitosa, Judith P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Super absorbent hydrogels (SAP) were synthesized at room temperature, by the use of potassium persulfate as initiator, N,N'-methylene bis acrylamide (MBA) as crosslinking agent, and N,N,N',N'- tetramethylethylenediamine. Gels at the same conditions were prepared with 10% of minerals (bentonite or dolomite). The materials of bentonite series were obtained from acrylamide followed by hydrolysis with NaOH. The gels of dolomite series were prepared from the two co-monomers (acrylamide and acrylate). All SAPs were characterized by elemental microanalysis, FTIR, x-ray diffraction, SEM, and by swelling measurements in water. An intercalated composite was obtained with bentonite hydrogel. After hydrolysis an exfoliated nanocomposite was formed. The dolomite mineral was dispersed in the polymeric matrix. The swelling degrees of the SAPs with mineral were higher than those gels without it. This degree was 1,000 times the dry gel weight. Taking into account the amount of water needed to the process, the gel with dolomite is the most promising as soil conditioner. (author)

  2. Mineral Resource of the Month: Lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Lime is the common term for several chemicals in three major categories: quicklime, hydrated lime and refractory dead-burned dolomite. Lime is almost never found naturally. It is primarily manufactured by burning limestone in kilns, followed by hydration when necessary. 

  3. Solution chemistry of carbonate minerals and its effects on the flotation of hematite with sodium oleate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Yin, Wan-zhong; Xue, Ji-wei; Yao, Jin; Fu, Ya-feng; Liu, Qi

    2017-07-01

    The effects of carbonate minerals (dolomite and siderite) on the flotation of hematite using sodium oleate as a collector were investigated through flotation tests, supplemented by dissolution measurements, solution chemistry calculations, zeta-potential measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The results of flotation tests show that the presence of siderite or dolomite reduced the recovery of hematite and that the inhibiting effects of dolomite were stronger. Dissolution measurements, solution chemistry calculations, and flotation tests confirmed that both the cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and CO3 2- ions dissolved from dolomite depressed hematite flotation, whereas only the CO3 2- ions dissolved from siderite were responsible for hematite depression. The zeta-potential, FTIR spectroscopic, and XPS analyses indicated that Ca2+, Mg2+, and CO3 2- (HCO3 -) could adsorb onto the hematite surface, thereby hindering the adsorption of sodium oleate, which was the main reason for the inhibiting effects of carbonate minerals on hematite flotation.

  4. Fire effects on rock images and similar cultural resources [Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger E. Kelly; Daniel F. McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Throughout human global history, people have purposely altered natural rock surfaces by drilling, drawing, painting, incising, pecking, abrading and chiseling images into stone. Some rock types that present suitable media surfaces for these activities are fine-grained sandstones and granites, basalts, volcanic tuff, dolomites, and limestones. Commonly called rock...

  5. Heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn) in mudfish and sediments from three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    2004-04-02

    Apr 2, 2004 ... and analysed for Cd and Pb by electro-thermal AAS, and for Cu and Zn by flame AAS. ... measurements and the dolomitic hard water and high pH of the Mooi River water .... Copper and zinc were determined by flame analysis at 324.8 nm ... were placed separately in clean 20 ml glass vials and one ml de-.

  6. Stratigraphic and palaeoenvironmental framework of the Early ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dolomite above and occasional oil shale. Formation. Age ... under a range of continental and marginal-to- shallow .... Salt Range to 150 m in the Sarin and Zaluch areas of the western Salt ..... Accumulation of the Permian sequence in the. Salt Range ...

  7. Fracture network growth for prediction of fracture characteristics and connectivity in tight reservoir rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Cox, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Fracturing experiments on very low-porosity dolomite rocks shows a difference in growth of fracture networks by stress-driven fracturing and fluid-driven fracturing. Stress-driven fracture growth, in the absence of fluid pressure, initially forms fractures randomly throughout the rocks followed by

  8. Kinetics of the decomposition reaction of phosphorite concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Run

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apatite is the raw material, which is mainly used in phosphate fertilizer, and part are used in yellow phosphorus, red phosphorus, and phosphoric acid in the industry. With the decrease of the high grade phosphorite lump, the agglomeration process is necessary for the phosphorite concentrate after beneficiation process. The decomposition behavior and the phase transformation are of vital importance for the agglomeration process of phosphorite. In this study, the thermal kinetic analysis method was used to study the kinetics of the decomposition of phosphorite concentrate. The phosphorite concentrate was heated under various heating rate, and the phases in the sample heated were examined by the X-ray diffraction method. It was found that the main phases in the phosphorite are fluorapatiteCa5(PO43F, quartz SiO2,and dolomite CaMg(CO32.The endothermic DSC peak corresponding to the mass loss caused by the decomposition of dolomite covers from 600°C to 850°C. The activation energy of the decomposition of dolomite, which increases with the increase in the extent of conversion, is about 71.6~123.6kJ/mol. The mechanism equation for the decomposition of dolomite agrees with the Valensi equation and G-B equation.

  9. Neoproterozoic marine carbonates and their paleoceanographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Ashleigh van Smeerdijk; Wallace, Malcolm William

    2018-01-01

    The primary mineralogy of marine carbonate precipitates has been a crucial factor in constraining the major element composition of ancient oceans. Secular changes in Phanerozoic marine chemistry, including Mg/Ca, have been well-documented using the original carbonate mineralogy of ooids, marine cements and biominerals. However, the history of Precambrian seawater chemistry is not as well constrained, partially due to the prevalence of dolomitisation in the Precambrian geological record. The Neoproterozoic ( 1000 Ma to 541 Ma) record of primary carbonate mineralogy is documented here using a combination of literature data and new analysis of marine carbonate precipitates from the Otavi Fold Belt, Namibia, the Death Valley succession, USA and the Adelaide Fold Belt, Australia. These data suggest that the last 460 million years of the Proterozoic were dominated by aragonite and high-Mg calcite precipitation in shallow marine settings. In contrast, low-Mg calcite has only been recognised in a small number of formations. In addition to aragonite and calcite precipitation, marine dolomite precipitation was widespread in Neoproterozoic oceans, including mimetic (syn-sedimentary) dolomitisation and primary dolomite marine cementation. The combination of marine aragonite, high Mg-calcite and dolomite precipitation during the Neoproterozoic suggests extremely high seawater Mg/Ca conditions relative to Phanerozoic oceans. Marine dolomite precipitation may also be linked to widespread marine anoxia during this time.

  10. 3D edge detection seismic attributes used to map potential conduits for water and methane in deep gold mines in the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Manzi, MSD

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inrushes of ground water and the ignition of flammable gases pose risks to workers in deep South African gold mines. Large volumes of water may be stored in solution cavities in dolomitic rocks that overlie the Black Reef (BLR) Formation, while...

  11. Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology - Vol 10, No 2 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of liming an acid nitisol with with either calcite of dolomite on two common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) varieties differing in aluminium tolerance · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. EN Mugai, SG Agong, H Matsumoto ...

  12. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Determination of Shale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Classical Least Square (CLS) model was developed from the attenuated spectra of mixtures of five mineral standards chosen to represent the most frequently encountered minerals in shale-type reservoir rocks namely: quartz, illite/smectite (30:70), kaolinite, calcite and dolomite. The CLS model developed was able to ...

  13. Super absorbent hydrogel composites as water retentive in soil; Hidrogeis compositos superabsorventes como retentores de agua no solo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Antonio Savio G. [Faculdade de Educacao de Itapipoca, Curso de Quimica, UECE, Itapipoca, Ceara (Brazil); Almeida Neto, Manuel P. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do RN - IFRN, Caico, RN (Brazil); Bezerra, Maslandia N.; Feitosa, Judith P.A., E-mail: judith@dqoi.ufc.br [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, UFC, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Super absorbent hydrogels (SAP) were synthesized at room temperature, by the use of potassium persulfate as initiator, N,N'-methylene bis acrylamide (MBA) as crosslinking agent, and N,N,N',N'- tetramethylethylenediamine. Gels at the same conditions were prepared with 10% of minerals (bentonite or dolomite). The materials of bentonite series were obtained from acrylamide followed by hydrolysis with NaOH. The gels of dolomite series were prepared from the two co-monomers (acrylamide and acrylate). All SAPs were characterized by elemental microanalysis, FTIR, x-ray diffraction, SEM, and by swelling measurements in water. An intercalated composite was obtained with bentonite hydrogel. After hydrolysis an exfoliated nanocomposite was formed. The dolomite mineral was dispersed in the polymeric matrix. The swelling degrees of the SAPs with mineral were higher than those gels without it. This degree was 1,000 times the dry gel weight. Taking into account the amount of water needed to the process, the gel with dolomite is the most promising as soil conditioner. (author)

  14. Ammonia Yield from Gasification of Biomass and Coal in Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeremiáš, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Bode, P.; Skoblia, S.; Beňo, Z.; Svoboda, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 117, Part B (2014), s. 917-925 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7C11009 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2010-0009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : limestone * NH3 * dolomite * NOx * gasifying agent Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.520, year: 2014

  15. Petrophysics of shale intervals in the Skjold Field, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Oji, C. O.

    2011-01-01

    interval 6 is mainly shale. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the dominance of inter-layered smectite/illite in interval 1–3 and upper part of interval 4, whereas illite dominates interval 5 and 6. Other minerals include kaolinite, chlorite, quartz, calcite, Opal-CT, dolomite and plagioclase...

  16. 26 CFR 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Clay, refractory and fire. 6 Diatomaceous earth. Dolomite. Fedlspar. Flake Graphite. 5 Applicable only... dimension stone or ornamental stone. Fluorspar Fullers earth. Barnet. Gilsonite. Granite Lepidolite...). (ii) Clay, refractory and fire—Clay which has a pyrometric cone equivalent of 19 or higher. (iii...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The water quality parameters such as Ca, Mg and HCO3 in the river water suggest under saturation with respect to calcite and dolomite.The mineral stability diagrams indicate that kaolinite and Ca-smectite are stable in the river water environment,hence they occur in suspended sediments and soils.The dominant influence ...

  18. Late Quaternary sea level and environmental changes from relic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India occur as dolomite crusts, aragonite sands (pelletal / oolitic) and aragonite-cemented limestones, oyster shells, corals, encrusted coralline algal and foraminiferal-dominated nodules. The petrology and mineralogy of the deposits indicate that except for aragonite ...

  19. Sinkhole formation by groundwater withdrawal: far west rand, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foose, R M

    1967-09-01

    Sinkholes up to 125 meters wide and 50 meters deep have developed catastrophically in thick unconsolidated debris above pinnacle-weathered dolomite after lowering of the groundwater surface by at least 160 meters. They are caused by shrinkage of desiccated debris, downward migration of debris into bedrock openings, and upward growth of multiple debris "caverns" by roof spalling.

  20. CO2 as Moderator for Biomass Gasification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohořelý, Michael; Jeremiáš, Michal; Svoboda, Karel; Kameníková, Petra; Skoblia, S.; Beňo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 117, PART: A (2014), s. 198-205 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7C11009 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2010-0009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : dolomite * limestone * catalyst Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.520, year: 2014

  1. Otěr minerálních katalyzátorů ve fluidním zplyňovacím reaktoru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Šyc, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2012), s. 844-846 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720701 Grant - others:RFCR(XE) CT2010-00009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : gasification of biomass * catalyst attrition * dolomites and limestones Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.453, year: 2012

  2. Mineral resource of the month: magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is the eighthmost abundant element in Earth’s crust, and the second-most abundant metal ion in seawater. Although magnesium is found in more than 60 minerals, only brucite, dolomite, magnesite and carnallite are commercially important for their magnesium content. Magnesium and its compounds also are recovered from seawater, brines found in lakes and wells, and bitterns (salts).

  3. Deposits and possibilities of using thermal waters in Debrc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajić Mirjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The geothermal waters in Debrc are in karstified Triassic limestone and dolomite. Maximal measured temperature is 58°C on the depth of 1000 m. By using geothermal energy from thermal waters of Debrc, is possible intensive agri and aqva culture production, especially organic food according to world ecologic standards, as well as toplification of Debrc.

  4. Mineralogical, textural, structural and geochemical aspects of Nakhlak lead mine, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Jazi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nakhlak lead mine is located at the Nakhlak mountain 55 km NE of Anarak town in Isfahan province. The mineralogy is simple; galena and barite are the main primary minerals and cerussite is the main secondary mineral. Sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite-tennantite and acanthite occur as minor and trace mineral inclusions in galena. Secondary minerals are anglesite, plattnerite, wulfenite and malachite. The host rock has undergone a pre-mineralization dolomitization process. Four types of dolomite have been identified which saddle dolomite is the most distinguished. Open space filling textures occur in the form of breccia, cockade, crustification and colloform. Analysis of the galena samples indicates presence of many trace elements in galena among which silver is the most important. Element pairs such as Ag-As, Zn-Cd, As-Cu and As-Sb are highly correlated. This correlation may be explained by the presence of inclusions. Ag-Sb-Bi ternary diagram indicates that galena samples from Nakhlak are rich in Ag and Sb and poor in Bi. Sb/Bi (3773 ratio in galena is suggestive of a low temperature of formation for the deposit. The Upper Cretaceous carbonate host rocks and their dolomitization, the stratabound and epigenetic mineralization, the absence of igneous activity, the open space filling texture, the simple mineralogy and geochemistry all point to a Mississippi valley type model for the Nakhlak Pb deposit.

  5. The carbonaceous matter in the uraniferous dequartzified and albitized leucogranite of Saraya (Senegal): an example of superimposed hydrothermal alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouthier, B.

    1988-01-01

    Two superimposed early hydrothermal alterations have been recognized in the Proterozoic Saraya leucogranite. Successively are described a major dequartzification leading to an episyenite infilled with carbonaceous matter and sulfate during an interruption of the system, succeeded by a mobilization of U and other elements during an albitization. A dolomite filling up followed by a silicopotassic feed-back alteration, close down the system [fr

  6. A forensic application of PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, I.I.; Dunnam, F.E.; Rinsvelt, H.A. van; Warren, M.W.; Falsetti, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    PIXE measurements were performed on various calcareous materials including identified bone residues, human cremains, and samples of disputed origin. In a forensic application, the elemental analysis suggests that the origin of a sample suspectly classified as human cremains can tentatively be identified as a mixture of sandy soil and dolomitic limestone

  7. Development of Miocene-Pliocene reef trend, St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, I.; Eby, D.E.; Hubbard, D.K.; Frost, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Miocene-Pliocene reef trend on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, rims the present southern western coasts of the island and includes accompanying lagoonal and forereef facies. The reef trend was established on a foram-algal bank facies that represents basinal shallowing from the deep-water pelagic and hemipelagic facies of the Miocene Kingshill Limestone. Information on facies distribution and thickness is derived from rock exposures and 22 test wells drilled to a maximum depth of 91 m. The greatest thickness of the reef facies exists in a subsidiary graben on the south coast of St. Croix. The thickness of the reef section in this locality is due to preservation of the section in a downdropped block. Reef faunas include extant corals, as well as several extinct genera. Extant corals (e.g. Montastrea annularis, Diploria sp., and Porites porites) and extinct corals (e.g., Stylophora affinis, Antillea bilobata, and Thysanus sp.) are the main reef frame-builders. Coralline algea and large benthic foraminifera are significant contributors to the sediments both prior to and during scleractinian reef growth. Dolomitization and calcite cementation occur prominantly in an area corresponding to a Holocene lagoon. The spatial distribution of the dolomite suggests that the lagoon is a Tertiary feature directly related to the dolomitization process. Stable isotopic values suggest dolomitization of fluids of elevated salinity.

  8. Utilization of Electric Arc Furnace Dust as raw material for the production of ceramic and concrete building products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikalidis, Constantine; Mitrakas, Manassis

    2006-01-01

    The up to 20 wt% addition of the Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD) hazardous waste on the properties of extruded clay-based ceramic building products fired at various temperatures (850 to 1050 degrees C), as well as of dolomite-concrete products was investigated. Chemical, mineralogical and particle size distribution analyses were performed in order to characterize the used EAFD. The results showed that the ceramic specimens prepared had water absorption, firing shrinkage, apparent density, mechanical strength, colour and leaching behaviour within accepted limits. Addition of 7.5 to 15 wt% EAFD presented improved properties, while 20 wt% seems to be the upper limit. Dolomite-concrete specimens were prepared by vibration and press-forming of mixtures containing cement, sand, dolomite, EAFD and water. Modulus of rupture values were significantly increased by the addition of EAFD. The leaching tests showed stabilization of all toxic metals within the sintered ceramic structure, while the leaching behaviour of lead in dolomite-concrete products needs further detailed study.

  9. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-09-30

    -marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with

  10. Carnian bauxite horizon on the Kopitov grič near Borovnica (Slovenia – is there a »forgotten« stratigraphic gap in its footwall?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomir Celarc

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Beds underlying the Carnian bauxite on the Kopitov gri~ (Slovenia are by the author’s opinion not Carnian (Cordevolian, but Ladinian age. The considerable stratigraphical gap is presented between Carnian clastic rocks and underlying limestones and dolomites. Bauxite is result of the weathering during the emersion.

  11. The Upper Permian in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.

    1955-01-01

    The Upper Permian in the Netherlands, as known from borehole data, is deposited in a mainly evaporitic facies north of the Brabant and Rhenish Massifs. In the extreme south (Belgian Campine, de Peel) a near-shore facies of reef dolomites and elastics occurs. In the western and central Netherlands

  12. Synthèse: Revue des Sciences et de la Technologie - Vol 18 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude de l'action du phosphate dipotassique sur la Dolomite: formation et évaluation des phosphates doubles de Potassium et Magnésium · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. H Bouziane, A Zeghdaoui, B Dibbe, 5-11 ...

  13. ﺗﺷﻛل وﺗطور اﻟﻔوﺳﻔﺎت ﻣزدوﺟﺔ : دراﺳﺔ ﺳﻠوك اﻟﻔوﺳﻔﺎت ﺛﻧﺎﺋﯾﺔ

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Bouziane et al. 6 bipotassic can react with dolomite and gave v5 the hollowing findings: - Phosphate bipotassic and calcium. ] [. 24. 3)PO(CaH. K. , -Phosphate double calcium. (. CaHPO. ) 4, -Potassium carbonite )COK(3. 2 and q soft compound contain the magnesium, this one will develop with water into phosphate third ...

  14. Survey and hydrogeology of Carroll Cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll Cave, located in Camden County, Missouri, is the largest known cave formed in the Gasconade Dolomite of the Salem Plateau. Despite extensive visitation over the last 50 years and multiple survey efforts, a comprehensive map of the cave has never been produced. In 2002, the Carroll Cave Conse...

  15. Groundwater governance in South Africa: A status assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundwater governance provisions and arrangements in South Africa were studied at national level and at local level for a highly productive aquifer, the Botleng Dolomite Aquifer. Technical, legal, institutional and operational governance provisions were found to be reasonable at the national level but weak with regards to ...

  16. Origin of brine in the Kangan gasfield: isotopic and hydrogeochemical approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagheri, R.; Nadri, A.; Raeisi, E.; Kazemi, G.A.; Eggenkamp, H.G.M.; Montaseri, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Kangan Permo-Triassic brine aquifer and the overlying gas reservoir in the southern Iran are located in Kangan and Dalan Formations, consisting dominantly of limestone, dolomite, and to a lesser extent, shale and anhydrite. The gasfield, 2,900 m in depth and is exploited by 36 wells, some of

  17. REE in the Griqualand-West carbonates - evidence for seawater/fresh water mixing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, A.

    1990-01-01

    The investigated sample material is derived from the carbonate buildup of the Transvaal Supergoup in an area between Schmitsdrift and Griquatown and Danielskuil and Douglas. Out of the stratigraphic sequence samples from seven formations have been analyzed. The studied material represents a wide range of environmental settings, from platform margin up to intertidal conditions. Various stages of dolomitization are present. 1 ref., 1 fig

  18. The use of chemical analyses of borehole samples in sub-surface mapping: an example of the Delmas-Bapsfontein area is given

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudman, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The East Rand Dolomites around Delmas-Bapsfontein underlie an area of about 1000 sq. km. but do not outcrop. An intensive ground water exploration programme had been carried out and the percussion samples obtained were analysed in an attempt to differentiate the sub-surface geology based on the chemistry of the samples. The gross chemistry of the various rock types has been well defined and various computer-aided graphical methods were used to highlight changes in the chemistry. Samples were analysed by means of x-ray fluorescence. The chert-rich dolomite formations near surface have been leached to the extent that all of the carbonate minerals have been removed, leaving a chert residium of commonly 80 m thick. The carbonates in this area can be regarded as 'pure' dolomites. There are however two discretely different CaO/MgO ratios present in the study area. Intrusives with up to 16% Na 2 O are noted. The effect of de-dolomitization at the contacts of the intrusives is clearly illustrated. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  19. Migration of radionuclides following shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlet, J.; Golchert, N.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of radionuclide migration was conducted at a facility used from 1944 to 1949 for the shallow land burial of radwaste produced during operations with two reactors and related nuclear research. It is situated in glacial drift 45 m thick. Underlying the drift is a generally level Silurian dolomite bedrock 60 m thick. The thickness of the drift decreases as the surface slopes downhill (north) until the dolomite reaches the surface and forms the bed of a river, 700 m to the north. This study was begun after tritiated water was detected in two picnic wells north of the facility, between the burial plot and the river. Surface and subsurface measurements indicate that tritium is migrating out of the burial site, but no other radionuclides have left the plot. The tritium concentrations decrease with distance from the plot. Tritium was found in the subsoil at all depths sampled, so the ground beneath and immediately around the plot contains tritium down to the dolomite aquifer. Time of travel of water from the burial plot to the nearest well is estimated to be 54 months. This would imply the peak concentration would reach the dolomite in about 35 years. By this time, 86% of the tritium would have disappeared by radioactive decay. The cyclical nature of the tritium content in the two wells implies that tritiated water is carried from the burial site by the spring rains when they recharge the groundwater supply

  20. Analysis of Deformation Characteristics and Stability Mechanisms of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    21

    analysis of landslide mass under the similar engineering geological ... The bedrock mainly consists of the green-gray marlite of the thin layer, the interbedded dolomitic limestone and the purple-red mudstone of the Badong Formation from the ...

  1. Parkovi talu Parkhofi mõisas / Jana Rand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rand, Jana, 1963-

    2009-01-01

    Perekond Villandi taastatud Parkovi talust Jalase külas Raplamaal, mis rajatud kunagise Parkhofi mõisa asukohale. Mõis kuulus enne hävitamist 1905. a. Viktor von Kotzebue'le. Madis ja Mihkel Villandi loodud firma Gildemann Dolomite Designs jätkab talus kiviraiumise traditsioone kaasaegses tootmisviisis

  2. Seismic velocity distribution in the vicinity of a mine tunnel at Thabazimbi, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, C

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the refracted arrivals on a seismic reflection profile recorded along the wall of a tunnel at an iron mine near Thabazimbi, South Africa, shows variations in P-wave velocity in dolomite away from the de-stressed zone that vary between 4...

  3. Test of the carbonates structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Lidia

    1987-01-01

    Several samples of carbonates were analyzed by X-ray techniques for determining the crystalline structure of the members of the isomorphes groups of calcite (CaCO 3 ) and dolomite (CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 ). Considering the single crystal, the monocrystal method was used, collecting oscillation and Weissenberg data by means of photographic films. (Author) [es

  4. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-01-01

    -marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained ( 100-250 (micro)m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from these analyses indicates late

  5. Acoustic Velocity Data for Clay Bearing Carbonate Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Shogenova, Alla

    1998-01-01

    Two sets of acoustic data on carbonates were combined to span the porosity interval from below 5% to more than 75%: dolomite and limestone of Paleozoic age from Estonia and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The carbonate content of the samples ranges from less than 50% to 100%, and it was attem...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New Sr isotopic analyses and calculated formation ages of carbonates from the Orgueil CI meteorite are reported. Among the samples analyzed in this work, dolomites give the youngest formation ages and may have been deposited intermittently starting near the time of parent body formation and continuing for at least 30 ...

  7. Ophrys apifera Huds. (Orchidaceae, a new orchid species to the flora of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osiadacz Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides data on the first locality of Ophrys apifera Huds. s. str. in Poland. Information about its geographical distribution and ecological features is given. A newly discovered population, found in a worked-out dolomite quarry near Imielin (Silesian Upland, is described and illustrated, as also, O. apifera is compared with O. insectifera L.

  8. The giant Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit, China: Controversy and ore genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Rui Fan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bayan Obo ore deposit is the largest rare-earth element (REE resource, and the second largest niobium (Nb resource in the world. Due to the complicated element/mineral compositions and involving several geological events, the REE enrichment mechanism and genesis of this giant deposit still remains intense debated. The deposit is hosted in the massive dolomite, and nearly one hundred carbonatite dykes occur in the vicinity of the deposit. The carbonatite dykes can be divided into three types from early to late: dolomite, co-existing dolomite-calcite and calcite type, corresponding to different evolutionary stages of carbonatite magmatism based on the REE and trace element data. The latter always has higher REE content. The origin of the ore-hosting dolomite at Bayan Obo has been addressed in various models, ranging from a normal sedimentary carbonate rocks to volcano-sedimentary sequence, and a large carbonatitic intrusion. More geochemical evidences show that the coarse-grained dolomite represents a Mesoproterozoic carbonatite pluton and the fine-grained dolomite resulted from the extensive REE mineralization and modification of the coarse-grained variety. The ore bodies, distributed along an E–W striking belt, occur as large lenses and underwent more intense fluoritization and fenitization. The first episode mineralization is characterized by disseminated mineralization in the dolomite. The second or main-episode is banded and/or massive mineralization, cut by the third episode consisting of aegirine-rich veins. Various dating methods gave different mineralization ages at Bayan Obo, resulting in long and hot debates. Compilation of available data suggests that the mineralization is rather variable with two peaks at ∼1400 and 440 Ma. The early mineralization peak closes in time to the intrusion of the carbonatite dykes. A significant thermal event at ca. 440 Ma resulted in the formation of late-stage veins with coarse crystals of REE

  9. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  10. Effect of some soil amendments on soil properties and plant growth in Southern Thailand acid upland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onthong, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major factors limiting plant growth is acid soil. In general lime is used for soil amendment in acid soil. However, It has been reported that gypsum or phosphogypsum can be used for ameliorating soilacidity. Pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of lime, phosphogypsum and kieserite on soil properties and plant growth in Kho Hong soil series (coarse loamy, kaolinitic,isohyperthermic, TypicKandiudults which was considered as acid upland soil (pH 5.07. Sweet corn variety INSEE 2 was used as the test crop. The experiment was a completely randomized design with 4 replications and 19 treatments asfollow : unamended, application of hydrated lime and dolomite to raise soil pH at 5.5, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with phosphogypsum at the rate that can supply calcium 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 time of both limes, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with kieserite at the rate 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 times of sulfur requirement for corn (40 kg S ha-1. The result showed that shoot and root dry weights of corn were increased when lime materials, phosphogypsum and kieserite were applied and the drymatter weights were increased according to the increasing of phosphogypsum and kieserite. The maximum shoot dry weight (18.98 g pot-1 was obtained when 1 times of kieserite was supplied with dolomite and wassignificantly (P<0.01 higher than those of the unamended treatment, only hydrated lime and dolomite treatments, which had dry weights of 12.64, 15.18 and 15.67 g pot-1 respectively. Phosphorus and K uptakewere not significantly different in all treatments and the lowest uptake of N, Ca, Mg and S was obtained in the unamended treatment. The maximum uptake of N (512.10 mg pot-1 was found when 0.5 times ofphosphogypsum was applied together with dolomite. Calcium and Mg uptake was likely to increase according to the increasing rate of soil amendment application. Highest uptake of Ca (42.51 mg pot-1 was obtainedwhen

  11. Lithostratigraphy of Upper Ordovician strata exposed in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gordon Whitney; Peterson, Warren Lee; Swadley, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Creek Limestone in the western and central parts. In east-central Kentucky, the Grant Lake is classified as a member of the Ashlock Formation, an assemblage of lithologically distinct units that were combined to facilitate mapping in the southeastern and southern part of the region. The Ashlock consists of the following members, in ascending order: The Tate (calcitic and dolomitic mudstone), the Grant Lake, the Gilbert (micrograined limestone and shale), the Stingy Creek (nodular-bedded mudstone and limestone), the Terrill (dolomitic and calcitic mudstone), the Sunset (micrograined limestone), and the Reba (nodular-bedded limestone and shale). The Bull Fork Formation, which overlies the Grant Lake Limestone, is made up of subequal amounts of thin-bedded highly fossiliferous limestone and shale; limestone makes up about 80 percent of the basal part of the formation and decreases in abundance irregularly upward to only 20 percent of the top part. On the east side of the Blue Grass region, the Bull Fork grades into the Reba Member of the Ashlock Formation; on the west side, it grades into the Grant Lake. The uppermost formation in the region is the Drakes Formation, which in east-central Kentucky consists of the Rowland Member (calcitic to dolomitic mudstone) overlain by the Preachersville Member (dolomitic to calcitic mudstone and dolomite and dolomitic siltstone). In northeast Kentucky, the Drakes is represented by only the Preachersville Member. In most of central and north-central Kentucky, the formation consists of three members: the Rowland at the base (dolomitic mudstone to muddy limestone), the Bardstown (fossiliferous limestone and shale), and the Saluda Dolomite (dolomite, in part calcitic and muddy). In northern north-central Kentucky, the Drakes is represented by only the Saluda Dolomite Member. The top of the Ordovician sequence in the Blue Grass region is generally formed by members of the Drakes Formation, which are overlain by str

  12. Isotopic measurements of carbon and oxygen in carbonates from Bambui Group in the center-north region of Bahia State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquato, J.R.; Misi, A.

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 85 carbonate samples of the Bambui Group from the Chapada de Irece, Bahia, exhibit four distinct 13 C and 18 O isotopic ratio groupings. Based on these results the following sedimentation model for the Bambui Group is proposed: 1. A continental environment originating the basal dolomitic limestones and argillacceous dolomites. Isotopic ratios from these rocks fall within ranges considered typical of continental sedimentation: delta 18 C between -2.9 and -6.4%o, and delta 18 O from -5.3 to -10.7%o (PDB). 2. An alternating continental and restricted marine environment resulting in the deposition of laminated dolomitic limestones with thin interbeds of muddy sediments. Delta 13 C ratios of +0.1 to -4.9%o and a mean value of -8.2+-0.3%o delta 18 O are compatible with such an environment. 3. A restricted marine environment dominated by sedimentation of the black, fetid limestones of the upper portion of the sequence. Isotopic ratios for 13 C are all over -1.8%o, up to about +7.5%o, and 18 O ratios vary from-4.9 to -10.0%o. A number of light-grey sileceous dolomites is interbered with the lowermost black limestones of this sequence. Isotopic data for these rocks show a narrow range for delta 18 C values (-0.5 to 1.0%o) and a broader variation for delta 18 O ratios (0.0 to -8.3%o). This latter may be interpreted as indicative of intense evaporation during deposition of the dolomitic facies [pt

  13. Unearthing a hidden treasure: 60 years of karst research in the Far West Rand, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljoscha Schrader

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Karstified dolomitic formations situated in the Far West Rand goldfield of the Witwatersrand Basin constitute a significant groundwater resource in semi?arid South Africa and would be of strategic importance for alleviating the increasing water stress in nearby metropolitan areas. The deep?level gold mines operating below the dolomites have suffered from large volumes of dolomitic groundwater flowing into the mine voids, rendering mining both expensive and hazardous. In order to secure safe and economical mining, the overlying dolomites were dewatered. Here we review research over 60 years, conducted in three of the four major dolomitic compartments affected by dewatering. After more than six decades of research, these aquifers are arguably the most investigated karst systems in South Africa, and possibly worldwide. The data generated are, in many respects, unique, as many measurements can never be repeated, covering stochastic events such as a major water inrush into mine workings and some of the most catastrophic sinkhole developments ever recorded. Given the potential value for improving the understanding of general and local karst hydrogeology, our main goal for this paper is to alert the scientific community to the existence of this resource of mostly unpublished data and research. A no less important aim is to support a systematic collation of these studies which are in danger of being irretrievably lost as mines increasingly close down. Ecological and economic impacts of the flooding of mines in and around Johannesburg emphasise the lack of reliable historical mine data to optimally address the matter. We provide the first comprehensive, yet not exhaustive, overview on the existing studies, briefly discussing scientific content as well as obstacles for utilising the scattered, and often non?peer reviewed, information sources.

  14. Identification of mineralized zones in the Zardu area, Kushk SEDEX deposit (Central Iran, based on geological and multifractal modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahooei Ahmad Heidari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to delineate the different lead–zinc mineralized zones in the Zardu area of the Kushk zinc–lead stratabound SEDEX deposit, Central Iran, through concentration–volume (C–V modeling of geological and lithogeochemical drillcore data. The geological model demonstrated that the massive sulfide and pyrite+dolomite ore types as main rock types hosting mineralization. The C–V fractal modeling used lead, zinc and iron geochemical data to outline four types of mineralized zones, which were then compared to the mineralized rock types identified in the geological model. ‘Enriched’ mineralized zones contain lead and zinc values higher than 6.93% and 19.95%, respectively, with iron values lower than 12.02%. Areas where lead and zinc values were higher than 1.58% and 5.88%, respectively, and iron grades lower than 22% are labelled “high-grade” mineralized zones, and these zones are linked to massive sulfide and pyrite+dolomite lithologies of the geological model. Weakly mineralized zones, labelled ‘low-grade’ in the C– V model have 0–0.63% lead, 0–3.16% zinc and > 30.19% iron, and are correlated to those lithological units labeled as gangue in the geological model, including shales and dolomites, pyritized dolomites. Finally, a log-ratio matrix was employed to validate the results obtained and check correlations between the geological and fractal modeling. Using this method, a high overall accuracy (OA was confirmed for the correlation between the enriched and high-grade mineralized zones and two lithological units — the massive sulfide and pyrite+dolomite ore types.

  15. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in carbonate aquifers of southern Latium region, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sappa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Spring and well water samples, from carbonate aquifers of Latium region, have been characterized to determine the hydrochemical processes governing the evolution of the groundwater. Most of the spring samples, issuing from Lepini, Ausoni and Aurunci Mts., are characterized as alkaline earth HCO3 waters, however, some samples show a composition of Cl--SO4 -- alkaline earth waters. Groundwater samples from Pontina Plain shows three different hydrochemical facies: alkaline earth HCO3 type, Cl-- SO4 -- alkaline earth type and Cl--SO4 -- alkaline type waters. Geochemical modeling and saturation index computation of the sampled waters show an interaction with calcareous and calcareous-dolomitic lithologies. Most of the springs and wells was kinetically saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite, and all the samples were below the equilibrium state with gypsum. This indicates that the groundwater has capacity to dissolve the gypsum along the flow paths. The electrical conductivity and Cl- concentrations of the sampled waters show a positive trend with the decrease in the distance from the coast, highlighting seawater intrusion in the coastal area. According to hydrochemistry results and geochemical modeling, the dominant factors in controlling the hydrochemical characteristics of groundwater are: (i water rock interaction with calcareous and calcareous-dolomitic lithologies; (ii seawater intrusion in the coastal area; (iii dissolution and/or precipitation of carbonate and (i.e. dolomite and calcite evaporate minerals (gypsum determined by saturation indexes; (iv mineral weathering process; (the high Mg/Ca ratio due to the weathering of Mg-rich dolomite.

  16. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Part 1. Evaluation of Phase 2 CO2 Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2. Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowersox, Richard [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Hickman, John [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Leetaru, Hannes [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-12-20

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO2 in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO2 storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO2 were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO2 was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole – including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite – at 1152–2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO2 was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter.

  17. Horizontal well drilled to intersect existing vertical well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.; Reynolds, J.

    1991-01-01

    Morse oilfield, in eastern Gray County of the Texas Panhandle, was originally developed between 1928 and 1937. It is but a very small part of the huge Texas Pandhandle field, which covers over 200,000 productive acres, containing 12,500 active wells with a cumulative production of one billion barrels of oil. The field produces from Permian age dolomites and the Pennsylvanian Granite Wash. This paper reports on multiple production techniques that have been used over the years with varying levels of success. Acidizing techniques in the late 1930s increased development, but the advent of hydraulic fracturing resulted in extensive development. The primary drive mechanism was solution-gas drive. Approximately one-fourth of Panhandle field has been subjected to gas injection, resulting in an estimated 50 million barrels of additional oil production. In 1955, waterflooding appeared to offer the most economical possibility of increasing ultimate recovery from the Brown Dolomite reservoir. The Morse Brown Dolomite pilot flood in Gray County and another Brown Dolomite pilot flood in Hutchinson County were the first two successful pilot floods in Panhandle field. The Morse flood has a total of 40 oil and 27 water injection wells on 500 flood acres. Morse field has a cumulative production of 15.7 million barrels of oil. The operating company, Future Petroleum Corp., a Dallas-based independent, believes that a third alternative using horizontal drilling has the potential to increase production. And it appears that the Brown Dolomite formation of Morse field offers the right combination of factors to attempt this type of venture

  18. Dynamics of soil organic carbon in density fractions during post-agricultural succession over two lithology types, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Li, Dejun; Chen, Hao; Wang, Kelin

    2017-10-01

    Agricultural abandonment has been proposed as an effective way to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. Nevertheless, SOC sequestration in the long term is largely determined by whether the stable SOC fractions will increase. Here the dynamics of SOC fractions during post-agricultural succession were investigated in a karst region, southwest China using a space-for-time substitution approach. Cropland, grassland, shrubland and secondary forest were selected from areas underlain by dolomite and limestone, respectively. Density fractionation was used to separate bulk SOC into free light fraction (FLFC) and heavy fraction (HFC). FLFC contents were similar over dolomite and limestone, but bulk SOC and HFC contents were greater over limestone than over dolomite. FLFC content in the forest was greater than in the other vegetation types, but bulk SOC and HFC contents increased from the cropland through to the forest for areas underlain by dolomite. The contents of bulk SOC and its fractions were similar among the four vegetation types over limestone. The proportion of FLFC in bulk SOC was higher over dolomite than over limestone, but the case was inverse for the proportion of HFC, indicating SOC over limestone was more stable. However, the proportions of both FLFC and HFC were similar among the four vegetation types, implying that SOC stability was not changed by cropland conversion. Exchangeable calcium explained most of the variance of HFC content. Our study suggests that lithology not only affects SOC content and its stability, but modulates the dynamics of SOC fractions during post-agricultural succession. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stratigraphy of the Silurian outcrop belt on the east side of the Cincinnati Arch in Kentucky, with revisions in the nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Silurian rocks form a narrow arcuate outcrop belt about 100 mi long on the east side of the Cincinnati Arch in Kentucky. They range from as much as 300 ft thick in the north to a pinchout edge in the south. The nomenclature of this sequence is revised to reflect mappability and lithologic uniformity on the basis of detailed mapping at a scale of 1:24,000 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kentucky Geological Survey. The Silurian rocks are divided into two parts: the Crab Orchard Group, raised in rank from Crab Orchard Formation and redefined, in the lower part of the Silurian section, and Bisher Dolomite in the upper part of the section. The Crab Orchard Group is subdivided into the Drowning Creek Formation (new name) at the base of the Silurian, overlain by the Alger Shale (adopted herein) south of Fleming County and by the Estill Shale (elevated to formational rank) north of Bath County. The Brassfield Member (reduced in rank from Brassfield Dolomite or Formation) and the Plum Creek Shale and Oldham Members of the former Crab Orchard Formation are included as members of the Drowning Creek; the Lulbegrud Shale, Waco, and Estill Shale Members of the former Crab Orchard Formation are now included in the Alger. The Drowning Creek Formation, 20 to 50 ft thick, is composed mainly of gray fine to coarse-grained dolomite with shale interbeds. The dolomite beds average several inches thick, with bedding surfaces that are locally smooth but generally irregular and are fossiliferous in many places; fossils include brachiopods, crinoid columnals, horn corals, colonial corals, trilobites, pelecypods, and bryozoans. The shale interbeds average several inches thick, except for its Plum Creek Shale Member which is entirely shale and as much as 12 ft thick, and are most abundant in the upper half of the formation. The members of the Drowning Creek intergrade and are indistinguishable in the northern part of the area. The Alger Shale, as much as 170 feet thick

  20. Grainstones and cementstone mounds: The Trogkofel summit section (Lower Permian, Carnic Alps, Austria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, M.; Sanders, D.; Krainer, K.

    2009-04-01

    are overgrown by abundant, thick fringes and botryoids of fibrous cement that is interpreted as calcitized aragonite cement. In addition, brachiopods, crustose red algae, and a few solitary and colonial rugose corals are typical. By volume, the former aragonite cement comprises the majority of the mounds. Intrinsic pores within the cementstone fabrics typically are filled by micropeloidal grainstone and/or by lime mudstone. The Trogkofel Limestone is locally dolomitized. Replacement dolomites show a wide range of crystal shapes and textures, but overall comprise (a) finely-crystalline, limpid dolostone of xenotopic or hypidiotopic fabrics that broadly mimick the texture of replaced sediment and cements, (b) coarse-crystalline fabrics of hypidiotopic to idiotopic, limpid or optically zoned dolomite, and (c) replacement saddle dolomite. The Trogkofel Limestone is riddled by karstic dykes and caverns that are mainly filled by, both or either of, geopetally-laminated red lime mudstone, terrigenous red sandstones, or thick fringes of fibrous cement. In the karstic cavity fills, packages of convolute geopetal lamination and brecciated internal sediments (internal seismites) overlain by infills with non-convolute lamination, fracture of fibrous cements, and dykes filled by multi-phase fracture breccias record tectonism during or after deposition of the Trogkofel Limestone. The Trogkofel Limestone is capped by a truncation surface which, in turn, is overlain by an interval of extremely poorly sorted, thick-bedded breccias with a former matrix of lime mudstone ("Trogkofel Breccia"). Both the components and the matrix of the Trogkofel Breccia are dolomitized. We interpret the facies and facies architecture of the eastern cliff section of Trogkofel as succession from the seaward side of a "grainstone-dominated" platform margin with cementstone mounds. The lack of clear-cut vertical trends in prevalent facies suggests that the platform margin developed mainly by aggradation. The

  1. Early diagenesis driven by widespread meteoric infiltration of a Central European carbonate ramp: A reinterpretation of the Upper Muschelkalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Arthur; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2017-12-01

    Meteoric diagenesis of carbonate ramps is often difficult to interpret and can commonly be confused with other coinciding diagenetic processes. The Middle Triassic Upper Muschelkalk of Switzerland provides an insightful case in which the effects of several overprinting diagenetic environments, including matrix dolomitization, can be clearly unravelled. Previous studies suggested that diagenesis took place in connate marine waters, with later meteoric waters being invoked to explain recrystallization of dolomite. In this study, diagenetic analyses (C-O stable isotope ratios, thin-section point counting, cathodoluminescence and UV-fluorescence microscopy) of calcitic bioclastic samples have revealed that early diagenesis (pre-stylolitization) and the accompanying porosity evolution did not occur exclusively in the presence of marine fluids. Five sequential stages of diagenesis have been identified: marine, shallow burial, mixing-zone, meteoric and dolomitization. Marine diagenesis induced precipitation of bladed and inclusion-rich syntaxial cements that fluoresce strongly under UV-light. Both cements account for a mean 7.5 vol% reduction in the porosity of bioclastic beds. Shallow burial diagenesis likely induced mouldic porosity and associated fluorescent dog-tooth cementation. Based on light oxygen isotope and elevated strontium isotope ratios, matrix aragonite-calcite neomorphism is interpreted to have occurred in a mixture of marine and meteoric fluids. The combination of shallow burial and mixing-zone processes reduced porosity on average by 4.8 vol%. Evidence for subsequent meteoric diagenesis is found in abundant dog-tooth and blocky calcite cements that have mean δ18OVPDB of - 9.36‰ and no signs of recrystallization. These meteoric cements reduced porosity by a further 13.4 vol%. Percolation of meteoric water through the ramp was driven by hydraulic gradients on an adjacent basement high, which was exposed by a cycle of early Ladinian regressions

  2. Erste Erkenntnisse zur Prospektion und Charakterisierung des Aquifers der Aroser Dolomiten, Schweiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regli, Christian; Kleboth, Peter; Eichenberger, Urs; Schmassmann, Silvia; Nyfeler, Peter; Bolay, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    In urban areas of the Swiss Alps the use of geothermal energy from several hundred meters depth becomes increasingly important. For this mainly open systems have priority. This work presents the first insights in the prospection and characterisation of the so far unexplored, utilizable, and abundant Aquifer of the Arosa Dolomites. Besides the use of established methods and techniques, such as seismic measurements, an exploration drilling, borehole geophysical measurements, and pumping tests, the application of the KARSYS-approach for geological and conceptual hydrogeological 3D-modelling of the aquifer is illustrated. In addition, the development of a viewer for 3D-visualization of drillings is documented. The hydrogeological and metrological approaches allow a lithological facies differentiation of the Arosa Dolomites, and a differentiation of the fractured and karstified areas within the aquifer. The results represent the basis for advanced findings optimizing and risks minimising exploration and drilling planning, and for sustainable utilization planning.

  3. Distribution of uranium in the carbonate rock of Um Bogma formation, Southwest, Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-AAssy, I.E.; Ahmed, F.Y.; Morsy, A.M.; El-Fawal, F.M.; Mansour, M.Gh.

    1998-01-01

    The lower carboniferous Um bogma Formation is a potential source for Mn, Cu and U. it is mainly composed of dolostone and limestone with few clastic different interbeds of clay stone, siltstone and sandstone. The different diagenetic processes which affected this formation are mainly, compaction, cementation, neomorphism, dissolution, dolomitization, silicification and filling the veins and pores. The distribution of uranium and thorium within the three members and their correlation with the iron oxides and organic matter, were studied. The channel porosity and intercrystalline spaces which resulted from dolomitization acted as pathways for uraniferous solutions in the carbonate rocks. On the other hand, the shales and clay stones underneath the carbonates of Um bogma formation acted as barriers and good depositional environment for the accumulation of uranium on the surfaces of joints and fractures.The accumulated uranium minerals in the carbonate rocks are most likely of the efflorescent deposits

  4. Numerical modeling of the effects of roughness on flow and eddy formation in fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Briggs

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of roughness on flow in fractures was investigated using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM. Simulations were conducted for both statistically generated hypothetical fractures and a natural dolomite fracture. The effect of increasing roughness on effective hydraulic aperture, Izbash and Forchheimer parameters with increasing Reynolds number (Re ranging from 0.01 to 500 was examined. The growth of complex flow features, such as eddies arising near the fracture surface, was directly associated with changes in surface roughness. Rapid eddy growth above Re values of 1, followed by less rapid growth at higher Re values, suggested a three-zone nonlinear model for flow in rough fractures. This three-zone model, relating effective hydraulic conductivity to Re, was also found to be appropriate for the simulation of water flow in the natural dolomite fracture. Increasing fracture roughness led to greater eddy volumes and lower effective hydraulic conductivities for the same Re values.

  5. Role of non-ferrous coal minerals and by-product metallic wastes in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.; Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Shridharani, K.; Huang, W.J.

    1981-02-01

    The effects of minerals and inexpensive ores or by-products (pyrites, red mud, flue dust, speculites, zinc sulfides, calcium oxide, dolomites, mica, molybdenite) in catalysing coal liquefaction or the hydrogenation of process solvents was studied with different cokes and solvents. Improved results were obtained in several cokes and th results are given in terms of oil fields, hydrogen consumption, desulfurization of SRC, etc. The addition of pyrite resulted in increased production of oils and increased conversion of coal; however, the effects varied from coal to coal. Dolomite, mica and molybdenite had insignificant catalytic activity. The reduction of pyrite, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ at process conditions was studied. (LTN)

  6. A study on the treatment process of industrial wastewater related to heavy metal wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Kim, J. H.; Yang, M. S.; Kim, M. J.; Son, J. S.; Park, H. S.

    1999-08-01

    The supernatant from metal wastewater by using magnesium hydroxide and dolomite was used to treat dyeing wastewater. In the case of magnesium hydroxide. In the case of magnesium hydroxide, the optimum dosage was 10 % (v/v) for supernatant A and 3 % (v/v) for separation B. Color turbidity and COD removal was 99 to 100 % , 85 to 97 % and 43 to 53 %, respectively. In the case of dolomite, the optimum dosage was 30 % (v/v) for supernatant A and 3% for supernatant B. Color, turbidity and COD removal was 96 to 99 %, 62 to 91 % and 52 to 53 %, respectively. In dyeing wastewater treatment by using supernatant from metal wastewater, the cost of chemicals was reduced by about 80 %

  7. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix.

  8. Characteristics of the soil in mountain beech communities on mountain Manjača

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremija Saša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented results of soil study, which will be used for defining the beech forest types of management unit 'Dubička Gora' on Mt. Manjača, are the basis for solving a series of current tasks of forestry profession. Relief and chemical nature of limestone are the main factors of the soil cover differentiation (Knežević, Košanin, 2004.. The results of physical and chemical soil properties are shown and its taxonomy is determined. Forest cover is represented by heterogeneous units-forest combinations. Four basic soil types are defined on the basis of detailed field and laboratory research: rendzina on dolomite, chernozem on limestone, brown soil on limestone, illimerised soil on limestone and dolomite.

  9. Characterization of marble waste for manufacture of artificial stone; Caracterizacao de residuo de marmore para fabricacao de rocha artificial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, M.C.; Silva, A.G.P., E-mail: maricostalonga2@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF/LAMAV), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Avancados; Gadioli, M.C.B. [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (CETEM/NR-ES), Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, ES (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This work aims to study the characterization of marble waste for the manufacture of artificial stone. The characterization of the waste was performed through X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the marble waste presents typical composition of a dolomite, calcite marble, and their minerals are: Calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) and dolomite (MgCa (CO{sub 3}){sub 2}. The waste presented predominance of particles below 200 mesh screen. This may be interesting for the production of artificial stone better visual appearance, such as marmoglass, for example. The results indicate that the use of marble waste for production of artificial stone is feasible and environmentally friendly alternative to give a destination for this waste generated in the order of millions of tons representing serious environmental problem. (author)

  10. PIXE analysis of nephrite minerals from different deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. W.; Gan, F. X.; Cheng, H. S.

    2011-02-01

    External-beam PIXE was used to determine the major, minor and trace elements of 45 nephrite minerals from 14 different deposits, including China and other countries. Depending on the R∗ value (mole percent of Mg 2+/(Mg 2+ + Fe 2+(3+))) and content of Cr, Co and Ni, two types of nephrite minerals from dolomite and serpentinized ultramafic deposits can be more accurately distinguished. Besides, the nephrite minerals from Xiaomeiling and Wenchuan deposit can be distinguished with others from dolomite deposits, through the content of Sr and Mn/Fe value, respectively. Moreover, depending on the Sr content, clear evidence was given to prove that the raw materials of ancient nephrite artifacts from Liangzhu culture ruins are not from Xiaomeiling nephrite deposit. Furthermore, PIXE as a non-destructive method will be more used to study ancient nephrite artifacts, so these results can provide scientific basis for seeking the provenance of nephrite raw materials.

  11. Hydrogeology of the Besparmak (Pentadactilos) Mountains (TRNC) Karstic Aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erduran, B.; Goekmenoglu, O.; Keskin, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Besparmak Mountains are located on the Nothern part of North Cyprus and lay paralel to the sea, 160 km 2 in length 10 km in width. Karstification, potential constituent and the hydro-dynamic structure of the Mesosoic aged carbonate rocks, located at high altitudes of the Besparmak Mountains have been investigated in this study. The Mesosoic aged carbonate rocks; dolomite, dolomitic limestones and recrytallized limestones are yhe units suitable for karstification in the exploration area. Surface area of the carbonate rocks is 84 km 2 . Chemical and isotopic samples have been collected, groundwater fluctuations have been observed and investigation wells have been openned for the definition of the karst aquifer. As the result of the geological, hydrogeological, drilling and geophysical investigations it was found that the Besparmak Mountains Karst Aquifer was formed of independent karstic systems and a total dynamic groundwater potential of aproximately 9 x 10 6 m 3 /year for these systems has been determined

  12. Traditional application of slates in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Demarco, Manuela; Cardenes Van den Eynde, Víctor

    2017-04-01

    Commercial slates in Uruguay are represented by dolomitic and pelitic slates, which are known in the local market with the generic name of "piedra laja". The dolomitic slates, or more precisely the "slaty dolomitic semipelites" and "slaty dolomitic metacarbonate rocks" (following the nomenclature of the British Geological Survey for metamorphic rocks, Robertson 1999), dominates the production since 1960. The mining started in a quarry called "Libro Gigante", which means "giant book" in Spanish, as the slaty cleavage of these rocks is almost vertical, which resembles a book when looked from far away. These slates integrate the Lavalleja Group, a unit that comprises the schist belt of the Neoproterozoic Dom Feliciano Belt that crops out in south-eastern Uruguay. According to Morales Demarco et al (2013), there are two active slate mining districts in this region: the northern, called "Arroyo Minas Viejas Mining District", from where light grey, light and dark green and green-red slate varieties are mined, and the southern called "Arroyo Mataojo Mining District" and where only dark grey slates are extracted. Few kilometres eastern from these districts, and still in Lavalleja Group, a quarry of slaty dolomitic pelite is found with sporadic production. Far to the east, the slaty muscovitic pelites of Rocha Group are mined from one quarry in "Puntas del Chafalote". The traditional applications of these slates in the country are as façade cladding and floor slabs, both indoor and outdoor. The potential use of the dolomitic slates as roofing slates has been investigated and discarded by Morales Demarco et al (2013), as the slabs resulting from splitting are too thick (0.5 to 2 cm) and thus too heavy for this application. The parameter that controls the fissility of slates is the mass value (Bentz and Martini, 1968; DIN EN 12326-2, 2000) and is very important to determine their potential applications. It takes into account the number of mica layers per mm and the average

  13. Characterization of marble waste for manufacture of artificial stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, M.C.; Silva, A.G.P.

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to study the characterization of marble waste for the manufacture of artificial stone. The characterization of the waste was performed through X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the marble waste presents typical composition of a dolomite, calcite marble, and their minerals are: Calcite (CaCO_3) and dolomite (MgCa (CO_3)_2. The waste presented predominance of particles below 200 mesh screen. This may be interesting for the production of artificial stone better visual appearance, such as marmoglass, for example. The results indicate that the use of marble waste for production of artificial stone is feasible and environmentally friendly alternative to give a destination for this waste generated in the order of millions of tons representing serious environmental problem. (author)

  14. Minerals from Macedonia: XV. Sivec mineral assemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boev, Blazho; Jovanovski, Gligor; Makreski, Petre; Bermanec, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents investigations carried out on the collected minerals from the Sivec deposit. It is situated in the vicinity of the town of Prilep, representing a rare occurrence of sugary white dolomite marbles. The application of suitable methods of exploitation of decorative-dimension stones makes possible to obtain large amounts of commercial blocks well known in the world. Despite the existence of dolomite marbles, a series of exotic minerals are typical in Sivec mineralization. Among them, the most significant are: calcite, fluorite, rutile, phlogopite, corundum, diaspore, almandine, kosmatite (clintonite or margarite), clinochlore, muscovite, quartz, pyrite, tourmaline and zoisite. An attempt to identify ten collected minerals using the FT IR spectroscopy is performed. The identification of the minerals was based on the comparison of the infrared spectra of our specimens with the corresponding literature data for the mineral species originating all over the world. The coloured pictures of all studied silicate minerals are presented as well. (Author)

  15. Refractory materials based on compounds of Mg, Zr, Si and Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drygalska, E.; Piech, J.; Szczerba, J.

    2003-01-01

    Basic refractory materials modified with zirconium oxide or calcium zirconate find application in metallurgy and ceramic industry. Fundamental raw material for ZrO 2 production is zirconia sand, while synthetic calcium zirconate is produced in reaction of zirconium oxide with calcium oxide. Regarding these facts new highly refractory composite materials CZ and DZ were obtained from mixtures of zirconia sand and limestone of dolomite. These composite materials may contain stabilised ZrO 2 and/or calcium zirconate. Among other important components are periclase and calcium orthosilicates. All these phases have high melting points (above 2000 o C). This work describes thermal and technological properties and microstructure of CZ and DZ materials. The use of calcareous raw materials (limestone and dolomite) yields materials with good hydration resistance. These composites may be used as an additive modifying properties of magnesia products. (author)

  16. Increasing the electrical discharge endurance of acid anhydride cured DGEBA epoxy resin by dispersion of nanoparticle silica. High Perform. Polym. 11 (1999) pp 281-296 by IOP Publishing Ltd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henk, Peter O; Kortsen, T.W.; Kvarts, T.

    1999-01-01

    combinations were used: (a) fumed nanoparticle silicon dioxide referred to as Aerosil, (b) equal volumes of Aerosil and nanoparticle anatase, and (c) Aerosil plus anatase in combination with coarse-particle filler grade calcium-magnesium carbonate dolomite. A test for endurance using the CIGRE method II...... electrode arrangement was applied, the test comprising the establishment of partial discharges running perpendicularly onto one face of a plate specimen for a period measured until breakdown.Our results show that the endurance of the pure polymer is low. Increased loading with Aerosil increases...... the endurance by a factor of up to 20 as the Aerosil content goes from zero to 5.4 vol%. Aerosil mixed with anatase has a similar effect. The high level of endurance is maintained with an additional high-volume (35 vol.%) filling of coarse-particle dolomite to an epoxy system already containing Aerosil...

  17. Eutrophication decrease: Phosphate adsorption processes in presence of nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeykens, Susana P; Piol, M Natalia; Samudio Legal, Lisa; Saralegui, Andrea B; Vázquez, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Eutrophication causes aquatic environment degradation as well as serious problems for different purposes of water uses. Phosphorus and nitrogen, mainly as phosphate and nitrate respectively, are considered responsible for eutrophication degradation. The focus of this work was the study of adsorption processes for decreasing phosphate and nitrate concentrations in bi-component aqueous systems. Dolomite and hydroxyapatite were selected as low-cost adsorbents. Obtained results showed that both adsorbents have high capacity for phosphate adsorption which the presence of nitrate does not modify. Hydroxyapatite proved to be the most efficient adsorbent, however, it showed a low percentage of desorption and few possibilities of reuse. Dolomite, on the other hand, allows a desorption of the adsorbed material that favours its reuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogen production from biomass tar by catalytic steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Jun; Choi, Young-Chan; Lee, Jae-Goo

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic steam reforming of model biomass tar, toluene being a major component, was performed at various conditions of temperature, steam injection rate, catalyst size, and space time. Two kinds of nickel-based commercial catalyst, the Katalco 46-3Q and the Katalco 46-6Q, were evaluated and compared with dolomite catalyst. Production of hydrogen generally increased with reaction temperature, steam injection rate and space time and decreased with catalyst size. In particular, zirconia-promoted nickel-based catalyst, Katalco 46-6Q, showed a higher tar conversion efficiency and shows 100% conversion even relatively lower temperature conditions of 600 deg. C. Apparent activation energy was estimated to 94 and 57 kJ/mol for dolomite and nickel-based catalyst respectively.

  19. Carbonaceous matter in the Pomozhan deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatek, G

    1979-01-01

    Carbonaceous matter (CM), encountered in the Pomozhan deposit, is coordinate to dolomitic-illitic clay, filling caverns in ore-bearing dolomites. The CM represents a disperse mass with particle sizes up to 2 mm, having a color from dark brown to black. The reflectivity (0.35-0.42%) and classification assignment of the CM to macerals of the vitrinite or dopplerinite group were determined by micropetrographic methods. CM belonging to the type of humic coals, transitional from brown to bituminous coals is an epigenetic formation. Its accumulation in the regions of the Ol'kush ore deposits occurred in the Triassic-Cretaceous or Cenozoic interval. Liassic coal of the Zavertse region or Helvetian coal of Khomentuv and Tarnobzheg could be the source of the CM.

  20. Microfacies, sedimentary environment and diagenesis of the upper part of Dalan and Kangan Formations in the Kuh-e Surmeh area, Folded Zagros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhossein Adabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The upper part of Dallan and Kangan formations (Permian-Triassic, are located in the Kuh-e Surmeh area in folded Zagros Basin with a thickness of 325 m overlying by Nar evaporite member and underlying by Dashtak Formation. Dominant lithology of these formations are limestone and dolomite. Our purpose in this study is to identify microfacieses, sedimentary environment and diagenetic proceses. To overcome this aim, thin sections petrographic studies, leaded to identify 12 microfacieses related to 4 facieses belt: tidal flat, lagoon, shoal and open marine. The observed microfacies patterns indicate a ramp carbonate platform as depositional environment. Based on petrographic studies, the important diagenetic processes in these formations consist of: micritization, dolomitization, cementation, stilolitization and chemical and physical compactions. Burial diagenesis is dominated diagenetic event. The observed porosities in this section are primary and secondary such as fenestral, vuggy, fracture, moldic, interparticle, intraparticle and channel

  1. Uranium and diagenesis in evaporitic lacustrine mudstone of the Oligocene White River Group, Dawes County, Nebraska. Bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Oligocene White River Group consists of the Chadron and the overlying Brule Formations in northwestern Nebraska. The Chadron Formation consists of alluvial and colluvial vitric mudstone beds, but in addition contains white persistent layers (purplish-white layers) that probably resulted from soil formation on vitric parent material. West of the current study area a basal sandstone facies of the Chadron is host rock for the Crow Butte uranium deposit. The Brule, which consists mostly of pedogenically altered alluvial and fluvial vitric mudstone deposits, contains a uraniferous lacustrine facies northwest of Chadron, Nebraska. Detrital minerals in rocks of the White River Group include quartz, feldspar, volcanic glass, smectite, and illite. Chemical precipitate minerals in the lacustrine facies are calcite, dolomite, and gypsum. Authigenic minerals include calcite, dolomite, gypsum, smectite, opal, chalcedony, together with oxidized uranium minerals

  2. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration. Plotting and examination of these data show that contrary to most depictions, the Michigan Basin is in fact extensively faulted and fractured, particularly in the central portion of the basin. This is in contrast to most of the existing work on the Michigan Basin, which tends to show relatively simple structure with few or minor faults. It also appears that these fractures and faults control the Paleozoic sediment deposition, the subsequent hydrocarbon traps and very likely the regional dolomitization patterns. Recent work has revealed that a detailed fracture pattern exists in the interior of the Central Michigan Basin, which is related to the mid-continent gravity high. The inference is that early Precambrian, ({approx}1 Ga) rifting events presumed by many to account for the gravity anomaly subsequently controlled Paleozoic sedimentation and later hydrocarbon accumulation. There is a systematic relationship between the faults and a number of gas and oil reservoirs: major hydrocarbon accumulations consistently occur in small anticlines on the upthrown side of the faults. The main tools used in this study to map the fault/fracture patterns are detailed, close-interval (CI = 10 feet) contouring of the formation top picks accompanied by a new way of visualizing the data using a special color spectrum to bring out the third dimension. In addition, recent improvements in visualization and contouring software were instrumental in the study. Dolomitization is common in the

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for two-phase flow in the vicinity of the repository in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Disturbed conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELTON, JON CRAIG; BEAN, J.E.; ECONOMY, K.; GARNER, J.W.; MACKINNON, ROBERT J.; MILLER, JOEL D.; SCHREIBER, J.D.; VAUGHN, PALMER

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results obtained in the 1996 performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented for two-phase flow in the vicinity of the repository under disturbed conditions resulting from drilling intrusions. Techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, examination of scatterplots, stepwise regression analysis, partial correlation analysis and rank transformations are used to investigate brine inflow, gas generation repository pressure, brine saturation and brine and gas outflow. Of the variables under study, repository pressure and brine flow from the repository to the Culebra Dolomite are potentially the most important in PA for the WIPP. Subsequent to a drilling intrusion repository pressure was dominated by borehole permeability and generally below the level (i.e., 8 MPa) that could potentially produce spallings and direct brine releases. Brine flow from the repository to the Culebra Dolomite tended to be small or nonexistent with its occurrence and size also dominated by borehole permeability

  4. Origin of channel systems in the Upper Cretaceous chalk group of the Paris Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmerode, E. V.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    the presence of at least two distinct intra-chalk discordant reflections: a Top Santonian and a Mid-Campanian reflection. These reflections are in places associated with up to 120-m-deep channel-like structures trending preferentially N-S and NW-SE. The Mid-Campanian reflection is also sporadically associated...... with a massive secondary dolomite layer, the thicknesses of which may reach 110 m. Diagenesis does not seem to account for the formation of the discordant reflections, as there is neither a one-to-one relationship between the dolomite and discordant reflections, nor are there signs of systematic collapse...... is suggested due to the uninterrupted deep-marine chalk facies below and above both unconformities, and the unrealistically large sea-level drop of more than 200 m, which would be necessary for subaerial exposure of the central Paris Basin during the Campanian. The channels are oriented parallel to the margins...

  5. Adapting existing experience with aquifer vulnerability and groundwater protection for Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Robins, NS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Africa today, and guidelines for risk assessment and groundwater protection (including protection zoning) exist, these are not always adhered to. For example, in Sep- tember 2005 an outbreak of typhoid in the town of Delmas in Mpumalanga killed... at least four people. Large parts of the town are supplied by boreholes drilled into a karstic dolomitic aquifer. The water is chlorinated before being made available for public supply. Following an earlier out- break of typhoid in 1993...

  6. The application of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method for the determination chemical composition of glass bath raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The estimation of determination accuracy of glass sand, limestone and dolomite compositions by the means of X-ray fluorescence method has been made. The most important advantage of XRF method application is short time of analysis. The preparation time of sample is not longer than 20 minutes, the analysis of single sample is about 1,5 minutes. The comparison of results of determinations by the means of XRF and complexometric methods have been given. (author)

  7. Study of marbles from Middle Atlas (Morocco): elemental, mineralogical and structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrissi, S.; Bejjit, L.; Haddad, M.; Falguères, C.; Ait Lyazidi, S.; El Amraoui, M.

    2018-05-01

    A series of marbles sampled from the region of Middle Atlas (Morocco), are characterized by different complementary spectroscopic techniques. X-Ray fluorescence is used to determine elemental composition of rock while X-Ray diffraction and the Raman spectroscopy are used to determine major crystalline phases (calcite and dolomite) and minor ones (quartz).The samples display typical EPR spectra of Mn2+ in calcite and reveal the presence of Fe3+ ions.

  8. Geocongress 84: 20. Geological congress of the Geological Society of South Africa. Abstracts: Pt. 2. Ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Only one article in the publication is relevant to INIS: Environmental isotopes and hydrochemistry in ground water studies. A very short review is given on the ground water resources of the Kalahari in Gordonia. Ground water in mining exploration and the geophysics of ground water and the methods used in the geophysics are discussed. The dolomitic aquifers, especially in the southern and western Transvaal and ground water models are also reviewed

  9. Potentiality of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in Microbial Solubilization of Phosphate Mine Tailings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dhakar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the solubilization behavior of the tailings produced by the floatation of a complex low grade phosphate ore. The composition of the tailings was essentially dolomite (52.04% with minor amounts of phosphate, iron and aluminium oxides (10.4 and 0.5% respectively. The presence of these products created uncontrolled land pollution and severely affected groundwater. An initiative has been taken up for utilization of this waste to generate an eco-friendly product. First step towards this panorama is incorporation of suitable microorganisms for the biodegradation of this effluent. Sulphur oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans produces sulphuric acid which neutralizes the dolomitic tailings and convert it into plant available forms. The solubilization activity was tested in sulphur medium with 5, 10, 15 and 20% concentration of tailings. The solubilization is graded on the basis of pH, Electrical conductivity (EC, soluble calcium and magnesium and soluble phosphate. The results from ex-situ experiments showed that the treatment with 15% tailings ended with highest solubilization. The values of pH, EC, soluble calcium and magnesium and soluble phosphate for this treatment were 4.92, 31.6 dS/m, 10.8 mL EDTA and 17.24 µg/mL respectively. Also, the results proved that sulphur oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans is capable of solubilizing dolomitic tailings from the Jhamarkotra mines. Finally, an important factor taken into account was solubilization of residual phosphate along with dolomite in the tailings. This combined action affects the solubilization behaviour of the residue, which was also showed successfully with the assayed laboratory studies.

  10. Modelization of reactive transport: application to the dedolomitization (Institut del Ciencies de la Tierr, CSIC, Barcelona (ES))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayora, C.; Taberner, C.; Samper, J.

    1994-01-01

    The replacement of dolomite with calcite (dedolomization) has been analyzed by means of two numerical models of reactive transport. The results of successive calculations under different scenarios have been compared with the observations made on the dedolomites developed on the Triassic strata from Prades (Tarragona, Spain). The model based on the local equilibrium assumption for water-rock interaction does not predict the development of the porosity associated to the replacement. The model based on kinetic laws for mineral dissolution and precipitation does predict the observed proportions of calcite, dolomite and porosity. The result of modeling under kinetic laws is sensitive to parameters such as the flow velocity, the chemical composition of the recharge water and the reactive surface of the minerals. The replacement and associated porosity is only formed for infiltration flows higher than 100 mm/year. The water has a neutral to slightly alkaline pH, far from equilibrium with carbonates and the atmosphere. The calcium concentrations must be one order of magnitude higher the average of surficial waters, probably due to sulfate dissolution. The reactive surface of dolomite has been estimated from a simple geometric model of fractures, whereas that of calcite has been inferred from calculations based on nucleation and crystal growth theory. The reactive surface of calcite appears to be several orders of magnitude lower than that of dolomite, in agreement with what is required for reactive transport calculations to generate porosity. The dedolomization and associated porosity takes place in the first meter of aquifers, whereas downstream the replacement vanishes and does not create porosity

  11. A unique model system of microbial carbonate precipitation: Stromatolites of Lagoa Vermelha, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warthmann, R. J.; Vasoncelos, C.; van Lith, Y.; Visscher, P. T.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Modern stromatolites are recognized as analogues to fossil laminated structures, which are remains of microbial activity that are widely found in sedimentary rocks beginning in the Neo-Archean, but are quite rare today. The key difference of modern microbial mats and stromatolites compared to ancient examples is the type of lithification. A few marine and hypersaline microbial mats have been observed to precipitate carbonates, and only in Shark Bay (Western, Australia) and Highborne Cay (Bahamas) has the formation of continuous laminae of carbonates been observed. Lagoa Vermelha, a moderate hypersaline lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, offers the ideal conditions to promote lithification. Calcified, sometimes dolomitic stromatolites grow on the sediment surface, whereas within the sediments dolomite precipitates. The factors controlling carbonate precipitation in Lagoa Vermelha are the changing water chemistry and the special hydrology, combined with a high primary production by cyanobacteria, a high rate of respiration and the absence of higher organisms. Here, we present a study of the physico-chemical parameters, microbial processes and bio-minerals associated with these stromatolites and microbial mats. This approach provides boundary conditions to better understand dolomite formation. Several discrete lithified calcium carbonate layers are present. The first lithified layer is found beneath a 2-mm-thick biofilm, which contains Gloeocapsa. Below the underlying dense Microcoleus layer, the second micrite deposit is observed at 4-5 mm depth. Successive micritic laminae are preserved in the layer of decaying cyanobacteria that harbors large numbers of purple sulfur bacteria, heterotrophic microbes and sulfate-reducing bacteria. C-isotope studies of the carbonate layers indicate a contribution of organic derived carbon associated with microbial processes, such as sulfate reduction. The O-isotopic values indicate an evaporitic enrichment of the water. Understanding

  12. Engineering effects of underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, Charles R [CER Geonuclear Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Useful effects of contained underground nuclear explosions are discussed in light of today's most promising potential applications. Relevant data obtained through exploration of explosion environments of nine U.S. tests in competent rock are summarized and presented as a practical basis for estimating magnitudes of effects. Effects discussed include chimney configuration, permeability, and volume as well as rubble particle size distributions and extents of permeability change in the chimney wall rock. Explosion mediums include shale, granite, dolomite, and salt. (author)

  13. Soil type affects Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum (Pinaceae) seedling growth in simulated drought experiments 1

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsey, Alexander J.; Kilgore, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Effects of drought stress and media type interactions on growth of Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum germinants were investigated. Methods and Results: Soil properties and growth responses under drought were compared across four growth media types: two native soils (dolomitic limestone and granite), a soil-less industry standard conifer medium, and a custom-mixed conifer medium. After 35 d of growth, the seedlings under drought stress (reduced watering) produced less sh...

  14. Qualitative mineralogical characterization of the sinter by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greca, M.C.; Pietroluongo, L.R.V.; Baliza, S.V.; Costa Pereira, E.A. da

    1987-01-01

    This paper aims the qualitative mineralogical characterization of sinters and raw materials employed on its fabrication, via X-ray diffraction technique. Thus, sample with constant coke breeze content and variable contents of sand, limestone, dunite and dolomite were prepared to obtain current sinter compositions, with variable basicity. The tests were performed at the research of the following institutions: Companhia Siderurgica Nacional, Centro de Tecnologia Mineral and Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia. (author) [pt

  15. Engineering effects of underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, Charles R.

    1970-01-01

    Useful effects of contained underground nuclear explosions are discussed in light of today's most promising potential applications. Relevant data obtained through exploration of explosion environments of nine U.S. tests in competent rock are summarized and presented as a practical basis for estimating magnitudes of effects. Effects discussed include chimney configuration, permeability, and volume as well as rubble particle size distributions and extents of permeability change in the chimney wall rock. Explosion mediums include shale, granite, dolomite, and salt. (author)

  16. INVESTIGATION OF ROCKS FOR PROJECTS AT BLASTING IN »KRIŽ« AND »BELSKI DOL« QUARRIES APPLICATION OF THE SHALLOW SEIZMIC REFRACTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations of softer and harder dolomite zones, measurements of naturally divided fragments in rock masses and investigations of rock mass by refractional geophysical method in the blasting area of the quarry were carried out. The obtained results provided the basis for selective projects of exploitation and blasting. Safety measures regarding possible damage to adjacent housing estates during blasting were determined (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Acute effects of Cu on oxygen consumption and 96 hr-LC 50 values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The median lethal copper (Cu) concentration (96 hr-LC50) values for acute Cu toxicity for Tilapia sparrmanii (live mass: 30 ± 8g) in Mooi River hard water of dolomitic origin at 20° C, pH 7.9, was 68.1 µmol l–1. At this 96 hr-LC50 value the specific oxygen consumption rate (∉ O2) decreased by 44.2 (± 2.1) % from a ...

  18. The effect of radionuclides and their carriers on diffusion coefficient of radionuclides in local rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Takriti, S.

    1995-07-01

    The diffusion coefficient of sup 9 sup 0 Sr and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs has been calculated for different local rocks in stationary and dynamic state. The effect of pH radioisotope solution dependence in shown by diffusion coefficient in some rocks. The results show that the cement and dolomite have the best quality of radioisotope retention which do not allow them to pollute the environment. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs

  19. Geothermometry obtained from the calcite twin and fluid inclusions in barite (Irankuh Pb-Zn deposit, Southwest of Isfahan)

    OpenAIRE

    Alijan Aftabi; Hengameh Hosseini-Dinani

    2017-01-01

    The Irankuh mining district is located 20 km southwest of Isfahan and is geologically situated in Sanandaj - Sirjan zone and the lower Cretaceous sequence of Isfahan-Malayer ore mineralization area. The ore minerals are emplaced in the faulted contact of Jurassic shale and Cretaceous carbonates and include pyrite, galena, sphalerite, calcite, barite, dolomite, quartz as well as minor marcasite, smithsonite, cerussite, gypsum, malachite, hematite and goethite. The mineralization is mainly occu...

  20. Early Silurian (Llandoverian) Leask Point and Charlton Bay bioherms, Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielczarek, W.; Copper, P.

    1986-08-01

    About 300 bioherms are known in the Llandoverian Manitoulin Formation of eastern Manitoulin Island. In the South Bay area, the large Leask Piont bioherm and Charlton Bay patch-reef complex lack a distinct skeletal growth framework. Bioherms consist of mudstone and wackestone, with isolated lenses of bafflestone, boundstone, floatstone. Fossils are scarce, but crinozoans and bryozoans comprise about 90% of the bioclasts. Other fauna include stromatoporoids, corals, brachiopods, gastropods, trilobites, and probable algae (algae are difficult to identify and may have played a significant role). Faunal ratios remained relatively constant during mound growth. Soft substrates with sedimentation rates of a few millimeters per year are suggested by bedding type and morphologic dominance of lamellar and tabular corals and stromatoporoids. An increased sedimentation rate, resulting from shoaling, is indicated by more overturned, broadly conical corals in the upper parts of the mounds. Shoaling may be responsible for cessation of mound growth. Lithoclasts are more common in the upper parts of the mounds. They formed when semiconsolidated muds were disturbed and redeposited during storms. Megarippled interreef surface areas, largely devoid of coral growth, indicate mud instability at Charlton Bay. Lack of suitable stable substrates may have hampered coral development. Dolomitization was postdepositional. The diagenetic sequence occurred in three stages: 1)selective pyritization and silicification, formation of an early muddy dolomite replacing the mud fraction of the dolostone, lithification and formation of rare calcite cement and neomorphic syntaxial rims; 2)clear, coarse dolomite replacing pore-filling calcite cement, syntaxial rims, and unaltered macrofossils, stylolitization, grain-to-grain dissolution; and 3)a late dolomite found mainly as fine rhombs in stylolites, solution seams, and intraskeletal pore space.

  1. Magnetic properties of glasses from geothite industrial wastes recycling (FeOOH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Rincon, J.M.; Esparza, M.; Gonzalez-Oliver, C.

    1997-01-01

    It has been carried out the magnetic properties determination for high iron oxide content glasses series obtained from a geothite red mud waste from the zinc hydrometallurgy and dolomite and glass cullet as main raw materials. It has been determined the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization values for the glasses here investigated. The results suggest that the magnetic behaviour are depending on the glass chemical composition, so that glasses can be differently classified like ferrimagnetic, ferromagnetic, superparamagnetic and paramagnetic. (Author) 6 refs

  2. ETUDE DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES CATIONS ECHANGEABLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SEI Joseph

    interfaces entre les solides, une solution aqueuse et un gaz généralement l'air. Ce procédé est favorisé par l'introduction de réactifs spécifiques appelés les collecteurs. Dans notre travail, on tient à déterminer les formes d'adsorption des collecteurs sur les surfaces minérales des carbonates (calcite et dolomite) et le quartz ...

  3. Caracterización estructural de vidrios con altos contenidos de óxidos de hierro obtenidos a partir de un residuo de la hidrometalurgia del zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, M.; Rincón, J. María; Mûsik, S.; Kozhukharov, W.

    1997-01-01

    It has been carried out the structural characterization of high oxide content glasses obtained by melting of a goethite industrial waste from the zinc hydrometallurgy with other raw materials as dolomite and glass cullet. The structural characterization has been carried out by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Diffraction by Amorphous Dispersion (RDF) and Mossbauer spectroscopy. It has been determined the interatomic distance, the oxidation state and the coordination of iron atoms in these glass...

  4. Development of catalytic gas cleaning in gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P; Kurkela, E; Staahlberg, P; Hepola, J [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Gasification gas containing dust can be efficiently purified from tars and ammonia with a nickel monolith catalyst. Temperatures of >900 deg C and a residence time of about 1 s (SV 2 500 1/h) were needed at 5 bar pressure to achieve complete tar decomposition and 80 % ammonia conversion. Catalyst deactivation was not observed during test runs of 100 h. At lower pressures dolomites and limestones can also be applied for tar removal at about 900 deg C temperatures. (orig.) 12 refs.

  5. Development of catalytic gas cleaning in gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P.; Kurkela, E.; Staahlberg, P.; Hepola, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Gasification gas containing dust can be efficiently purified from tars and ammonia with a nickel monolith catalyst. Temperatures of >900 deg C and a residence time of about 1 s (SV 2 500 1/h) were needed at 5 bar pressure to achieve complete tar decomposition and 80 % ammonia conversion. Catalyst deactivation was not observed during test runs of 100 h. At lower pressures dolomites and limestones can also be applied for tar removal at about 900 deg C temperatures. (orig.) 12 refs.

  6. Effects on Setting, Strength, Moisture Resistance and Linear Changes of Sorel’s Cement on Mixing Portland Cement as an Additive

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Ritu; Chandrawat, M. P. S.; Sharma, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium oxysulphate cement (MOC, Magnesia / Sorel’s Cement), discovered by Sorel S.T. in 1867 and has versatile cementing characteristics. It is prepared by the reaction of magnesium sulphate with magnesia in aqueous solution. Dolomite is used as inert filler to absorb the heat evolved during the exothermic formations of oxysulphate cement. Additives play an important role to modify the properties of Sorel’s cement by nullifying the harmful effects of the impurities present in the matrix...

  7. Lithology determination from neutron activation of calcium and magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, J.S.; Tapphorn, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of investigating the lithology of an earth formation traversed by a well bore using neutron activation analysis gamma spectroscopy. The intensities of 27 Mg and 49 Ca gamma radiation are measured and the two intensities combined to provide an indication of the lithology of the earth formation and, in particular, of the extent of dolomitization of the formation. (U.K.)

  8. Distribution of magnesium in groundwater of Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Milosavljević Jovana; Andrijašević Jakov; Todorović Maja

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is chemical element commonly found in the environment and the main constituent of many types of minerals and rocks. This element is also essential to man. Owing to its abundance in nature, magnesium is present in all water resources and generally occur as the dominant cation, with calcium, in those that feature low TDS levels, whose origin is associated with large formations of sedimentary rocks (limestones, dolomites), and to a lesser extent with...

  9. Forming mechanism of the Ordovician karst carbonate reservoirs on the northern slope of central Tarim Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Fu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ordovician karst carbonate reservoirs on the northern slope of central Tarim Basin are important oil and gas exploration targets in the basin, but their dissolution mechanisms are in controversy. In this paper, based on the integrated study of sedimentation, sequence and reservoir, together with microscopic analysis and macroscopic seismic data analysis, the carbonate karst reservoirs in the study area were divided into three types: dissolved pore-cavity limestone reservoir, pore-cavity dolomite reservoir and fracture-cavity siliceous reservoir, and their forming mechanisms were discussed respectively. Some findings were obtained. First, dissolved pore-cavity limestone reservoirs are distributed in the upper Yingshan Fm and Yijianfang Fm of the Ordovician vertically, while pore-cavity dolomite reservoirs are mainly developed in the Penglai Fm and lower Yingshan Fm of the Ordovician with great thickness. Second, dissolved pore-cavity limestone reservoirs were formed by karstification on the third-order sequence boundary (lowstand tract, while pore-cavity dolomite reservoirs were formed by deep burial dolomitization controlled by karstification on the third-order sequence boundary, both of which are distributed in the highstand tract below the third-order sequence boundary. Third, siliceous reservoirs are developed under the control of faulting, as a result of reworking of deep hydrothermal fluids along faults to the limestone, and the siliceous reservoirs and their hydrothermal solution fracture-cavity systems are distributed near faults. It is further predicted that, in addition to the three types of reservoir above, platform-margin reef-flat reservoirs are developed in the Ordovician on the northern slope of central Tarim Basin.

  10. Neutralising acid mine waters underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminov, A S

    1978-09-01

    It is essential to treat acid mine drainage in order to avoid its corrosive effects on plant and equipment. Neutralisation aims at increasing the pH to 7 and is carried out using lime, limestone or dolomite, in conjunction with aeration. Use of residues from settling ponds to slake the lime increases economy in water and lime, improves sedimentation and provides a better and more even sediment.

  11. Structural characterization of hog iron oxide content glasses obtained from zinc hydrometallurgy wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Rincon, J.M.; Musik, S.; Kozhujharov, W.

    1997-01-01

    It has been carried out the structural characterization of high oxide content glasses obtained by melting of a goethite industrial waste from the zinc hydrometallurgy with other raw materials as dolomite and glass cullet. The structural characterization has been carried out by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Diffraction by Amorphous Dispersion (RDF) and Mossbauer spectroscopy. It has been determined the interatomic distance, the oxidation state and the coordination of iron atoms in these glasses. (Author) 16 refs

  12. High resolution cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of carbonate cementation in Khurmala Formation (Paleocene-L. Eocene) from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Muhamed F.; Omer, Dilshad; Zebari, Bahroz Gh.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of high resolution cathodoluminsecnce-spectroscopy (HRS-CL) with spatial electron microprobe analysis and optical microscopy is used to determine paragenesis and history of cementation in the limestones and dolostones of Khurmala Formation which is exposed in many parts of Northern Iraq. Khurmala Formation was subjected to different diagenetic processes such as micritization, compaction, dissolution, neomorphism, pyritization and cementation that occurred during marine to shallow burial stages and culminated during intermediate to deep burial later stages. Five dolomite textures are recognized and classified according to crystal size distribution and crystal-boundary shape. Dolomitization is closely associated with the development of secondary porosity that pre-and postdates dissolution and corrosion; meanwhile such porosity was not noticed in the associated limestones. Microprobe analysis revealed three types of cement, calcite, dolomite and ankerite which range in their luminescence from dull to bright. Cathodoluminescence study indicated four main texture generations. These are (1) unzoned microdolomite of planar and subhedral shape, with syntaxial rim cement of echinoderm that show dull to red luminescence, (2) equant calcite cements filling interparticle pores which shows dull luminescence and weak zonal growth, (3.1) homogenous intrinsic blue stoichiometric calcite with dull luminescence and without activators, (3.2) coarse blocky calcite cement with strong oscillatory zoning and bright orange luminescence which postdates other calcite cements, (4) ankerite cement with red to orange, non-luminescence growth zonation which is the last formed cement.

  13. Karst development and speleogenesis, Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, E.F.; Mylroie, J.; Troester, J.; Alexander, E.C.; Carew, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Isla de Mona consists of a raised table-top Miocene-Pliocene reef platform bounded on three sides by vertical cliffs, up to 80 m high. Hundreds of caves ring the periphery of the island and are preferentially developed in, but not limited to, the Lirio Limestone/Isla de Mona Dolomite contact. These flank margin caves originally formed at sea level and are now exposed at various levels by tectonic uplift of the island (Franbk 1983; Mylroie et al. 1995b). Wall cusps, a characteristic feature of flank margin caves, are ubiquitois features. Comparisons among similar caves formed in the Bahamas and Isla de Mona reveal the same overall morphology throughout the entire range of sizes and complexities. The coincidence of the primary cave development zone with the Lirio Limestone/Isla de Mona Dolomite contact may result from syngenetic speleogenesis and dolomitization rather than preferential dissolution along a lithologic boundary. Tectonic uplift and glacioeustatic sea level fluctuations produced caves at a variety of elevations. Speleothem dissolution took place in many caves under phreatic conditions, evidence these caves were flooded after an initial period of subaerial exposure and speleothem growth. Several features around the perimeter of the island are interpreted to be caves whose roofs were removed by surficial denudation processes. Several large closed depressions and dense pit cave fields are further evidence of surficial karst features. The cliff retreat around the island perimeter since the speleogenesis of the major cave systems is small based upon the distribution of the remnant cave sections.

  14. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-9 (C-2950)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    2005-01-01

    SNL-9 (permitted by the State Engineer as C-2950) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation within a proposed re-entrant of the margin of halite dissolved from the upper part of the Salado near Livingston Ridge. SNL-9 is located in the southeast quarter of section 23, T22S, R30E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-9 was drilled to a total depth of 845 ft below the ground surface. Below surface dune sand and the Berino soil, SNL-9 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatuna, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and uppermost Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Medanos Members and into the uppermost Salado Formation. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to total depth, and the drillhole was successfully completed with a screened interval open across the Culebra.

  15. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-9 (C-2950)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-19

    SNL-9 (permitted by the State Engineer as C-2950) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation within a proposed re-entrant of the margin of halite dissolved from the upper part of the Salado near Livingston Ridge. SNL-9 is located in the southeast quarter of section 23, T22S, R30E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-9 was drilled to a total depth of 845 ft below the ground surface. Below surface dune sand and the Berino soil, SNL-9 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatuna, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and uppermost Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: 1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and 2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Meda?os Members and into the uppermost Salado Formation. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to total depth, and the drillhole was successfully completed with a screened interval open across the Culebra.

  16. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-12 (C-2954)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dennis W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (United States)

    2005-01-20

    SNL-12 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2954) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation near the margin of dissolution of halite in the upper part of the Salado south of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). SNL-12 is located in the southeast quarter of section 20, T23S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-12 was drilled to a total depth of 905 ft below the ground level. Below surface dune sand and the Berino soil, SNL-12 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and uppermost Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Meda?os Members and into the uppermost Salado Formation. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to total depth, and the drillhole was successfully completed with a screened interval open across the Culebra. At SNL-12, the uppermost Salado cores display displacive halite crystals in clastic-rich units below an amalgamated sulfate at the top of the formation. There is no indication of thinning of the upper Salado due to postdepositional dissolution, and this is consistent with predrilling expectations.

  17. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-5 (C-3002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-18

    SNL-5 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-3002) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation in an area north of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site where data are sparse and where a pumping or monitoring well for the northern pumping test is needed. SNL-5 is located in the southeast quarter of section 6, T22S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-5 was drilled to a total depth of 687 ft below ground level (bgl), based on driller's measurements. Below the caliche pad, SNL-5 encountered the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, and Rustler Formations. Two intervals of the Rustler were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and into the upper Los Meda?os Members. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to a depth of ~672 ft. No water was observed to flow into the open drillhole until the Culebra was penetrated. includes horizontal beds and laminae near the base, and the uppermost part shows some inclined bedding. The mudstone unit shows mostly reddish brown claystone and siltstone with some gray mottling. Clasts or intraclasts are also included in the unit. The upper Tamarisk sulfate is somewhat brecciated near the base.

  18. Depositional model for Rival and Midale subintervals (Mississippian), north-central Burke County, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, T.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Rival and Midale subintervals (Charles Formation, Upper Mississippian), north-central Burke County, North Dakota, represent two relative sea level fluctuations. Updip (northeast), the Rival subinterval contains fine to medium-bedded and chicken-wire anhydrite with interbedded algal bindstone that was deposited on supratidal flats. Basinward (southwest), the lithology changes to oncolitic, peloidal, intraclastic grainstone/packstone that was deposited in intertidal and subtidal restricted lagoonal environments. Evaporites precipitated in the sediment of the intertidal to shallow subtidal restricted lagoonal environment. Overlying the Rival subinterval is skeletal wackestone and packstone of the lower Midale subinterval. The presence of normal-marine fauna (crinoids, brachiopods, trilobites, rugose and tabulate coral) indicates a significant relative sea level transgression occurred following deposition of the Rival. The middle and upper Midale subinterval consists of intensely burrowed dolowackestone and dolomudstone that contain a less diversified faunal assemblage. Overlying the Midale carbonates is a transitional zone of calcareous shale and dolomite that grades upward into mottled (burrowed.) and finely laminated microgranular dolomite and anhydrite. The upper Midale section represents a relative sea level regression (shoreline progradation). Updip (northeast) reservoirs produce from the Midale carbonates, which are sealed laterally and vertically by calcarous shale and microgranular dolomitic anhydrite of the Midale Evaporite. Downdip (southwest), the Rival produces from porous grainstone, which is sealed laterally by intertidal/supratidal carbonates and evaporites, resulting in a stratigraphic trap. Vuggy and intergranular porosity are the major porosity types in the Rival grainstone, and moldic and intercrystalline porosity are dominant in the Midale dolowackestone.

  19. EPR and X-ray diffraction investigation of some Greek marbles and limestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duliu, Octavian; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Cristea, Corina

    2009-01-01

    Twelve different marble and limestone samples collected from well-known Greek quarries have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). X-ray diffraction spectra permitted to determine both major (calcite and dolomite) and minor (quartz or magnesite) mineralogical components. EPR has been used to investigate the same samples unirradiated and after 10 kGy gamma-ray irradiation. The unirradiated samples display typical EPR spectra of Mn 2+ in calcite and dolomite as well as a superposition of these while some samples displayed EPR free radicals signals of centers (low field signal) and centers (high field signal). From X-ray diffraction and EPR spectra it was possible to extract numerical values of several numerical parameters such as dolomite to calcite ratio, EPR intensity parameter, and low field to high field EPR signals intensity ratio. These values as well as the correlation coefficients between the digital functions that described the low field Mn 2+ ions EPR line have been used as entry data for cluster analysis to quantify the resemblance and differences between analyzed samples. (authors)

  20. Insights into the diagenetic environment of fossil marine vertebrates of the Pisco Formation (late Miocene, Peru) from mineralogical and Sr-isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioncada, A.; Petrini, R.; Bosio, G.; Gariboldi, K.; Collareta, A.; Malinverno, E.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Di Celma, C.; Pasero, M.; Urbina, M.; Bianucci, G.

    2018-01-01

    The late Miocene Pisco Formation of Peru is an outstanding example of richness and high-quality preservation of fossil marine vertebrates. In order to reconstruct the fossilization path, we present new textural, mineralogical and Sr-isotope data of diagenetic minerals formed in correspondence of fossil specimens such as marine vertebrates and mollusks. These fossil specimens were found at Cerro los Quesos, in the Ica Desert, within the diatomaceous strata of the Pisco Formation. Dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite and Mn minerals are the main phases found, while the calcium carbonate originally forming the mollusk valves is replaced by gypsum. An early formation of dolomite and of Mn minerals, triggered by the modifications of the geochemical environment due to organic matter degradation, is suggested by the textural relationships and is confirmed by the Sr isotopic ratio of dolomite, which agrees with that of seawater at the time of sedimentation. Instead, gypsum Sr isotopic ratios indicate a pre-Miocene seawater-derived brine circulating within the sedimentary sequence as a source for Sr. Oxidation of diagenetic sulfide causing a lowering of the pH of porewater is proposed as an explanation for Ca-carbonate dissolution. The diagenetic chemical environment was, nevertheless, favorable to bone preservation.

  1. Chemical fingerprint of iron oxides related to iron enrichment of banded iron formation from the Cauê Formation - Esperança Deposit, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil: a laser ablation ICP-MS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilia Aparecida Ramos de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Chemical signatures of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite and high-grade iron ore from the Esperança deposit, located in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, indicate that polycyclic processes involving changing of chemical and redox conditions are responsible for the iron enrichment on Cauê Formation from Minas Supergroup. Variations of Mn, Mg and Sr content in different generations of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite, high-grade iron ore and syn-mineralization quartz-carbonate-hematite veins denote the close relationship between high-grade iron ore formation and carbonate alteration. This indicates that dolomitic itabirite is the main precursor of the iron ore in that deposit. Long-lasting percolation of hydrothermal fluids and shifts in the redox conditions have contributed to changes in the Y/Ho ratio, light/heavy rare earth elements ratio and Ce anomaly with successive iron oxide generations (martite-granular hematite, as well as lower abundance of trace elements including rare earth elements in the younger specularite generations.

  2. Technological assumptions for biogas purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makareviciene, Violeta; Sendzikiene, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Biogas can be used in the engines of transport vehicles and blended into natural gas networks, but it also requires the removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, and moisture. Biogas purification process flow diagrams have been developed for a process enabling the use of a dolomite suspension, as well as for solutions obtained by the filtration of the suspension, to obtain biogas free of hydrogen sulphide and with a carbon dioxide content that does not exceed 2%. The cost of biogas purification was evaluated on the basis of data on biogas production capacity and biogas production cost obtained from local water treatment facilities. It has been found that, with the use of dolomite suspension, the cost of biogas purification is approximately six times lower than that in the case of using a chemical sorbent such as monoethanolamine. The results showed travelling costs using biogas purified by dolomite suspension are nearly 1.5 time lower than travelling costs using gasoline and slightly lower than travelling costs using mineral diesel fuel.

  3. Conglomerates of Stopnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Čar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the area between Stopnik, [ebrelje and Pick of [ebrelje the Ladinian clastic, carbonate and volcanogenic rocks, in the thickness of more then 600 m, are very diversely developed. They are situated on diferent structural blocks bounded by the middle Triassicfaults and overlay partly eroded Anisian dolomite in the footwall. Variegated volcanogenic sedimentary rocks with conglomerate lenses comprising the middle part of the Ladinian succession in the broader sorounding of Stopnik are very important for paleogeographicinterpretation of the area. Ten conglomerate lenses were separated in the middle of volcanoclastic and volcanogenic rocks on the [ebrelje structural block. Cross sections of the conglomerate lenses are some 10 m to 550 m long and 15 to 60 m thick. Their axes arearranged in the direction NW-SE. In the lower and upper part of the lithological succession in the lenses prevail conglomerates with more ordered internal structure, denser packing of pebbles and more distinct bedding but in the middle part of the succession in lensesprevail sandy conglomerates and pebbly sandstones with less ordered internal structure, less denser packing of pebbles and less distinct bedding. The pebbles consist of diferent types of limestone, dolomite, volcanic rocks, tuffs, tuffaceous sandstone and conglomerate.They represent prevailing resedimented lower Ladinian rocks. The described sedimentary rocks are interpreted as a product of alluvial fan and fan delta sedimentary complexes, which were transgressively covered by tuffaceous muddy marine sediments passing intothe Cordevolian dolomite.

  4. Carbonate rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age in the Lancaster quadrangle, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, Harold; Becher, Albert E.

    1968-01-01

    Detailed mapping has shown that the carbonate rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age in the Lancaster quadrangle, Pennsylvania, can be divided into 14 rock-stratigraphic units. These units are defined primarily by their relative proportions of limestone and dolomite. The oldest units, the Vintage, Kinzers, and Ledger Formations of Cambrian age, and the Conestoga Limestone of Ordovician age are retained in this report. The Zooks Corner Formation, of Cambrian age, a dolomite unit overlying the Ledger Dolomite, is named here for exposures along Conestoga Creek near the village of Zooks Corner. The Conococheague (Cambrian) and Beekmantown (Ordovician) Limestones, as mapped by earlier workers, have been elevated to group rank and subdivided into formations that are correlated with and named for geologic units in Lebanon and Berks Counties, Pa. These formations, from oldest to youngest, are the Buffalo Springs, Snitz Creek, Millbach, and Richland Formations of the Conococheague Group, and the Stonehenge, Bpler, and Ontelaunee Formations of the Beekmantown Group. The Annville and Myerstown Limestones, which are named for lithologically similar units in Dauphin and Lebanon Counties, Pa., overlie the Beekmantown Group in one small area in the quadrangle.

  5. WIPP Hydrology Program: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico, Hydrologic Data Report No. 5: Parts, A-WIPP-13 multipad test; B-H-4c, P-17, ERDA-9, and Cabin Baby-1 slug tests; C-Engle and Carper well pumping tests; D-WIPP-12, H-14, and H-15 drill-stem tests; E-Water-level data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stensrud, W.A.; Bame, M.A.; Lantz, K.D.; LaVenue, A.M.; Palmer, J.B.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Part A of this report describes the objectives, scope, design, equipment, and methodology for a long-term pumping test conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The test was conducted to provide technical assistance as part of the ongoing hydrologic characterization of the WIPP site. The test is referred to as the northern multipad pumping test, because it was designed to create a hydraulic stress over a wide area of the northern half of the WIPP site. The fluid-pressure and water-level recovery in both pumping and observation wells were monitored for a minimum of 72 days. The test interval was the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Twenty-three observation wells completed in the Culebra dolomite were monitored at least once a month as part of the regional water-level monitoring program. Severl wells completed in the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation were monitored during the test to assess the possibility of Magenta-Culebra communication in the expected area of influence of this test. The succeeding sections of this part of Hydrologic Data Report No. 5 present detailed descriptions of the test objectives, pretest data collection, test equipment and test-well configuration, the observation-well network, and test results. 3 refs., 147 figs., 107 tabs

  6. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-12 (C-2954) (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    2005-01-01

    SNL-12 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2954) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation near the margin of dissolution of halite in the upper part of the Salado south of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). SNL-12 is located in the southeast quarter of section 20, T23S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-12 was drilled to a total depth of 905 ft below the ground level. Below surface dune sand and the Berino soil, SNL-12 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and uppermost Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Medanos Members and into the uppermost Salado Formation. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to total depth, and the drillhole was successfully completed with a screened interval open across the Culebra. At SNL-12, the uppermost Salado cores display displacive halite crystals in clastic-rich units below an amalgamated sulfate at the top of the formation. There is no indication of thinning of the upper Salado due to postdepositional dissolution, and this is consistent with predrilling expectations.

  7. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-5 (C-3002) (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    2005-01-01

    SNL-5 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-3002) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation in an area north of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site where data are sparse and where a pumping or monitoring well for the northern pumping test is needed. SNL-5 is located in the southeast quarter of section 6, T22S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-5 was drilled to a total depth of 687 ft below ground level (bgl), based on driller's measurements. Below the caliche pad, SNL-5 encountered the Mescalero caliche, Gatuna, Dewey Lake, and Rustler Formations. Two intervals of the Rustler were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and into the upper Los Medanos Members. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to a depth of ∼672 ft. No water was observed to flow into the open drillhole until the Culebra was penetrated. includes horizontal beds and laminae near the base, and the uppermost part shows some inclined bedding. The mudstone unit shows mostly reddish brown claystone and siltstone with some gray mottling. Clasts or intraclasts are also included in the unit. The upper Tamarisk sulfate is somewhat brecciated near the base.

  8. The Effects of Varying Crustal Carbonate Composition on Assimilation and CO2 Degassing at Arc Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L. B.; Holmes, A. K.; Dasgupta, R.; Tumiati, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magma-crustal carbonate interaction and subsequent decarbonation can provide an additional source of CO2 release to the exogenic system superimposed on mantle-derived CO2. Carbonate assimilation at present day volcanoes is often modeled by limestone consumption experiments [1-4]. Eruptive products, however, do not clearly display the characteristic ultracalcic melt compositions produced during limestone-magma interaction [4]. Yet estimated CO2outflux [5] and composition of volcanics in many volcanic systems may allow ~3-17% limestone- or dolostone-assimilated melt contribution. Crystallization may retain ultracalcic melts in pyroxenite cumulates. To extend our completed study on limestone assimilation, here we explore the effect of varying composition from calcite to dolomite on chemical and thermal decarbonation efficiency of crustal carbonates. Piston cylinder experiments at 0.5 GPa and 900-1200 °C demonstrate that residual mineralogy during interaction with magma shifts from CaTs cpx and anorthite/scapolite in the presence of calcite to Di cpx and Fo-rich olivine with dolomite. Silica-undersaturated melts double in magnesium content, while maintaining high (>30 wt.%) CaO values. At high-T, partial thermal breakdown of dolomite into periclase and CO2 is minimal (<5%) suggesting that in the presence of magma, CO2 is primarily released due to assimilation. Assimilated melts at identical P-T conditions depict similarly high volatile contents (10-20 wt.% by EMPA deficit at 0.5 GPa, 1150 °C with hydrous basalt) with calcite or dolomite. Analysis of the coexisting fluid phase indicates the majority of water is dissolved in the melt, while CO2 released from the carbonate is preferentially partitioned into the vapor. This suggests that although assimilated melts have a higher CO2 solubility, most of the CO2can easily degas from the vapor phase at arc volcanoes, possibly more so at volcanic plumbing systems traversing dolomite [8]. [1]Conte et al 2009 EuJMin (21) 763

  9. Maquoketa Shale Caprock Integrity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Knox Project objective is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambrian-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone (St. Peter Sandstone and Potosi Dolomite) as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. The suitability of the St. Peter Sandstone and Potosi Dolomite to serve as reservoirs for CO2 sequestration is discussed in separate reports. In this report the data gathered from the Knox project, the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) and Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration project (IL-ICCS) are used to make some conclusions about the suitability of the Maquoketa shale as a confining layer for CO2 sequestration. These conclusions are then upscaled to basin-wide inferences based on regional knowledge. Data and interpretations (stratigraphic, petrophysical, fractures, geochemical, risk, seismic) applicable to the Maquoketa Shale from the above mentioned projects was inventoried and summarized. Based on the analysis of these data and interpretations, the Maquoketa Shale is considered to be an effective caprock for a CO2 injection project in either the Potosi Dolomite or St. Peter Sandstone because it has a suitable thickness (~200ft. ~61m), advantageous petrophysical properties (low effective porosity and low permeability), favorable geomechanical properties, an absence of observable fractures and is regionally extensive. Because it is unlikely that CO2 would migrate upward through the Maquoketa Shale, CO2, impact to above lying fresh water aquifers is unlikely. Furthermore, the observations indicate that CO2 injected into the St. Peter Sandstone or Potosi Dolomite may never even migrate up into the Maquoketa Shale at a high enough concentrations or pressure to threaten the integrity of the caprock. Site specific conclusions were reached by unifying the data and conclusions from the IBDP, ICCS and the Knox projects. In the Illinois Basin, as one looks further away from

  10. Hydrothermal replacement of biogenic and abiogenic aragonite by Mg-carbonates - Relation between textural control on effective element fluxes and resulting carbonate phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Laura; Müller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf; Immenhauser, Adrian; Putlitz, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Dolomitization, i.e., the secondary replacement of calcite or aragonite (CaCO3) by dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2), is one of the most volumetrically important carbonate diagenetic processes. It occurs under near surface and shallow burial conditions and can significantly modify rock properties through changes in porosity and permeability. Dolomitization fronts are directly coupled to fluid pathways, which may be related to the initial porosity/permeability of the precursor limestone, an existing fault network or secondary porosity/permeability created through the replacement reaction. In this study, the textural control on the replacement of biogenic and abiogenic aragonite by Mg-carbonates, that are typical precursor phases in the dolomitization process, was experimentally studied under hydrothermal conditions. Aragonite samples with different textural and microstructural properties exhibiting a compact (inorganic aragonite single crystal), an intermediate (bivalve shell of Arctica islandica) and open porous structure (skeleton of coral Porites sp.) were reacted with a solution of 0.9 M MgCl2 and 0.015 M SrCl2 at 200 °C. The replacement of aragonite by a Ca-bearing magnesite and a Mg-Ca carbonate of non-stoichiometric dolomitic composition takes place via a dissolution-precipitation process and leads to the formation of a porous reaction front that progressively replaces the aragonite precursor. The reaction leads to the development of porosity within the reaction front and distinctive microstructures such as gaps and cavities at the reaction interface. The newly formed reaction rim consists of chemically distinct phases separated by sharp boundaries. It was found that the number of phases and their chemical variation decreases with increasing initial porosity and reactive surface area. This observation is explained by variations in effective element fluxes that result in differential chemical gradients in the fluid within the pore space of the reaction rim. Observed

  11. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO2 emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in Biganzoli et al. (2014) and from the dolomitic sorbent production plant. The results of the LCA show minor changes in the potential impacts between the two operational modes of the plants. These differences are for 8 impact categories in favour of the new operational mode based on the addition of the dolomitic sorbent, and for 7 impact categories in favour of the traditional operation. A final evaluation was conducted on the potential

  12. Telescoped porphyry-style and epithermal veins and alteration at the central Maratoto valley prospect, Hauraki Goldfield, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, M.P.; Mauk, J.L.; Kendrick, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    At the central Maratoto valley prospect, southern Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand, andesite flows and dacite breccias host rare porphyry-style quartz veins that are telescoped by widespread epithermal veins and alteration. Early porphyry-style quartz veins, which lack selvages of porphyry-style alteration, host hypersaline fluid inclusions that contain several translucent daughter crystals, including halite and sylvite. Overprinting epithermal veins and alteration are divided into two stages. Main-stage epithermal alteration and veins are characterised by the successive deposition of pyrite, quartz, and ankerite-dolomite veinlets coupled with intense alteration of the wall rock to quartz, illite, interlayer illite-smectite (≤ 10% smectite), chlorite, pyrite, ankerite, and dolomite. Late-stage epithermal veins and alteration are characterised by the formation of calcite and siderite veinlets, coupled with overprinting of the wall rocks by both these minerals. Multiphase fluid inclusions in a porphyry-style quartz vein formed at temperatures >400 degrees C and trapped hypersaline magmatic fluid. Lower temperature secondary liquid-rich inclusions in the porphyry-style quartz vein homogenise between 283 and 329 degrees C and trapped a dilute fluid with 18 O (VSMOW) values of 13.5-18.1 permille, whereas late-stage epithermal calcite has δ 18 O (VSMOW) values of 3.1-5.1 permille. Calculated isotopic compositions for the fluid in equilibrium with ankerite-dolomite and calcite at 260 degrees C, averages 6 and -3 permille, respectively. The enriched value for main-stage ankerite-dolomite suggests formation from waters that underwent significant water-rock exchange, whereas isotopically lighter water that formed late-stage calcite underwent little water-rock interaction. We propose a three-stage model to explain telescoped veins and alteration styles at the central Maratoto valley prospect area. Porphyry-style quartz veins were the first to form from hot hypersaline

  13. Fluid-chemical evidence for one billion years of fluid flow through Mesoproterozoic deep-water carbonate mounds (Nanisivik zinc district, Nunavut)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, K. E.; Turner, E. C.; Kontak, D. J.; Fayek, M.

    2018-02-01

    Ancient carbonate rocks commonly contain numerous post-depositional phases (carbonate minerals; quartz) recording successive diagenetic events that can be deciphered and tied to known or inferred geological events using a multi-pronged in situ analytical protocol. The framework voids of large, deep-water microbial carbonate seep-mounds in Arctic Canada (Mesoproterozoic Ikpiarjuk Formation) contain multiple generations of synsedimentary and late cement. An in situ analytical study of the post-seafloor cements used optical and cathodoluminescence petrography, SEM-EDS analysis, fluid inclusion (FI) microthermometry and evaporate mound analysis, LA-ICP-MS analysis, and SIMS δ18O to decipher the mounds' long-term diagenetic history. The six void-filling late cements include, in paragenetic order: inclusion-rich euhedral dolomite (ED), finely crystalline clear dolomite (FCD), hematite-bearing dolomite (HD), coarsely crystalline clear dolomite (CCD), quartz (Q), replacive calcite (RC) and late calcite (LC). Based on the combined analytical results, the following fluid-flow history is defined: (1) ED precipitation by autocementation during shallow burial (fluid 1; Mesoproterozoic); (2) progressive mixing of Ca-rich hydrothermal fluid with the connate fluid, resulting in precipitation of FCD followed by HD (fluid 2; also Mesoproterozoic); (3) precipitation of hydrothermal dolomite (CCD) from high-Ca and K-rich fluids (fluid 3; possibly Mesoproterozoic, but timing unclear); (4) hydrothermal Q precipitation (fluid 4; timing unclear), and (5) RC and LC precipitation from a meteoric-derived water (fluid 5) in or since the Mesozoic. Fluids associated with FCD, HD, and CCD may have been mobilised during deposition of the upper Bylot Supergroup; this time interval was the most tectonically active episode in the region's Mesoproterozoic to Recent history. The entire history of intermittent fluid migration and cement precipitation recorded in seemingly unimportant void

  14. Effets des amendements locaux sur les rendements, les indices de nutrition et les bilans culturaux dans un système de rotation coton-maïs dans l'ouest du Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koulibaly B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ffects of local amendments on yields, nutrition indexes and mineral balances in a cotton-maize rotation system in the west of Burkina Faso. After 20 years of continuous cropping system on a tropical ferruginous soil, the effects of three amendments on crop yield and nutrients uptake were studied for two years in this system. Compost, phosphate rock and dolomite amendments at respectively the rate of 6, 0.3 and 1.5 t.ha-1 were compared to the control soil not amended. The experimental design was a block Fisher with three amendments and four replications. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and maize (Zea mays L. mineral nutrition were determined as well as their yields. These plants dry matter productions were measured after harvesting. Results showed that compost, phosphate rock and dolomite application to soil improved the dry matter production of cotton and maize plants. Soil amendment with 6 t.ha-1 of compost significantly improved cotton seed and maize production. In the same time, the application of 1.5 t.ha-1 of dolomite limestone significantly increased maize yield. The application of phosphate rock (0.3 t.ha-1 had no effect on cotton or maize yields as well as their dry matter production. Compost, phosphate rock and dolomite application to soil had no influence on cotton and maize plants contents in N, P and K. Seventy days after sowing, the amendments did not improve cotton nutrition indexes which revealed a good nutrition for P, K and S. Nutrition indexes indicated that N deficiencies in cotton plants with amended soils (IN < 80 were more important than those observed with cotton plants grown on control soil (IN = 84. The application of mineral fertilizer to the control soil or to amended soils gave positive balances for nutrients like P (45 to 100 kg.ha-1 and S (5 to 24 kg.ha-1, while soils amended with phosphate rock and dolomite showed a high deficit for N and K, compared to the control soil. The study showed that compost combined to

  15. Geothermal prospection in the Greater Geneva Basin (Switzerland and France). Impact of diagenesis on reservoir properties of the Upper Jurassic carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhloufi, Yasin; Rusillon, Elme; Brentini, Maud; Clerc, Nicolas; Meyer, Michel; Samankassou, Elias

    2017-04-01

    Diagenesis of carbonate rocks is known to affect the petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability) of the host rock. Assessing the diagenetic history of the rock is thus essential when evaluating any reservoir exploitation project. The Canton of Geneva (Switzerland) is currently exploring the opportunities for geothermal energy exploitation in the Great Geneva Basin (GGB) sub-surface. In this context, a structural analysis of the basin (Clerc et al., 2016) associated with reservoir appraisal (Brentini et al., 2017) and rock-typing of reservoir bodies of potential interest were conducted (Rusillon et al., 2017). Other geothermal exploitation projects elsewhere (e.g. Bavaria, south Germany, Paris Basin, France) showed that dolomitized carbonate rocks have good reservoir properties and are suitable for geothermal energy production. The objectives of this work are to (1) describe and characterize the dolomitized bodies in the GGB and especially their diagenetic history and (2) quantify the reservoir properties of those bodies (porosity, permeability). Currently, our study focuses on the Upper Jurassic sedimentary bodies of the GGB. Field and well data show that the dolomitization is not ubiquitous in the GGB. Results from the petrographical analyses of the Kimmeridgian cores (Humilly-2) and of field analogues (Jura, Saleve and Vuache mountains) display complex diagenetic histories, dependent of the study sites. The paragenesis exhibits several stages of interparticular calcite cementation as well as different stages of dolomitization and/or dedolomitization. Those processes seem to follow constrained path of fluid migrations through burial, faulting or exhumation during the basin's history. These complex diagenetic histories affected the petrophysical and microstructural properties via porogenesis (conservation of initial porosity, moldic porosity) and/or poronecrosis events. The best reservoir properties appear to be recorded in patch reef and peri

  16. Brackish to hypersaline lake dolostones of the Mississippian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Carys; Kearsey, Timothy; Davies, Sarah; Millward, David; Marshall, John

    2016-04-01

    Flat-lying ferroan dolomite beds are common in the Mississippian and occur along the southern margin of Laurassia, from Kentucky USA to Poland. These rocks are important as they record shallow marine to coastal plain environments that may have acted as a pathway or refugia for animals that were radiating into freshwaters such as tetrapods, fish, molluscs and arthropods. This study is a contribution to the TW:eed Project (Tetrapod World: early evolution and diversification), that examines the rebuilding of Carboniferous ecosystems following a mass extinction at the end of the Devonian. The project focuses on the Tournaisian Ballagan Formation of Scotland, which contains rare fish and tetrapod fossils. The formation is characterised by an overbank facies association of siltstone, sandstone and palaeosols, interbedded with dolostone and evaporite units, and cut by fluvial sandstone facies associations of fining-upwards conglomerate lags, cross-bedded sandstone and rippled siltstone. Two sites are used as a case study to describe the sedimentological, faunal and ichnofaunal diversity of these dolostones. More than 270 dolostone beds are recorded in each of the 500 metre depth Norham Core (near Berwick-upon-Tweed) and from a 520 metre thick field section at Burnmouth. The beds are laterally extensive, over ˜1 km, although individual units do not appear to correlate between the core and the field site. In the Norham Core dolostones comprise up to 14% of the succession. 17% of the beds contain marginal marine fossils: Spirorbis, rare orthocones, brachiopods and putative marine sharks. More common fauna include ostracods, bivalves, plants, eurypterids, gastropods and sarcopterygian fish, which are interpreted as brackish to freshwater tolerant. Bioturbation is fairly common with Serpula colonies within dolostone beds and Chondrites burrowing down from the base of dolostone beds. Some rare units in the field section have a bulbous bed surface and preserve tree root traces

  17. The use of biogas plant fermentation residue for the stabilisation of toxic metals in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geršl, Milan; Šotnar, Martin; Mareček, Jan; Vítěz, Tomáš; Koutný, Tomáš; Kleinová, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Our department has been paying attention to different methods of soil decontamination, including the in situ stabilisation. Possible reagents to control the toxic metals mobility in soils include a fermentation residue (FR) from a biogas plant. Referred to as digestate, it is a product of anaerobic decomposition taking place in such facilities. The fermentation residue is applied to soils as a fertiliser. A new way of its use is the in situ stabilisation of toxic metals in soils. Testing the stabilisation of toxic metals made use of real soil samples sourced from five agriculturally used areas of the Czech Republic with 3 soil samples taken from sites contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn and 2 samples collected at sites of natural occurrence of Cu, Pb and Zn ores. All the samples were analysed using the sequential extraction procedure (BCR) (determine the type of Cu, Pb and Zn bonds). Stabilisation of toxic metals was tested in five soil samples by adding reagents as follows: dolomite, slaked lime, goethite, compost and fermentation residue. A single reagent was added at three different concentrations. In the wet state with the added reagents, the samples were left for seven days, shaken twice per day. After seven days, metal extraction was carried out: samples of 10 g soil were shaken for 2 h in a solution of 0.1M NH4NO3 at a 1:2.5 (g.ml-1), centrifuged for 15 min at 5,000 rpm and then filtered through PTFE 0.45 μm mesh filters. The extracts were analysed by ICP-OES. Copper The best reduction of Cu concentration in the extract was obtained at each of the tested sites by adding dolomite (10 g soil + 0.3 g dolomite). The concentration of Cu in the leachate decreased to 2.1-18.4% compare with the leachate without addition. Similar results were also shown for the addition of fermentation residue (10 g soil + 1 g FR). The Cu concentration in the leachate decreased to 16.7-26.8% compared with the leachate without addition. Lead The best results were achieved by adding

  18. Geology of Paleozoic Rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, Excluding the San Juan Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    2003-01-01

    The geology of the Paleozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, was studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program to provide support for hydrogeological interpretations. The study area is segmented by numerous uplifts and basins caused by folding and faulting that have recurred repeatedly from Precambrian to Cenozoic time. Paleozoic rocks in the study area are 0-18,000 feet thick. They are underlain by Precambrian igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks and are overlain in most of the area by Triassic formations composed mostly of shale. The overlying Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks are 0-27,000 feet thick. All Paleozoic systems except the Silurian are represented in the region. The Paleozoic rocks are divisible into 11 hydrogeologic units. The basal hydrogeologic unit consisting of Paleozoic rocks, the Flathead aquifer, predominantly is composed of Lower to Upper Cambrian sandstone and quartzite. The aquifer is 0-800 feet thick and is overlain gradationally to unconformably by formations of Cambrian to Mississippian age. The Gros Ventre confining unit consists of Middle to Upper Cambrian shale with subordinate carbonate rocks and sandstone. The confining unit is 0-1,100 feet thick and is overlain gradationally to unconformably by formations of Cambrian to Mississippian age. The Bighom aquifer consists of Middle Cambrian to Upper Ordovician limestone and dolomite with subordinate shale and sandstone. The aquifer is 0-3,000 feet thick and is overlain unconformably by Devonian and Mississipplan rocks. The Elbert-Parting confining unit consists of Lower Devonian to Lower Mississippian limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartzite, shale, and anhydrite. It is 0-700 feet thick and is overlain conformably to unconformably by Upper Devonian and Mississippian rocks. The Madison aquifer consists of two zones of distinctly different lithology. The lower (Redwall-Leadville) zone

  19. Biomass oxygen/steam gasification in a pressurized bubbling fluidized bed: Agglomeration behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chunguang; Rosén, Christer; Engvall, Klas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dolomite is a superior material in preventing bed agglomeration. • Small molten ash particles deposited on magnesite at bed temperatures above 1000 °C. • The performance, when using magnesite, is sensitive to temperature disturbances. • The anti-agglomeration mechanisms of Ca- and Mg-bearing materials were discussed. - Abstract: In this study, the anti-agglomeration abilities of Ca- and Mg-containing bed materials, including dolomite and magnesite, in a pressurized bubbling fluidized bed gasifier using pine pellets and birch chips as feedstock, is investigated. The most typical bed material—silica sand—was also included as a reference for comparison. The sustainability of the operation was evaluated via analyzing the temperatures at different levels along the bed height. During the performances, the aim was to keep the temperature at the bottom zone of the reactor at around 870 °C. However, the success highly depends on the bed materials used in the bed and the temperature can vary significantly in case of agglomeration or bad mixing of bed materials and char particles. Both Glanshammar and Sala dolomites performed well with no observed agglomeration tendencies. In case of magnesite, the bed exhibited a high agglomeration tendency. Silica sand displayed the most severe agglomeration among all bed materials, even when birch chips with a low silica content was fed at a relatively low temperature. The solid samples of all the bed materials were inspected by light microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) detector was used to detect the elemental distribution in the surface. The crystal chemical structure was analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Magnesite agglomerates glued together by big molten ash particles. There was no coating layer detected on magnesite particles at bed temperatures – below 870 °C. But when the temperature was above 1000 °C, a significant amount of small molten

  20. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Racanella, Gaia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marras, Roberto [Unicalce S.p.A., R and D Department, Via Tonio da Belledo 30, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  1. Manganese removal from mine waters - investigating the occurrence and importance of manganese carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamforth, Selina M.; Manning, David A.C.; Singleton, Ian; Younger, Paul L.; Johnson, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese is a common contaminant of mine water and other waste waters. Due to its high solubility over a wide pH range, it is notoriously difficult to remove from contaminated waters. Previous systems that effectively remove Mn from mine waters have involved oxidising the soluble Mn(II) species at an elevated pH using substrates such as limestone and dolomites. However it is currently unclear what effect the substrate type has upon abiotic Mn removal compared to biotic removal by in situ micro-organisms (biofilms). In order to investigate the relationship between substrate type, Mn precipitation and the biofilm community, net-alkaline Mn-contaminated mine water was treated in reactors containing one of the pure materials: dolomite, limestone, magnesite and quartzite. Mine water chemistry and Mn removal rates were monitored over a 3-month period in continuous-flow reactors. For all substrates except quartzite, Mn was removed from the mine water during this period, and Mn minerals precipitated in all cases. In addition, the plastic from which the reactor was made played a role in Mn removal. Manganese oxyhydroxides were formed in all the reactors; however, Mn carbonates (specifically kutnahorite) were only identified in the reactors containing quartzite and on the reactor plastic. Magnesium-rich calcites were identified in the dolomite and magnesite reactors, suggesting that the Mg from the substrate minerals may have inhibited Mn carbonate formation. Biofilm community development and composition on all the substrates was also monitored over the 3-month period using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles in all reactors showed no change with time and no difference between substrate types, suggesting that any microbiological effects are independent of mineral substrate. The identification of Mn carbonates in these systems has important implications for the design of Mn treatment systems in that the provision of a carbonate-rich substrate

  2. Provenance and geological significance of red mud and other clastic sediments of the Mugnano cave (Montagnola Senese, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacoviello Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mugnano cave is characterized by a thick clastic sedimentary fill showing a great variability of sedimentary facies, ranging from clay to coarse-grained sand deposits. This paper deals with combined sedimentological and mineralogical (XRD and SEM studies of these sediments and bedrock insoluble residues in order to understand the origin and geological significance of cave deposits, with particular attention to red mud sediments, often considered as the residue of host rock dissolution. Three different sedimentary facies were recognized: i YS, yellow sand with occasionally shell fragments, testifying the arrival of sediments from the surrounding landscape; ii RS, red laminated mud; iii GS, grey and red-grey mud and sand, dolomite-rich sediments. Furthermore, the results obtained in the present study allowed the identification of two fingerprint minerals: i quartz, present only as traces in the limestone host-rock, and ii dolomite, certainly related to the incomplete bedrock dissolution. Results obtained by this multidisciplinary approach testify that no one of the investigated sediments is representative of a completely autochthonous sedimentation (i.e. accumulation of insoluble residue of limestone in a cave environment. In fact, all the three sedimentary facies show a bulk composition rich in quartz, a mineral indicating an external origin for these sediments. Also the grey sediments, despite of their high content of bedrock- related dolomite, are quite rich in quartz and they testify the mixing of autochthonous and allocthonous sediments. The clay fraction of cave sediments shows strong compositional similarities with bedrock insoluble residue and consequently its analysis cannot be considered as a clear proxy for distinguishing between different parent materials. Therefore, the origin of these cave deposits is dominantly related to external sediments inputs, with terra rossa surface soils as the most probable parent material for red mud

  3. Dynamics of pH, Ferrum and Mangan, and Phosphorus on Newly Opened Paddy Soil having High Soil Organic Matter on Rice Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukristyonubowo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research had been carried out at the Research and Soil Testing Laboratory and Greenhouse of Soil ResearchInstitute, Bogor using newly opened paddy soil from Pesisir Selatan districts, West Sumatra (one year old. Totaltreatments tested were 12 which were combination of farmer rate, NPK recommendation (½×; ¾×; 1½×, strawcompost (½×; ¾×; 1½×, and dolomite. The trial was conducted using a completely randomized design with threereplications. This research had been prepared in two units, one unit for observing plant response to nutrientmanagement and another unit for incubation trial with the same treatment placed in the greenhouse. Rice cultivarused was IR-42 in accordance to the preferred varieties of local farmers. The sampling method for measuring thesolubility of Fe2+ and Mn2+, as well as the availability of PO43- was by centrifuge 50 g mud samples from theincubation pots then separated clear extract using filter paper. The observation results on dynamics of pH, Fe2+,Mn2+ and PO4-3 mainly occured in 1 to 14 days after submerging (incubation. After 14 days soil reaction had reachedthermodynamic sequence of oxidation-reduction processes, the PO43- more available and pH of the soil reached thepeak. The optimum dose of NPK fertilizer obtained 0.875 NPK or equal to 175 kg of urea, 87.5 kg of SP-36 and 87.5 kgKCl ha-1. The highest number of hills achieved from straw compost treatment 1½ organic matter (OM or 3 tons withan increase of 20%. Application of ameliorant dolomite increased the number of tillers about 2-3%, but insignificantlydifferent with no dolomite treatment.

  4. Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

    1996-08-01

    A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site

  5. The influence of petrography, mineralogy and chemistry on burnability and reactivity of quicklime produced in Twin Shaft Regenerative (TSR) kilns from Neoarchean limestone (Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vola, Gabriele; Sarandrea, Luca; Della Porta, Giovanna; Cavallo, Alessandro; Jadoul, Flavio; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of chemical, mineralogical and petrographic features of the Neoarchean limestone from the Ouplaas Mine (Griqualand West, South Africa) on its burnability and quicklime reactivity, considering the main use as raw material for high-grade lime production in twin shaft regenerative (TSR) kilns. This limestone consists of laminated clotted peloidal micrite and fenestrate microbial boundstone with herringbone calcite and organic carbon (kerogen) within stylolites. Diagenetic modifications include hypidiotopic dolomite, micrite to microsparite recrystallization, stylolites, poikilotopic calcite, chert and saddle dolomite replacements. Burning and technical tests widely attest that the Neoarchean limestone is sensitive to high temperature, showing an unusual and drastically pronounced sintering or overburning tendency. The slaking reactivity, according to EN 459-2 is high for lime burnt at 1050 °C, but rapidly decreases for lime burnt at 1150 °C. The predominant micritic microbial textures, coupled with the organic carbon, are key-factors influencing the low burnability and the high sintering tendency. The presence of burial cementation, especially poikilotopic calcite, seems to promote higher burnability, either in terms of starting calcination temperature, or in terms of higher carbonate dissociation rate. In fact, the highest calcination velocity determined by thermal analysis is consistent with the highest slaking reactivity of the lower stratum of the quarry, enriched in poikilotopic calcite. Secondly, locally concentered dolomitic marly limestones, and sporadic back shales negatively affects the quicklime reactivity, as well. This study confirms that a multidisciplinary analytical approach is essential for selecting the best raw mix for achieving the highest lime reactivity in TSR kilns.

  6. Safety of gardening on lead- and arsenic-contaminated urban brownfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoe, Phillip P; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Benedict, Christopher; Martin, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Elevated levels of lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) are not uncommon for urban soils. Test plots were established at urban gardens in Tacoma and Seattle, WA. The Tacoma site was contaminated with Pb (51-312 mg kg) and As (39-146 mg kg), and the Seattle site had high Pb soil concentrations ranging from 506 to 2022 mg kg and As concentrations of Food-chain transfer of Pb and As were evaluated by measuring plant Pb and As concentrations after kitchen-style washing, a laboratory cleaning procedure, or peeling. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with a split-plot arrangement. Tacoma site treatments included a Class A biosolids mix (TAGRO) with dolomite, and soil at the Seattle site was amended with Cedar-Grove compost (CGC) plus dolomite. TAGRO amendment diluted soil Pb by 10 to 23% and As by 12 to 25% at the Tacoma site, and CGC + dolomite resulted in 20 to 50% dilution in soil Pb at the Seattle site. Both amendments reduced Pb concentrations in vegetables by 50 to 71%, and As reductions ranged from 46 to 80%. At the Tacoma site, Pb concentrations (dry weight basis) in carrots, lettuce, and tomatoes ranged from 8.89 to 25.0, from 0.37 to 3.83, and from 0.54 to 1.24 mg kg, respectively. Plant As concentrations were below 703 μg kg (dry weight) for the vegetables and followed the order lettuce > carrot > tomato. Food-chain transfer of Pb and As in vegetables grown in contaminated urban soils were reduced by laboratory cleaning. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of Skid Resistance of Wearing Course Made Of Stone Mastic Asphalt Mixture in Laboratory Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Marta

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the comparison of skid resistance of wearing course made of SMA (Stone Mastic Asphalt) mixtures which differ in resistance to polishing of coarse aggregate. Dolomite, limestone, granite and trachybasalt were taken for investigation. SMA mixtures have the same nominal size of aggregate (11 mm) and very similar aggregate particle-size distribution in mineral mixtures. Tested SMA11 mixtures were designed according to EN 13108-5 and Polish National Specification WT-2: 2014. Evaluation of the skid resistance has been performed using the FAP (Friction After Polishing) test equipment also known as the Wehner/Schulze machine. Laboratory method enables to compare the skid resistance of different types of mixtures under specified conditions simulating polishing processes. Tests were performed on both the specimens made of each coarse aggregate and SMA11 mixtures containing these aggregates. Measuring of friction coefficient μm was conducted before and during polishing process up to 180 0000 passes of polishing head. Comparison of the results showed differences in sensitivity to polishing among particular mixtures which depend on the petrographic properties of rock used to produce aggregate. Limestone and dolomite tend to have a fairly uniform texture with low hardness which makes these rock types susceptible to rapid polishing. This caused lower coefficient of friction for SMA11 mixtures with limestone and dolomite in comparison with other test mixtures. These significant differences were already registered at the beginning of the polishing process. Limestone aggregate had lower value of μm before starting the process than trachybasalt and granite aggregate after its completion. Despite the differences in structure and mineralogical composition between the granite and trachybasalt, slightly different values of the friction coefficient at the end of polishing were obtained. Images of the surface were taken with the optical microscope for better

  8. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-2 (C-2948) (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    2005-01-01

    SNL-2 was drilled in the northwest quarter of Section 12, T22S, R30E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico (Figure 2-1). It is located 574 ft from the north line (fnl) and 859 ft from the west line (fwl) of the section (Figure 2-2). This location places the drillhole east of the Livingston Ridge escarpment among oil wells of the Cabin Lake field. SNL-2 will be used to test hydraulic properties and to monitor ground water levels of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation. SNL-2 was permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2948. [Official correspondence regarding permitting and regulatory information must reference this permit number.] In the plan describing the integrated groundwater hydrology program (Sandia National Laboratories, 2003), SNL-2 is also codesignated WTS-1 because the location also satisfies needs for long-term monitoring of water quality and movement in the Culebra Dolomite for RCRA permitting; this program is under the management of Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS). In the event that additional wells are established on the SNL-2 drillpad to monitor other hydrological units (e.g., the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation), the current drillhole will likely be referred to as SNL-2C because it is completed in the Culebra. Most drillholes at WIPP have been described after completion to provide an account of the geology, hydrology, or other basic data acquired during drilling and immediate completion of the drillhole. In addition, the basic data report provides an account of the drilling procedures and activities that may be helpful to later interpretations of data or for further work in the drillhole, including test activities and eventual plugging and abandoning activities. The basic data report also provides a convenient means of reporting information about administrative activities necessary to drill the hole.

  9. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-2 (C-2948)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dennis W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (United States)

    2005-01-19

    SNL-2 was drilled in the northwest quarter of Section 12, T22S, R30E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico (Figure 2-1). It is located 574 ft from the north line (fnl) and 859 ft from the west line (fwl) of the section (Figure 2-2). This location places the drillhole east of the Livingston Ridge escarpment among oil wells of the Cabin Lake field. SNL-2 will be used to test hydraulic properties and to monitor ground water levels of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation. SNL-2 was permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2948. [Official correspondence regarding permitting and regulatory information must reference this permit number.] In the plan describing the integrated groundwater hydrology program (Sandia National Laboratories, 2003), SNL-2 is also codesignated WTS-1 because the location also satisfies needs for long-term monitoring of water quality and movement in the Culebra Dolomite for RCRA permitting; this program is under the management of Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS). In the event that additional wells are established on the SNL-2 drillpad to monitor other hydrological units (e.g., the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation), the current drillhole will likely be referred to as SNL-2C because it is completed in the Culebra. Most drillholes at WIPP have been described after completion to provide an account of the geology, hydrology, or other basic data acquired during drilling and immediate completion of the drillhole. In addition, the basic data report provides an account of the drilling procedures and activities that may be helpful to later interpretations of data or for further work in the drillhole, including test activities and eventual plugging and abandoning activities. The basic data report also provides a convenient means of reporting information about administrative activities necessary to drill the hole.

  10. Stones used in Milan architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folli, Luisa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The city of Milan lies in a plain with clayey soil well suited to brick-making, but no stone deposits. An ample supply of stone is available, however, in the surrounding hills and mountains, which are connected to the city via both natural and artificial waterways. The types of stone used since Roman times include: granite, marble and gneiss from Ossola Valley; dolomite from Lake Maggiore; detrital limestone from Ceresio Valley; sandstone from the Brianza Hills; black limestone and marble from Lake Como; and conglomerate and sandstone from the Adda River basin. Traditionally, the chief uses have been dimension stone (all stones, column shafts (granite, slabs (marble, moulding (dolomite, limestone and ornamental (marble, dolomite, limestone.La ciudad de Milán se encuentra en una llanura de suelo arcilloso adecuado para la fabricación de ladrillos pero en la cual no hay yacimientos de rocas. No obstante, en las colinas y montañas circundantes, que están comunicadas con la ciudad mediante vías navegables naturales y artificiales, sí existe una abundante cantidad de piedra. Entre los tipos de piedra utilizados desde la época de los romanos se encuentran granitos, mármoles y gneises del valle de Ossola, dolomías del lago Mayor, calizas detríticas del valle de Ceresio (Lugano, areniscas de las colinas de la Brianza, calizas negras y mármoles del lago Como y conglomerados y areniscas de la cuenca del río Adda. Tradicionalmente, los principales usos han sido la piedra de fábrica (todas ellas, fustes de columnas (granito, losas (mármol, molduras (dolomía, caliza y ornamental (mármol, dolomía, caliza.

  11. Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

  12. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport: an interim report on experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; White, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    Five possible systems that might lead to borehole plugs were considered with respect to replacement of the original rock with a material of essentially the same chemical composition and mineralogical makeup or with the introduction of other materials that might be chemically compatible with the surrounding wall rock. The five systems were: Quartz or chalcedony plugs from the SiO 2 -water system, replacement of shale rock by transport in the ''clay''-water system, hydrothermal cement systems, carbonate plugs in limestone and dolomite, and sulfur plugs by transport in the system sulfur-water. Hydrothermal cements appear to be most feasible from an engineering and economic point of view. Pressures and temperatures for reactions in the systems CaO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -H 2 O are modest and there is evidence that the plug formed would have a lower porosity and permeability than those derived from more conventional cement systems. Further, the mineral phases, principally tobermorite, are likely to be compatible with expected shale, sandstone, and limestone wall rock materials. Calcite (but not dolomite) plugs could be formed in limestone or dolomite rock. Less is known about carbonate plugs and the porosity, permeability, and possible reactions with circulating groundwater. Quartz or chalcedony plugs would be the most impervious, have the lowest chemical reactivity with groundwater, the lowest thermal expansion, and be the most compatible with the wall rock but would be extremely difficult to form in place. It was concluded that replacement of shales by clay, mica, or other layer silicate transport in hydrothermal solution was limited by the extremely sluggish kinetics of these reactions and that a practical plug of such materials is not feasible. Likewise, the sulfur-water system was found to be unlikely to yield a plug material

  13. Effectiveness of Some Ameliorants in Reducing Co2 and N2o Emission in Corn Planting in Peat Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Maftuah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amelioration is very important in supporting plant growth in peat land. The use of low emission ameliorant will support the sustainability of agricultural system in peat land. The research is intended to study the effectiveness of some ameliorants in reducing CO2 and N2O emission in corn planting in peat land. The research was conducted in April to October 2013, in Kalampangan Village Palangkaraya Municipality Central Kalimantan. Ameliorant materials used were chicken manure fertilizer, domolite, mineral soil, paddy husk biochar, coconut shell biochar. Ameliorant treatments applied were the type of ameliorant compositions, those were (A1 80% chicken manure fertilizer + 20% dolomite, (A2 20% chicken manure fertilizer + 20% agricultural weeds + 20% spodosol mineral soil + 20% “purun tikus” (eleocharis dulcis compost + 20% dolomite, (A3 19% chicken manure fertilizer + 9% dolomite + 72% mineral soil, (A4 100% coconut shell biochar, (A5 paddy husk biochar, (A6 farmer’s way (20% ash + 40% spodosol mineral soil + 40% chicken manure fertilizer and control. Experiment design used a Randomized Factorial Block Design, with 3 repetitions. Ameliorant dosage used was 7.5 t/ha. The crop used was hybrid corn. Parameters which were observed periodically were emission of CO2 and N2O, ground water level height, soil pH and Eh, once a month for 5 periods. The research result showed that ameliorant was capable of reducing emission of both CO2 and N2O in corn planting in peat land. Coconut shell biochar could reduce emission of CO2 up to 26% as compared with control, whereas paddy husk biochar could reduce emission of N2O up to 52% as compared with control.

  14. Use of ``rock-typing`` to characterize carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikwuakor, K.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the project was to apply techniques of ``rock-typing`` and quantitative formation evaluation to borehole measurements in order to identify reservoir and non-reservoir rock-types and their properties within the ``C`` zone of the Ordovician Red River carbonates in the northeast Montana and northwest North Dakota areas of the Williston Basin. Rock-typing discriminates rock units according to their pore-size distribution. Formation evaluation estimates porosities and pore fluid saturation. Rock-types were discriminated using crossplots involving three rock-typing criteria: (1) linear relationship between bulk density and porosity, (2) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and porosity, and (3) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and bulk density. Each rock-type was quantitatively characterized by the slopes and intercepts established for different crossplots involving the above variables, as well as porosities and fluid saturations associated with the rock-types. All the existing production was confirmed through quantitative formation evaluation. Highly porous dolomites and anhydritic dolomites contribute most of the production, and constitute the best reservoir rock-types. The results of this study can be applied in field development and in-fill drilling. Potential targets would be areas of porosity pinchouts and those areas where highly porous zones are downdip from non-porous and tight dolomites. Such areas are abundant. In order to model reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, a more localized (e.g. field scale) study, expanded to involve other rock-typing criteria, is necessary.

  15. Thermal properties of Permian Basin evaporites to 493 K and 30 MPa confining pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Heard, H.C.; Boro, C.O.; Keller, K.T.; Ralph, W.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements have been made of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of four rock salts, two anhydrites, and two dolomites bordering the Cycle 4 and Cycle 5 bedded salt formations in the Permian Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Measurement conditions ranged from 303 to 473 K in temperature, and 0.1 to 31.0 MPa in hydrostatic confining pressure. Within the +-5% measurement resolution neither conductivity nor diffusivity showed a dependence upon pressure in any of the rocks. Conductivity and diffusivity in all rocks had a negative temperature dependence. For the two Cycle 4 salt samples, conductivity over the temperature range explored fell from 5.5 to 3.75 W/m.K, and diffusivity fell from about 2.7 to 1.7 x 10 -6 m 2 /s. One of the Cycle 5 salts was a single crystal which had anomalous results, but the other had a low conductivity, about 3.4 W/m.K, with very weak temperature dependence, and a high diffusivity, 3.8 to 2.5 x 10 -6 m 2 /s over the temperature range. In the nonsalts, conductivity and diffusivity decreased 10 to 20% over the temperature range explored, which was 308 -6 m 2 /s for the anhydrites and 1.4 x 10 -6 m 2 /s for both the dolomites. The coefficient of thermal linear expansion was measured for the Cycle 5 salt and nonsalts over 308 -6 K -1 at P = 3.0 MPa to 4 x 10 -6 K -1 at P = 30 MPa for both nonsalt rocks. In anhydrite, it decreased with increasing temperature at a rate of roughly 5 x 10 -8 K -2 at all pressures. In dolomite, the coefficient increased at roughly the same rate. Expansion of the salt ranged from 33 to 38 x 10 -6 K -1 and was independent of pressure and temperature

  16. Experimental results of combustion and desulphurization in fluidized bed. Implementation opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragos, L.; Jinescu, G.; Scarlat, N.

    1996-01-01

    Possibilities of both stationary fluidized bed combustion (SFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) technologies for desulfurization of Romanian coal-fired power plants have been studied since the 70's. The results of research on a 2 MWh SFBC semi-industrial pilot hot water boiler and an 1 MWh CFBC pilot plant are presented. 4 sorts of lignite (3 Romanian and 1 Albanian) are used in the study. The combustion efficiencies for SFBC are between 82 - 84% and for CFBC - between 84 - 87%. The heat transfer coefficients for lignite and peat coal have been determined for different zones, different levels of ash recirculation rate and various operating loads. Experiments with 2 sorts of sorbents: dolomite and limestone, under different temperature conditions and at Ca/S molar ratio 0.5 - 3.5 have been carried out. The temperature range for the maximum values of desulfurization efficiency is 840-870 o C for limestone and 820-860 o C for dolomite. The following efficiency values are obtained for lignite in the SFBC pilot plant: 1) over 80%, when using dolomite as a sorbent and the Ca/S molar ratio is greater than 2.5; 2) 75 - 90%, when limestone has been used and the Ca/S molar ratio is in the range 2-3. Desulfurization efficiency in CFBC plant for lignite using limestone is 80-93% for Ca/S ratio between 2 and 3. The necessity to commission a demonstrative installation with low pollutant emissions is pointed out. The Comanesti Power Plant has been chosen for this purpose. An old 75 t/h steam boiler will be replaced with 45 MWh CFBC boiler for combined heat and steam production. The overall estimated investment costs for this plant are about 6 million $US. 1 tabs., 5 refs

  17. Effect of mix parameters on longevity of bituminous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Clayton Matthew

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of varying aggregate sources, aggregate gradations on the stripping and rutting potential of bituminous based plant mixes specified by the Missouri Department of Transportation. The different aggregate combinations included two different aggregate sources (Potosi Dolomite and Jefferson City Dolomite) including two variations for the Jefferson City Dolomite mix to simulate a marginally in-specification mix and an out-of-specification but in-field tolerance mix. The "field" mix simulated the marginal mix where field tolerance of high dust and low binder content were maximized. All three mixes were evaluated for stripping susceptibility using the Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR) test and the Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device (HWTD). The mix characteristics (unit weight, effective binder content, and air voids) were used for a Level 3 analysis in the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) to determine long term pavement distress conditions such as fatigue cracking, rutting, and IRI (smoothness). The Potosi mix exhibited the best resistance to rutting and stripping during both the TSR testing as well as the Hamburg testing. The Jefferson City In-Spec and Out-of-Spec mixes showed less resistance to rutting and stripping in order, respectively. This was expected for the Jefferson City mixes where the aggregate was of lower quality (higher Los Angeles Abrasion, Micro Deval loss, absorption, and deleterious materials). Also, in the case of the Jefferson City Out-of-Spec mix, the binder content was lower. Upon evaluating the mixes using the MEPDG software, it was shown that mix characteristics such as air voids, VMA, and VFA influenced the fatigue cracking, rutting, and IRI predictions to a minor degree.

  18. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydary, J., E-mail: juma.haydary@stuba.sk [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Susa, D.; Dudáš, J. [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  19. The Mechanism of Disintegration of Cement Concrete at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocius Vytautas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a composite material composed of a binder, aggregates, water and additives. Mixing of cement with water results in a number of chemical reactions known as cement hydration. Heating of concrete results in dehydration processes of cement minerals and new hydration products, which disintegrate the microstructure of concrete. This article reviews results of research conducted with Portland and alumina cement with conventional and refractory concrete aggregates. In civic buildings such common fillers as gravel, granite, dolomite or expanded clay are usually used. It is important to point out the differences between fillers because they constitute the majority of the concrete volume.

  20. Gas dusulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.E.; Bakhshi, V.S.; Randolph, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    A process for adsorbing sulfur dioxide from a gas comprising contacting a gas containing SO 2 , such as a flue gas, with about stoichiometric amounts of a specially prepared calcium oxide so that substantially all of the sulfur dioxide content is reacted throughout the calcium oxide particle to form a calcium sulfate reaction product. The useful calcium oxide particles comprise a highly voided skeletal structure of very large surface area and large pore volume with numerous macro pores. Such particles are obtained by flash calcining sand-size grains of calcium carbonate, such as aragonite, calcite or dolomite

  1. Characterization of the main types of marble extracted in the area of Macael (Almeria, southeastern Spain) and its historical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, R.; Cruz, A.S.; Arriaga, L.; Baltuille, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The marble from Macael is one of the most important ornamental stones found in Spain. It has been used not only as a building material but also as a decorative element, especially the type nown as “White Macael “. There is evidence of its use dating back over 4000 years. One of the most prominent examples is the Courtyard of the Lions in the Alhambra (Granada), but it is also possible to see some eleme Its in the Roman amphitheatre of Mérida (Badajoz), in Italica (Sevilla), in the palace of Medina Azahara (Córdoba) and in the Royal Palace of Madrid, amongst dozens of palaces and churches throughout the country. In this study we describe the use that this material has had throughout history and the main features and properties of the different varieties of “White Macael”, “Grey Macael”, “Anasol” (calcite marbles) and “Yellow Macael” (dolomitic marbles). They all have mineralogical, physical and mechanical features that make them suitable for almost all uses. Calcite marbles have porosity, absorption and density values lower than dolomite marbles, whilst the latter have more resistance to compression, similar flexural strength under concentrated load, and lower resistance to breaking load at dowel hole than the calcitic marbles. The values of abrasion resistance are also better in the dolomite marbles, whilst the slip resistance is similar in all cases. As far as decay is concerned, the dolomitic marbles, with the exception of the variety Amarillo Triana, suffer more in the frost resistance test but less by the action of salts, with the exception of the White Macael Rio (calcitic) which is the variety that has less alteration. Regarding the status of the stone sector in the region, it is noteworthy that, despite a 60% drop in sales in the domestic market, exports in 2012 increased by 49 % compared to the previous year. The data we present provides increased knowledge of one of the most common building materials in our country with the aim of

  2. Exploring biotic vs. abiotic controls on syngenetic carbonate and clay mineral precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Gabriela S.; McKenzie, Judith A.; Martinez Ruiz, Francisca; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2016-04-01

    A possible syngenetic relationship between carbonate and clay mineral precipitation has been reported for sedimentary rocks deposited in both lacustrine and marine sedimentary environments throughout the geological record. In particular, the mineral dolomite is often found associated with Mg-rich clays, such as stevensite. It is notable that this carbonate/clay association has been recorded in numerous samples taken from modern dolomite precipitating environments; for example, the Coorong lakes, South Australia, coastal sabkhas, Abu Dhabi, UAE and coastal hypersaline lagoons (Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho) east of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An HRTEM study of samples from these three locations indicates a possible physical/chemical association between the Ca-dolomite and Mg-rich clays, demonstrating a probable co-precipitation. To test this hypothesis, we have conducted a series of biotic and abiotic laboratory experiments. If this syngenesis actually occurs in nature, what, if any, are the biogeochemical processes controlling these precipitation reactions? Our experiments were designed to determine the extent of the biotic versus abiotic component influencing the mineral precipitation and, in the case of a biotic influence, to understand the mechanism through which microorganisms might mediate the formation of clay minerals. The experiments were carried out in the Geomicrobiology Laboratory of ETH Zürich using cultures of living microbes and artificial organic compounds that simulate functional groups present in natural biofilms formed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, pure inorganic experiments were designed to understand possible physico-chemical conditions for diagenetic processes that could induce dissolution of Mg-carbonates and precipitation of Mg-rich clays. Our results show a remarkable biotic influence during the formation of clay minerals. Specifically, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), released by microbes in their

  3. Effect of carboxymethyl cellulose and ionic strength on stability of mineral suspensions in potash ore flotation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, M; Laskowski, J S; Ansari, A

    2003-04-15

    The adsorption of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose from aqueous solutions varying in ionic strength from that of distilled water to 50% NaCl/KCl brine (about 3.5 mol/dm(3)) onto illite and dolomite has been studied. The purpose of this work was to investigate the solvency effects in the phenomena underlying the potash flotation process that is carried out in saturated brine. Based on viscosity measurements, the adsorption results were analyzed in terms of a simple model of polymer macromolecules in solution. Suspension stability measurements carried out concomitantly with adsorption tests showed the ranges of carboxymethyl cellulose concentration over which the tested suspensions either were aggregated or were restabilized.

  4. Geochemistry and migration of contaminants at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1989--91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations were conducted by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the US Department of Energy at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site to determine the geochemistry of the shallow aquifer and geochemical controls on the migration of uranium and other constituents from the raffinate (waste) pits. Water-quality analyses from monitoring wells at the site and vicinity property indicate that water in the shallow aquifer is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type that is at equilibrium with respect to calcite and slightly supersaturated with respect to dolomite

  5. Three-dimensional preservation of cellular and subcellular structures suggests 1.6 billion-year-old crown-group red algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtson, Stefan; Sallstedt, Therese; Belivanova, Veneta

    2017-01-01

    The ~1.6 Ga Tirohan Dolomite of the Lower Vindhyan in central India contains phosphatized stromatolitic microbialites. We report from there uniquely well-preserved fossils interpreted as probable crown-group rhodophytes (red algae). The filamentous form Rafatazmia chitrakootensis n. gen, n. sp. has....... The wider affinities of Denaricion are uncertain. Ramathallus lobatus n. gen., n. sp. is a lobate sessile alga with pseudoparenchymatous thallus, “cell fountains,” and apical growth, suggesting florideophycean affinity. If these inferences are correct, Rafatazmia and Ramathallus represent crown......-group multicellular rhodophytes, antedating the oldest previously accepted red alga in the fossil record by about 400 million years....

  6. A study on mineralization U,REE and related processes in anomaly No.6 Khoshomy area central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidaryan, F.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium mineralization in Khoshomy prospect, located in central. part of Iran, with 303-15000 (cps) and 14 to 4000 (ppm) released, The main rock types include: gneiss, granite, pegmatite and migmatite, that influenced by pegmatite-albitic vines (quartz-heldespatic). Acidic and basic dykes, granodioritic, units and dolomite and marble have been seen. The alteration associated with the mineralization is potassic, argillic, propylitic, carbonization, silisificaition and hematitizaition. Uranium mineralization occurred in a hydrothermal phase with Cu, Mo, Ni and Au elements. Uranium primary minerals include pitchblende, coffinite, uraninite; and uranium secondary minerals include uranophane and . boltwoodite. REE mineralization occurred by the potassic phase in peginatitization process

  7. The review of recent carbonate minerals processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solihin

    2018-02-01

    Carbonate is one of the groups of minerals that can be found in relatively large amount in the earth crust. The common carbonate minerals are calcium carbonate (calcite, aragonite, depending on its crystal structure), magnesium carbonate (magnesite), calcium-magnesium carbonate (dolomite), and barium carbonate (barite). A large amount of calcite can be found in many places in Indonesia such as Padalarang, Sukabumi, and Tasikmalaya (West Java Provence). Dolomite can be found in a large amount in Gresik, Lamongan, and Tuban (East Java Provence). Magnesite is quite rare in Indonesia, and up to the recent years it can only be found in Padamarang Island (South East Sulawesi Provence). The carbonate has been being exploited through open pit mining activity. Traditionally, calcite can be ground to produce material for brick production, be carved to produce craft product, or be roasted to produce lime for many applications such as raw materials for cement, flux for metal smelting, etc. Meanwhile, dolomite has traditionally been used as a raw material to make brick for local buildings and to make fertilizer for coconut oil plant. Carbonate minerals actually consist of important elements needed by modern application. Calcium is one of the elements needed in artificial bone formation, slow release fertilizer synthesis, dielectric material production, etc. Magnesium is an important material in automotive industry to produce the alloy for vehicle main parts. It is also used as alloying element in the production of special steel for special purpose. Magnesium oxide can be used to produce slow release fertilizer, catalyst and any other modern applications. The aim of this review article is to present in brief the recent technology in processing carbonate minerals. This review covers both the technology that has been industrially proven and the technology that is still in research and development stage. One of the industrially proven technologies to process carbonate mineral is

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Microfiltration Ceramic Membranes Based on Natural Quartz Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Ivanets

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of phase and chemical composition of natural quartz sand, binder and burnable additives was studied. The conditions of application of the membrane and biocide layers on the formation of porous ceramic and microfiltration membranes were investigated. It is shown that a crystalline oxide of Si(IV is determinant for obtaining the ceramic materials. The presence of carbonates (calcite, dolomite, aragonite, etc. and crystalline aluminosilicates (microcline, albite, phlogopit, etc. leads to a decrease in mechanical strength of ceramics. The biocide coating designed to protect the ceramic membrane surfaces from biofouling was applied and its anti-bacterial activity was shown.

  9. Natural radioactivity in iron and steel materials by low-level gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, G.; Tanase, Maria

    2003-01-01

    High resolution low-level gamma spectrometry was applied to perform a radioactivity measurement in iron and steel raw materials (coal, coke, iron ore, pellets, manganese ore, limestone, dolomite), auxiliary materials (scorialite, oxide of Ti, bentonite), and some related final products (cast iron, slag, blast-furnace, flue dust) involved in iron making processing. We control the activity of materials in various kinds of samples and we investigate for transfer of radioactivity during the blast-furnace process. Artificial radioisotopes are rarely encountered. (authors)

  10. Mineralogical, geochemical and hydrocarbon potential of subsurface Cretaceous shales, Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Mousa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four Cretaceous shale core samples of Gibb Afia-1, Betty-1, Salam-1X and Mersa Matruh-1 wells were mineralogically and geochemically studied using XRD, XRF and Rock Eval Pyrolysis. Kaolinite, smectite and illite are the main clay minerals in addition to rare chlorite, while the non-clay minerals include quartz, calcite, dolomite and rare siderite. The shales were derived through intensive chemical weathering of mafic basement and older sedimentary rocks. These sediments were deposited in a near-shore shallow marine environment with some terrestrial material input. The shales have poor to fair organic content. It is marginally to rarely mature.

  11. BRICKS WITH TOTAL REPLACEMENT OF CLAY BY FLY ASH MIXED WITH DIFFERENT MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    J.N Akhtar; J.Alam; M.N Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash is a powdery substance obtained from the dust collectors in the Thermal power plants that use coal as fuel. From the cement point of view the mineralogy of Fly ash is important as it contains 80% - 90% of glass. The impurities in coal-mostly clays, shale’s, limestone & dolomite; they cannot be burned so they turn up as ash. The Fly ash of class C category was used as a raw material to total replacement of clay for making Fly ash bricks. In present study the effect of Fly ash with high...

  12. An assessment of the performance of the immunity system in iron and steel workers exposed to hazardous industrial factors. Pt. 2. Regulation of immuno-deficiencies in iron and steel workers suffering from chronic bronchitis. Die Beurteilung der Leistung des Immunsystems bei Huettenarbeitern unter Einwirkung schaedlicher industrieller Faktoren. T. 2. Regulierung von Immundefiziten bei Erzhuettenarbeitern mit chronischer Bronchitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheller, S.; Czuba, Z.; Krol, W.; Nikodemowicz, E.; Aleksandrowicz, J.; Zydowicz, G. (Inst. for Microbiology, Medical Academy, Zabrze-Rokitnica (Poland)); Shani, J. (Univ. of South California, School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Malinowska, B. (Sanatorium for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis, Bystra Slaska (Poland))

    1991-05-01

    147 iron and steel workers suffering from chronic bronchitis underwent a 24 days climatic treatment. A local antibacterial treatment was empolyed as well as local and systemic regulation of the immunosystem. Significant immuno-deficiencies were found in the patients concerned. EEP in an isotonic saline solution was applied locally by means of inhalations as a remedy with antibacterial and immunotropic effects. The systematic immunotherapy was carried out by administering Propolin tablets, Dolomit, Methindol (Indomethazin), Biostymina, and Decaris (Levamisole). After the treatment we stated a favorable change of several parameters. (orig.).

  13. Proceedings, volume 20, The Institute for Briquetting and Agglomeration, September 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.L. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    32 papers are presented covering aspects of briquetting, pelletizing and agglomeration of various materials, including coal, plastics, flue gas gypsum and fertilizers. Papers on coal included the start-up of the Petrofina coal briquetting plant (UK), coal and refuse agglomeration by extrusion, coal dust reduction, agglomeration of Brazilian coal fines, use of coal and briquetting in ancient Chinese metallurgy, cooking briquettes from lignites in developing nations, use of coal-dolomite pellets to eliminate sulphur emissions, extruded coal capsule flow characteristics, and oil agglomeration as a catalyst loading method in coal liquefaction.

  14. Carbonatites in China: A review for genesis and mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonatites are commonly related to the accumulation of economically valuable substances such as REE, Cu, and P. The debate over the origin of carbonatites and their relationship to associated silicate rocks has been ongoing for about 45 years. Worldwide, the rocks characteristically display more geochemical enrichments in Ba, Sr and REE than sedimentary carbonate rocks. However, carbonatite’s geochemical features are disputed because of secondary mineral effects. Rock-forming carbonates from carbonatites at Qinling, Panxi region, and Bayan Obo in China show REE distribution patterns ranging from LREE enrichment to flat patterns. They are characterized by a Sr content more than 10 times higher than that of secondary carbonates. The coarse- and fine-grained dolomites from Bayan Obo H8 dolomite marbles also show similar high Sr abundance, indicating that they are of igneous origin. Some carbonates in Chinese carbonatites show REE (especially HREE contents and distribution patterns similar to those of the whole rocks. These intrusive carbonatites display lower platinum group elements and stronger fractionation between Pt and Ir relative to high-Si extrusive carbonatite. This indicates that most intrusive carbonatites may be carbonate cumulates. Maoniuping and Daluxiang in Panxi region are large REE deposits. Hydrothermal fluorite ore veins occur outside of the carbonatite bodies and are emplaced in wallrock syenite. The fluorite in Maoniuping has Sr and Nd isotopes similar to carbonatite. The Daluxiang fluorite shows Sr and REE compositions different from those in Maoniuping. The difference is reflected by both the carbonatites and rock-forming carbonates, indicating that REE mineralization is related to carbonatites. The cumulate processes of carbonate minerals make fractionated fluids rich in volatiles and LREE as a result of low partition coefficients for REE between carbonate and carbonatite melt and an increase from LREE to HREE. The

  15. Characteristics of a calcite "limestone"-marble from Macedonia, used as flux material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristova E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase characteristics of calcite "limestone"-marble from Banjany area village (near Skopje, Macedonia were examined by means of XRD, SEM microscope in polarizing and reflected lights, chemical, DT/TG-analyses. It was concluded as follows: - calcite (CaCO3 is a major mineral component (cca 80-90 % prevailing in the marble over the other minerals - dolomite is generally of minor importance (cca 10-20 % in the rock - quartz, micas graphite, pyrite represent typical accessories. As result of the mentioned phase characteristics, this raw materials was for a long time (more than 30 years used as flux in the iron and steel metallurgy in Macedonia.

  16. Recent advances in AFB biomass gasification pilot plant with catalytic reactors in a downstream slip flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, M P; Gil, J; Martin, J A; Frances, E; Olivares, A; Caballero, M A; Perez, P [Saragossa Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemistry and Environment; Corella, J [Madrid Univ. (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    A new 3rd generation pilot plant is being used for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. It is based on a 15 cm. i.d. fluidized bed with biomass throughputs of 400-650 kg/h.m{sup 2}. Gasification is performed using mixtures of steam and oxygen. The produced gas is passed in a slip flow by two reactors in series containing a calcined dolomite and a commercial reforming catalyst. Tars are periodically sampled and analysed after the three reactors. Tar conversions of 99.99 % and a 300 % increase of the hydrogen content in the gas are obtained. (author) (2 refs.)

  17. Chernobyl: recovery operations and the entombment of Reactor 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalziel, S.P.C.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate actions taken following the accident at the Chernobyl-number 4 reactor in April 1986 are described. These included actions to put out the fires, initial medical aid and the dropping of sand, lead, dolomite and boron onto the reactor from helicopters. Following this the chamber below the damaged reactor core was filled with concrete to prevent any further explosions or meltdown. The reactor was subsequently entombed in steel and concrete. The evacuation of the surrounding area is also mentioned. (U.K.)

  18. Geomorfološki razvoj doline Krnice in njene zadnje poledenitve = Geomorphological development of the Krnica valley and its late glaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Kunaver

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the geomorphological development of the elongated Krnica valley in the Julian Alps near Kranjska gora, which geneticaly resembles to the Vršič Pass. The basic idea is the development of this Alpine valley under the strong influence of the softer dolomitic strata which is beneath the limestone. Besides, the fault lines contribute a lot to this development. Not only the frontal moraines in the valley itself but also the two of them near Kranjska gora can be the result of the same late postwürmian stadial glacier, as this was the longest in the region.

  19. Pb-Zn mineralization of the Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco): characterisation of the deposit and relationships with the clay assemblages; Mineralisation Pb-Zn du type MVT de la region d'Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, Maroc): caracterisations du gite et relations avec les corteges de mineraux argileux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouguina, E. M.; Daoudi, L.

    2008-07-01

    Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas) are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., syn sedimentary faults) played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralizations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid. (Author) 55 refs.

  20. Fresh tar (from biomass gasification) destruction with downstream catalysts: comparison of their intrinsic activity with a realistic kinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A model for fresh tar destruction over catalysts placed downstream a biomass gasifier is presented. It includes the stoichio-metry and the calculation of the kinetic constants for the tar destruction. Catalysts studied include commercial Ni steam reforming catalysts and calcinated dolomites. Kinetic constants for tar destruction are calculated for several particle sizes, times- on-stream and temperatures of the catalyst and equivalence ratios in the gasifier. Such intrinsic kinetic constants allow a rigorous or scientific comparison of solids and conditions to be used in an advanced gasification process. (orig.) 4 refs.