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Sample records for doctor albert schweitzer

  1. [Albert Schweitzer and psychoanalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noth, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The correspondence between Albert Schweitzer and Oskar Pfister, published in 2006, reveals Schweitzer's strong interest in psychoanalysis. That Schweitzer, ethicist, theologian and missionary doctor, would show such appreciation for psychoanalysis to which the Zurich pastor had introduced him is not immediately self-evident. This article indicates three points of congruence which may explain the connectivity between Schweitzer's thinking and psychoanalysis.

  2. [Lambarene 25 years after Albert Schweitzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, W

    1993-04-27

    The author, who lived with Albert Schweitzer during the last four years of the doctor's life, and who worked as a physician in Lambarene for ten years, tells about the evolution of the Gabonese Republic and the Lambarene Hospital since 1961. The actual medical importance of the hospital as well as the spiritual response Schweitzer still finds today among Africans are described. And: Africa, too, has a message for us.

  3. [Interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Ruiz-Llanos, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a young and promising German who at age 29 decided to undertake the profession of Medical Doctor at the University of Strassburg after finishing a career in musical studies in Paris (1899) and obtaining in Berlin a doctoral degree in Philosophy and Theology. Surprisingly, Albert Schweitzer, despite his comfortable life in Europe, decided in 1913 to practice his medical career in a remote and small Equatorial African country. He devoted nearly 50 years of his life caring for the Black population at Lamaberene, where he built a hospital. In this paper, we attempt to develop some theoretical aspects related with interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. We begin by considering certain sociocultural variables in hospitals that give care to patients with cultural characteristics that are substantially different from those of the health care personnel who organize, administer, and execute medical functions.

  4. Albert Schweitzer's Legacy for Education: Reverence for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rud, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    "Albert Schweitzer's Legacy for Education" is the first book devoted to the study of the thought and deeds of Albert Schweitzer in relation to education. Schweitzer's life and work offer both inspiration and timely insights for educational thought and practice in the twenty-first century. Focusing on Schweitzer's central thought,…

  5. [The last days of Albert Schweitzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wjst, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Schweitzer was one of the leading physicians of the last century. He overcame not only the boundaries of humanities and natural sciences, but also the boundaries of Europe and Africa. He has become a symbol of humanity. But the person of Albert Schweitzer was almost in danger of disappearing behind it. "My hair starts to turn gray. My body begins to feel the exertions I have undertaken, and the burden of the years". This is how the 56-year-old Schweitzer ended his autobiography "Out of my life and thought" in 1931. Even 50 years after Schweitzer's death in 1965, there is still no coherent scientific reappraisal of his work. Part of the posthumous manuscripts was published in recent years in a critical edition, including first biographies that are no longer considered as hagiography, as they would have been in the contemporary literature. The legacy, however, is scattered. Much of the correspondence and the library are located in Schweitzer's former house in Gunsbach in Alsace. The manuscripts are mainly stored in the Central Library Zurich, but also in the Syracuse University New York, while the personal bequest is in the hands of his family or collectors. This presentation is part of a biographical approach and depicts the last weeks in the life of Albert Schweitzer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Albert Schweitzer: a patient with writer's cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacik, P; Schrader, C; Weber, E; Dressler, D

    2012-06-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) the world-famous philosopher, theologian, concert organist, musicologist, philanthropist and winner of the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize suffered throughout most of his life from severe and painful muscle cramps in his right upper extremity which were triggered exclusively by handwriting. They led to tonic finger flexion and wrist extension and produced slow and clumsy handwriting of a reduced character size. Other motor functions including Schweitzer's highly skilful and famous organ playing were not affected. Inheritance from his mother is likely. Schweitzer applied several coping strategies including a specific holding pattern for pens, usage of special pens, avoidance of handwriting and slowing of handwriting. With all these features Schweitzer presents as a classical case of action-specific dystonia in the form of a simple tonic writer's cramp. Interestingly, Schweitzer never received a medical diagnosis, although writer's cramp had already been identified and described as a medical condition. Impairment of his handwriting but not his organ playing may give insight into the multifactorial aetiology of writer's cramp. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Albert Schweitzer. The man as a symbol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliexer

    2007-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer, the great missionary physician from the XXth century, had a versatile personality that integrated multiple talents, leading to the slightly frequent conjunction of the thinker with the man of action, and the humanist with the scientist and the artist. He studied all these disciplines in a brilliant manner: Philosophy, Theology, Music and Medicine; he was also a great scholar of Bach's work, Jesus Christ and the civilization history. In his maturity, this great man renounced to the fame and glory gained as intellectual and musician, to dedicate his life as a physician for the forgotten African natives. His deeply religious spirit allowed him to penetrate into the most recondite of the human soul; in his personality, he expressed in its entire dimension the eternally unsatisfied desire of the solitary man, against the immensity of the universe. His philosophy, based on the respect for life, was realized throughout the practice of the medical profession. His noble character and personality was based on the man as symbol, since it was not so much what he did helping people but what people could do to others due to him. His singular example represented a moral force in the world, superior to millions of men armed for a war. In 1953, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his philanthropic work in Africa during more that fifty years, and for his deep love to the living beings. He was transformed in a perennial legend as the Lambaréné doctor.

  8. Medical research at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issifou, Saadou; Adegnika, Ayola A; Lell, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    Built in 1981, the Medical Research Unit is located at the campus of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital. The main scientific activities of this research unit lie on clinical research focusing on antimalarial drugs and vaccines, and basic studies on pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Since 2002 the Medical Research Unit has experience in organising and hosting high quality training in clinical research in collaboration with the Vienna School of Clinical Research and other partners. For the future, this unit is involved as a key partner in the Central African Network on Tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and Malaria (CANTAM) consortium playing a central role for the excellence in clinical research in Central Africa.

  9. Albert Schweitzer se etiese gesigseinder: Eerbied vir en dankbaarheid teenoor die lewe

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, Pieter JJ

    2015-01-01

    In the search for relevant theology, especially in the context of the ethical and moral challenges facing contemporary South Africa, the theology/philosophy of religion of Albert Schweitzer can play an important role. Aspects of Schweitzer's deliberations are briefly discussed under three topics: ethical mysticism, the centrality of life and the responsibility associated with living. The famous statement, "reverence for life" as summary for Schweitzer's thinking is embedded in profound and co...

  10. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in the Hospital Albert Schweitzer District of Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, James D; Carraway, Robert D; Dowell, Duane L; King, Mary Etta; Pierre, Ronald

    2002-05-01

    This report details current epidemiologic information on peripartum cardiomyopathy in 1 district of Haiti and represents the initial report of an ongoing investigation that addresses potential etiologic and prognostic factors. Another goal is to alert the medical community of what appears to be a high-incidence area. A detailed peripartum cardiomyopathy registry has been implemented to include a review of case records from 1994 to 2000 and subsequently to identify new cases from February 1, 2000, to July 1, 2001. The Hospital Albert Schweitzer District of Haiti is a 600-square mile area with approximately 258,000 population served by a hospital, an associated clinic, and outlying health centers. There are approximately 7740 live births annually. This report details epidemiologic information on the HAS District peripartum cardiomyopathy patients including incidence, mortality rate, complications, and prognostic factors. There were 47 confirmed patients (retrospective cohort, 20 patients; prospective cohort, 27 patients), which was approximately 1 case per 400 live births (compared with an incidence of 1 case per 3000 to 4000 live births in the United States). There were 4 deaths (14% of 29 patients with follow-up), and 7 complications (pulmonary embolism, 1 case; hemiplegia, 1 case; subsequent deterioration of heart function, 5 cases). The prognosis for subsequent pregnancy was 4 of 5 cases (80%) of recurrent congestive heart failure. Peripartum cardiomyopathy appears to be relatively common in the Hospital Albert Schweitzer District of Haiti. A core group of patients is identified for ongoing epidemiologic and immunohematologic investigation of risk factors and potential etiologic factors.

  11. History and perspectives of medical research at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramharter, Michael; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Matsiegui, Pierre Blaise; Grobusch, Martin P.; Winkler, Stefan; Graninger, Wolfgang; Krishna, Sanjeev; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Lell, Bertrand; Missinou, Michel A.; Mavoungou, Elie; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    In 1913 Albert Schweitzer founded one of the first modern hospitals in Africa dedicated to the health of the local population. The Albert Schweitzer Hospital is located in Lambaréné, a small town in Gabon. In 1981 a research department--the Medical Research Unit--was established with the aim to

  12. Cholera management and prevention at Hôpital Albert Schweitzer, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Silvia; Weinrobe, Carolyn; Bien-Aime, Charbel; Rawson, Ian

    2011-11-01

    In October 2010, Hopital Albert Schweitzer Haiti treated some of the first patients with cholera in Haiti. Over the following 10 months, a strategic plan was developed and implemented to improve the management of cases at the hospital level and to address the underlying risk factors at the community level.

  13. [Albert Schweitzer's MD thesis on Criticism of the medical pathographies on Jesus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The prominent philosopher, theologian, physician, musicologist and organ soloist Albert Schweitzer (14. 1. 1875-4. 9. 1965) submitted his MD thesis Kritik der von medizinischer Seite veröffentlichten Pathographien uber Jesus (Criticism of the medical pathographies on Jesus) in 1913. Very soon he published this work under the title Die psychiatrische Beurteilung Jesu. Darstellung und Kritik (The psychiatric evaluation of Jesus. Description and criticism) in order to reach a broader audience. Schweitzer's explicit motive for selecting this topic was to influence the theological debate by means of a M. D. thesis on psychiatric pathographies on Jesus. He was confronted with a lot of reproaches. These reproaches contended that his theological opinions had been supporting tendencies to describe Jesus as a mentally ill person or a religious fanatic. In addition, some authors of pathographies on Jesus (De Loosten, Binet-Sanglé, Hirsch, Rasmussen) characterized Jesus as mentally ill, suffering from paranoia. Schweitzer intended to reject the reproaches considering himself and the postulates of the authors of the pathographies. Schweitzer combined in a transdisciplinary way theological, psychiatric and psychopathological arguments. He did this in a very convincing way. Although Schweitzer did not deal with a central or explicit psychiatric question, he implicitly postulated transdisciplinary approaches for proper retrospective pathographies on historic persons. At the age of thirty, Schweitzer decided to finish his academic career and to begin studies in medicine as a preparation for work as a physician in Africa. This decision provoked much lack of understanding in his personal environment. Therefore it may be possible that a very personal motive contributed to the selection of the topic of the MD thesis. Among psychiatric authorities, Albert Schweitzer's interest in the criticisms of psychiatric pathographies and his transdisciplinary approach to this topic encountered

  14. [Experience in establishing ophthalmology at the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer (HAS) in Deschapelles, Haiti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, D; Bracher, H R

    2007-04-01

    Haiti is regarded as the poorest country of the Western hemisphere. The Hôpital Albert Schweitzer (HAS), founded in 1956 by Larimer Melon, is providing medical care to the Artibonite valley, an area in the centre of Haiti with over 400 000 inhabitants. Until 2001, a three-fold population was without eye care in central Haiti. In 2001, Hans Rudolf Bracher, a retired ophthalmologist from Bern, initiated the eye department at HAS and organised an eye examination unit, a microscope and further surgical equipment. Since then, eye care to the population was provided by short-term visits of ophthalmologists, nurses and orthoptists, mainly from switzerland. Additionally, teaching and surgical training was performed at university hospital in Port-au-Price, the only education centre for ophthalmologists in the country. The actual political and security situation complicates visits of western doctors. A development association for the HAS eye department was founded and with its help, an Haitian ophthalmologist is employed in a full-time position. Furthermore, logistic support is provided with drugs and surgical equipment. Today, under difficult circumstances, the eye department is well established as an effective and cost-covering institution at HAS.

  15. Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965: Fiction and Historical Reconstruction in Movies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio CARRERAS PANCHÓN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1952 Nobel Peace Prize granted to Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965 meant not only an acknowledgement of his altruistic work in Africa but also implied his development into a global public figure. His influence covered a wide range of fields (theologian, philosopher, musician, physician. In the context of the cold war and the menace of a nuclear war, he advocated for a universal concept of ethics and the “Reverence for life”. His life was very soon object of dramatisations, both in film and theatre plays, often openly apologetically. Following the decolonization and the fall of real socialism, his figure has been revisited in a number of films. However, many of these modern dramatisations tend to focus on thencurrent concerns and disregard the contradictions and limitations of Albert Schweitzer. The biopic is a genre where the freedom of scriptwriters and directors prevail, and where those specific events that may be most appealing to the public are emphatically portrayed. The documentary film, intended to enhance the image of the person, has given way to other approaches, where a number of Schweitzer acquaintances provide a more clear and corroborated picture of his complex personality.

  16. Schweitzer (Albert) Bresslau (Hélène), Correspondance 1901-1905. L’amitié dans l’amour

    OpenAIRE

    Uberfill, François

    2012-01-01

    Que pouvait-on encore apprendre sur les relations entre Albert Schweitzer et Hélène Bresslau qui n’ait été dit, après la belle biographie rédigée par Verena Mühlstein Helene Schweitzer Bresslau. Ein Leben für Lambarene, parue en 2001 et dont il a été rendu compte ici (RA 2003, p. 382-386). Et pourtant ! Jean-Paul Sorg, spécialiste des études schweitzériennes a eu raison de publier la correspondance entre les deux amis. Ces lettres seraient tombées dans l’oubli si leur fille Rhena Schweitzer-M...

  17. History and perspectives of medical research at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramharter, Michael; Adegnika, Ayola A; Agnandji, Selidji T; Matsiegui, Pierre Blaise; Grobusch, Martin P; Winkler, Stefan; Graninger, Wolfgang; Krishna, Sanjeev; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Lell, Bertrand; Missinou, Michel A; Mavoungou, Elie; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    In 1913 Albert Schweitzer founded one of the first modern hospitals in Africa dedicated to the health of the local population. The Albert Schweitzer Hospital is located in Lambaréné, a small town in Gabon. In 1981 a research department--the Medical Research Unit--was established with the aim to perform research in the field of infectious diseases ( www.lambarene.org ). The main focus lies on clinical research on malaria and other parasitic diseases. Studies on the molecular biology and immunology of parasitic diseases are fostered since the inauguration of a novel building dedicated for basic science. A training program in clinical research in tropical diseases for African scientists has been set up recently.

  18. [Evaluation of primary health care activities at the Albert Schweitzer hospital in Lambarene, Gabon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, M; Ninteretse, B

    2007-06-01

    In 1999 the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambrene, Gabon set up a community health care service that provides immunization campaigns and mother/child health care and manages 9 village health care centers in a district with a population of approximately 64000 inhabitants. An evaluation conducted in April 2006 showed that collection of a consultation charge (15 euros) could cover the basic costs of operating these centers and purchasing necessary medicines. Three of the four centers evaluated demonstrated good quality indicators including properly kept records, posting of information bulletins for patients, appropriate referrals, and good relations with village authorities. At the center that performed poorly, the nurse apparently received no pay or lodging. Analysis of data about pediatric activity showed that diagnosis of diarrhea, malnutrition and anemia has fallen while hospitalization for tuberculosis and urinary schistomiasis is now being recorded. At the same time, village health centers are increasingly concerned with problems related to management and prevention of AIDS, malaria and urinary schistomiasis. This service shows that with good supervision it is possible to improve the quality of primary health care with partial but adequate recovery of costs and that basic health care workers are able to provide overall management for complicated patients, facilitate the work of reference hospital, and report new health problems.

  19. Reducing under-five mortality through Hôpital Albert Schweitzer's integrated system in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry; Cayemittes, Michel; Philippe, Francois; Dowell, Duane; Dortonne, Jean Richard; Menager, Henri; Bottex, Erve; Berggren, Warren; Berggren, Gretchen

    2006-05-01

    The degree to which local health systems contribute to reductions in under-five mortality in severely impoverished settings has not been well documented. The current study compares the under-five mortality in the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer (HAS) Primary Health Care Service Area with that for Haiti in general. HAS provides an integrated system of community-based primary health care services, hospital care and community development. A sample of 10% of the women of reproductive age in the HAS service area was interviewed, and 2390 live births and 149 child deaths were documented for the period 1995-99. Under-five mortality rates were computed and compared with rates for Haiti. In addition, available data regarding inputs, processes and outputs for the HAS service area and for Haiti were assembled and compared. Under-five mortality was 58% less in the HAS service area, and mortality for children 12-59 months of age was 76% less. These results were achieved with an input of fewer physicians and hospital beds per capita than is available for Haiti nationwide, but with twice as many graduate nurses and auxiliary nurses per capita than are available nationwide, and with three cadres of health workers that do not exist nationwide: Physician Extenders, Health Agents and Community Health Volunteers. The population coverage of targeted child survival services was generally 1.5-2 times higher in the HAS service area than in rural Haiti. These findings support the conclusion that a well-developed system of primary health care, with outreach services to the household level, integrated with hospital referral care and community development programmes, can make a strong contribution to reducing infant and child mortality in severely impoverished settings.

  20. The Goldwyn diary of November and December 1960, at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwyn, Robert M; Constantian, Mark B

    2012-01-01

    Through unexpected circumstances, I went to Lambaréné, in Gabon, to be Dr. Albert Schweitzer's surgeon for 2 months, November and December of 1960.This diary I can honestly say I never thought would become public. The years have passed; I am now 77. I realize that not many of those who served in a medical capacity at his hospital are still alive and not everyone will share his or her experiences.I want to make clear that I was with Dr. Schweitzer only 2 months. I would not want anyone to think that I played a strategic role at the hospital. I did not, but I helped as best I could.Although I have traveled throughout the world and have been a surgeon in many out-of-the-way places, I have not returned to Lambaréné. The reason, I confess, is that I wanted it to remain in my mind as it was. For Dr. Schweitzer and those who served there, his hospital was a way of life. It was a world of its own and, though small, it came into being because of the arching ideals and unflagging dedication of a remarkable man. His example should inspire us to enlarge our personal horizons, not just to recognize the less fortunate but to act without delay on their behalf. For each of us, there is an Ogowe waiting to be crossed.

  1. El Legado de Albert Schweitzer - RESUMEN DE VOCABULARIO DE LA SENSIBILIDAD PROFUNDA Y SUPERFICIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cardenas Escovar

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Octubre, 1989

    ALBERT SCHWEITZER(1875-1965 descuella en nuestro tiempo como ejemplo del verdadero humanismo. La vida entera de este alsaciano fue una extraordinaria aventura, entregada al servicio de sus semejantes. Su espíritu estuvo sin cesar colmado por una diversidad de estudios y tareas, a los cuales se sometió con pasión y profundidad, dando siempre lo mejor de sí mismo. Su actividad lo llevó a través de los campos de la teología, la religión, los estudios clásicos y la música, y en todas estas disciplinas alcanzó la excelencia. Con justicia es aclamado por su labor docente, su predicación, sus libros sobre teología, sobre la “Búsqueda de Jesús Histórico”, sobre Johann Sebastian Bach, los órganos y su construcción.

    Al leer su libro autobiográfico “De mi vida y de mi Pensamiento”, se comprende cómo contribuyeron múltiples factores afortunados, especialmente herencia, tradición, vida familiar, ambiente cultural y, sobre todo, esos impulsos individuales que los creyentes reconocemos como llamamientos de Dios para cumplir una misión específica, a través de la coherencia de la propia vida, para estructurar la personalidad de Schweitzer.

    Tanto su padre como su abuelo materno fueron pastores evangélicos.

    Su abuelo paterno fue maestro de escuela y organista. Schweitzer tenía apenas cinco años cuando comenzó a recibir de su padre lecciones de música, y ocho cuando comenzó a tocar el órgano. Atribuía su pasión por este instrumento a la herencia de su abuelo materno. A los nueve años tomó por primera vez el lugar del organista en un servicio, en Günsbach.

    Pero quizás el aspecto más conocido de la vida de Schweitzer es su carrera médica en Estrasburgo (1905-1912, la que emprendió cuando había cumplido los treinta años, después de renunciar su cargo de principal en el Colegio Teológico de Santo Tomás, contra las opiniones de la mayoría de sus

  2. Developing information technology at the Medical Research Unit of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibacka, Paterne Lessihuin; Bounda, Yann; Nguema, Davy Ondo; Lell, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    Information technology has become a key resource for research institutions, providing services such as hardware, software and network maintenance, as well as data management services. The IT department of the Medical Research Unit (MRU) of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon is a good example of how IT has developed at African Research Centres in recent years and demonstrates the scope of work that a modern research centre needs to offer. It illustrates the development in the past 15 years--from single computers maintained by investigators to the present situation of a group of well-trained local IT personal who are in charge of a variety of hardware and software and who also develop applications for use in a research environment. Open source applications are particularly suited for these needs and various applications are used in data management, data analysis, accounting, administration and quality management.

  3. Assessing the causes of under-five mortality in the Albert Schweitzer Hospital service area of rural Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry B; Ross, Allen G; Fernand, Facile

    2005-09-01

    Limited information is available regarding the causes of under-five mortality in nearly all of the countries in which mortality is the highest. The purpose of this study was to use a standard computerized protocol for defining the leading causes of death among children in a high-mortality rural population of Haiti and to highlight the need for similar studies else-where in Haiti and throughout the high-mortality areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. In 2001 a standardized, closed-ended verbal autopsy questionnaire endorsed by the World Health Organization was administered to a representative, population-based sample of the mothers or other caregivers of 97 children who had died before reaching 5 years of age between 1995 and 1999 in the service area of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, which is located in the rural Artibonite Valley of Haiti. With the data from the questionnaires we used a computerized algorithm to generate diagnoses of the cause of death; the algorithm made it possible to have more than one cause of death. Acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) was the leading diagnosis, present in 45% of all under-five deaths, followed by enteric diseases, present in 21% of deaths. Neonatal tetanus, preterm birth, and other early neonatal causes unassociated with ALRI or diarrhea were present in 41% of the neonatal deaths. Among children 1-59 months of age, ALRI was present in 51% of the deaths, and enteric diseases in 30%. Deaths were concentrated during the first few months of life, with 35% occurring during the first month. Among the neonatal deaths, 27% occurred on the first day of life, and 80% occurred during the first 10 days of life. In the Albert Schweitzer Hospital program area--and presumably in other areas of Haiti as well--priority needs to be given to the prevention of and the early, effective treatment of ALRI, diarrhea, and early neonatal conditions. This study points to the need for more, similar standardized assessments to guide local

  4. An innovative way of renovating with low energy: the Albert-Schweitzer Quarter, Berlin-Friedrichshagen. Short report, final report part 1: state-of-the art, final report part 2: planning and implementation, measurements and evaluations; Innovative Niedrigenergiesanierung Albert-Schweitzer-Viertel, Berlin-Friedrichshagen. Kurzbericht, Schlussbericht Teil 1: Bestandsaufnahme, Schlussbericht Teil 2: Planung und Durchfuehrung, Messungen und Auswertungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Although there are high rates of vacancies in some regions, the 2 million flats in the flat-roof buildings in the new states (Eastern Germany) are a part of Germany's residential buildings which cannot be done without. Almost one tenth of them is likely to be torn down within the next years, but the major part must be converted into energy-saving, well-functioning and well-accepted building if they are not to come down to 21st century-slums. The Albert-Schweitzer Quarter was renovated as a model where strategies to achieve these objectives were tested. The model project covers the energetic rehabilitation and elimination of construction-related damage in the residential blockP2, Albert-Schweitzer-Str. 31-40 with a total of 100 flats. The project was started in January 2001. The works were finished by the end of 2001. The project including measurements and evaluations continued until December 2003. [German] Trotz punktuell hoher Leerstandsquoten bilden die 2 Millionen Wohnungen in den Plattenbauten der neuen Bundeslaender insgesamt einen unverzichtbaren Bestandteil des Wohngebaeudebestandes. Etwa ein Zehntel dieser Substanz wird in den naechsten Jahren wohl abgerissen, aber der weitaus groesste Teil muss in energiesparende, gut funktionierende und Akzeptanz findende Gebaeude umgewandelt werden, sollen diese Siedlungen nicht zu den Slums des 21. Jahrhunderts verkommen. In der modellhaften Sanierung Albert-Scheitzer-Viertel wurden Strategien zum Erreichen dieser Ziele erprobt. Das Modellvorhaben umfasst die energetische Sanierung und Bauschadensbeseitigung des P2-Wohnblockes Albert-Schweitzer-Str. Nr. 31-40 mit insgesamt 100 Wohnungen. Projektstart war im Januar 2001. Die Baumassnahmen wurden Ende 2001 abgeschlossen, das Vorhaben lief einschliesslich der Messungen und Auswertungen bis Dezember 2003. (orig.)

  5. Treatment of tuberculosis in a rural area of Haiti: directly observed and non-observed regimens. The experience of H pital Albert Schweitzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollé-Goig, J E; Alvarez, J

    2001-02-01

    Artibonite Valley, a rural area in Haiti. To evaluate a tuberculosis control program in rural Haiti and to compare two strategies for treatment implemented in two areas that were not chosen at random: treatment delivered at the patients' homes observed by former tuberculosis patients (DOT), and non observed treatment (non-DOT). Retrospective analysis of the clinical records of adult patients diagnosed with tuberculosis at H pital Albert Schweitzer in Deschapelles, Haiti, during 1994-1995. There were 143 patients in the non-DOT group and 138 patients in the DOT group. The results of treatment were significantly different: in the non-DOT group 29% defaulted, 12% died and 58% had a successful outcome; in the DOT group 7% defaulted (P < 0.01), 4% died (P = 0.01) and 87% had a successful outcome (P < 0.01). These differences are also significant when considering only human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients (defaulted P < 0.01; died P = 0.09; successful outcome P < 0.01). Delivering treatment in patients' homes with direct observation by former tuberculosis patients can achieve good results, even in an area of extreme poverty and high rates of HIV infection. In this population the number of patients who are able to complete their treatment without observed administration is far from optimal.

  6. Health equity issues at the local level: socio-geography, access, and health outcomes in the service area of the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer-Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry B; King-Schultz, Leslie W; Aftab, Asma S; Bryant, John H

    2007-08-01

    Although health equity issues at regional, national and international levels are receiving increasing attention, health equity issues at the local level have been virtually overlooked. Here, we describe here a comprehensive equity assessment carried out by the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer-Haiti (HAS) in 2003. HAS has been operating health and development programs in the Artibonite Valley of Haiti for 50 years. We reviewed all available information arising from a comprehensive evaluation of the programs of HAS carried out in 1999 and 2000. As part of this evaluation, two demographic and health surveys were carried out. We carried out exit interviews with clients receiving primary health care, observations within health facilities, interviews with households related to quality of care, and focus group discussions with community-based health workers. A special study was carried out in 2003 to assess factors determining the use of prenatal care services. Finally, selected findings were obtained from the HAS information system. We found markedly reduced access to health services in the peripheral mountainous areas compared to the central plains. The quality of services was more deficient and the coverage of key services was lower in the mountains. Finally, health status, as measured by under-five mortality rates and levels of childhood malnutrition, was also worse in the mountains. These findings indicate that local health programs need to give attention to monitoring the health status as well as the quality and coverage of basic services among marginalized groups within the program service area. Health inequities will not be overcome until such monitoring occurs and leaders of health programs ensure that inequities identified are addressed in the local programming of activities. It is quite likely that, within relatively small geographic areas in resource-poor settings around the world, similar, if not even greater, levels of health inequities exist. These inequities

  7. Assessing the causes of under-five mortality in the Albert Schweitzer Hospital service area of rural Haiti La evaluación de las causas de mortalidad en niños menores de cinco años en la zona rural atendida por el Hospital Albert Schweitzer de Haití

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry B. Perry

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Limited information is available regarding the causes of under-five mortality in nearly all of the countries in which mortality is the highest. The purpose of this study was to use a standard computerized protocol for defining the leading causes of death among children in a high-mortality rural population of Haiti and to highlight the need for similar studies elsewhere in Haiti and throughout the high-mortality areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. METHODS: In 2001 a standardized, closed-ended verbal autopsy questionnaire endorsed by the World Health Organization was administered to a representative, population-based sample of the mothers or other caregivers of 97 children who had died before reaching 5 years of age between 1995 and 1999 in the service area of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, which is located in the rural Artibonite Valley of Haiti. With the data from the questionnaires we used a computerized algorithm to generate diagnoses of the cause of death; the algorithm made it possible to have more than one cause of death. RESULTS: Acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI was the leading diagnosis, present in 45% of all under-five deaths, followed by enteric diseases, present in 21% of deaths. Neonatal tetanus, preterm birth, and other early neonatal causes unassociated with ALRI or diarrhea were present in 41% of the neonatal deaths. Among children 1-59 months of age, ALRI was present in 51% of the deaths, and enteric diseases in 30%. Deaths were concentrated during the first few months of life, with 35% occurring during the first month. Among the neonatal deaths, 27% occurred on the first day of life, and 80% occurred during the first 10 days of life. CONCLUSIONS: In the Albert Schweitzer Hospital program area-and presumably in other areas of Haiti as well-priority needs to be given to the prevention of and the early, effective treatment of ALRI, diarrhea, and early neonatal conditions. This study points to the need for

  8. Health equity issues at the local level: Socio-geography, access, and health outcomes in the service area of the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer-Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Asma S

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although health equity issues at regional, national and international levels are receiving increasing attention, health equity issues at the local level have been virtually overlooked. Here, we describe here a comprehensive equity assessment carried out by the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer-Haiti (HAS in 2003. HAS has been operating health and development programs in the Artibonite Valley of Haiti for 50 years. Methods We reviewed all available information arising from a comprehensive evaluation of the programs of HAS carried out in 1999 and 2000. As part of this evaluation, two demographic and health surveys were carried out. We carried out exit interviews with clients receiving primary health care, observations within health facilities, interviews with households related to quality of care, and focus group discussions with community-based health workers. A special study was carried out in 2003 to assess factors determining the use of prenatal care services. Finally, selected findings were obtained from the HAS information system. Results We found markedly reduced access to health services in the peripheral mountainous areas compared to the central plains. The quality of services was more deficient and the coverage of key services was lower in the mountains. Finally, health status, as measured by under-five mortality rates and levels of childhood malnutrition, was also worse in the mountains. Conclusion These findings indicate that local health programs need to give attention to monitoring the health status as well as the quality and coverage of basic services among marginalized groups within the program service area. Health inequities will not be overcome until such monitoring occurs and leaders of health programs ensure that inequities identified are addressed in the local programming of activities. It is quite likely that, within relatively small geographic areas in resource-poor settings around the world, similar, if not

  9. Beyond Schweitzer and the psychiatrists: Jesus as fictive personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Capps

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Albert Schweitzer and the psychiatric studies of Jesus that he critiqued in 1913 shared the belief that Jesus identified himself as the coming Messiah. Unlike the psychiatrists, however, Schweitzer did not therefore judge Jesus to have been delusional. This article concurs with Schweitzer on the grounds that “ideas of reference” were a common feature of the religious milieu in which Jesus lived. It introduces the psychoanalytic concept of the “fictive personality” as relevant to Jesus’ identification of himself as the coming Messiah. In contrast to delusional theories, this concept emphasizes the positive uses of such identifications, especially as a means of self-empowerment.

  10. Gastvrijheid in het Albert Schweitzer ziekenhuis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, M.; van der Voordt, D.J.M.; Bos, P.; Willemse, M.

    2012-01-01

    Het ASz bestaat uit ziekenhuizen in Sliedrecht, Zwijndrecht en Dordrecht. Bij het ASz mogen de patiënten de juiste zorg op het juiste moment en de juiste plaats met de juiste middelen door de juiste persoon met het juiste resultaat verwachten. Maar wat is juist? Als het gaat om (medisch

  11. Investidura de doctores Honoris Causa de Albert Bandura y José del Castillo Nicolau. Universidad de Salamanca, 17 de julio de 1992

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez López, Cándido, Candy

    1992-01-01

    Cincuenta y siete fotografías de la ceremonia de investidura de doctores Honoris Causa de Albert Bandura y José del Castillo Nicolau. Acto celebrado en el Paraninfo de la Universidad de Salamanca el 17 de julio de 1992.

  12. BOUNDZANGA (Noël Bertrand) et NDOMBET (Wilson-André) (dir.), Le malentendu Schweitzer

    OpenAIRE

    Sorg, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Nul doute que l’ouvrage collectif intitulé Le malentendu Schweitzer rebondit sur l’idée d’un malentendu productif, dégagée et soulignée par Augustin Emane dans Docteur Schweitzer, une icône africaine (voir notre compte rendu ci-dessus). Des universitaires gabonais y ont signé douze études fort diverses et de facture inégale, dont deux avaient été exposées au colloque international organisé à Lambaréné, les 8 et 9 juillet 2013, sur le thème général « Albert Schweitzer : une aventure africaine ...

  13. [Hippocrates and Schweitzer - comparison of their concepts of medical ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romankow, J

    1999-01-01

    The Greek physician Hippocrates (c. 460-377 BC) is traditionally regarded as the founder of medicine as a scientific discipline and medical ethics. Hippocrates sought to rely on facts, observation and experiment in the diagnosis and treatment of illness. His work Corpus Hippocraticum included also the remarques on the aspects of environmental medicine. Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965), recipient of the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize, attained fame as a theologian and musician (his activity included a modern interpretation of J.S. Bach) before turning to missionary work in Africa. Having trained as a physician in Strasbourg, he founded (1913) a hospital at Lambarene, Gabon, to which he dedicated the rest of his life. Early in his life he felt deep "reverence for life". His philosophy culminated in an universal affirmative ethnics of an active charity.

  14. Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In a single year, 1905, Albert Einstein made several dramatic contributions to physics. He deduced the true nature of Brownian motion (doing much to underline the molecular and atomic nature of matter), he demonstrated the particle nature of light in a way which was accessible to experimental investigation (the work for which he received the Nobel prize) and, most dramatically of all, he conceived the special theory of relativity

  15. Stress and burnout in junior doctors | Schweitzer | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 84, No 6 (1994) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  16. Sturen op een gastvrij Albert Schweitzer ziekenhuis : Invloed van de gebouwde omgeving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prevosth, J.M.; van der Voordt, D.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    De beleving van gastvrijheid door patiënten en bezoekers van ziekenhuizen wordt door veel aspecten beïnvloed: de bejegening door het personeel, de kwaliteit en keuzevrijheid in eten en drinken, de kwaliteit van het gebouw als geheel, de indeling en inrichting van de afzonderlijke ruimten, en de

  17. Signets Albert Camus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Poul Søren

    2010-01-01

    Liste med relevant information om den franske forfatter og Nobelprismodtager Albert Camus - fremstillet i forbindelse med 50-året for forfatterens død og i forbindelse med en konference om forfatteren på Syddansk Universitet......Liste med relevant information om den franske forfatter og Nobelprismodtager Albert Camus - fremstillet i forbindelse med 50-året for forfatterens død og i forbindelse med en konference om forfatteren på Syddansk Universitet...

  18. Albert Einsteins Wonderjaar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieks, D.G.B.J.

    In het jaar 1905 publiceerde Albert Einstein een reeks artikelen die een omwenteling voor de wetenschap betekende. En toch bleef Einstein een kind van zijn tijd, van een eeuw die in het teken stond van dynamo’s, raderen en stoommachines.

  19. Albert Abraham Michelson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some experiments change the face of a subject, and some experiments do that many times over. Albert Michelson built his interferometer in order to determine the effect of Earth's rotation on the speed of light. The null result supported the crucial assumption in Einstein's special theory of relativity and was the final nail in the ...

  20. Cotton, Prof. Frank Albert

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1985 Honorary. Cotton, Prof. Frank Albert. Date of birth: 9 April 1930. Date of death: 20 February 2007. Last known address: Department of Chemistry, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, U.S.A..

  1. Johann Baptist von Schweitzer: the queer Marx loved to hate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, H

    1995-01-01

    Despite his conviction on a morals charge involving a boy, the early German Social Democrat Johann Baptist von Schweitzer went on to have a successful political career. His life furnishes the context to present remarks by his political opponents Marx and Engels, which reveal their deep-seated homophobia. It is pointed out that this has been glossed over by the translations of the recently published Marx/Engels Collected Works. Some remarks on boy-love and anarchism are appended.

  2. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  3. Albert Londe positions autochromistes

    OpenAIRE

    Boulouch, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    "L'autochromie amènera fatalement une révolution complète dans la photographie d'amateur. Celui qui en aura essayé ne voudra plus rien faire d'autre." Albert Londe, Le Chasseur français, 1909. En octobre 1909, Le Chasseur français publie la dernière "chronique photographique" d'Albert Londe (1858-1917). Celui qui animait les pages de "l'organe de tous les sports et de la vie en plein air" se retire en saluant les frères Lumière pour leur dernière découverte, la plaque autochrome: "...

  4. Albert einstein - Illustrated biography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    A genius of science, but also a great-hearted man who fought his convictions all his life long. That is the Albert Einstein s portrait what draw the documents collected in this book: photographies, talks, letters and narrations, sometimes unpublished. With evidences and anecdotes is drawn a surprising personality of a man full of humor and originality who made his mark, as nobody else, in this tumultuous century. (N.C.)

  5. Albert Einstein, Analogizer Extraordinaire

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Where does deep insight in physics come from? It is tempting to think that it comes from the purest and most precise of reasoning, following ironclad laws of thought that compel the clear mind completely rigidly. And yet the truth is quite otherwise. One finds, when one looks closely at any major discovery, that the greatest of physicists are, in some sense, the most crazily daring and irrational of all physicists. Albert Einstein exemplifies this thesis in spades. In this talk I will describe the key role, throughout Albert Einstein's fabulously creative life, played by wild guesses made by analogy lacking any basis whatsoever in pure reasoning. In particular, in this year of 2007, the centenary of 1907, I will describe how over the course of two years (1905 through 1907) of pondering, Einstein slowly came, via analogy, to understand the full, radical consequences of the equation that he had first discovered and published in 1905, arguably the most famous equation of all time: E = mc2.

  6. Albert Einstein a biography

    CERN Document Server

    Fölsing, Albrecht

    1997-01-01

    Albert Einstein's achievements are not just milestones in the history of science; decades ago they became an integral part of the twentieth-century world in which we live. Like no other modern physicist he altered and expanded our understanding of nature. Like few other scholars, he stood fully in the public eye. In a world changing with dramatic rapidity, he embodied the role of the scientist by personal example. Albrecht Folsing, relying on previously unknown sources and letters, brings Einstein's "genius" into focus. Whereas former biographies, written in the tradition of the history of science, seem to describe a heroic Einstein who fell to earth from heaven, Folsing attempts to reconstruct Einstein's thought in the context of the state of research at the turn of the century. Thus, perhaps for the first time, Einstein's surroundings come to light.

  7. [Albert Bandura and his work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrin, Brigitte

    2012-03-01

    The Canadian psychologist Albert Bandura (1925) author of the concept of self-efficacy is still not much known of nurses. This article offers an outline of his biography and his work. Theories of Albert Bandura provide a positive, dynamic relationship with the agentivity human control over events that affect their existence. The concept of vicarious learning, self-efficacy and agency can enrich nursing research.

  8. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, Daniele; Weisskopf, Victor Frederick; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    The scientist and his work by D. AMATI and S. FUBINI. A socially engaged scientist by V. F. WEISSKOPF. This week, we pay homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The centenary of his birth is being commemorated all over the world. Exhibitions and symposia are being organized, books published, postage stamps is...

  9. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Victor Frederick; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    A socially engaged scientist by V. F. WEISSKOPF. On the origin of the Einstein-Russell statement on nuclear weapon by H. S. BURHOP. This week, we pay homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The centenary of his birth is being commemorated all over the world. Exhibitions and symposia are being organized, books...

  10. Tuberculosis patients hospitalized in the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon-a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolp, S M; Huson, M A M; Janssen, S; Beyeme, J O; Grobusch, M P

    2013-11-01

    Epidemiological data on tuberculosis in Central Africa are limited. We performed a retrospective observational study on clinical characteristics of 719 hospitalized tuberculosis patients in Lambaréné, Gabon. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection rate was high (34%) and in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in HIV-positive patients (10% versus 2%). Long-term information on patient outcome was limited; however, from 2008 to 2011, loss to follow up was noted in 28% of cases. Our data illustrate the high burden of TB in Gabon, where loss to follow up and emerging drug resistance are important problems for which comprehensive data are still lacking. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  11. A North Carolina Model for Improving Rural Health Care: 1/10 Albert Schweitzer, 9/10 ORHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Mercy Hardie

    1980-01-01

    The article describes North Carolina's precedent setting Office of Rural Health Services, its background and design, and its significant role in the development of primary health care clinics such as that in Balsom Grove which is staffed by a family nurse practitioner and enjoying wide community support. (SB)

  12. Tuberculosis patients hospitalized in the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon-a retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolp, S. M.; Huson, M. A. M.; Janssen, S.; Beyeme, J. O.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data on tuberculosis in Central Africa are limited. We performed a retrospective observational study on clinical characteristics of 719 hospitalized tuberculosis patients in Lambaréné, Gabon. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection rate was high (34%) and in-hospital

  13. Albert Keding zum 65. Geburtstag

    OpenAIRE

    Pietsch, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Herr Albert Keding beging am 2. März 1997 seinen 65. Geburtstag. Er wurde in Schreitlacken, Kreis Samland (Ostpreußen) geboren, wo seine Eltern einen Landwirtschaftsbetrieb besaßen. Dort wurde das Interesse des Jubilars zur Landwirtschaft geweckt. So besuchte Albert Keding später in Dassow-Lütgenhof (Mecklenburg) eine Fachschule für Landwirtschaft, wo er seine Vorliebe für Gräser entdeckte. An diese Ausbildung schloss sich ein Landwirtschaftsstudium an der Martin-Luther-Universität in Halle a...

  14. Albert Einstein: A Biographical Sketch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Albert Einstein: A Biographical Sketch. Maja Winteler-Einstein. Reflections Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 111-120. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0111-0120 ...

  15. Visions of Savage Paradise : Albert Eckhout, Court Painter in Colonial Dutch Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, Rebecca Parker

    2006-01-01

    Visions of Savage Paradise is the first major book-length study of the Dutch artist Albert Eckhout to be published since 1938. This book, which draws extensively on the author's doctoral dissertation, examines the fascinating works of art produced by Eckhout while he was court painter in Dutch

  16. [Robert Schweitzer. Finnland, das Zarenreich und die Deutschen] / Karsten Bgüggemann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brüggemann, Karsten, 1965-

    2011-01-01

    Arvustus: Robert Schweitzer. Finnland, das Zarenreich und die Deutschen : gesammelte Studien zum europäischen Nordosten. Festgabe zum 60. Geburtstag des Verfassers. Hrsg. von Uta-Maria Liertz. (Veröffentlichungen der Aue-Stiftung. Bd. 20) Verlag Schmidt-Römhild

  17. PEMIKIRAN PENDIDIKAN MORAL ALBERT BANDURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qumruin Nurul Laila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Albert Bandura dilahirkan pada tanggal 4 Desember 1925 di Mundare, sebuah kota kecil di barat daya Alberta, Kanada, sekitar 50 mil sebelah timur Edmonton. Berasal dari keluarga keturunan Eropa Timur. Ayahnya dari Krakow Polandia dan ibunya dari Ukraina. Pada tahun 1952 Albert Bandura menikah dengan Virginia Varns dan dikaruniai dua orang anak, Mary dan Carol. Bandura belajar bersama Robert Sears, salah satu perintis teori belajar sosial lainnya dan mengambil gelar diplomanya dari University of British Columbia dan gelar kesarjanaan psikologinya dari University of Iowa. Karena reputasinya, pada tahun 1974 dia dipercaya menjabat sebagai Presiden Asosiasi Psikologi Amerika (APA. Sebagai ahli dibidang psikologi, dia percaya bahwa proses transfer keilmuan atau pendidikan, tak lepas dari norma-norma moral yang berlaku di masyarakat hingga nilai-nilai dari norma tersebut diejawantahkan dalam prilaku siswa sehari-hari. Atas dasar asumsi tersebut, maka teori pembelajaran Albert Bandura disebut sosial kognitif karena proses kognitif dalam diri individu memegang peranan dalam pembelajaran, sedangkan pembelajaran terjadi karena adanya pengaruh lingkungan sosial. Proses tahapan-tahapan dalam pembelajaran social kognitif meliputi: Tahap perhatian (attentional phase, Tahap penyimpanan dalam ingatan (retention phase, Tahap reproduksi (reproduction phase dan tahap motivasi (motivation phase. Teori pembelajaran sosial ini menekankan kepada proses bagaimana anak-anak belajar norma-norma kemasyarakatan. Jika pesan yang disampaikan bersifat positif, anak-anak menerimanya dengan baik dan pengaruh lainnya adalah sama positifnya, maka anak itu akan cenderung untuk membesar dengan nilai-nilai yang baik. Begitu juga sebaliknya.

  18. Albert Einstein:. Opportunity and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    The year 1905 has been called Albert Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." It was during that year that he caused revolutionary changes in man's primordial concepts about the physical world: space, time, energy, light and matter. How could a 26-year-old clerk, previously unknown, cause such profound conceptual changes, and thereby open the door to the era of modern scientific technological world? No one, of course, can answer that question. But one can, perhaps, analyze some factors that were essential to his stepping into such a historic role...

  19. Albert Einstein, un hombre universal

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Arroyo, Gladys

    2014-01-01

    Albert Einstein, famoso por su teoría de la relatividad, que cambió toda las concepciones previas sobre la gravitación, el cosmos, la geometría y en general toda la ciencia moderna. Además de ser un genio científico, fue un gran humanista, partidario de la convivencia pacífica entre los pueblos, gran defensor de la libertad individual y del progreso. A pesar de que en su infancia y juventud tropezó con más inconvenientes que ventajas, tuvo la gran habilidad de conectar sus innegables dotes na...

  20. 76 FR 11789 - Albert Poet: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ...] Albert Poet: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... FD&C Act) permanently debarring Albert Poet, MD from providing services in any capacity to a person that has an approved or pending drug product application. We base this order on a finding that Dr. Poet...

  1. Albert Einstein and 20th century's physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.

    1979-01-01

    Albert Einstein's teaching and his three fundamental works are discussed dealing with the molecular theory of heat applied to the motion of suspended particles in liquids at rest, the photoelectric effect, and the theory of relativity. Albert Einstein's impact on contemporary physics is evaluated. (J.P.)

  2. The times of Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.M.W.

    1990-09-01

    ''The life of Albert Einstein has a dramatic quality that does not rest exclusively on his theory of relativity. The extravagant timing of history linked him with three shattering developments of the twentieth century: the rise and fall of Nazi Germany, the birth of nuclear weapons, and the birth of zionism (and Israel). Their impact on Einstein's genius combined to drive him into a contact with the affairs of the world for which Einstein had little taste''. This article is the result of my lecture delivered at ICTP on 17 August, 1990 before a knowledgable audience that included scientists from many countries including the third world countries. This one and half hour lecture was organised by Dr. A.M. Hamende and Dr. H.R. Dalafi. 10 refs

  3. Obituary: Albert G. Petschek, 1928-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Petschek, Rolfe G.; Libersky, Larry D.

    2005-12-01

    Albert G. Petschek died suddenly 8 July 2004. He enjoyed good health and was very active professionally and personally until his death. He was highly respected, particularly in theoretical physics, for his deep, broad-ranging analytical powers, which resulted in contributions to nuclear physics, astrophysics, atmospheric physics, quantum mechanics, and quantum computing. Albert was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1928. His extended family left Czechoslovakia when its sovereignty was threatened by Germany in 1938 and settled throughout the Western Hemisphere. Albert's father, a banker, settled in Scarsdale, near New York City. Albert graduated from White Plains High School and obtained his BS from MIT in a program accelerated during World War II. While getting his masters degree at the University of Michigan, Albert met his wife, Marilyn, also a physics masters student. In 1953, Albert obtained his PhD from the University of Rochester working with Robert Marshak on aspects of nuclear theory, and joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Soon thereafter, Albert's younger brother, Harry, also became a PhD physicist. Harry is now well known in plasma physics for reconnection theory. At Los Alamos, Albert worked closely with Carson Mark, Marshall Rosenbluth, and Conrad Longmire designing the first thermonuclear weapons. His derivation of several radiation diffusion solutions, later published as LAMS 2421, remains a classic in its field, as does work on nuclear theory done with Baird Brandow and Hans Bethe during a sabbatical at Cornell in 1961. Bethe was a frequent visitor to Los Alamos and a close friend. A devoted family man, Albert also valued Los Alamos as a safe, stimulating environment for raising an active family. Like many of the scientists at Los Alamos, Albert enjoyed its ready access to outdoor activities such as hiking and skiing. Albert often combined his passions for intellectual activity and the outdoors

  4. Albert Camus´ "Katk" / Ott Ojamaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojamaa, Ott, 1926-1996

    2010-01-01

    Arvustus: Camus, Albert. Katk : romaan / prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Henno Rajandi ; eessõna: Ott Ojamaa. Tallinn : Ajalehtede-Ajakirjade Kirjastus, 1963. (Loomingu raamatukogu ; 1963, 43/46 (311/314))

  5. Albert Hofmann and Steve Myers honoured by the University of Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann (top) and Steve Myers (bottom) receive the title of Doctor Honoris Causa from the hands of Maurice Bourquin, Rector of the University of Geneva and President of CERN Council.   In front of Geneva University's crowded auditorium, Albert Hofmann and Steve Myers received title of Doctor Honoris Causa last Friday 8 June. The two members of CERN thereby received the University's highest distinction. This honour comes in recognition of their careers in the service of accelerator physics and their essential contribution to the success of LEP. Steve Myers joined CERN in August 1972 to work as engineer-in charge of the Intersecting Storage Rings collider (ISR). He was responsible for the acceleration by phase displacement of the high intensity beams to 31 GeV/c. He also worked on many other topics, notably the beam-beam effect in the ISR. Albert Hofmann arrived at CERN from the Cambridge Electron Accelerator (CEA) near Boston, USA, in 1973 - already with an excellent reputation as accelerato...

  6. Biographical sketch: Albert P. Iskrant, MA, FAPHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Richard A

    2010-07-01

    This biographical sketch on Albert P. Iskrant corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: The Etiology of Fractured Hips in Females, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1267-y . The article can also be accessed on the American Journal of Public Health web site at http://ajph.aphapublications.org/cgi/reprint/58/3/485 .

  7. Biographical Sketch: Albert P. Iskrant, MA, FAPHA

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    This biographical sketch on Albert P. Iskrant corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: The Etiology of Fractured Hips in Females, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1267-y. The article can also be accessed on the American Journal of Public Health web site at http://ajph.aphapublications.org/cgi/reprint/58/3/485.

  8. 2260-IJBCS-Article-Prof Trokourey Albert

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Datché TRAORE1,2, A.S.M. ABDELAZIZ2, Yapi S. BROU1 and Albert TROKOUREY1*. 1 Laboratoire ... preparation by simple mixing a modifier with the paste. ..... copper mixed chelate complexation. An. Univ. ... electrode modified with iron (II).

  9. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  10. Albert Einstein, guide spirituel du CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sandraz, Raphaël

    2005-01-01

    The year 2005, proclaimed "World year of Physics" by UNESCO, dedicates the 100th anniversary of the theory of relativity and the 50th anniversary of the death of his discoverer: Albert Einstein. The CERN in Geneva applies every day his theories (1 page)

  11. Albert Memmi in the Era of Decolonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keally McBride

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers the reception of Albert Memmi's Decolonization and the Decolonized.  Memmi himself observed that it is much harder to be a writer about postcolonialism than colonialism. Why would this be true?  What can we learn about the difficutlies of postcolonial philosophizing and the politics of decolonization through this publication of Memmi's?

  12. Albert Einstein and the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlickova, E.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is presented of Albert Einstein's works, listing his correspondence, biographical literature, articles on A. Einstein published in Czech journals, principal relativity theory monographs and popular, historical and philosophical publications. The bibliographical records are listed alphabetically. Most references give the abbreviations of libraries where the publications are available. (J.P.)

  13. Albert Einstein the roads to pacifism

    CERN Document Server

    Anta, Claudio Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Albert Einstein (1879-1955) is universally known as the father of the theory of relativity; however, he was also one of the most eminent pacifists of the first half of the twentieth century. Through his active, pragmatic and nuanced breed of pacifism, he sought to confront the dilemmas and problems of his time.

  14. Albert Einstein's Magic Mountain: An Aarau Education*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    For economic reasons, the electrotechnical factory J. Einstein & Cie. (co-owned by Albert Einstein's father Hermann) had to be closed in the summer of 1894. While Albert's parents emigrated to Italy to build a new existence, he remained in Munich to complete his studies at the Gymnasium. Left behind, however, he had a difficult time with what he considered the rigid educational practices at the Munich Luitpold-Gymnasium and quit without a diploma. The present article discusses Einstein's richly winding path to the Aargau Cantonal School (Switzerland), especially its history and educational philosophy during the time of his stay in Aarau. There, Einstein met some outstanding teachers, who could serve him as models of scholars and human beings. In spite of Einstein's distinct independence of mind, these personalities may well have had a significant influence on the alignment of his inner compass.

  15. Physician-assisted dying: thoughts drawn from Albert Camus' writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzaro, Claudia

    2018-03-20

    Physician-assisted dying (assisted suicide and euthanasia) is currently an intensely discussed topic in several countries. Despite differences in legislation and application, countries with end-of-life laws have similar eligibility criteria for assistance in dying: individuals must be in a hopeless situation and experience unbearable suffering. Hopelessness, as a basic aspect of the human condition, is a central topic in Albert Camus' philosophical work The Myth of Sisyphus, which addresses the question of suicide. Suffering in the face of a hopeless situation, and the way doctors approach this suffering, is the topic of his novel The Plague, which describes the story of a city confronted with a plague epidemic. In this paper, I draw philosophical and ethical conclusions about physician-assisted dying based on an analysis of central concepts in the work of Camus-specifically, those treated in The Myth of Sisyphus and The Plague. On the basis of my interpretation of Camus' work, I argue that hopelessness and unbearable suffering are useless as eligibility criteria for physician-assisted dying, given that they do not sufficiently elucidate where the line should be drawn between patients who should to be eligible for assistance and those who should not.

  16. Hans Alberts Christentumskritik : Ein kritischer vergleich zwischen Alberts kritik und klassischen religionskritiken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grube, Dirk Martin

    2002-01-01

    In this article, it is argued that Hans Albert's criticism of Christianity is stronger than the logical positivist as well as the classical, e.g. Feuerbachian, criticism, since it rests on less questionable presuppositions. Other than those other forms of criticism, it does not presuppose an

  17. Little Albert from the Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology Textbook Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeUnes, Arnold

    1983-01-01

    Watson and Rayner's study of Little Albert and conditioned emotional reactions is unquestionably a classic in psychology. Observations are made on what authors of 27 college textbooks in abnormal psychology have to say or not to say about Little Albert. (RM)

  18. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  19. Mileva Maric Einstein vivre avec Albert Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Milentijevic, Radmila

    2013-01-01

    Radmila Milentijevic n’est pas la première à écrire sur les relations entre le génial Albert Einstein et sa première épouse et précieuse collaboratrice durant ses années de recherches, la scientifique serbe Mileva Maric. Mais c’est la première fois qu’un ouvrage traite de cette idylle, puis de ce drame familial qui a duré près de cinquante années, sous une forme quasiment poétique, si rare dans l’historiographie scientifique.Professeur émérite d’histoire à l’université de New York, l’auteur propose ici une monographie riche et vivante, dévoilant une face cachée d’Albert Einstein, et faisant de sa compagne une figure historique de premier plan en même temps qu’un personnage romanesque dont le destin tragique ne laissera aucun lecteur indifférent.

  20. Policing epistemic deviance: Albert Von Schrenck-Notzing and Albert Moll(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Shortly after the death of Albert von Schrenck-Notzing (1862-1929), the doyen of early twentieth century German para psychology, his former colleague in hypnotism and sexology Albert Moll (1862-1939) published a treatise on the psychology and pathology of parapsychologists, with Schrenck-Notzing serving as a prototype of a scientist suffering from an 'occult complex'. Moll's analysis concluded that parapsychologists vouching for the reality of supernormal phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, telekinesis and materialisations, suffered from a morbid will to believe, which paralysed their critical faculties and made them cover obvious mediumistic fraud. Using Moll's treatment of Schrenck-Notzing as an historical case study of boundary disputes in science and medicine, this essay traces the career of Schrenck-Notzing as a researcher in hypnotism, sexology and parapsychology; discusses the relationship between Moll and Schrenck-Notzing; and problematises the pathologisation and defamation strategies of deviant epistemologies by authors such as Moll.

  1. Interview with Albert Ziegler about Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Z. Leana-Tascilar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Albert Ziegler is the chair of Educational Psychology and Research on Excellence at the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg and one of the most productive and cited academicians in gifted education in Europe and also all over the world. Prof. Ziegler has contributed different theories about gifted education and education in general. One of his well-known theories is The Actiotope Model of Giftedness and the 7-Step-Cycle of Self-Regulated Learning. Since last year I had the chance to be with him and his colleagues in Germany, thus I decided to share with you the interview that we had about his theories and his recommendations for Turkey.

  2. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  3. Spin doctoring

    OpenAIRE

    Vozková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    1 ABSTRACT The aim of this text is to provide an analysis of the phenomenon of spin doctoring in the Euro-Atlantic area. Spin doctors are educated people in the fields of semiotics, cultural studies, public relations, political communication and especially familiar with the infrastructure and the functioning of the media industry. Critical reflection of manipulative communication techniques puts spin phenomenon in historical perspective and traces its practical use in today's social communica...

  4. Nuclear Heuristics: Selected Writings of Albert and Roberta Wohlstetter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zarate, Robert; Sokolski, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This publication is an edited volume of Albert and Roberta Wohlstetters' key writings relating to nuclear proliferation and national security affairs, with commentaries by the Wohlstetters' colleagues and students...

  5. Albert Einstein and the problem of unification of fundamental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.

    1986-01-01

    Albert Einstein's attempts to construct a unified field theory of electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are presented and commented from the standpoint of the present day physics. 16 refs. (author)

  6. Pere Albert: Barcelona Canon, Royal Advocate, Feudal Theorist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagay, Donald K.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the life and career of one of Catalonia's greatest medieval legists is discussed. Using notarial and court documentation, the author explores the work of Pere Albert as judge and advocate. The Customs of Catalonia and other of Pere Albert's treatises form the basis for the review of the legist's career as a theorist in feudal law. The basis for this article is the collection of documents pertaining to Pere Albert, which the author includes in an appendix.

    En este artículo se estudia la vida y la carrera de uno de los jurisconsultos medievales más importantes de Cataluña. Utilizando la documentación notarial y judicial, el autor analiza la labor de Pere Albert como juez y abogado. ElsCostums de Catalunya y otros tratados de Pere Albert constituyen la base para el estudio de la carrera del jurisconsulto, como teórico en ley feudal y real. El artículo se basa en una colección de documentos originales relativos a Pere Albert, que el autor incluye en un apéndice.

  7. Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein and Franz Joseph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1983-01-01

    Under the Emperor Francis Joseph (1848-1916) the natural sciences were less weIl supported in Austria than in other countries of Europe. This is explained by the fact that the German speaking middle classes accepted the preeminence of the feudal forces with their antiscientific attitude. The reason for this readiness to subordination was that those middle classes feIt threatened in their relatively favourable situation by Slavs and Latins. Francis Joseph was the typical representative of the aristocracy. Personally, he did his duty conscientiously and was not corrupt, but progressive ideas and scientific thought were alien to him. From his desk he treated Boltzmann benevolently, but he had no wish to meet personally the greatest mind of the Empire or in any respect to ask his views. Another famous subject of the Emperor, Albert Einstein, was apparently ignored altogether. The structural weakness of Austria, due to the national problems, led to immobilism in her scientific life, but also, up to a point, to tolerance. The impression of Victor Adler on Einstein is considered in this historical context. (author) [de

  8. New Information about Albert Einstein's Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In order to glean information about hominin (or other) brains that no longer exist, details of external neuroanatomy that are reproduced on endocranial casts (endocasts) from fossilized braincases may be described and interpreted. Despite being, of necessity, speculative, such studies can be very informative when conducted in light of the literature on comparative neuroanatomy, paleontology, and functional imaging studies. Albert Einstein's brain no longer exists in an intact state, but there are photographs of it in various views. Applying techniques developed from paleoanthropology, previously unrecognized details of external neuroanatomy are identified on these photographs. This information should be of interest to paleoneurologists, comparative neuroanatomists, historians of science, and cognitive neuroscientists. The new identifications of cortical features should also be archived for future scholars who will have access to additional information from improved functional imaging technology. Meanwhile, to the extent possible, Einstein's cerebral cortex is investigated in light of available data about variation in human sulcal patterns. Although much of his cortical surface was unremarkable, regions in and near Einstein's primary somatosensory and motor cortices were unusual. It is possible that these atypical aspects of Einstein's cerebral cortex were related to the difficulty with which he acquired language, his preference for thinking in sensory impressions including visual images rather than words, and his early training on the violin.

  9. Prince Albert II of Monaco visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    With a strong curiosity for the work of CERN, HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco visited CMS and the CERN Control Centre on 2 September. "The Prince is interested in and sensitive to what CERN is doing. Monaco is closely linked to France, which is an important member of CERN. He wishes to express his help to the scientific community in every trip. He wants to meet scientists and to be really personally involved," explained Francois Chantrait, Head of the Press Service of the Prince’s Palace. CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer welcomed the Prince of Monaco to Point 5 with a presentation about CERN before they descended 100 metres underground to see the CMS experiment. Although the detector was closed up for test runs, he was able to see its grand scale as well as look at some of the intricate sample parts exhibited by CMS Spokesperson, Jim Virdee. The Prince wrote in the CERN Visitors’ Book that he perceives a realisation of promisin...

  10. Policing Epistemic Deviance: Albert von Schrenck-Notzing and Albert Moll1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after the death of Albert von Schrenck-Notzing (1862–1929), the doyen of early twentieth century German para psychology, his former colleague in hypnotism and sexology Albert Moll (1862–1939) published a treatise on the psychology and pathology of parapsychologists, with Schrenck-Notzing serving as a prototype of a scientist suffering from an ‘occult complex’. Moll’s analysis concluded that parapsychologists vouching for the reality of supernormal phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, telekinesis and materialisations, suffered from a morbid will to believe, which paralysed their critical faculties and made them cover obvious mediumistic fraud. Using Moll’s treatment of Schrenck-Notzing as an historical case study of boundary disputes in science and medicine, this essay traces the career of Schrenck-Notzing as a researcher in hypnotism, sexology and parapsychology; discusses the relationship between Moll and Schrenck-Notzing; and problematises the pathologisation and defamation strategies of deviant epistemologies by authors such as Moll. PMID:23002296

  11. Doctor's Orders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VALERIE SARTOR

    2010-01-01

    @@ "To become a doctor is like becoming a bomb expert:It takes a long time to learn this skill; you must use care and intuition; and you must understand that your work has grave consequences for those around you,"said Amgalan Gamazhapov,an advanced medical student who studies traditional Chinese and Mongolian medicine at the Inner Mongolia Medical University.

  12. Doctor Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biographical data of John Langdon Down, his invaluable contribution to the development of rehabilitation programs for children with Down syndrome. The basis of these programs was the socialization of people with intellectual disabilities. In doctor Down’s rehabilitation center there were used methods, including health care, education, physical education, the formation of correct behavior.

  13. Little Albert's alleged neurological impairment: Watson, Rayner, and historical revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digdon, Nancy; Powell, Russell A; Harris, Ben

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, Fridlund, Beck, Goldie, and Irons (2012) announced that "Little Albert"-the infant that Watson and Rayner used in their 1920 study of conditioned fear (Watson & Rayner, 1920)-was not the healthy child the researchers described him to be, but was neurologically impaired almost from birth. Fridlund et al. also alleged that Watson had committed serious ethical breaches in regard to this research. Our article reexamines the evidentiary bases for these claims and arrives at an alternative interpretation of Albert as a normal infant. In order to set the stage for our interpretation, we first briefly describe the historical context for the Albert study, as well as how the study has been construed and revised since 1920. We then discuss the evidentiary issues in some detail, focusing on Fridlund et al.'s analysis of the film footage of Albert, and on the context within which Watson and Rayner conducted their study. In closing, we return to historical matters to speculate about why historiographical disputes matter and what the story of neurologically impaired Albert might be telling us about the discipline of psychology today.

  14. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  15. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Staff members of the Agency working at the Seibersdorf laboratory are continuing to achieve high academic distinction. Two more - both Austrian - have now been awarded the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. Joachim Kramer, who is 26, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur in 1967 with the degree of Diplom-Ingenieur and then started work in the plant breeding and genetics section of the laboratory under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen. The results of the research work he carried out were accepted as the subject of a thesis for which he has now been granted his doctorate. The doctoral promotion took place on 30 June, at a ceremony attended by Dr. Andre Finkelstein, Deputy Director General for Research and Isotopes. The subject of Dr. Kramer's thesis was a comprehensive study of the mutagenic effects of fast neutrons and gamma rays, and the influence of various modifying factors such as water content, oxygen and metabolic state of seeds at the time of irradiation. This work has contributed significantly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which these two types of ionizing radiation produce mutations in seeds. The knowledge gained will be of great importance in the efficient use of ionizing radiation in practical plant breeding. Paul Wassermann, who is 33 years old, joined the Agency in 1965. He, too, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur as Diplom-Ingenieur in agriculture, having graduated with honours previously from the agricultural secondary school at Raumberg, Austria, in 1958. Dr. Wassermann's own words may be used to explain how he came to gain his doctorate. 'In October, 1966, I completed my studies at the Hochschule,' he writes. 'I was employed at the Agency laboratories in Seibersdorf, working in the plant and soils group. Encouraged by the interesting research which was performed there, a thesis entitled 'the Fate of Nitrogen in Submerged Rice Soils' was started, which finally led to the doctor's degree in Agriculture in June this year

  16. [Robert Schweitzer. Eine Unveröffentlichte Quelle zur Schulgeschichte von Reval Ferdinand Wiedemanns Geschichte des Revaler Gouvernementsgymnasiums aus dem Jahr 1856] / Paul Kaegbein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaegbein, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Arvustus: Robert Schweitzer. Eine Unveröffentlichte Quelle zur Schulgeschichte von Reval Ferdinand Wiedemanns Geschichte des Revaler Gouvernementsgymnasiums aus dem Jahr 1856. - Buch und Bildung im Baltikum. Münster : LIT, 2005. lk. 495-525. Kubermangugümnaasiumi vanemõpetaja Ferdinand Wiedemann kirjutas 1856. aastal kooli ajaloo, mis mingitel põhjustel jäi avaldamata. Tema tööd on kasutanud 1881. aastal Gotthard von Hansen

  17. Agency doctorates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-07-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  18. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  19. 'God's ethicist': Albert Moll and his medical ethics in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2012-04-01

    In 1902, Albert Moll, who at that time ran a private practice for nervous diseases in Berlin, published his comprehensive book on medical ethics, Ärztliche Ethik. Based on the concept of a contractual relationship between doctor and client, it gave more room to the self-determination of patients than the contemporary, usually rather paternalistic, works of this genre. In the first part of the present paper this is illustrated by examining Moll's views and advice on matters such as truthfulness towards patients, euthanasia, and abortion. The second part of this article discusses how Moll engaged with the then publicly debated issues of experimentation on hospital patients and the 'trade' of foreign private patients between agents and medical consultants. In both matters Moll collected evidence of unethical practices and tried to use it to bring about change without damaging his or the profession's reputation. However, with his tactical manoeuvres, Moll made no friends for himself among his colleagues or the authorities; his book on ethics also met with a generally cool response from the medical profession and seems to have been more appreciated by lawyers than by other doctors.

  20. Rereading Albert B. Lord's The Singer of Tales . Revisiting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to a fresh set of video-recordings of Sesotho praise-poetry made in the year 2000 enabled the author to revisit his adaptation of Albert Lord's definition of the formula as a dynamic compositional device that the oral poet utilizes during delivery. The basic adaptation made in 1983 pertains to heroic praises (dithoko tsa ...

  1. Albert Einstein and LD: An Evaluation of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marlin

    2000-01-01

    This article refutes claims that Albert Einstein had a learning disability and argues the claim derives its force not from evidence but from belief that the greatest among us suffer from some impairment and from desire to enhance the status of a marginalized group by including exceptional individuals. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  2. 76 FR 66072 - Albert Ronald Cioffi: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0159] Albert Ronald Cioffi: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kenny Shade...

  3. GERAKAN MESSIANISTIK ALBERT DIETZ DI SEMARANG TAHUN 1918

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Nurhasanah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerakan Messianistik Albert Dietz di Semarang merupakan salah satu gerakan sosial yang terjadi pada awal abad XX. Didalamnya sangat kental dengan unsur-unsur keagamaan dan dipimpin oleh seorang yang memiliki latar belakang pendidikan tinggi lulusan Europeesch Lagere School (ELS Gerakan Messianistik yang dipimpin oleh Albert Dietz terjadi di Dukuh Kenangkan desa Bergaskidul Onderdistrik Lemahbang, Distrik Ungaran Afdeeling Salatiga, Semarang. Latar belakang kondisi sosial, ekonomi, dan budaya masyarakatnya mayoritas sebagai masyarakat agraris. Kondisi ekonomi yang sulit serta keterbelakangan dalam pendidikan membuat masyarakat mudah terpengaruh untuk terlibat dalam gerakan sosial. Hal ini juga berhubungan dengan pola pikir masyarakat yang bersifat tradisional.Dilihat dari tipologi gerakan yang dilakukannya, Albert Dietz dapat dikategorikan sebagai pemimpin gerakan yang memiliki kharisma cukup besar di hadapan pengikutnya. Dalam gerakannya tersebut, ia cenderung memilih menjadi dukun dengan menggunakan cara-cara yang berhubungan dengan kekuatan supranatural dan ilmu mistik. Sebagai seorang lulusan ELS, hal ini merupakan suatu kontradiksi kemungkinan besar ini tidak terlepas dari latar belakang kehidupan kerohaniannya. Pendidikan informal yang diberikan oleh ibunya sangat memperhatikan kehidupan tradisional budaya jawa, yang mengakibatkan diri Albert Dietz diwarnai oleh nilai-nilai yang terkandung dalam tradisi Jawa tersebut.

  4. Albert Shanker and the Future of Teacher Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    "Tough Liberal," a book penned by the author of this article, traces the life of Albert Shanker (1928-1997) chronologically from birth to death. Shanker was the longtime head of the United Federation of Teachers (UFT) in New York City (1964-1986) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) nationally (1974-1997). "Tough Liberal" recounts the…

  5. Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein and Franz Joseph; Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein und Franz Joseph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1983-07-01

    Under the Emperor Francis Joseph (1848-1916) the natural sciences were less weIl supported in Austria than in other countries of Europe. This is explained by the fact that the German speaking middle classes accepted the preeminence of the feudal forces with their antiscientific attitude. The reason for this readiness to subordination was that those middle classes feIt threatened in their relatively favourable situation by Slavs and Latins. Francis Joseph was the typical representative of the aristocracy. Personally, he did his duty conscientiously and was not corrupt, but progressive ideas and scientific thought were alien to him. From his desk he treated Boltzmann benevolently, but he had no wish to meet personally the greatest mind of the Empire or in any respect to ask his views. Another famous subject of the Emperor, Albert Einstein, was apparently ignored altogether. The structural weakness of Austria, due to the national problems, led to immobilism in her scientific life, but also, up to a point, to tolerance. The impression of Victor Adler on Einstein is considered in this historical context. (author) [German] Die Naturwissenschaften wurden in Österreich unter Franz Joseph (1848-1916) weniger gefördert als in anderen Staaten Europas. Dies wird darauf zurückgeführt, daß das deutschsprechende Bürgertum sich mit der Vorherrschaft der feudalen Kräfte abfand, die nicht wissenschafts-freundlich waren. Für die Bereitschaft zur Unterordnung unter die Feudalen war maßgebend, daß das deutschsprechende Bürgertum sich durch Slawen und Romanen in seiner relativen Vorzugsstellung bedroht sah. Franz Joseph war der typische Repräsentant des konservativen Feudalismus. Er war persönlich pflichtbewußt und integer, doch waren ihm fortschrittliche Gedanken und wissenschaftliche Denkweise fremd. Boltzmann behandelte er von seinem Schreibtisch aus wohlwollend, doch hegte er keinen Wunsch, den größten Geist seines Reiches persönlich kennen zu lernen oder ihn in

  6. Revolution in 7 parts: Albert Einstein and the others.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, E.

    2005-01-01

    Between 1925 and 1935 a new physics was born: quantum physics. This physics was the fruit of imagination, creativity and boldness of a handful of physicists. This book pays tribute to 7 of them: Georges Gamow, Albert Einstein, Paul Dirac, Ettore Majorana, Wolfgang Pauli, Paul Ehrenfest and Erwin Schroedinger. The author describes the talents and contributions of each one and shows the slow but sure path towards the creation of quantum physics

  7. Isolation and Suffering Related to Serious and Terminal Illness: Metaphors and Lessons From Albert Camus' Novel, The Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffuor, Akosua N; Payne, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Health care providers have much to learn from Albert Camus' great novel, The Plague. The Plague tells the story of a bubonic plague epidemic through the lens of doctor-narrator Rieux. In addition to Rieux, this essay also focuses on the perspective of Father Paneloux, a Jesuit priest, who provides important religious commentary on the epidemic, before falling victim to it and dying. Camus' masterful engagement of the metaphor of isolation and its profound impact on suffering emphasizes the important role of community and spiritual perspectives of patients and providers in coping with serious illness, death, and dying. The Plague is relevant today, particularly given the challenges of distancing, alienation, and isolation imposed by not only disease but also by technology and clinical and administrative practices that have unintended consequences of incentivizing separation between patient and healer, thus engendering greater stress and suffering in both. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Albert Einstein, the human side glimpses from his archives

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert; Hoffmann, Banesh

    2013-01-01

    Modesty, humor, compassion, and wisdom are the traits most evident in this illuminating selection of personal papers from the Albert Einstein Archives. The illustrious physicist wrote as thoughtfully to an Ohio fifth-grader, distressed by her discovery that scientists classify humans as animals, as to a Colorado banker who asked whether Einstein believed in a personal God. Witty rhymes, an exchange with Queen Elizabeth of Belgium about fine music, and expressions of his devotion to Zionism are but some of the highlights found in this warm and enriching book.

  9. [Albert Reder Ritter von Schellmann (1826-1904)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G; Holubar, K

    1990-01-01

    Albert Reder von Schellmann (1826-1904) was an important syphilidologist of the Vienna Medical School in the second half of the nineteenth century. He went in for the dualistic concept of the origin of syphilis and ulcer caused by soft chancre. In 1870 - Reder became head of a third dermato-syphilidologic department in the "Josephinum" in Vienna, where military surgeons got their medical education. At the same time the two full professorships of dermatosyphilidology in the Vienna General Hospital were held by Ferdinand von Hebra (1816-1880) and Carl Ludwig Sigmund von Ilanor (1810-1883).

  10. Remembering Albert deutsch, an advocate for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth J

    2011-12-01

    Albert Deutsch, journalist, advocate for the mentally ill, and honorary APA Fellow died 50 years ago. Author of The Mentally Ill in America and The Shame of the States, he believed in the obligation of individuals and institutions to advocate for patients. In 1961, he was in the midst of a vast project to assess the state of the art in psychiatric research. This article recalls aspects of Deutsch's life and work and places him in the historical context of individuals who have shown great compassion for disabled persons.

  11. Building doctoral ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    heavily from the support from informal and extra-curricular researcher communities and non-formal support systems even beyond the institution in the private and societal lifeworlds. The chapter describes and analyses such forms of organizational and existential darkness within doctoral education...... and professionalization of doctoral education, with Graduate schools increasing in size and organizational complexity. Paradoxically, we see in contemporary research into doctoral students’ learning experiences that the students do not favour the formalized support systems and supervision, but on the contrary draw most......, and discusses how institutions and doctoral programmes could use such sprawling spaces for learning to build doctoral ecologies and to strengthening existentially based pedagogies within doctoral education....

  12. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  13. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  14. Suicide in doctors and wives of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakinofsky, I

    1980-06-01

    This paper re-examines the widespread belief that doctors have a proneness for suicide greater than the general population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio for male physicians is 335 and for single women doctors 257. Doctors' wives have an even greater risk: their SMR is 458. These rates for doctors are higher than for most other professional groups (except pharmacists) and the rate for doctors' wives far exceeds that for wives of other professionals. The intrinsic causes of the physician's high occupational mortality include his knowledge of toxicology and ready access to lethal drugs, so that impulsive suicide is more often successful. Professional stress and overwork, particularly the unrelenting responsibility for decisions upon which the lives of others may depend, have been inculpated. These stresses interact with the decline in the doctors' self-respect and with a personality that is prestige-oriented and independent. Some physicians turn in their frustration to alcohol/and or drugs, accelerating the process of deterioration. The high suicide rate in doctors' wives appears to be the result of unrequited needs for caring and dependency which the doctors' career demands and personality deny them.

  15. Finding Little Albert: A Journey to John B. Watson's Infant Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Hall P.; Levinson, Sharman; Irons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In 1920, John Watson and Rosalie Rayner claimed to have conditioned a baby boy, Albert, to fear a laboratory rat. In subsequent tests, they reported that the child's fear generalized to other furry objects. After the last testing session, Albert disappeared, creating one of the greatest mysteries in the history of psychology. This article…

  16. Psychology's Lost Boy: Will the Real Little Albert Please Stand Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the recent debate about the identity of psychology's lost boy-Little Albert, the infant subject in Watson and Rayner's classic experiment on fear conditioning. For decades, psychologists and psychology students have been intrigued by the mystery of Albert's fate. Now two evidentiary-based solutions to…

  17. Meet Cover Directors--Steve Albert, Rainbow School, Kahuku, Hawaii; Chuck Larson, Seagull Schools, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Profiles Chuck Larson and Steve Albert, each of whom directs a multi-site child care organization in Hawaii. Larson directs Rainbow School, dedicated to the idea that learning is a natural, joyful accomplishment of living. Albert directs Seagull School, responding to the early educational needs of Hawaii's diverse community by offering affordable,…

  18. 'Trick', 'manipulation' and 'farce': Albert Moll's critique of occultism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffram, Heather

    2012-04-01

    In July 1925, the psychiatrist Albert Moll appeared before the district court in Berlin-Schöneberg charged with having defamed the medium Maria Vollhardt (alias Rudloff) in his 1924 book Der Spiritismus [Spiritism]. Supported by some of Berlin's most prominent occultists, the plaintiff--the medium's husband--argued that Moll's use of terms such as 'trick', 'manipulation' and 'farce' in reference to Vollhardt's phenomena had been libellous. In the three-part trial that followed, however, Moll's putative affront to the medium--of which he was eventually acquitted--was overshadowed, on the one hand, by a debate over the scientific status of parapsychology, and on the other, by the question of who--parapsychologists, occultists, psychiatrists or jurists--was entitled to claim epistemic authority over the occult. This paper will use the Rudloff-Moll trial as a means of examining Moll's critique of occultism, not only as it stood in the mid-1920s, but also as it had developed since the 1880s. It will also provide insight into the views of Germany's occultists and parapsychologists, who argued that their legitimate bid for scientific credibility was hindered by Dunkelmänner [obscurantists] such as Albert Moll.

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  20. Finding the Right Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certified hospital Communicating with Healthcare Professionals for Caregivers Consumer Health Care • Home • Health Insurance Information • Your Healthcare Team Introduction Finding the Right Doctor Talking to Your Doctor Getting a Second ...

  1. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Impact of NIH Research Science, Health, and Public Trust You are here Home » Institutes at NIH » NIH ... Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing for ...

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Communications & Public Liaison » Clear Communication Clear Communication Clear Communication Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor ...

  3. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... for the doctor’s contact information and their preferred method of communication. Remember that nurses and pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH ...

  4. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking ... A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National ...

  5. Doctors in Balzac's work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Balzac wrote his novels during a time of great literary and scientific change. Romanticism gave way to the school of realism, of which Balzac could be considered the founder. It was via realism, where both the positive and negative aspects of life were depicted, that doctors naturally gained a much more active role in novels. In conjunction with this was the development of science and medicine, which fascinated Balzac, also leading to the significant and prevalent role of doctors in his works. His fascination with the sciences led to him to gain many acquaintances and much knowledge in the medical domain, especially in neuropsychiatry and physiology. His fictional doctors, such as Desplein and Bianchon, thus demonstrate considerable knowledge of pathology, physiology, and neuropsychiatry. The doctors in Balzac's novels can be grouped into four categories: provincial doctors, Parisian doctors, country doctors, and military doctors. They were most often fictitious representations of real individuals (e.g. Guillaume Dupuytren), and often symbolize schools of thought which were in vogue at the time. In addition to the accurate scientific depiction of doctors, it must be noted that his doctors not only played an active role in clinically assessing their patients, but also had a sociological role in assessing society; it is through his doctors that Balzac gave his opinion of the world in which he lived. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Albert Ross Tilley: The legacy of a Canadian plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The present article chronicles the career of Dr Albert Ross Tilley, one of the most important Canadian plastic surgeons of the 20th century. Tilley is most well known for his innovations of burn management during World War II and his treatment of a group of burn patients known affectionately as the 'Guinea Pig Club'. In addition to the superb surgical skills he applied to the physical wounds of his patients, Tilley was also a pioneer of caring for the emotional and psychological afflictions suffered by many airmen of World War II. As one of the founding fathers of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons, Tilley's work was instrumental in establishing the specialty and ensured its prosperity for years to come. Serving in the capacity of leader, educator and innovator, Tilley remains one of Canada's most decorated physicians, and his body of work encompasses contributions to the medical field that remain significant and beneficial to patient care to this day.

  7. Doctors and pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G

    2009-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is seen as seducing doctors by providing expensive gifts, subsidising travel and underwriting practice expenses in return for those doctors prescribing products that otherwise they would not use. This paints doctors in a very negative light; suggests doctors are available to the highest bidder; implies doctors do not adequately act as independent agents; and that doctors are driven more by self-interest than by patient needs. Similar practices, in other industries, are accepted as normal business behaviour but it is automatically assumed to be improper if the pharmaceutical industry supports doctors. Should the pharmaceutical industry withdraw educational grants then there would be: fewer scientific meetings; reduced attendance at conferences; limited post graduate education; and a depreciated level of maintenance of professional standards. To suggest that doctors prescribe inappropriately in return for largesse maligns their integrity but where there is no scientific reason to choose between different treatments then there can be little argument against selecting the product manufactured by a company that has invested in the doctor and the question arises as to whether this represents bad medicine? This paper will examine what constitutes non-professional conduct in response to inducements by the pharmaceutical industry. It will review: conflict of interest; relationships between doctors and pharma and the consequences for patients; and the need for critical appraisal before automatically decrying this relationship while accepting that there remain those who do not practice ethical medicine.

  8. Partnering Research Involving Mentoring and Education (PRIME) in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    to the Profession of Nursing 1995-1996 Albert Schweitzer Fellowship 1995-1997 Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina...cancer prevention and early detection in African Americans; and Using the Albert Schweitzer fellowship program to foster cross-cultural experiences for...In North Carolina for Outstanding Contributions to the Profession of Nursing 1995-1996 Albert Schweitzer Fellowship 1995-1997 Lineberger

  9. Absurd ja lootus Albert Camus' lühiproosas / Aivar Kull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kull, Aivar, 1955-

    2004-01-01

    Arvustus: Camus, Albert. Pagendus ja kuningriik : kogutud lühiproosa / prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Triinu Tamm, Krista Vogelberg, Tanel Lepsoo, Henno Rajandi. Tallinn : Varrak, 2004. Vaata ka: Kull, Aivar. Kulli pilk. - Tartu : Ilmamaa, 2005, lk. 78-79

  10. Kuidas sai kirjanik Mart Raud endale kirjanik Albert Kivikase maja? : [Tallinn, Vaarika 3] / Stepan Karja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karja, Stepan

    1995-01-01

    Vastukaja : Raud, Valda; Raud, Anu. Vastuseks Stepan Karja artiklile 'Kuidas sai kirjanik Mart Raud endale kirjanik Albert Kivikase maja' // Postimees, 1995, 18.apr., lk.7 ; Rebane, Ilme. Alati on raske loobuda armsaks saanud elupaigast // Postimees, 1995, 25.mai, lk.6

  11. The Epistemic Virtues of the Virtuous Theorist: On Albert Einstein and His Autobiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.; van Dongen, J.; Paul, H.

    2017-01-01

    Albert Einstein’s practice in physics and his philosophical positions gradually reoriented themselves from more empiricist towards rationalist viewpoints. This change accompanied his turn towards unified field theory and different presentations of himself, eventually leading to his highly

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) ...

  13. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Discovery Into Health ® Impact of NIH Research Science, Health, and Public Trust You are here Home » Institutes at NIH » ... Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing ...

  14. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation...... impact the supervisor – student relationship in a positive way....

  15. The doctoral learning penumbra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Robinson, Gill; Wisker, Gina

    This paper presents our cross-national research into what we term the ‘doctoral learning penumbra’, which covers the diverse, unnoticed, and often unrecognised forms of help and support that doctoral students draw from during their PhD, and which are vital for completion. Our aim is to better...

  16. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5 Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. -- Highlights: ► TV-rate STEM imaging of heavy atoms is demonstrated. ► DNA sequencing by STEM dark field imaging should be possible at a rate of 10 6 bases/s. ► Individual silicon atom impurities in graphene are imaged atom-by-atom. ► Single atoms of nitrogen and boron incorporated in graphene are imaged spectroscopically. ► Bonding of individual atoms can be probed by analyzing the fine structures of their EEL spectra.

  17. Heretic or rebel? The heresy trial of Albert Geyser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Dreyer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During September 1961, a charge of heresy was laid against New Testament scholar and antiapartheid activist Prof. A.S. (Albert Geyser. The charge was brought by three senior theological students of the University of Pretoria. They accused Geyser of interpreting Philippians 2 in such a way that it undermined the church’s doctrine of Christ’s pre-existence. The heresy trial started on 24 October 1961 under massive public interest. The trial lasted 6 months and the proceedings covered 2672 typed pages. Reporters of 25 national and international newspapers attended the trial. The heresy trial caused widespread international condemnation of what was regarded as an orchestrated attempt to get rid of Geyser, because of his public and radical opposition to apartheid. In this contribution, Geyser’s theological critique of apartheid as well as his conviction of heresy is discussed. The proceedings of the trial, minutes of the moderature, media coverage and Geyser’s publications serve as primary sources. It concludes with a critical evaluation of Geyser’s theology and his role as a public theologian.

  18. Working with doctors and nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with doctors and nurses Working with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting poked and ... to pay? What questions will the doctor or nurse ask? top It’s a good idea to know ...

  19. Choose your doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Jeremy

    2007-02-01

    The development of education options for nurses has been inexorable and it is increasingly the case that senior nurses are considering a doctorate as the logical next step in their educational career. Such individuals need to make important decisions as to whether they should embark on a taught doctorate, professional doctorate or a traditional PhD. Each of these options will necessitate a considerable investment in time and money as well as the sacrifice of quality time and spare time over a significant number of years. A doctorate is not for everyone. Those still reading this text may be asking 'could this possibly be for me'? This paper will try to help the reader decide which if any option to take. It is suggested that nurses will now turn to the doctoral degree as their next adventure in academic study. It is argued that this development is not being controlled by management forces and indeed cannot be controlled by them. This last is chiefly because the move towards doctoral education is led by individuals who choose to study for a doctorate simply because they can. The paper considers what choices are available to nurses who wish to pursue a doctoral programme of study. In particular, this paper considers what new developments in doctoral courses are becoming available and what advantage there may be in studying for one of the newer professional doctorates rather than a traditional PhD. The material here is the result of a review of the literature on recent developments in doctoral education for nurses. The existing provision by UK and other universities was also reviewed, the data being collected by an informal review of universities' advertising material. It is inevitable that some nurses who are already qualified to degree and masters degree will take advantage of the doctoral degree opportunities which now newly present themselves. For nurses in practice, the advantages of the professional doctorate is that it is more structured, enables more peer and

  20. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maalampi, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise [de

  1. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... honest communication between you and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health. ... recovery. Here are a few tips that can help you talk to your doctor and make the ...

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    Full Text Available ... your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how ...

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  7. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. ...

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  12. Talking to Your Doctor

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  13. The Doctor and Society*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the pressure of his own discipline he should be an edu- cated person in the ... found and multiform influence on social norms and human .destiny. The paths of ... This broad approach is fundamental to a sound doctor- patient relationship.

  14. Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When on Active Duty Getting Care When Traveling What's Covered Health Care Dental Care ... Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When on Active Duty Getting Care When Traveling Bread Crumbs Home Find a Doctor ...

  15. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine P. Dabney; Robert H. Tai

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female...

  16. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics; Die Weltlinie. Albert Einstein und die moderne Physik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalampi, Jukka [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise. [German] Das Buch ist eine unterhaltsame und formelfreie Darstellung der modernen Physik vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart. Das Leben Albert Einsteins

  17. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  18. Wanted--doctors who care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovdal, L T; Pearson, R

    1989-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine what consumers value in doctors' behavior. Results indicate that consumers in the sample population studied prefer doctors who are friendly and caring as well as those who are technically competent. However, these respondents reported less favorable opinions about doctors' friendliness (i.e., affective behavior) than they did about doctors' competence (i.e., instrumental behavior).

  19. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  20. La peste (1992). De Albert Camus a Luis Puenzo

    OpenAIRE

    Ontoso Picón, David

    2006-01-01

    La peste muestra cómo se afecta la vida en una ciudad tras ser declarada una epidemia de peste. Pero va mucho más allá y refleja como el desastre y la desgracia pueden hacer aflorar los mejores sentimientos y actitudes de las personas para luchar y lograr sobreponerse ante lo que consideran injusto. El protagonista, el doctor Rieux, se queda en la ciudad porque marcharse sería desertar, siente la necesidad decombatir para acabar con el mal, que tiene la forma de la temible peste bubónica. Est...

  1. Paul Ehrenfest, Niels Bohr, and Albert Einstein: Colleagues and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Martin J.

    2010-09-01

    In May 1918 Paul Ehrenfest received a monograph from Niels Bohr in which Bohr had used Ehrenfest's adiabatic principle as an essential assumption for understanding atomic structure. Ehrenfest responded by inviting Bohr, whom he had never met, to give a talk at a meeting in Leiden in late April 1919, which Bohr accepted; he lived with Ehrenfest, his mathematician wife Tatyana, and their young family for two weeks. Albert Einstein was unable to attend this meeting, but in October 1919 he visited his old friend Ehrenfest and his family in Leiden, where Ehrenfest told him how much he had enjoyed and profited from Bohr's visit. Einstein first met Bohr when Bohr gave a lecture in Berlin at the end of April 1920, and the two immediately proclaimed unbounded admiration for each other as physicists and as human beings. Ehrenfest hoped that he and they would meet at the Third Solvay Conference in Brussels in early April 1921, but his hope was unfulfilled. Einstein, the only physicist from Germany who was invited to it in this bitter postwar atmosphere, decided instead to accompany Chaim Weizmann on a trip to the United States to help raise money for the new Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Bohr became so overworked with the planning and construction of his new Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen that he could only draft the first part of his Solvay report and ask Ehrenfest to present it, which Ehrenfest agreed to do following the presentation of his own report. After recovering his strength, Bohr invited Ehrenfest to give a lecture in Copenhagen that fall, and Ehrenfest, battling his deep-seated self-doubts, spent three weeks in Copenhagen in December 1921 accompanied by his daughter Tanya and her future husband, the two Ehrenfests staying with the Bohrs in their apartment in Bohr's new Institute for Theoretical Physics. Immediately after leaving Copenhagen, Ehrenfest wrote to Einstein, telling him once again that Bohr was a prodigious physicist, and again

  2. [Murder of the doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorettu, Liliana; Falchi, Lorenzo; Nivoli, Fabrizia L; Milia, Paolo; Nivoli, Giancarlo; Nivoli, Alessandra M

    2015-01-01

    To examine possible risk factors for the doctor to be killed by the patient in the clinical practice by examining a series of murders that involved physicians. This aim has been achieved through a retrospective review on clinical cases of doctors killed by patients within the period between 1988 and 2013, in Italy. In this period 18 Italian doctors have been killed in the workplace, with a rate of 0.3/100,000. In 7 cases, the murder resulted in the context of doctor-dissatisfaction; in 7 cases the murder was committed by a psychiatric patient; 1 case in the context of a stalking; 3 cases occurred in a workplace which was not safe enough. Four categories of at-risk contexts have been identified. One category includes a murder in the context of a doctor-dissatisfaction, perceived by patient. The second category concerns murders committed by patients suffering from mental illness. A third category includes homicides in a workplace which is not safe. The last category comprises the murder in the context of stalking. These categories identify specific dangerous situations for physicians, in which are highlighted elements that have played a crucial role in the murder and for which special precautions are suggested preventive.

  3. Analytical estimates and proof of the scale-free character of efficiency and improvement in Barabasi-Albert trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Bermejo, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Edificio Departamental II, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: benito.hernandez@urjc.es; Marco-Blanco, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Edificio Departamental II, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain); Romance, M. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Edificio Departamental II, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain)

    2009-02-23

    Estimates for the efficiency of a tree are derived, leading to new analytical expressions for Barabasi-Albert trees efficiency. These expressions are used to investigate the dynamic behaviour of such networks. It is proved that the preferential attachment leads to an asymptotic conservation of efficiency as the Barabasi-Albert trees grow.

  4. Analytical estimates and proof of the scale-free character of efficiency and improvement in Barabasi-Albert trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Bermejo, B.; Marco-Blanco, J.; Romance, M.

    2009-01-01

    Estimates for the efficiency of a tree are derived, leading to new analytical expressions for Barabasi-Albert trees efficiency. These expressions are used to investigate the dynamic behaviour of such networks. It is proved that the preferential attachment leads to an asymptotic conservation of efficiency as the Barabasi-Albert trees grow

  5. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  6. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or risks? Will I need more tests later? Understanding your doctor's responses is essential to good communication. Here are a few more tips: If you ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and ... and Human Services | The National Institutes of Health | USA.gov ...

  8. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age or sex. This includes care for your physical, mental, and emotional health. Family doctors get to know their patients. They ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ...

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Repayment More » Search the NIH Guide Quick Links RePORT eRA Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the ... if you feel embarrassed or shy. Have an open dialogue with your doctor — ask questions to make ...

  11. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science ... Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick Links ...

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in ...

  13. Quest for consistency, symmetry and simplicity - The legacy of Albert Tarantola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    his career in astrophysics, and later in his life he wrote several papers and books on physics and probability, including new formulations of fluid dynamics, elasticity theory, global positioning, and scientific inference. Albert possessed a unique combination of exceptional skills and remarkable...

  14. [ISO 9002 at the Center of Pediatric Intensive Care at the Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gé Lacerda, D P; Rocha, M L; Santos, R P

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the process of implementation of a quality program in Pediatric Intensive Therapy Center of "Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein" which resulted in the certification of this service for the Standards ISO 9002/94. It points out the nurse's role as a leader in this process.

  15. Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2012-01-01

    Albert Einstein accepted a “special” visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation

  16. The Gendering of Albert Einstein and Marie Curie in Children's Biographies: Some Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rachel E.; Jarrard, Amber R.; Tippins, Deborah J.

    2009-01-01

    Few twentieth century scientists have generated as much interest as Albert Einstein and Marie Currie. Their lives are centrally depicted in numerous children's biographies of famous scientists. Yet their stories reflect interesting paradoxes and tacit sets of unexplored sociocultural assumptions about gender in science education and the larger…

  17. Over lichtemissie: Albert Einstein en de vroege geschiedenis van de Nederlandse Natuurkundige Vereniging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauschinsky, A.; van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2008-01-01

    Op 29 april 1922 gaf Albert Einstein een lezing voor de Nederlandse Natuurkundige Vereniging op het Natuurkundig Laboratorium aan de Plantage Muidergracht te Amsterdam. Hij deed er verslag van een experiment dat hij zo’n zes maanden eerder had voorgesteld en dat zou hebben moeten uitmaken of licht

  18. Albert Memmi and Audre Lorde: Gender, Race, and the Rhetorical Uses of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Guadalupe Davidson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Feminists, like members of other oppressed groups, are likely to embrace many aspects of Albert Memmi’s profound analysis of domination and oppression. Even though feminists can find common cause with Memmi in many respects, nevertheless they are likely to find themselves at odds with what Memmi says and does not say about women.  

  19. Democracy's Champion: Albert Shanker and the International Impact of the American Federation of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Albert Shanker (1928-1997) is known mainly for his successful struggle to obtain collective bargaining for teachers, his leadership of teacher unions, and his championship of education reform. Shanker built large and powerful city, state, and national unions of teachers and other public employees that still stand as models both for union democracy…

  20. Albert J. Beveridge as Imperialist and Progressive: The Means Justify the End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. Cheree

    1988-01-01

    Describes Senator Albert Jerimiah Beveridge as a leader in two early twentieth-century movements: imperialism and progressivism. Indicates that Beveridge's success demonstrates the possibility that rhetors can adapt to changes in the rhetorical situation without surrendering their personal convictions. (JK)

  1. Reinventing The Doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a seismic shift in the lives of people because of technology. People are far better informed than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. Much of this information is available through the media but even more is available and archived on the internet. The forces pushing the internet into health and health care are strong and unstoppable, ensuring that the internet and the choices it offers must be part of the design of our future health care system. We are no longer content to wait in queues as we live at a faster pace than earlier generations — we don’t not have time to wait for appointments months, weeks or even days in advance. The internet offers the prospect of online consultations in the comfort of your own home. The physical examination will change as new devices are developed to allow the necessary sounds and signals emitted by our malfunctioning bodies to be recorded, interpreted and captured at a remote location. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to see a health care practitioner in person the options to consult practitioners other than doctors who can advise on our health is expanding. The reality is we can’t afford to train or pay for all the doctors we need under the current “doctor-knows-best” system of health care. Patients no longer believe the rhetoric and are already voting with their feet. Pharmacists, nurses and other allied health professionals are beginning to play a much greater role in offering relief from symptoms and monitoring of chronic diseases. Of course, the doctor of the future will still need to offer face-to-face consultations to some people most of the time or most people some of the time. The social role doctors play will continue to be important as humans will always need other humans to personally respond to their distress. As doctors reinvent themselves, the internet and the value of time with patients will be the driving forces that move us into a more sustainable future in health care.

  2. Radon house doctor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, I.A.; Brennan, T.; Wadach, J.B.; O'Neil, R.

    1986-01-01

    The term house doctor may be generalized to include persons skilled in the use of instruments and procedures necessary to identify, diagnose, and correct indoor air quality problems as well as energy, infiltration, and structural problems in houses. A radon house doctor would then be a specialist in radon house problems. Valuable experience in the skills necessary to be developed by radon house doctors has recently been gained in an extensive radon monitoring and mitigation program in upstate New York sponsored by Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. These skills, to be described in detail in this paper, include: (i) the use of appropriate instruments, (ii) the evaluation of the symptoms of a radon-sick house, (iii) the diagnostic procedures required to characterize radon sources in houses, (iv) the prescription procedures needed to specify treatment of the problem, (v) the supervision of the implementation of the treatment program, (vi) the check-up procedures required to insure the house cured of radon problems. 31 references, 3 tables

  3. Pioneering figures in medicine: Albert Bruce Sabin--inventor of the oral polio vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek R; Leggat, Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Over ten years after his death, the Sabin oral vaccine continues its profound influence on public health throughout the world. The annual incidence of polio has fallen dramatically since its introduction, with more than 300,000 lives being spared each year and an annual global saving in excess of 1 billion US dollars. In many ways, the development of an effective oral vaccine and its subsequent regulation by the World Health Organization can serve as a model for medical researchers. Our review describes the contribution of Albert Sabin as a medical researcher, and how his vaccine had a profound impact on the global reduction of polio infections. As many different factors influenced health-care last century, we describe Sabin's involvement with respect to prevailing scientific paradigms and public health issues of the time. Our paper also outlines the basic epidemiology of poliovirus and the historical development of an effective vaccine, both with and without Albert Sabin.

  4. Albert Memmi: retrato de un extranjero. Crisis de identidad y creación literaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Marco Vega

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Albert Memmi’s first autobiographical novel, called La statue de sel, was published in 1953. Born in a Jewish family, Memmi grows up in Tunisia at a time where this Muslim majority country was still a French protectorate. Growing up in such an exceptional environment causes him a serious identity crisis. At 35, Memmi realizes that only literature can help him understand his place in the world. In this paper, we would like to analyze the feeling of strangeness Albert Memmi grew up with, paying special attention to his books: La statue de sel and the Portrait du colonisé, an essay published in 1957 as a theoretical complement to the novel.

  5. ALBERT, HANS, Racionalismo crítico. Por Juan A. Estrada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Estrada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autor: Hans Albert (2002 Editorial: Síntesis, Madrid, 238 pp.   Desde su tratado sobre la razón crítica, Albert no ha cesado de precisar su concepción filosófica, desde un diálogo constante con Popper y respondiendo a las diversas críticas de la hermenéutica y la fenomenología, de la teoría crítica y de la misma teología. En este volumen ofrece varios trabajos con el subtítulo de «Cuatro capítulos para una sátira del pensamiento ilusorio», precedida de un denso y buen prólogo de Ángeles J. Perona.

  6. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  7. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Tapper, Elliot B.

    2010-01-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation...

  8. Evaluating North American Electric Grid Reliability Using the Barabasi-Albert Network Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The reliability of electric transmission systems is examined using a scale-free model of network structure and failure propagation. The topologies of the North American eastern and western electric networks are analyzed to estimate their reliability based on the Barabasi-Albert network model. A commonly used power system reliability index is computed using a simple failure propagation model. The results are compared to the values of power system reliability indices previously obtained using s...

  9. PEMBENTUKAN KARAKTER PADA ANAK: MODEL MEKANISME SANKSI DIRI DARI ALBERT BANDURA SEBAGAI REGULASI PERILAKU MORAL

    OpenAIRE

    Lestari, Sri

    2016-01-01

    Child rearing in family has various purposes, among of them is to build child’s character. The evidence shows that character strengths are positively related to the individual’s well‐ being and happiness. Albert Bandura proposed self‐sanction mechanism model to regulate moral behavior by giving physical sanction and verbal reprimand. As child grows, the child need parental guiding to understand standards of conduct and to learn about social sanction. If child can function s...

  10. On the number of subgraphs of the Barabasi-Albert random graph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabchenko, Aleksandr A; Samosvat, Egor A [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region, Russian Frderation (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-30

    We study a model of a random graph of the type of the Barabasi-Albert preferential attachment model. We develop a technique that makes it possible to estimate the mathematical expectation for a fairly wide class of random variables in the model under consideration. We use this technique to prove a theorem on the asymptotics of the mathematical expectation of the number of subgraphs isomorphic to a certain fixed graph in the random graphs of this model.

  11. On the number of subgraphs of the Barabási-Albert random graph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, Aleksandr A; Samosvat, Egor A

    2012-01-01

    We study a model of a random graph of the type of the Barabási-Albert preferential attachment model. We develop a technique that makes it possible to estimate the mathematical expectation for a fairly wide class of random variables in the model under consideration. We use this technique to prove a theorem on the asymptotics of the mathematical expectation of the number of subgraphs isomorphic to a certain fixed graph in the random graphs of this model.

  12. Entretien avec l'économiste Albert Berry | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    13 oct. 2010 ... Selon ce qu'a révélé en 2002 une enquête très médiatisée de la maison ... par le CRDI en Amérique latine ont achevé il y a peu une étude de deux ans ... Écoutez Albert Berry parler des dangers qui guettent une économie ...

  13. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Elliot B

    2010-10-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation between viewer and viewed representing public attitudes towards doctors, medicine, and science.

  14. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Dabney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  15. The Business of Doctoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The core business of medicine is the consultation. During the consultation one human being responds to another in distress. Most doctors spend more time talking with people than performing surgery, prescribing pills or ordering tests. The extent to which the doctor succeeds as a communicator may even govern the ‘success’ of any procedure performed, if we define success as relief from the condition causing distress. As human beings our ability to benefit from what is offered to alleviate our symptoms is limited by the extent to which we feel that we have been heard and supported with empathy. It has been demonstrated that the human body has the capacity to heal and that healers are limited by their capacity to facilitate that process. That is not to say that ‘talking’ can spare us the need for other interventions. In this review the author examines the factors that impact on the medical consultation with particular emphasis on the scope for harm when the consultation is interrupted.

  16. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-06-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  17. [Health behaviour of doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Anikó

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviour involves maintaining, improving and restoration of health. The aim of the author was to assess correlations of health behaviour with age, gender, job type and overtime. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted using an online questionnaire (N = 186). Data were analyzed with chi-square, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Doctors working in in-patient care drink more coffee (p = 0.034) and energy drinks (p = 0.018); they eat undisturbed only on weekends at home (p = 0.032). Men consume more alcohol (p = 0.003), red meats (pmeals (p = 0.018) and their daily fluid consumption exceeds 2 litres (p = 0.005); their body mass index values are higher compared to women (peat more hot meals (p = 0.005), and those under the age of 30 consume more crisps, fast food (p = 0.001) and energy drinks (p = 0.005), while they are more active (p = 0.010). Dietary habits of doctors are not ideal and their physical activity is diminished compared to international trends. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1198-1206.

  18. [Doctors in love].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how often doctors fall in love or are in a relationship with a colleague. Descriptive questionnaire. Doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire during the summer of 2012. The questions concerned baseline characteristics as well as their feelings of happiness. In addition, we asked them whether they were in love or had ever been with a colleague and whether this had resulted in a steady relationship. A total of 401 individuals participated, of which 41% were male and 59% female. Their mean age was 40 years. Altogether, 40% of the participants indicated to be or have been in love with a colleague. This occurred more often in women than men. In 82% the relationship was of an equivalent nature; it was hierarchical in the remainder. In only 23% of cases, the relationship was steady; this was independent of age. Dermatologists appeared to be the least apt to fall in love with a colleague, while obstetricians had the highest rate. Although love between colleagues is a frequently occurring phenomenon, this is associated with a steady relationship in only about 25% of cases. There is wide variation among specialists in their proneness to intercollegial love.

  19. [Patients, doctors and the internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, Jean Gabriel; Bischoff, Thomas

    2015-05-13

    The majority of the Swiss population uses the internet to seek information about health. The objective is to be better informed, before or after the consultation. Doctors can advise their information-seeking patients about high quality websites, be it medical portals or websites dedicated to a specific pathology. Doctors should not see the internet as a threat but rather as an opportunity to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship.

  20. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  1. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  2. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  3. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  4. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  5. Women, Men and the Doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centra, John A; Kuykendall, Nancy M.

    This study describes the current status and professional development of a sample of women doctorates and compares them to a sample of men who have attained the same educational status. Chapters cover the sample and procedures used; employment patterns; doctorates in academe; publications, income, and job satisfaction; marriage and family life;…

  6. Doctorate Program Trains Industrial Chemists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The University of Texas (Dallas) has initiated a new Ph.D. program specifically to train chemists for doctoral level work in industry (Doctor of Chemistry). Participants will complete three research practica (at an industrial site and in two laboratory settings) instead of the traditional dissertation, emphasizing breadth and flexibility in…

  7. Intolerance and Violence Against Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meharban

    2017-10-01

    Intolerance and grouse against doctors is a global phenomenon but India seems to lead the world in violence against doctors. According to World Health Organization, about 8-38% healthcare workers suffer physical violence at some point in their careers. Many more are verbally abused or threatened. Public is almost behaving like health sector terrorists. The spate of increasing attacks on doctors by damaging their property and causing physical injury is not acceptable by any civilized society. The public is becoming increasingly intolerant to a large number of social issues because of poor governance and vote bank politics. There is a need to arrest the development of further distrust between doctors and their patients/relatives, otherwise it will compromise all achievements of medical science and adversely affect healing capabilities of doctors. Rude and aggressive behavior of the patients or their family members, and arrogant and lackadaisical approach of the doctor, adversely affects the doctor-patient relationship and the outcome of the patient. The doctors, hospital administration and government must exercise "zero tolerance" with respect to acts of violence against healthcare professionals. It is possible to reduce the incidence of intolerance against doctors but difficult to eliminate it completely. The healthcare providers should demonstrate greater compassion and empathy with improved communication skills. The hospitals must have adequate infrastructure, facilities and staff to handle emergencies without delay and with due confidence and skills. The security of healthcare providers, especially in sensitive areas, should be improved by having adequate number of security guards, frisking facilities, extensive CCTV network and availability of "Quick response team" to handle unruly mob. In case of any grievances for alleged mismanagement, the public should handle the situation in a civilized manner and seek redressal through Medical Protection Act and legal

  8. Radiographers as doctors: A profile of UK doctoral achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaith, B.; Harris, M.A.; Harris, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiography aspires to be a research active profession, but there is limited information regarding the number of individuals with, or studying for, a doctoral award. This study aims to profile UK doctoral radiographers; including their chosen award, approach and employment status. Method: This was a prospective cohort study utilising an electronic survey. No formal database of doctoral radiographers existed therefore a snowball sampling method was adopted. The study sample was radiographers (diagnostic and therapeutic) based in the UK who were registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and who held, or were studying for, a doctoral award. Results: A total of 90 unique responses were received within the timescale. The respondents comprised 58 females (64.4%) and the majority were diagnostic radiographers (n = 71/90; 78.9%). The traditional PhD was the most common award, although increasing numbers were pursuing Education or Professional Doctorates. An overall increase in doctoral studies is observed over time, but was greatest amongst those working in academic institutions, with 63.3% of respondents (n = 57/90) working solely within a university, and a further 10% employed in a clinical–academic role (n = 9/90). Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that radiography is emerging as a research active profession, with increasing numbers of radiographers engaged in study at a doctoral level. This should provide a platform for the future development of academic and clinical research. - Highlights: • 90 radiographers were identified as holding, or studying for, a doctoral award. • The PhD is the most common award. • EdD and professional doctorates are increasing in popularity. • Academic staff were more likely to pursue such research training.

  9. Turning Doctors Into Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much of the contentious debate surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare” concerned its financing and its attempt to guarantee (near universal access to healthcare through the private insurance market.  Aside from sensationalist stories of “death panels,” much less attention went to implications of the bill for the actual provision of healthcare. Methodology: This paper examines the "patient-centered medical home" (PCMH model which has been widely promoted as a means of reviving and improving primary care (i.e. general internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics. Argument: The PCMH and many of its components (e.g pay-for-performance, electronic medical records were interventions that were implemented on a massive basis without any evidence of benefit. Recent research has not generally supported clinical benefits with the PCMH model. Instead it seems to designed to de-professionalize (make proletarians of health care workers and enforce corporate models of health. The core values of professional work are undermined while the PCMH does nothing to address the structural marginalization of primary care within US health care. Conclusions: The development of alternative models will require political changes. Both doctors and teachers are in a position of advocate for more progressive systems of care and education.

  10. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  11. Identification and characterization of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Albert isolates in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, Jason P; Campbell, Davina; Grass, Julian; Brown, Allison C; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Joseph, Lavin A; Plumblee, Jodie R; Walker, Carrie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Whichard, Jean M

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment of invasive salmonellosis is critical. The primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and resistance to these antimicrobial drugs may complicate treatment. At present, S. enterica is composed of more than 2,600 unique serotypes, which vary greatly in geographic prevalence, ecological niche, and the ability to cause human disease, and it is important to understand and mitigate the source of human infection, particularly when antimicrobial resistance is found. In this study, we identified and characterized 19 S. enterica serotype Albert isolates collected from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States during 2005 to 2013. All five isolates from nonhuman sources were obtained from turkeys or ground turkey, and epidemiologic data suggest poultry consumption or live-poultry exposure as the probable source of infection. S. enterica serotype Albert also appears to be geographically localized to the midwestern United States. All 19 isolates displayed multidrug resistance, including decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Turkeys are a likely source of multidrug-resistant S. enterica serotype Albert, and circulation of resistance plasmids, as opposed to the expansion of a single resistant strain, is playing a role. More work is needed to understand why these resistance plasmids spread and how their presence and the serotype they reside in contribute to human disease. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Influence of Ernst Mach and Ludwig Boltzmann on Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This document, written by Engelbert Broda in 1979, analyses the influence of Ernst Mach and Ludwig Boltzmann on Albert Einstein. Broda describes how Einstein and his scientific thinking benefited from Mach’s criticism on classical mechanics and its basic concepts like absolute time and absolute space. This criticism encouraged Einstein in the time he worked on his special relativity. On the other side Broda writes about the influence of Ludwig Boltzman, an atomist, whose scientific work and research prepared the ground for Einsteins work on the quantum-structure of electromagnetic radiation or the discovery of the photoelectric effect. (nowak)

  14. The legacy of Albert Einstein a collection of essays in celebration of the Year of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This indispensable volume contains a compendium of articles covering a vast range of topics in physics which were begun or influenced by the works of Albert Einstein: special relativity, quantum theory, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, general relativity, geometry, cosmology and unified field theory. An essay on the societal role of Einstein is included. These articles, written by some of the renowned experts, offer an insider's view of the exciting world of fundamental science. Sample Chapter(s). Chapter 1: Einstein and the Search for Unification (625 KB). Contents: Einstein and

  15. PEMBENTUKAN KARAKTER PADA ANAK: MODEL MEKANISME SANKSI DIRI DARI ALBERT BANDURA SEBAGAI REGULASI PERILAKU MORAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lestari

    2016-06-01

    being and happiness. Albert Bandura proposed self‐sanction mechanism model to regulate moral behavior by giving physical sanction and verbal reprimand. As child grows, the child need parental guiding to understand standards of conduct and to learn about social sanction. If child can function self‐sanction mechanism, child is expected be able to evaluate his conduct right or wrong. The functioning of behavior moral regulation is an important part in developing child’s character. The strength and weakness of model and the application of this model in Indonesian context will be discussed.

  16. Albert Einstein and his mentor Max Talmey. The seventh Charles B. Snyder Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, J G

    1997-01-01

    While he was a student at the Munich medical school, Max Talmey strongly influenced the education of Albert Einstein. Their association occurred during five years of Einstein's second decade. They lost contact for many years after each left Munich. Talmey emigrated to the United States and practiced medicine, mainly ophthalmology, in New York City. He made significant contributions to medicine, to the popularization of Einstein's work, and to the development of international languages. The relationship of Talmey and Einstein was rekindled when Einstein visited and later moved to the United States.

  17. El lugar de la persuasión en sociedades degradadas: sobre Albert Speer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Uribe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I try to contrast the sense of the term "persuasion", as defined by Aristotle in his Rhetoric, with the sense of the term "fascination", proposed by Hannah Arendt in her Origins of Totalitarianism. I illustrate such contrast through references to the relationship between Albert Speer and Adolf Hitler. By considering the use of the two terms and the references, I reach a conclusion that shows why, in what I call "degraded social orders", there is no place for rhetoric.

  18. Evolution of egoism on semi-directed and undirected Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2015-05-01

    Through Monte Carlo simulations, we study the evolution of the four strategies: Ethnocentric, altruistic, egoistic and cosmopolitan in one community of individuals. Interactions and reproduction among computational agents are simulated on undirected and semi-directed Barabási-Albert (BA) networks. We study the Hammond-Axelrod (HA) model on undirected and semi-directed BA networks for the asexual reproduction case. With a small modification in the traditional HA model, our simulations showed that egoism wins, differently from other results found in the literature where ethnocentric strategy is common. Here, mechanisms such as reciprocity are absent.

  19. Biohistorical materials and contemporary privacy concerns-the forensic case of King Albert I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Bekaert, Bram; Baumers, Maarten; Wenseleers, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Borry, Pascal; Decorte, Ronny

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement of technology in genomic analysis increasingly allows researchers to study human biohistorical materials. Nevertheless, little attention has been paid to the privacy of the donor's living relatives and the negative impact they might experience from the (public) availability of genetic results, even in cases of scientific, forensic or historical relevance. This issue has become clear during a cold case investigation of a relic attributed to Belgian King and World War I-hero Albert I who died, according to the official version, in a solo climbing accident in 1934. Authentication of the relic with blood stains assigned to the King and collected on the place where his body was discovered is recognised as one of the final opportunities to test the plausibility of various conspiracy theories on the King's demise. While the historical value and current technological developments allow the genomic analysis of this relic, publication of genetic data would immediately lead to privacy concerns for living descendants and relatives of the King, including the Belgian and British royal families, even after more than 80 years. Therefore, the authentication study of the relic of King Albert I has been a difficult exercise towards balancing public research interests and privacy interests. The identification of the relic was realised by using a strict genetic genealogical approach including Y-chromosome and mitochondrial genome comparison with living relatives, thereby limiting the analysis to genomic regions relevant for identification. The genetic results combined with all available historical elements concerning the relic, provide strong evidence that King Albert I was indeed the donor of the blood stains, which is in line with the official climbing accident hypothesis and contradicts widespread 'mise-en-scène' scenarios. Since publication of the haploid data of the blood stains has the potential to violate the privacy of living relatives, we opted for

  20. MUROS ABSURDOS E CONDIÇÃO HUMANA NA OBRA DE ALBERT CAMUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Oliveira Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus descreve a condição humana como sendo contingente, frágil e absurda, para isso ele utiliza a noção de “muros absurdos”, que são situações que enfrentamos e contra as quais não podemos escapar. Se a princípio, a morte, a velhice, a desumanidade parecem experiências banais, no pensamento camusiano, elas se revelam como possibilidade de tomada de consciência do absurdo de nossa condição. Palavras-chave: absurdo; condição humana; consciência.

  1. TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Hernández Esteve

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations María Soledad Campos Lucena: El control de las arcas municipales a través de la rendición de cuentas. La transformación del proceso del Antiguo al Nuevo régimen y la consolidación del modelo liberal: 1745-1914 The control of municipal coffers by means of account rendering. The change from Ancien Régime to the New Regime and the consolidation of liberalism: 1745-1914 Candelaria Castro Pérez: La institución parroquial a través de los registros contables del Señorío episcopal de la Villa de Agüimes. (1500-1860 The parochial institution seen through the account books of the Episcopal domain of the city of Aguimes (1500-1860 José Julián Hernández Borreguero: El Cabildo Catedral de Sevilla: organización y sistema contable. (1625-1650 Administrative and accounting organization of the Seville Cathedral. (1625-1650 Juan Lanero Fernández: El esplendor de la teneduría de libros: la partida doble en los tratados contables ingleses de la dinastia Tudor (1543-1588 Bookkeeping splendor: double-entry in the English accounting treatises at the time of the Tudor dynasty (1543-1588 María Llompart Bibiloni: Un análisis histórico-contable de la Procuración del Real Patrimonio en el Reino de Mallorca, período 1310-1330 An accounting historical análisis of the Royal Exchequer of the Kingdom of Mallorca (1310-1330

  2. Doctors do cry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Sonal; Goel, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Physicians have tried to understand whether crying for a patient is a raw emotion that demonstrates their lack of control over themselves and the situation, or whether it is a sign of humanity and concern for one's fellow beings. Studies on medical students and doctors'narrations of times when they have shed tears over a patient's suffering or death have established beyond doubt that medical students and physicians are not immune to their patients'suffering and may cry when overwhelmed by stress and emotions. Even though humanity is the cornerstone of medicine, depersonalisation has somehow crept into the physician-patient relationship and crying is considered incompatible with the image of a good physician, who is supposed to be strong, confident and fully in charge. Thus, crying has been equated to weakness and at times, incompetence. This could be attributed to the fact that our medical curriculum has ingrained in us the belief that emotion clouds rationality and prevents us from being objective while making decisions regarding a patient's clinical progress. Our curriculum fails to teach us how to handle emotional situations, witness the dying process, communicate bad news, interact with the bereaved during the period of grief immediately following death, and reduce the professional stress involved in working with newly bereaved persons. Our training focuses on cure, amelioration of disease and the restoration of good health, with little emphasis on death, which is an absolute reality. It is crucial that medical educators take note of these lacunae in the curriculum. Physicians and teachers must recognise and accept the emotions that medical students experience in these situations, and teach them to offer their patients a sound blend of rationality and compassion with an attitude of humility.

  3. Feasible utopias in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Dely; Guccione, Kay; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    -Martek, Chen & McAlpine, 2011). PGRs’ motivation, creativity, resilience and momentum during their long and intense doctoral journey are often strongly sustained by unseen informal structures, social support systems and extra-curricular activities tacitly providing emotional, social, pastoral and academic......Part 1 Abstract Ongoing educational and psycho-social challenges in doctoral education (e.g. psychological distress, attrition and delay in completion) warrant a more comprehensive understanding of the expanded doctoral education context and how the different facets of doctoral support mechanisms......, 2016b; Bengtsen & Barnett, 2017; Bryan & Guccione, 2018; Elliot et al., 2016b, 2016c; Wisker et al., 2017). Yet, there remains a somewhat limited understanding not only of these multifaceted components but how they interact with already existing formal and informal support mechanisms offered...

  4. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral...... journeys. Some considers formal and informal learning communities supporting students on research journeys, and roles played by families, friends and others, sometimes o ering encouragement and sometimes added stress. However, little has been explored concerning often uno cial, largely unrecognised...... sanctioned (‘lightside’), and less well recognised often unsanctioned (‘darkside’) on doctoral research and writing learning journey, instigating questions about doctoral student needs, and the range of support provided, both legitimate, well known, less legitimate. This work concentrates on the ‘darkside’....

  5. Heinrich ZANGGER (1874-1957. El hombre que salvó la vida de Albert Einstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Montes-Santiago

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El profesor de la Universidad de Zurich, Heinrich Zangger (1874-1957, es recordado principalmente por haber sido compañero y amigo de Albert Einstein. La abundante correspondencia entre ambos revela esclarecedores aspectos del pensamiento científico de Einstein. Sin embargo, es menos conocido que en varias ocasiones salvó la vida del físico (rescatándole de una intoxicación por monóxido de carbono o suministrándole alimentos durante las penurias de la I Guerra Mundial y veló por las necesidades económicas y de salud del resto de la familia de Einstein: su primera mujer Mileva y sus hijos Hans Albert y Eduard. Pero además Zangger fue un hombre extraordinario que merece ser recordado también por sus aportaciones pioneras en el campo de las enfermedades profesionales como la silicosis o la intoxicación por plomo, sobre la Medicina de catástrofes, por sus estudios forenses y de Derecho sanitario, así como por su labor humanitaria con la Cruz Roja.

  6. Albert Busch

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.B. Ruthven

    konstitutive Dimension sichtbar wird?“ (S. 1). Die empirische Grundlage der. Untersuchung bilden 136 Parlamentsreden (von 1963 bis 2000), 216 Artikel aus dem Magazin Stern (1968 bis 2000) sowie die Online-Korpora des Instituts für. Deutsche Sprache in Mannheim und das Leipziger Online-Wortschatzlexikon. Im 1.

  7. Healthy Doctors – Sick Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are among the healthiest segments of the population in western countries. Nevertheless, they complain strongly of stress and burnout. Their own explanation is deprofessionalisation: The honourable art of doctoring has been replaced by standardised interventions and production lines; professional autonomy has withered. This view is shared by many medical sociologists who have identified a “golden age of medicine,” or “golden age of doctoring,” starting after World War II and declining around 1970. This article looks at some of the central sociological literature on deprofessionalisation, particularly in a perspective of countervailing powers. It also looks into another rise-and-fall model, proposed by the medical profession itself, where the fall in professional power was generated by the notion that there are no more white spots to explore on the map of medicine. Contemporary doctoring is a case of cognitive dissonance, where the traditional doctor role seems incompatible with modern health care.Keywords: deprofessionalisation, professional autonomy, cognitive dissonance, golden age of doctoring

  8. 175 years of wire rope. A reminiscence of Mining Councillor Albert's invention; 175 Jahre Drahtseil. Eine Erinnerung an Oberbergrat Alberts Erfindung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampe, Wolfgang [NLA Niedersachsen, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Rueckbrodt, Kai [Landesamt fuer Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    There is a vague consensus that the wire rope can be designated as the most sustainable invention from the mining industry in Harz mountains. Such wire ropes are not to be excluded any longer from the today's life. These ropes really seem quite self-evident not only in the mining industry. The name of the Mining Councillor Wilhelm August Julius Albert inseparably is connected with wire ropes. The development of the first, in Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Federal Republic of Germany) successfully used wire rope consisting of iron wires succeeded to him. The year 2009 is the 175th anniversary of the invention of wire ropes. In 2009, the mountain city Clausthal-Zellerfeld evoked this anniversary with a week-long festival. At 22nd and 23th July1834, two wire ropes consisting of iron wires with a length of 605 m were put into operation for the first time at the 408 m deep pit Caroline in Clausthal-Zellerfeld. Instead of the past belt conveyors or hemp ropes, the new hoisting ropes proved to be a great success so that other pits also were retrofitted, accordingly.

  9. Work of female rural doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Jo

    2004-04-01

    To identify the impact of family life on the ways women practice rural medicine and the changes needed to attract women to rural practice. Census of women rural doctors in Victoria in 2000, using a self-completed postal survey. General and specialist practice. Two hundred and seventy-one female general practitioners and 31 female specialists practising in Rural, Remote and Metropolitan Area Classifications 3-7. General practitioners are those doctors with a primary medical degree and without additional specialist qualifications. Interaction of hours and type of work with family responsibilities. Generalist and specialist women rural doctors carry the main responsibility for family care. This is reflected in the number of hours they work in clinical and non-clinical professional practice, availability for on-call and hospital work, and preference for the responsibilities of practice partnership or the flexibility of salaried positions. Most of the doctors had established a satisfactory balance between work and family responsibilities, although a substantial number were overworked in order to provide an income for their families or meet the needs of their communities. Thirty-six percent of female rural general practitioners and 56% of female rural specialists preferred to work fewer hours. Female general practitioners with responsibility for children were more than twice as likely as female general practitioners without children to be in a salaried position and less likely to be a practice partner. The changes needed to attract and retain women in rural practice include a place for everyone in the doctor's family, flexible practice structures, mentoring by women doctors and financial and personal recognition. Women make up less than a quarter of the rural general practice workforce and an even smaller percentage of the specialist rural medical workforce. As a result their experiences are not well articulated in research on rural medical practice and their needs are

  10. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGAD 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European EmergencyCall 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will...

  11. Engineering Design Handbook. Army Weapon Systems Analysis. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    detecting the target with a given number of looks. Schweitzer (Ref. 21) also studied this same problem of minimum-search policy. In Ref.M21, Schweitzer ...Stephen M. Pollack, "A Simple Model of Search for a Moving Target", Operations Research 18., pp. 883-903 (September.October 1970). 21. Paul J. Schweitzer ... Albert Shapero and Charles Bates, Jr., A Method for Performing Human Engineeriýg Analysis of Wenpoa Systems, WADC Technical Report 59-784, Wright

  12. Self-organized Criticality in a Modified Evolution Model on Generalized Barabasi-Albert Scale-Free Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Min; Wang Gang; Chen Tianlun

    2007-01-01

    A modified evolution model of self-organized criticality on generalized Barabasi-Albert (GBA) scale-free networks is investigated. In our model, we find that spatial and temporal correlations exhibit critical behaviors. More importantly, these critical behaviors change with the parameter b, which weights the distance in comparison with the degree in the GBA network evolution.

  13. Predicted high-water elevations for selected flood events at the Albert Pike Recreation Area, Ouachita National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.A. Marion

    2012-01-01

    The hydraulic characteristics are determined for the June 11, 2010, flood on the Little Missouri River at the Albert Pike Recreation Area in Arkansas. These characteristics are then used to predict the high-water elevations for the 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood events in the Loop B, C, and D Campgrounds of the recreation area. The peak discharge and related...

  14. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and…

  15. [Life conditions of Togolese doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi-Tessio, Annick Viwalé; Oniankitan, Owonayo; Mijiyawa, Moustafa

    2010-09-01

    A study has been carried out by Togolese medical doctors in order to determine the perceived and the real life of their profession. The study, which was transversal, has taken in account a sample of 52 medical doctors made on the basis of a cautious choice. Most of these medical doctors (15 general practitioners, 23 specialists and 14 hospitalo-universitaires) work in the medical cares centres of Lomé. A sheet of survey has permitted the collection of demographic data and data relating to the medical studies and career. The 52 medical doctors included in the study (7 women, 45 men) were between 25 and 59 years old; their age of getting their A-level was between 16 and 23 years old, and that of getting the doctorate diploma between 24 and 37. The length of professional experience stands between 8 months and 27 years. The marital status was specified by 47 of the 52 medical doctors: 13 single, one divorced, and 33 married; 5 of the 7 women who took part in the survey were single and without any child. The love of the profession (65%), the social status it confers (37%) and the honour tied to the profession (27%) were the main motives of choosing the profession. The decision of doing medical studies was taken during secondary studies by 45 of the 52 persons. The faculty of medicine of Lomé has been the study frame to general medicine studies of 35 persons (67%). The low payment (83%), the poverty of the patients (83%), the narrowness of the technical platform (79%), the insufficiency of cares structures in paramedical personnel (67%), the insufficiency of continuing education (60%), and the lack or insufficiency of drugs (58%) were the main problems encountered during their professional experience by the people questioned. 22 medical doctors (43%) have estimated that their profession has given them a particular social status. Only 8 medical doctors have found that the real things they have gone trough in the profession matches with the idea they had, while 32 (62

  16. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio from the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine.

  17. Preservar la experiencia: sobre el imperativo metodológico de Albert Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Blanco Ilari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus was one of the most important writers of the last century. In this paper, one of the central subjects of his work it´s analyzed: the need to preserve the original experience from the suffocating conceptualization and the distortion of reason. Camus’s work represents a tireless effort to retain pictures and metaphors, as well as the persons and places where he belongs. Facing the strangeness of the distant thought, Camus raises the power of art as a place of memory. This article attempts to explore some of the most relevant concepts of his work. The intention is synoptic but not exhaustive. The absurd, the rebellion, the nuptials with the Mediterranean sun, are some of the issues that articulate his work. The treatment of the artist could help us keep an almost stubborn fidelity to those things which deserve to be protected.

  18. About Time. Physics, Philosophy and the Battle Between Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam

    The historical relationship between physics and philosophy has had many famous high and low points. The two function best when both can challenge and support each other. In this talk I explore the famous debate between Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson over the nature of time. While history rightly judged Einstein to have won the debate in terms of relativity, there were deeper aspects of Bergsons critique that remain unappreciated. We will explore the different ways philosophy approaches the issue of time. In particular, we will look at the Continental Schools\\x9D, such as Phenomenology, which brings a unique perspective to the debate lying outside the traditional approach of physicists. From this perspective questions related to the act of being an observer, its essential subjective nature and the proper context of physics can be explored.

  19. Dynamic scaling, data-collapse and self-similarity in Barabasi-Albert networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, M Kamrul; Pavel, Neeaj I [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Hassan, M Zahedul, E-mail: khassan@univdhaka.edu [Institute of Computer Science, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

    2011-04-29

    In this paper, we show that if each node of the Barabasi-Albert (BA) network is characterized by the generalized degree q, i.e. the product of their degree k and the square root of their respective birth time, then the distribution function F(q, t) exhibits dynamic scaling F(q, t {yields} {infinity}) {approx} t{sup -1/2}{phi}(q/t{sup 1/2}) where {phi}(x) is the scaling function. We verified it by showing that a series of distinct F(q, t) versus q curves for different network sizes N collapse onto a single universal curve if we plot t{sup 1/2}F(q, t) versus q/t{sup 1/2} instead. Finally, we show that the BA network falls into two universality classes depending on whether new nodes arrive with single edge (m = 1) or with multiple edges (m > 1).

  20. International Dictatorship or International Democracy. A Discussion of Albert Camus’ 1946 Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visone Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the series Neither Victims Nor Executioners (1946 the Franco-Algerian writer Albert Camus argued for the need of a relative utopia that would allow man, who refused the logic of murder and violence, to revolt against their historical condition. To this end Camus stressed the importance of fighting for a new democratic world order that would have reversed the condition of international dictatorship immanent in the interdependent world of the 20th century. In the series of essays another reading is possible; an attempt to find a new political way after the end of the classic modern world - a system founded on the supremacy of European nation-States - and to consider such an attempt as an interesting standpoint to face current transnational challenges.

  1. Words, Names, Nature, Earth: On the Poetry of Pierre-Albert Jourdan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bonnefoy

    1989-11-01

    Full Text Available An ambivalence toward language is present throughout the work of Pierre-Albert Jourdan. Words are associated with the closure of a grey world; they are always arriving late, after the fact; they are veils, masks, dreams detached from truth, knowledge, and immediacy. Yet, words and names hold out the possibility of hope; they can designate the presence of beauty in the world; they can mediate the encounter of self and other. The human word signifies itself through the substance of the world and the communion of beings. At the intersection of natural reality—the center of the real for Jourdan—and of language are found the garden, the earth, places of an ephemeral, haiku like presence where the natural opens itself to the human.

  2. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  3. The Doctorate in Chemistry. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Ronald

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  4. La arquitectura como objeto técnico. La arquitectura industrial de Albert Kahn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guillermo Pancorbo Crespo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available La adopción del paradigma mecanicista por parte de la ciencia impulsó la revolución tecnológica e industrial, dando origen a la era de la máquina y a una nueva categoría de lo material; los objetos técnicos. El predominio generalizado del paradigma mecánico en arquitectura a partir del siglo XX, adoptando la técnica como rectora de la actividad arquitectónica, y utilizando premisas racionales y científicas en el proceso de proyecto, supuso el nacimiento de la arquitectura moderna. En esta génesis tuvo un papel destacado la obra industrial de Albert Kahn, que transporta a la arquitectura el tipo de proyecto utilizado por los ingenieros para la creación de los objetos técnicos. Esta investigación trata de pormenorizar y poner en valor esta influencia, que creemos de vital importancia y que en cambio ha tenido escasa fortuna crítica. La actual sustitución del paradigma mecánico en arquitectura, consagrado por el Movimiento Moderno, por un nuevo paradigma que podríamos denominar termodinámico, forzada por los nuevos modelos de sostenibilidad y ahorro energético, vuelve a poner en primera línea ciertas obras industriales de Albert Kahn, en las que la gestión de las condiciones ambientales juega un papel prioritario en la génesis del proyecto.

  5. Leveraging Social Networking Technologies: An Analysis of the Knowledge Flows Facilitated by Social Media and the Potential Improvements in Situational Awareness, Readiness, and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    and Alberts , Garstka, & Stein (1999), in Network Centric Warfare: Developing and Leveraging Information Superiority, that data and information are...professionally enhancing issues to those in the military profession (Dixon, 2007; Dixon, Allen, Burgess, Kilner, & Schweitzer , 2005; Small Wars...Journal, 2009). These sites are a popular medium for officers and enlisted to share knowledge and seek mentorship (Long & Schweitzer , 2004). Senior

  6. African Stories

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    en dié van sy “vriende”, onder wie baie oud- soldate. Die boek begin met 'n roerende vertelling van Venter se besoek in 1964 aan die bekende. Duitse dokter en sendeling Albert Schweitzer in die hedendaagse Gaboen. Schweitzer, wat in 1913 saam met sy vrou Helene 'n hospitaal diep in die ekwatoriale reënwoud op die.

  7. Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Funding Opportunities (NIH Guide) Forms and Deadlines Electronic Research Admin (eRA) Grants Policy OER News About ... remains the most commonly used pain reliever. The French physician, Dr. Albert Schweitzer, proclaimed in 1931 that, “ ...

  8. Eerbied voor het leven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoomes, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    De ethische grondhouding van 'Ehrfurcht vor dem Leben' gaat terug op jeugdervaringen van Albert Schweitzer, rond 1900, in combinatie met christelijk-wijsgerige opvattingen. Deze ethische benadering krijgt in onze tijd opnieuw betekenis in samenhang met de milieuproblematiek en de

  9. ID.alistic: identificatie met een touch voor de patiënt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wilschut; M. Zijlmans; Dr. L.S.G.L Wauben

    2017-01-01

    ID.alistic is een conceptuele patiëntidentificatie methode (middels een vingerafdrukscanner), ter vervanging van het polsbandjessysteem van het Albert Schweitzer ziekenhuis (ASz) dialysecentrum. Dit onderzoek bepaalt de implementeerbaarheid van ID.alistic binnen het dialysecentrum door

  10. Medicine, a threat to health: limitations of drug, non drug treatments and protocolized medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atiqi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Een behoorlijk aantal ziekenhuisopnamen is niet het gevolg van een acute aandoening, maar van ernstige bijwerkingen van medicijnen. Roya Atiqi onderzocht onder meer opnamen op de afdelingen Inwendige Geneeskunde, Cardiologie en Longziekten van het Albert Schweitzer Ziekenhuis in Dordrecht. Bijna

  11. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 13 December 1923 ... Date of birth: 5 July 1949 .... 1, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, U.S.A. ... Address: Honorary Director, ICMCB-CNRS, Bordeaux University, 87 Avenue Dr Albert Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex, France

  12. Newborn jaundice - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaundice - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about newborn jaundice ... What causes jaundice in a newborn child? How common is newborn jaundice? Will the jaundice harm my child? What are the ...

  13. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child ... should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy? Will my child need to take medicines during ...

  14. Doctoral Program Selection Using Pairwise Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadisina, Suresh K.; Bhasin, Vijay

    1989-01-01

    The application of a pairwise comparison methodology (Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process) to the doctoral program selection process is illustrated. A hierarchy for structuring and facilitating the doctoral program selection decision is described. (Author/MLW)

  15. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  16. Angina - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about angina and heart disease; Coronary artery disease - what to ask your doctor ... the signs and symptoms that I am having angina? Will I always have the same symptoms? What ...

  17. The Plight of the Woman Doctoral Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Engin Inel; Holmstrom, Robert W.

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated factors underlying discrimination against woman doctoral students. Analyses revealed that faculty attitudes and behavior toward woman doctoral students contributed significantly to their emotional stresses and self-doubts. (Author/NE)

  18. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... What type of symptoms or problems will my child have? Will my child have problems thinking or ...

  19. Proceedings of Arcom Doctoral Workshop Research Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Lloyd

    2018-01-01

    Editorial Editorial Welcome to this special doctoral workshop on Research Methodology which forms part of what is now a well-established support mechanism for researchers in the discipline of the Built Environment and more particularly construction management. The ARCOM doctoral series, around now for some seventeen years, has addressed many of the diverse research areas that PhD researchers in the discipline have chosen to focus on in their doctoral journey. This doctoral workshop has as ...

  20. Comments on the Paper "Is the Sea Level Stable at Aden, Yemen?" by Albert Parker and Clifford D. Ollier in Earth Systems and Environment (Volume 1, December 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, Lesley

    2018-02-01

    This short note provides comments and a response to the paper published in Earth Systems and Environment by Albert Parker and Clifford D. Ollier (Volume 1, December 2017) entitled "Is the Sea Level Stable at Aden, Yemen?"

  1. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  2. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... Alzheimer's Association. Dementia Care Practice Recommendations ... in a Home Setting. Updated 2009. Alz.org. www.alz.org/national/ ...

  3. The Trouble with Doctoral Aspiration Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James

    2018-01-01

    This article attends to the affective-political dimensions of doctoral aspiration. It considers why doctoral students continue to hope for an 'academic good life' in spite of the depressed and precarious features of the academic present. The article emerges from 2013 research with ten doctoral students in the Arts and Social Sciences, at a…

  4. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... How can I tell if the headache I am having is dangerous? What are ... headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical ...

  5. Peace and nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, A.

    1981-01-01

    In the fifties and sixties, Albert Schweitzer fought for a policy of peace and warned of the dangers of nuclear war in speeches and publications. Reading his appeals again today, we find that they have lost nothing of their uncanny up-to-dateness. Just the opposite: The disaster predicted by Albert Schweitzer is a stronger threat now than it was at his time. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Recent Advances in Supramolecular Assemblies with Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-29

    xavier.moreau@up.univ-mrs.fr 28 Name Contact Information Laurence Navailles Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, 115, Avenue Albert Schweitzer 33600...Switzerland Email : peter.walde@mat.ethz.ch 29 Name Contact Information Cécile Zakri Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, 115, Avenue Albert ... Schweitzer 33600 Pessac, France Email : zakri@crpp-bordeaux.cnrs.fr Guy Zuber Laboratoire de Chimie Génétique, CNRS UMR 7175- LC1- Faculté de

  7. The effect of the doctor's sex on the doctor-patient relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Judith

    1982-01-01

    The differences between male and female doctors are investigated, and what patients expect from their doctors is examined. Some conclusions are drawn from the preferences which patients express for male and female doctors and from the different outcomes of male and female doctor-patient interactions.

  8. Nurses Taking the Lead: A Community Engagement and Knowledge Exchange Forum on Substance Abuse and Addiction in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Geoffrey; Mishak, Brenda; de Padua, Anthony; Strudwick, Gillian; Docabo, Angelica; Tahir, Hira

    2017-01-01

    Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, is experiencing a substance use and addiction crisis with devastating consequences. To engage local stakeholders on substance use and addiction issues, nurse researchers at the University of Saskatchewan, Prince Albert Campus, planned and organized a one-day community engagement and knowledge exchange forum. The forum provided the opportunity for interested community groups, members and individuals to share their experiences and to explore novel ways to prevent and respond to the substance abuse and addiction challenges in the region. Participants included community leaders, people and families living with addiction, service providers, local stakeholders, health professionals, researchers and Indigenous Elders. This paper describes the process and outcomes of this event and describes the role of nurse scholars in leading these efforts. © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  9. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  10. A Comparative Study on the Theme of Human Existence in the Novels of Albert Camus and F. Sionil Jose

    OpenAIRE

    F. P. A. Demeterio

    2008-01-01

    Albert Camus (1913-1960), novelist, essayist, dramatist, and recipient of the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature, is esteemed as one of the finest philosophical writers of modern France. The French existentialist philosopher, Jean-Paul Sartre wrote about him as "the latest example of that long line of moralistes whose works constitute perhaps the most original element in French letters." Camus' literary legacy includes three novels, namely L'Etranger (The Stranger) of 1942, La Peste (The Plague)...

  11. Ethical assessment of research protocols: the experience of the Research Ethics Committee of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Oliveira de Barros

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a review article on the origin of the ethical analysis ofresearch protocols, the Brazilian and International legislation,including the Research Ethics Committee of Hospital IsraelitaAlbert Einstein. Since 1997, when the Committee was validatedits role has been recognized as that of a consultant and educator,participating on local and national scientific events andcollaborating with researchers in order to improve their projectsand learn to recognize ethical dilemmas in their protocols.

  12. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Isabel ... a doctor with expertise in osteoporosis. For many people, finding a doctor who is knowledgeable about osteoporosis ...

  13. The powers of suggestion: Albert Moll and the debate on hypnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2014-01-01

    The Berlin physician Albert Moll (1862–1939) was an advocate of hypnotic suggestion therapy and a prolific contributor to the medical, legal and public discussions on hypnotism from the 1880s to the 1920s. While his work in other areas, such as sexology, medical ethics and parapsychology, has recently attracted scholarly attention, this paper for the first time comprehensively examines Moll’s numerous publications on hypnotism and places them in their contemporary context. It covers controversies over the therapeutic application of hypnosis, the reception of Moll’s monograph Der Hypnotismus (1889), his research on the rapport between hypnotizer and subject, his role as an expert on ‘hypnotic crime’, and his views on the historical influence of hypnotism on the development of psychotherapy. My findings suggest that Moll rose to prominence due to the strong late-nineteenth-century public and medical interest in the phenomena of hypnosis, but that his work was soon overshadowed by new, non-hypnotic psychotherapeutic approaches, particularly Freud’s psychoanalysis. PMID:24594818

  14. Einstein's cosmos how Albert Einstein's vision transformed our understanding of space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaku, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Few figures loom as large as Albert Einstein in our contemporary culture. It is truly remarkable that a man from such humble beginnings, an unemployed dreamer without a future or a job, who was written off by his professors as a hopeless loser, could to dare to scale the heights he reached. In this enlightening book Michio Kaku reasseses Einstein's work by centering on his three great theories - special relativity, general relativity and the Unified Field Theory. The first yielded the equation E =mc which is now such a fixture in our culture that it is practically a ubiquitous slogan. But the subsequent theories led to the Big Bang theory and have changed irrevocably the way we perceive time and space. Michio Kaku gives a new, refreshing look at the pioneering work of Einstein, giving a more accurate portrayal of his enduring legacy than previous biographies. As today's advanced physicists continue their intense search to fulfill Einstein's most cherished dream, a 'theory of everything', he is recognised as a...

  15. The powers of suggestion: Albert Moll and the debate on hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2014-03-01

    The Berlin physician Albert Moll (1862-1939) was an advocate of hypnotic suggestion therapy and a prolific contributor to the medical, legal and public discussions on hypnotism from the 1880s to the 1920s. While his work in other areas, such as sexology, medical ethics and parapsychology, has recently attracted scholarly attention, this paper for the first time comprehensively examines Moll's numerous publications on hypnotism and places them in their contemporary context. It covers controversies over the therapeutic application of hypnosis, the reception of Moll's monograph Der Hypnotismus (1889), his research on the rapport between hypnotizer and subject, his role as an expert on 'hypnotic crime', and his views on the historical influence of hypnotism on the development of psychotherapy. My findings suggest that Moll rose to prominence due to the strong late-nineteenth-century public and medical interest in the phenomena of hypnosis, but that his work was soon overshadowed by new, non-hypnotic psychotherapeutic approaches, particularly Freud's psychoanalysis.

  16. Travel diaries of Albert Einstein Far East, Palestine, and Spain, 1922-1923

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2018-01-01

    In the fall of 1922, Albert Einstein, along with his then-wife, Elsa Einstein, embarked on a five-and-a-half-month voyage to the Far East and Middle East, regions that the renowned physicist had never visited before. Einstein's lengthy itinerary consisted of stops in Hong Kong and Singapore, two brief stays in China, a six-week whirlwind lecture tour of Japan, a twelve-day tour of Palestine, and a three-week visit to Spain. This handsome edition makes available, for the first time, the complete journal that Einstein kept on this momentous journey. The telegraphic-style diary entries--quirky, succinct, and at times irreverent―record Einstein's musings on science, philosophy, art, and politics, as well as his immediate impressions and broader thoughts on such events as his inaugural lecture at the future site of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, a garden party hosted by the Japanese Empress, an audience with the King of Spain, and meetings with other prominent colleagues and statesmen. Entries also contain...

  17. Dr Albert L. Rhoton Jr's Time at the Mayo Clinic: The Beginnings of a Remarkable Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Tarek; Carlson, Matthew L; Piepgras, David G; Link, Michael J; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2017-08-09

    Dr Albert L. Rhoton Jr became the focal point of neurosurgery's evolution in understanding the intricate and complex microanatomy of the human brain over the last 4 decades. His pioneering work on cadaveric specimens proved to be a pivotal endeavor in the pursuit to better understand the complex microsurgical anatomy of cranial surgery. This paper details his early career at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. A comprehensive review and synthesis of data acquired from the institutional historical archives including the Annual Reports to the Executive Committee, the Reports to the Board of Directors, the MAYOVOX Newsletter, the illustration archives of the Mayo Clinic Division of Creative Media, staff biographies, curriculum vitae, personal interviews, as well as full-text journal articles, and book publications was performed. Dr Rhoton was engaged in a busy clinical practice as a young staff at the Mayo Clinic. Records show he focused on tackling complex intracranial pathologies along with numerous basic research and neuroanatomy projects that became a major part of his life's work and passion. He was a great teacher and friend to countless individuals and his work will continue to impact and improve the care provided to neurosurgery patients for generations to come. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  18. Friedrich Albert Lange on neo-Kantianism, socialist Darwinism, and a psychology without a soul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Friedrich Albert Lange was a German philosopher, political theorist, educator, and psychologist who outlined an objective psychology in the 1860s. This article shows how some of the most important worldviews of the nineteenth century (Kantianism, Marxism, and Darwinism) were combined creatively in his thought system. He was crucial in the development of neo-Kantianism and incorporated psycho-physiological research on sensation and perception in order to defend Kant's epistemological idealism. Based on a critique of phrenology and philosophical psychology of his time, Lange developed a program of a psychology without a soul. He suggested that only those phenomena that can be observed and controlled should be studied, that psychology should focus on actions and speech, and that for each psychological event the corresponding physical or physiological processes should be identified. Lange opposed introspection and subjective accounts and promoted experiments and statistics. He also promoted Darwinism for psychology while developing a socialist progressive-democratic reading of Darwin in his social theory. The implications of socialist Darwinism on Lange's conceptualization of race are discussed and his prominence in nineteenth century philosophy and psychology is summarized. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The epidemiological profile of Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanetzki, Camila Sanches; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Cardim; Bass, Lital Moro; Abramovici, Sulim; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2012-01-01

    This study outlined the epidemiological profiles of patients who were admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital during 2009. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients admitted to the PICC during 2009. A total of 433 medical charts were reviewed, and these data were extracted using the DATAMARTS System and analyzed using the statistical software package STATA, version 11.0. There were no statistically significant differences in regards to patient gender, and the predominant age group consisted of patients between the ages of 1 to 4 years. The average occupancy rate was 69.3% per year, and there was a greater number of admissions during April, August, and October. The average length of stay at the hospital ranged from 9.7 to 19.1 days. Respiratory diseases were the main cause for admission to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center, and the mortality rate of the patients admitted was 1.85%. Respiratory diseases were the most common ailment among patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center, and the highest mortality rates were associated with neoplastic diseases.

  20. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  1. Studying scientific thought experiments in their context: Albert Einstein and electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potters, Jan; Leuridan, Bert

    2017-05-01

    This article concerns the way in which philosophers study the epistemology of scientific thought experiments. Starting with a general overview of the main contemporary philosophical accounts, we will first argue that two implicit assumptions are present therein: first, that the epistemology of scientific thought experiments is solely concerned with factual knowledge of the world; and second, that philosophers should account for this in terms of the way in which individuals in general contemplate these thought experiments in thought. Our goal is to evaluate these assumptions and their implications using a particular case study: Albert Einstein's magnet-conductor thought experiment. We will argue that an analysis of this thought experiment based on these assumptions - as John Norton (1991) provides - is, in a sense, both misguided (the thought experiment by itself did not lead Einstein to factual knowledge of the world) and too narrow (to understand the thought experiment's epistemology, its historical context should also be taken into account explicitly). Based on this evaluation we propose an alternative philosophical approach to the epistemology of scientific thought experiments which is more encompassing while preserving what is of value in the dominant view.

  2. Promoting Sustainable Forest Management Among Stakeholders in the Prince Albert Model Forest, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen T Hvenegaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Model Forests are partnerships for shared decision-making to support social, environmental, and economic sustainability in forest management. Relationships among sustainable forest management partners are often strained, but the Prince Albert Model Forest (PAMF represents a process of effective stakeholder involvement, cooperative relationships, visionary planning, and regional landscape management. This article seeks to critically examine the history, drivers, accomplishments, and challenges associated with the PAMF. Four key phases are discussed, representing different funding levels, planning processes, research projects, and partners. Key drivers in the PAMF were funding, urgent issues, provincial responsibility, core of committed people, evolving governance, desire for a neutral organisation, role of protected areas, and potential for mutual benefits. The stakeholders involved in the Model Forest, including the forest industry and associated groups, protected areas, Aboriginal groups, local communities, governments, and research groups, were committed to the project, cooperated on many joint activities, provided significant staffing and financial resources, and gained many benefits to their own organisations. Challenges included declining funding, changing administrative structures, multiple partners, and rotating representatives. The PAMF process promoted consultative and integrated land resource management in the region, and demonstrated the positive results of cooperation between stakeholders interested in sustainable forest management.

  3. Loss of innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the invention of childhood sexuality around 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz D H

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child's 'normal' development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children's sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children's and adults' sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler.

  4. The sexologist Albert Moll--between Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigusch, Volkmar

    2012-04-01

    Albert Moll was one of the most influential sexologists during the first three decades of the twentieth century. In contrast to his rivals Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld, his achievements have not yet been recognised adequately. The author gives a comparative account of the work of these three protagonists. This shows that Moll formed some ideas which are regarded as psychoanalytical today before Freud, and that he, in contrast to Hirschfeld, was able to reflect critically on contemporary discourses, such as the debates on racial improvement through eugenics. As scientific theories, Freud's psychoanalysis represented the unconscious, fantasy, experience and latency, while Moll's sexology represented consciousness, ontological reality, behaviour and manifestation. Moll's major disagreement with Hirschfeld's sexology was his advocacy of apolitical and impartial science, whereas Hirschfeld's aim was to achieve sexual reforms politically. Added to these differences were strong personal animosities. Freud called Moll a 'beast' and 'pettifogger'; and Moll complained about Hirschfeld's 'problematic' character. When Hirschfeld escaped the Nazi terror and went to Paris, Moll denounced him in order to prevent him rebuilding a new existence in exile.

  5. Ivan Karamazov’s rebellion in Albert Camus’ and Karl Jaspers’ interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lisowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present Albert Camus’ and Karl Jaspers’ interpretations of Ivan Karamazov’s rebellion as the diagnoses of the weakness of the human intellect in confrontation with the world and the criticism of rationalism. Therefore, in the introduction I will present those fragments of the novel that characterize Ivan’s rebellion as highly abstract and theoretical. At the same time, this common literary context serves as the ground for reconstruction and comparison of the basic philosophical assumptions of each author. The intention of the remaining part of the paper is, firstly, to reconstruct A. Camus’ and K. Jaspers’ epistemology and, secondly, to analyse the arguments against Ivan’s attitude formulated by the writers. Their criticisms of the protagonist’s excessive trust in intellect is based on their own concepts of human epistemic capacity, which are related to the problems of the absurd in A. Camus’ and transcendence in K. Jaspers’ writings. The question of nihilism demands analysis of A. Camus’ idea of the nature of rebellion as both affirmative and negative, and of K. Jaspers’ notion of faith as pre-intellectual trust. Finally, their criticisms of the slogan “If there is no God, then anything is allowed” introduces the problem of freedom, which allows the comparison of the concepts of solidarity (A. Camus and communication (K. Jaspers. In the conclusion these two philosophical attitudes are discussed together. Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

  6. The collected papers of Albert Einstein. Volume 2. The Swiss years: Writings, 1900-1909

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachel, J.; Cassidy, D.C.; Renn, J.; Schulmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    This second volume of the papers of Albert Einstein chronologically presents published articles, unpublished papers, research and lecture notes, reviews, and patent applications for the period 1900-1909 during which time Einstein had a two-year period of short-term employment and a permanent position at the Swiss Patent Office in Bern. There are 62 published documents reproduced. The writings of this period deal with seven general themes: molecular forces, the foundation of statistical physics, the quantum hypothesis, determining molecular dimensions, Brownian movement, the theory of relativity, and the electrodynamics of moving media. The book also presents all available letters written by Einstein along with all significant letters sent to him and many important third-party letters written about him. The editors have added substantial introduction and a set of eight editorial notes that place Einstein's writings within their immediate scientific context. Footnotes to Einstein texts designed to illuminate the sources of scientific problems that Einstein confronted and the ideas and techniques with which he addressed them have been added by the editors. A comprehensive index to Einstein's early writings is provided

  7. Teaching doctors to treat doctors: medical student peer counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J H; Roenneburg, M; Maly, B J

    1980-01-01

    Physicians' emotional problems need to be recognized and treated. Intervention and prevention in this problem area have been attempted at the Medical College of Wisconsin through a programme of peer counselling designed to teach student physicians how to recognize and treat emotional difficulties faced by their peers. During the 18 months that the programme has been in operation, 20 peer counsellors reported a total 1,185 hours spent in counselling their peers, lending credence to the speculation that doctors will turn to their peers for help if, in medical school, there is acceptance of fallibility and responsiveness on the part of peers.

  8. Urgent need of a doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON (24H/24H): 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY r...

  9. Urgent Need of a Doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am&...

  10. Urgent Need of a Doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am...

  11. Urgent need of a doctor

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H: 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL : 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 1...

  12. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 r...

  13. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 rue du Jura, Ambilly 04-50-87-47-47 EMERGENCIES 17 rue...

  14. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    GENEVA PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor  Or SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) Or ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (7H-23H) 022 748-49-50 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest  022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES  30 Bd de la Cluse  022 382-45-55  MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest  022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer  022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR  Meyrin  022 719-61-11 URGENCES ADULTES  Meyrin  022 719-66-80  URGENCES : AMBULANCE (GENEVE ET VAUD) : 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 767-44-44  FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H  01-251-51-510 APPEL D'URGENCE EUROPEEN 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (ou­or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN  Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie&a...

  15. Doctor's dilemma (medical decision making)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Disagreement between experts is presumed to be uncommon in medical diagnosis. Radiology is considered to be a particularly objective means of diagnosis and expert radiographic interpretation is expected to be infallible. Five military radiologists were made to review independently chest radiographs of 1256 patients recorded in four image formats and interpret each as positive or negative for tuberculosis. The results were unexpected. Ability to detect tuberculosis varied little between various image formats but the extent of disagreement between doctors was remarkable. The number of cases judged positive varied from 56 to 100 among the five readers. Of cases judged positive at least once, the mean rate of disagreement between pairs of readers was 19%. The validity of these findings have been confirmed repeatedly in several subsequent trials. Other diagnostic modalities show equally surprising rates of diagnostic dissonance. Extensive observer disagreement was found to be a universal problem in medical diagnosis, giving credence to the proverbial adage that 'no two doctors agree'. The magnitude of disagreement between experts is the principal theoretic problem of diagnosis. Even a stochastic theory of diagnosis is devised which accounts for the disagreement between experts, where the disagreement approaches a theoretic maximum even for ideal diagnosticians

  16. Doctor shopping: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Hall, Joanne M

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a significant problem in the United States that poses a serious health risk to Americans and is therefore significant to the field of nursing. The prescription drugs that are designated in the United States as having abuse potential are called controlled or scheduled drugs. The most common types of abused prescription drugs are benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, opioids prescribed for pain, and stimulants prescribed for attention deficit disorder. These prescription drugs are abused by taking larger doses than prescribed for nonmedical use to achieve a high or euphoric feeling, or are sold illicitly for profit. In 2009, there were 2.4 million nonmedical users of prescription opioids in the United States. These prescription drugs are often obtained by seeing multiple prescribers, often under false pretenses or with complicity from the prescribers that leads to abuse and illicit sales. The term doctor shopping has been used not only to refer to this phenomenon but has also had other meanings throughout the past decades. Thus, concept analysis is the focus of this article for clarification using the Walker and Avant method. Health implications and suggestions for minimizing doctor shopping are included.

  17. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly communities are dependent on and often measured by their ability to attract and develop doctoral students. Recent literature suggests that most scholarly communities entail ecological niches in which the doctoral students learn the codes and practices of research. In this article, we...... successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...... explore the microclimate in an ecological niche of doctoral education. Based on a theoretical definition of microclimate as the emotional atmosphere that ties group members together and affects their actions, we conducted a case study that aimed to describe the key features of the microclimate...

  18. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  19. Kuidas maikrahv uued rõivad sai. Leopold von Pezoldi "Maikrahvi sissesõit Tallinna" ja Theodor Albert Sprengeli "Reformatsiooni algus Tallinnas" avalik konserveerimine = How the May King got his new clother. Public conservation of Leopold von Pezol

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aas, Kristina, 1988-

    2015-01-01

    Ülevaade baltisaksa kunstnike Leopold von Pezoldi ja Theodor Albert Sprengeli maalidest Suurgildi hoones, nende varasematest restaureerimistest, avalikust konserveerimisest ja tehnilistest uuringutest.

  20. The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Frederick E.; Noe, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    Upon his death in 1955, Albert Einstein’s brain was removed, fixed and photographed from multiple angles. It was then sectioned into 240 blocks, and histological slides were prepared. At the time, a roadmap was drawn that illustrates the location within the brain of each block and its associated slides. Here we describe the external gross neuroanatomy of Einstein’s entire cerebral cortex from 14 recently discovered photographs, most of which were taken from unconventional angles. Two of the photographs reveal sulcal patterns of the medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and another shows the neuroanatomy of the right (exposed) insula. Most of Einstein’s sulci are identified, and sulcal patterns in various parts of the brain are compared with those of 85 human brains that have been described in the literature. To the extent currently possible, unusual features of Einstein’s brain are tentatively interpreted in light of what is known about the evolution of higher cognitive processes in humans. As an aid to future investigators, these (and other) features are correlated with blocks on the roadmap (and therefore histological slides). Einstein’s brain has an extraordinary prefrontal cortex, which may have contributed to the neurological substrates for some of his remarkable cognitive abilities. The primary somatosensory and motor cortices near the regions that typically represent face and tongue are greatly expanded in the left hemisphere. Einstein’s parietal lobes are also unusual and may have provided some of the neurological underpinnings for his visuospatial and mathematical skills, as others have hypothesized. Einstein’s brain has typical frontal and occipital shape asymmetries (petalias) and grossly asymmetrical inferior and superior parietal lobules. Contrary to the literature, Einstein’s brain is not spherical, does not lack parietal opercula and has non-confluent Sylvian and inferior postcentral sulci. PMID:23161163

  1. The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Dean; Lepore, Frederick E; Noe, Adrianne

    2013-04-01

    Upon his death in 1955, Albert Einstein's brain was removed, fixed and photographed from multiple angles. It was then sectioned into 240 blocks, and histological slides were prepared. At the time, a roadmap was drawn that illustrates the location within the brain of each block and its associated slides. Here we describe the external gross neuroanatomy of Einstein's entire cerebral cortex from 14 recently discovered photographs, most of which were taken from unconventional angles. Two of the photographs reveal sulcal patterns of the medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and another shows the neuroanatomy of the right (exposed) insula. Most of Einstein's sulci are identified, and sulcal patterns in various parts of the brain are compared with those of 85 human brains that have been described in the literature. To the extent currently possible, unusual features of Einstein's brain are tentatively interpreted in light of what is known about the evolution of higher cognitive processes in humans. As an aid to future investigators, these (and other) features are correlated with blocks on the roadmap (and therefore histological slides). Einstein's brain has an extraordinary prefrontal cortex, which may have contributed to the neurological substrates for some of his remarkable cognitive abilities. The primary somatosensory and motor cortices near the regions that typically represent face and tongue are greatly expanded in the left hemisphere. Einstein's parietal lobes are also unusual and may have provided some of the neurological underpinnings for his visuospatial and mathematical skills, as others have hypothesized. Einstein's brain has typical frontal and occipital shape asymmetries (petalias) and grossly asymmetrical inferior and superior parietal lobules. Contrary to the literature, Einstein's brain is not spherical, does not lack parietal opercula and has non-confluent Sylvian and inferior postcentral sulci.

  2. [Influence of patients' attitude on doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; Qiu, Ze-qi; Zhang, Tuo-hong

    2009-04-18

    To describe the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship and find out the influencing factors of the patients, gathering evidence to improve the doctor-patient relationship. This study was a cross-sectional study, in which doctors and nurses in 10 hospitals of Beijing, Shandong and Chongqing were surveyed with structured questionnaires and in-depth interviews. The mean score of the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was 59.97, which was much lower than the patients'. The patients' socio-demographic characteristics, social economic status (SES) and behavior characteristics influence the interaction of the doctors and the patients. The doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was influenced by the patients' trust. The doctors' perspective is helpful to define the tension and the cause of the doctor-patient relationship. The patients' characteristics have important influence on the doctor-patient relationship. It's necessary to take action on the patients to improve the doctor-patient relationship.

  3. The Cape doctor 1807-1910: perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Howard

    2004-01-01

    This chapter contrasts the Cape doctor in 1807 and in 1910, and finds that, in a whole variety of ways, the differences between the two were not of degree but of kind. Underlying this sea-change was the germ revolution of the late Victorian era, which transformed the Cape doctor out of all recognition, thereby laying important foundations for the development of the twentieth-century South African doctor.

  4. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  5. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Albert-Lembert versus hybrid-layered suture in hand sewn end-to-end cervical esophagogastric anastomosis after esophageal squamous cell carcinoma resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Sun, Li; Xu, Guanghui; Hong, Liu; Yang, Jianjun; Cai, Lei; Li, Guocai; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Zhang, Hongwei

    2015-11-01

    Hand sewn cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (CEGA) is regarded as preferred technique by surgeons after esophagectomy. However, considering the anastomotic leakage and stricture, the optimal technique for performing this anastomosis is still under debate. Between November 2010 and September 2012, 230 patients who underwent esophagectomy with hand sewn end-to-end (ETE) CEGA for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) were analyzed retrospectively, including 111 patients underwent Albert-Lembert suture anastomosis and 119 patients underwent hybrid-layered suture anastomosis. Anastomosis construction time was recorded during operation. Anastomotic leakage was recorded through upper gastrointestinal water-soluble contrast examination. Anastomotic stricture was recorded during follow up. The hybrid-layered suture was faster than Albert-Lembert suture (29.40±1.24 min vs. 33.83±1.41 min, P=0.02). The overall anastomotic leak rate was 7.82%, the leak rate in hybrid-layered suture group was significantly lower than that in Albert-Lembert suture group (3.36% vs. 12.61%, P=0.01). The overall anastomotic stricture rate was 9.13%, the stricture rate in hybrid-layered suture group was significantly lower than that in Albert-Lembert suture group (5.04% vs. 13.51%, P=0.04). Hand sewn ETE CEGA with hybrid-layered suture is associated with lower anastomotic leakage and stricture rate compared to hand sewn ETE CEGA with Albert-Lembert suture.

  7. Persisting Dreams: The Impact of the Doctoral Socialization Process on Latina Post-Doctoral Career Aspirations

    OpenAIRE

    Westerband, Yamissette

    2016-01-01

    Latinas are underrepresented within the professorate and within doctoral programs, particularly within Research Intensive Institutions. This dissertation explores how the doctoral socialization process impacts the pipeline from the Ph.D. to scholarly careers for Latinas in Research universities. Given the low numbers of representation and production at the doctoral level for Latinas, what happens when they do enter Ph.D. programs? Their doctoral experience must be marked in one way or anot...

  8. When doctors cross the line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, M K

    1994-05-01

    Everybody's doing it. Lawyers. Professors. Yes, even doctors. Professionals in positions of authority and trust are taking a closer look at how they relate to their clients, students, or patients. Perhaps it all started with Anita Hill, the woman who sounded the wake-up call that was heard around America with the message that sexual harassment, even sexual innuendo, will no longer be tolerated. It's a new day and age. Today, for ethical as well as practical reasons, some bar associations (including Minnesota's) are warning lawyers not to have sex with clients, and many colleges are forbidding professors from getting involved with students. The American Medical Association and state medical boards are also re-evaluating the rules, because in today's climate even something as simple as a pat on the knee can get a physician in trouble.

  9. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  10. Doctoral research on cadastral development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagdas, Volkan; Stubkjær, Erik

    2009-01-01

    of the countries concerned. The cadastre, however, is the core of both systems as it provides for systematic and official descriptions of land parcels or real property units. The research mentioned often has a development perspective, and in this article we will motivate the introduction of the research domain...... of cadastral development. This research is multi-disciplinary and draws on elements of theories and methodologies from the natural, the social, the behavioral, and the formal sciences. During the last decade or so, doctoral dissertations have come to constitute a substantial part of this research effort...... with a call for a shared terminology and a shared set of concepts which may contribute to further theory building within the cadastral domain. Udgivelsesdato: OCT...

  11. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 3. Doctor-artists in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-06-09

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts is being discussed in a series of six articles. The first two articles dealt with doctors and the visual arts in New South Wales. In this, the third, doctor-artists in Victoria are discussed.

  12. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  13. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  14. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  15. Doctoral Education in Nursing: Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Florence S.

    1978-01-01

    Problems that confront nursing education and the quality of doctoral preparation are discussed in this article and include the steep rise in requests from nurses for admission into doctoral programs and tight university budgets; other concerns are the development of scholars and sharing research findings. (TA)

  16. Richard W. Ziolkowski Receives Honorary Doctorate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav

    2012-01-01

    At the annual Commemoration of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) on April 27, 2012, Prof. Richard W. Ziolkowski, University of Arizona (UoA), received DTU's highest academic degree, the Honorary Doctor degree: Doctor Technices Honoris Causa (Figure 1). Prof. Ziolkowski has been a close...

  17. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2018 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-30

    May 30, 2018 ... You must be enrolled at a Canadian university at the doctoral level ... IDRC Doctoral Research Awards are intended to promote the capacity and growth of ... including academic training, local language capacity, professional ... funding opportunity to support Canadian-African research teams studying Ebola.

  18. Talking to Your Doctor (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems , weight concerns, depression, suicidal thoughts , and even body odor . You should be able to talk to your doctor about everything, but that's easier said than done. Being examined and questioned about your body can also be intimidating, especially when the doctor ...

  19. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  20. Cultural and musical activity among Norwegian doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2013-06-25

    The cultural and musical activity of Norwegian doctors was studied in 1993. We wished to re-examine their cultural and musical activity, analyse the development and study the correlation with satisfaction, health and other leisure activities. In the autumn of 2010, a survey was undertaken among a representative sample of economically active Norwegian doctors. The survey asked the same questions as in 1993, and the responses were also compared to the population studies conducted by Statistics Norway. We also used a cultural index that we have developed ourselves. Altogether 1,019 doctors (70%) responded to the survey. They reported a higher level of cultural activity in 2010 than in 1993, measured in terms of reading of non-medical literature and visits to the cinema, theatre and concerts. The doctors engaged in musical activity of their own especially frequently: 58% reported to be able to play an instrument, and 21% reported to play on a regular basis, which is more than among other academic professions. We found a significant correlation between the doctors' level of cultural activity and their job satisfaction, general satisfaction, self-reported health and physical activity. The doctors who engage most frequently in cultural activities are thus most satisfied with their work and with life in general. Furthermore, they also have better self-reported health. Norwegian doctors give priority to cultural and musical activities. The assertion that doctors are particularly fond of music is more than just a myth.

  1. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  2. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper. PMID:27417625

  3. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  4. Rational Emotive Behavioural Therapy: The Evolution of a Revolution: Interview With Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis, Work Partner and Wife of Dr. Albert Ellis, the Creator of REBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Debbie Joffe; Rovira, Montse

    2015-02-01

    Recognized as one of the most influential thinkers and psychologists, Albert Ellis PhD (1913-2007) revolutionized Psychology when he created the first cognitive psychotherapy, Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy. After he passed away, Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis continues spreading his legacy around the world. Psychologist, lecturer, writer, trainer, she dedicates her life to disseminate REBT and extend it through different statements, from the social to the educational, from the academic to the clinical. In this interview, she goes through her own history and her husband's one, bringing us closer to understanding Albert Ellis as the leading figure in his field, and the oneness they experienced through their professional and personal relationship.

  5. Albert Einstein and Wernher von Braun - the two great German-American physicists seen in a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-04-01

    It was Albert Einstein who for the first time changed our view of the universe to be a non-euclidean curved space-time. And it was Wernher von Braun who blazed the trail to take us into this universe, leaving for the first time the gravitational field of our planet earth, with the landing a man on the moon the greatest event in human history. Both these great physicists did this on the shoulders of giants. Albert Einstein on the shoulders of his landsman, the mathematician Bernhard Riemann, and Wernher von Braun on the shoulders of Goddard and Oberth. Both Einstein and von Braun made a Faustian pact with the devil, von Braun by accepting research funds from Hitler, and Einstein by urging Roosvelt to build the atom bomb (against Hitler). Both of these great men later regretted the use of their work for the killing of innocent bystanders, even though in the end the invention of nuclear energy and space flight is for the benefit of man. Their example serves as a warning for all of us. It can be formulated as follows: ``Can I in good conscience accept research funds from the military to advance scientific knowledge, for weapons developed against an abstract enemy I never have met in person?'' Weapons if used do not differentiate between the scientist, who invented these weapons, and the non-scientist.

  6. Implant dentistry curriculum in undergraduate education: part 2-program at the Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeplin, Birgit S; Strub, Joerg R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the didactic and clinical undergraduate implant dentistry program of the Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany, with emphasis on the clinical implant experience. A detailed description of the implant curriculum at Albert-Ludwigs University is given with documented exemplary cases and additional flow charts. All students participate in 28 hours of lectures and approximately 64 hours of seminars with hands-on courses and gain clinical experience. All undergraduate students are eligible to place and restore oral implants. Emphasis is placed on prosthetic-driven planning of implant positions, three-dimensional imaging, and computer-guided implant placement. Implant restorations performed by undergraduate students comprise single crowns and small multiunit fixed dental prostheses in partially edentulous posterior maxillae and anterior or posterior mandibles, implant-retained overdentures (snap attachment) in edentulous patients, and telescopic fixed-removable dental prostheses on remaining teeth and strategically placed additional implants. Over the past 2.5 years, 51 patients were treated with 97 dental implants placed by students in the undergraduate program. Seventy-one restorations were inserted: 60.6% single crowns, 7% fixed dental protheses, 21.1% overdentures, and 11.3% telescopic fixed-removable dental prostheses. The implant survival rate was 98.9%. Because survival rates for dental implants placed and restored by students are comparable to those of experienced dentists, oral implant dentistry should be implemented as part of the undergraduate dental curriculum.

  7. Poetics of assembly Albert Kahn and D.W. Griffith in the birth of the Machine Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pancorbo Crespo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research seeks to establish a double parallel between cinema and modern architecture, focusing on a moment of refounding of both  disciplines, the early twentieth century. We will be based on two seminal characters: DW Griffith and Albert Kahn. We will explore a temporal and geographical parallelism in their main evolutionary lines, which run through a similar way in the beginning, from the U.S to the U.S.S.R, to return again to the place of origin. This trip was triggered by the arrival to the USSR of  the first copies of the film "Intolerance" in 1918 and the arrival of Albert  Kahn in 1928 for the realization of numerous industrial projects during the First Five-Year Plan. Furthermore, we will explore a more conceptual  parallelism, studying the use of the notion of assembly in both disciplines  during that period, using again the work of our two main characters as the basis for research, but also leaning on other essential actors for that issue, like are Eisenstein and Miliutin.

  8. ‘Trick’, ‘Manipulation’ and ‘Farce’: Albert Moll’s Critique of Occultism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffram, Heather

    2012-01-01

    In July 1925, the psychiatrist Albert Moll appeared before the district court in Berlin-Schöneberg charged with having defamed the medium Maria Vollhardt (alias Rudloff) in his 1924 book Der Spiritismus [Spiritism]. Supported by some of Berlin’s most prominent occultists, the plaintiff – the medium’s husband – argued that Moll’s use of terms such as ‘trick’, ‘manipulation’ and ‘farce’ in reference to Vollhardt’s phenomena had been libellous. In the three-part trial that followed, however, Moll’s putative affront to the medium – of which he was eventually acquitted – was overshadowed, on the one hand, by a debate over the scientific status of parapsychology, and on the other, by the question of who – parapsychologists, occultists, psychiatrists or jurists – was entitled to claim epistemic authority over the occult. This paper will use the Rudloff–Moll trial as a means of examining Moll’s critique of occultism, not only as it stood in the mid-1920s, but also as it had developed since the 1880s. It will also provide insight into the views of Germany’s occultists and parapsychologists, who argued that their legitimate bid for scientific credibility was hindered by Dunkelmänner [obscurantists] such as Albert Moll. PMID:23002297

  9. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  10. Doctor's dilemma: Medical decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    How a doctor arrives at a decision is of interest to both the developed and the developing countries. The developed and the developing want to walk on the same road but from different directions: one wants to develop a little more and the other wants to develop a little less for cost containment. To justify nuclear medicine in a developing country we have to see nuclear medicine in a new role. It is not for putting the diagnostic labels, not for differential diagnosis as we have been conditioned to think so far. In a developing country it should be for differential management, How does it alter the management decision in respect to a particular patient? If management outcomes are restricted, there is no need for an investigation which does not help in any way the management of the patient. If there is no bypass surgery, what use is the thallium perfusion? Although primarily a diagnostic discipline for its justification and survival in the developing country it should lead to a sensible differential management

  11. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judie L. Brill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 sources. The search was narrowed to include only doctoral study and mentoring. Research questions of interest were: Why do high attrition rates exist for doctoral students? What are the barriers to retention? What are the benefits of doctoral mentoring? What programs do institutions have in place to reduce attrition? The researchers found a key factor influencing doctoral student retention and success is effective faculty mentorship. In particular, the design of a mentoring and faculty training program to increase retention and provide for success after graduation is important. This research represents a key area of interest in the retention literature, as institutions continue to search for ways to better support students during their doctoral programs and post-graduation. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i2.186

  12. Open notes: doctors and patients signing on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan; Darer, Jonathan D; Elmore, Joann G; Feldman, Henry J; Leveille, Suzanne G; Ralston, James D; Ross, Stephen E; Vodicka, Elisabeth; Weber, Valerie D

    2010-07-20

    Few patients read their doctors' notes, despite having the legal right to do so. As information technology makes medical records more accessible and society calls for greater transparency, patients' interest in reading their doctors' notes may increase. Inviting patients to review these notes could improve understanding of their health, foster productive communication, stimulate shared decision making, and ultimately lead to better outcomes. Yet, easy access to doctors' notes could have negative consequences, such as confusing or worrying patients and complicating rather than improving patient-doctor communication. To gain evidence about the feasibility, benefits, and harms of providing patients ready access to electronic doctors' notes, a team of physicians and nurses have embarked on a demonstration and evaluation of a project called OpenNotes. The authors describe the intervention and share what they learned from conversations with doctors and patients during the planning stages. The team anticipates that "open notes" will spread and suggests that over time, if drafted collaboratively and signed by both doctors and patients, they might evolve to become contracts for care.

  13. The doctor(s) in house: an analysis of the evolution of the television doctor-hero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Elena C; Goodier, Bethany C

    2011-03-01

    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the "television doctor" by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering and resolving instances of disease. This article examines the implicit and explicit messages in House M.D. and critically analyzes both the show and its lead character in relation to the traditional medical drama genre that highlights the "doctor-hero" as the central character. While at first House seems to completely violate narrative and generic norms, ultimately the program provides a new form that reinforces the presence of the doctor-hero, but highlights House's character as the central figure who is personally and interpersonally problematic but biomedically effective.

  14. HOMENAJE AL DOCTOR JORGE CAVELIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Rueda Montaña

    1979-06-01

    Full Text Available

    (Palabras del doctor Guillermo Rueda Montaña, durante el entierro del doctor Jorge Cavelier, el 25 de junio de 1978.

    Señores:

    Cuentan viejos relatos indígenas, de la "Tierra de los árboles inmensos", que en los grandes bosques se produce un silencio total de muchas horas, cuando cae uno de esos titanes. Varias veces centenario. Como si la tierra y todas sus criaturas recibieran el impacto y el profundo dolor de la caída de un ser aparentemente inmortal. Así nosotros, absortos y asombrados, presenciamos el derrumbe de este otro gigante que proyectó su sombra sobre el Territorio Nacional, y se constituyó por sus ejecutorias, en figura casi mística en la Medicina Colombiana.

    Pues fue JORGE CAVELIER el hombre - acción. Si hubiera vivido en el Egipto clásico, habría construído una pirámide, si en los tiempos medioevales, habría emprendido una cruzada o levantado una Catedral.
    Tenía una visión muy clara y era capaz de traducirla a fuerza de mandobles si fuere necesario, en una obra de interés común.
    La hercúlea conformación de su raza, mezcla de celtas y vikingos, creadora de marinos, de hombres de acción, de grandes capitanes, lo impulsaba a la ejecución.
    Cuando se fijaba una meta, siempre orientada hacia el progreso de la comunidad, se lanzaba en procura sin que ningún obstáculo pudiera detener el impulso emocional de su voluntad ejecutiva. Así también, con esa misma garra, se enfrentó a la muerte, a rompe y rasga, sin cuartel, sin concesiones, porque quería vivir, para continuar haciendo.

    Esos ojos profundamente azules, que en tantas ocasiones reflejaron la ira, cuando algo o alguien se interponía en el camino de su férrea voluntad, eran también capaces de brillar emocionados cuando se tocaba sus más íntimas fibras de aguda sensibilidad social y
    completa solidaridad humana.
    Fué intemperante y fue soberbio, pero fue grande en sus prop

  15. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  16. The Indian Hill Petroglyph Site, 14EW1, Kanopolis Lake: Development of Alternative Mitigation Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Archaeology), Oxford, England, 19 51 (equivalent to an American Ph.D.). a.D. Ip.ternational Studies in Sociology, Albert Schweitzer Colleges, Chur...3 (1): 69-185. ’"^ "’ ~ Sc voeder, Albert H. 1965 A brief history of the Southern Utes. Southwestern L : • ’’.n i- 51-73. :; i th, Ann M

  17. Reasons for doctor migration from South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Push factors motivating migration most frequently include dissatisfaction with ... The year of graduation ranged from 1964 to 2000 (median 1985), and the year of leaving ... South African doctors working in Canada had increased by more than.

  18. Reasons for doctor migration from South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zealand, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, United Kingdom, Canada, Yemen and Australia. ..... media. Of the 13.8% of the doctors with children who were either studying ... become a significant social and economic burden to the country.

  19. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:May 9, ... you? This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Can the quantum mechanical description of the physical reality be considered as complete?; Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Kann die quantenmechanische Beschreibung der physikalischen Realitaet als vollstaendig betrachtet werden?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Claus (ed.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2015-07-01

    The year 2015 marks not only the centenary anniversary around the general relativity theory, but also the octogenary anniversary around one of the most effective works of theoretical physics: The work of Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen (EPR) from the year 1935 reprinted and commented here. In the commented edition present here not only the historical context and the effect history of this work are drawn after in detail but also the effects on modern research and the still discussed theoretical foundations of quantum theory. Reprinted are beyond the German translation of the EPR work also the translation of Bohr's subsequent work with the same title from the same year as well Einstein's article for the journal Dialectica written 1948 in German.

  1. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  2. First district sanitary doctor of Katerynoslav

    OpenAIRE

    M.P. Chaban; Z.I. Shevtsova; V.V. Gaponov

    2017-01-01

    The life and professional activity of Vasyl Tymofiiovych Skrylnikov — a famous doctor-hygienist, scientist, and public figure have been represented. V.T. Skrylnikov contributed to the development of sanitary-prophylaxis direction in zemstvo medicine in Katerynoslav province in the second half of the 19th century; he was the first district sanitary doctor in Katerynoslav. The scientist actively studied medical features of natural agents, namely Tymofiivska clay. He successfully worked at Slovi...

  3. Doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Gretchen L; Smith, Michael J; Abate, Marie A; Halverson, Joel

    2012-06-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a major health concern nationwide, with West Virginia having one of the highest prescription drug death rates in the United States. Studies are lacking that compare living subjects with persons who died from drug overdose for evidence of doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances. The study objectives were to compare deceased and living subjects in West Virginia for evidence of prior doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances and to identify factors associated with drug-related death. A secondary data study was conducted using controlled substance, Schedule II-IV, prescription data from the West Virginia Controlled Substance Monitoring Program and drug-related death data compiled by the Forensic Drug Database between July 2005 and December 2007. A case-control design compared deceased subjects 18 years and older whose death was drug related with living subjects for prior doctor and pharmacy shopping. Logistic regression identified factors related to the odds of drug-related death. A significantly greater proportion of deceased subjects were doctor shoppers (25.21% vs. 3.58%) and pharmacy shoppers (17.48% vs. 1.30%) than living subjects. Approximately 20.23% of doctor shoppers were also pharmacy shoppers, and 55.60% of pharmacy shoppers were doctor shoppers. Younger age, greater number of prescriptions dispensed, exposure to opioids and benzodiazepines, and doctor and pharmacy shopping were factors with greater odds of drug-related death. Doctor and pharmacy shopping involving controlled substances were identified, and shopping behavior was associated with drug-related death. Prescription monitoring programs may be useful in identifying potential shoppers at the point of care.

  4. Pregnancy and childbirth: is the doctor necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1979-05-01

    The changing fashions in childbirth over the past 200 years are related to the present demand by women and their partners for "participatory" childbirth, including homebirth. The argument is advanced that doctors must be responsive to these changes. The opinion is made that home birth is currently inappropriate, but that hospitals should provide "birth centres"; and that obstetrics should be conducted by a "team", in which nurse-midwives and family doctors play as important a role as specialist obstetricians.

  5. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  6. El Kalevipoeg, otra epopeya ignorada / Jüri Talvet ; [inglise keelest tlk. Giselle Lázaro ja Albert Lázaro Tinaut

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Talvet, Jüri, 1945-

    2003-01-01

    Pealk. tõlge: "Kalevipoeg" - veel üks unustatud eepos. - Lisa: Fr. R. Kreutzwald. A la libertad : [Priiusele / tlk. Jüri Talvet ja Albert Lázaro Tinaut], lk. 35. Artikkel on eesti keeles ilmunud pealkirja ""Kalevipoeg" - suur Euroopa eepos" all.

  7. [Never forget this in making your drawings and equations! A conversation with Albert Einstein on learning, teaching and the secrets of the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, A

    2009-03-01

    Albert Einstein, the genius--this aspect often has been noted. A neglected aspect is Einstein's role as student and teacher. For this reason, Einstein's notes have been looked at once again. The selected original quotes are composed into the format of a fictive dialogue. The original context and coherence of his comments have thereby been respected carefully.

  8. A redescription of the specimens of “Telesto humilis” (Octocorallia) collected by Prince Albert Ier of Monaco, with the descritpion of four new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinberg, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Four new octocoral species, Telestula stocki, Telestula batoni, Telestula verseveldti, and Telestula kuekenthali are described and illustrated and a redescription is given of Telesto humilis Thomson, 1927. All the species mentioned were collected during expeditions by Prince Albert Ier of Monaco in

  9. Ein Märtyrer auf der Zugspitze? Glühbirnenkreuze, Bildpropaganda und andere Medialisierungen des Totenkults um Albert Leo Schlageter in der Weimarer Republik und im Nationalsozialismus

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhrmeister, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Der Beitrag vergleicht die Grundzüge des Totenkults um Albert Leo Schlageter in der Weimarer Republik und im Nationalsozialismus. Der Fokus der Untersuchung liegt auf dem Medieneinsatz, der den nationalsozialistischen Märtyrerkult vom Totengedenken in der Weimarer Republik unterscheidet. Die verschiedenen Ebenen der Medialisierung werden abschließend an einem konkreten Fallbeispiel, dem Schlageter-Gedenken auf der Zugspitze, demonstriert.

  10. Szenci Molnár Albert elveszettnek hitt Igaz Vallás portréja avagy Holland–flamand-magyar szellemi kapcsolatok a kora újkorban

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teszelszky, Kees

    This is the story of a work of one of the greatest early-modern humanists of Hungary, Albert Szenci Molnár, which had been lost for almost 400 years. The rediscovered Icon religionis or 'Image of Religion' is one of the oldest broadsheets printed in the Hungarian language. It was found in the

  11. Did You Hear the One About the Doctor? An Examination of Doctor Jokes Posted on Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Matthew A; Haney, Carol Sue; Weeks, William B; Sirovich, Brenda E; Anthony, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Background Social networking sites such as Facebook have become immensely popular in recent years and present a unique opportunity for researchers to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues. Objective We sought to explore doctor-related humor by examining doctor jokes posted on Facebook. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 33,326 monitored Facebook users, 263 (0.79%) of whom posted a joke that referenced doctors on their Facebook wall during a 6-month o...

  12. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 1. Doctor-artists in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    Since Europeans first settled in Australia their doctors have been interested in the visual arts. Some have been hobby painters and sculptors, a few with great distinction. Some have been gallery supporters and administrators. A few have written art books. Some have been outstanding photographers. Of the larger number of doctors who have collected art, only those are mentioned who have made their collections public or have made important donations to galleries. The subject of Australian doctors and the visual arts will be discussed in six articles in this and following issues of the journal. The first deals with doctor-artists in New South Wales.

  13. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector; La formacion de doctores en el sector nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-03-01

    Doctoral aducation is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  14. [The motivation to become a medical doctor - doctoral students in a formal academic study program compared with those pursuing their doctorate independently].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, M; Dimitriadis, K; Holzer, M; Reincke, M; Fischer, M R

    2011-04-01

    Weight and quality of medical doctoral theses have been discussed in Germany for years. Doctoral study programs in various graduate schools offer opportunities to improve quality of medical doctoral theses. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate distinctions and differences concerning motivation, choice of subject and the dissertation process between doctoral candidates completing the doctoral seminar for doctoral students in the Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich and doctoral candidates doing their doctorate individually. All 4000 medical students of the LMU obtained an online-questionnaire which was completed by 767 students (19 % response rate). The theoretical framework of this study was based upon the Self-Determination-Theory by Deci and Ryan. Doctoral candidates completing the doctoral study program were more intrinsically motivated than doctoral candidates doing their doctorate individually; no difference was found in their extrinsic motivation. In regard to choice of subject and dissertation process the doctoral students in the seminar were distinguished from the individual group by having chosen a more challenging project. They anticipated a demanding dissertation process including conference participation, publishing of papers, etc. Intrinsic motivation correlates positively with choosing a challenging project and a demanding dissertation process. High intrinsic motivation seems to be very important for autonomous scholarly practice. Our results suggest that doctoral study programs have a positive impact on intrinsic motivation and interest in research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Self-organization of vortex-length distribution in quantum turbulence: An approach based on the Barabasi-Albert model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitani, Akira; Tsubota, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    The energy spectrum of decaying quantum turbulence at T=0 obeys Kolmogorov's law. In addition to this, recent studies revealed that the vortex-length distribution (VLD), meaning the size distribution of the vortices, in decaying Kolmogorov quantum turbulence also obeys a power law. This power-law VLD suggests that the decaying turbulence has scale-free structure in real space. Unfortunately, however, there has been no practical study that answers the following important question: why can quantum turbulence acquire a scale-free VLD? We propose here a model to study the origin of the power law of the VLD from a generic point of view. The nature of quantized vortices allows one to describe the decay of quantum turbulence with a simple model that is similar to the Barabasi-Albert model, which explains the scale-invariance structure of large networks. We show here that such a model can reproduce the power law of the VLD well

  16. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Can the quantum mechanical description of the physical reality be considered as complete?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks not only the centenary anniversary around the general relativity theory, but also the octogenary anniversary around one of the most effective works of theoretical physics: The work of Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen (EPR) from the year 1935 reprinted and commented here. In the commented edition present here not only the historical context and the effect history of this work are drawn after in detail but also the effects on modern research and the still discussed theoretical foundations of quantum theory. Reprinted are beyond the German translation of the EPR work also the translation of Bohr's subsequent work with the same title from the same year as well Einstein's article for the journal Dialectica written 1948 in German.

  17. Sexological deliberation and social engineering: Albert Moll and the sterilisation debate in late imperial and Weimar Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The physician and sexologist Albert Moll, from Berlin, was one of the main protagonists within the German discourse on the opportunities and dangers of social engineering, by eugenic interventions into human life in general, as well as into reproductive hygiene and healthcare policy in particular. One of the main sexological topics that were discussed intensively during the late-Wilhelminian German Reich and the Weimar Republic was the question of the legalisation of voluntary and compulsory sterilisations on the basis of medical, social, eugenic, economic or criminological indications. As is clear from Moll's conservative principles of medical ethics, and his conviction that the genetic knowledge required for eugenically indicated sterilisations was not yet sufficiently elaborated, he had doubts and worries about colleagues who were exceedingly zealous about these surgical sterilisations--especially Gustav Boeters from Saxony.

  18. Bridging the knowledge gap: An analysis of Albert Einstein's popularized presentation of the equivalence of mass and energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, Shulamit

    2014-11-01

    This article presents an analysis of a scientific article written by Albert Einstein in 1946 for the general public that explains the equivalence of mass and energy and discusses the implications of this principle. It is argued that an intelligent popularization of many advanced ideas in physics requires more than the simple elimination of mathematical formalisms and complicated scientific conceptions. Rather, it is shown that Einstein developed an alternative argument for the general public that bypasses the core of the formal derivation of the equivalence of mass and energy to provide a sense of derivation based on the history of science and the nature of scientific inquiry. This alternative argument is supported and enhanced by variety of explanatory devices orchestrated to coherently support and promote the reader's understanding. The discussion centers on comparisons to other scientific expositions written by Einstein for the general public. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Collaboration of Art and Science in Albert Edelfelt's Portrait of Louis Pasteur: The Making of an Enduring Medical Icon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Richard E; Hansen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Historians of medicine--and even Louis Pasteur's biographers--have paid little attention to his close relationship with the Finnish artist Albert Edelfelt. A new look at Edelfelt's letters to his mother, written in Swedish and never quoted at length in English, reveals important aspects of Pasteur's working habits and personality. By understanding the active collaboration through which this very famous portrait was made, we also discover unnoticed things in the painting itself, gain a new appreciation of its original impact on the French public's image of science, and better understand its enduring influence on the portrayal of medicine in the art and the popular culture of many countries even to the present day.

  20. Patient perception of smartphone usage by doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry G

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Georgina Kerry,1 Shyam Gokani,2 Dara Rasasingam,2 Alexander Zargaran,3 Javier Ash,2 Aaina Mittal2 1College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, 2Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, 3Faculty of Medicine, St George’s University of London, London, UK Abstract: Technological advancements have revolutionized modern medicine and smartphones are now ubiquitous among health care professionals. The ability to look up information promptly is invaluable to doctors and medical students alike, but there is an additional contiguous benefit to patients. Queries can be answered more accurately through fingertip access to evidence-based medicine, and physicians have instant access to emergency care protocols. However, is consideration always extended to the patient’s perception of the use of smartphones by doctors? Do patients know why we use smartphones to assist us in their care? What do they think when they see a doctor using a smartphone?An independent question, conducted within a wider service evaluation (ethical approval not required, full verbal and written electronic consent provided by all patients at St. Mary’s Hospital, London, indicated that although the majority (91.0% of patients owned a smartphone, many (61.6% did not agree that the use of smartphones at work by doctors is professional. This highlights the potential for damage to the doctor–patient relationship. There is a risk that these patients will disconnect with care services with possible detriment to their health. Additionally, it is notable that a larger proportion of those patients aged >70 years found the use of smartphones by doctors at work unprofessional, compared with patients aged <70 years.Adequate communication between the doctor and patient is critical in ensuring that doctors can make use of modern technology to provide the best possible care and that patients are comfortable with this and do not feel isolated or

  1. Interpersonal perception in the context of doctor-patient relationships: a dyadic analysis of doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, David A; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Weijden, Trudy van der; Leblanc, Annie; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Légaré, France; Campbell, Craig

    2010-03-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an interpersonal process and essential to relationship-centered care. However, in many studies, doctors and patients are studied as if living in separate worlds. This study assessed whether: 1) doctors' perception of their communication skills is congruent with their patients' perception; and 2) patients of a specific doctor agree with each other about their doctor's communication skills. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three provinces in Canada with 91 doctors and their 1749 patients. Doctors and patients independently completed questions on the doctor's communication skills (content and process) after a consultation. Multilevel modeling provided an estimate of the patient and doctor variance components at both the dyad-level and the doctor-level. We computed correlations between patients' and doctors' perceptions at both levels to assess how congruent they were. Consensus among patients of a specific doctor was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean score of the rating of doctor's skills according to patients was 4.58, and according to doctors was 4.37. The dyad-level variance for the patient was .38 and for the doctor was .06. The doctor-level variance for the patient ratings was .01 and for the doctor ratings, .18. The correlation between both the patients' and the doctors' skills' ratings scores at the dyad-level was weak. At the doctor-level, the correlation was not statistically significant. The ICC for patients' ratings was .03 and for the doctors' ratings .76. Overall, this study suggests that doctors and their patients have a very different perspective of the doctors' communication skills occurring during routine clinical encounters. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  3. Attracting and retaining doctors in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R

    2010-01-01

    In Nepal, a number of private sector medical schools have opened recently; although sufficient numbers of doctors are graduating there continues to be a doctor shortage in rural areas. This article analysed the rural doctor shortage in Nepal and reviewed the international literature for strategies that may be suitable for use in Nepal. Original research articles, reviews, magazine articles and project reports dealing with Nepal and other developing countries during the period 1995 to 2010 were sourced via Google, Google Scholar and Pubmed. Full text access was obtained via WHO's HINARI database. The health workforce in Nepal is unevenly distributed resulting in doctor shortages in rural areas. The recent introduction of mandatory rural service for scholarship students was aimed to reduce the loss of medical graduates to developed nations. High tuition fees in private medical schools and low Government wages prevent recent graduates from taking up rural positions, and those who do face many challenges. Potential corrective strategies include community-based medical education, selecting rural-background medical students, and providing a partial or complete tuition fee waiver for medical students who commit to rural service. Traditional healers and paramedical staff can also be trained for and authorized to provide rural health care. A range of strategies developed elsewhere could be used in Nepal, especially community-oriented medical education that involves rural doctors in training medical students. The reimbursement of tuition fees, assistance with relocation, and provision of opportunities for academic and professional advancement for rural doctors should also be considered. Government investment in improving working conditions in rural Nepal would assist rural communities to attract and retain doctors.

  4. The Legacy of Albert Einstein: A Collection of Essays in Celebration of the Year of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straumann, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    During the 'World Year of Physics' much has been written on the epoch-making 1905 papers of Albert Einstein and his later great contributions to physics. Why another book on the enormous impact of Einstein's work on 20th-century physics? The short answer is that the present collection of 13 relatively short essays on the legacy of Einstein by outstanding scientists is very pleasant to read and should be of interest to physicists of all branches. Beside looking back, most articles present later and topical developments, whose initiation began with the work of Einstein. During the year 2005, the growing recognition among physicists, historians, and philosophers of Einstein's revolutionary role in quantum theory was often emphasized. It is truly astonishing that most active physicists were largely unaware of this before. Fortunately, the article 'Einstein and the quantum' by V Singh puts the subject in perspective and describes all the main steps, beginning with the truly revolutionary 1905 paper on the light-quantum hypothesis and ending with Einstein's extension of the particle-wave duality to atoms and other particles in 1924-1925. The only point which, in my opinion, is not sufficiently emphasized in the discussion of the 1916-1917 papers on absorption and emission of radiation is the part on the momentum transfer in each elementary process. Einstein's result that there is a directed recoil hν/c-also for spontaneous emission-in complete contrast to classical theory, was particularly important to him. I enjoyed reading the articles on Brownian motion (S Majumdar), Bose-Einstein condensation (N Kumar) and strongly correlated electrons (T Ramakrishnan), which are all written for non-experts. Connected with Einstein's most lasting work-general relativity-there are two articles on cosmology. The one by J Narlikar gives a brief historical account of the development that was initiated by the 1917 paper of Einstein. S Sarkar's essay emphasizes the remarkable recent

  5. The Criminal Justice Doctorate: A Study of Doctoral Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felkenes, George T.

    Graduates of six institutions were surveyed in an effort to develop a profile of doctoral graduates from institutions that have traditionally offered doctoral programs oriented specifically toward the field of criminal justice. A second research objective was to develop an understanding of the attitudes, frustrations, and utilization patterns of…

  6. African International Doctoral Students in New Zealand: Englishes, Doctoral Writing and Intercultural Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Stephanie; Manathunga, Catherine; Prinsen, Gerard; Tallon, Rachel; Cornforth, Sue

    2018-01-01

    While the experiences of international doctoral students, especially those from Asian countries, have been well researched, fewer studies have explored the experiences of African students in Southern countries like Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand. This article reports on doctoral writing and student and supervisor perspectives on English…

  7. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  8. Non-EEA-doctors in EEA-countries: doctors or cleaners?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul; Kater, L.; Haalboom, J.R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Migration of non-EEA doctors to EEA-countries has become a common phenomenon. As coordination within the EEA has not yet been established, every EEA-country is re-inventing the wheel of assessment of foreign medical degrees and developing additional programmes for non-EEA doctors. There

  9. Reexamining the Structure of Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, James

    2003-01-01

    Considers how Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife" is a model of Edgar Allan Poe's aesthetic of the short story. Examines this work on many levels. Concludes that great writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, challenge readers to find the clues, to connect the dots, to pay attention to the "little details." (SG)

  10. Child Development and the Coworking of Doctor and Teacher: A Waldorf School Doctor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnow, Gerald F.

    This paper draws on the nearly 20 years' experiences of a school doctor working with teachers at the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City to describe general principles of assessing child development in relation to educational progress. The paper contrasts the customary role of school doctors (related to conducting physical examinations for…

  11. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 4. Doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-07-07

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts is being discussed in a series of six articles. Doctor-artists in New South Wales and Victoria, and doctors as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in New South Wales, have been discussed in earlier articles. This, the fourth article, deals with doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

  12. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  13. Barriers facing junior doctors in rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah M

    2005-01-01

    Early postgraduate, or junior doctors, are still required to practise in rural and remote communities, and they continue to face numerous issues and difficulties. Within the hospital setting, exposure to rural practice appears to be very limited during internship, and also to some extent, during the second postgraduate year and beyond. This is a major issue for those required to undertake country relieving, rural terms or who will be bonded to rural and remote practice for several years after internship. This research investigated the current issues and difficulties faced by junior doctors, required to undertake rural and remote practice in Queensland, Australia. An exploratory study was undertaken. Primary data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with key stakeholders. Stakeholders included: directors of clinical training; medical educators; junior doctors; rural practitioners; academic rural practitioners; and medical administrators. Of the 23 people approached, a total of 19 agreed to be interviewed. The response rate was 82.6%. Similar to the issues identified in the literature, there are currently a number of barriers influencing the ability of junior doctors to practise competently and confidently when undertaking practice in rural and remote communities. Minimal clinical experience, lack of supervision and on-site support, inadequate orientation and uninformed expectations, limited access to relevant education, and the influence of isolation, results in an overall lack of preparation both professionally and personally. When asked, respondents supported the identification of core skills and knowledge, and integration of these and other issues affecting rural practice, into their hospital-based programs. Current hospital-based education and training programs were not adequately preparing junior doctors for rural and remote practice. It was commented that orientation and education, with a rural emphasis, could assist junior doctors in their

  14. IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  15. Stress in doctors and dentists who teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Harry; Herzberg, Joe; Paice, Elisabeth

    2002-06-01

    To explore the relationship between a teaching role and stress in doctors and dentists who teach. Medline, PubMed, BIDS database for social sciences literature, and the ERIC database for educational literature were searched using the key words 'stress' or 'burnout' with the terms doctor, physician, dentist, teacher, lecturer, academic staff, and university staff. Other books and journals known to the authors were also used. Many studies have shown high levels of stress in doctors, dentists, teachers, and lecturers. A large number of factors are implicated, including low autonomy, work overload, and lack of congruence between power and responsibility. Doctors and dentists who take on a teaching role in addition to their clinical role may increase their levels of stress, but there is also evidence that this dual role may reduce job-related stress. Working as a doctor or dentist may entail higher levels of stress than are experienced by the general population. In some situations adding in the role of teacher reduces this stress, but more research is needed to explain this finding.

  16. Challenges to the Doctoral Journey: a Case of Female Doctoral Students from Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asamenew Demessie Bireda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate some challenges female doctoral students experience in their doctoral journey. The study used a qualitative design and structured interviews. The theoretical framework that guided the study was that of Urie Bronfenbrenner’s ecosystemic theory. A purposely selected sample of five female doctoral students from the University of South Africa Ethiopia campus participated in the study. The results identified three major areas of concern such as: academic, psychosocial and home/work related. Specifically, female doctoral students reported concerns surrounding quality of supervision support, inadequate academic skill, nature or system of education, stress, motivation, isolation, balancing personal and professional life, relationship problems, home and work related concerns. Hence, universities must provide opportunities and resourceful strategies to meet the challenges posed by women scholars in the doctoral journey.

  17. Profesor Doctor Fernando Sonnet: In Memoriam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto José Figueras

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recuerdo del Profesor Doctor Fernando Sonnet, destacado docente e investigador, en las áreas de economía agraria, economía de empresas y microeconomía, en el Instituto de Economía y Finanzas de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.Palabras Clave: Fernando H. Sonnet; Recuerdo; Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.Código JEL: B32. Professor Doctor Fernando Sonnet: In MemoriamAbstractRemembrance of Professor Doctor Fernando Sonnet, a senior lecturer and researcher in the areas of agricultural economics, business economics and microeconomics at the Institute of Economics and Finance at the Faculty of Economics, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.Keywords: Fernando H. Sonnet; Memory; Universidad Nacional de CórdobaJEL Classification: B32.

  18. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  19. Life Satisfaction and Frequency of Doctor Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information is available about the association between life satisfaction and health care use. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Methods Participants were 6,379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50. Participants were tracked for four years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Results Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a six-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits—after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86 to 0.93). The most satisfied respondents (N=1,121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than the least satisfied (N=182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.99). Conclusions Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs. PMID:24336427

  20. Life satisfaction and frequency of doctor visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high-quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information about the association between life satisfaction and health care use is available. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Participants were 6379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults older than 50 years. Participants were tracked for 4 years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a 6-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits--after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (relative risk = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.86-0.93). The most satisfied respondents (n = 1121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than did the least satisfied (n = 182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.93-0.99). Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs.

  1. Improving professional IT doctorate completion rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kisalay Burmeister

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Professional doctorates in Information Technology (IT have been a relatively recent phenomenon, giving IT professionals career management choices not previously available to them. However, successful completion rates are the lowest of all disciplines. Completed doctorates rate in quality equivalent to PhDs, and retention has been identified as a major obstacle to completion. This qualitative study, involving 44 semi-structured interviews with students, supervisors and institutional support personnel, investigated the obstacles. Amongst the strategies discovered to improve completion rates were retention, student engagement with supervisors, feedback on progress, student engagement in the course, and student involvement in institutional communities of practice.

  2. First district sanitary doctor of Katerynoslav

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Chaban

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The life and professional activity of Vasyl Tymofiiovych Skrylnikov — a famous doctor-hygienist, scientist, and public figure have been represented. V.T. Skrylnikov contributed to the development of sanitary-prophylaxis direction in zemstvo medicine in Katerynoslav province in the second half of the 19th century; he was the first district sanitary doctor in Katerynoslav. The scientist actively studied medical features of natural agents, namely Tymofiivska clay. He successfully worked at Sloviansk resort, was the editor of a local newspaper. V.T. Skrylnikov is an author of many works on balneotherapy.

  3. Perceptions of doctors on being treated by a doctor just completing the house job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Amina; Haque Shaikh, Siraj Ul; Tayyab, Muhammad; Gardezi, Javed Raza

    2014-12-01

    To determine the percentage of medical teachers and fresh doctors who feel that graduating doctors are competent or incompetent to handle common ailments and to evaluate the reasons for their perceptions. Sequential mixed method. First phase extending from December 2010 to December 2011 and second phase was conducted in March 2014. First phase comprised electronic distribution of questionnaire to 100 medical teachers and fresh doctors working in hospitals attached with 5 private and 5 public sector medical colleges of Lahore and Karachi to rate an average house officer on a frequency scale of 1 - 6 and do self-assessment, in case of a fresh doctor. The second phase included interviews of 20 medical teachers to explore justification for their rating in the survey questionnaire and for triangulation of data. Quantitative data was analyzed through SPSS version 15 to calculate frequencies and percentages and interviews were analyzed through quasi-statistical approach. In survey, 38.36% out of 73 medical teachers and 30% out of 20 medical teachers in interviews confirmed their confidence on consulting fresh doctors for common ailments as opposed to 61.64% and 70% respectively, expressing their dissatisfaction. Self-assessment of fresh doctors indicated that 40% are confident in handling common medical conditions as opposed to 33.3% out of 75 respondents, who are not confident about their clinical skills. Faculty and self-assessment of fresh doctors has a fair overlap, indicating room for further improvement in the house job training program.

  4. ONR Far East Scientific Information Bulletin. Volume 13, Number 2, April-June 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    including the Albert gory of Preventative Medicine. In the cate- Schweitzer International Prize for gory of Energy I echnology, French scientist...Australian National University. From and the Albert Lasker Prize (1986). 1949-67 he was professor of microbiology at Dr. Robert C. Gallo, leading his own...Hammer Prize for Cancer Research (1985), and the Albert Lasker Sandy Kawano is the editor of the Clinical Medical Research Award (1986). Scientific

  5. Patient-doctor relationship: the practice orientation of doctors in Kano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiola, T; Udofia, O; Abdullahi, A T

    2014-01-01

    Attitude and orientation of doctors to the doctor-patient relationship has a direct influence on delivery of high quality health- care. No study to the knowledge of these researchers has so far examined the practice orientation of doctors in Nigeria to this phenomenon. The aims of this study were to determine the orientation of Kano doctors to the practice of doctor-patient relationship and physicians' related-factors. Participants were doctors working in four major hospitals (i.e., two federal-owned and two state-owned) servicing Kano State and its environs. The Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) and a socio-demographic questionnaire were completed by the 214 participants. The PPOS has 18 items and measures three parameters of a total score and two dimension of "sharing" and "caring". The mean age of participants was 31.72 years (standard deviation = 0.87), with 22% being females, 40.7% have been practicing for ≥ 6 years and about two-third working in federal-owned health institution. The Cronbach's alpha of total PPOS scores was 0.733 and that of two sub-scale scores of "sharing" and "caring" were 0.659 and 0.546 respectively. Most of the doctors' orientation (92.5%) was towards doctor-centered (i.e., paternalistic) care, majority (75.2%) upheld the view of not sharing much information and control with patients, and showing little interest in psychosocial concerns of patients (i.e., 'caring'=93.0%). Respondents' characteristics that were significantly associated with high doctor 'caring' relationship orientation were being ≥ 30-year-old and practicing for ≥ 6 years. Working in State-owned hospitals was also significantly associated with high doctor "sharing" orientation. This paper demonstrated why patient-centered medical interviewing should be given top priority in medical training in Nigeria, and particularly for federal health institutions saddled with production of new doctors and further training for practicing doctors.

  6. Teaching possibilities of some elements of Albert Einstein's Gravitation theory in frame of physics courses taught at technical universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordache, Dan-Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    As in the period of creation of the 'monumental' works of A. Einstein (1905-1920, mainly), when many outstanding physicists [theoreticians, inclusively, as Albert Einstein (alumni of the Polytechnics from Geneva), as Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac, Alexandru Proca (alumni of Bucharest Polytechnics), et al., finished their academic studies to different Polytechnics Universities, presently many students of technical Universities obtained (as high-school students) some outstanding results in the Physics field. Particularly, the leadership of the Faculty of Control Systems and Computers of the Bucharest University has found that 'the best students in their divisions are winners at the Physics Olympics Contests'. These students and many of their colleagues (those with special scientific aptitudes) want to know more details about the most difficult scientific creation of Albert Einstein: the Gravitation Theory. Taking into account that the Einstein's Gravitation Theory is particularly difficult (from mathematical point of view, especially), and the duration of the Physics study in our technical universities is so restricted (totally 42 to 98 teaching hours, depending on the technical division profile), we have to answer to the question: what elements of the Einstein's gravity theory could be presented in frame of Physics courses taught in our technical universities? After accomplishing our analysis, we concluded as possible and useful - for the scientific training of the best students 'engineers' - the assimilation of the following elements of the Einstein's gravity theory: - The time and space concepts in the Einstein's gravitation theory, in connection with the equation of electromagnetic waves in ideal media and - eventually - in relation with the Larmor's theory of the electrical dipole radiation [which needs the expressions in curvilinear coordinates of the gradient and divergence (the main elements of the mathematical theory of fields)]; - The applications of the

  7. Understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that doctors' ethical challenges can be usefully conceptualised as role virtue conflicts. The hospital environment requires doctors to be simultaneously good doctors, good team members, good learners and good employees. I articulate a possible set of role virtues for each of these four roles, as a basis for a virtue ethics approach to analysing doctors' ethical challenges. Using one junior doctor's story, I argue that understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts enables recognition of important moral considerations that are overlooked by other approaches to ethical analysis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. NEW, GOOD DOCTORS FOR AN ALTERED SOCIETY*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    idea of being a doctor, and who is the central man, the species-type of a .... suspicious every time we get a cold in the head, but how greatly our .... It's hard not to fall for the .... ways, but the truth remains that health is single and in- divisible; that ...

  9. Hombres: Doctor Luis Ángel Arango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    1958-02-01

    Full Text Available En el documento se realiza la nota de conmemoración  del fallecimiento del Doctor Luis Ángel Arango  Esta nota tiene como fin realizar un homenaje a tan reputado ciudadano colombiano y mienbro de la comunidad de funcionarios del Banco de la República.

  10. Do Doctors differ from Medical Laboratory Scientists?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Doctors and laboratory scientists are at risk of infection from blood borne pathogens during routine clinical duties. After over 20 years of standard precautions, health care workers knowledge and compliance is not adequate. Aim: This study is aimed at comparing adherence and knowledge of standard ...

  11. IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will come to your home. Cal...

  12. Appraisal of family doctors: an evaluation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.I.; Elwyn, G.; Wood, F.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appraisal has evolved to become a key component of workforce management. However, it is not clear from existing proposals for appraisal of doctors whether employers, health authorities or primary care organisations should take responsibility for appraisal processes. AIMS: To evaluate the

  13. Student Socialization in Interdisciplinary Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Daniel; Borrego, Maura; Newswander, Lynita K.

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approaches are often seen as necessary for attacking the most critical challenges facing the world today, and doctoral students and their training programs are recognized as central to increasing interdisciplinary research capacity. However, the traditional culture and organization of higher education are ill-equipped to…

  14. The Doctorate in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Tvede, Olaf

    1998-01-01

    Overview of research training systems leading to doctoral degrees in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden emphasizes the structure of postgraduate education, administration and funding, number of students, time to degree, completion rates, labor market, and study abroad. Comparisons to U.S., British, German, and French systems suggests a trend…

  15. How Six Sigma Methodology Improved Doctors' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Six Sigma methodology was used in a District General Hospital to assess the effect of the introduction of an educational programme to limit unnecessary admissions. The performance of the doctors involved in the programme was assessed. Ishikawa Fishbone and 5 S's were initially used and Pareto analysis of their findings was performed. The results…

  16. Understanding Critical Thinking to Create Better Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Zayabalaradjane; Menon, Vikas; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Batmanabane, Gitanjali

    2016-01-01

    Medical students master an enormous body of knowledge, but lack systematic problem solving ability and effective clinical decision making. High profile reports have called for reforms in medical education to create a better generation of doctors who can cope with the system based problems they would encounter in an interdisciplinary and…

  17. Leadership Preparation in an Education Doctorate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, Dean

    2011-01-01

    This was a study of an education doctorate program at a small, private college. It examined the following nine components: theory of leadership for school improvement; candidate recruitment and selection based on leadership; coherent curriculum; use of active learning strategies; knowledgeable faculty; high quality internships; social and…

  18. Academic programme satisfaction and doctorate aspiration among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of doctorates in Nigerian universities is grossly below the bench mark. Among the obvious reasons for this unhealthy situation in the universities is about holders of the apex degree. They are in short supply. This study fundamentally examined mentoring experience as antecedent of academic programme ...

  19. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  20. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jill Alexa

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with 21 US schools of education, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) has created a network of education faculty who are differentiating the EdD from the PhD in order to better meet the needs of their practitioner-scholar students. Their discussions center on two questions: "What are the knowledge, skills, and…

  1. NEW, GOOD DOCTORS FOR AN ALTERED SOCIETY*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NEW, GOOD DOCTORS FOR AN ALTERED SOCIETY*. ANrHONY BARKER ... the concept of trying to become one is just a psychological throwback? ... called all these things and many things besides, yet this ... sex (women ought to be better at it than men, but often are not) .... foundations to lay for a specialized career.

  2. Framing doctoral supervision as formative assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    Doctoral supervision has been described through a number of models useful for understanding different aspects of supervision. None of these are all-encompassing, but each emphasizes a particular perspective, like the relationship, personal vs. structural support, process vs. product orientation. ...

  3. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  4. Examining the Doctoral Thesis: A Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The examination of doctoral theses controls an important academic threshold, yet practices are often private, codes non-specific, and individuals isolated. This article adds to recent investigation of the examination culture by reporting informal panel discussion amongst a total of 23 University of Auckland (New Zealand) faculty members as to…

  5. Terminating the Doctor-Patient Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jarald

    1978-01-01

    Emotional aspects of ending the physician-patient relationship should be illustrated in clinical teaching courses. Teaching opportunities include examination of this relationship and professional development, unresolved doctor-patient conflicts, role underevaluation, patient gifts, and referral procedures. (Author/LBH)

  6. 2011 African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    smwero

    The African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) in partnership with the International Development. Research Centre (IDRC) is pleased to announce the fourth call for applications for the African Doctoral Dissertation. Research Fellowships (ADDRF). The 2011 ADDRF seeks to facilitate more rigorous ...

  7. Training and experience of doctors administering obstetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background All the published Saving Mothers Reports generated by the National Committee of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in South Africa have associated anaesthesia-related maternal deaths with the lack of skills of the doctors administering the anaesthesia. The Reports have shown the Free State to ...

  8. Delineating Cultural Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    APPENDIX A: Bibliography Albert , D. (1994). Knowledge structures. New York: Springer-Verlag. Amblard, F., & Deffuant, G. (2004). The role...Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Groeber, P., Schweitzer , F., & Press, K. (2009). How groups can foster consensus: The case of local cultures. Journal of...narratives. Journal of Knowledge Management, 8(4), 65-74. Stark, H. U., Tessone, C. J., & Schweitzer , F. (2008). Slower is faster: Fostering

  9. Multiobjective Optimal Control Methodology for the Analysis of Certain Sociodynamic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    but less expensive in both time and memory. 137 References [1] R. Albert and A-L Barabasi. Statistical mechanics of complex networks. Reviews of Modern...Review, E(51):4282–4286, 1995. [24] D. Helbing, P. Molnar, and F. Schweitzer . Computer simulation of pedestrian dynamics and trail formation. May 1998...Patterson AFB, OH, 2001. [49] F. Schweitzer . Brownian Agents and Active Particles. Springer, Santa Fe, NM, 2003. [50] P. Sen. Complexities of social

  10. Aprendizaje criminal desde los postulados de Albert Bandura y su articulación con la política criminal

    OpenAIRE

    Hikal, Wael

    2016-01-01

    La agresión es una conducta heredada y aprendida a través de siglos, ha sido necesaria para enfrentar determinadas situaciones; sin embargo, hay otros tipos de agresividad que son destructivos. En el presente se revisa desde la postura de Albert Bandura, sobre el aprendizaje a la agresión por observación, imitación, modelamiento, ya sea por los padres, familiares, amigos, medios de comunicación u otras formas.

  11. Medical Doctors Perceptions of Genetically Modified Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Savas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recombinant DNA and with similar technical changes made on genes or transferred isolated gene the living organisms have been named genetically modified organisms (GMOs. Thanks to advances in genetic technology, the advancement of enzyme and fermentation techniques result obtained by the use of GMOs in food industry products of genetically modified (GM foods are named. In this study, GM foods about the possible harmful effects have information and community advice on this matter to be medical doctors on this issue perceptions, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors aimed to measure.Material and Method: The study was made on including 200 medical doctors aged 23-65, 118 men (59%, 82 women (41%. In the statistical analysis based on the responses of medical doctors, against GM food risk perception, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Results: 80.5% of the participants’ think that GM foods are harmful. 22% of the participants were expressed that their knowledge are ‘’good’’ and ‘’very good’’ about GM food. While 38% of the participants use internet and 23.5% of the participants  use media, only 4.5% of the participants use medical schools as a source of sufficient information about GM foods. Discussion: While the risk perception of medical doctors about GM foods is high, the knowledge on this issue is observed low. Though the consumption and the prevelance of GM foods are increasing, medical doctors should have more information about this issue to enlighten and guide the community.

  12. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Uk Chae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE. Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%. NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  13. EHR adoption among doctors who treat the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Valerie A; Menachemi, Nir; Brooks, Robert G

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine Electronic Health Record (EHR) adoption among Florida doctors who treat the elderly. This analysis contributes to the EHR adoption literature by determining if doctors who disproportionately treat the elderly differ from their counterparts with respect to the utilization of an important quality-enhancing health information technology application. This study is based on a primary survey of a large, statewide sample of doctors practising in outpatient settings in Florida. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine whether doctors who treat a high volume of elderly (HVE) patients were different with respect to EHR adoption. Our analyses included responses from 1724 doctors. In multivariate analyses controlling for doctor age, training, computer sophistication, practice size and practice setting, HVE doctors were significantly less likely to adopt EHR. Specifically, compared with their counterparts, HVE doctors were observed to be 26.7% less likely to be utilizing an EHR system (OR=0.733, 95% CI 0.547-0.982). We also found that doctor age is negatively related to EHR adoption, and practice size and doctor computer savvy-ness is positively associated. Despite the fact that EHR adoption has improved in recent years, doctors in Florida who serve the elderly are less likely to adopt EHRs. As long as HVE doctors are adopting EHR systems at slower rates, the elderly patients treated by these doctors will be at a disadvantage with respect to potential benefits offered by this technology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Stress and wellbeing of junior doctors in Australia: a comparison with American doctors and population norms

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Deanne S.; Chan, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress in doctors adversely affects decision-making, memory, information-recall and attention, thereby negatively impacting upon the provision of safe and high quality patient care. As such, stress in doctors has been subject to increasing scientific scrutiny and has amassed greater public awareness in recent years. The aims of this study are to describe stress levels and the psychological wellbeing of current junior medical officers (JMOs), and to compare this to their predecessor...

  15. The scientific legacy of Little Hans and Little Albert: future directions for research on specific phobias in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Muris, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We review issues associated with the phenomenology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of specific phobias in children and adolescents and provide suggestions for future research and clinical practice. In doing so, we highlight the early case studies of Little Hans and Little Albert and the advances that have been made following the publication of these seminal cases. In recent years, we have witnessed a deeper understanding of the etiology of specific phobias and developed a rich array of evidence-based assessments and treatments with which to address specific phobias in youth. Although much has been accomplished in this area of inquiry, we also note that much remains to be done before we can advance more fully our understanding, assessment, and treatment of specific phobias in youth. It will be important for future work to build more firmly on these developments and to better determine the moderators and mediators of change with our evidence-based treatments and to more vigorously pursue their dissemination in real-word settings.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Theme of Human Existence in the Novels of Albert Camus and F. Sionil Jose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. A. Demeterio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Albert Camus (1913-1960, novelist, essayist, dramatist, and recipient of the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature, is esteemed as one of the finest philosophical writers of modern France. The French existentialist philosopher, Jean-Paul Sartre wrote about him as "the latest example of that long line of moralistes whose works constitute perhaps the most original element in French letters." Camus' literary legacy includes three novels, namely L'Etranger (The Stranger of 1942, La Peste (The Plague of 1947, and La Chute (The Fall of 1957, and a fourth unfinished one that was posthumously published as The First Man in 1995. Camus' works both intensively and extensively explored the theme that was prevalent in the intellectual climate of the post-World War II Europe, the absurdity of human existence together with the notions of alienation and disillusionment, and speculated beyond the crushing pessimism a glimmering faith on human dignity and brotherhood. These concerns, no matter how well ingrained they may be in the European history of ideas, would prove to be too cognitively remote for a contemporary Filipino reader. Thus, there is a need to mediate Camus' literary discourses with a more familiar Filipino text.

  17. Generation of life in a test tube: Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Bruno Straub, and the discovery of actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jack A

    2018-06-01

    This is a story about a great scientist, luck, great discovery that changed the future direction of muscle research, war, a clandestine war mission, postwar politics, and an attempt to rewrite scientific history. Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, at 44 yr of age, won the Nobel Prize in 1937 for his work on vitamin C and the establishment of the groundwork of the citric acid cycle. He now wanted to investigate one of the fundamental aspects of life and settled on the study of muscle contraction. The Szent-Gyorgyi laboratory in Hungary during World War II demonstrated that contraction could be reproduced in vitro by threads consisting of just two proteins, myosin and the newly discovered protein by Bruno Straub that they called actin. Szent-Gyorgyi called seeing the contraction of these threads, which occurred in the presence of ATP and ions, "the most thrilling moment" of his scientific life. This major discovery of the generation of "life" in a test tube was totally unknown for years by the rest of the world because of the war. When the discovery was finally communicated to the world, it was not immediately accepted by all as being relevant to the physiology of muscle contraction. Nonetheless, this discovery opened up the modern phase of muscle research. Serendipity played an important role in the great discovery, and much later politics would lead to a shocking controversy around the true discoverer of actin.

  18. Evolution of Cooperation in Continuous Prisoner's Dilemma Games on Barabasi—Albert Networks with Degree-Dependent Guilt Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Jia; Quan, Ji; Liu, Wei-Bing

    2012-05-01

    This paper studies the continuous prisoner's dilemma games (CPDG) on Barabasi—Albert (BA) networks. In the model, each agent on a vertex of the networks makes an investment and interacts with all of his neighboring agents. Making an investment is costly, but which benefits its neighboring agents, where benefit and cost depend on the level of investment made. The payoff of each agent is given by the sum of payoffs it receives in its interactions with all its neighbors. Not only payoff, individual's guilty emotion in the games has also been considered. The negative guilty emotion produced in comparing with its neighbors can reduce the utility of individuals directly. We assume that the reduction amount depends on the individual's degree and a baseline level parameter. The group's cooperative level is characterized by the average investment of the population. Each player makes his investment in the next step based on a convex combination of the investment of his best neighbors in the last step, his best history strategies in the latest steps which number is controlled by a memory length parameter, and a uniformly distributed random number. Simulation results show that this degree-dependent guilt mechanism can promote the evolution of cooperation dramatically comparing with degree-independent guilt or no guilt cases. Imitation, memory, uncertainty coefficients and network structure also play determinant roles in the cooperation level of the population. All our results may shed some new light on studying the evolution of cooperation based on network reciprocity mechanisms.

  19. Through doctors' eyes: A qualitative study of hospital doctor perspectives on their working conditions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, Yvonne

    2013-03-11

    BACKGROUND: Hospital doctors face significant challenges in the current health care environment, working with staff shortages and cutbacks to health care expenditure, alongside increased demand for health care and increased public expectations. OBJECTIVE: This article analyses challenges faced by junior hospital doctors, providing insight into the experiences of these frontline staff in delivering health services in recessionary times. DESIGN: A qualitative methodology was chosen. METHODS: Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 doctors from urban Irish hospitals. Interviews were recorded via note taking. Full transcripts were analysed thematically using NVivo software. RESULTS: Dominant themes included the following: (1) unrealistic workloads: characterised by staff shortages, extended working hours, irregular and frequently interrupted breaks; (2) fatigue and its impact: the quality of care provided to patients while doctors were sleep-deprived was questioned; however, little reflection was given to any impact this may have had on junior doctors own health; (3) undervalued and disillusioned: insufficient training, intensive workloads and a perceived lack of power to influence change resulted in a sense of detachment among junior doctors. They appeared immune to their surroundings. CONCLUSION: Respondents ascribed little importance to the impact of current working conditions on their own health. They felt their roles were underappreciated and undervalued by policy makers and hospital management. Respondents were concerned with the lack of time and opportunity for training. This study highlighted several \\'red flags\\

  20. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about ear tube surgery; Tympanostomy - what to ask your doctor; Myringotomy - what ... other treatments? What are the risks of the surgery? Is it safe to wait before getting ear ...

  1. When may doctors give nurses telephonic treatment instructions?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When is it legal for doctors to give nurses telephonic treatment instructions? ... telemedicine? Telemedicine is defined as 'the practice of medicine, from a distance, ... [6] Therefore, if in such circumstances the doctors cannot reach the patients in ...

  2. Exercise: When to Check with Your Doctor First

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check with your doctor before you start to exercise. By Mayo Clinic Staff Regular exercise can help you control your weight, reduce your ... talk to your doctor before starting a new exercise routine. Although moderate physical activity such as brisk ...

  3. Lonely Days and Lonely Nights: Completing the Doctoral Dissertation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germeroth, Darla

    1991-01-01

    Surveys holders of doctorates in speech communication to discover the greatest barriers to dissertation completion and the forms of emotional support perceived as most useful. Offers advice to help doctoral candidates succeed in completing a dissertation. (SR)

  4. Talking With Your Doctor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor (For Teens) (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Working with doctors and nurses (Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health) Seniors Living with Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults ...

  5. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  6. General FAQs regarding the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2018 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This award covers field research expenses for advanced doctoral students who intend ... serious security challenges, IDRC may ask you to delay your field research, .... Women candidates applying to IDRC Doctoral Research Awards calls in ...

  7. Arab doctors, evolving society and corruption: a medical student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2015-01-01

    Doctors, especially junior doctors, face immense pressure in their day-to-day work. As a result, the rates of depression and anxiety are particularly high in this demanding profession. The pressure, which is compounded by constantly being under societal scrutiny, can unfortunately drive the doctor to breaking point. However, we can help doctors deal with these pressures in a more meaningful way if we make them aware of their wider environment (within a social paradigm) and the implications of their actions.

  8. 'Covering doctors' standing in for unavailable colleagues: What is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-19

    Jan 19, 2018 ... [1] In terms of contract, a doctor 'undertakes to treat a patient with the required skill and care, and a patient undertakes to pay their fees'.[1] Under the law of delict, once a doctor begins to provide care to a person or instructs other healthcare personnel on how to treat such a person, the doctor is regarded as ...

  9. The Professional Doctorate in Nursing: A Position Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Margaret A.

    1975-01-01

    The need for family-centered health care could be met by nurses now if they had a professional doctorate and the recognition and authority that go with it. The author distinguishes between an academic doctorate (Preparation for scholars) and a professional doctorate (a practice degree). (Author/BP)

  10. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  11. "Tough Love and Tears": Learning Doctoral Writing in the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Catterall, Janice; Ross, Pauline; Burgin, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary changes to the doctorate mean student researchers are likely to be expected to write differently, write more and more often, and yet, despite a growing interest in doctoral education, we still know relatively little about the teaching and learning practices of students and supervisors vis-a-vis doctoral writing. This paper draws from…

  12. Who are the job seekers? : Explaining unemployment among doctoral recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yerkes, M.; Van de Schoot, R.; Sonneveld, H.

    2012-01-01

    Despite increased attention for doctoral education in recent years, one particular phenomenon has received little attention—the unemployment of doctoral candidates following graduation. While the unemployment of doctoral recipients is relatively low in comparison to the general popula-tion, the

  13. Doctoral Dissertation Defences: Performing Ambiguity between Ceremony and Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Arjen; Rufas, Alix; Supper, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Dissertation defenses are ambiguous affairs, which mark both the end of a long process of doctoral education and the inauguration of a doctoral candidate into a body of experts. At Maastricht University (and other Dutch universities), the decision to award a doctoral degree is made on the basis of

  14. State Level Review of Doctoral Programs in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Nil

    Review of doctoral degree programs in Texas public colleges and universities is discussed. Attention is directed to review procedures and strengths and weaknesses in the state's doctoral programs in educational psychology, counseling and guidance, and student personnel services. Doctoral programs were reviewed because of their high cost and a…

  15. The role of clinic visits: perceptions of doctors | Couper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A range of important themes emerged from the interviews, relating to the intended function of the clinics and their resources, the operationalisation of doctors' visits, the varied roles that doctors play in clinics and the importance of teamwork and support. Doctors working full time in the clinics shared a more positive view.

  16. Gender variations in specialties among medical doctors working in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gender variations exist in the choice of specialties among ... as it affects the distribution of doctors in public health institutions and patient care. ... For female doctors,pediatrics was the topmost specialty (25%) followed by ... Keywords: Gender variation,Specialties,Doctors,Public healthcare,Health workforce ...

  17. Obstacles to Success--Doctoral Student Attrition in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The article explores doctoral attrition in South Africa, investigating and comparing the attributions of attrition of doctoral students and PhD programme leaders. The article is based on secondary data analysis of two large studies on doctoral education in South Africa. The main point of the article is that the different understandings of the…

  18. Looking Back at Doctoral Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a quantitative picture of doctoral education in South Africa up to 2010, from the time the first doctorate was awarded in 1899. It identifies the different institutional profiles and emphases of doctoral graduation in South African universities at various periods of time in the context of economic, political and social…

  19. LAZA K. LAZAREVIC, DOCTOR AND WRITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade R. Babić

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Laza K. Lazarevic was born on the 13th of May in 1851. He died on the 11th of January in 1891 in Belgrade. Laza K. Lazarevic was a Serb, jurist, warrior, doctor and writer. He studied medicine in Berlin and law in Belgrade. He took part in the Serbian-Turkish war and the Serbian-Bulgarian war. He published seventy-two professional and scientific papers on medicine. He gave some explanations on the appearance of pain in sciatica. He wrote nine short stories. He is an Associate Member of the Serbian Royal Academy. He spoke Russian, German and French. He was a personal doctor of King Milan.

  20. Medical humanities: a resident doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauranik, Anvita

    2012-01-01

    The barrage of competitive examinations, overwork, sleep deprivation, and the pressure of expectations all combine to destroy the dreams that resident doctors have when they start medical school. The empathy they had before entering this field fades away, and they eventually become insensitive to their patients. Medical humanities may be the means to halt this trend. Sensitising young minds, using the arts, literature, history and lessons on social issues, may bring about a paradigm shift in these doctors' outlook towards their patients. However, for the humanities to be integrated into medical education, the current curriculum must be modified and made more clinically and socially relevant. Further, the humanities cannot be taught in lecture halls; they need to be integrated into all aspects of medical school. For this, the medical school faculty should be sensitised to, and trained in, humanities education.

  1. The Spin Doctors of news sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  2. THE SPIN DOCTORS OF NEWS SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  3. Professional recognition of female and male doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruguera, M; Arrizabalaga, P; Londoño, M C; Padrós, J

    2014-03-01

    The awards for the excellence of the Official College of Physicians of Barcelona (COMB) were instituted in 2004 to recognize the excellence of the professional exercise. The winners are yearly chosen by juries appointed by the board of government, whose members propose for the award doctors who, in their opinion, have an exemplary professional and human behaviour. The number of male and female doctors who have obtained this recognition has been analysed in relation with the sex distribution in the juries. Likewise it has been compared the ratios men-to-women of those who have been rewarded and this ratio among physicians of more than 45 years. Between the awarded physicians the ratio men-to-women was of 2.7/1 (range, from 1.2/1 for awardees in primary care to 6/1 in research). The men-to-women ratio among those who were awarded was in parallel to the man-to-women ratios of the juries. The ratio between men and women among members of the COMB of more than 45 years was 1.4/1, whereas in those who were awarded it was of 2.7/1. The increase in the proportion of women in the juries in the last four years has been followed by an increase in the number of female physicians awarded. This data demonstrates that the predominance of male doctors among those who were awarded does not depend so much on the age factor, but basically on the proportion of male and female doctors in the juries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Family doctors' involvement with families in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lember Margus

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family doctors should care for individuals in the context of their family. Family has a powerful influence on health and illness and family interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes for a variety of health problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the Estonian family doctors' (FD attitudes to the patients' family-related issues in their work: to explore the degree of FDs involvement in family matters, their preparedness for management of family-related issues and their self-assessment of the ability to manage different family-related problems. Methods A random sample (n = 236 of all FDs in Estonia was investigated using a postal questionnaire. Altogether 151 FDs responded to the questionnaire (response rate 64%, while five of them were excluded as they did not actually work as FDs. Results Of the respondents, 90% thought that in managing the health problems of patients FDs should communicate and cooperate with family members. Although most of the family doctors agreed that modifying of the health damaging risk factors (smoking, alcohol and drug abuse of their patients and families is their task, one third of them felt that dealing with these problems is ineffective, or perceived themselves as poorly prepared or having too little time for such activities. Of the respondents, 58% (n = 83 were of the opinion that they could modify also relationship problems. Conclusions Estonian family doctors are favourably disposed to involvement in family-related problems, however, they need some additional training, especially in the field of relationship management.

  5. Marcel Proust's fictional diseases and doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Marcel Proust (1875-1922), the son and brother of famous physicians, had close and continuous contact with medicine and doctors in connection with chronic asthma, neurasthenia, medical 'tourism', and self-medication. This proximity to medical issues is obvious in his work, particularly his novel In Search of Lost Time, which today is still considered one of the most important literary works ever. In this novel, medicine, patients, and doctors are everywhere, and it can be claimed that while it is often considered to be the great novel of memory, medicine in itself also can be seen as a true character of the story, in which Proust displays surprisingly extensive knowledge. Neurasthenia and asthma (i.e. Proust's diseases), as well as specific neurological disorders, such as stroke, migraine, epilepsy, and dementia, appear in the novel. The disease of the narrator's grandmother remains a piece of anthology, and probably remains the best literary report of a progressive stroke leading to death. Proust also quoted neurological conditions which were virtually unreported in his time, such as phantom limb syndrome and poststroke depression associated with aphasia in Baron Charlus. Doctors are nearly systematically depicted as incompetent and superficial, characteristics which appear to increase with academic titles and glory. The main physician of the novel, Professor Cottard, even ends up writing fake certificates for his rich friend Mrs. Verdurin during World War I so that she can obtain fresh croissants for breakfast, while poor people around her are starving. When called to examine a dying patient, one of the real doctors of the novel, Professor Dieulafoy, says and does nothing except ask for his fees. This defiance and criticism of physicians were indeed those of Proust in real life. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Employment experiences of vocationally trained doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, K

    1991-09-28

    To investigate the expectations and employment experiences of male and female doctors who completed vocational training in East Anglia during 1981-7 and to examine the factors which had influenced those who had changed direction early in their careers. Survey conducted by confidential postal questionnaire. Britain. 281 doctors, 233 (83%) of whom responded. Ideal choice of work on completion of vocational training; present employment; factors which had restricted present choice of work; factors associated with reported satisfaction with job. 77/83 (93%) men and 130/150 (87%) women had hoped to work in general practice (p = 0.75). A smaller proportion of women (71%; 106) than men (89%; 74) were in general practice posts (p less than 0.01); only 6% (nine) of women were on maternity leave or caring for children without paid employment. More women than men were working in medical jobs other than general practice (18% (27) women v 4% (three) men; p less than 0.01). 44/91 (49%) women with children had achieved their employment goals compared with 47/59 (80%) women without children and 55/71 (78%) men with children. 87% (72/83) of men and 65% (98/150) of women had achieved the status of principal (p less than 0.01). 162/193 (84%) doctors who had worked in general practice reported satisfaction with their jobs. Dissatisfaction was linked with doing a job different from that hoped for and with perceiving that the share of practice income did not accurately reflect their share of the practice workload. Steps need to be taken to retain women in general practice, including a statutory part time pay allowance and incentives for practices to allow flexible working hours for doctors with young children.

  7. Home care, hospitalizations and doctor visits

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves Judite; Weaver France

    2014-01-01

    This study estimates the effects of formal home care on hospitalizations and doctor visits. We compare the effects of medically- and non-medically-related home care and investigate heterogeneous effects by age group and informal care availability. Two-part models are estimated, using data from Switzerland. In this federal country, home care policy is decentralized into cantons (i.e. states). The endogeneity of home care is addressed by using instrumental variables, canton and time fixed effec...

  8. Doctoral Students Becoming Researchers: An Innovative Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S. Garson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Creating a quality literature review is fundamental to doctoral student professionalization, yet research into how the literature review is taught, learned, or experienced is limited.  Responding to this under-addressed but critical key to doctoral education, the focus of this mixed methods study is on students’ perceptions of a year-long course, co-taught by a faculty member and embedded librarian, devoted specifically to addressing the literature review.  Analysis of students’ course evaluations and written reflections/feedback over an eight year period revealed four primary themes: 1 Entering students’ technological know-how does not guarantee effective information literacy skill and without the requisite skills one-shot library workshops are insufficient for making learning whole;  2 Rather than conceiving of the literature review as a product, constructing a literature review represents a pivotal process in doctoral students’ research and literacy skill development; 3 Creating a literature review, and the process it entails, signals in students the development of their professional researcher identity, involving movement beyond “how to” to address questions of “why” and “for whom”; 4 The literature review course was experienced as a substantively different course than is typical in the doctoral experience, mirroring the course’s  foundational assumption that librarians, instructors, and learners share agency in creating the literature review process. The course curriculum is framed by two simultaneous learning streams: information literacy competencies and student research agenda. The course curriculum aligns information literacy competencies and research methodology with the goal of exploring and purposefully integrating creativity and curiosity in the search and research construction process.

  9. [Occupational stress and job burnout in doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Mian-Zhen; Lan, Ya-Jia; Wu, Si-Ying

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the status of job burnout in doctors and its relationship with occupational stress. A total of 561 doctors from three provincial hospitals were randomly selected. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) was used to identify job burnout. The occupation stress inventory revised edition (OSI-R) was used to evaluate the level of occupational stress. Surgeon and doctors working in the internal medicine wards scored significantly higher in job burnout than their colleagues (P < 0.05). The 30-40 years of age group scored highest in exhaustion. The score of professional efficacy decreased with age and increased with educational levels. Role overload, responsibility, physical environment, reaction and self-care were major predictors for exhaustion. Role insufficiency, role overload and responsibility were major predictors for cynicism. Role insufficiency, social support and rational/cognitive were major predictors for professional efficacy. Maintaining moderate professional duty and responsibility, clearly defining job requirements, enriching leisure activities, and improving self-care ability are important measures to preventing job burnout.

  10. Epistaxis management: current understanding amongst junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R; Nash, R; Liu, Z-W; Singh, A

    2016-03-01

    Epistaxis is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency. This survey assesses understanding and confidence in epistaxis management amongst current junior doctors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of foundation year one and two doctors based at three National Health Service trusts within a single region of the UK, assessing basic understanding and procedural confidence. A total of 111 foundation doctors completed this survey. The average duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology was 8.1 days. Forty-one per cent of respondents stated that they would apply pressure to the nasal bones to control epistaxis. Seventy-five per cent lacked confidence in their ability to manage epistaxis. Those with two weeks or more of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology were more confident than those with one week or less of exposure (p epistaxis management, with patient safety implications. Confidence is associated with the duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology. A minimum emergency safe competency should be a priority during foundation training if not achieved in UK medical schools.

  11. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 2. Doctors as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-04-28

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts if being discussed in a series of six articles. The first article dealt with doctor-artists in new South Wales. In this, the second, doctors are discussed as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in this State.

  12. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  13. Skill set development of doctoral and post-doctoral graduates in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, R S

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and post-doctoral training programs at leading research universities in the USA are highly important in generating the much needed knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics for keeping rural and urban economies strong and societies healthy and prosperous. In addition, innovative graduate and post doctoral research programs are the driving engines of the success of U.S. economy and have made the U.S. the most successful model of generating new knowledge in the broader areas of life sciences (and agricultural education, research, and extension). We need to do everything in our power to make these training programs innovative, collaborative, independent, and resourceful so that students are trained in different disciplines making them more flexible within a range of challenges and opportunities. The training programs must empower students to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the society in 21st century and make our students competitive within a global economic system, to improve the health of the nation's economy. If our land grant schools and institutions of higher learning are not preparing doctoral students to be globally competitive scientists to create new knowledge and technologies to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the 21st century, then either we need to redefine the mission of our land grant system or we risk losing our role to serve the public and industry effectively. Doctoral and post doctoral students should be given the needed skills and experiences to prepare them for tenure track faculty jobs at leading US Universities in the 21st century as well as prepare them for the world outside of academia. I would say minimum competency skills are needed as "bare survival skills" for all doctoral students to become successful after obtaining PhD degrees. Today's PhD students will be working in a global but highly competitive, rapidly changing, and complex world. It is no longer enough to be a good

  14. Dr Oen Boen Ing Patriot doctor, social activist, and doctor of the poor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravando Lie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the efforts and achievements of Oen Boen Ing, a Tionghoa doctor, to improve the quality of health of the poorer inhabitants of Surakarta. Dr Oen played an important role in five different periods: Dutch colonialism, the Japanese occupation, the Indonesian revolution, Soekarno’s regime, and Suharto’s New Order. Known for being a benevolent doctor, activist, and patriot of the revolution during his life-time, Dr Oen also gave medical assistance to the needy, which famously earned him the accolade of “doctor of the poor”. During the Indonesian revolution, Dr Oen assisted the Student Soldiers (Tentara Pelajar and afterwards was appointed the member of Supreme Advisory Council (Dewan Pertimbangan Agung/DPA by Soekarno in 1949. As a benevolent doctor and activist, Dr Oen is remembered for founding the Panti Kosala Hospital which was renamed to perpetuate his name on 30 October 1983, exactly a year after his passing. When he died, thousands of peoples gathered to pay their final respects to the doctor. He was honoured with a ceremony conducted in the Mangkunegaran Palace. Dr Oen’s name will be eternally respected, especially in Surakarta.

  15. Did you hear the one about the doctor? An examination of doctor jokes posted on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew A; Haney, Carol Sue; Weeks, William B; Sirovich, Brenda E; Anthony, Denise L

    2014-02-13

    Social networking sites such as Facebook have become immensely popular in recent years and present a unique opportunity for researchers to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues. We sought to explore doctor-related humor by examining doctor jokes posted on Facebook. We performed a cross-sectional study of 33,326 monitored Facebook users, 263 (0.79%) of whom posted a joke that referenced doctors on their Facebook wall during a 6-month observation period (December 15, 2010 to June 16, 2011). We compared characteristics of so-called jokers to nonjokers and identified the characteristics of jokes that predicted joke success measured by having elicited at least one electronic laugh (eg, an LOL or "laughing out loud") as well as the total number of Facebook "likes" the joke received. Jokers told 156 unique doctor jokes and were the same age as nonjokers but had larger social networks (median Facebook friends 227 vs 132, PFacebook likes (rate ratio [RR] 2.36, 95% CI 0.97-5.74). This study provides insight into the use of social networking sites for research pertaining to health and medicine, including the world of doctor-related humor.

  16. The complex thinking and prospect of actions of future doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Segtowich

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing prospects of actions manifested by future doctors in the beginning of their doctoral training. The research started through my involvement in the ambit of doctoral education in the curriculum component Epistemological Basis of Research on Education in Science and Mathematics, offered in the Postgraduate Course in Science and Mathematics Education, at Federal University of Pori (UFPA in 2010 academic year. At these meetings, the teachers trainers requested the doctoral students, in pairs, to elaborate three questions about the following positioning: "HOW DO I SEE MYSELF AS A DOCTOR?" These questions were discussed by all the doctoral students and subsequently reduced to five to be answered by all individually. The responses to this questionnaire provided the data for this research. The answers revealed that doctoral students are not tied to methodologies or unique processes, this positioning being demonstrated through prospects of performance in ways that were diverse and interactive

  17. Historical changes in caribou distribution and land cover in and around Prince Albert National Park: land management implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Arlt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In central Saskatchewan, boreal woodland caribou population declines have been documented in the 1940s and again in the 1980s. Although both declines led to a ban in sport hunting, a recovery was only seen in the 1950s and was attributed to wolf control and hunting closure. Recent studies suggest that this time, the population may not be increasing. In order to contribute to the conservation efforts, historical changes in caribou distribution and land cover types in the Prince Albert Greater Ecosystem (PAGE, Saskatchewan, were documented for the period of 1960s to the present. To examine changes in caribou distribution, survey observations, incidental sightings and telemetry data were collated. To quantify landscape changes, land cover maps were created for 1966 and 2006 using current and historic forest resources inventories, fire, logging, and roads data. Results indicate that woodland caribou are still found throughout the study area although their distribution has changed and their use of the National Park is greatly limited. Results of transition prob¬abilities and landscape composition analyses on the 1966 and 2006 land cover maps revealed an aging landscape for both the National Park and provincial crown land portions of the PAGE. In addition, increased logging and the development of extensive road and trail networks on provincial crown land produced significant landscape fragmentation for woodland caribou and reduced functional attributes of habitat patches. Understanding historical landscape changes will assist with ongoing provincial and federal recovery efforts for boreal caribou, forest management planning activities, and landscape restoration efforts within and beyond the Park boundaries.

  18. Interprofessional student education: exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Herron, Patrick D; Downie, Sherry A; Myers, Daniel C; Milan, Felise B; Olson, Todd R; Kligler, Ben E; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The growing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), of which estimated 38% of adults in the United States used in 2007, has engendered changes in medical school curricula to increase students' awareness of it. Exchange programs between conventional medical schools and CAM institutions are recognized as an effective method of interprofessional education. The exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein, Yeshiva University) and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY) is in its fifth year and is part of a broader relationship between the schools encompassing research, clinical training, interinstitutional faculty and board appointments, and several educational activities. The Einstein/PCOM-NY student education exchange program is part of the Einstein Introduction to Clinical Medicine Program and involves students from Einstein learning about Chinese medicine through a lecture, the experience of having acupuncture, and a four-hour preceptorship at the PCOM outpatient clinic. The students from PCOM learn about allopathic medicine training through an orientation lecture, a two-and-a-half-hour dissection laboratory session along side Einstein student hosts, and a tour of the clinical skills center at the Einstein campus. In the 2011/2012 offering of the exchange program, the participating Einstein and PCOM students were surveyed to assess the educational outcomes. The data indicate that the exchange program was highly valued by all students and provided a unique learning experience. Survey responses from the Einstein students indicated the need for greater emphasis on referral information, which has been highlighted in the literature as an important medical curriculum integrative medicine competency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of Cooperation in Continuous Prisoner's Dilemma Games on Barabasi-Albert Networks with Degree-Dependent Guilt Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianjia; Quan Ji; Liu Weibing

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the continuous prisoner's dilemma games (CPDG) on Barabasi-Albert (BA) networks. In the model, each agent on a vertex of the networks makes an investment and interacts with all of his neighboring agents. Making an investment is costly, but which benefits its neighboring agents, where benefit and cost depend on the level of investment made. The payoff of each agent is given by the sum of payoffs it receives in its interactions with all its neighbors. Not only payoff, individual's guilty emotion in the games has also been considered. The negative guilty emotion produced in comparing with its neighbors can reduce the utility of individuals directly. We assume that the reduction amount depends on the individual's degree and a baseline level parameter. The group's cooperative level is characterized by the average investment of the population. Each player makes his investment in the next step based on a convex combination of the investment of his best neighbors in the last step, his best history strategies in the latest steps which number is controlled by a memory length parameter, and a uniformly distributed random number. Simulation results show that this degree-dependent guilt mechanism can promote the evolution of cooperation dramatically comparing with degree-independent guilt or no guilt cases. Imitation, memory, uncertainty coefficients and network structure also play determinant roles in the cooperation level of the population. All our results may shed some new light on studying the evolution of cooperation based on network reciprocity mechanisms. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  20. How To Talk to Your Doctor (and Get Your Doctor To Talk to You!). An Educational Workshop on Doctor Patient Communication = Como Hablarle a su Doctor (iY que su doctor le hable a usted!). Un seminario educativo sobre la comunicacion entre el doctor y el paciente.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    This workshop, written in both English and Spanish, focuses on improving communication between physician and patient. In the workshop, the trainers will talk about "building bridges" between patient and doctor by understanding the doctor's role and his/her duty to the patient. According to the workshop, a person's doctor should…

  1. Interventions for improving patients' trust in doctors and groups of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Alix; Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Car, Josip; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-03-04

    Trust is a fundamental component of the patient-doctor relationship and is associated with increased satisfaction, adherence to treatment, and continuity of care. Our 2006 review found little evidence that interventions improve patients' trust in their doctor; therefore an updated search was required to find out if there is further evidence of the effects of interventions that may improve trust in doctors or groups of doctors. To update our earlier review assessing the effects of interventions intended to improve patients' trust in doctors or a group of doctors. In 2003 we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Star, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS, African Trials Register, African Health Anthology, Dissertation Abstracts International and the bibliographies of studies selected for inclusion. We also contacted researchers active in the field. We updated and re-ran the searches on available original databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library issue 2, 2013), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), CINAHL (Ebsco)) as well as Proquest Dissertations and Current Contents for the period 2003 to 18 March 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series of interventions (informative, educational, behavioural, organisational) directed at doctors or patients (or carers) where trust was assessed as a primary or secondary outcome. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Where mentioned, we extracted data on adverse effects. We synthesised data narratively. We included 10 randomised controlled trials (including 7 new trials) involving 11,063 patients. These studies were all undertaken in North America, and all but two involved primary care.  As expected, there was considerable heterogeneity between

  2. The development of online doctor reviews in China: an analysis of the largest online doctor review website in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haijing

    2015-06-01

    Since the time of Web 2.0, more and more consumers have used online doctor reviews to rate their doctors or to look for a doctor. This phenomenon has received health care researchers' attention worldwide, and many studies have been conducted on online doctor reviews in the United States and Europe. But no study has yet been done in China. Also, in China, without a mature primary care physician recommendation system, more and more Chinese consumers seek online doctor reviews to look for a good doctor for their health care concerns. This study sought to examine the online doctor review practice in China, including addressing the following questions: (1) How many doctors and specialty areas are available for online review? (2) How many online reviews are there on those doctors? (3) What specialty area doctors are more likely to be reviewed or receive more reviews? (4) Are those reviews positive or negative? This study explores an empirical dataset from Good Doctor website, haodf.com—the earliest and largest online doctor review and online health care community website in China—from 2006 to 2014, to examine the stated research questions by using descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, and multivariate linear regression. The dataset from the Good Doctor website contained 314,624 doctors across China and among them, 112,873 doctors received 731,543 quantitative reviews and 772,979 qualitative reviews as of April 11, 2014. On average, 37% of the doctors had been reviewed on the Good Doctor website. Gynecology-obstetrics-pediatrics doctors were most likely to be reviewed, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.497 (95% CI 1.461-1.535), and internal medicine doctors were less likely to be reviewed, with an OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.921-0.960), relative to the combined small specialty areas. Both traditional Chinese medicine doctors and surgeons were more likely to be reviewed than the combined small specialty areas, with an OR of 1.483 (95% CI 1.442-1.525) and an OR of 1

  3. Two-dimensional simulation of the June 11, 2010, flood of the Little Missouri River at Albert Pike Recreational Area, Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    In the early morning hours of June 11, 2010, substantial flooding occurred at Albert Pike Recreation Area in the Ouachita National Forest of west-central Arkansas, killing 20 campers. The U.S. Forest Service needed information concerning the extent and depth of flood inundation, the water velocity, and flow paths throughout Albert Pike Recreation Area for the flood and for streamflows corresponding to annual exceedence probabilities of 1 and 2 percent. The two-dimensional flow model Fst2DH, part of the Federal Highway Administration’s Finite Element Surface-water Modeling System, and the graphical user interface Surface-water Modeling System (SMS) were used to perform a steady-state simulation of the flood in a 1.5-mile reach of the Little Missouri River at Albert Pike Recreation Area. Peak streamflows of the Little Missouri River and tributary Brier Creek served as inputs to the simulation, which was calibrated to the surveyed elevations of high-water marks left by the flood and then used to predict flooding that would result from streamflows corresponding to annual exceedence probabilities of 1 and 2 percent. The simulated extent of the June 11, 2010, flood matched the observed extent of flooding at Albert Pike Recreation Area. The mean depth of inundation in the camp areas was 8.5 feet in Area D, 7.4 feet in Area C, 3.8 feet in Areas A, B, and the Day Use Area, and 12.5 feet in Lowry’s Camp Albert Pike. The mean water velocity was 7.2 feet per second in Area D, 7.6 feet per second in Area C, 7.2 feet per second in Areas A, B, and the Day Use Area, and 7.6 feet per second in Lowry’s Camp Albert Pike. A sensitivity analysis indicated that varying the streamflow of the Little Missouri River had the greatest effect on simulated water-surface elevation, while varying the streamflow of tributary Brier Creek had the least effect. Simulated water-surface elevations were lower than those modeled by the U.S. Forest Service using the standard-step method, but the

  4. [Gender patterns in Spanish otolaryngologic doctoral theses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim-Espada, María Pilar; De Diego-Sastre, Juan Ignacio; Pérez-Fernández, Elia

    2010-01-01

    In last decades women in Spain have a greater access to postgraduate education. The objective of this study was to perform a gender analysis on the Otolaryngology doctoral theses presented in a 25 year-period. The TESEO data base on doctoral theses was searched for theses on Otorhinolaryngology written between 1981 and 2005. As strategy for the research we employed the terms: 1) Otorrinolaringología (Otorhinolaryngology); 2) Cirugía de garganta, nariz y oídos (Ear, nose and throat surgery); 3) Fisiología de la audición (Physiology of hearing); 4) Fisiología del equilibrio (Physiology of balance); 5) Física de la audición (Physics of hearing); and 6) Bioacústica (Bioacoustics). A total of 450 theses (18.0±8.3 theses/year) were found, of which 129 were written by females (28.6%). There was a gender imbalance among authors, with 5.2±3.4 theses/year for women vs. 12.9±6.6 theses/year for men (p=0.0002). Nevertheless, there was a tendency toward equality in the last 10 years (p=0.001). On the other hand, the PhD student's gender was clearly related to the supervisor's gender (p=0.0001). With respect to the main topics in our area (otology, audiology/vestibular diseases, rhinology and pathology of paranasal sinuses and neck diseases), there were no significant differences between males and females (p=0.231). These results indicate a tendency towards equality in the number of men and women successfully completing doctoral studies in Otolaryngology. However, the PhD student's gender is clearly related to the supervisor's gender. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Hvad nu, hvis livet var helligt?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Tue; Gjerris, Mickey

    2015-01-01

    Lægen og fi losoffen Albert Schweitzer tilbyder et etisk perspektiv på bioteknologien: Hvor går grænserne for, hvad vi kan tillade os over for andre livsformer, og hvornår kommer vores egen bekvemmelighed i vejen for vores overlevelse?......Lægen og fi losoffen Albert Schweitzer tilbyder et etisk perspektiv på bioteknologien: Hvor går grænserne for, hvad vi kan tillade os over for andre livsformer, og hvornår kommer vores egen bekvemmelighed i vejen for vores overlevelse?...

  6. Recordando al doctor Alberto Pradilla Ferreira

    OpenAIRE

    Mercedes de Onís; Beatriz Gracia

    2012-01-01

    Brillante, sencillo, reservado, amigo solidario, colega entusiasta, trabajador incansable, maestro. Adjetivos que abrigan el recuerdo de quien dejó un legado importante para la salud pública, la pediatría y la docencia en salud pública, centrado principalmente en la nutrición.Médico y Cirujano de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia (1956), el doctor Alberto Pradilla fue uno de los pocos médicos colombianos que además de su especialidad médica como pediatra, se formó en el área de nutrición.Se...

  7. Patients' preferences for doctors' attire in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Osamu; Ohde, Sachiko; Deshpande, Gautam A; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2010-01-01

    Physicians' attire is one important factor to enhance the physician-patient relationship. However, there are few studies that examine patients' preferences for physicians' attire in Japan. We sought to assess patients' preference regarding doctors' attire and to assess the influence of doctors' attire on patients' confidence in their physician. Furthermore, we examined whether patients' preferences would change among various clinical situations. Employing a cross-sectional design, Japanese outpatients chosen over one week in October 2008 from waiting rooms in various outpatient departments at St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, were given a 10-item questionnaire. A 5-point Likert scale was used to estimate patient preference for four types of attire in both male and female physicians, including semi-formal attire, white coat, surgical scrubs, and casual wear. In addition, a 4-point Likert Scale was used to measure the influence of doctors' attire on patient confidence. Japanese outpatients consecutively chosen from waiting rooms at St. Luke's International Hospital in Tokyo for one week in October 2008. Of 2,272 outpatients enrolled, 1483 (67.1%) of respondents were women. Mean age of subjects was 53.8 years (SD 16.2 years). Respondents most preferred the white coat (mean rank: 4.18, SD: 0.75) and preferred casual attire the least (mean rank: 2.32, SD: 0.81). For female physicians, 1.4% of respondents ranked the white coat little/least preferred while 64.7% of respondents ranked casual wear little/least preferred. Among respondents who most preferred the white coat for physician attire, perceived hygiene (62.7%) and inspiring confidence (59.3%) were important factors for doctor's attire. Around 70% of all respondents reported that physicians' attire has an influence on their confidence in their physician. This study confirms that Japanese outpatients prefer a white coat. Furthermore, this study strongly suggests that wearing a white coat could favorably

  8. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilas, Lisbeth; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Laursen, Jacob Brink

    2016-01-01

    English skills was perceived low. Conclusion Teaching in English was rated as 30 % more difficult than in Danish, and a significant subgroup of doctors had difficulties in all forms of communication in English, resulting in challenges when introducing international students in non-native English speaking...... medical departments. Keywords International students Clinical teaching Teaching in foreign language Doctors’ English skills Self-assessment......Background From 2012–2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, “Internationalization at Home ”, offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students...

  9. Conceptualising Doctoral Writing as an Affective-political Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Burford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This article offers a conceptual summary and critique of existing literature on doctoral writing and emotion. The article seeks to intervene in current debates about doctoral writing by re-positioning it as an affective-political practice Background: Over recent decades public interest in the doctorate has expanded as it has become re-framed as a key component of national success in the global knowledge economy. It is within this context that the practice of doctoral writing has crystallised as an object of interest. While researchers have examined the increased regulation, surveillance, and intensification of doctoral writing, often this work is motivated to develop pedagogies that support students to meet these new expectations. At this point, there has been limited attention to what broad changes to the meanings and practices of doctoral writing feel like for students. Methodology: The paper offers a conceptual review that examines the ways in which doctoral writing tends to be understood. A review of literature in the areas of doctoral writing, doctoral emotion, and critical studies of academic labour was undertaken in order to produce a more comprehensive understanding of the political and emotional dynamics of doctoral writing. Contribution: It is intended that this conceptual research paper help researchers attend to the emotional context of doctoral writing in the current university context. Critical studies of academic work and life are identified as a possible platform for the development of future doctoral education research, and the conceptual tool of “affective-politics” is advanced as a novel frame for approaching doctoral writing research.

  10. Albert Einstein, visto desde la filosofía, en el año internacional de la física

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Monserrat Puchades

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available En el año 1905 aparecieron una serie de artículos de Albert Einstein en quese contenían ya algunas de sus decisivas aportaciones a la ciencia física.Este annus mirabilis sólo es comparable quizá en la historia de la física a otroannus mirabilis, de 1665 a 1666, en que Isaac Newton estableció las bases delcálculo integral, la ley de la gravitación y la teoría de los colores. [...

  11. A critical view of the quest for brain structural markers of Albert Einstein's special talents (a pot of gold under the rainbow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Jorge A

    2018-06-01

    Assertions regarding attempts to link glial and macrostructural brain events with cognitive performance regarding Albert Einstein, are critically reviewed. One basic problem arises from attempting to draw causal relationships regarding complex, delicately interactive functional processes involving finely tuned molecular and connectivity phenomena expressed in cognitive performance, based on highly variable brain structural events of a single, aged, formalin fixed brain. Data weaknesses and logical flaws are considered. In other instances, similar neuroanatomical observations received different interpretations and conclusions, as those drawn, e.g., from schizophrenic brains. Observations on white matter events also raise methodological queries. Additionally, neurocognitive considerations on other intellectual aptitudes of A. Einstein were simply ignored.

  12. 31st Annual Conference of the Gesellschaft für Klassifikation e.V., Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Hans; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Decker, Reinhold

    2008-01-01

    Data analysis and machine learning are research areas at the intersection of computer science, artificial intelligence, mathematics and statistics. They cover general methods and techniques that can be applied to a vast set of applications such as web and text mining, marketing, medical science, bioinformatics and business intelligence. This volume contains the revised versions of selected papers in the field of data analysis, machine learning and applications presented during the 31st Annual Conference of the German Classification Society (Gesellschaft für Klassifikation - GfKl). The conference was held at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg, Germany, in March 2007.

  13. Patient‑doctor relationship: The practice orientation of doctors in Kano

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-19

    Aug 19, 2013 ... relationship borders mainly on patients' satisfaction[12‑16] from either the .... Female. 47 (22.0). Marital status. Single. 87 (40.7). Married. 127 (59.3) ... doctors' place of work was only statistically significant in the “sharing” ...

  14. The Mathematics Doctorate: A Time for Change? Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  15. The Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate: The Case of Mathematics. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Hyman

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  16. Reflections on Doctoral Education in Chemistry. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiram, Alvin L.

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  17. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Faber, M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Elwyn, G.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy-makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  18. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Karlijn; Faber, Marjan J.; Arah, Onvebuchi A.; Elwyn, Glyn; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Wollersheim, Hub C.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  19. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E C; Laursen, J B; Kling, J; Cortes, D

    2016-08-27

    From 2012-2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, "Internationalization at Home ", offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional English skills was perceived low. Teaching in English was rated as 30 % more difficult than in Danish, and a significant subgroup of doctors had difficulties in all forms of communication in English, resulting in challenges when introducing international students in non-native English speaking medical departments.

  20. Total pelvic exenteration: the Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center Experience (1987 to 2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary L; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Einstein, Mark H; Smith, Harriet O; Anderson, Patrick S; Fields, Abbie L

    2006-05-01

    To review the trends, modifications and results of 103 consecutive total pelvic exenterations (TPE) performed at the Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine from 1987 to 2003. All patients who underwent TPE from January 1987 to December 2003 were included. The medical record, complications, follow-up, clinical status and demographic information were entered in a database. The procedure performed, the method of urinary diversion, colonic diversion, pelvic floor support and vaginal reconstruction were documented. Surviving patients were surveyed regarding their satisfaction with the urinary diversion, the vaginal reconstruction and their sexual function since the surgery. 103 pts were identified. Indications for TPE were recurrent cancers of the cervix (95), endometrium (2), colon and rectum (5), vulva (1). Overall 5-year survival was 47%. 5-year survival for pts with recurrent cervix cancer was 48%. Six pts (6%) recurred >5 years after the TPE. 14 pts (14%) had ureteral anastomotic leaks (no difference between ileal conduit 9/65 (14%) versus 5/38 (13%) continent conduit (P = 0.92). 34 pts (89%) with continent conduits were "continent." 14 pts (17%) had wound complications. 4 pts (4%) had parastomal hernias. 5/11 (46%) pts who had a low rectal reanastomosis developed recurrence in the pelvis. 21/39 (54%) of pts with continent conduits would choose an ileal conduit if they had the option again. Long-term renal function was similar in pts with ileal and continent conduits. Mesh of any type for pelvic floor reconstruction is associated with infection and bowel/urinary fistulas. VRAM flaps for neovagina fill the pelvic dead space, reduce the risk of fistulas and 20/36 pts (55%) are sexually active. Our overall 5-year survival is encouraging, and modifications in surgical technique have improved the reconstructive phase. Low rectal anastomoses at TPE adversely affects survival. Many of our pts with continent urinary diversions would not choose

  1. Which Doctor to Trust: A Recommender System for Identifying the Right Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Jin, Bo; Yao, Cuili; Yang, Haoyu; Huang, Degen; Wang, Fei

    2016-07-07

    Key opinion leaders (KOLs) are people who can influence public opinion on a certain subject matter. In the field of medical and health informatics, it is critical to identify KOLs on various disease conditions. However, there have been very few studies on this topic. We aimed to develop a recommender system for identifying KOLs for any specific disease with health care data mining. We exploited an unsupervised aggregation approach for integrating various ranking features to identify doctors who have the potential to be KOLs on a range of diseases. We introduce the design, implementation, and deployment details of the recommender system. This system collects the professional footprints of doctors, such as papers in scientific journals, presentation activities, patient advocacy, and media exposure, and uses them as ranking features to identify KOLs. We collected the information of 2,381,750 doctors in China from 3,657,797 medical journal papers they published, together with their profiles, academic publications, and funding. The empirical results demonstrated that our system outperformed several benchmark systems by a significant margin. Moreover, we conducted a case study in a real-world system to verify the applicability of our proposed method. Our results show that doctors' profiles and their academic publications are key data sources for identifying KOLs in the field of medical and health informatics. Moreover, we deployed the recommender system and applied the data service to a recommender system of the China-based Internet technology company NetEase. Patients can obtain authority ranking lists of doctors with this system on any given disease.

  2. Smart strategies for doctors and doctors-in-training: heuristics in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwarth, Odette; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2009-08-01

    How do doctors make sound decisions when confronted with probabilistic data, time pressures and a heavy workload? One theory that has been embraced by many researchers is based on optimisation, which emphasises the need to integrate all information in order to arrive at sound decisions. This notion makes heuristics, which use less than complete information, appear as second-best strategies. In this article, we challenge this pessimistic view of heuristics. We introduce two medical problems that involve decision making to the reader: one concerns coronary care issues and the other macrolide prescriptions. In both settings, decision-making tools grounded in the principles of optimisation and heuristics, respectively, have been developed to assist doctors in making decisions. We explain the structure of each of these tools and compare their performance in terms of their facilitation of correct predictions. For decisions concerning both the coronary care unit and the prescribing of macrolides, we demonstrate that sacrificing information does not necessarily imply a forfeiting of predictive accuracy, but can sometimes even lead to better decisions. Subsequently, we discuss common misconceptions about heuristics and explain when and why ignoring parts of the available information can lead to the making of more robust predictions. Heuristics are neither good nor bad per se, but, if applied in situations to which they have been adapted, can be helpful companions for doctors and doctors-in-training. This, however, requires that heuristics in medicine be openly discussed, criticised, refined and then taught to doctors-in-training rather than being simply dismissed as harmful or irrelevant. A more uniform use of explicit and accepted heuristics has the potential to reduce variations in diagnoses and to improve medical care for patients.

  3. How Doctors View and Use Social Media: A National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, James; Ryan, Christopher; Harris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Doctors are uncertain of their ethical and legal obligations when communicating with patients online. Professional guidelines for patient-doctor interaction online have been written with limited quantitative data about doctors’ current usage and attitudes toward the medium. Further research into these trends will help to inform more focused policy and guidelines for doctors communicating with patients online. Objective The intent of the study was to provide the first national profi...

  4. [The virtuous doctor in cinema: the final examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Gustavo

    2014-10-01

    The virtuous doctor has subscribed an oath and by subscribing to this solemn promise, he is committed to live in accordance with the purposes, obligations and virtues established in the medical profession. Cinematic art has shown only a superficial interest in complex aspects of medical profession. An exception is Ingmar Bergman's film "Wild Strawberries", where Professor Isak Borg, a widowed 76-year-old physician, is to be awarded the Doctor Jubilaris degree, 50 years after he received his doctorate at Lund University. During the trip, Isak is forced by a nightmare to reevaluate his professional life as not being a virtuous doctor.

  5. PERSONAL MARKETING OF DOCTORS IN THE CONTEXT OF SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Anamaria IOAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than ever doctors are beginning to recognize that beyond impeccable professionalism shown to the patient, equally imports became part of communication, and in one century of the Internet, the most effective communication process moves online, in the social networks. It is important for doctors to develop a personal brand because a reputation, passed with internet speed can only have a positive effect. In a century in which patients make the decision to see a particular doctor, largely based on recommendations and research the forums online discussions, doctors are beginning realize the importance of a strong presence, constant and reliable environment through online networks social priority.

  6. The quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siedine K. Coetzee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of doctoral programmes in nursing has multiplied rapidly throughout the world. This has led to widespread concern about nursing doctoral education, specifically with regard to the quality of curricula and faculty, as well as to the availability of appropriate institutional resources. In South Africa, no study of these issues has been conducted at a national level. Objective: To explore and describe the quality of nursing doctoral education in South Africa from the perspectives of deans, faculty, doctoral graduates and students. Method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. All deans (N = 15; n = 12, faculty (N = 50; n = 26, doctoral graduates (N = 43; n = 26 and students (N = 106; n = 63 at South African nursing schools that offer a nursing doctoral programme (N = 16; n = 15 were invited to participate. Data were collected by means of structured email-mediated Quality of Nursing Doctoral Education surveys. Results: Overall, the graduate participants scored their programme quality most positively of all the groups and faculty scored it most negatively. All of the groups rated the quality of their doctoral programmes as good, but certain problems related to the quality of resources, students and faculty were identified. Conclusion: These evaluations, by the people directly involved in the programmes, demonstrated significant differences amongst the groups and thus provide valuable baseline data for building strategies to improve the quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa.

  7. Mediador cultural ou antropólogo do mal: Bruce Albert e o caso de “A queda do céu”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Alessandra Alves de Souza Ferreira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo desenvolve uma análise crítica sobre o fragmento “Postscriptum, quando eu é um outro (e vice-versa”, apresentado na obra A Queda do céu: palavras de um xamã yanomami. O livro foi pensado por um xamã yanomami; Davi Kopenawa, e produzido por um etnólogo francês Bruce Albert. Problematizo o processo de produção do livro onde dois universos culturais se encontram, uma produção literária indígena do povo Yanomami que apresenta uma coautoria. Essa análise busca investigar a postura epistêmica de Bruce Albert como mediador cultural ou “antropólogo do mal” no processo de elaboração do livro, a fim de levantar questionamentos sobre o ato tradutório e suas implicações, destacando os desa os e contribuições apresentadas nesse processo. Nesta direção, esse artigo se fundamenta nos pensamentos da história cultural.

  8. Poéticas del montaje Albert Kahn y D.W.Griffith en el nacimiento de la era de la máquina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pancorbo Crespo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Esta investigación trata de establecer un doble paralelismo entre cine y arquitectura moderna, centrándose en un momento de refundación de ambas disciplinas, los primeros años del siglo XX y apoyándonos en dos personajes seminales: D.W. Griffith y Albert Kahn. Exploraremos primero un paralelismo temporal y geográfico en sus líneas evolutivas principales, que recorren un camino similar en sus inicios, desde los Estados Unidos hasta la URSS, para volver al lugar de origen. Este viaje fue activado gracias a la llegada a la URSS de las primeras copias de la película” Intolerancia” en 1918 y de Albert Kahn en 1928 para la realización de numerosas obras industriales durante el Primer Plan Quinquenal. Por otro lado, exploraremos un paralelismo de carácter más conceptual, estudiando el uso de la noción de montaje en ambas disciplinas durante ese periodo, utilizando otra vez la obra de nuestros dos protagonistas como base de la investigación, pero recurriendo también a otros esenciales para el tema como son los soviéticos Eisenstein y Miliutin.

  9. Albert Abraham Michelson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    his knowledge of physics gave him an unfair advantage. ... temporarily lost his job at Case, although he was reinstated after a year at a lower salary. Mor .... He could not have paid a better tribute to his lifelong passion to measure what the poet ...

  10. Reasons for Consulting a Doctor on the Internet: Web Survey of Users of an Ask the Doctor Service

    OpenAIRE

    Umefjord, Göran; Petersson, Göran; Hamberg, Katarina

    2003-01-01

    Background In 1998 the Swedish noncommercial public health service Infomedica opened an Ask the Doctor service on its Internet portal. At no charge, anyone with Internet access can use this service to ask questions about personal health-related and disease-related matters. Objective To study why individuals choose to consult previously-unknown doctors on the Internet. Methods Between November 1, 2001, and January 31, 2002 a Web survey of the 3622 Ask the Doctor service users, 1036 men (29%) a...

  11. Which doctors and with what problems contact a specialist service for doctors? A cross sectional investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Tann Matthias

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom, specialist treatment and intervention services for doctors are underdeveloped. The MedNet programme, created in 1997 and funded by the London Deanery, aims to fill this gap by providing a self-referral, face-to-face, psychotherapeutic assessment service for doctors in London and South-East England. MedNet was designed to be a low-threshold service, targeting doctors without formal psychiatric problems. The aim of this study was to delineate the characteristics of doctors utilising the service, to describe their psychological morbidity, and to determine if early intervention is achieved. Methods A cross-sectional study including all consecutive self-referred doctors (n = 121, 50% male presenting in 2002–2004 was conducted. Measures included standardised and bespoke questionnaires both self-report and clinician completed. The multi-dimensional evaluation included: demographics, CORE (CORE-OM, CORE-Workplace and CORE-A an instrument designed to evaluate the psychological difficulties of patients referred to outpatient services, Brief Symptom Inventory to quantify caseness and formal psychiatric illness, and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results The most prevalent presenting problems included depression, anxiety, interpersonal, self-esteem and work-related issues. However, only 9% of the cohort were identified as severely distressed psychiatrically using this measure. In approximately 50% of the sample, problems first presented in the preceding year. About 25% were on sick leave at the time of consultation, while 50% took little or no leave in the prior 12 months. A total of 42% were considered to be at some risk of suicide, with more than 25% considered to have a moderate to severe risk. There were no significant gender differences in type of morbidity, severity or days off sick. Conclusion Doctors displayed high levels of distress as reflected in the significant proportion of those who were at some risk of

  12. Working as a doctor when chronically ill or disabled: comments made by doctors responding to UK surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J; Lambert, Trevor W

    2016-07-01

    To report a qualitative study of themes doctors raised spontaneously, in a large-scale prospective cohort study covering many aspects of their medical careers, when referring to their own chronic illness or disability. Questionnaire survey. UK. Questionnaires were sent one, five and 10 years after graduation to 44,539 doctors who qualified between 1993 and 2012 in the UK: 38,613 questionnaires were returned and 11,859 respondents provided comments made by doctors about their training or work. The comments of 123 doctors about their own chronic illness or disability. Main themes raised included poor support for doctors with chronic illness or disability, delays in and changes to careers (either planned ahead or imposed), the impact of pressure at work, difficulties returning to work after illness, limitations on career choices and inadequate careers advice for doctors with chronic illness or disabilities. More needs to be done to ensure that doctors with chronic illness or disability receive appropriate support. Occupational health guidance should be monitored closely, with more support for ill doctors including adjustments to the job, help if needed with morale and mental health, and advice on career options. Further studies should establish the prevalence of long-term health conditions among doctors.

  13. [Doctor patient communication: which skills are effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philippa; Gómez, Gricelda; Kurtz, Suzanne; Vargas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Effective Communication Skills form part of what is being a good doctor. There is a solid evidence base that defines the components of effective communication. This article offers a practical conceptual framework to improve physician patient communication to a professional level of competence. There are six goals that physicians and patients work to achieve through their communication with each other. These are to construct a relationship, structure an interview, start the interview, gather information, explain, plan and close the interview. The outcomes that can be improved with an effective communication and the "first principles" of communication are described. A brief look at the historical context that has influenced our thinking about communication in health care is carried out. Finally, the Calgary Cambridge Guide, an approach for delineating and organizing the specific skills required of an effective communication with patients is described. It is clear from the literature that better communication skills improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

  14. Paternity leave experiences of NHS doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Hannah; Szram, Joanna

    2013-10-01

    This study assesses NHS doctors' experiences of paternity leave and evaluates whether practices have changed since the introduction of additional paternity leave (APL) in April 2011. An anonymised online survey designed to discover experiences and uptake of APL and ordinary paternity leave (OPL) was distributed to all members of the London Deanery Synapse® network. In total, 364 fathers responded. Their seniority ranged from foundation trainees to consultants. Following the formal introduction of OPL in 2003, the number of fathers taking any paternity leave increased (from 50% to 95.6%). The majority of respondents (76.7%) felt well supported by their employer. Since the introduction of APL, 3% of respondents took additional leave. Reasons for the low uptake of APL included the impracticalities of the law, poor awareness and perceived attitudes and implications for training. Problems with OPL included the inadequate provision of cover and difficulties in timing the leave appropriately.

  15. Do medical doctors respond to economic incentives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Leif; Di Tommaso, Maria Laura; Strøm, Steinar

    2013-03-01

    A longitudinal analysis of married physicians labor supply is carried out on Norwegian data from 1997 to 1999. The model utilized for estimation implies that physicians can choose among 10 different job packages which are a combination of part time/full time, hospital/primary care, private/public sector, and not working. Their current choice is influenced by past available options due to a habit persistence parameter in the utility function. In the estimation we take into account the budget constraint, including all features of the tax system. Our results imply that an overall wage increase or less progressive taxation moves married physicians toward full time job packages, in particular to full time jobs in the private sector. But the overall and aggregate labor supply elasticities in the population of employed doctors are rather low compared to previous estimates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Edinburgh doctors and their physic gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2008-12-01

    Edinburgh has had eight physic gardens on different sites since its first one was created by the Incorporation of Barbers and Surgeons in 1656. As the gardens grew in size, they evolved from herb gardens to botanic gardens with small herbaria for the supply of medical herbs. They were intended for the instruction of medical, surgical and apothecary students and, in the case of the physicians, to demonstrate the need for a physicians' college and a pharmacopoeia. Some of the doctors in charge of them were equally famous and influential in botany as in medicine, and while Edinburgh Town Council enjoyed the fame the gardens brought to the city it was parsimonious and slow to support its botanical pioneers. The gardens are celebrated today in the Sibbald Garden within the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

  17. Why doctors should care about animal cruelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Miranda

    2007-01-01

    Animal cruelty is a significant problem for society, and there are good reasons why doctors should be particularly concerned by it. Increasing evidence for links between animal cruelty and child or spousal abuse is an area of growing concern internationally and of real importance to health professionals. This article aims to raise awareness of the relevance of animal cruelty to medical practice. The links between animal cruelty and human health are discussed broadly and some wider ethical issues raised. Animal cruelty impacts on human health in disparate ways: intentional and unintentional acts of cruelty may reflect underlying mental health problems that need to be addressed. Cruelty within the family setting is an important sentinel for domestic violence and should prompt an assessment for possible child abuse. Furthermore, animal cruelty raises important questions about the nature of empathy, and the type of society that we wish to live in.

  18. [Doctors in Bydgoszcz 1815-1920].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpalska, W

    2000-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century the number of Polish doctors in Pomerania increased significantly. They constituted a major group among the freelance professions within the Polish intelligentsia. The development of the Polish intelligentsia took place during a period of strong conflict between the two cultures and under increasing German influence. This was especially noticeable in Bydgoszcz which was one of the main centers of German culture in Provinz Posen. The growing wealth of the capitalistic society, as well as the development of medical science, created a greater demand for medical care. Medicine was the most liberated profession, which made it more independent from the German administration and this, in turn, made it more accessible to the Polish community.

  19. The master degree: A critical transition in STEM doctoral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sheila Edwards

    The need to broaden participation in the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate and graduate programs is currently a matter of national urgency. The small number of women and underrepresented minorities (URM) earning doctoral degrees in STEM is particularly troubling given significant increases in the number of students earning master's degrees since 1990. In the decade between 1990 and 2000, the total number of master's recipients increased by 42%. During this same time period, the number of women earning master's degrees increased by 56%, African Americans increased by 132%, American Indians by 101%, Hispanics by 146%, and Asian Americans by 117% (Syverson, 2003). Growth in underrepresented group education at the master's level raises questions about the relationship between master's and doctoral education. Secondary data analysis of the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) was used to examine institutional pathways to the doctorate in STEM disciplines and transitions from master's to doctoral programs by race and gender. While the study revealed no significant gender differences in pathways, compared to White and Asian American students, URM students take significantly different pathways to the doctorate. URM students are significantly more likely to earn the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees at three different institutions. Their path is significantly more likely to include earning a master's degree en route to the doctorate. Further, URM students are more likely to experience transition between the master's and doctoral degrees, and the transitions are not limited to those who earn master's degrees at master's-only institutions. These findings suggest that earning a master's degree is more often a stepping stone to the doctorate for URM students. Master's degree programs, therefore, have the potential to be a valuable resource for policymakers and graduate programs seeking to increase the diversity of URM students

  20. Diagnosing the doctors' departure: survey on sources of dissatisfaction among Irish junior doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruce-Brand, R

    2012-01-01

    There has been a significant decline in the number of applications for non-consultant hospital doctor (NCHD) posts in Ireland over the last 18 months. We conducted an online, anonymous survey of Irish NCHDs to establish levels of satisfaction, sources of dissatisfaction and the major reasons for junior doctors seeking work abroad. 522 NCHDs took the survey, including 64 (12.3%) currently working outside of the Republic. 219 (45.8%) were slightly dissatisfied and 142 (29.7%) were extremely dissatisfied with practising medicine in Ireland. Major sources of dissatisfaction included the state of the health care system, staffing cover for leave and illness, the dearth of consultant posts and the need to move around Ireland. The most important reason for NCHDs wishing to leave was to seek better training and career opportunities abroad.