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Sample records for dna microarray-based gene

  1. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

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    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  2. A new approach to species determination for yeast strains: DNA microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a yeast DNA microarray with 6000 genes.

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    Watanabe, Takahito; Murata, Yoshinori; Oka, Syuichi; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2004-03-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization is known as the superior method in the elucidation of relationships between closely related taxa, such as species and strain. For species determination we propose a new DNA-DNA hybridization method: the DNA microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) method, using a yeast DNA microarray with approximately 6000 genes. The genome from a yeast strain as a sample strain (Sample) was labelled with Cy3-dye and hybridized to a single DNA microarray, together with the Cy5-labelled genome of S. cerevisiae S288C as a reference strain (Reference). The log2 ratio values [log2[Cy3(Sample)/Cy5(Reference)]: Ratio] of signal intensities of all the gene spots were estimated and divided into the following groups: Ratio < or = -1; -1 < Ratio < 1; 1 < or = Ratio. The hybridization profiles of the genomes of type strains belonging to the genus Saccharomyces were significantly different from that of S. cerevisiae S288C. The Ratio-based grouping allowed us to discriminate between some species from S. cerevisiae more clearly. Furthermore, cluster analysis discriminated between closely related species and strains. Using this method, we were able to not only perform species determination but also to obtain information on alternation in gene copy number of such gene amplifications and deletions with single-gene resolution. These observations indicated that DNA microarray-based CGH is a powerful system for species determination and comparative genome analysis. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Fast DNA Serotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Determination of Salmonella enterica with an Oligonucleotide Microarray-Based Assay

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    Braun, Sascha D.; Ziegler, Albrecht; Methner, Ulrich; Slickers, Peter; Keiling, Silke; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella (S.) belongs to the most prevalent food-borne zoonotic diseases throughout the world. Therefore, serotype identification for all culture-confirmed cases of Salmonella infection is important for epidemiological purposes. As a standard, the traditional culture method (ISO 6579:2002) is used to identify Salmonella. Classical serotyping takes 4–5 days to be completed, it is labor-intensive, expensive and more than 250 non-standardized sera are necessary to characterize more than 2,500 Salmonella serovars currently known. These technical difficulties could be overcome with modern molecular methods. We developed a microarray based serogenotyping assay for the most prevalent Salmonella serovars in Europe and North America. The current assay version could theoretically discriminate 28 O-antigens and 86 H-antigens. Additionally, we included 77 targets analyzing antimicrobial resistance genes. The Salmonella assay was evaluated with a set of 168 reference strains representing 132 serovars previously serotyped by conventional agglutination through various reference centers. 117 of 132 (81%) tested serovars showed an unique microarray pattern. 15 of 132 serovars generated a pattern which was shared by multiple serovars (e.g., S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Nitra). These shared patterns mainly resulted from the high similarity of the genotypes of serogroup A and D1. Using patterns of the known reference strains, a database was build which represents the basis of a new PatternMatch software that can serotype unknown Salmonella isolates automatically. After assay verification, the Salmonella serogenotyping assay was used to identify a field panel of 105 Salmonella isolates. All were identified as Salmonella and 93 of 105 isolates (88.6%) were typed in full concordance with conventional serotyping. This microarray based assay is a powerful tool for serogenotyping. PMID:23056321

  4. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

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    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  5. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

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    Jang Soo Yook

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197 as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  6. A Fisheye Viewer for microarray-based gene expression data.

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    Wu, Min; Thao, Cheng; Mu, Xiangming; Munson, Ethan V

    2006-10-13

    Microarray has been widely used to measure the relative amounts of every mRNA transcript from the genome in a single scan. Biologists have been accustomed to reading their experimental data directly from tables. However, microarray data are quite large and are stored in a series of files in a machine-readable format, so direct reading of the full data set is not feasible. The challenge is to design a user interface that allows biologists to usefully view large tables of raw microarray-based gene expression data. This paper presents one such interface--an electronic table (E-table) that uses fisheye distortion technology. The Fisheye Viewer for microarray-based gene expression data has been successfully developed to view MIAME data stored in the MAGE-ML format. The viewer can be downloaded from the project web site http://polaris.imt.uwm.edu:7777/fisheye/. The fisheye viewer was implemented in Java so that it could run on multiple platforms. We implemented the E-table by adapting JTable, a default table implementation in the Java Swing user interface library. Fisheye views use variable magnification to balance magnification for easy viewing and compression for maximizing the amount of data on the screen. This Fisheye Viewer is a lightweight but useful tool for biologists to quickly overview the raw microarray-based gene expression data in an E-table.

  7. A fisheye viewer for microarray-based gene expression data

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    Munson Ethan V

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray has been widely used to measure the relative amounts of every mRNA transcript from the genome in a single scan. Biologists have been accustomed to reading their experimental data directly from tables. However, microarray data are quite large and are stored in a series of files in a machine-readable format, so direct reading of the full data set is not feasible. The challenge is to design a user interface that allows biologists to usefully view large tables of raw microarray-based gene expression data. This paper presents one such interface – an electronic table (E-table that uses fisheye distortion technology. Results The Fisheye Viewer for microarray-based gene expression data has been successfully developed to view MIAME data stored in the MAGE-ML format. The viewer can be downloaded from the project web site http://polaris.imt.uwm.edu:7777/fisheye/. The fisheye viewer was implemented in Java so that it could run on multiple platforms. We implemented the E-table by adapting JTable, a default table implementation in the Java Swing user interface library. Fisheye views use variable magnification to balance magnification for easy viewing and compression for maximizing the amount of data on the screen. Conclusion This Fisheye Viewer is a lightweight but useful tool for biologists to quickly overview the raw microarray-based gene expression data in an E-table.

  8.  DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling in diagnosis, assessing prognosis and predicting response to therapy in colorectal cancer

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    Przemysław Kwiatkowski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. It is considered as a biological model of a certain type of cancerogenesis process in which progression from an early to late stage adenoma and cancer is accompanied by distinct genetic alterations.Clinical and pathological parameters commonly used in clinical practice are often insufficient to determine groups of patients suitable for personalized treatment. Moreover, reliable molecular markers with high prognostic value have not yet been determined. Molecular studies using DNA-based microarrays have identified numerous genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation during the process of cancerogenesis. Assessment of the genetic profile of colorectal cancer using the microarray technique might be a useful tool in determining the groups of patients with different clinical outcomes who would benefit from additional personalized treatment.The main objective of this study was to present the current state of knowledge on the practical application of gene profiling techniques using microarrays for determining diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment in colorectal cancer.

  9. A comprehensive microarray-based DNA methylation study of 367 hematological neoplasms.

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    Jose I Martin-Subero

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the DNA methylation pattern are a hallmark of leukemias and lymphomas. However, most epigenetic studies in hematologic neoplasms (HNs have focused either on the analysis of few candidate genes or many genes and few HN entities, and comprehensive studies are required.Here, we report for the first time a microarray-based DNA methylation study of 767 genes in 367 HNs diagnosed with 16 of the most representative B-cell (n = 203, T-cell (n = 30, and myeloid (n = 134 neoplasias, as well as 37 samples from different cell types of the hematopoietic system. Using appropriate controls of B-, T-, or myeloid cellular origin, we identified a total of 220 genes hypermethylated in at least one HN entity. In general, promoter hypermethylation was more frequent in lymphoid malignancies than in myeloid malignancies, being germinal center mature B-cell lymphomas as well as B and T precursor lymphoid neoplasias those entities with highest frequency of gene-associated DNA hypermethylation. We also observed a significant correlation between the number of hypermethylated and hypomethylated genes in several mature B-cell neoplasias, but not in precursor B- and T-cell leukemias. Most of the genes becoming hypermethylated contained promoters with high CpG content, and a significant fraction of them are targets of the polycomb repressor complex. Interestingly, T-cell prolymphocytic leukemias show low levels of DNA hypermethylation and a comparatively large number of hypomethylated genes, many of them showing an increased gene expression.We have characterized the DNA methylation profile of a wide range of different HNs entities. As well as identifying genes showing aberrant DNA methylation in certain HN subtypes, we also detected six genes--DBC1, DIO3, FZD9, HS3ST2, MOS, and MYOD1--that were significantly hypermethylated in B-cell, T-cell, and myeloid malignancies. These might therefore play an important role in the development of different HNs.

  10. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

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    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumour class prediction and discovery by microarray-based DNA methylation analysis

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    Adorján, Péter; Distler, Jürgen; Lipscher, Evelyne; Model, Fabian; Müller, Jürgen; Pelet, Cécile; Braun, Aron; Florl, Andrea R.; Gütig, David; Grabs, Gabi; Howe, André; Kursar, Mischo; Lesche, Ralf; Leu, Erik; Lewin, André; Maier, Sabine; Müller, Volker; Otto, Thomas; Scholz, Christian; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Seifert, Hans-Helge; Schwope, Ina; Ziebarth, Heike; Berlin, Kurt; Piepenbrock, Christian; Olek, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation of CpG sites is among the earliest and most frequent alterations in cancer. Several studies suggest that aberrant methylation occurs in a tumour type-specific manner. However, large-scale analysis of candidate genes has so far been hampered by the lack of high throughput assays for methylation detection. We have developed the first microarray-based technique which allows genome-wide assessment of selected CpG dinucleotides as well as quantification of methylation at each site. Several hundred CpG sites were screened in 76 samples from four different human tumour types and corresponding healthy controls. Discriminative CpG dinucleotides were identified for different tissue type distinctions and used to predict the tumour class of as yet unknown samples with high accuracy using machine learning techniques. Some CpG dinucleotides correlate with progression to malignancy, whereas others are methylated in a tissue-specific manner independent of malignancy. Our results demonstrate that genome-wide analysis of methylation patterns combined with supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques constitute a powerful novel tool to classify human cancers. PMID:11861926

  12. Microarray-based Detection of Antibiotic Resisteance Genes in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the presented study, 143 Salmonella isolates belonging to 26 different serovars were screened for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes by microarray analysis. The microarray contained a total of 223 oligonucleotides representing genes encoding for resistance to the following antibiotic

  13. Microarray-based analysis of plasma cirDNA epigenetic modification profiling in xenografted mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia

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    Rene Cortese

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH during sleep is one of the major abnormalities occurring in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, a highly prevalent disorder affecting 6–15% of the general population, particularly among obese people. IH has been proposed as a major determinant of oncogenetically-related processes such as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. During the growth and expansion of tumors, fragmented DNA is released into the bloodstream and enters the circulation. Circulating tumor DNA (cirDNA conserves the genetic and epigenetic profiles from the tumor of origin and can be isolated from the plasma fraction. Here we report a microarray-based epigenetic profiling of cirDNA isolated from blood samples of mice engrafted with TC1 epithelial lung cancer cells and controls, which were exposed to IH during sleep (XenoIH group, n = 3 or control conditions, (i.e., room air (RA; XenoRA group, n = 3 conditions. To prepare the targets for microarray hybridization, we applied a previously developed method that enriches the modified fraction of the cirDNA without amplification of genomic DNA. Regions of differential cirDNA modification between the two groups were identified by hybridizing the enriched fractions for each sample to Affymetrix GeneChip Human Promoter Arrays 1.0R. Microarray raw and processed data were deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database (accession number: GSE61070.

  14. Microarray-based analysis of plasma cirDNA epigenetic modification profiling in xenografted mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia.

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    Cortese, Rene; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2015-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep is one of the major abnormalities occurring in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a highly prevalent disorder affecting 6-15% of the general population, particularly among obese people. IH has been proposed as a major determinant of oncogenetically-related processes such as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. During the growth and expansion of tumors, fragmented DNA is released into the bloodstream and enters the circulation. Circulating tumor DNA (cirDNA) conserves the genetic and epigenetic profiles from the tumor of origin and can be isolated from the plasma fraction. Here we report a microarray-based epigenetic profiling of cirDNA isolated from blood samples of mice engrafted with TC1 epithelial lung cancer cells and controls, which were exposed to IH during sleep (XenoIH group, n = 3) or control conditions, (i.e., room air (RA); XenoRA group, n = 3) conditions. To prepare the targets for microarray hybridization, we applied a previously developed method that enriches the modified fraction of the cirDNA without amplification of genomic DNA. Regions of differential cirDNA modification between the two groups were identified by hybridizing the enriched fractions for each sample to Affymetrix GeneChip Human Promoter Arrays 1.0R. Microarray raw and processed data were deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database (accession number: GSE61070).

  15. Microarray-based analysis of plasma cirDNA epigenetic modification profiling in xenografted mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia

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    Cortese, Rene; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep is one of the major abnormalities occurring in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a highly prevalent disorder affecting 6–15% of the general population, particularly among obese people. IH has been proposed as a major determinant of oncogenetically-related processes such as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. During the growth and expansion of tumors, fragmented DNA is released into the bloodstream and enters the circulation. Circulating tumor DNA (cirDNA) conserves the genetic and epigenetic profiles from the tumor of origin and can be isolated from the plasma fraction. Here we report a microarray-based epigenetic profiling of cirDNA isolated from blood samples of mice engrafted with TC1 epithelial lung cancer cells and controls, which were exposed to IH during sleep (XenoIH group, n = 3) or control conditions, (i.e., room air (RA); XenoRA group, n = 3) conditions. To prepare the targets for microarray hybridization, we applied a previously developed method that enriches the modified fraction of the cirDNA without amplification of genomic DNA. Regions of differential cirDNA modification between the two groups were identified by hybridizing the enriched fractions for each sample to Affymetrix GeneChip Human Promoter Arrays 1.0R. Microarray raw and processed data were deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database (accession number: GSE61070). PMID:26484214

  16. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

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    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  17. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

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    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  18. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

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    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  19. Prenatal Screening for 22q11.2 Deletion Using a Targeted Microarray-Based Cell-Free DNA Test.

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    Schmid, Maximilian; Wang, Eric; Bogard, Patrick E; Bevilacqua, Elisa; Hacker, Coleen; Wang, Susie; Doshi, Jigna; White, Karen; Kaplan, Jennifer; Sparks, Andrew; Jani, Jacques C; Stokowski, Renee

    2017-11-08

    To determine the performance of a targeted microarray-based cell-free DNA (cfDNA) test (Harmony Prenatal Test®) for the identification of pregnancies at increased risk for 22q11.2 deletion. Test performance was determined in 2 steps including a total of 1,953 plasma samples. Analytical validation was performed in 1,736 plasma samples. Clinical verification of performance was performed in an additional 217 prospectively ascertained samples from pregnancies with fetal deletion status determined by diagnostic testing. Analytical sensitivity was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.1-82.2%) based on 122 samples with deletions ranging from 1.96 to 3.25 Mb. In 1,614 presumed unaffected samples, specificity was determined to be at least 99.5% (95% CI: 99.0-99.7%). In the clinical cohort, 5 of 7 samples from pregnancies affected with 22q11.2 deletion were determined to have a high probability of deletion. There were no false positive results in the 210 unaffected samples in this cohort. These clinical data are consistent with the performance demonstrated in the analytical validation. cfDNA testing using a targeted microarray-based technology is able to identify pregnancies at increased risk for 22q11.2 deletions of 3.0 Mb and smaller while maintaining a low false positive rate. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Genotyping and DNA microarray based characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from rabbit carcasses.

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    Merz, Axel; Stephan, Roger; Johler, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause staphylococcal food poisoning. Although the organism is frequently detected on rabbit carcasses, little is known about the characteristics of S. aureus strains contaminating rabbit meat. In this study, 137 S. aureus isolates originating from 137 rabbit carcasses were spa typed and characterized by DNA microarray. The isolates were assigned to CC5, CC7, CC8, CC15, CC96, CC101, CC121, and ST890, and to 13 spa types (t056, t085, t091, t160, t179, t681, t741, t745, t1190, t1773, t4770, t8456, t14871). Enterotoxin genes detected included sea, sed, sej, and ser. In addition, the egc operon, encoding the newly described staphylococcal enterotoxins SEG/SEI/SElM/SElN/SElO/SElU, was found in all isolates except those of t091. While none of the examined isolates presented genes conferring methicillin, vancomycin, or aminoglycoside resistance, we frequently detected blaZ/I/R conferring resistance to penicillin. The isolates represented a heterogeneous group assigned to clonal lineages detected among humans and animals, with two spa types exclusively associated with rabbit meat (t4770, t8456). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and assessment of microarray-based DNA fingerprinting in Eucalyptus grandis.

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    Lezar, Sabine; Myburg, A A; Berger, D K; Wingfield, M J; Wingfield, B D

    2004-11-01

    Development of improved Eucalyptus genotypes involves the routine identification of breeding stock and superior clones. Currently, microsatellites and random amplified polymorphic DNA markers are the most widely used DNA-based techniques for fingerprinting of these trees. While these techniques have provided rapid and powerful fingerprinting assays, they are constrained by their reliance on gel or capillary electrophoresis, and therefore, relatively low throughput of fragment analysis. In contrast, recently developed microarray technology holds the promise of parallel analysis of thousands of markers in plant genomes. The aim of this study was to develop a DNA fingerprinting chip for Eucalyptus grandis and to investigate its usefulness for fingerprinting of eucalypt trees. A prototype chip was prepared using a partial genomic library from total genomic DNA of 23 E. grandis trees, of which 22 were full siblings. A total of 384 cloned genomic fragments were individually amplified and arrayed onto glass slides. DNA fingerprints were obtained for 17 individuals by hybridizing labeled genome representations of the individual trees to the 384-element chip. Polymorphic DNA fragments were identified by evaluating the binary distribution of their background-corrected signal intensities across full-sib individuals. Among 384 DNA fragments on the chip, 104 (27%) were found to be polymorphic. Hybridization of these polymorphic fragments was highly repeatable (R2>0.91) within the E. grandis individuals, and they allowed us to identify all 17 full-sib individuals. Our results suggest that DNA microarrays can be used to effectively fingerprint large numbers of closely related Eucalyptus trees.

  2. Prevalence, identification by a DNA microarray-based assay of human and food isolates Listeria spp. from Tunisia.

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    Hmaïed, F; Helel, S; Le Berre, V; François, J-M; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Smaoui, H; Kechrid, A; Boudabous, A; Barkallah, I

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence of Listeria species isolated from food samples and characterizing food and human cases isolates. Between 2005 and 2007, one hundred food samples collected in the markets of Tunis were analysed in our study. Five strains of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for human listeriosis isolated in hospital of Tunis were included. Multiplex PCR serogrouping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applying the enzyme AscI and ApaI were used for the characterization of isolates of L. monocytogenes. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay to a reliable discrimination of species within the Listeria genus. The prevalence of Listeria spp. in food samples was estimated at 14% by using classical biochemical identification. Two samples were assigned to L. monocytogenes and 12 to L. innocua. DNA microarray allowed unambiguous identification of Listeria species. Our results obtained by microarray-based assay were in accordance with the biochemical identification. The two food L. monocytogenes isolates were assigned to the PCR serogroup IIa (serovar 1/2a). Whereas human L. monocytogenes isolates were of PCR serogroup IVb, (serovars 4b). These isolates present a high similarity in PFGE. Food L. monocytogenes isolates were classified into two different pulsotypes. These pulsotypes were different from that of the five strains responsible for the human cases. We confirmed the presence of Listeria spp. in variety of food samples in Tunis. Increased food and clinical surveillance must be taken into consideration in Tunisia to identify putative infections sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Microarray-Based Analysis of Differential Gene Expression between Infective and Noninfective Larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis

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    Ramanathan, Roshan; Varma, Sudhir; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Myers, Timothy G.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Abraham, David; Lok, James B.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Differences between noninfective first-stage (L1) and infective third-stage (L3i) larvae of parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis at the molecular level are relatively uncharacterized. DNA microarrays were developed and utilized for this purpose. Methods and Findings Oligonucleotide hybridization probes for the array were designed to bind 3,571 putative mRNA transcripts predicted by analysis of 11,335 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) obtained as part of the Nematode EST project. RNA obtained from S. stercoralis L3i and L1 was co-hybridized to each array after labeling the individual samples with different fluorescent tags. Bioinformatic predictions of gene function were developed using a novel cDNA Annotation System software. We identified 935 differentially expressed genes (469 L3i-biased; 466 L1-biased) having two-fold expression differences or greater and microarray signals with a p valuemicroarray tool for the examination of S. stercoralis biology has been developed and provides new and valuable insights regarding differences between infective and noninfective S. stercoralis larvae. Potential therapeutic and vaccine targets were identified for further study. PMID:21572524

  4. Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiling to Elucidate Effectiveness of Fermented Codonopsis lanceolata in Mice

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    Choi, Woon Yong; Kim, Ji Seon; Park, Sung Jin; Ma, Choong Je; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Codonopsis lanceolata fermented by lactic acid on controlling gene expression levels related to obesity was observed in an oligonucleotide chip microarray. Among 8170 genes, 393 genes were up regulated and 760 genes were down regulated in feeding the fermented C. lanceolata (FCL). Another 374 genes were up regulated and 527 genes down regulated without feeding the sample. The genes were not affected by the FCL sample. It was interesting that among those genes, Chytochrome P450, Dmbt1, LOC76487, and thyroid hormones, etc., were mostly up or down regulated. These genes are more related to lipid synthesis. We could conclude that the FCL possibly controlled the gene expression levels related to lipid synthesis, which resulted in reducing obesity. However, more detailed protein expression experiments should be carried out. PMID:24717412

  5. Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiling to Elucidate Effectiveness of Fermented Codonopsis lanceolata in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon Yong Choi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of Codonopsis lanceolata fermented by lactic acid on controlling gene expression levels related to obesity was observed in an oligonucleotide chip microarray. Among 8170 genes, 393 genes were up regulated and 760 genes were down regulated in feeding the fermented C. lanceolata (FCL. Another 374 genes were up regulated and 527 genes down regulated without feeding the sample. The genes were not affected by the FCL sample. It was interesting that among those genes, Chytochrome P450, Dmbt1, LOC76487, and thyroid hormones, etc., were mostly up or down regulated. These genes are more related to lipid synthesis. We could conclude that the FCL possibly controlled the gene expression levels related to lipid synthesis, which resulted in reducing obesity. However, more detailed protein expression experiments should be carried out.

  6. The construction and use of bacterial DNA microarrays based on an optimized two-stage PCR strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesta David

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays are a powerful tool with important applications such as global gene expression profiling. Construction of bacterial DNA microarrays from genomic sequence data using a two-stage PCR amplification approach for the production of arrayed DNA is attractive because it allows, in principal, the continued re-amplification of DNA fragments and facilitates further utilization of the DNA fragments for additional uses (e.g. over-expression of protein. We describe the successful construction and use of DNA microarrays by the two-stage amplification approach and discuss the technical challenges that were met and resolved during the project. Results Chimeric primers that contained both gene-specific and shared, universal sequence allowed the two-stage amplification of the 3,168 genes identified on the genome of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, an important prokaryotic model organism for the study of oxygenic photosynthesis. The gene-specific component of the primer was of variable length to maintain uniform annealing temperatures during the 1st round of PCR synthesis, and situated to preserve full-length ORFs. Genes were truncated at 2 kb for efficient amplification, so that about 92% of the PCR fragments were full-length genes. The two-stage amplification had the additional advantage of normalizing the yield of PCR products and this improved the uniformity of DNA features robotically deposited onto the microarray surface. We also describe the techniques utilized to optimize hybridization conditions and signal-to-noise ratio of the transcription profile. The inter-lab transportability was demonstrated by the virtual error-free amplification of the entire genome complement of 3,168 genes using the universal primers in partner labs. The printed slides have been successfully used to identify differentially expressed genes in response to a number of environmental conditions, including salt stress. Conclusions The technique detailed

  7. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by mesenchymal stem cells in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ming; Gao, Chang E.; Li, Wen Hui; Yang, Yi; Chang, Li; Dong, Jian; Ren, Yan Xin; Chen, De Dian

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors with a high case-fatality rate among women. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on breast cancer by exploring the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The expression profile of GSE43306, which refers to MDA-MB-231 cells with or without a 1:1 ratio of MSCs, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database for differentially expressed gene (DEG) screening. The Database for Annotati...

  8. Microarray-based screening of differentially expressed genes in glucocorticoid-induced avascular necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangyong; Wei, Yibing; Zhao, Guanglei; Xia, Jun; Wang, Siqun; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Chen, Jie; Shi, Jingshen

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) have yet to be fully understood, in particular the mechanisms associated with the change of gene expression pattern. The present study aimed to identify key genes with a differential expression pattern in GC-induced ANFH. E-MEXP-2751 microarray data were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in 5 femoral head samples of steroid-induced ANFH rats compared with 5 placebo-treated rat samples. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed upon these DEGs. A total 93 DEGs (46 upregulated and 47 downregulated genes) were identified in GC-induced ANFH samples. These DEGs were enriched in different GO terms and pathways, including chondrocyte differentiation and detection of chemical stimuli. The enrichment map revealed that skeletal system development was interconnected with several other GO terms by gene overlap. The literature mined network analysis revealed that 5 upregulated genes were associated with femoral necrosis, including parathyroid hormone receptor 1 (PTHR1), vitamin D (1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3) receptor (VDR), collagen, type II, α1, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 6 and zinc finger protein 354C (ZFP354C). In addition, ZFP354C and VDR were identified to transcription factors. Furthermore, PTHR1 was revealed to interact with VDR, and α-2-macroglobulin (A2M) interacted with fibronectin 1 (FN1) in the PPI network. PTHR1 may be involved in GC-induced ANFH via interacting with VDR. A2M may also be involved in the development of GC-induced ANFH through interacting with FN1. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced ANFH may provide novel targets for diagnostics and therapeutic treatment. PMID:28393228

  9. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by mesenchymal stem cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Gao, Chang E; Li, Wen Hui; Yang, Yi; Chang, Li; Dong, Jian; Ren, Yan Xin; Chen, De Dian

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors with a high case-fatality rate among women. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on breast cancer by exploring the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The expression profile of GSE43306, which refers to MDA-MB-231 cells with or without a 1:1 ratio of MSCs, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database for differentially expressed gene (DEG) screening. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery was used for gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis for DEGs. The protein-protein interactional (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins. The data was subsequently analyzed using molecular complex detection for sub-network mining of modules. Finally, DEGs in modules were analyzed using GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. A total of 291 DEGs including 193 upregulated and 98 downregulated DEGs were obtained. Upregulated DEGs were primarily enriched in pathways including response to wounding (P=5.92×10 -7 ), inflammatory response (P=5.92×10 -4 ) and defense response (P=1.20×10 -2 ), whereas downregulated DEGs were enriched in pathways including the cell cycle (P=7.13×10 -4 ), mitotic cell cycle (P=6.81×10 -3 ) and M phase (P=1.72 ×10 -2 ). The PPI network, which contained 156 nodes and 289 edges, was constructed, and Fos was the hub node with the degree of 29. A total of 3 modules were mined from the PPI network. In total, 14 DEGs in module A were primarily enriched in GO terms, including response to wounding (P=4.77×10 -6 ), wounding healing (P=6.25×10 -7 ) and coagulation (P=1.13 ×10 -7 ), and these DEGs were also enriched in 1 KEGG pathway (complement and coagulation cascades; P=0.0036). Therefore, MSCs were demonstrated to exhibit potentially beneficial effects for breast cancer therapy. In

  10. The development of a DNA microarray-based assay for the characterization of commercially formulated microbial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, J W; Hill, S; England, L S; Edge, T; Masson, L; Trevors, J T; Brousseau, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercially formulated bioproducts containing a complex consortia of bacteria as an active ingredient pose a significant challenge for regulatory agencies and companies seeking to assess the safety and efficacy of these bioproducts. The main challenge stems from how to characterize the bacterial composition of these products, for which there is presently a lack of suitable methods. A prototype DNA microarray composed of oligonucleotide probes for functional genes, virulence factors, and taxonomic genes for a number of bacterial species was developed to examine the utility of microarray technology as a molecular tool for characterizing consortia bioproducts. The genomic DNA from four different products was extracted by two methods and examined with the microarray prototype and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Although the identity of the consortial species remains unknown, the microarray assay provided unique and reproducible hybridization patterns for all four products, and agreed with the fingerprints generated by DGGE. The ability to differentiate between a variety of consortia products demonstrates that DNA microarrays have the potential to be a powerful tool in monitoring complex microbial communities.

  11. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  12. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Nanette; Gazendam, Inge; Oelofse, Dean; Berger, Dave K

    2010-04-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i) to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii) to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self-BLAST function within SSHdb grouped redundant clones together and illustrated that the

  13. Microarray-based analysis of IncA/C plasmid-associated genes from multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    In the family Enterobacteriaceae, plasmids have been classified according to 27 incompatibility (Inc) or replicon types that are based on the inability of different plasmids with the same replication mechanism to coexist in the same cell. Certain replicon types such as IncA/C are associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). We developed a microarray that contains 286 unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes based on sequences from five IncA/C plasmids: pYR1 (Yersinia ruckeri), pPIP1202 (Yersinia pestis), pP99-018 (Photobacterium damselae), pSN254 (Salmonella enterica serovar Newport), and pP91278 (Photobacterium damselae). DNA from 59 Salmonella enterica isolates was hybridized to the microarray and analyzed for the presence or absence of genes. These isolates represented 17 serovars from 14 different animal hosts and from different geographical regions in the United States. Qualitative cluster analysis was performed using CLUSTER 3.0 to group microarray hybridization results. We found that IncA/C plasmids occurred in two lineages distinguished by a major insertion-deletion (indel) region that contains genes encoding mostly hypothetical proteins. The most variable genes were represented by transposon-associated genes as well as four antimicrobial resistance genes (aphA, merP, merA, and aadA). Sixteen mercury resistance genes were identified and highly conserved, suggesting that mercury ion-related exposure is a stronger pressure than anticipated. We used these data to construct a core IncA/C genome and an accessory genome. The results of our studies suggest that the transfer of antimicrobial resistance determinants by transfer of IncA/C plasmids is somewhat less common than exchange within the plasmids orchestrated by transposable elements, such as transposons, integrating and conjugative elements (ICEs), and insertion sequence common regions (ISCRs), and thus pose less opportunity for exchange of antimicrobial resistance.

  14. Gametogenesis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a microarrays-based analysis identifies sex and stage specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn M Dheilly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011 representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters

  15. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oelofse Dean

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self-BLAST function within SSHdb grouped

  16. SSHscreen and SSHdb, generic software for microarray based gene discovery: application to the stress response in cowpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Suppression subtractive hybridization is a popular technique for gene discovery from non-model organisms without an annotated genome sequence, such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). We aimed to use this method to enrich for genes expressed during drought stress in a drought tolerant cowpea line. However, current methods were inefficient in screening libraries and management of the sequence data, and thus there was a need to develop software tools to facilitate the process. Results Forward and reverse cDNA libraries enriched for cowpea drought response genes were screened on microarrays, and the R software package SSHscreen 2.0.1 was developed (i) to normalize the data effectively using spike-in control spot normalization, and (ii) to select clones for sequencing based on the calculation of enrichment ratios with associated statistics. Enrichment ratio 3 values for each clone showed that 62% of the forward library and 34% of the reverse library clones were significantly differentially expressed by drought stress (adjusted p value 88% of the clones in both libraries were derived from rare transcripts in the original tester samples, thus supporting the notion that suppression subtractive hybridization enriches for rare transcripts. A set of 118 clones were chosen for sequencing, and drought-induced cowpea genes were identified, the most interesting encoding a late embryogenesis abundant Lea5 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, a thaumatin, a universal stress protein, and a wound induced protein. A lipid transfer protein and several components of photosynthesis were down-regulated by the drought stress. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed the enrichment ratio values for the selected cowpea genes. SSHdb, a web-accessible database, was developed to manage the clone sequences and combine the SSHscreen data with sequence annotations derived from BLAST and Blast2GO. The self-BLAST function within SSHdb grouped redundant clones together and

  17. Microarray based study on virulence-associated genes and resistance determinants of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Kuhnert, Peter; Hotzel, Helmut; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2007-11-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen which can colonise and infect not only man, but also domestic animals. Especially, infection of cattle is of high economic relevance as S. aureus is an important causal agent of bovine mastitis. In the present contribution, a DNA microarray was applied for the study of 144 different gene targets, including resistance genes and genes encoding exotoxins, in S. aureus isolated from cows. One hundred and twenty-eight isolates from Germany and Switzerland were tested. These isolates were assigned to 20 different strains and nine clonal complexes. The majority of isolates belonged either to apparently closely related clonal complexes 8, 25, and 97 (together 34.4%) or were related to the sequenced bovine strain RF122 (48.4%). Notable characteristics of S. aureus of bovine origin are the carriage of intact haemolysin beta (in 82% of isolates tested), the absence of staphylokinase (in 89.1%), the presence of allelic variants of several exotoxins such as toxic shock syndrome toxin and enterotoxin N, and the occurrence of the leukocidin lukF-P83/lukM (in 53.1%). Two isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). One of them was a clonal complex 8 MRSA related to the epidemic MRSA strain Irish 01. The other one belonged to ST398/spa-type 34 resembling a newly emerging MRSA strain which has been described to occur in humans as well as in domestic animals. The presence of these two strains highlights the possibility of transfers of S. aureus strains between different host species.

  18. Microarray-based gene expression analysis of strong seed dormancy in rice cv. N22 and less dormant mutant derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Yang, Chunyan; Ding, Baoxu; Feng, Zhiming; Wang, Qian; He, Jun; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-02-01

    Seed dormancy in rice is an important trait related to the pre-harvest sprouting resistance. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of seed dormancy, gene expression was investigated by transcriptome analysis using seeds of the strongly dormant cultivar N22 and its less dormant mutants Q4359 and Q4646 at 24 days after heading (DAH). Microarray data revealed more differentially expressed genes in Q4359 than in Q4646 compared to N22. Most genes differing between Q4646 and N22 also differed between Q4359 and N22. GO analysis of genes differentially expressed in both Q4359 and Q4646 revealed that some genes such as those for starch biosynthesis were repressed, whereas metabolic genes such as those for carbohydrate metabolism were enhanced in Q4359 and Q4646 seeds relative to N22. Expression of some genes involved in cell redox homeostasis and chromatin remodeling differed significantly only between Q4359 and N22. The results suggested a close correlation between cell redox homeostasis, chromatin remodeling and seed dormancy. In addition, some genes involved in ABA signaling were down-regulated, and several genes involved in GA biosynthesis and signaling were up-regulated. These observations suggest that reduced seed dormancy in Q4359 was regulated by ABA-GA antagonism. A few differentially expressed genes were located in the regions containing qSdn-1 and qSdn-5 suggesting that they could be candidate genes underlying seed dormancy. Our work provides useful leads to further determine the underling mechanisms of seed dormancy and for cloning seed dormancy genes from N22. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of Listeria Species by Microarray-Based Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Volokhov, Dmitriy; Rasooly, Avraham; Chumakov, Konstantin; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection and discrimination of six species of the Listeria genus: L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. grayi. The approach used in this study involves one-tube multiplex PCR amplification of six target bacterial virulence factor genes (iap, hly, inlB, plcA, plcB, and clpE), synthesis of fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA, and hybridization to the multiple individual oligonucleot...

  20. Time-course investigation of the gene expression profile during Fasciola hepatica infection: A microarray-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Vicente, Belén; Collía, Francisco; Muro, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fasciolosis is listed as one of the most important neglected tropical diseases according with the World Health Organization and is also considered as a reemerging disease in the human beings. Despite there are several studies describing the immune response induced by Fasciola hepatica in the mammalian host, investigations aimed at identifying the expression profile of genes involved in inducing hepatic injury are currently scarce. Data presented here belong to a time-course investigation of the gene expression profile in the liver of BALB/c mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae at 7 and 21 days after experimental infection. The data published here have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE69588, previously published by Rojas-Caraballo et al. (2015) in PLoS One [1].

  1. Time-course investigation of the gene expression profile during Fasciola hepatica infection: A microarray-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rojas-Caraballo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis is listed as one of the most important neglected tropical diseases according with the World Health Organization and is also considered as a reemerging disease in the human beings. Despite there are several studies describing the immune response induced by Fasciola hepatica in the mammalian host, investigations aimed at identifying the expression profile of genes involved in inducing hepatic injury are currently scarce. Data presented here belong to a time-course investigation of the gene expression profile in the liver of BALB/c mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae at 7 and 21 days after experimental infection. The data published here have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE69588, previously published by Rojas-Caraballo et al. (2015 in PLoS One [1].

  2. Microarray-based identification of differentially expressed genes in intracellular Brucella abortus within RAW264.7 cells.

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    Mingxing Tian

    Full Text Available Brucella spp. is a species of facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that induces abortion and causes sterility in domesticated mammals and chronic undulant fever in humans. Important determinants of Brucella's virulence and potential for chronic infection include the ability to circumvent the host cell's internal surveillance system and the capability to proliferate within dedicated and non-dedicated phagocytes. Hence, identifying genes necessary for intracellular survival may hold the key to understanding Brucella infection. In the present study, microarray analysis reveals that 7.82% (244/3334 of all Brucella abortus genes were up-regulated and 5.4% (180/3334 were down-regulated in RAW264.7 cells, compared to free-living cells in TSB. qRT-PCR verification further confirmed a >5-fold up-regulation for fourteen genes. Functional analysis classified araC, ddp, and eryD as to partake in information storage and processing, alp, flgF and virB9 to be involved in cellular processes, hpcd and aldh to play a role in metabolism, mfs and nikC to be involved in both cellular processes and metabolism, and four hypothetical genes (bruAb1_1814, bruAb1_0475, bruAb1_1926, and bruAb1_0292 had unknown functions. Furthermore, we constructed a B. abortus 2308 mutant Δddp where the ddp gene is deleted in order to evaluate the role of ddp in intracellular survival. Infection assay indicated significantly higher adherence and invasion abilities of the Δddp mutant, however it does not survive well in RAW264.7 cells. Brucella may survive in hostile intracellular environment by modulating gene expression.

  3. Microarray-based analysis of gene expression profiles in peripheral blood of patients with acute primary angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeoung, Jin Wook; Ko, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yu Jeong; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Ki Ho; Oh, Joo Youn

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the expression of molecules in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma of patients with acute primary angle closure (APAC). Peripheral blood was collected from patients with APAC (n = 10) and age-matched controls (n = 5). The gene transcription profile was analyzed in PBMCs using microarrays and validated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The levels of secreted proteins were evaluated in plasma by ELISA. 347 gene transcripts were up-regulated by 2-fold or more, and 696 transcripts down-regulated 2-fold or more in PBMCs from patients compared to controls. The most highly up-regulated gene was thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, 8.66-fold increase), and the most down-regulated gene was prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, 9.09-fold decrease). Real-time RT-PCR assay confirmed the increase of TSP-1 and the decrease of PTGS2 in PBMCs of patients. ELISA revealed that the levels of TSP-1 and active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 that is activated by TSP-1 were elevated in plasma of patients, while the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that is converted by PTGS2 was reduced. The plasma level of TSP-1 was positively correlated with that of active TGF-β1. Our data suggest that the molecular network including TSP-1, TGF-β1, and PGE2 might be involved in the pathogenesis of APAC and PACG.

  4. Microarray-based analysis of the differential expression of melanin synthesis genes in dark and light-muzzle Korean cattle.

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    Sang Hwan Kim

    Full Text Available The coat color of mammals is determined by the melanogenesis pathway, which is responsible for maintaining the balance between black-brown eumelanin and yellow-reddish pheomelanin. It is also believed that the color of the bovine muzzle is regulated in a similar manner; however, the molecular mechanism underlying pigment deposition in the dark-muzzle has yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to identify melanogenesis-associated genes that are differentially expressed in the dark vs. light muzzle of native Korean cows. Using microarray clustering and real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques, we observed that the expression of genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and Wnt signaling pathways is distinctively regulated in the dark and light muzzle tissues. Differential expression of tyrosinase was also noticed, although the difference was not as distinct as those of MAPK and Wnt. We hypothesize that emphasis on the MAPK pathway in the dark-muzzle induces eumelanin synthesis through the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein and tyrosinase, while activation of Wnt signaling counteracts this process and raises the amount of pheomelanin in the light-muzzle. We also found 2 novel genes (GenBank No. NM-001076026 and XM-588439 with increase expression in the black nose, which may provide additional information about the mechanism of nose pigmentation. Regarding the increasing interest in the genetic diversity of cattle stocks, genes we identified for differential expression in the dark vs. light muzzle may serve as novel markers for genetic diversity among cows based on the muzzle color phenotype.

  5. Evaluation of applicability of DNA microarray-based characterization of bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates using whole genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Stefanie A; Menge, Christian; Eichhorn, Inga; Semmler, Torsten; Pickard, Derek; Geue, Lutz

    2017-09-01

    We assessed the ability of a commercial DNA microarray to characterize bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates and evaluated the results using in silico hybridization of the microarray probes within whole genome sequencing scaffolds. From a total of 69,954 reactions (393 probes with 178 isolates), 68,706 (98.2%) gave identical results by DNA microarray and in silico probe hybridization. Results were more congruent when detecting the genoserotype (209 differing results from 19,758 in total; 1.1%) or antimicrobial resistance genes (AMRGs; 141 of 26,878; 0.5%) than when detecting virulence-associated genes (VAGs; 876 of 22,072; 4.0%). Owing to the limited coverage of O-antigens by the microarray, only 37.2% of the isolates could be genoserotyped. However, the microarray proved suitable to rapidly screen bovine STEC strains for the occurrence of high numbers of VAGs and AMRGs and is suitable for molecular surveillance workflows.

  6. Identification of Listeria species by microarray-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokhov, Dmitriy; Rasooly, Avraham; Chumakov, Konstantin; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection and discrimination of six species of the Listeria genus: L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. grayi. The approach used in this study involves one-tube multiplex PCR amplification of six target bacterial virulence factor genes (iap, hly, inlB, plcA, plcB, and clpE), synthesis of fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA, and hybridization to the multiple individual oligonucleotide probes specific for each Listeria species and immobilized on a glass surface. Results of the microarray analysis of 53 reference and clinical isolates of Listeria spp. demonstrated that this method allowed unambiguous identification of all six Listeria species based on sequence differences in the iap gene. Another virulence factor gene, hly, was used for detection and genotyping all L. monocytogenes, all L. ivanovii, and 8 of 11 L. seeligeri isolates. Other members of the genus Listeria and three L. seeligeri isolates did not contain the hly gene. There was complete agreement between the results of genotyping based on the hly and iap gene sequences. All L. monocytogenes isolates were found to be positive for the inlB, plcA, plcB, and clpE virulence genes specific only to this species. Our data on Listeria species analysis demonstrated that this microarray technique is a simple, rapid, and robust genotyping method that is also a potentially valuable tool for identification and characterization of bacterial pathogens in general.

  7. DNA microarray-based solid-phase RT-PCR for rapid detection and identification of influenza virus type A and subtypes H5 and H7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sun; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bang, Dang Duong

    2011-01-01

    Endemic of avian influenza virus (AIV) in Asia and epizootics in some European regions have caused considerable public concern on a possible pandemic of AIV. A rapid method for virus detection and effective surveillance in wild avian, poultry production as well as in humans is required. In this a......Endemic of avian influenza virus (AIV) in Asia and epizootics in some European regions have caused considerable public concern on a possible pandemic of AIV. A rapid method for virus detection and effective surveillance in wild avian, poultry production as well as in humans is required...... of RNA extract in the liquid phase with sequence-specific nested PCR on the solid phase. A simple ultraviolet cross-linking method was used to immobilize the DNA probes over an unmodified glass surface, which makes solid-phase PCR a convenient possibility for AIV screening. The testing of 33 avian fecal...

  8. The Arabidopsis co-expression tool (act): a WWW-based tool and database for microarray-based gene expression analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, C. H.; Manfield, I. W.; Michalopoulos, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    gene co-expression patterns. To demonstrate the ability of the software to develop testable hypotheses on gene function within a defined biological process we have used the example of cell wall biosynthesis genes. The resource is freely available at http://www.arabidopsis.leeds.ac.uk/ACT/......, and dissection into cliques of co-regulated genes. We illustrate the applications of the software by analysing genes encoding functionally related proteins, as well as pathways involved in plant responses to environmental stimuli. These analyses demonstrate novel biological relationships underlying the observed...

  9. Development of a miniaturised microarray-based assay for the rapid identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batchelor, M.; Hopkins, K.L.; Liebana, E.; Slickers, P.; Ehricht, R.; Mafura, M.; Aerestrup, F.; Mevius, D.J.; Clifton-Hadley, F.A.; Woodward, M.; Davies, R.; Threlfall, J.; Anjum, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development of a miniaturised microarray for the detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria. Included on the array are genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and ß-lactams, including extended-spectrum

  10. Development of a miniaturised microarray-based assay for the rapid identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchelor, Miranda; Hopkins, Katie L; Liebana, Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    also seen in the number and type of resistance genes harboured by E. coli and Salmonella strains. The array provides an effective, fast and simple method for detection of resistance genes in clinical isolates suitable for use in diagnostic laboratories, which in future will help to understand...

  11. A high-density transcript linkage map with 1,845 expressed genes positioned by microarray-based Single Feature Polymorphisms (SFP in Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfenas Acelino C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances are progressively increasing the application of genomics to a wider array of economically and ecologically important species. High-density maps enriched for transcribed genes facilitate the discovery of connections between genes and phenotypes. We report the construction of a high-density linkage map of expressed genes for the heterozygous genome of Eucalyptus using Single Feature Polymorphism (SFP markers. Results SFP discovery and mapping was achieved using pseudo-testcross screening and selective mapping to simultaneously optimize linkage mapping and microarray costs. SFP genotyping was carried out by hybridizing complementary RNA prepared from 4.5 year-old trees xylem to an SFP array containing 103,000 25-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 20,726 unigenes derived from a modest size expressed sequence tags collection. An SFP-mapping microarray with 43,777 selected candidate SFP probes representing 15,698 genes was subsequently designed and used to genotype SFPs in a larger subset of the segregating population drawn by selective mapping. A total of 1,845 genes were mapped, with 884 of them ordered with high likelihood support on a framework map anchored to 180 microsatellites with average density of 1.2 cM. Using more probes per unigene increased by two-fold the likelihood of detecting segregating SFPs eventually resulting in more genes mapped. In silico validation showed that 87% of the SFPs map to the expected location on the 4.5X draft sequence of the Eucalyptus grandis genome. Conclusions The Eucalyptus 1,845 gene map is the most highly enriched map for transcriptional information for any forest tree species to date. It represents a major improvement on the number of genes previously positioned on Eucalyptus maps and provides an initial glimpse at the gene space for this global tree genome. A general protocol is proposed to build high-density transcript linkage maps in less characterized

  12. A high-density transcript linkage map with 1,845 expressed genes positioned by microarray-based Single Feature Polymorphisms (SFP) in Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Leandro G; Mc Mamani, Eva; Alfenas, Acelino C; Kirst, Matias; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2011-04-14

    Technological advances are progressively increasing the application of genomics to a wider array of economically and ecologically important species. High-density maps enriched for transcribed genes facilitate the discovery of connections between genes and phenotypes. We report the construction of a high-density linkage map of expressed genes for the heterozygous genome of Eucalyptus using Single Feature Polymorphism (SFP) markers. SFP discovery and mapping was achieved using pseudo-testcross screening and selective mapping to simultaneously optimize linkage mapping and microarray costs. SFP genotyping was carried out by hybridizing complementary RNA prepared from 4.5 year-old trees xylem to an SFP array containing 103,000 25-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 20,726 unigenes derived from a modest size expressed sequence tags collection. An SFP-mapping microarray with 43,777 selected candidate SFP probes representing 15,698 genes was subsequently designed and used to genotype SFPs in a larger subset of the segregating population drawn by selective mapping. A total of 1,845 genes were mapped, with 884 of them ordered with high likelihood support on a framework map anchored to 180 microsatellites with average density of 1.2 cM. Using more probes per unigene increased by two-fold the likelihood of detecting segregating SFPs eventually resulting in more genes mapped. In silico validation showed that 87% of the SFPs map to the expected location on the 4.5X draft sequence of the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The Eucalyptus 1,845 gene map is the most highly enriched map for transcriptional information for any forest tree species to date. It represents a major improvement on the number of genes previously positioned on Eucalyptus maps and provides an initial glimpse at the gene space for this global tree genome. A general protocol is proposed to build high-density transcript linkage maps in less characterized plant species by SFP genotyping with a concurrent objective of

  13. Microarray based analysis of an inherited terminal 3p26.3 deletion, containing only the CHL1 gene, from a normal father to his two affected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerone Margherita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background terminal deletions of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 3 cause a rare contiguous gene disorder characterized by growth retardation, developmental delay, mental retardation, dysmorphisms, microcephaly and ptosis. The phenotype of individuals with deletions varies from normal to severe. It was suggested that a 1,5 Mb minimal terminal deletion including the two genes CRBN and CNTN4 is sufficient to cause the syndrome. In addition the CHL1 gene, mapping at 3p26.3 distally to CRBN and CNTN4, was proposed as candidate gene for a non specific mental retardation because of its high level of expression in the brain. Methods and Results we describe two affected siblings in which array-CGH analysis disclosed an identical discontinuous terminal 3p26.3 deletion spanning less than 1 Mb. The deletion was transmitted from their normal father and included only the CHL1 gene. The two brothers present microcephaly, light mental retardation, learning and language difficulties but not the typical phenotype manifestations described in 3p- syndrome. Conclusion a terminal 3p26.3 deletion including only the CHL1 gene is a very rare finding previously reported only in one family. The phenotype of the affected individuals in the two families is very similar and the deletion has been inherited from an apparently normal parent. As already described for others recurrent syndromes with variable phenotype, these findings are challenging in genetic counselling because of an evident variable penetrance.

  14. Comprehensive microarray-based analysis for stage-specific larval camouflage pattern-associated genes in the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futahashi Ryo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body coloration is an ecologically important trait that is often involved in prey-predator interactions through mimicry and crypsis. Although this subject has attracted the interest of biologists and the general public, our scientific knowledge on the subject remains fragmentary. In the caterpillar of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus, spectacular changes in the color pattern are observed; the insect mimics bird droppings (mimetic pattern as a young larva, and switches to a green camouflage coloration (cryptic pattern in the final instar. Despite the wide variety and significance of larval color patterns, few studies have been conducted at a molecular level compared with the number of studies on adult butterfly wing patterns. Results To obtain a catalog of genes involved in larval mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, we constructed expressed sequence tag (EST libraries of larval epidermis for P. xuthus, and P. polytes that contained 20,736 and 5,376 clones, respectively, representing one of the largest collections available in butterflies. A comparison with silkworm epidermal EST information revealed the high expression of putative blue and yellow pigment-binding proteins in Papilio species. We also designed a microarray from the EST dataset information, analyzed more than five stages each for six markings, and confirmed spatial expression patterns by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Hence, we succeeded in elucidating many novel marking-specific genes for mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, including pigment-binding protein genes, the melanin-associated gene yellow-h3, the ecdysteroid synthesis enzyme gene 3-dehydroecdysone 3b-reductase, and Papilio-specific genes. We also found many cuticular protein genes with marking specificity that may be associated with the unique surface nanostructure of the markings. Furthermore, we identified two transcription factors, spalt and ecdysteroid signal-related E75, as genes

  15. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  16. Neural networks and Fuzzy clustering methods for assessing the efficacy of microarray based intrinsic gene signatures in breast cancer classification and the character and relations of identified subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun

    2015-01-01

    In the classification of breast cancer subtypes using microarray data, hierarchical clustering is commonly used. Although this form of clustering shows basic cluster patterns, more needs to be done to investigate the accuracy of clusters as well as to extract meaningful cluster characteristics and their relations to increase our confidence in their use in a clinical setting. In this study, an in-depth investigation of the efficacy of three reported gene subsets in distinguishing breast cancer subtypes was performed using four advanced computational intelligence methods-Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), Emergent Self-Organizing Maps (ESOM), Fuzzy Clustering by Local Approximation of Memberships (FLAME), and Fuzzy C-means (FCM)-each differing in the way they view data in terms of distance measures and fuzzy or crisp clustering. The gene subsets consisted of 71, 93, and 71 genes reported in the literature from three comprehensive experimental studies for distinguishing Luminal (A and B), Basal, Normal breast-like, and HER2 subtypes. Given the costly procedures involved in clinical studies, the proposed 93-gene set can be used for preliminary classification of breast cancer. Then, as a decision aid, SOM can be used to map the gene signature of a new patient to locate them with respect to all subtypes to get a comprehensive view of the classification. These can be followed by a deeper investigation in the light of the observations made in this study regarding overlapping subtypes. Results from the study could be used as the base for further refining the gene signatures from later experiments and from new experiments designed to separate overlapping clusters as well as to maximally separate all clusters.

  17. Microarray-based mutation analysis of the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene in autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klevering, B.J.; Ijzer, S.; Rohrschneider, K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Allikmets, R.; Born, L.I. van den; Maugeri, A.; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCA4 gene have been associated with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We employed a recently developed genotyping microarray, the ABCR400-chip, to search for known ABCA4 mutations in patients with isolated or

  18. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation Status of CpGs in Placental DNA and Maternal Blood DNA - Potential New Epigenetic Biomarkers for Cell Free Fetal DNA-Based Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M; Graakjaer, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    of the present study was to define new fetal specific epigenetic markers present in placental DNA that can be utilized in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted a high-resolution methylation specific beadchip microarray study assessing more than 450.000 CpG sites. We have analyzed the DNA methylation......G sites to be used with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes (MSRE) in PCR-based NIPD, we furthermore refined the list of selected sites, containing a restriction sites for one of 16 different methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. We present a list of markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21...

  19. DNA microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These genes may play a major role in promoting excessive proliferation and accumulation of lipid droplets, which contribute to the development of obesity. By using microarray-based technology, we examined differential gene expression in early differentiated adipocytes and late differentiated adipocytes. Validated genes ...

  20. Visualizing spatiotemporal dynamics of apoptosis after G1 arrest by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and insights into gene expression changes using microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax is a potent activator of viral and cellular gene expression that interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Many reports show that Tax is capable of regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis both positively and negatively. However, it still remains to understand why the Tax oncoprotein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, or whether Tax-induced apoptosis is dependent upon its ability to induce G1 arrest. The present study used time-lapse imaging to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of cell cycle dynamics in Tax-expressing HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator, Fucci2. A large-scale host cell gene profiling approach was also used to identify the genes involved in Tax-mediated cell signaling events related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Results Tax-expressing apoptotic cells showed a rounded morphology and detached from the culture dish after cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Thus, it appears that Tax induces apoptosis through pathways identical to those involved in G1 arrest. To elucidate the mechanism(s by which Tax induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, regulation of host cellular genes by Tax was analyzed using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts. Seventeen genes related to cell cycle regulation were identified as being up or downregulated > 2.0-fold in Tax-expressing cells. Several genes, including SMAD3, JUN, GADD45B, DUSP1 and IL8, were involved in cellular proliferation, responses to cellular stress and DNA damage, or inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, 23 pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were deregulated by Tax, including TNFAIP3, TNFRS9, BIRC3 and IL6. Furthermore, the kinetics of IL8, SMAD3, CDKN1A, GADD45A, GADD45B and IL6 expression were altered following the induction of Tax, and correlated closely with the morphological changes observed by time

  1. Visualizing spatiotemporal dynamics of apoptosis after G1 arrest by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and insights into gene expression changes using microarray-based gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arainga, Mariluz; Murakami, Hironobu; Aida, Yoko

    2012-06-22

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax is a potent activator of viral and cellular gene expression that interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Many reports show that Tax is capable of regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis both positively and negatively. However, it still remains to understand why the Tax oncoprotein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, or whether Tax-induced apoptosis is dependent upon its ability to induce G1 arrest. The present study used time-lapse imaging to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of cell cycle dynamics in Tax-expressing HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator, Fucci2. A large-scale host cell gene profiling approach was also used to identify the genes involved in Tax-mediated cell signaling events related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Tax-expressing apoptotic cells showed a rounded morphology and detached from the culture dish after cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Thus, it appears that Tax induces apoptosis through pathways identical to those involved in G1 arrest. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Tax induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, regulation of host cellular genes by Tax was analyzed using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts. Seventeen genes related to cell cycle regulation were identified as being up or downregulated > 2.0-fold in Tax-expressing cells. Several genes, including SMAD3, JUN, GADD45B, DUSP1 and IL8, were involved in cellular proliferation, responses to cellular stress and DNA damage, or inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, 23 pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were deregulated by Tax, including TNFAIP3, TNFRS9, BIRC3 and IL6. Furthermore, the kinetics of IL8, SMAD3, CDKN1A, GADD45A, GADD45B and IL6 expression were altered following the induction of Tax, and correlated closely with the morphological changes observed by time-lapse imaging. Taken together, the results of this

  2. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... with these modifications, it is likely that the primary use of DNA vaccines may be as primers for viral-vectored vaccines, rather than as single agents. This review discusses the approaches used to enhance DNA vaccine immunogenicity, with a primary focus on fusion strategies that enhance antigen presentation....

  3. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... with viral-vectored vaccines, various synergistic components may need to be incorporated into DNA vaccines. From the perspective of the future clinical use of DNA vaccines, it has been suggested that antigen presentation should be improved and cytokine coadministration attempted. However, even...

  4. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  5. Gene expression profiling by DNA microarrays and its application to dental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Winston Patrick; Whipple, Mark E; Sonis, Stephen T; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian

    2002-10-01

    DNA microarray technology has been used for genome-wide gene expression studies that incorporate molecular genetics and computer science skills on massive levels. The technology permits the simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of genes for the purposes of gene discovery, disease diagnosis. improved drug development, and therapeutics tailored to specific disease processes. In this review, the two most common microarray technologies and their potential application to dental research will be discussed. The authors review current articles pertaining to the technologies and analysis of mRNA expression using DNA micro-arrays and its application to dental research. Since many genes contribute to normal functioning, research efforts are moving from the search for a disease specific gene to the understanding of the biochemical and molecular functioning of a variety of genes and how complicated networks of interaction can lead to a disease state, such as oral cancer. With the incorporation of DNA micro-array based research, we can look forward to more accurate diagnosis and surgical treatment/drug-delivery therapy based on an individual patient's genetic profile.

  6. Multiplex Detection and Genotyping of Point Mutations Involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Using a Hairpin Microarray-Based Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Baaj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously developed a highly specific method for detecting SNPs with a microarray-based system using stem-loop probes. In this paper we demonstrate that coupling a multiplexing procedure with our microarray method is possible for the simultaneous detection and genotyping of four point mutations, in three different genes, involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. DNA from healthy individuals and patients was amplified, labeled with Cy3 by multiplex PCR; and hybridized to microarrays. Spot signal intensities were 18 to 74 times greater for perfect matches than for mismatched target sequences differing by a single nucleotide (discrimination ratio for “homozygous” DNA from healthy individuals. “Heterozygous” mutant DNA samples gave signal intensity ratios close to 1 at the positions of the mutations as expected. Genotyping by this method was therefore reliable. This system now combines the principle of highly specific genotyping based on stem-loop structure probes with the advantages of multiplex analysis.

  7. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To simulate single gene retrieval from ancient DNA, several related factors have been investigated. By monitoring a 889 bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product and genomic DNA degradation, we find that heat and oxygen (especially heat) are both crucial factors influencing DNA degradation. The heat influence ...

  8. Detection of small genomic imbalances using microarray-based multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalis, Philippos C; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Männik, Katrin; Sismani, Carolina; Zilina, Olga; Parkel, Sven; Puusepp, Helen; Tõnisson, Neeme; Palta, Priit; Remm, Maido; Kurg, Ants

    2007-02-01

    Array-based genome-wide screening methods were recently introduced to clinical practice in order to detect small genomic imbalances that may cause severe genetic disorders. The continuous advancement of such methods plays an extremely important role in diagnostic genetics and medical genomics. We have modified and adapted the original multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH) to a novel microarray format providing an important new diagnostic tool for detection of small size copy-number changes in any locus of human genome. Here, we describe the new array-MAPH diagnostic method and show proof of concept through fabrication, interrogation and validation of a human chromosome X-specific array. We have developed new bioinformatic tools and methodology for designing and producing amplifiable hybridization probes (200-600 bp) for array-MAPH. We designed 558 chromosome X-specific probes with median spacing 238 kb and 107 autosomal probes, which were spotted onto microarrays. DNA samples from normal individuals and patients with known and unknown chromosome X aberrations were analyzed for validation. Array-MAPH detected exactly the same deletions and duplications in blind studies, as well as other unknown small size deletions showing its accuracy and sensitivity. All results were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and probe-specific PCR. Array-MAPH is a new microarray-based diagnostic tool for the detection of small-scale copy-number changes in complex genomes, which may be useful for genotype-phenotype correlations, identification of new genes, studying genetic variation and provision of genetic services.

  9. Towards standardization of microarray-based genotyping of Salmonella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Grønlund, Hugo Ahlm; Riber, Leise

    2010-01-01

    Genotyping is becoming an increasingly important tool to improve risk assessments of Salmonella. DNA microarray technology is a promising diagnostic tool that can provide high resolution genomic profile of many genes simultaneously. However, standardization of DNA microarray analysis is needed...... of Salmonella at two different laboratories. The low-density array contained 281 of 57-60-mer oligonucleotide probes for detecting a wide range of specific genomic markers associated with antibiotic resistance, cell envelope structures, mobile genetic elements and pathogenicity. Several test parameters...... for a decentralized and simple-to-implement DNA microarray as part of a pan-European source-attribution model for risk assessment of Salmonella....

  10. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs

  11. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the chemical ... needed to build the entire human body. A gene traditionally refers to the unit of DNA that ...

  12. Investigation of parameters that affect the success rate of microarray-based allele-specific hybridization assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Poulsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of microarray-based genetic tests for diseases that are caused by known mutations is becoming increasingly important. The key obstacle to developing functional genotyping assays is that such mutations need to be genotyped regardless of their location in genomic regions. These regions include large variations in G+C content, and structural features like hairpins. METHODS/FINDINGS: We describe a rational, stable method for screening and combining assay conditions for the genetic analysis of 42 Phenylketonuria-associated mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. The mutations are located in regions with large variations in G+C content (20-75%. Custom-made microarrays with different lengths of complementary probe sequences and spacers were hybridized with pooled PCR products of 12 exons from each of 38 individual patient DNA samples. The arrays were washed with eight buffers with different stringencies in a custom-made microfluidic system. The data were used to assess which parameters play significant roles in assay development. CONCLUSIONS: Several assay development methods found suitable probes and assay conditions for a functional test for all investigated mutation sites. Probe length, probe spacer length, and assay stringency sufficed as variable parameters in the search for a functional multiplex assay. We discuss the optimal assay development methods for several different scenarios.

  13. Microarray-based method for the parallel analysis of genotypes and expression profiles of wood-forming tissues in Eucalyptus grandis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barros, E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available of Eucalyptus grandis planting stock that exhibit preferred wood qualities is thus a priority of the South African forestry industry. The researchers used microarray-based DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis in combination with expression...

  14. Application of Microarray-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Prenatal and Postnatal Settings: Three Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH is a newly emerged molecular cytogenetic technique for rapid evaluation of the entire genome with sub-megabase resolution. It allows for the comprehensive investigation of thousands and millions of genomic loci at once and therefore enables the efficient detection of DNA copy number variations (a.k.a, cryptic genomic imbalances. The development and the clinical application of array CGH have revolutionized the diagnostic process in patients and has provided a clue to many unidentified or unexplained diseases which are suspected to have a genetic cause. In this paper, we present three clinical cases in both prenatal and postnatal settings. Among all, array CGH played a major discovery role to reveal the cryptic and/or complex nature of chromosome arrangements. By identifying the genetic causes responsible for the clinical observation in patients, array CGH has provided accurate diagnosis and appropriate clinical management in a timely and efficient manner.

  15. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Nuclear gene sequences from a late pleistoncene sloth copro- lite; Curr. Biol. 13 1150–1152. Poinar H N, HÖss M, Bada J L and Pääbo S 1996 Amino acid racemization and the preservation of ancient DNA; Science. 272 864–867. Reiners P W, Brady R, Farley K A, Fryxell J E, Wernicke B and Lux D 2000 Helium and argon ...

  16. Development and Use of Integrated Microarray-Based Genomic Technologies for Assessing Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Zhou; S.-K. Rhee; C. Schadt; T. Gentry; Z. He; X. Li; X. Liu; J. Liebich; S.C. Chong; L. Wu

    2004-03-17

    To effectively monitor microbial populations involved in various important processes, a 50-mer-based oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on known genes and pathways involved in: biodegradation, metal resistance and reduction, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis, carbon polymer decomposition, and sulfate reduction. This array contains approximately 2000 unique and group-specific probes with <85% similarity to their non-target sequences. Based on artificial probes, our results showed that at hybridization conditions of 50 C and 50% formamide, the 50-mer microarray hybridization can differentiate sequences having <88% similarity. Specificity tests with representative pure cultures indicated that the designed probes on the arrays appeared to be specific to their corresponding target genes. Detection limits were about 5-10ng genomic DNA in the absence of background DNA, and 50-100ng ({approx}1.3{sup o} 10{sup 7} cells) in the presence background DNA. Strong linear relationships between signal intensity and target DNA and RNA concentration were observed (r{sup 2} = 0.95-0.99). Application of this microarray to naphthalene-amended enrichments and soil microcosms demonstrated that composition of the microflora varied depending on incubation conditions. While the naphthalene-degrading genes from Rhodococcus-type microorganisms were dominant in enrichments, the genes involved in naphthalene degradation from Gram-negative microorganisms such as Ralstonia, Comamonas, and Burkholderia were most abundant in the soil microcosms (as well as those for polyaromatic hydrocarbon and nitrotoluene degradation). Although naphthalene degradation is widely known and studied in Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas genes were not detected in either system. Real-time PCR analysis of 4 representative genes was consistent with microarray-based quantification (r{sup 2} = 0.95). Currently, we are also applying this microarray to the study of several

  17. DNA Amplification of Meat Tenderness Gene of Bali Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Susilo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find out DNA band pattern as a result of amplification using DNA primer from meat tenderness gene of Bali cattle. Sample used in this study was DNA isolated from blood Bali cattle. Blood samples was collected in heparin tubes from jugular vein. Leucocyte cells were isolated using RBCs (Red Blood Cells lysis buffer. To get DNA fragmen, marbling and meat tenderness gene were amplified by using DNA primer for for meat tenderness (forward: 5’–CTACCGGGACGTCAACCT-3’; reverse: 5’-GGTTGTCGGGGTAGCTCA-3’. The size of DNA fragment were 210 bp. Key words: Bali cattle, meat tenderness gene

  18. DNA Amplification of Meat Tenderness Gene of Bali Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Susilo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to know DNA band pattern as a result of amplification using DNA primer from meat tenderness gene of Bali cattle. Sample used in this study was DNA isolated from blood Bali cattle. Blood samples was collected in heparin tubes from jugular vein. Leucocyte cells were isolated using RBCs (Red Blood Cells lysis buffer. To get DNA fragmen, marbling and meat tenderness gene were amplified by using DNA primer for for meat tenderness (forward: 5’–CTACCGGGACGTCAACCT-3’; reverse: 5’-GGTTGTCGGGGTAGCTCA-3’. The size of DNA fragment were 210 bp, respectively. Key words: Bali cattle, meat tenderness gene

  19. Accurate and rapid identification of Candida spp. frequently associated with fungemia by using PCR and the microarray-based Prove-it Sepsis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aittakorpi, Anne; Kuusela, Pentti; Koukila-Kähkölä, Pirkko; Vaara, Martti; Petrou, Michael; Gant, Vanya; Mäki, Minna

    2012-11-01

    The rapid identification of microbes responsible for bloodstream infections (BSIs) allows more focused and effective therapies and outcomes. DNA sequence-based methods offer an opportunity for faster, accurate diagnosis and for effective therapy. As our objective of the study, the ability of the Prove-it Sepsis platform, already proven as a rapid PCR- and microarray-based assay for the majority of sepsis-causing bacteria, was extended to also rapidly identify clinically relevant yeasts in blood culture. The performance characteristics of this extended platform are described. We found that the extended diagnostic Prove-it Sepsis platform was found to be highly accurate when analyzing primary isolates, spiked blood cultures, nucleic acid extracts from a retrospective blood culture data set, and primary blood cultures. Comparison of the blood culture results from the Prove-it Sepsis platform with those from conventional culture-based methods or by gene sequencing demonstrated a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 98% for fungal targets (based on analysis of a total of 388 specimens). Total assay time was 3 h from DNA extraction to BSI diagnosis. These results extend the performance characteristics of the Prove-it platform for bacteria to the easy, rapid, and accurate detection and species identification of yeasts in positive blood cultures. Incorporation of this extended and rapid diagnostic platform into the tools for clinical patient management would allow possibly faster identification and more focused therapies for BSIs.

  20. Gene activation by induced DNA rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnipper, L.E.; Chan, V.; Sedivy, J.; Jat, P.; Sharp, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    A murine cell line (EN/NIH) containing the retroviral vector ZIPNeoSV(x)1 that was modified by deletion of the enhancer elements in the viral long terminal repeats has been used as an assay system to detect induced DNA rearrangements that result in activation of a transcriptionally silent reporter gene encoded by the viral genome. The spontaneous frequency of G418 resistance is less than 10(-7), whereas exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or the combination of UV irradiation plus TPA resulted in the emergence of drug resistant cell lines at a frequency of 5 per 10(6) and 67 per 10(6) cells, respectively. In several of the cell lines that were analyzed a low level of amplification of one of the two parental retroviral integrants was observed, whereas in others no alteration in the region of the viral genome was detected. To determine the effect of the SV40 large T antigen on induced DNA rearrangements, EN/NIH cells were transfected with a temperature sensitive (ts) mutant of SV40 T. Transfectants were maintained at the permissive temperature (33 degrees C) for varying periods of time (1-5 days) in order to vary SV40 T antigen exposure, after which they were shifted to 39.5 degrees C for selection in G418. The frequency of emergence of drug resistant cell clones increased with duration of exposure to large T antigen (9-52 per 10(6) cells over 1-5 days, respectively), and all cell lines analyzed demonstrated DNA rearrangements in the region of the neo gene. A novel 18-kilobase pair XbaI fragment was cloned from one cell line which revealed the presence of a 2.0-kilobase pair EcoRI segment containing an inverted duplication which hybridized to neo sequences. It is likely that the observed rearrangement was initiated by the specific binding of large T antigen to the SV40 origin of replication encoded within the viral genome

  1. Microarray-Based Cancer Prediction Using Soft Computing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the difficulties in using gene expression profiles to predict cancer is how to effectively select a few informative genes to construct accurate prediction models from thousands or ten thousands of genes. We screen highly discriminative genes and gene pairs to create simple prediction models involved in single genes or gene pairs on the basis of soft computing approach and rough set theory. Accurate cancerous prediction is obtained when we apply the simple prediction models for four cancerous gene expression datasets: CNS tumor, colon tumor, lung cancer and DLBCL. Some genes closely correlated with the pathogenesis of specific or general cancers are identified. In contrast with other models, our models are simple, effective and robust. Meanwhile, our models are interpretable for they are based on decision rules. Our results demonstrate that very simple models may perform well on cancerous molecular prediction and important gene markers of cancer can be detected if the gene selection approach is chosen reasonably.

  2. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    expression and function, leading to variation in cancer risk. To maintain integrity of the genome, mammalian cells have developed several DNA-repair mechanisms that each deal with a specific type of DNA damage. DNA-repair genes, like detoxification enzymes, are responsible for preventing cancer by protecting the ...

  3. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... [Khandelwal G, Gupta J and Jayaram B 2012 DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in prokaryotes. J. Biosci. 37 433–444] DOI ..... illustration for detecting potential new genes in 12 different genomes with varied GC ..... maps and genetic map of DNA double strand. J. Phys. Soc. Jpn.

  4. Microarray-based ultra-high resolution discovery of genomic deletion mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oligonucleotide microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) offers an attractive possible route for the rapid and cost-effective genome-wide discovery of deletion mutations. CGH typically involves comparison of the hybridization intensities of genomic DNA samples with microarray chip representations of entire genomes, and has widespread potential application in experimental research and medical diagnostics. However, the power to detect small deletions is low. Results Here we use a graduated series of Arabidopsis thaliana genomic deletion mutations (of sizes ranging from 4 bp to ~5 kb) to optimize CGH-based genomic deletion detection. We show that the power to detect smaller deletions (4, 28 and 104 bp) depends upon oligonucleotide density (essentially the number of genome-representative oligonucleotides on the microarray chip), and determine the oligonucleotide spacings necessary to guarantee detection of deletions of specified size. Conclusions Our findings will enhance a wide range of research and clinical applications, and in particular will aid in the discovery of genomic deletions in the absence of a priori knowledge of their existence. PMID:24655320

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  6. Gene assembly via one-pot chemical ligation of DNA promoted by DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuguerra, Ilenia; Croce, Stefano; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.

    2018-01-01

    Current gene synthesis methods are driven by enzymatic reactions. Here we report the one-pot synthesis of a chemically-ligated gene from 14 oligonucleotides. The chemical ligation benefits from the highly efficient click chemistry approach templated by DNA nanostructures, and produces modified DNA...

  7. A mechanism of gene amplification driven by small DNA fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuntal Mukherjee

    Full Text Available DNA amplification is a molecular process that increases the copy number of a chromosomal tract and often causes elevated expression of the amplified gene(s. Although gene amplification is frequently observed in cancer and other degenerative disorders, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of DNA copy number increase remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that small DNA fragments could be the trigger of DNA amplification events. Following our findings that small fragments of DNA in the form of DNA oligonucleotides can be highly recombinogenic, we have developed a system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to capture events of chromosomal DNA amplification initiated by small DNA fragments. Here we demonstrate that small DNAs can amplify a chromosomal region, generating either tandem duplications or acentric extrachromosomal DNA circles. Small fragment-driven DNA amplification (SFDA occurs with a frequency that increases with the length of homology between the small DNAs and the target chromosomal regions. SFDA events are triggered even by small single-stranded molecules with as little as 20-nt homology with the genomic target. A double-strand break (DSB external to the chromosomal amplicon region stimulates the amplification event up to a factor of 20 and favors formation of extrachromosomal circles. SFDA is dependent on Rad52 and Rad59, partially dependent on Rad1, Rad10, and Pol32, and independent of Rad51, suggesting a single-strand annealing mechanism. Our results reveal a novel molecular model for gene amplification, in which small DNA fragments drive DNA amplification and define the boundaries of the amplicon region. As DNA fragments are frequently found both inside cells and in the extracellular environment, such as the serum of patients with cancer or other degenerative disorders, we propose that SFDA may be a common mechanism for DNA amplification in cancer cells, as well as a more general cause of DNA copy number variation

  8. DNA uptake, intracellular trafficking and gene transfection after ultrasound exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Jing; Santangelo, Philip J; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound has been studied as a promising tool for intracellular gene delivery. In this work, we studied gene transfection of a human prostate cancer cell line exposed to megahertz pulsed ultrasound in the presence of contrast agent and assessed the efficiency of fluorescently labelled DNA delivery into cell nuclei, which is necessary for gene transfection. At the sonication conditions studied, ~30% of cells showed DNA uptake 30min after sonication, but that fraction decreased over time to ~10% of cells after 24h. Most cells containing DNA had DNA in their nuclei, but the amount varied significantly. Transfection efficiency peaked at ~10% at 8h post sonication. Among those cells containing DNA, ~30% of DNA was localized in the cell nuclei, ~30% was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes and the remainder was "free" in the cytoplasm 30min after sonication. At later times up to 24h, ~30% of DNA continued to be found in the nuclei and most or all of the rest of the DNA was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. These results demonstrate that ultrasound can deliver DNA into cell nuclei shortly after sonication and that the rest of the DNA can be cleared by autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence for gene silencing by endogenous DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Robin; Ho, Thu

    1998-01-01

    Transformed cells can spontaneously silence genes by de novo methylation, and it is generally assumed that this is due to DNA methyltransferase activity. We have tested the alternative hypothesis that gene silencing could be due to the uptake of 5-methyl-dCMP into DNA, via the di- and triphosphonucleotides. 5-Methyl-dCMP would be present in cells from the ongoing repair of DNA. We have isolated a strain of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, designated HAM−, which spontaneously silences two tested genes at a very high frequency. We have shown that this strain incorporates 5-[3H]methyldeoxycytidine into 5-methylcytosine and thymine in DNA. It also has low 5-methyl-dCMP deaminase activity. Another HAM+ strain has high deaminase activity and a very low frequency of gene silencing. The starting strain, CHO K1, has a phenotype intermediate between HAM− and HAM+. PMID:9671746

  10. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  11. Genes with stable DNA methylation levels show higher evolutionary conservation than genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Wenhua; Luan, Meiwei; Zheng, Jiajia; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Li, Jin; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-24

    Different human genes often exhibit different degrees of stability in their DNA methylation levels between tissues, samples or cell types. This may be related to the evolution of human genome. Thus, we compared the evolutionary conservation between two types of genes: genes with stable DNA methylation levels (SM genes) and genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels (FM genes). For long-term evolutionary characteristics between species, we compared the percentage of the orthologous genes, evolutionary rate dn/ds and protein sequence identity. We found that the SM genes had greater percentages of the orthologous genes, lower dn/ds, and higher protein sequence identities in all the 21 species. These results indicated that the SM genes were more evolutionarily conserved than the FM genes. For short-term evolutionary characteristics among human populations, we compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density, and the linkage disequilibrium (LD) degree in HapMap populations and 1000 genomes project populations. We observed that the SM genes had lower SNP densities, and higher degrees of LD in all the 11 HapMap populations and 13 1000 genomes project populations. These results mean that the SM genes had more stable chromosome genetic structures, and were more conserved than the FM genes.

  12. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    somal localizations of 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were verified by two different colour FISH probes. Briefly, the current data provide an insights for hybridization projects and breeding improvement of tilapias. [Zhu H. P., Lu M. X., Gao F. Y., Huang Z. H., Yang L. P. and Gui J. F. 2010 Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and ...

  13. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair ...

  14. Microarray based comparative genome-wide expression profiling of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic cells with no capacity to differentiate into mature blood cells leads to leukemia. Though considerable amount of work has been done in understanding the molecular basis and gene expression profiles of hematologic malignancies viz., chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), ...

  15. Chromosomal location of the human gene for DNA polymerase β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, O.W.; Zmudzka, B.Z.; Wilson, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Inhibition studies indicate that DNA polymerase β has a synthetic role in DNA repair after exposure of mammalian cells to some types of DNA-damaging agents. The primary structure of the enzyme is highly conserved in vertebrates, and nearly full-length cDNAs for the enzyme were recently cloned from mammalian cDNA libraries. Southern blot analysis of DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, using portions of the cDNA as probe, indicates that the gene for human DNA polymerase β is single copy and located on the short arm or proximal long arm of chromosome 8 (8pter-8q22). A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was detected in normal individuals by using a probe from the 5' end of the cDNA, and this RFLP probably is due to an insertion or duplication of DNA in 20-25% of the population. This restriction site can be used as one marker for chromosome 8 genetic linkage studies and for family studies of traits potentially involving this DNA repair gene

  16. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  17. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  18. DNA methylation of retrotransposons, DNA transposons and genes in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schmidt, Martin; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Schmidt, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    The methylation of cytosines shapes the epigenetic landscape of plant genomes, coordinates transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, represses the activity of transposable elements (TEs), affects gene expression and, hence, can influence the phenotype. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris), an important crop that accounts for 30% of worldwide sugar needs, has a relatively small genome size (758 Mbp) consisting of approximately 485 Mbp repetitive DNA (64%), in particular satellite DNA, retrotransposons and DNA transposons. Genome-wide cytosine methylation in the sugar beet genome was studied in leaves and leaf-derived callus with a focus on repetitive sequences, including retrotransposons and DNA transposons, the major groups of repetitive DNA sequences, and compared with gene methylation. Genes showed a specific methylation pattern for CG, CHG (H = A, C, and T) and CHH sites, whereas the TE pattern differed, depending on the TE class (class 1, retrotransposons and class 2, DNA transposons). Along genes and TEs, CG and CHG methylation was higher than that of adjacent genomic regions. In contrast to the relatively low CHH methylation in retrotransposons and genes, the level of CHH methylation in DNA transposons was strongly increased, pointing to a functional role of asymmetric methylation in DNA transposon silencing. Comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation between sugar beet leaves and callus revealed a differential methylation upon tissue culture. Potential epialleles were hypomethylated (lower methylation) at CG and CHG sites in retrotransposons and genes and hypermethylated (higher methylation) at CHH sites in DNA transposons of callus when compared with leaves. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Repair of DNA damage in the human metallothionein gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Snowden, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to distinguish enhanced repair of a sequence due to its transcriptional activity from enhanced repair due to chromatin alterations brought about by integration of a sequence into the genome, we have investigated the repair of damage both in endogenous genes and in cell lines that contain an integrated gene with an inducible promoter. The endogenous genes we are studying are the metallothioneins (MTs), a multigene family in man consisting of about 10-12 members. Cultured cells were exposed to 10-J/m 2 uv light and allowed to repair in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine. The DNA was then isolated, digested with Eco RI, and fully hybrid density DNA made by semiconservative synthesis was separated from unreplicated DNA by centrifugation in CsCl density gradients. Unreplicated, parental-density DNA was then reacted with a monoclonal antibody against bromouracil. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. The gene expressions of DNA methylation/demethylation enzymes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A decrease in mRNA levels for cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits was observed in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid rats. However, the precise expression mechanisms of the related genes in hypothyroid state still remain unclear. This study investigated gene expressions of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), DNA ...

  1. The gene expressions of DNA methylation/demethylation enzymes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... A decrease in mRNA levels for cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits was observed in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid rats. However, the precise expression mechanisms of the related genes in hypothyroid state still remain unclear. This study investigated gene expressions of DNA methyltransferases.

  2. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/037/03/0433-0444 ... We present here a novel methodology for predicting new genes in prokaryotic genomes on the basis of inherent energetics of DNA. Regions of ... Quite surprisingly, the methodology identifies new genes even in well-annotated genomes. Also, the ...

  3. cDNA libraries for virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Andrea T; Liu, Enwu; Page, Jonathan E

    2010-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) exploits endogenous plant antiviral defense mechanisms to posttranscriptionally silence the expression of targeted plant genes. VIGS is quick and relatively easy to perform and therefore serves as a powerful tool for high-throughput functional genomics in plants. Combined with the use of subtractive cDNA libraries for generating a collection of VIGS-ready cDNA inserts, VIGS can be utilized to screen a large number of genes to determine phenotypes resulting from the knockdown/knockout of gene function. Taking into account the optimal insert design for VIGS, we describe a methodology for producing VIGS-ready cDNA libraries enriched for inserts relevant to the biological process of interest.

  4. CG gene body DNA methylation changes and evolution of duplicated genes in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Beyene, Getu; Zhai, Jixian; Feng, Suhua; Fahlgren, Noah; Taylor, Nigel J; Bart, Rebecca; Carrington, James C; Jacobsen, Steven E; Ausin, Israel

    2015-11-03

    DNA methylation is important for the regulation of gene expression and the silencing of transposons in plants. Here we present genome-wide methylation patterns at single-base pair resolution for cassava (Manihot esculenta, cultivar TME 7), a crop with a substantial impact in the agriculture of subtropical and tropical regions. On average, DNA methylation levels were higher in all three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH, where H equals A, T, or C) than those of the most well-studied model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. As in other plants, DNA methylation was found both on transposons and in the transcribed regions (bodies) of many genes. Consistent with these patterns, at least one cassava gene copy of all of the known components of Arabidopsis DNA methylation pathways was identified. Methylation of LTR transposons (GYPSY and COPIA) was found to be unusually high compared with other types of transposons, suggesting that the control of the activity of these two types of transposons may be especially important. Analysis of duplicated gene pairs resulting from whole-genome duplication showed that gene body DNA methylation and gene expression levels have coevolved over short evolutionary time scales, reinforcing the positive relationship between gene body methylation and high levels of gene expression. Duplicated genes with the most divergent gene body methylation and expression patterns were found to have distinct biological functions and may have been under natural or human selection for cassava traits.

  5. Correlation of microarray-based breast cancer molecular subtypes and clinical outcomes: implications for treatment optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Kuo-Jang; Chang, Kai-Ming; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Huang, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing treatment through microarray-based molecular subtyping is a promising method to address the problem of heterogeneity in breast cancer; however, current application is restricted to prediction of distant recurrence risk. This study investigated whether breast cancer molecular subtyping according to its global intrinsic biology could be used for treatment customization. Gene expression profiling was conducted on fresh frozen breast cancer tissue collected from 327 patients in conjunction with thoroughly documented clinical data. A method of molecular subtyping based on 783 probe-sets was established and validated. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate molecular subtypes with survival outcome and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Heterogeneity of molecular subtypes within groups sharing the same distant recurrence risk predicted by genes of the Oncotype and MammaPrint predictors was studied. We identified six molecular subtypes of breast cancer demonstrating distinctive molecular and clinical characteristics. These six subtypes showed similarities and significant differences from the Perou-Sørlie intrinsic types. Subtype I breast cancer was in concordance with chemosensitive basal-like intrinsic type. Adjuvant chemotherapy of lower intensity with CMF yielded survival outcome similar to those of CAF in this subtype. Subtype IV breast cancer was positive for ER with a full-range expression of HER2, responding poorly to CMF; however, this subtype showed excellent survival when treated with CAF. Reduced expression of a gene associated with methotrexate sensitivity in subtype IV was the likely reason for poor response to methotrexate. All subtype V breast cancer was positive for ER and had excellent long-term survival with hormonal therapy alone following surgery and/or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not provide any survival benefit in early stages of subtype V patients. Subtype V was consistent with a unique subset of luminal A intrinsic

  6. Gene Expression Analysis Using Agilent DNA Microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hybridization of labeled cDNA to microarrays is an intuitively simple and a vastly underestimated process. If it is not performed, optimized, and standardized with the same attention to detail as e.g., RNA amplification, information may be overlooked or even lost. Careful balancing of the amount...

  7. Feedback regulation of DNA methyltransferase gene expression by methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, A; Cervoni, N; Pinard, M; Szyf, M

    1999-08-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that expression of the DNA methyltransferase, dnmt1, gene is regulated by a methylation-sensitive DNA element. Methylation of DNA is an attractive system for feedback regulation of DNA methyltransferase as the final product of the reaction, methylated DNA, can regulate gene expression in cis. We show that an AP-1-dependent regulatory element of dnmt1 is heavily methylated in most somatic tissues and in the mouse embryonal cell line, P19, and completely unmethylated in a mouse adrenal carcinoma cell line, Y1. dnmt1 is highly over expressed in Y1 relative to P19 cell lines. Global inhibition of DNA methylation in P19 cells by 5-azadeoxycytidine results in demethylation of the AP-1 regulatory region and induction of dnmt1 expression in P19cells, but not Y1 cells. We propose that this regulatory region of dnmt1 acts as a sensor of the DNA methylation capacity of the cell. These results provide an explanation for the documented coexistence of global hypomethylation and high levels of DNA methyltransferase activity in many cancer cells and for the carcinogenic effect of hypomethylating diets.

  8. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    for maintaining genomic integrity. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pattern of cerebral DNA repair enzyme regulation after stress through the quantification of a targeted range of gene products involved in different types of DNA repair. 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either......Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  9. Microarray-based identification and RT-PCR test screening for epithelial-specific mRNAs in peripheral blood of patients with colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppola Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of screening for colorectal cancer using a simple blood-based assay for the detection of tumor cells disseminated in the circulation at an early stage of the disease is gaining positive feedback from several lines of research. This method seems able to reduce colorectal cancer mortality and may replace colonoscopy as the most effective means of detecting colonic lesions. Methods In this work, we present a new microarray-based high-throughput screening method to identifying candidate marker mRNAs for the early detection of epithelial cells diluted in peripheral blood cells. This method includes 1. direct comparison of different samples of colonic mucosa and of blood cells to identify consistent epithelial-specific mRNAs from among 20,000 cDNA assayed by microarray slides; 2. identification of candidate marker mRNAs by data analysis, which allowed selection of only 10 putative differentially expressed genes; 3. Selection of some of the most suitable mRNAs (TMEM69, RANBP3 and PRSS22 that were assayed in blood samples from normal subjects and patients with colon cancer as possible markers for the presence of epithelial cells in the blood, using reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Our present results seem to provide an indication, for the first time obtained by genome-scale screening, that a suitable and consistent colon epithelium mRNA marker may be difficult to identify. Conclusion The design of new approaches to identify such markers is warranted.

  10. Gene Specific Impedimetric Bacterial DNA Sensor for Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Kaushal, Ankur; Gupta, Sunil; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    An impedimetric mga gene specific DNA sensor was developed by immobilization of single stranded DNA probe onto the screen printed modified gold-dendrimer nanohybrid composite electrode for early and rapid detection of S. pyogenes in human throat swab samples causing rheumatic heart disease. Electrochemical impedance response was measured after hybridization with bacterial single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) with probe. The sensor was found highly specific to S. pyogenes and can detect as low as 0.01 ng ssDNA in 6 µL sample only in 30 min. The nanohybrid sensor was also tested with non-specific pathogens and characterized by FTIR. An early detection of the pathogen S. pyogenes in human can save damage of mitral and aortic heart valves (rheumatic heart disease) by proper medical care.

  11. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    So, based on known geothermal gra- dients and the depth of ancient remains, one can try to estimate the chances of retrieval of single genes. Acknowledgements. We thank Prof. Gerard Peter Latawiec (University of Read- ing, UK) for his critical reading of the manuscript. This work was supported by the NSFC key project ...

  12. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes induce differential patterns of DNA methylation that result in differential chromosomal gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William T; Sun, Xin; Tsai, Te-Sha; Johnson, Jacqueline L; Gould, Jodee A; Garama, Daniel J; Gough, Daniel J; McKenzie, Matthew; Trounce, Ian A; St John, Justin C

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA copy number is strictly regulated during development as naive cells differentiate into mature cells to ensure that specific cell types have sufficient copies of mitochondrial DNA to perform their specialised functions. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are defined as specific regions of mitochondrial DNA that cluster with other mitochondrial sequences to show the phylogenetic origins of maternal lineages. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are associated with a range of phenotypes and disease. To understand how mitochondrial DNA haplotypes induce these characteristics, we used four embryonic stem cell lines that have the same set of chromosomes but possess different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. We show that mitochondrial DNA haplotypes influence changes in chromosomal gene expression and affinity for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial DNA replication factors to modulate mitochondrial DNA copy number, two events that act synchronously during differentiation. Global DNA methylation analysis showed that each haplotype induces distinct DNA methylation patterns, which, when modulated by DNA demethylation agents, resulted in skewed gene expression patterns that highlight the effectiveness of the new DNA methylation patterns established by each haplotype. The haplotypes differentially regulate α -ketoglutarate, a metabolite from the TCA cycle that modulates the TET family of proteins, which catalyse the transition from 5-methylcytosine, indicative of DNA methylation, to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, indicative of DNA demethylation. Our outcomes show that mitochondrial DNA haplotypes differentially modulate chromosomal gene expression patterns of naive and differentiating cells by establishing mitochondrial DNA haplotype-specific DNA methylation patterns.

  13. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene specific DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Benoukraf, Touati; Amabile, Giovanni; Goff, Loyal A.; Terragni, Joylon; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; De Figureido Pontes, Lorena Lobo; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, Pu; Wu, Mengchu; D’Alò, Francesco; Melnick, Ari; Leone, Giuseppe; Ebralidze, Konstantin K.; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Rinn, John L.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation was described almost a century ago. However, the rules governing its establishment and maintenance remain elusive. Here, we present data demonstrating that active transcription regulates levels of genomic methylation. We identified a novel RNA arising from the CEBPA gene locus critical in regulating the local DNA methylation profile. This RNA binds to DNMT1 and prevents CEBPA gene locus methylation. Deep sequencing of transcripts associated with DNMT1 combined with genome-scale methylation and expression profiling extended the generality of this finding to numerous gene loci. Collectively, these results delineate the nature of DNMT1-RNA interactions and suggest strategies for gene selective demethylation of therapeutic targets in disease. PMID:24107992

  14. Effect of gene order in DNA constructs on gene expression upon integration into plant genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın Akbudak, M; Srivastava, Vibha

    2017-06-01

    Several plant biotechnology applications are based on the expression of multiple genes located on a single transformation vector. The principles of stable expression of foreign genes in plant cells include integration of full-length gene fragments consisting of promoter and transcription terminator sequences, and avoiding converging orientation of the gene transcriptional direction. Therefore, investigators usually generate constructs in which genes are assembled in the same orientation. However, no specific information is available on the effect of the order in which genes should be assembled in the construct to support optimum expression of each gene upon integration in the genome. While many factors, including genomic position and the integration structure, could affect gene expression, the investigators judiciously design DNA constructs to avoid glitches. However, the gene order in a multigene assembly remains an open question. This study addressed the effect of gene order in the DNA construct on gene expression in rice using a simple design of two genes placed in two possible orders with respect to the genomic context. Transgenic rice lines containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) genes in two distinct orders were developed by Cre-lox-mediated site-specific integration. Gene expression analysis of transgenic lines showed that both genes were expressed at similar levels in either orientation, and different transgenic lines expressed each gene within 1-2× range. Thus, no significant effect of the gene order on gene expression was found in the transformed rice lines containing precise site-specific integrations and stable gene expression in plant cells could be obtained with altered gene orders. Therefore, gene orientation and integration structures are more important factors governing gene expression than gene orders in the genomic context.

  15. Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L.; Liu, X.; Fields, M.W.; Thompson, D.K.; Bagwell, C.E.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2008-01-15

    The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, P<0.01). Significant linear relationships were also observed between the CGA-based genome similarities and those derived from small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (r=0.79, P<0.0001), gyrB sequences (r=0.95, P<0.0001) or REP- and BOX-PCR fingerprinting profiles (r=0.82, P<0.0001). The CGA hybridization-revealed species relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

  16. Enhancing comparative rabies DNA vaccine effectiveness through glycoprotein gene modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinubi, M O V; Wu, X; Franka, R; Niezgoda, M; Nok, A J; Ogunkoya, A B; Rupprecht, C E

    2009-11-27

    Enhancing DNA vaccine effectiveness remains a challenge, especially if the desired goal is immunization efficacy after a single dose. The glycoprotein gene from the rabies virus Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain was modified by mutation at amino acid residue 333 from arginine to glutamine. The modified and original unmodified glycoprotein genes were cloned separately and developed as DNA vaccines for immunization in mice. The intramuscular (IM) route using a single dose (100 microg) of a modified DNA vaccine showed virus neutralizing antibody induction by d30, and 80% of the mice survived a challenge in which 100% of unvaccinated controls succumbed. Similar results were obtained using a single dose (10 microg) by the intradermal (ID) route with one-tenth amount of the DNA administered. Administration of single dose of DNA vaccine with unmodified G did not result in the production of detectable levels of virus neutralizing antibody by d30. The results of the IM and the ID routes of administration were statistically significant (Prabies virus strain may be an ideal candidate for DNA vaccine efficacy enhancement.

  17. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  18. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...

  19. Onchocercal DNA amplification using beta actin gene primers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onchocercal DNA amplification using beta actin gene primers compared with first internal transcribed spacer sequences for monitoring onchocerciasis eradication strategy. ... Out of the 12 amplicons in agarose gel, there were 6 sharp and 6 faint bands of 100bp molecular weight as documented. The sharp bands included 3 ...

  20. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation - The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Siddharthan

    2007-11-03

    Nov 3, 2007 ... Predicting cis-regulatory modules: eve enhancers. Performance, even without prior WMs, comparable to dedicated CRM prediction programs like Stubb. Rahul Siddharthan. (The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600 113. What DNA sequence tells us about gene regulation. 03/11/2007. 27 / 34 ...

  1. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb frag...

  2. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA damage and cancer risk in several epidemiology. Figure 1. Human XRCC1 protein and gene structure showing protein domains known to interact with other com- ponents of base excision repair and the locations of key polymorphisms. Interacting proteins are defined in the text. (Reprinted with permission from ...

  3. Gene therapy for bladder pain with gene gun particle encoding pro-opiomelanocortin cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chou, A-K; Wu, P-C; Chiang, Po-Hui; Yu, T-J; Yang, L-C; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2003-11-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a bladder hypersensitivity disease associated with bladder pain that has been a major challenge to understand and treat. We hypothesized that targeted and localized expression of endogenous opioid peptide in the bladder could be useful for the treatment of bladder pain. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is one of such precursor molecules. In this study we developed a gene gun method for the transfer of POMC cDNA in vivo and investigated its therapeutic effect on acetic acid induced bladder hyperactivity in rats. Human POMC cDNA was cloned into a modified pCMV plasmid and delivered into the bladder wall of adult female rats by direct injection or the gene gun. Three days after gene therapy continuous cystometrograms were performed using urethane anesthesia by filling the bladder (0.08 ml per minute) with saline, followed by 0.3% acetic acid. Bladder immunohistochemical testing was used to detect endorphin after POMC cDNA transfer. The intercontraction interval was decreased after intravesical instillation of acetic acid (73.1% or 68.1% decrease) in 2 control groups treated with saline or the gene gun without POMC cDNA, respectively. However, rats that received POMC cDNA via the gene gun showed a significantly decreased response (intercontraction interval 35% decreased) to acetic acid instillation, whereas this antinociceptive effect was not detected in the plasmid POMC cDNA direct injection group. This effect induced by POMC gene gun treatment was reversed by intramuscular naloxone (1 mg/kg), an opioid antagonist. Increased endorphin immunoreactivity with anti-endorphin antibodies was observed in the bladder of gene gun treated animals. The POMC gene can be transferred in the bladder using the gene gun and increased bladder expression of endorphin can suppress nociceptive responses induced by bladder irritation. Thus, POMC gene gun delivery may be useful for the treatment of interstitial cystitis and other types of visceral pain.

  4. Germline Mutations in DNA Repair Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Erin M; Gable, Dustin L; Stanley, Susan E; Khalil, Sara E; Antonescu, Valentin; Florea, Liliana; Armanios, Mary

    2017-11-01

    Although lung cancer is generally thought to be environmentally provoked, anecdotal familial clustering has been reported, suggesting that there may be genetic susceptibility factors. We systematically tested whether germline mutations in eight candidate genes may be risk factors for lung adenocarcinoma. We studied lung adenocarcinoma cases for which germline sequence data had been generated as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas project but had not been previously analyzed. We selected eight genes, ATM serine/threonine kinase gene (ATM), BRCA2, DNA repair associated gene (BRCA2), checkpoint kinase 2 gene (CHEK2), EGFR, parkin RBR E3 ubiquitin protein ligase gene (PARK2), telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT), tumor protein p53 gene (TP53), and Yes associated protein 1 gene (YAP1), on the basis of prior anecdotal association with lung cancer or genome-wide association studies. Among 555 lung adenocarcinoma cases, we detected 14 pathogenic mutations in five genes; they occurred at a frequency of 2.5% and represented an OR of 66 (95% confidence interval: 33-125, p mutations fell most commonly in ATM (50%), followed by TP53, BRCA2, EGFR, and PARK2. Most (86%) of these variants had been reported in other familial cancer syndromes. Another 12 cases (2%) carried ultrarare variants that were predicted to be deleterious by three protein prediction programs; these most frequently involved ATM and BRCA2. A subset of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, at least 2.5% to 4.5%, carry germline variants that have been linked to cancer risk in Mendelian syndromes. The genes fall most frequently in DNA repair pathways. Our data indicate that patients with lung adenocarcinoma, similar to other solid tumors, include a subset of patients with inherited susceptibility. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Countering criticisms of single mitochondrial DNA gene barcoding in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Allan J; Tavares, Erika Sendra; Elbourne, Rebecca F

    2009-05-01

    General criticisms of a single mtDNA gene barcodes include failure to identify newly evolved species, use of species-delimitation thresholds, effects of selective sweeps and chance occurrence of reciprocal monophyly within species, inability to deal with hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting, and superiority of multiple genes in species identification. We address these criticisms in birds because most species are known and thus provide an ideal test data set, and we argue with selected examples that with the exception of thresholds these criticisms are not problematic for avian taxonomy. Even closely related sister species of birds have distinctive COI barcodes, but it is not possible to universally apply distance thresholds based on ratios of within-species and among-species variation. Instead, more rigorous methods of species delimitation should be favoured using coalescent-based techniques that include tests of chance reciprocal monophyly, and times of lineage separation and sequence divergence. Incomplete lineage sorting is also easily detected with DNA barcodes, and usually at a younger time frame than a more slowly evolving nuclear gene. Where DNA barcodes detect divergent reciprocally monophyletic lineages, the COI sequences can be combined with multiple nuclear genes to distinguish between speciation or population subdivision arising from high female philopatry or regional selective sweeps. Although selective sweeps are increasingly invoked to explain patterns of shallow within-species coalescences in COI gene trees, caution is warranted in this conjecture because of limited sampling of individuals and the reduced power to detect additional mtDNA haplotypes with one gene. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Deoxyribonucleic acid initiation mutation dnaB252 is suppressed by elevated dnaC+ gene dosage.

    OpenAIRE

    Sclafani, R A; Wechsler, J A

    1981-01-01

    The Escherichia coli dnaB252 allele is the only dnaB mutation which confers a deoxyribonucleic acid initiation-defective phenotype on the cell. The presence of a multicopy hybrid plasmid containing the dnaC+ gene in a dnaB252 strain completely suppressed the temperature-sensitive phenotype. It is suggested that at high temperature the dnaB252 protein has a lowered affinity for dnaC protein, and that the formation of a dnaB-dnaC complex is mandatory for initiation.

  7. Divergence of gene body DNA methylation and evolution of plant duplicate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available It has been shown that gene body DNA methylation is associated with gene expression. However, whether and how deviation of gene body DNA methylation between duplicate genes can influence their divergence remains largely unexplored. Here, we aim to elucidate the potential role of gene body DNA methylation in the fate of duplicate genes. We identified paralogous gene pairs from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica genomes and reprocessed their single-base resolution methylome data. We show that methylation in paralogous genes nonlinearly correlates with several gene properties including exon number/gene length, expression level and mutation rate. Further, we demonstrated that divergence of methylation level and pattern in paralogs indeed positively correlate with their sequence and expression divergences. This result held even after controlling for other confounding factors known to influence the divergence of paralogs. We observed that methylation level divergence might be more relevant to the expression divergence of paralogs than methylation pattern divergence. Finally, we explored the mechanisms that might give rise to the divergence of gene body methylation in paralogs. We found that exonic methylation divergence more closely correlates with expression divergence than intronic methylation divergence. We show that genomic environments (e.g., flanked by transposable elements and repetitive sequences of paralogs generated by various duplication mechanisms are associated with the methylation divergence of paralogs. Overall, our results suggest that the changes in gene body DNA methylation could provide another avenue for duplicate genes to develop differential expression patterns and undergo different evolutionary fates in plant genomes.

  8. DNA-transporting nanoparticles : design and in vitro evaluation of DNA and formulation for non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaal, E.V.B.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of gene therapy is to treat, cure or prevent a disease by replacing defective genes, introducing new genes or changing the expression of a person’s genes. Success of gene therapy is dependent on successful delivery of DNA from the site of administration into cell nuclei. Naturally occurring

  9. Non-electrostatic complexes with DNA: towards novel synthetic gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, J; Bessodes, M; Pitard, B; Mailhe, P; Scherman, D; Byk, G

    2000-05-01

    We have developed new DNA complexing amphiphile based on Hoechst 33258 interaction with DNA grooves. The synthesis and physicochemical characterisation of lipid/DNA complexes, as compared to that of classical lipopolyamine for gene delivery, are described and discussed.

  10. DNA copy number alterations, gene expression changes and disease-free survival in patients with colorectal cancer: a 10 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; De Filippo, Carlotta; Castagnini, Cinzia; Toti, Simona; Acquadro, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Fazi, Marilena; Dolara, Piero; Messerini, Luca; Tonelli, Francesco; Luceri, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and gene expression changes have amply been encountered in colorectal cancers (CRCs), but the extent at which CNAs affect gene expression, as well as their relevance for tumor development, are still poorly defined. Here we aimed at assessing the clinical relevance of these parameters in a 10 year follow-up study. Tumors and normal adjacent colon mucosa, obtained at primary surgery from 21 CRC patients, were subjected to (i) high-resolution array CGH (a-CGH) for the detection of CNAs and (ii) microarray-based transcriptome profiling for the detection of gene expression (GE) changes. Correlations between these genomic and transcriptomic changes and their associations with clinical and histopathological parameters were assessed with the aim to identify molecular signatures associated with disease-free survival of the CRC patients during a 10 year follow-up. DNA copy number gains were frequently detected in chromosomes 7, 8q, 13, 19, 20q and X, whereas DNA copy number losses were frequently detected in chromosomes 1p, 4, 8p, 15, 17p, 18, 19 and 22q. None of these alterations were observed in all samples. In addition, we found that 2,498 genes were up- and that 1,094 genes were down-regulated in the tumor samples compared to their corresponding normal mucosa (p number gains, whereas decreased expression levels of the MUC1, E2F2, HRAS and SIRT3 genes were associated with copy number losses. Pathways related to cell cycle progression, eicosanoid metabolism, and TGF-β and apoptosis signaling, were found to be most significantly affected. Our results suggest that CNAs in CRC tumor tissues are associated with concomitant changes in the expression of cancer-related genes. In other genes epigenetic mechanism may be at work. Up-regulation of the IL17RA, IGF2BP2 and ABCC2 genes, and of genes acting in the mTOR and cytokine receptor pathways, appear to be associated with a poor survival. These alterations may, in addition to Dukes' staging

  11. Biolistic DNA delivery to mice with the low pressure gene gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2013-01-01

    Biolistic DNA delivery is an approach to deliver plasmid to culture cells, plants, or animals. Plasmid DNA is usually transferred through bombardment of DNA-coated particles by highly pressurized gas in various kinds of delivery vehicles. The low pressure gene gun can deliver plasmid at lower pressure. Here, we describe methods of biolistic DNA delivery to mice using the low pressure gene gun.

  12. Independent component analysis of Alzheimer's DNA microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderburg Charles R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene microarray technology is an effective tool to investigate the simultaneous activity of multiple cellular pathways from hundreds to thousands of genes. However, because data in the colossal amounts generated by DNA microarray technology are usually complex, noisy, high-dimensional, and often hindered by low statistical power, their exploitation is difficult. To overcome these problems, two kinds of unsupervised analysis methods for microarray data: principal component analysis (PCA and independent component analysis (ICA have been developed to accomplish the task. PCA projects the data into a new space spanned by the principal components that are mutually orthonormal to each other. The constraint of mutual orthogonality and second-order statistics technique within PCA algorithms, however, may not be applied to the biological systems studied. Extracting and characterizing the most informative features of the biological signals, however, require higher-order statistics. Results ICA is one of the unsupervised algorithms that can extract higher-order statistical structures from data and has been applied to DNA microarray gene expression data analysis. We performed FastICA method on DNA microarray gene expression data from Alzheimer's disease (AD hippocampal tissue samples and consequential gene clustering. Experimental results showed that the ICA method can improve the clustering results of AD samples and identify significant genes. More than 50 significant genes with high expression levels in severe AD were extracted, representing immunity-related protein, metal-related protein, membrane protein, lipoprotein, neuropeptide, cytoskeleton protein, cellular binding protein, and ribosomal protein. Within the aforementioned categories, our method also found 37 significant genes with low expression levels. Moreover, it is worth noting that some oncogenes and phosphorylation-related proteins are expressed in low levels. In

  13. MOLECULAR CLONING OF OVINE cDNA LEPTIN GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA TEREZIA SOCOL

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An efficient bacterial transformation system suitable for cloning the coding sequence of the ovine leptin gene in E. coli DH5α host cells using the pGEMT easy vector it is described in this paper. The necessity of producing leptin is based on the fact that the role of this molecule in the animal and human organism is still unknown, leptin not existing as commercial product on the Romanian market. The results obtained in the bacterial transformation, cloning, recombinant clones selection, control of the insertion experiments and DNA computational analysis represent the first steps in further genetic engineering experiments such as production of DNA libraries, DNA sequencing, protein expression, etc., for a further contribution in elucidating the role of leptin in the animal and human organism.

  14. Optimal control of gene mutation in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juanyi; Li, Jr-Shin; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular-level control system view of the gene mutations in DNA replication from the finite field concept. By treating DNA sequences as state variables, chemical mutagens and radiation as control inputs, one cell cycle as a step increment, and the measurements of the resulting DNA sequence as outputs, we derive system equations for both deterministic and stochastic discrete-time, finite-state systems of different scales. Defining the cost function as a summation of the costs of applying mutagens and the off-trajectory penalty, we solve the deterministic and stochastic optimal control problems by dynamic programming algorithm. In addition, given that the system is completely controllable, we find that the global optimum of both base-to-base and codon-to-codon deterministic mutations can always be achieved within a finite number of steps.

  15. Cloning and characterization of human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Weber, C.A.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The isolation of two addition human genes that give efficient restoration of the repair defects in other CHO mutant lines is reported. The gene designated ERCC2 (Excision Repair Complementing Chinese hamster) corrects mutant UV5 from complementation group 1. They recently cloned this gene by first constructing a secondary transformant in which the human gene was shown to have become physically linked to the bacterial gpt dominant-marker gene by cotransfer in calcium phosphate precipitates in the primary transfection. Transformants expressing both genes were recovered by selecting for resistance to both UV radiation and mycophenolic acid. Using similar methods, the human gene that corrects CHO mutant EM9 was isolated in cosmids and named XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Complementing Chinese hamster). In this case, transformants were recovered by selecting for resistance to CldUrd, which kills EM9 very efficiently. In both genomic and cosmid transformants, the XRCC1 gene restored resistance to the normal range. DNA repair was studied using the kinetics of strand-break rejoining, which was measured after exposure to 137 Cs γ-rays

  16. DNA methylation and gene expression of HIF3A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, Ailsa Maria; Gillberg, Linn; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Associations between BMI and DNA methylation of hypoxia-inducible factor 3-alpha (HIF3A) in both blood cells and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) have been reported. In this study, we investigated associations between BMI and HIF3A DNA methylation in the blood and SAT from the same...... individuals, and whether HIF3A gene expression in SAT and skeletal muscle biopsies showed associations with BMI and insulin resistance. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate gender specificity and heritability of these traits. METHODS: We studied 137 first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients...... glucose tolerance tests. RESULTS: BMI was associated with HIF3A methylation at one CpG site in the blood, and there was a positive association between the blood and SAT methylation levels at a different CpG site within the individuals. The SAT methylation level did not correlate with HIF3A gene expression...

  17. GenePublisher: automated analysis of DNA microarray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Steen; Workman, Christopher; Sicheritz-Ponten, T.

    2003-01-01

    , statistical analysis and visualization of the data. The results are run against databases of signal transduction pathways, metabolic pathways and promoter sequences in order to extract more information. The results of the entire analysis are summarized in report form and returned to the user.......GenePublisher, a system for automatic analysis of data from DNA microarray experiments, has been implemented with a web interface at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GenePublisher. Raw data are uploaded to the server together with aspecification of the data. The server performs normalization...

  18. Identification of differential genes by suppression subtractive hybridization: I. Preparation of subtracted cDNA or genomic DNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrikov, Denis V

    2008-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONSuppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is one of the most powerful and popular methods for generating subtracted cDNA or genomic DNA libraries. This technique can be used to compare two mRNA populations and obtain cDNAs representing genes that are either overexpressed or exclusively expressed in one population as compared to another. It can also be used for comparison of genomic DNA populations. This protocol describes the preparation of a subtracted cDNA or genomic DNA library, and includes methods for cDNA synthesis, tester and driver DNA digestion, and adapter ligation.

  19. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    repeats of Atlantic salmon 5S rDNA. Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 67,. 31–36. Puerma E., Acosta M. J., Barragán M. J., Martınez S., Marchal J. A.,. Bullejos M. and Sánchez A. 2008 The karyotype and 5S rRNA genes from Spanish individuals of the bat species Rhinolophus hipposideros (Rhinolophidae; Chiroptera). Genetica 134 ...

  20. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  1. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  2. Promoter DNA hypermethylation and gene repression in undifferentiated Arabidopsis cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Berdasco

    Full Text Available Maintaining and acquiring the pluripotent cell state in plants is critical to tissue regeneration and vegetative multiplication. Histone-based epigenetic mechanisms are important for regulating this undifferentiated state. Here we report the use of genetic and pharmacological experimental approaches to show that Arabidopsis cell suspensions and calluses specifically repress some genes as a result of promoter DNA hypermethylation. We found that promoters of the MAPK12, GSTU10 and BXL1 genes become hypermethylated in callus cells and that hypermethylation also affects the TTG1, GSTF5, SUVH8, fimbrin and CCD7 genes in cell suspensions. Promoter hypermethylation in undifferentiated cells was associated with histone hypoacetylation and primarily occurred at CpG sites. Accordingly, we found that the process specifically depends on MET1 and DRM2 methyltransferases, as demonstrated with DNA methyltransferase mutants. Our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation may be another important epigenetic mechanism for the establishment and/or maintenance of the undifferentiated state in plant cells.

  3. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-09-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold.

  4. DnaB gene product-independence of DNA polymerase III-directed repair synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.; Hellermann, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the role of dnaB gene product in X-ray-induced repair synthesis carried out by DNA polymerase III in toluene-treated Escherichia coli K-12. A polAl polBlOO dnaB mutant deficient in both DNA polymerase I and II activities was used, and it was shown that the level of X-ray-induced, ATP-dependent, non-conservative DNA synthesis was, unlike semi-conservative DNA synthesis, unaffected by a temperature shift from 30 0 to 42 0 C. The dnaB gene product was not therefore necessary for DNA polymerase III-directed repair synthesis, which occurred in the absence of replicative synthesis. (U.K.)

  5. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  6. Clinical significance of rare copy number variations in epilepsy: a case-control survey using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Antonietta; Paravidino, Roberta; Malacarne, Michela; Gimelli, Stefania; Robbiano, Angela; Traverso, Monica; Pezzella, Marianna; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Amedeo; Elia, Maurizio; Falace, Antonio; Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Freri, Elena; Galasso, Roberta; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Molinatto, Cristina; Cavani, Simona; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Striano, Salvatore; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Silengo, Margherita; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Benelli, Matteo; Magi, Alberto; Piccione, Maria; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Coviello, Domenico A; Fichera, Marco; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico

    2012-03-01

    To perform an extensive search for genomic rearrangements by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization in patients with epilepsy. Prospective cohort study. Epilepsy centers in Italy. Two hundred seventy-nine patients with unexplained epilepsy, 265 individuals with nonsyndromic mental retardation but no epilepsy, and 246 healthy control subjects were screened by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Identification of copy number variations (CNVs) and gene enrichment. Rare CNVs occurred in 26 patients (9.3%) and 16 healthy control subjects (6.5%) (P = .26). The CNVs identified in patients were larger (P = .03) and showed higher gene content (P = .02) than those in control subjects. The CNVs larger than 1 megabase (P = .002) and including more than 10 genes (P = .005) occurred more frequently in patients than in control subjects. Nine patients (34.6%) among those harboring rare CNVs showed rearrangements associated with emerging microdeletion or microduplication syndromes. Mental retardation and neuropsychiatric features were associated with rare CNVs (P = .004), whereas epilepsy type was not. The CNV rate in patients with epilepsy and mental retardation or neuropsychiatric features is not different from that observed in patients with mental retardation only. Moreover, significant enrichment of genes involved in ion transport was observed within CNVs identified in patients with epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy show a significantly increased burden of large, rare, gene-rich CNVs, particularly when associated with mental retardation and neuropsychiatric features. The limited overlap between CNVs observed in the epilepsy group and those observed in the group with mental retardation only as well as the involvement of specific (ion channel) genes indicate a specific association between the identified CNVs and epilepsy. Screening for CNVs should be performed for diagnostic purposes preferentially in patients with epilepsy and mental retardation or

  7. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  8. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A. Wojcik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER. Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1 nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease.

  9. Microarray based on autodisplayed Ro proteins for medical diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Gu; Bong, Ji-Hong; Kim, Sinyoung; Jose, Joachim; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2014-07-15

    A microarray-based immunoassay for the detection of autoantibodies against Ro protein was developed using Escherichia coli with autodisplayed Ro proteins (Ro(+)-E. coli). Patient serum usually contains various antibodies against the outer membrane components of E. coli as well as autoantibodies against the Ro protein. Therefore, the conventional immunoassay based on Ro(+)-E. coli requires both wild type E. coli (blank test) and Ro(+)-E. coli, and both strains of E. coli must be prepared in situ for each individual test serum. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using several types of animal sera as a replacement for individual human sera. An immunoassay without the blank test was developed using Ro(+)-E. coli by (1) blocking with rabbit serum, and (2) cleaving the Fc region from antibodies using papain. Modified E. coli with autodisplayed Ro protein was immobilized to a surface-modified microplate and the applicability of the immunoassay without the blank test was demonstrated using sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using this approach, a microarray-based fluorescence immunoassay with immobilized Ro(+)-E. coli was able to detect anti-Ro autoantibodies in SLE patient sera with high specificity and selectivity and improved efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. The Cloning of the Human Tumor Supressor Gene INGI: DNA Cloning into Plasmid Vector and DNA Analysis by Restriction Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA cloning is one of the most important techniques In the field of molecular biology, with a critical role in analyzing the structure and function of genes and their adjacent regulatory regions. DNA cloning is helpful in learning fundamental molecular biological techniques, since DNA cloning involves a series of them, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA ligation, bacterial transformation, bacterial culture, plasmid DNA extraction, DNA digestion with restriction enzymes and agarose gel electrophoresis. In this paper the cloning of the human tumor suppressor gene INGI has been used to illustrate the methodology. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned into a TA-cloning vectore, and restriction enzyme mapping was used to distinguish the sense INGI construct from the antisense INGI construct.

  12. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration and transactivation of cellular genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is etiologically related to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Most HCCs contain integrated HBV DNA in hepatocyte, suggesting that the integration may be involved in carcinogenesis. Available data on the integrants from human hepatocellular carcinomas seem to represent primary integrants as well as the products of secondary rearrangements. By means of structural analyses of the possible primary integrants, it has been observed that the replication intermediates of the viral genome are the preferred substrates for integration. The integrated HBV DNA and the target cellular DNA are invariably associated with deletions, possibly reflecting the substrate for, and the mechanism of, the integration reaction. The host DNA sequences as well as the target site of integration in chromosomes are selected randomly suggesting that HBV DNA integration should bring about random mutagenic effects. Analysis of the samples recovered from hepatocellular carcinomas show that the integrated HBV DNA can mediate secondary rearrangements of chromosomes, such as translocations, inversions, deletions and (possibly amplifications. The integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion. The integration has been shown in a number of cases to affect a variety of cancer-related genes and to exert insertional mutagenesis. However, in contrast to the woodchuck model, in which specific HBV-DNA integration is detectable in most cases, insertional activation or inactivation of cellular genes appears to be a rare event in man. The discovery of transactivating functions exerted by HBx and truncated HBs(urface proteins supports the notion that these could be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis as these transactivator sequences have been found in a large number of HCC tumors or hepatoma-derived cell lines. The HBx

  13. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-23

    Apr 23, 2013 ... A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for identification and intraspecific molecular typing of bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and its comparative analysis with ribosomal DNA sequences. AUNDY KUMAR. 1,*, THEKKAN PUTHIYAVEEDU PRAMEELA.

  14. DNA mismatch repair preferentially protects genes from mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Eric J; Ding, Zhong Jie; Jamieson, Fiona J C; Visscher, Anne M; Zheng, Shao Jian; Mithani, Aziz; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2018-01-01

    Mutation is the source of genetic variation and fuels biological evolution. Many mutations first arise as DNA replication errors. These errors subsequently evade correction by cellular DNA repair, for example, by the well-known DNA mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism. Here, we determine the genome-wide effects of MMR on mutation. We first identify almost 9000 mutations accumulated over five generations in eight MMR-deficient mutation accumulation (MA) lines of the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana We then show that MMR deficiency greatly increases the frequency of both smaller-scale insertions and deletions (indels) and of single-nucleotide variant (SNV) mutations. Most indels involve A or T nucleotides and occur preferentially in homopolymeric (poly A or poly T) genomic stretches. In addition, we find that the likelihood of occurrence of indels in homopolymeric stretches is strongly related to stretch length, and that this relationship causes ultrahigh localized mutation rates in specific homopolymeric stretch regions. For SNVs, we show that MMR deficiency both increases their frequency and changes their molecular mutational spectrum, causing further enhancement of the GC to AT bias characteristic of organisms with normal MMR function. Our final genome-wide analyses show that MMR deficiency disproportionately increases the numbers of SNVs in genes, rather than in nongenic regions of the genome. This latter observation indicates that MMR preferentially protects genes from mutation and has important consequences for understanding the evolution of genomes during both natural selection and human tumor growth. © 2018 Belfield et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. A microarray-based genetic screen for yeast chronological aging factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Matecic

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Model organisms have played an important role in the elucidation of multiple genes and cellular processes that regulate aging. In this study we utilized the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a large-scale screen for genes that function in the regulation of chronological lifespan, which is defined by the number of days that non-dividing cells remain viable. A pooled collection of viable haploid gene deletion mutants, each tagged with unique identifying DNA "bar-code" sequences was chronologically aged in liquid culture. Viable mutants in the aging population were selected at several time points and then detected using a microarray DNA hybridization technique that quantifies abundance of the barcode tags. Multiple short- and long-lived mutants were identified using this approach. Among the confirmed short-lived mutants were those defective for autophagy, indicating a key requirement for the recycling of cellular organelles in longevity. Defects in autophagy also prevented lifespan extension induced by limitation of amino acids in the growth media. Among the confirmed long-lived mutants were those defective in the highly conserved de novo purine biosynthesis pathway (the ADE genes, which ultimately produces IMP and AMP. Blocking this pathway extended lifespan to the same degree as calorie (glucose restriction. A recently discovered cell-extrinsic mechanism of chronological aging involving acetic acid secretion and toxicity was suppressed in a long-lived ade4Delta mutant and exacerbated by a short-lived atg16Delta autophagy mutant. The identification of multiple novel effectors of yeast chronological lifespan will greatly aid in the elucidation of mechanisms that cells and organisms utilize in slowing down the aging process.

  16. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  17. Complete gene expression profiling of Saccharopolyspora erythraea using GeneChip DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni Roberta

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome sequence, recently published, presents considerable divergence from those of streptomycetes in gene organization and function, confirming the remarkable potential of S. erythraea for producing many other secondary metabolites in addition to erythromycin. In order to investigate, at whole transcriptome level, how S. erythraea genes are modulated, a DNA microarray was specifically designed and constructed on the S. erythraea strain NRRL 2338 genome sequence, and the expression profiles of 6494 ORFs were monitored during growth in complex liquid medium. Results The transcriptional analysis identified a set of 404 genes, whose transcriptional signals vary during growth and characterize three distinct phases: a rapid growth until 32 h (Phase A; a growth slowdown until 52 h (Phase B; and another rapid growth phase from 56 h to 72 h (Phase C before the cells enter the stationary phase. A non-parametric statistical method, that identifies chromosomal regions with transcriptional imbalances, determined regional organization of transcription along the chromosome, highlighting differences between core and non-core regions, and strand specific patterns of expression. Microarray data were used to characterize the temporal behaviour of major functional classes and of all the gene clusters for secondary metabolism. The results confirmed that the ery cluster is up-regulated during Phase A and identified six additional clusters (for terpenes and non-ribosomal peptides that are clearly regulated in later phases. Conclusion The use of a S. erythraea DNA microarray improved specificity and sensitivity of gene expression analysis, allowing a global and at the same time detailed picture of how S. erythraea genes are modulated. This work underlines the importance of using DNA microarrays, coupled with an exhaustive statistical and bioinformatic analysis of the results, to understand the transcriptional

  18. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  19. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aittakorpi Anne

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner.

  20. Gene Silencing and Sex Determination by Programmed DNA Elimination in Parasitic Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Adrian; Wang, Jianbin; Kang, Yuanyuan; Davis, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is essential. However, programmed DNA elimination removes specific DNA sequences from the genome during early development. DNA elimination occurs in unicellular ciliates and diverse metazoa ranging from nematodes to vertebrates. Two distinct groups of nematodes use DNA elimination to silence germline-expressed genes in the soma (ascarids) or for sex determination (Strongyloides spp.). Data suggest that DNA elimination likely evolved independently in these nematodes. Recent studies indicate that differential CENP-A deposition within chromosomes determines which sequences are retained and lost during Ascaris DNA elimination. Additional studies are needed to determine the distribution, functions, and mechanisms of DNA elimination in nematodes. PMID:27315434

  1. Cloning of the mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, O; Yasui, Y; Sakai, Y; Watanabe, T; Ishii, K; Yanagihara, S; Andoh, T

    1993-03-30

    The mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 3512 bp was determined. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 767 amino acids (aa), which is 2 aa longer than its human counterpart. Overall aa sequence homology between the mouse and human, and between the mouse and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) sequences was 96% and 42%, respectively. The mouse TopI gene was mapped at position 54.5 on chromosome 2 from linkage analyses of a three-point cross test with Geg, Ada, and a as marker genes.

  2. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasugi Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the DNA methylation status of 899 nuclear mt genes in the liver, brain, and heart tissues of mouse, and identified 636 nuclear mt genes carrying tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs. These nuclar mt genes are involved in various mitochondrial functions and they also include genes related to human diseases. T-DMRs regulate the expression of nuclear mt genes. Nuclear mt genes with tissue-specific hypomethylated T-DMRs were characterized by enrichment of the target genes of specific transcription factors such as FOXA2 in the liver, and CEBPA and STAT1 in the brain. Conclusions A substantial proportion of nuclear mt genes contained T-DMRs, and the DNA methylation status of numerous T-DMRs should underlie tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions.

  3. Gene structure, DNA methylation, and imprinted expression of the human SNRPN gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, T.C.; Filbrandt, M.M. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The human SNRPN (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N) gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the smallest deletion region involved in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) within chromosome 15q11-q13. Paternal only expression of SNRPN has previously been demonstrated by use of cell lines from PWS patients (maternal allele only) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients (paternal allele only). We have characterized two previously unidentified 5{prime} exons of the SNRPN gene and demonstrate that exons -1 and 0 are included in the full-length transcript. This gene is expressed in a wide range of somatic tissues and at high, approximately equal levels in all regions of the brain. Both the first exon of SNRPN (exon -1) and the putative transcription start site are embedded within a CpG island. This CpG island is extensively methylated on the repressed maternal allele and is unmethylated on the expressed paternal allele, in a wide range of fetal and adult somatic cells. This provides a quick and highly reliable diagnostic assay for PWS and AS, which is based on DNA-methylation analysis that has been tested on >100 patients in a variety of tissues. Conversely, several CpG sites {approximately}22 kb downstream of the transcription start site in intron 5 are preferentially methylated on the expressed paternal allele in somatic tissues and male germ cells, whereas these same sites are unmethylated in fetal oocytes. These findings are consistent with a key role for DNA methylation in the imprinted inheritance and subsequent gene expression of the human SNRPN gene. 59 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Observation of intermittency in gene expression on cDNA microarrays

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, L E

    2002-01-01

    We used scaled factorial moments to search for intermittency in the log expression ratios (LERs) for thousands of genes spotted on cDNA microarrays (gene chips). Results indicate varying levels of intermittency in gene expression. The observation of intermittency in the data analyzed provides a complimentary handle on moderately expressed genes, generally not tackled by conventional techniques.

  5. DNA supercoiling is a fundamental regulatory principle in the control of bacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J; Dorman, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    Although it has become routine to consider DNA in terms of its role as a carrier of genetic information, it is also an important contributor to the control of gene expression. This regulatory principle arises from its structural properties. DNA is maintained in an underwound state in most bacterial cells and this has important implications both for DNA storage in the nucleoid and for the expression of genetic information. Underwinding of the DNA through reduction in its linking number potentially imparts energy to the duplex that is available to drive DNA transactions, such as transcription, replication and recombination. The topological state of DNA also influences its affinity for some DNA binding proteins, especially in DNA sequences that have a high A + T base content. The underwinding of DNA by the ATP-dependent topoisomerase DNA gyrase creates a continuum between metabolic flux, DNA topology and gene expression that underpins the global response of the genome to changes in the intracellular and external environments. These connections describe a fundamental and generalised mechanism affecting global gene expression that underlies the specific control of transcription operating through conventional transcription factors. This mechanism also provides a basal level of control for genes acquired by horizontal DNA transfer, assisting microbial evolution, including the evolution of pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Genomic and cDNA cloning of a novel mouse lipoxygenase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems van Dijk, K.; Steketee, K.; Havekes, L.; Frants, R.; Hofker, M.

    1995-01-01

    A novel 12- and 15-lipoxygenase related gene was isolated from a mouse strain 129 genomic phage library in a screen with a human 15-lipoxygenase cDNA probe. The complete genomic sequence revealed 14 exons and 13 introns covering 7.3 kb of DNA. The splice junctions were verified from the cDNA

  7. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menck Carlos FM

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA, endonuclease III (nth, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene, photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular

  8. Analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and survival in low-grade and anaplastic gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi; Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the variation in DNA repair genes in adults with WHO grade II and III gliomas and their relationship to patient survival. We analysed a total of 1,458 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected to cover DNA repair genes, in 81 grade ...

  9. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phelim Isichei

    large number of possible candidate genes, these approaches most often remains laborious (De Lonlay et ... RNA interference of genes involved in mtDNA replication such as polg-1, encoding the mitochondrial DNA .... adult worms were independently picked up and transferred to fresh. RNAi plates with or without different ...

  10. Identification and caste-dependent expression patterns of DNA methylation associated genes in Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beibei; Hou, Li; Zhu, Dan; Xu, Xilian; An, Shiheng; Wang, Xianhui

    2018-02-05

    DNA methylation has been proposed to play critical roles in caste fate and behavioral plasticity in bumblebees, however, there is little information on its regulatory mechanisms. Here, we identified six important genes mediating the modification of DNA methylation and determined their expression patterns in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. There is a complete functional DNA methylation system, including four DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1a, DNMT1b, DNMT2, and DNMT3), a DNA demethylase (Ten-eleven translocation), and a methyl-CpG-binding domain protein in B. terrestris. Most of these genes were highly expressed in fat bodies and gonads but lowly expressed in antennae and brains of bumblebee adults. Besides, these genes exhibited caste-specific expression patterns in bumblebees, with higher transcription levels in queens than workers and drones. Whereas their expression levels showed no remarkable difference in queenright and queenless workers. These results suggested potential roles of DNA methylation-related genes in caste differentiation in bumblebees.

  11. Characterization of swine stress gene by DNA testing using plucked hair as a source of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Gaspar Bastos

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The swine stress gene (hal in recessive homozygotes (nn leads to porcine stress syndrome (PSS, and is associated with pale, soft, exudative pork (PSE. In heterozygosis (Nn it is linked to poor carcass quality. A total of 179 pigs (86 Large White, 69 Landrace, 12 Duroc and 12 Pietrain were characterized as normal homozygotes (NN, heterozygotes or recessive homozygotes following amplification of a target region of the hal gene using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, followed by a restriction endonuclease assay. Plucked hair was used as a source of genomic DNA. The resulting PCR was digested with the restriction enzyme CfoI, followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Of 179 animals tested, 70% were NN, 28% were Nn, and 2% were nn. The frequency of heterozygotes was higher (P O gene do estresse suíno (hal em homozigose recessiva (nn ocasiona a síndrome do estresse porcino (PSS, e está relacionado com a ocorrência da carne pálida, mole e exudativa (PSE. Em heterozigose (Nn está associado com diminuição da qualidade de carcaça. Um total de 179 suínos (86 Large White, 69 Landrace, 12 Duroc e 12 Pietrain foram caracterizados como homozigotos normais (NN, heterozigotos e homozigotos recessivos por análise do DNA usando a reação de polimerização em cadeia (PCR, seguida de um ensaio com endonuclease de restrição. Foi utilizado folículo piloso como fonte de DNA genômico. O produto do PCR foi digerido com a enzima de restrição CfoI, seguindo-se análise dos fragmentos por eletroforese em gel de agarose. Dentre os 179 animais analisados, 126 (70,0% foram caracterizados como NN, 50 (28,0% como Nn, e 3 (2,0% caracterizados como nn. A freqüência de heterozigotos foi maior (P < 0,05 em animais da raça Landrace do que em animais da raça Large White. Nove animais da raça Pietrain foram classificados como heterozigotos e tres como homozigotos recessivos. Estes resultados podem estar relacionados com a incidência de PSS e PSE nestas ra

  12. Identification of Bicarbonate as a Trigger and Genes Involved with Extracellular DNA Export in Mycobacterial Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J. Rose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is an integral biofilm matrix component of numerous pathogens, including nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. Cell lysis is the source of eDNA in certain bacteria, but the source of eDNA remains unidentified for NTM, as well as for other eDNA-containing bacterial species. In this study, conditions affecting eDNA export were examined, and genes involved with the eDNA export mechanism were identified. After a method for monitoring eDNA in real time in undisturbed biofilms was established, different conditions affecting eDNA were investigated. Bicarbonate positively influenced eDNA export in a pH-independent manner in Mycobacterium avium, M. abscessus, and M. chelonae. The surface-exposed proteome of M. avium in eDNA-containing biofilms revealed abundant carbonic anhydrases. Chemical inhibition of carbonic anhydrases with ethoxzolamide significantly reduced eDNA export. An unbiased transposon mutant library screen for eDNA export in M. avium identified many severely eDNA-attenuated mutants, including one not expressing a unique FtsK/SpoIIIE-like DNA-transporting pore, two with inactivation of carbonic anhydrases, and nine with inactivation of genes belonging to a unique genomic region, as well as numerous mutants involved in metabolism and energy production. Complementation of nine mutants that included the FtsK/SpoIIIE and carbonic anhydrase significantly restored eDNA export. Interestingly, several attenuated eDNA mutants have mutations in genes encoding proteins that were found with the surface proteomics, and many more mutations are localized in operons potentially encoding surface proteins. Collectively, our data strengthen the evidence of eDNA export being an active mechanism that is activated by the bacterium responding to bicarbonate.

  13. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  14. Cross-platform comparison of microarray-based multiple-class prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Fan

    Full Text Available High-throughput microarray technology has been widely applied in biological and medical decision-making research during the past decade. However, the diversity of platforms has made it a challenge to re-use and/or integrate datasets generated in different experiments or labs for constructing array-based diagnostic models. Using large toxicogenomics datasets generated using both Affymetrix and Agilent microarray platforms, we carried out a benchmark evaluation of cross-platform consistency in multiple-class prediction using three widely-used machine learning algorithms. After an initial assessment of model performance on different platforms, we evaluated whether predictive signature features selected in one platform could be directly used to train a model in the other platform and whether predictive models trained using data from one platform could predict datasets profiled using the other platform with comparable performance. Our results established that it is possible to successfully apply multiple-class prediction models across different commercial microarray platforms, offering a number of important benefits such as accelerating the possible translation of biomarkers identified with microarrays to clinically-validated assays. However, this investigation focuses on a technical platform comparison and is actually only the beginning of exploring cross-platform consistency. Further studies are needed to confirm the feasibility of microarray-based cross-platform prediction, especially using independent datasets.

  15. Microarray-based analysis of fish egg quality after natural or controlled ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fostier Alexis

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The preservation of fish egg quality after ovulation-control protocols is a major issue for the development of specific biotechnological processes (e.g. nuclear transfer. Depending on the species, it is often necessary to control the timing of ovulation or induce the ovulatory process. The hormonal or photoperiodic control of ovulation can induce specific egg quality defects that have been thoroughly studied. In contrast, the impact on the egg transcriptome as a result of these manipulations has received far less attention. Furthermore, the relationship between the mRNA abundance of maternally-inherited mRNAs and the developmental potential of the egg has never benefited from genome-wide studies. Thus, the present study aimed at studying the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss egg transcriptome after natural or controlled ovulation using 9152-cDNA microarrays. Results The analysis of egg transcriptome after natural or controlled ovulation led to the identification of 26 genes. The expression patterns of 17 of those genes were monitored by real-time PCR. We observed that the control of ovulation by both hormonal induction and photoperiod manipulation induced significant changes in the egg mRNA abundance of specific genes. A dramatic increase of Apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1 and tyrosine protein kinase HCK was observed in the eggs when a hormonal induction of ovulation was performed. In addition, both microarray and real-time PCR analyses showed that prohibitin 2 (PHB2 egg mRNA abundance was negatively correlated with developmental success. Conclusion First, we showed, for the first time in fish, that the control of ovulation using either a hormonal induction or a manipulated photoperiod can induce differences in the egg mRNA abundance of specific genes. While the impact of these modifications on subsequent embryonic development is unknown, our observations clearly show that the egg transcriptome is affected by an artificial

  16. DNA Sequence of Cutinase Gene Isolated from Spilocaea oleagina as Determined by PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Hideyoshi; Morii, Naho; Graniti, Antonio; Ouchi, Seiji

    1998-01-01

    [Synopsis] In this study, partial cutinase genes were cloned from Spilocaea oleagina and four different formae specials of Fusarium oxysporum (lycopersici, melonis, spinaciae and fragariae) by using PCR method. The reported amino acid sequences were aligned with DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ), and highly conserved amino acid regions were selected to construct specific primers of cutinase genes. Chromosomal DNA of S. oleagina was isolated and used for template of PCR to amplify cutinase genes. ...

  17. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  18. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. DNA methylation of amino acid transporter genes in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simner, C; Novakovic, B; Lillycrop, K A; Bell, C G; Harvey, N C; Cooper, C; Saffery, R; Lewis, R M; Cleal, J K

    2017-12-01

    Placental transfer of amino acids via amino acid transporters is essential for fetal growth. Little is known about the epigenetic regulation of amino acid transporters in placenta. This study investigates the DNA methylation status of amino acid transporters and their expression across gestation in human placenta. BeWo cells were treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine to inhibit methylation and assess the effects on amino acid transporter gene expression. The DNA methylation levels of amino acid transporter genes in human placenta were determined across gestation using DNA methylation array data. Placental amino acid transporter gene expression across gestation was also analysed using data from publically available Gene Expression Omnibus data sets. The expression levels of these transporters at term were established using RNA sequencing data. Inhibition of DNA methylation in BeWo cells demonstrated that expression of specific amino acid transporters can be inversely associated with DNA methylation. Amino acid transporters expressed in term placenta generally showed low levels of promoter DNA methylation. Transporters with little or no expression in term placenta tended to be more highly methylated at gene promoter regions. The transporter genes SLC1A2, SLC1A3, SLC1A4, SLC7A5, SLC7A11 and SLC7A10 had significant changes in enhancer DNA methylation across gestation, as well as gene expression changes across gestation. This study implicates DNA methylation in the regulation of amino acid transporter gene expression. However, in human placenta, DNA methylation of these genes remains low across gestation and does not always play an obvious role in regulating gene expression, despite clear evidence for differential expression as gestation proceeds. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples.

  1. [Cloning associated genes using microdissection-cDNA PCR-SSH in gastric dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dong-mei; Sun, Xiu-ju; Zheng, Zhi-hong; He, Guang; Ma, Ming-chao; Xu, Hui-mian; Wang, Mei-xian; Sun, Kai-lai

    2003-10-01

    To construct cDNA subtracted libraries from gastric dysplasia and further screen differentially expressed genes. Relatively pure dysplasia and normal tissue were procured by manual microdissection, and amplified by cDNA-PCR, which was used to carry on for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Subtracted cDNA fragments were linked with vector, cloned, screened, sequenced, and made homologous search. Differentially expressed fragments were verified by dot hybridization. Two subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed. Among 26 sequenced clones, 15 fragments corresponded to known genes, 3 fragments were known EST and 8 fragments were unknown EST (GenBank BQ164614-BQ164616, BQ291516-BQ291520). Fifteen fragments were verified to be differentially expressed in gastric dysplasia. Subtracted cDNA libraries from gastric dysplasia are constructed using combination of microdissection-cDNA PCR and SSH setup in our laboratory. Some fragments have been screened and verified to help to search for novel associated genes with gastric carcinogenesis.

  2. Gene Transfer into the Lung by Nanoparticle Dextran-Spermine/Plasmid DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cationic polymer, dextran-spermine (D-SPM, has been found to mediate gene expression in a wide variety of cell lines and in vivo through systemic delivery. Here, we extended the observations by determining the optimal conditions for gene expression of D-SPM/plasmid DNA (D-SPM/pDNA in cell lines and in the lungs of BALB/c mice via instillation delivery. In vitro studies showed that D-SPM could partially protect pDNA from degradation by nuclease and exhibited optimal gene transfer efficiency at D-SPM to pDNA weight-mixing ratio of 12. In the lungs of mice, the levels of gene expression generated by D-SPM/pDNA are highly dependent on the weight-mixing ratio of D-SPM to pDNA, amount of pDNA in the complex, and the assay time postdelivery. Readministration of the complex at day 1 following the first dosing showed no significant effect on the retention and duration of gene expression. The study also showed that there was a clear trend of increasing size of the complexes as the amount of pDNA was increased, where the sizes of the D-SPM/pDNA complexes were within the nanometer range.

  3. DNA tagging of blast resistant gene(s in three Brazilian rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Sandhu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast is the most important fungal disease of rice and is caused by Pyricularia oryzae Sacc. (Telomorph Magnoporthe grisea Barr.. Seven randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers OPA5, OPG17, OPG18, OPG19, OPF9, OPF17 and OPF19 showed very clear polymorphism in resistant cultivar lines which differed from susceptible lines. By comparing different susceptible lines, nine DNA amplifications of seven primers (OPA5(1000, OPA5(1200, OPG17(700, OPG18(850, OPG19(500, OPG19(600, OPF9(600, OPF17(1200 and OPF19(600 were identified as dominant markers for the blast resistant gene in resistant cultivar lines. These loci facilitate the indirect scoring of blast resistant and blast susceptible genotypes. The codomine RAPDs markers will facilitate marker-assisted selection of the blast resistant gene in two blast resistant genotypes of rice (Labelle and Line 11 and will be useful in rice breeding programs.

  4. Chitosan-Graft-Polyethylenimine/DNA Nanoparticles as Novel Non-Viral Gene Delivery Vectors Targeting Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lulu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. The present study was designed to develop and evaluate the chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CP)/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene vectors for gene therapy of osteoarthritis. The CP/DNA nanoparticles were produced through a complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP after grafting chitosan (CS) with a low molecular weight (Mw) PEI (Mw = 1.8 kDa). Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CP:DNA, where decreases in nanoparticle size and increases in surface charge were observed as CP content increased. The buffering capacity of CP was significantly greater than that of CS. The transfection efficiency of CP/DNA nanoparticles was similar with that of the Lipofectamine™ 2000, and significantly higher than that of CS/DNA and PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of the CP/DNA nanoparticles was dependent on the weight ratio of CP:DNA (w/w). The average cell viability after the treatment with CP/DNA nanoparticles was over 90% in both chondrocytes and synoviocytes, which was much higher than that of PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The CP copolymers efficiently carried the pDNA inside chondrocytes and synoviocytes, and the pDNA was detected entering into nucleus. These results suggest that CP/DNA nanoparticles with improved transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity might be a safe and efficient non-viral vector for gene delivery to both chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PMID:24392152

  5. Microneedle delivery of plasmid DNA to living human skin: formulation coating, skin insertion and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearton, Marc; Saller, Verena; Coulman, Sion A; Gateley, Chris; Anstey, Alexander V; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Birchall, James C

    2012-01-01

    Microneedle delivery of nucleic acids, in particular plasmid DNA (pDNA), to the skin represents a potential new approach for the clinical management of genetic skin diseases and cutaneous cancers, and for intracutaneous genetic immunization. In this study excised human skin explants were used to investigate and optimize key parameters that will determine stable and effective microneedle-facilitated pDNA delivery. These include (i) high dose-loading of pDNA onto microneedle surfaces, (ii) stability and functionality of the coated pDNA, (iii) skin penetration capability of pDNA-coated microneedles, and (iv) efficient gene expression in human skin. Optimization of a dip-coating method enabled significant increases in the loading capacity, up to 100 micrograms of pDNA per 5-microneedle array. Coated microneedles were able to reproducibly perforate human skin at low (coated pDNA was partially compromised on storage, although this was improved through the addition of saccharide excipients without detriment to the biological functionality of pDNA. The pDNA-coated microneedles facilitated reporter gene expression in viable human skin. The efficiency of gene expression from coated microneedles will depend upon suitable DNA loading, efficient and reproducible skin puncture and rapid in situ dissolution of the plasmid at the site of delivery. PMID:22516089

  6. DNA demethylases target promoter transposable elements to positively regulate stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Ngoc; Schumann, Ulrike; Smith, Neil A; Tiwari, Sameer; Au, Phil Chi Khang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kazan, Kemal; Llewellyn, Danny J; Zhang, Ren; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-09-17

    DNA demethylases regulate DNA methylation levels in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis encodes four DNA demethylases, DEMETER (DME), REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1), DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), and DML3. While DME is involved in maternal specific gene expression during seed development, the biological function of the remaining DNA demethylases remains unclear. We show that ROS1, DML2, and DML3 play a role in fungal disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A triple DNA demethylase mutant, rdd (ros1 dml2 dml3), shows increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We identify 348 genes differentially expressed in rdd relative to wild type, and a significant proportion of these genes are downregulated in rdd and have functions in stress response, suggesting that DNA demethylases maintain or positively regulate the expression of stress response genes required for F. oxysporum resistance. The rdd-downregulated stress response genes are enriched for short transposable element sequences in their promoters. Many of these transposable elements and their surrounding sequences show localized DNA methylation changes in rdd, and a general reduction in CHH methylation, suggesting that RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), responsible for CHH methylation, may participate in DNA demethylase-mediated regulation of stress response genes. Many of the rdd-downregulated stress response genes are downregulated in the RdDM mutants nrpd1 and nrpe1, and the RdDM mutants nrpe1 and ago4 show enhanced susceptibility to F. oxysporum infection. Our results suggest that a primary function of DNA demethylases in plants is to regulate the expression of stress response genes by targeting promoter transposable element sequences.

  7. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  8. [cDNA libraries construction and screening in gene expression profiling of disease resistance in wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meng; Kong, Xiu-Ying; Liu, Yue; Zhou, Rong-Hua; Jia, Ji-Zeng

    2002-09-01

    A wheat line, Bai Nong 3217/Mardler BC5F4 with resistance to powdery mildew, was used to construct a conventional cDNA library and a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library from wheat leaves inoculated by Erysiphe graminis DC. Three hundred and eighty-seven non-redundant ESTs from the conventional cDNA library and 760 ESTs from the SSH cDNA library were obtained, and the ESTs similarity analysis using BLASTn and BLASTx were conducted by comparing these ESTs with sequences in GenBank. The results showed that the redundancy of some kinds of genes such as photosynthesis related genes and ribosome related genes was higher in the conventional cDNA library but the varieties and quantities of disease resistance genes were less than those in the SSH cDNA library. The SSH cDNA library was found to have obvious advantages in gene expression profiling of disease resistance such as simple library construction procedure, rich specific DRR (disease-resistance-related) genes and decreased sequencing amount. To acquire genes that were involved in the powdery mildew resistance of wheat, hybridization with high-density dots membranes was used to screen the two libraries. The result showed that the method was relatively simple in operation, and the membranes could be used for many times. But some problems also existed with this screening method. For instance, a large amount of mRNA and radioactive isotope were needed and the hybridization procedure must be repeated several times to obtain stable hybridization results. About 54.1% function-known ESTs in the SSH cDNA library were identified to be DRR genes by screening. There were 247 clones of the SSH cDNA library that had positive signal in the repeated hybridizations with the pathogen uninfected probe. The identified DRR genes distributed in the whole procedure of powdery mildew resistance, but mainly focused on the SAR (systemic of acquired resistance).

  9. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening of Caenorhabditis elegans genes possibly involved in the mitochondrial genome maintenance was performed using our previous validated method of RNAi combined with ethidium bromide. This was to knock down C. elegans genes homologous to yeast genes known to be involved in mtDNA stability but of ...

  10. Variation of DNA methylation patterns associated with gene expression in rice (Oryza sativa) exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sheng Jun; Liu, Xue Song; Tao, Hua; Tan, Shang Kun; Chu, Shan Shan; Oono, Youko; Zhang, Xian Duo; Chen, Jian; Yang, Zhi Min

    2016-12-01

    We report genome-wide single-base resolution maps of methylated cytosines and transcriptome change in Cd-exposed rice. Widespread differences were identified in CG and non-CG methylation marks between Cd-exposed and Cd-free rice genomes. There are 2320 non-redundant differentially methylated regions detected in the genome. RNA sequencing revealed 2092 DNA methylation-modified genes differentially expressed under Cd exposure. More genes were found hypermethylated than those hypomethylated in CG, CHH and CHG (where H is A, C or T) contexts in upstream, gene body and downstream regions. Many of the genes were involved in stress response, metal transport and transcription factors. Most of the DNA methylation-modified genes were transcriptionally altered under Cd stress. A subset of loss of function mutants defective in DNA methylation and histone modification activities was used to identify transcript abundance of selected genes. Compared with wide type, mutation of MET1 and DRM2 resulted in general lower transcript levels of the genes under Cd stress. Transcripts of OsIRO2, OsPR1b and Os09g02214 in drm2 were significantly reduced. A commonly used DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine was employed to investigate whether DNA demethylation affected physiological consequences. 5-azacytidine provision decreased general DNA methylation levels of selected genes, but promoted growth of rice seedlings and Cd accumulation in rice plant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  12. Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xueduan; Fields, Matthew W; Thompson, Dorothea K; Bagwell, Christopher E; Tiedje, James M; Hazen, Terry C; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-06-01

    The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, Pspecies relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

  13. Screening for candidate genes related to breast cancer with cDNA microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Juan Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to reveal the exact changes during the occurrence of breast cancer to explore significant new and promising genes or factors related to this disease. Methods: We compared the gene expression profiles of breast cancer tissues with its uninvolved normal breast tissues as controls using the cDNA microarray analysis in seven breast cancer patients. Further, one representative gene, named IFI30, was quantitatively analyzed by real-time PCR to confirm the result of the cDNA microarray analysis. Results: A total of 427 genes were identified with significantly differential expression, 221 genes were up-regulated and 206 genes were down-regulated. And the result of cDNA microarray analysis was validated by detection of IFI30 mRNA level changes by real-time PCR. Genes for cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell division, mitosis, apoptosis, and immune response were enriched in the up-regulated genes, while genes for cell adhesion, proteolysis, and transport were significantly enriched in the down-regulated genes in breast cancer tissues compared with normal breast tissues by a gene ontology analysis. Conclusion: Our present study revealed a range of differentially expressed genes between breast cancer tissues and normal breast tissues, and provide candidate genes for further study focusing on the pathogenesis and new biomarkers for breast cancer. Keywords: Breast neoplasms, Candidate genes, Microarray

  14. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  15. SETDB1 is involved in postembryonic DNA methylation and gene silencing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Gou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is fundamental for the stability and activity of genomes. Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates establish a global DNA methylation pattern of their genome during early embryogenesis. Large-scale analyses of DNA methylation patterns have uncovered revealed that DNA methylation patterns are dynamic rather than static and change in a gene-specific fashion during development and in diseased cells. However, the factors and mechanisms involved in dynamic, postembryonic DNA methylation remain unclear. Methylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 (H3-K9 by members of the Su(var3-9 family of histone methyltransferases (HMTs triggers embryonic DNA methylation in Arthropods and Chordates. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SETDB1 (dSETDB1 can mediate DNA methylation and silencing of genes and retrotransposons. We found that dSETDB1 tri-methylates H3-K9 and binds methylated CpA motifs. Tri-methylation of H3-K9 by dSETDB1 mediates recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2 and Su(var205, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian "Heterochromatin Protein 1", to target genes for dSETDB1. By enlisting Dnmt2 and Su(var205, dSETDB1 triggers DNA methylation and silencing of genes and retrotransposons in Drosophila cells. DSETDB1 is involved in postembryonic DNA methylation and silencing of Rt1b{} retrotransposons and the tumor suppressor gene retinoblastoma family protein 1 (Rb in imaginal discs. Collectively, our findings implicate dSETDB1 in postembryonic DNA methylation, provide a model for silencing of the tumor suppressor Rb, and uncover a role for cell type-specific DNA methylation in Drosophila development.

  16. How does chromatin package DNA within nucleus and regulate gene expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazary, Ahmed E; Ju, Yi-Hsu; Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S M

    2017-08-01

    The human body is made up of 60 trillion cells, each cell containing 2 millions of genomic DNA in its nucleus. How is this genomic deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] organised into nuclei? Around 1880, W. Flemming discovered a nuclear substance that was clearly visible on staining under primitive light microscopes and named it 'chromatin'; this is now thought to be the basic unit of genomic DNA organization. Since long before DNA was known to carry genetic information, chromatin has fascinated biologists. DNA has a negatively charged phosphate backbone that produces electrostatic repulsion between adjacent DNA regions, making it difficult for DNA to fold upon itself. In this article, we will try to shed light on how does chromatin package DNA within nucleus and regulate gene expression? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene duplication and concerted evolution of mitochondrial DNA in crane species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Nishida, Chizuko; Momose, Kunikazu; Onuma, Manabu; Takami, Kazutoshi; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2017-01-01

    The gene duplication in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been reported in diverse bird taxa so far. Although many phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of cranes were carried out based on mtDNA diversity, whether mtDNA contains duplicated regions is unknown. To address the presence or absence of gene duplication in cranes and investigate the molecular evolutionary features of crane mtDNA, we analyzed the gene organization and the molecular phylogeny of mtDNA from 13 crane species. We found that the mtDNA in 13 crane species shared a tandem duplicated region, which consists of duplicated sequence sets including cytochrome b (Cytb), NADH6, control region (CR) and three genes of tRNA. The gene order in the duplicated region was identical among all the 13 crane species, and the nucleotide sequences found within each individual showed high similarities. In addition, phylogenetic trees based on homologous sequences of CR and Cytb indicated the possibility of concerted evolution among the duplicated genes. The results suggested that the duplication event occurred in the common ancestor of crane species or some older ancestors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA capture reveals transoceanic gene flow in endangered river sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenhong; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Straube, Nicolas; Harris, Mark; Hofreiter, Michael; White, William T; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2015-10-27

    For over a hundred years, the "river sharks" of the genus Glyphis were only known from the type specimens of species that had been collected in the 19th century. They were widely considered extinct until populations of Glyphis-like sharks were rediscovered in remote regions of Borneo and Northern Australia at the end of the 20th century. However, the genetic affinities between the newly discovered Glyphis-like populations and the poorly preserved, original museum-type specimens have never been established. Here, we present the first (to our knowledge) fully resolved, complete phylogeny of Glyphis that includes both archival-type specimens and modern material. We used a sensitive DNA hybridization capture method to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes from all of our samples and show that three of the five described river shark species are probably conspecific and widely distributed in Southeast Asia. Furthermore we show that there has been recent gene flow between locations that are separated by large oceanic expanses. Our data strongly suggest marine dispersal in these species, overturning the widely held notion that river sharks are restricted to freshwater. It seems that species in the genus Glyphis are euryhaline with an ecology similar to the bull shark, in which adult individuals live in the ocean while the young grow up in river habitats with reduced predation pressure. Finally, we discovered a previously unidentified species within the genus Glyphis that is deeply divergent from all other lineages, underscoring the current lack of knowledge about the biodiversity and ecology of these mysterious sharks.

  19. Heterogeneous pattern of DNA methylation in developmentally important genes correlates with its chromatin conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Puja; Singh, Kiran; Sachan, Manisha

    2017-01-11

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification, playing a crucial role in the development and differentiation of higher organisms. DNA methylation is also known to regulate transcription by gene repression. Various developmental genes such as c-mos, HoxB5, Sox11, and Sry show tissue-specific gene expression that was shown to be regulated by promoter DNA methylation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the establishment of chromatin marks (active or repressive) in relation to heterogeneous methylation in the promoter regions of these developmentally important genes. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed to immuno-precipitate chromatin by antibodies against both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K9me3) chromatin regions. The analysis of ChIP results showed that both the percentage input and fold enrichment of activated chromatin was higher in tissues expressing the respective genes as compared to the tissues not expressing the same set of genes. This was true for all the genes selected for the study (c-mos, HoxB5, Sox11, and Sry). These findings illustrate that inconsistent DNA methylation patterns (sporadic, mosaic and heterogeneous) may also influence gene regulation, thereby resulting in the modulation of chromatin conformation. These findings illustrate that various patterns of DNA methylation (asynchronous, mosaic and heterogeneous) correlates with chromatin modification, resulting in the gene regulation.

  20. Retrieval of glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase genes from environmental DNA by metagenomic gene specific multi-primer PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaolong; Yin, Xiaopu; Pei, Xiaolin; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Ao; Li, Yan; Gong, Weibo; Wang, Qiuyan

    2012-05-01

    A new method, termed metagenomic gene specific multi-primer PCR (MGSM-PCR), is presented that uses multiple gene specific primers derived from an isolated gene from a constructed metagenomic library rather than degenerate primers designed based on a known enzyme family. The utility of MGSM-PCR was shown by applying it to search for homologues of the glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase in metagenomic DNA. The success of the multiplex PCR was verified by visualizing products on an agarose gel following gel electrophoresis. A total of 127 homologous genes were amplified with combinatorial multi-primer reactions from 34 soil DNA samples. Multiple alignments revealed extensive sequence diversity among these captured sequences with sequence identity varying from 26 to 99.7%. These results indicated that significantly diverse homologous genes were indeed readily accessible when using multiple metagenomic gene specific primers.

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based concurrent screening of 24-chromosome aneuploidy and unbalanced translocations in preimplantation human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Nathan R; Northrop, Lesley E; Kasabwala, Khushabu; Su, Jing; Levy, Brynn; Scott, Richard T

    2011-04-01

    To develop, validate, and apply a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray-based method for simultaneous preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of unbalanced inheritance of rearranged chromosomes and 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening. Prospective clinical research study. Academic reproductive medicine center. Eighteen couples carrying a balanced reciprocal or Robertsonian chromosomal rearrangement. PGD on blastocyst trophectoderm biopsy specimens. Aneuploidy, implantation, pregnancy, and delivery rates after SNP microarray-based aneuploidy and translocation screening. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray was capable of detecting translocation-associated imbalances as small as 9.0 megabases. In the 12 transfers performed, sustained implantation occurred for 9 (45%) of 20 balanced-normal and euploid embryos replaced. The clinical pregnancy rate in patients receiving a transfer was 75% with six singleton deliveries and three ongoing singleton pregnancies thus far. Significantly fewer embryos were eligible for transfer with the incorporation of simultaneous 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening. Arrested embryos were also significantly more likely to possess unbalanced chromosomes when compared with developmentally competent blastocysts. This SNP microarray-based method provides the first opportunity to improve outcomes through comprehensive identification of euploid embryos from translocation carrier couples. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. From High-Throughput Microarray-Based Screening to Clinical Application: The Development of a Second Generation Multigene Test for Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Denkert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Several multigene tests have been developed for breast cancer patients to predict the individual risk of recurrence. Most of the first generation tests rely on proliferation-associated genes and are commonly carried out in central reference laboratories. Here, we describe the development of a second generation multigene assay, the EndoPredict test, a prognostic multigene expression test for estrogen receptor (ER positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 negative (ER+/HER2− breast cancer patients. The EndoPredict gene signature was initially established in a large high-throughput microarray-based screening study. The key steps for biomarker identification are discussed in detail, in comparison to the establishment of other multigene signatures. After biomarker selection, genes and algorithms were transferred to a diagnostic platform (reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR to allow for assaying formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples. A comprehensive analytical validation was performed and a prospective proficiency testing study with seven pathological laboratories finally proved that EndoPredict can be reliably used in the decentralized setting. Three independent large clinical validation studies (n = 2,257 demonstrated that EndoPredict offers independent prognostic information beyond current clinicopathological parameters and clinical guidelines. The review article summarizes several important steps that should be considered for the development process of a second generation multigene test and offers a means for transferring a microarray signature from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

  3. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes.

  4. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2003-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology

  5. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  6. DNA-repair gene variants are associated with glioblastoma survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara; Henriksson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Patient outcome from glioma may be influenced by germline variation. Considering the importance of DNA repair in cancer biology as well as in response to treatment, we studied the relationship between 1458 SNPs, which captured the majority of the common genetic variation in 136 DNA repai...

  7. Gene therapeutics and DNA vaccines; quality and regulatory aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk JAC; Hegger I; Jongen PMJM; LGM

    2001-01-01

    Overdracht van genen naar cellen, gevolgd door de expressie van deze genen kan de symptomen van een ziekte opheffen (gentherapie), of infectieuze ziektes voorkomen (DNA vaccinatie). Gentherapie en DNA vaccinatie zijn gebaseerd op relatief nieuwe technologieen. De verwachting is dat de eerste

  8. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... 2009; Morey et al. 2011). Previous studies have also documented the effect of various energy components on the stability of DNA and mutational stability of DNA sequences (Delcourt and Blake 1991; Hunter. 1993; Sugimoto et al. 1996; Owczarzy et al. 1999; Sponer et al. 2001, 2004; Protozanova et al.

  9. Alterations in radioresistance of eucaryotic cells after the transfer of genomic wildtype DNA and metallothionein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrer, H.

    1987-01-01

    The presented paper describes experiments concerning the alteration of radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after gene transfer. Ionizing radiation (γ- or X-ray) induces DNA single- or double strand breaks, which are religated by an unknown repair system. Repair deficient cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. In the experiments described, cells from a patient with the heritable disease Ataxia telangiectasia were used as well as two X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell lines. After gene transfer of an intact human DNA repair gene or a metallothionein gene the cells should regain radioresistance. (orig.) [de

  10. DNA methylation and gene expression differences in children conceived in vitro or in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Katari, Sunita; Turan, Nahid; Bibikova, Marina; Erinle, Oluwatoyin; Chalian, Raffi; Foster, Michael; Gaughan, John P.; Coutifaris, Christos; Sapienza, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that children conceived in vitro have a greater relative risk of low birth-weight, major and minor birth defects, and rare disorders involving imprinted genes, suggesting that epigenetic changes may be associated with assisted reproduction. We examined DNA methylation at more than 700 genes (1536 CpG sites) in placenta and cord blood and measured gene expression levels of a subset of genes that differed in methylation levels between children conceived in vitro ve...

  11. Nonparametric testing for DNA copy number induced differential mRNA gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, W.N.; van de Wiel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology relates DNA with mRNA. Array CGH measures DNA copy number and gene expression microarrays measure the amount of mRNA. Methods that integrate data from these two platforms may uncover meaningful biological relationships that further our understanding of cancer.

  12. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Friis, J; Fugger, L

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DPB in 54 patients with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) and in healthy Danes. The frequencies of DNA fragments a...

  13. cDNA fingerprinting of osteoprogenitor cells to isolate differentiation stage-specific genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Candeliere, G A; Rao, Y; Floh, A; Sandler, S D; Aubin, J E

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA fingerprinting strategy was developed to identify genes based on their differential expression pattern during osteoblast development. Preliminary biological and molecular staging of cDNA pools prepared by global amplification PCR allowed discrim-inating choices to be made in selection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to be isolated. Sequencing of selected ESTs confirmed that both known and novel genes can be isolated from any developmental stage of interest, e.g. from primitive progen...

  14. Imaging in solution of (Lys)(16)-containing bifunctional synthetic peptide/DNA nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Louise; Kaszuba, Michael; Fabre, John W

    2004-04-07

    The physical properties of non-viral vector/DNA nanoparticles in physiological aqueous solution are poorly understood. A Fluid Particle Image Analyser (FPIA), normally used for analysis of industrial and environmental fluids, was used to visualise individual (Lys)(16)-containing peptide/DNA particles. Eight (Lys)(16)-containing synthetic peptides were used to generate peptide/DNA particles at a constant + to - charge ratio of 2.8:1 with 10 microg/ml of plasmid DNA in phosphate buffered saline. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and gene delivery studies were also performed. We present the first images of non-viral vector/DNA nanoparticles in physiological aqueous solution, together with precise measurements of individual particle size and shape in solution and, for the first time, an accurate measure of particle number. Particle size and shape, particle number, and efficiency for gene delivery varied markedly with different peptides. Under standard conditions for in vitro gene delivery, we estimate approximately 60 peptide/DNA nanoparticles per target cell, each containing approximately 70,000 plasmids. This novel capacity to image individual vector/DNA nanoparticles in solution and to count them accurately will enable a more precise assessment of non-viral gene delivery systems, and a more quantitative interpretation of gene delivery experiments.

  15. Distinct co-evolution patterns of genes associated to DNA polymerase III DnaE and PolC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelen Stefan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes displaying a strong bias between the leading and the lagging strand of DNA replication encode two DNA polymerases III, DnaE and PolC, rather than a single one. Replication is a highly unsymmetrical process, and the presence of two polymerases is therefore not unexpected. Using comparative genomics, we explored whether other processes have evolved in parallel with each polymerase. Results Extending previous in silico heuristics for the analysis of gene co-evolution, we analyzed the function of genes clustering with dnaE and polC. Clusters were highly informative. DnaE co-evolves with the ribosome, the transcription machinery, the core of intermediary metabolism enzymes. It is also connected to the energy-saving enzyme necessary for RNA degradation, polynucleotide phosphorylase. Most of the proteins of this co-evolving set belong to the persistent set in bacterial proteomes, that is fairly ubiquitously distributed. In contrast, PolC co-evolves with RNA degradation enzymes that are present only in the A+T-rich Firmicutes clade, suggesting at least two origins for the degradosome. Conclusion DNA replication involves two machineries, DnaE and PolC. DnaE co-evolves with the core functions of bacterial life. In contrast PolC co-evolves with a set of RNA degradation enzymes that does not derive from the degradosome identified in gamma-Proteobacteria. This suggests that at least two independent RNA degradation pathways existed in the progenote community at the end of the RNA genome world.

  16. DNA Methylation and Gene Expression Profiling of Ewing Sarcoma Primary Tumors Reveal Genes That Are Potential Targets of Epigenetic Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikul Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of aberrant DNA methylation in Ewing sarcoma is not completely understood. The methylation status of 503 genes in 52 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded EWS tumors and 3 EWS cell lines was compared to human mesenchymal stem cell primary cultures (hMSCs using bead chip methylation analysis. Relative expression of methylated genes was assessed in 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine-(5-AZA-treated EWS cell lines and in a cohort of primary EWS samples and hMSCs by gene expression and quantitative RT-PCR. 129 genes demonstrated statistically significant hypermethylation in EWS tumors compared to hMSCs. Thirty-six genes were profoundly methylated in EWS and unmethylated in hMSCs. 5-AZA treatment of EWS cell lines resulted in upregulation of expression of hundreds of genes including 162 that were increased by at least 2-fold. The expression of 19 of 36 candidate hypermethylated genes was increased following 5-AZA. Analysis of gene expression from an independent cohort of tumors confirmed decreased expression of six of nineteen hypermethylated genes (AXL, COL1A1, CYP1B1, LYN, SERPINE1, and VCAN. Comparing gene expression and DNA methylation analyses proved to be an effective way to identify genes epigenetically regulated in EWS. Further investigation is ongoing to elucidate the role of these epigenetic alterations in EWS pathogenesis.

  17. DNA thermodynamic stability and supercoil dynamics determine the gene expression program during the bacterial growth cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Glinkowska, Monika; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2013-07-01

    The chromosomal DNA polymer constituting the cellular genetic material is primarily a device for coding information. Whilst the gene sequences comprise the digital (discontinuous) linear code, physiological alterations of the DNA superhelical density generate in addition analog (continuous) three-dimensional information essential for regulation of both chromosome compaction and gene expression. Insight into the relationship between the DNA analog information and the digital linear code is of fundamental importance for understanding genetic regulation. Our previous study in the model organism Escherichia coli suggested that the chromosomal gene order and a spatiotemporal gradient of DNA superhelicity associated with DNA replication determine the growth phase-dependent gene transcription. In this study we reveal a general gradient of DNA thermodynamic stability correlated with the polarity of chromosomal replication and manifest in the spatiotemporal pattern of gene transcription during the bacterial growth cycle. Furthermore, by integrating the physical and dynamic features of the transcribed sequences with their functional content we identify spatiotemporal domains of gene expression encompassing different functions. We thus provide both an insight into the organisational principle of the bacterial growth program and a novel holistic methodology for exploring chromosomal dynamics.

  18. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation of 1st Trimester Trisomic Placentas from Down Syndrome, Edwards Syndrome and Patau Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M; Bach, Cathrine; Graakjaer, Jesper; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Methylation-based non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal aneuploidies is an alternative method that could possibly improve fetal aneuploidy diagnosis, especially for trisomy 13(T13) and trisomy 18(T18). Our aim was to study the methylation landscape in placenta DNA from trisomy 13, 18 and 21 pregnancies in an attempt to find trisomy-specific methylation differences better suited for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted high-resolution methylation specific bead chip microarray analyses assessing more than 450,000 CpGs analyzing placentas from 12 T21 pregnancies, 12 T18 pregnancies and 6 T13 pregnancies. We have compared the methylation landscape of the trisomic placentas to the methylation landscape from normal placental DNA and to maternal blood cell DNA. Comparing trisomic placentas to normal placentas we identified 217 and 219 differentially methylated CpGs for CVS T18 and CVS T13, respectively (delta β>0.2, FDR<0.05), but only three differentially methylated CpGs for T21. However, the methylation differences was only modest (delta β<0.4), making them less suitable as diagnostic markers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the gene set connected to theT18 differentially methylated CpGs was highly enriched for GO terms related to"DNA binding" and "transcription factor binding" coupled to the RNA polymerase II transcription. In the gene set connected to the T13 differentially methylated CpGs we found no significant enrichments.

  19. Identification and localization of a gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trucksis, M.; Depew, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I (ω protein) was identified with the aid of a radioimmunoassay for this protein. E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was produced by Salmonella typhimurium merodiploids that harbored E. coli plasmid F' 123, but not by strains that lost this plasmid. Analysis of strains with spontaneous deletions of F' 123 showed that the gene, topA, required for production of the E. coli ω protein was between the trp operon and the cysB gene. Deletions that eliminated topA also eliminated the supX gene. We suggest that topA is the structural gene of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and that topA is identical to supX

  20. DNA polymerases ν and θ are required for efficient immunoglobulin V gene diversification in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nishihara, Kana; Hirota, Kouji; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Yoshimura, Michio; Ekino, Shigeo; Butler, John E.; Watanabe, Masami; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2010-01-01

    The chicken DT40 B lymphocyte line diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) V genes through translesion DNA synthesis–dependent point mutations (Ig hypermutation) and homologous recombination (HR)–dependent Ig gene conversion. The error-prone biochemical characteristic of the A family DNA polymerases Polν and Polθ led us to explore the role of these polymerases in Ig gene diversification in DT40 cells. Disruption of both polymerases causes a significant decrease in Ig gene conversion events, although POLN−/−/POLQ−/− cells exhibit no prominent defect in HR-mediated DNA repair, as indicated by no increase in sensitivity to camptothecin. Polη has also been previously implicated in Ig gene conversion. We show that a POLH−/−/POLN−/−/POLQ−/− triple mutant displays no Ig gene conversion and reduced Ig hypermutation. Together, these data define a role for Polν and Polθ in recombination and suggest that the DNA synthesis associated with Ig gene conversion is accounted for by three specialized DNA polymerases. PMID:20584917

  1. MethylMix 2.0: an R package for identifying DNA methylation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedoz, Pierre-Louis; Prunello, Marcos; Brennan, Kevin; Gevaert, Olivier

    2018-04-14

    DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is a major mechanism of gene expression deregulation in a wide range of diseases. At the same time, high-throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements. We developed MethylMix, an algorithm implemented in R to identify disease specific hyper and hypomethylated genes. Here we present a new version of MethylMix that automates the construction of DNA-methylation and gene expression datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). More precisely, MethylMix 2.0 incorporates two major updates: the automated downloading of DNA methylation and gene expression datasets from TCGA and the automated preprocessing of such datasets: value imputation, batch correction and CpG sites clustering within each gene. The resulting datasets can subsequently be analyzed with MethylMix to identify transcriptionally predictive methylation states. We show that the Differential Methylation Values created by MethylMix can be used for cancer subtyping. olivier.gevaert@stanford.edu. https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/manuals/MethylMix/man/MethylMix.pdf. MethylMix 2.0 was implemented as an R package and is available in bioconductor.

  2. DNA methylation and gene expression of TXNIP in adult offspring of women with diabetes in pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Houshmand-Oeregaard

    Full Text Available Fetal exposure to maternal diabetes increases the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM, possibly mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Low blood TXNIP DNA methylation has been associated with elevated glucose levels and risk of T2DM, and increased skeletal muscle TXNIP gene expression was reported in subjects with impaired glucose metabolism or T2DM. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and skeletal muscle play a key role in the control of whole body glucose metabolism and insulin action. The extent to which TXNIP DNA methylation levels are decreased and/or gene expression levels increased in SAT or skeletal muscle of a developmentally programmed at-risk population is unknown.The objective of this study was to investigate TXNIP DNA methylation and gene expression in SAT and skeletal muscle, and DNA methylation in blood, from adult offspring of women with gestational diabetes (O-GDM, n = 82 or type 1 diabetes (O-T1DM, n = 67 in pregnancy compared with offspring of women from the background population (O-BP, n = 57.SAT TXNIP DNA methylation was increased (p = 0.032 and gene expression decreased (p = 0.001 in O-GDM, but these differences were attenuated after adjustment for confounders. Neither blood/muscle TXNIP DNA methylation nor muscle gene expression differed between groups.We found no evidence of decreased TXNIP DNA methylation or increased gene expression in metabolic target tissues of offspring exposed to maternal diabetes. Further studies are needed to confirm and understand the paradoxical SAT TXNIP DNA methylation and gene expression changes in O-GDM subjects.

  3. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Hereditary and Sporadic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ricks-Santi, Luisel

    2006-01-01

    .... There is variable penetrance for breast cancer among women in families with known BRCA1 mutations, and we hypothesize that this might be due to genetic variants in wild-type BRCA1 or other DNA repair...

  4. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the rep......The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind...... already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR...

  5. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, F.P. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kuasne, H. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Marchi, F.A. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Programa Inter-Institucional em Bioinformtica, Instituto de Matemtica e Estatstica, Universidade So Paulo, So Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, P.M. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [CIPE, Laboratrio NeoGene, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Achatz, M.I. [CIPE, Laboratrio de Oncogentica Molecular, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Oncogentica, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, So Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results.

  6. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens

  7. DNA methylation in an intron of the IBM1 histone demethylase gene stabilizes chromatin modification patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigal, Mélanie; Kevei, Zoltán; Pélissier, Thierry; Mathieu, Olivier

    2012-06-29

    The stability of epigenetic patterns is critical for genome integrity and gene expression. This highly coordinated process involves interrelated positive and negative regulators that impact distinct epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation and dimethylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2). In Arabidopsis, mutations in the DNA methyltransferase MET1, which maintains CG methylation, result in aberrant patterns of other epigenetic marks, including ectopic non-CG methylation and the relocation of H3K9me2 from heterochromatin into gene-rich chromosome regions. Here, we show that the expression of the H3K9 demethylase IBM1 (increase in BONSAI methylation 1) requires DNA methylation. Surprisingly, the regulatory methylated region is contained in an unusually large intron that is conserved in IBM1 orthologues. The re-establishment of IBM1 expression in met1 mutants restored the wild-type H3K9me2 nuclear patterns, non-CG DNA methylation and transcriptional patterns at selected loci, which included DNA demethylase genes. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for long-standing puzzling observations in met1 mutants and reveal yet another layer of control in the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modification, which stabilizes DNA methylation patterns at genes.

  8. Sequence and transcription analysis of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzarides, T.; Bankier, A.T.; Satchwell, S.C.; Weston, K.; Tomlinson, P.; Barrell, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the gene coding for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase is present within the long unique region of the virus genome. Identification is based on extensive amino acid homology between the predicted HCMV open reading frame HFLF2 and the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus type 1. The authors present here a 5280 base-pair DNA sequence containing the HCMV pol gene, along with the analysis of transcripts encoded within this region. Since HCMV pol also shows homology to the predicted Epstein-Barr virus pol, they were able to analyze the extent of homology between the DNA polymerases of three distantly related herpes viruses, HCMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus. The comparison shows that these DNA polymerases exhibit considerable amino acid homology and highlights a number of highly conserved regions; two such regions show homology to sequences within the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase. The HCMV pol gene is flanked by open reading frames with homology to those of other herpes viruses; upstream, there is a reading frame homologous to the glycoprotein B gene of herpes simplex virus type I and Epstein-Barr virus, and downstream there is a reading frame homologous to BFLF2 of Epstein-Barr virus

  9. Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking of DNA After Gene Electrotransfer In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Rosazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA electrotransfer is a successful technique for gene delivery into cells and represents an attractive alternative to virus-based methods for clinical applications including gene therapy and DNA vaccination. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms governing DNA internalization and its fate inside cells. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of endocytosis and to quantify the contribution of different routes of cellular trafficking during DNA electrotransfer. To pursue these objectives, we performed flow cytometry and single-particle fluorescence microscopy experiments using inhibitors of endocytosis and endosomal markers. Our results show that ≃50% of DNA is internalized by caveolin/raft-mediated endocytosis, 25% by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and 25% by macropinocytosis. During active transport, DNA is routed through multiple endosomal compartments with, in the hour following electrotransfer, 70% found in Rab5 structures, 50% in Rab11-containing organelles and 30% in Rab9 compartments. Later, 60% of DNA colocalizes with Lamp1 vesicles. Because these molecular markers can overlap while following organelles through several steps of trafficking, the percentages do not sum up to 100%. We conclude that electrotransferred DNA uses the classical endosomal trafficking pathways. Our results are important for a generalized understanding of gene electrotransfer, which is crucial for its safe use in clinics.

  10. Global and gene-specific DNA methylation pattern discriminates cholecystitis from gallbladder cancer patients in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagohara, Luciane Tsukamoto; Schussel, Juliana L; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Lebron, Cynthia; Brait, Mariana; Maldonado, Leonel; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Jahuira, Martha; Lopez, Jaime; Letelier, Pablo; Brebi-Mieville, Priscilla; Ili, Carmen; Pandey, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, Aditi; Sidransky, David; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of global and gene-specific DNA methylation changes as potential biomarkers for gallbladder cancer (GBC) in a cohort from Chile. Material & methods DNA methylation was analyzed through an ELISA-based technique and quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Results Global DNA Methylation Index (p = 0.02) and promoter methylation of SSBP2 (p = 0.01) and ESR1 (p = 0.05) were significantly different in GBC when compared with cholecystitis. Receiver curve operator analysis revealed promoter methylation of APC, CDKN2A, ESR1, PGP9.5 and SSBP2, together with the Global DNA Methylation Index, had 71% sensitivity, 95% specificity, a 0.97 area under the curve and a positive predictive value of 90%. Conclusion Global and gene-specific DNA methylation may be useful biomarkers for GBC clinical assessment. PMID:25066711

  11. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro Feliciello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  12. Plasimids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Martinez, Susana; Lopez, Paloma; Espinosa, Manuel

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumocccal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme.

  13. Junk DNA enhances pEI-based non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, E.V.B. van; Oosting, R.S.; Hennink, W.E.; Crommelin, D.J.A.; Mastrobattista, E.

    Gene therapy aims at delivering exogenous DNA into the nuclei of target cells to establish expression of a therapeutic protein. Non-viral gene delivery is examined as a safer alternative to viral approaches, but is presently characterized by a low efficiency. In the past years several non-viral

  14. Improvement of Hydrodynamics-Based Gene Transfer of Nonviral DNA Targeted to Murine Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an important organ for supporting the life of an individual. Gene transfer toward this organ has been attempted in many laboratories to date; however, there have been few reports on improved liver-targeted gene delivery by using a nonviral vector. In this study, we examined the effect of various types of gene delivery carriers on enhancing the uptake and gene expression of exogenous DNA in murine hepatocytes when a hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HGD is performed via tail-vein injection. Mice were singly injected with a large amount of phosphate-buffered saline containing reporter plasmid DNA and/or with a gene delivery carrier. One day after the gene delivery, the animals' livers were dissected and subjected to biochemical, histochemical, and molecular biological analyses. The strongest signal from the reporter plasmid DNA was observed when the DNA was mixed with a polyethylenimine- (PEI- based reagent. Coinjection with pCRTEIL (a loxP-floxed reporter construct and pTR/NCre (a liver-specific Cre expression vector resulted in the liver-specific recombination of pCRTEIL. The combination of PEI with HGD would thus be a valuable tool for liver-specific manipulation to examine the function of a gene of interest in the liver and for creating liver disease models.

  15. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of a DNA repair gene from Serratia marcescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the SOS response and two 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases (TagI and TagII) are required for repair of DNA damaged by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Mutations of the recA gene eliminate the SOS response. TagI and TagII are encoded by the tag and alkA genes, respectively. A gene (rpr) encoding 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. The gene, localized to a 1.5-kilobase pair SmaI-HindIII restriction fragment, was cloned into plasmid pUC18. The clone complemented E. coli tag alkA and recA mutations for MMS resistance. The rpr gene did not, however, complement recA mutations for resistance to ultraviolet light or the ability to perform homologous recombination reactions, nor did it complement E. coli ada or alkB mutations. Two proteins of molecular weights 42,000 and 16,000 were produced from the rpr locus. Analysis of deletion and insertion mutants of rpr suggested that the 42kD molecule is the active protein. The 16kD protein may either be a breakdown product of the 42kD species or may be encoded by another gene overlapping the reading frame of the rpr gene. Biochemical assays showed that the rpr gene product (Rpr) possesses 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity

  16. Neural network predicts sequence of TP53 gene based on DNA chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, J.S.; Wikman, F.; Lu, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    We have trained an artificial neural network to predict the sequence of the human TP53 tumor suppressor gene based on a p53 GeneChip. The trained neural network uses as input the fluorescence intensities of DNA hybridized to oligonucleotides on the surface of the chip and makes between zero...

  17. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1987-08-28

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of /und Streptococcus/ /und pneumoniae/. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumococcal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Absolute Quantitation of DNA Methylation of 28 Candidate Genes in Prostate Cancer Using Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataڑa Vasiljeviš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis and its mapping is likely to provide biomarkers for improved diagnostic and risk assessment in prostate cancer (PCa. We quantified and compared absolute methylation levels among 28 candidate genes in 48 PCa and 29 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH samples using the pyrosequencing (PSQ method to identify genes with diagnostic and prognostic potential.

  19. Development of an ultrasound-responsive and mannose-modified gene carrier for DNA vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, Keita; Kawakami, Shigeru; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2010-10-01

    Development of a gene delivery system to transfer the gene of interest selectively and efficiently into targeted cells is essential for achievement of sufficient therapeutic effects by gene therapy. Here, we succeeded in developing the gene transfection method using ultrasound (US)-responsive and mannose-modified gene carriers, named Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes. Compared with the conventional lipofection method using mannose-modified carriers, this transfection method using Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes and US exposure enabled approximately 500-800-fold higher gene expressions in the antigen presenting cells (APCs) selectively in vivo. This enhanced gene expression was contributed by the improvement of delivering efficiency of nucleic acids to the targeted organs, and by the increase of introducing efficiency of nucleic acids into the cytoplasm followed by US exposure. Moreover, high anti-tumor effects were demonstrated by applying this method to DNA vaccine therapy using ovalbumin (OVA)-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA). This US-responsive and cell-specific gene delivery system can be widely applied to medical treatments such as vaccine therapy and anti-inflammation therapy, which its targeted cells are APCs, and our findings may help in establishing innovative methods for in-vivo gene delivery to overcome the poor introducing efficiency of carriers into cytoplasm which the major obstacle associated with gene delivery by non-viral carriers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis.

  1. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA...... as several apoptosis-related genes, in particular STK17A and CRYAB. As MPP1 and CRYAB are also among the 14 genes differentially expressed in all three of the drug-resistant sublines, they represent the strongest candidates for resistance against DNA-damaging drugs....

  2. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  3. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT + colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references

  4. Identification of aminotransferase genes for biosynthesis of aminoglycoside antibiotics from soil DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Atsushi; Takeyama, Satoko; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2005-07-01

    Aminoglycoside has been known as a clinically important antibiotic for a long time, but genetic information for the biosynthesis of aminoglycoside is still insufficient. In this study, we tried to clone aminoglycoside-biosynthetic genes from soil DNA for accumulation of genetic information. We chose the genes encoding L-glutamine:(2-deoxy-)scyllo-inosose aminotransferase as the target, because it is specific for all types of aminoglycoside biosynthesis. By degenerate PCR, we obtained 33 individual clones that were homologous with aminotransferase genes in aminoglycoside biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis and alignment of these genes showed that horizontal gene transfer has occurred in the soil. Among these, several quite interesting genes were obtained. Some genes probably originated from non-actinomycetes, and some were far from the known homologs. These genes can be useful markers for the isolation of entire gene clusters and originating organisms.

  5. Polymorphisms of Selected DNA Repair Genes and Lung Cancer in Chromium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasova, E; Matakova, T; Skerenova, M; Krutakova, M; Slovakova, P; Dzian, A; Javorkova, S; Pec, M; Kypusova, K; Hamzik, J

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is a well-known mutagen and carcinogen involved in lung cancer development. DNA repair genes play an important role in the elimination of genetic changes caused by chromium exposure. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms of the following DNA repair genes: XRCC3, participating in the homologous recombination repair, and hMLH1 and hMSH2, functioning in the mismatch repair. We focused on the risk the polymorphisms present in the development of lung cancer regarding the exposure to chromium. We analyzed 106 individuals; 45 patients exposed to chromium with diagnosed lung cancer and 61 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined by a PCR-RFLP method. We unravelled a potential for increased risk of lung cancer development in the hMLH1 (rs1800734) AA genotype in the recessive model. In conclusion, gene polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes underscores the risk of lung cancer development in chromium exposed individuals.

  6. The human cytomegalovirus gene products essential for late viral gene expression assemble into prereplication complexes before viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Hiroki; Stinski, Mark F; Murata, Takayuki; Yamashita, Yoriko; Kanda, Teru; Toyokuni, Shinya; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) late gene expression by viral proteins is poorly understood, and these viral proteins could be targets for novel antivirals. HCMV open reading frames (ORFs) UL79, -87, and -95 encode proteins with homology to late gene transcription factors of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 ORFs 18, 24, and 34, respectively. To determine whether these HCMV proteins are also essential for late gene transcription of a betaherpesvirus, we mutated HCMV ORFs UL79, -87, and -95. Cells were infected with the recombinant viruses at high and low multiplicities of infection (MOIs). While viral DNA was detected with the recombinant viruses, infectious virus was not detected unless the wild-type viral proteins were expressed in trans. At a high MOI, mutation of ORF UL79, -87, or -95 had no effect on the level of major immediate-early (MIE) gene expression or viral DNA replication, but late viral gene expression from the UL44, -75, and -99 ORFs was not detected. At a low MOI, preexpression of UL79 or -87, but not UL95, in human fibroblast cells negatively affected the level of MIE viral gene expression and viral DNA replication. The products of ORFs UL79, -87, and -95 were expressed as early viral proteins and recruited to prereplication complexes (pre-RCs), along with UL44, before the initiation of viral DNA replication. All three HCMV ORFs are indispensable for late viral gene expression and viral growth. The roles of UL79, -87, and -95 in pre-RCs for late viral gene expression are discussed.

  7. DNA Characterization and Polymorphism of KISS1 Gene in Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was the detection of the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KISS1 gene in six major Egyptian small ruminant breeds. The primers used in this study flanked a 377 bp fragment from intron 1 of KISS1 gene in sheep and goat. These PCR ...

  8. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara; Dahlberg, Johan; Nilsson, Sara; Raine, Amanda; Nystedt, Sara; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Berglund, Eva C; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Cavelier, Lucia; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Nordlund, Jessica; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2017-08-14

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  9. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanara Marincevic-Zuniga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. Methods We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. Results We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Conclusion Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  10. Exercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetics is the study of processes--beyond DNA sequence alteration--producing heritable characteristics. For example, DNA methylation modifies gene expression without altering the nucleotide sequence. A well-studied DNA methylation-based phenomenon is genomic imprinting (ie, genotype-independent parent-of-origin effects). We aimed to elucidate: (1) the effect of exercise on DNA methylation and (2) the role of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle gene networks (ie, gene group functional profiling analyses). Gene ontology (ie, gene product elucidation)/meta-analysis. 26 skeletal muscle and 86 imprinted genes were subjected to g:Profiler ontology analysis. Meta-analysis assessed exercise-associated DNA methylation change. g:Profiler found four muscle gene networks with imprinted loci. Meta-analysis identified 16 articles (387 genes/1580 individuals) associated with exercise. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation could elevate effect size bias. Only skeletal muscle gene networks including imprinted genes were reported. Exercise-associated effect sizes were calculated by gene. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation were moderators. Six imprinted loci (RB1, MEG3, UBE3A, PLAGL1, SGCE, INS) were important for muscle gene networks, while meta-analysis uncovered five exercise-associated imprinted loci (KCNQ1, MEG3, GRB10, L3MBTL1, PLAGL1). DNA methylation decreased with exercise (60% of loci). Exercise-associated DNA methylation change was stronger among older people (ie, age accounted for 30% of the variation). Among older people, genes exhibiting DNA methylation decreases were part of a microRNA-regulated gene network functioning to suppress cancer. Imprinted genes were identified in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Exercise-associated DNA methylation modification could rewind the 'epigenetic clock' as we age. CRD42014009800. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  11. DNA entropy reveals a significant difference in complexity between housekeeping and tissue specific gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David; Finan, Chris; Newport, Melanie J; Jones, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The complexity of DNA can be quantified using estimates of entropy. Variation in DNA complexity is expected between the promoters of genes with different transcriptional mechanisms; namely housekeeping (HK) and tissue specific (TS). The former are transcribed constitutively to maintain general cellular functions, and the latter are transcribed in restricted tissue and cells types for specific molecular events. It is known that promoter features in the human genome are related to tissue specificity, but this has been difficult to quantify on a genomic scale. If entropy effectively quantifies DNA complexity, calculating the entropies of HK and TS gene promoters as profiles may reveal significant differences. Entropy profiles were calculated for a total dataset of 12,003 human gene promoters and for 501 housekeeping (HK) and 587 tissue specific (TS) human gene promoters. The mean profiles show the TS promoters have a significantly lower entropy (pentropy distributions for the 3 datasets show that promoter entropies could be used to identify novel HK genes. Functional features comprise DNA sequence patterns that are non-random and hence they have lower entropies. The lower entropy of TS gene promoters can be explained by a higher density of positive and negative regulatory elements, required for genes with complex spatial and temporary expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative analysis of gene-specific DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Dennis E.; Mercer, Belinda G.; Wiklendt, Agnieszka M.; Aitken, R. John

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human spermatozoa are highly susceptible to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. However, a detailed analysis of the precise nature of this damage and the extent to which it affects the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes has not been reported. To induce DNA damage, human spermatozoa were treated in vitro with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ; 0-5 mM) or iron (as Fe(II)SO 4 , 0-500 μM). Quantitative PCR (QPCR) was used to measure DNA damage in individual nuclear genes (hprt, β-pol and β-globin) and mitochondrial DNA. Single strand breaks were also assessed by alkaline gel electrophoresis. H 2 O 2 was found to be genotoxic toward spermatozoa at concentrations as high as 1.25 mM, but DNA damage was not detected in these cells with lower concentrations of H 2 O 2 . The mitochondrial genome of human spermatozoa was significantly (P 2 O 2 -induced DNA damage than the nuclear genome. However, both nDNA and mtDNA in human spermatozoa were significantly (P<0.001) more resistant to damage than DNA from a variety of cell lines of germ cell and myoblastoid origin. Interestingly, significant DNA damage was also not detected in human spermatozoa treated with iron. These studies report, for the first time, quantitative measurements of DNA damage in specific genes of male germ cells, and challenge the commonly held belief that human spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to DNA damage

  13. Gene prediction based on DNA spectral analysis: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhon, Sajid A; Kremer, Stefan C

    2011-04-01

    The identification of regions of DNA sequences that code for proteins is one of the most fundamental applications in bioinformatics. These protein-coding regions are in contrast to other DNA regions that encode functional RNA molecules, provide structural stability of chromosomes, serve as genetic raw materials, represent molecular fossils, or have no known purpose (sometimes called "junk DNA"). A number of approaches have been suggested for differentiating between the protein-coding and non-protein-coding regions of DNA. A selection of these approaches is based on digital signal processing (DSP) techniques. These DSP techniques rely on the phenomenon that protein-coding regions have a prominent power spectrum peak at frequency f=⅓ arising from the length of codons (three nucleic acids). This article partitions the identification of protein-coding regions into four discrete steps. Based on this partitioning, DSP techniques can be easily described and compared based on their unique implementations of the processing steps. We compare the approaches, and discuss strengths and weaknesses of each in the context of different applications. Our work provides an accessible introduction and comparative review of DSP methods for the identification of protein-coding regions. Additionally, by breaking down the approaches into four steps, we suggest new combinations that may be worthy of future study. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  14. DNA polymorphism of butyrophilin gene by PCR-RFLP technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCRRFLP) technique to screen for DNA polymorphism in 109 cattle. In all cattle, we amplified an 863 fragment consisting of part of exon 8. The amplified fragment digested with HaeIII restriction endonuclease and subjected to electrophoretic ...

  15. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  16. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene-specific DNA methylation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Di Ruscio, A.; Ebralidze, A.; Benoukraf, T.; Amabile, G.; Goff, L.A.; Terragni, J.; Figueroa, M.E.; Pontes, L.L.D.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, P.; Wu, M.C.; D´Alo, F.; Melnick, A.; Leone, G.; Ebralidze, K.K.; Pradhan, S.; Rinn, J.L.; Tenen, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 503, č. 7476 (2013), s. 371-376 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21307 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA methylation * non-coding RNA * DNMT1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 42.351, year: 2013

  17. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Methods: This study was performed on 98 HBV infected patients' serum samples from Western India. A nested PCR protocol ... typing has gained immense importance in guiding treat- ment decisions, improving vaccination .... DNA isolation from serum samples was performed using. High Pure Viral Nucleic ...

  18. Gene Therapy for Chronic HBV-Can We Eliminate cccDNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Kristie; Maepa, Mohube Betty; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2018-04-12

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a global health concern and accounts for approximately 1 million deaths annually. Amongst other limitations of current anti-HBV treatment, failure to eliminate the viral covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) and emergence of resistance remain the most worrisome. Viral rebound from latent episomal cccDNA reservoirs occurs following cessation of therapy, patient non-compliance, or the development of escape mutants. Simultaneous viral co-infections, such as by HIV-1, further complicate therapeutic interventions. These challenges have prompted development of novel targeted hepatitis B therapies. Given the ease with which highly specific and potent nucleic acid therapeutics can be rationally designed, gene therapy has generated interest for antiviral application. Gene therapy strategies developed for HBV include gene silencing by harnessing RNA interference, transcriptional inhibition through epigenetic modification of target DNA, genome editing by designer nucleases, and immune modulation with cytokines. DNA-binding domains and effectors based on the zinc finger (ZF), transcription activator-like effector (TALE), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) systems are remarkably well suited to targeting episomal cccDNA. This review discusses recent developments and challenges facing the field of anti-HBV gene therapy, its potential curative significance and the progress towards clinical application.

  19. Hydrophobicity of methylated DNA as a possible mechanism for gene silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Parminder; Lindsay, Stuart; Plochberger, Birgit; Costa, Peter; Cope, Stephanie M; Vaiana, Sara M

    2012-01-01

    AFM images show that chromatin reconstituted on methylated DNA (meDNA) is compacted when imaged under water. Chromatin reconstituted on unmethylated DNA is less compacted and less sensitive to hydration. These differences must reflect changes in the physical properties of DNA on methylation, but prior studies have not revealed large differences between methylated and unmethylated DNA. Quasi-elastic light scattering studies of solutions of methylated and unmethylated DNA support this view. In contrast, AFM images of molecules at a water/solid interface yield a persistence length that nearly doubles (to 92.5 ± 4 nm) when 9% of the total DNA is methylated. This increase in persistence length is accompanied by a decrease in contour length, suggesting that a significant fraction of the meDNA changes into the stiffer A form as the more hydrophobic meDNA is dehydrated at the interface. This suggests a simple mechanism for gene silencing as the stiffer meDNA is more difficult to remove from nucleosomes. (paper)

  20. Identification of DNA Methyltransferase Genes in Human Pathogenic Bacteria by Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto Cesar; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression and virulence in some pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we describe DNA methyltransferases (MTases) present in human pathogenic bacteria and compared them with related species, which are not pathogenic or less pathogenic, based in comparative genomics. We performed a search in the KEGG database of the KEGG database orthology groups associated with adenine and cytosine DNA MTase activities (EC: 2.1.1.37, EC: 2.1.1.113 and EC: 2.1.1.72) in 37 human pathogenic species and 18 non/less pathogenic relatives and performed comparisons of the number of these MTases sequences according to their genome size, the DNA MTase type and with their non-less pathogenic relatives. We observed that Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria spp. presented the highest number of MTases while ten different species did not present a predicted DNA MTase. We also detected a significant increase of adenine MTases over cytosine MTases (2.19 vs. 1.06, respectively, p DNA MTases associated with type I restriction modification systems were more numerous than those associated with type III restriction modification systems (0.84 vs. 0.17, p DNA MTases, indicating that the number of DNA MTases is related to the particular evolution and lifestyle of specific species, regulating the expression of virulence genes in some pathogenic bacteria.

  1. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  2. Glycoprotein is enough for sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Juanjuan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the necessity and potential application of structural genes for expressing heterogenous genes from Sindbis virus-derived vector, the DNA-based expression vector pVaXJ was constructed by placing the recombinant genome of sindbis-like virus XJ-160 under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter of the plasmid pVAX1, in which viral structural genes were replaced by a polylinker cassette to allow for insertion of heterologous genes. The defect helper plasmids pVaE or pVaC were developed by cloning the gene of glycoprotein E3E26KE1 or capsid protein of XJ-160 virus into pVAX1, respectively. The report gene cassette pVaXJ-EGFP or pV-Gluc expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP or Gaussia luciferase (G.luc were constructed by cloning EGFP or G.luc gene into pVaXJ. EGFP or G.luc was expressed in the BHK-21 cells co-transfected with report gene cassettes and pVaE at levels that were comparable to those produced by report gene cassettes, pVaC and pVaE and were much higher than the levels produced by report gene cassette and pVaC, suggesting that glycoprotein is enough for Sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes in host cells. The method of gene expression from Sindbis virus-based DNA vector only co-transfected with envelop E gene increase the conveniency and the utility of alphavirus-based vector systems in general.

  3. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation of 1st Trimester Trisomic Placentas from Down Syndrome, Edwards Syndrome and Patau Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Bach, Cathrine; Graakjaer, Jesper; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E.; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Methylation-based non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal aneuploidies is an alternative method that could possibly improve fetal aneuploidy diagnosis, especially for trisomy 13(T13) and trisomy 18(T18). Our aim was to study the methylation landscape in placenta DNA from trisomy 13, 18 and 21 pregnancies in an attempt to find trisomy–specific methylation differences better suited for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted high-resolution methylation specific bead chip microarray analyses assessing more than 450,000 CpGs analyzing placentas from 12 T21 pregnancies, 12 T18 pregnancies and 6 T13 pregnancies. We have compared the methylation landscape of the trisomic placentas to the methylation landscape from normal placental DNA and to maternal blood cell DNA. Comparing trisomic placentas to normal placentas we identified 217 and 219 differentially methylated CpGs for CVS T18 and CVS T13, respectively (delta β>0.2, FDR<0.05), but only three differentially methylated CpGs for T21. However, the methylation differences was only modest (delta β<0.4), making them less suitable as diagnostic markers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the gene set connected to theT18 differentially methylated CpGs was highly enriched for GO terms related to”DNA binding” and “transcription factor binding” coupled to the RNA polymerase II transcription. In the gene set connected to the T13 differentially methylated CpGs we found no significant enrichments. PMID:27490343

  4. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with DNA repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Vedithi, Sundeep Chaitanya; Das, Madhusmita; Roy, Anindya; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2017-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%), 11 hypothetical proteins (18%), and 14 pseudogenes (23%). All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32%) in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA). The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes) were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the direct repair pathway. This study provided

  5. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with dna repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. Methods: T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%, 11 hypothetical proteins (18%, and 14 pseudogenes (23%. All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32% in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. Results: It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA. The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the

  6. A DNA vector-based RNAi technology to suppress gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guangchao; Soohoo, Christina; Affar, El Bachir; Gay, Frédérique; Shi, Yujiang; Forrester, William C; Shi, Yang

    2002-04-16

    Double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) has recently emerged as a powerful reverse genetic tool to silence gene expression in multiple organisms including plants, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila. The discovery that synthetic double-stranded, 21-nt small interfering RNA triggers gene-specific silencing in mammalian cells has further expanded the utility of RNAi into mammalian systems. Here we report a technology that allows synthesis of small interfering RNAs from DNA templates in vivo to efficiently inhibit endogenous gene expression. Significantly, we were able to use this approach to demonstrate, in multiple cell lines, robust inhibition of several endogenous genes of diverse functions. These findings highlight the general utility of this DNA vector-based RNAi technology in suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells.

  7. Genome-wide Gene Expression Analysis of Mucosal Colonic Biopsies and Isolated Colonocytes Suggests a Continuous Inflammatory State in the Lamina Propria of Patients with Quiescent Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    syndrome (controls, n = 10). After isolation of colonocytes and subsequent extraction of total RNA, GWGE data were acquired using Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip Array (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Data analysis was carried out by principal component analysis and projection to latent structure......Background: Genome-wide gene expression (GWGE) profiles of mucosal colonic biopsies have suggested the existence of a continuous inflammatory state in quiescent ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of this study was to use DNA microarray-based GWGE profiling of mucosal colonic biopsies and isolated...

  8. DNA Methylation Maintains Allele-specific KIR Gene Expression in Human Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Huei-Wei; Kurago, Zoya B.; Stewart, C. Andrew; Wilson, Michael J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Mace, Brian E.; Carrington, Mary; Trowsdale, John; Lutz, Charles T.

    2003-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) bind self–major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, allowing natural killer (NK) cells to recognize aberrant cells that have down-regulated class I. NK cells express variable numbers and combinations of highly homologous clonally restricted KIR genes, but uniformly express KIR2DL4. We show that NK clones express both 2DL4 alleles and either one or both alleles of the clonally restricted KIR 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes. Despite allele-independent expression, 3DL1 alleles differed in the core promoter by only one or two nucleotides. Allele-specific 3DL1 gene expression correlated with promoter and 5′ gene DNA hypomethylation in NK cells in vitro and in vivo. The DNA methylase inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, induced KIR DNA hypomethylation and heterogeneous expression of multiple KIR genes. Thus, NK cells use DNA methylation to maintain clonally restricted expression of highly homologous KIR genes and alleles. PMID:12538663

  9. Evaluation of Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition by Peptide Microarray-Based Fluorescence Assay on Polymer Brush Substrate and in Vivo Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhen; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Yaoqi; Meng, Xianying; Wang, Zhenxin

    2017-12-20

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets of tumor. In this report, a peptide microarray-based fluorescence assay is developed for MMPs inhibitors evaluation through immobilization of biotin-modified peptides on the poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (P(GMA-HEMA)) brush-modified glass slides. After biotin is recognized with cyanine 3 (Cy3)-modified avidin (Cy3-avidin), the microarrays can produce strong fluorescence signal. The biotin moieties detach from microarray, when the biotin-modified peptide substrates are specially cleaved by a MMP, resulting in decreased fluorescence intensity of the microarray. The decreasing level of fluorescence intensity is correlated with the MMP inhibition. Nine known MMP inhibitors against MMP-2 and MMP-9 are evaluated by the assay, and the quantitative determination of inhibitory potencies (half maximal inhibitory concentration) are obtained, which are comparable with the literatures. Two biocompatible fluorogenic peptides containing MMP-specific recognition sequences and FAM/Dabcyl fluorophore-quencher pair are designed as activatable reporter probes for sensing MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in cell and in vivo. The peptide microarray-based results are well verified by the cell inhibition assay and in vitro fluorescence imaging, and further confirmed by the in vivo imaging of HT-1080 tumor-bearing mice.

  10. Production of DNA microarray and expression analysis of genes from Xylella fastidiosa in different culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane de Fátima Travensolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray was developed to monitor the expression of many genes from Xylella fastidiosa, allowing the side by-side comparison of two situations in a single experiment. The experiments were performed using X. fastidiosa cells grown in two culture media: BCYE and XDM2. The primers were synthesized, spotted onto glass slides and the array was hybridized against fluorescently labeled cDNAs. The emitted signals were quantified, normalized and the data were statistically analyzed to verify the differentially expressed genes. According to the data, 104 genes were differentially expressed in XDM2 and 30 genes in BCYE media. The present study showed that DNA microarray technique efficiently differentiate the expressed genes under different conditions.DNA Microarray foi desenvolvida para monitorar a expressão de muitos genes de Xylella fastidiosa, permitindo a comparação de duas situações distintas em um único experimento. Os experimentos foram feitos utilizando células de X. fastidiosa cultivada em dois meios de cultura: BCYE e XDM2. Pares de oligonucleotídeos iniciadores foram sintetizados, depositados em lâminas de vidro e o arranjo foi hibridizado contra cDNAs marcados fluorescentemente. Os sinais emitidos foram quantificados, normalizados e os dados foram estatisticamente analisados para verificar os genes diferencialmente expressos. De acordo com nossos dados, 104 genes foram diferencialmente expressos para o meio de cultura XDM2 e 30 genes para o BCYE. No presente estudo, nós demonstramos que a técnica de DNA microarrays eficientemente diferencia genes expressos sob diferentes condições de cultivo.

  11. Microarray-based identification of clinically relevant vaginal bacteria in relation to bacterial vaginosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, Joke A M; Smit, Pieter W; Kort, Remco; Reid, Gregor; Schuren, Frank H J; Tempelman, Hugo; Bontekoe, Tj Romke; Korporaal, Hans; Boon, Mathilde E

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the use of a tailor-made DNA microarray containing probes representing the vaginal microbiota to examine bacterial vaginosis. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred one women attending a health center for HIV testing in South Africa were enrolled. Stained, liquid-based

  12. Intercellular heterogeneity of expression of the MGMT DNA repair gene in pediatric medulloblastoma1

    OpenAIRE

    Rood, Brian R.; Zhang, Huizhen; Cogen, Philip H.

    2004-01-01

    DNA methylation and epigenetic inactivation of the O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene induces MGMT deficiency, reducing the tumor cell’s DNA repair capacity and increasing its susceptibility to alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. Consequently, adult patients whose tumors are deficient in MGMT have better outcomes with alkylator chemotherapy, and MGMT methylation has been proposed as a screening marker of deficient tumors. In order to test the feasibility of this approach for medul...

  13. Identification and characterization of the cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase gene family in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Li; Caili Li; Shanfa Lu

    2018-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation is highly conserved epigenetic modification involved in a wide range of biological processes in eukaryotes. It was established and maintained by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) in plants. Through genome-wide identification, eight putative SmC5-MTase genes were identified from the genome of Salvia miltiorrhiza, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine material and an emerging model medicinal plant. Based on conserved domains and phylogenetic analysis, ei...

  14. Obesity is associated with depot-specific alterations in adipocyte DNA methylation and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Si Brask; Yadav, Rachita; Yin, Guangliang

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify genes exhibiting concomitant obesity-dependent changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in adipose tissues in the mouse using diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6J and genetically obese ob/ob mice as models. Mature adipocytes were isolated from epididymal...... and inguinal adipose tissues of ob/ob and DIO C57BL/6J mice. DNA methylation was analyzed by MeDIP-sequencing and gene expression by microarray analysis. The majority of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were hypomethylated in obese mice. Global methylation of long interspersed elements indicated...... that hypomethylation did not reflect methyl donor deficiency. In both DIO and ob/ob mice, we observed more obesity-associated methylation changes in epididymal than in inguinal adipocytes. Assignment of DMRs to promoter, exon, intron and intergenic regions demonstrated that DIO-induced changes in DNA methylation in C...

  15. Triple Negative Breast Cancers Have a Reduced Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreis, Daniele; Bertoni, Ramona; Giardini, Roberto; Fox, Stephen B.; Broggini, Massimo; Bottini, Alberto; Zanoni, Vanessa; Bazzola, Letizia; Foroni, Chiara; Generali, Daniele; Damia, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair is a key determinant in the cellular response to therapy and tumor repair status could play an important role in tailoring patient therapy. Our goal was to evaluate the mRNA of 13 genes involved in different DNA repair pathways (base excision, nucleotide excision, homologous recombination, and Fanconi anemia) in paraffin embedded samples of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared to luminal A breast cancer (LABC). Most of the genes involved in nucleotide excision repair and Fanconi Anemia pathways, and CHK1 gene were significantly less expressed in TNBC than in LABC. PARP1 levels were higher in TNBC than in LABC. In univariate analysis high level of FANCA correlated with an increased overall survival and event free survival in TNBC; however multivariate analyses using Cox regression did not confirm FANCA as independent prognostic factor. These data support the evidence that TNBCs compared to LABCs harbour DNA repair defects. PMID:23825533

  16. DNA vaccine constructs expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific genes induce immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, S N M; Al-Attiyah, R; Mustafa, A S

    2010-11-01

    RD1 PE35, PPE68, EsxA, EsxB and RD9 EsxV genes are present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome but deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The aim of this study was to clone these genes into DNA vaccine vectors capable of expressing them in eukaryotic cells as fusion proteins, fused with immunostimulatory signal peptides of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and evaluate the recombinant DNA vaccine constructs for induction of antigen-specific cellular immune responses in mice. DNA corresponding to the aforementioned RD1 and RD9 genes was cloned into DNA vaccine plasmid vectors pUMVC6 and pUMVC7 (with hIL-2 and tPA signal peptides, respectively), and a total of 10 recombinant DNA vaccine constructs were obtained. BALB/c mice were immunized with the parent and recombinant plasmids and their spleen cells were tested for antigen-induced proliferation with antigens of M. tuberculosis and pure proteins corresponding to the cloned genes. The results showed that antigen-specific proliferation responses were observed for a given antigen only with spleen cells of mice immunized with the homologous recombinant DNA vaccine construct. The mice immunized with the parent plasmids did not show positive immune responses to any of the antigens of the cloned genes. The ability of the DNA vaccine constructs to elicit cellular immune responses makes them an attractive weapon as a safer vaccine candidate for preventive and therapeutic applications against tuberculosis. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. CellMinerHCC: a microarray-based expression database for hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Frank; Krupp, Markus; Maass, Thorsten; Itzel, Timo; Weinmann, Arndt; Lee, Ju-Seog; Schmidt, Bertil; Müller, Martina; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Galle, Peter R; Teufel, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Therapeutic options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) still remain limited. Development of gene targeted therapies is a promising option. A better understanding of the underlying molecular biology is gained in in vitro experiments. However, even with targeted manipulation of gene expression varying treatment responses were observed in diverse HCC cell lines. Therefore, information on gene expression profiles of various HCC cell lines may be crucial to experimental designs. To generate a publicly available database containing microarray expression profiles of diverse HCC cell lines. Microarray data were analyzed using an individually scripted R program package. Data were stored in a PostgreSQL database with a PHP written web interface. Evaluation and comparison of individual cell line expression profiles are supported via public web interface. This database allows evaluation of gene expression profiles of 18 HCC cell lines and comparison of differential gene expression between multiple cell lines. Analysis of commonly regulated genes for signaling pathway enrichment and interactions demonstrates a liver tumor phenotype with enrichment of major cancer related KEGG signatures like 'cancer' and 'inflammatory response'. Further molecular associations of strong scientific interest, e.g. 'lipid metabolism', were also identified. We have generated CellMinerHCC (http://www.medicalgenomics.org/cellminerhcc), a publicly available database containing gene expression data of 18 HCC cell lines. This database will aid in the design of in vitro experiments in HCC research, because the genetic specificities of various HCC cell lines will be considered. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. DNA methylation changes in genes frequently mutated in sporadic colorectal cancer and in the DNA repair and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farkas, S. A.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Vodičková, Ludmila; Vodička, Pavel; Torbjörn, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2014), s. 179-191 ISSN 1750-1911 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP304/11/P715; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585; GA MZd NT14329 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : CpG * DNA repair genes * sporadic colorectal cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.649, year: 2014

  19. A two-gene blood test for methylated DNA sensitive for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne K Pedersen

    Full Text Available Specific genes are methylated with high frequency in colorectal neoplasia, and may leak into blood. Detection of multiple methylated DNA biomarkers in blood may improve assay sensitivity for colorectal cancer (CRC relative to a single marker. We undertook a case-control study evaluating the presence of two methylation DNA markers, BCAT1 and IKZF1, in circulation to determine if they were complementary for detection of CRC.Methylation-specific PCR assays were developed to measure the level of methylated BCAT1 and IKZF1 in DNA extracted from plasma obtained from colonoscopy-confirmed 144 healthy controls and 74 CRC cases.DNA yields ranged from 2 to 730 ng/mL plasma (mean 18.6ng/mL; 95% CI 11-26 ng/mL and did not correlate with gender, age or CRC status. Methylated BCAT1 and IKZF1 DNA were detected in respectively 48 (65% and 50 (68% of the 74 cancers. In contrast, only 5 (4% and 7 (5% controls were positive for BCAT1 and IKZF1 DNA methylation, respectively. A two-gene classifier model ("either or" rule improved segregation of CRC from controls, with 57 of 74 cancers (77% compared to only 11 of 144 (7.6% controls being positive for BCAT1 and/or IKZF1 DNA methylation. Increasing levels of methylated DNA were observed as CRC stage progressed.Detection of methylated BCAT1 and/or IKZF1 DNA in plasma may have clinical application as a novel blood test for CRC. Combining the results from the two methylation-specific PCR assays improved CRC detection with minimal change in specificity. Further validation of this two-gene blood test with a view to application in screening is now indicated.

  20. Corruption of the intra-gene DNA methylation architecture is a hallmark of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Bartlett

    Full Text Available Epigenetic processes--including DNA methylation--are increasingly seen as having a fundamental role in chronic diseases like cancer. It is well known that methylation levels at particular genes or loci differ between normal and diseased tissue. Here we investigate whether the intra-gene methylation architecture is corrupted in cancer and whether the variability of levels of methylation of individual CpGs within a defined gene is able to discriminate cancerous from normal tissue, and is associated with heterogeneous tumour phenotype, as defined by gene expression. We analysed 270985 CpGs annotated to 18272 genes, in 3284 cancerous and 681 normal samples, corresponding to 14 different cancer types. In doing so, we found novel differences in intra-gene methylation pattern across phenotypes, particularly in those genes which are crucial for stem cell biology; our measures of intra-gene methylation architecture are a better determinant of phenotype than measures based on mean methylation level alone (K-S test [Formula: see text] in all 14 diseases tested. These per-gene methylation measures also represent a considerable reduction in complexity, compared to conventional per-CpG beta-values. Our findings strongly support the view that intra-gene methylation architecture has great clinical potential for the development of DNA-based cancer biomarkers.

  1. Interaction of DNA/nuclear protein/polycation and the terplexes for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yuan; Pan Shirong; Feng Min; Wen Yuting; Deng Jingjing; Luo Xin; Wu Chuanbin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan II Road 74, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Peng Hui, E-mail: fengmin@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Zhongshan Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2010-01-29

    Nuclear transport of exogenous DNA is a major barrier to nonviral gene delivery that needs to be addressed in the design of new vectors. In this study, we prepared pDNA/HMGB1/PEG-PEI terplexes to promote nuclear import. HMGB1 in the terplexes was used to assist the transportation of pDNA into the nucleus of cells, since it contained nuclear localization signal (NLS); PEG chains were introduced to stabilize pDNA/vector terplexes and reduce the cytotoxicity. HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors have been investigated specifically for their structure interaction by atomic force microscopy and circular dichroic spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the HMGB1 molecule could bind with the pDNA chains, but not condense pDNA well. The PEG-PEI further compacted pDNA/HMGB1 complexes into nanosized spherical terplexes. The pDNA delivered by HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors was significantly accumulated in the nucleus of cells, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The percentage of GFP-transfected cells and VEGF protein expression level induced by HMGB1/PEG-PEI were 2.6-4.9-fold and 1.4-2.8-fold higher, respectively, than that of a common cationic polymer PEI 25 kDa. Therefore, the HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vector could be used as a versatile vector for promoting exogenous DNA nuclear localization, thereby enhancing its expression.

  2. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  3. Variation in DNA methylation of the oxytocin receptor gene predicts children's resilience to prenatal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milaniak, Izabela; Cecil, Charlotte A M; Barker, Edward D; Relton, Caroline L; Gaunt, Tom R; McArdle, Wendy; Jaffee, Sara R

    2017-12-01

    Emerging research in epigenetics has shown that there is variability in how environmental exposures "get under the skin" through mechanisms like DNA methylation to influence gene expression that may lead to differential adaptations to stress. This is the first study to examine prospectively the relationship between DNA methylation at birth and resilience to prenatal environmental stressors in several domains (conduct, hyperactivity, emotional problems, and global symptomatology) in middle childhood. We focused on DNA methylation in the vicinity of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene as it has been previously associated with impairments in social-cognitive processes that may underlie a wide range of childhood psychopathology. Participants were 91 youth exposed to pre- and postnatal adversity with established conduct problem trajectories drawn from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Consistent with our hypothesis, OXTR DNA methylation was predictive of resilience in the conduct problems domain in middle childhood. DNA methylation profiles did not predict resilience in domains of emotional, hyperactivity, and global symptomatology, suggesting a potential role for OXTR in the development of conduct problems in particular. However, individuals who were resilient to conduct problems were also broadly resilient across multiple domains. Therefore, future research should elucidate the biological pathways between OXTR DNA methylation and gene expression and its relation to impairments in social behavior.

  4. Molecular cloning and analysis of DNA repair gene from the radioresistant bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Wang Mingsuo

    1998-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr) possesses a prominent ability to repair DNA injury induced by various DNA-damaging agents including mitomycin C (MC), ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation. A DNA repair mutant Dr KH3111 is a streptomycin resistant (Sm R ) derivative of KH311 which is generated by treatment with nitrosoguanidine and is sensitive to MC, 8-trimethyl-psoralen, UV and γ-ray irradiation. Gene affected by a mutation in the mutant is identified and its nucleotide sequence is determined. A complete open reading frame (ORF) which encompassed the KH3111 mutation region is found and tentatively designated as orf144b. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of orf144b consists of 284 aa and has no significant homology to other known proteins. The exact KH3111 mutation site is one nucleotide altered (G to A) in the sequence of orf144b in the mutant. The KH3111 mutation causes the substitution of Gly for Glu at aa position 149 of Orf144b. Survival measurements of a revertant KH3112 which was produced by transforming with DNA containing a part of the orf144b gene of KD8301 showed that the resistances to MC, UV and γ-ray in the revertant were fully restored at a level equal to the wild type. Thus, the orf144b gene required for the multiple-DNA-damaging agent resistance of Dr was designated with the name of pprA (Pleiotropic gene promoting DNA repair). This new gene can express in E. coli at very high level, and make the host E. coli resistant to MC, UV and γ-ray. The pprA gene does not express in normal Dr, but it can be induced to express by treatment with MC, UV and γ-ray. It was thought that the PprA polypeptide is a cytoplasmic protein because of the absence of characteristics found in the aa sequence of membrane proteins

  5. Histone gene expression remains coupled to DNA synthesis during in vitro cellular senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, G.; Stein, J.; Dell'Orco, R.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a decrease in the extent to which confluent monolayers of late compared to early passage CF3 human diploid fibroblasts can be stimulated to proliferate, the time course of DNA synthesis onset is similar regardless of the in vitro age of the cells. A parallel and stoichiometric relationship is maintained between the rate of DNA synthesis and the cellular levels of histone mRNA independent of the age of the cell cultures. Furthermore, DNA synthesis and cellular histone mRNA levels decline in a coordinate manner after inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea treatment. These results indicate that while the proliferative activity of human diploid fibroblasts decreases with passage in culture, those cells that retain the ability to proliferate continue to exhibit a tight coupling of DNA replication and histone gene expression

  6. Tagging of blast resistance gene(s) to DNA markers and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in rice improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, J.Y.; Lu, J.; Qian, H.R.; Lin, H.X.; Zheng, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports progress made on the tagging of blast resistance gene(s) to DNA markers and on the initiation of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for blast resistance in rice improvement. A pair of near isogenic lines, K8OR and K79S, were developed using a Chinese landrace Hong-jiao-zhan as the resistance donor. Ten putatively positive markers were identified by screening 177 mapped DNA markers. Using the F 2 population of 143 plants and the derived F 3 lines, three Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) markers (RG81, RG869 and RZ397) on chromosome 12 of rice were identified to be closely linked to the blast resistance gene Pi-12(t). The genetic distance between Pi-12(t) and the closest marker RG869 was 5.1 cM. By employing the bulk segregant analysis (BSA) procedure, six of 199 arbitrary primers were found to produce positive Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) bands. Tight linkage between Pi-12(t) and three RAPD bands, each from a different primer, was confirmed after amplification of DNA of all F 2 individuals. Two fragments were cloned and sequenced, and two sequence characterised amplified re-ion (SCAR) markers were established. In two other F 3 populations, Xian-feng I/Tetep and Xian-feng, 1/Hong-jiao-zhan, the blast resistance was found to be controlled by interactions of two or more genes. One resistance gene was located in the vicinity of RG81 in both populations. Work to identify other gene(s) is currently under way. Marker assisted selection for blast resistance was initiated. Crosses were made between elite varieties and blast resistance donors to develop populations for DNA marker-assisted selection of blast resistance. In addition, 48 varieties widely used in current rice breeding programs were provided by rice breeders. DNA marker-based polymorphism among, these varieties and resistance donors were analysed to produce a database for future MAS program. (author)

  7. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M.; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K.; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1ATR/Tel1ATM-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5′ to 3′ resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  8. Cloning of the PYR3 gene of Ustilago maydis and its use in DNA transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, G.R.; Taylor, S.Y. (National Institute for Medical Research, London (England))

    1988-12-01

    The Ustilago maydis PYR3 gene encoding dihydroorotase activity was cloned by direct complementation of Escherichia coli pyrC mutations. PYR3 transformants of E. coli pyrC mutants expressed homologous transcripts of a variety of sizes and regained dihydroorotase activity. PYR3 also complemented Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura4 mutations, and again multiple transcripts were expressed in transformants, and enzyme activity was regained. A 1.25-kilobase poly(rA)+ PYR3 transcript was detected in U. maydis itself. Linear DNA carrying the PYR3 gene transformed a U. maydis pyr3-1 pyrimidine auxotroph to prototrophy. Hybridization analysis revealed that three different types of transformants could be generated, depending on the structure of the transforming DNA used. The first type involved exchange of chromosomal mutant gene sequences with the cloned wild-type plasmid sequences. A second type had integrated linear transforming DNA at the chromosomal PYR3 locus, probably via a single crossover event. The third type had integrated transforming DNA sequences at multiple sites in the U. maydis genome. In the last two types, tandemly reiterated copies of the transforming DNA were found to have been integrated. All three types had lost the sensitivity of the parental pyr3-1 mutant to UV irradiation. They had also regained dihydroorotase activity, although its level did not correlate with the PYR3 gene copy number.

  9. Postreplication repair gap filling in an Escherichia coli strain deficient in dnaB gene product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Gaps in daughter-strand DNA synthesized after exposure of Escherichia coli E279 to ultraviolet light are filled during reincubation at 30 0 C for 20 min. Escherichia coli E279 is phenotypically DnaB - when incubated at 43 0 C. Cells incubated at 43 0 C were tested for their ability to complete postreplication repair gap filling. It is concluded that the dnaB gene product is essential for postreplication repair gap filling and that the inhibition seen is not initially the result of degradation

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on DNA-mediated gene transfer efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J.S.; Hall, E.J.; Hei, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes a number of molecular changes in cells including DNA damage and gene amplification. In this study the authors examined whether radiation can effect the efficiency of integration and expression of exogenous DNA sequences. They examined both 137 Cs γ rays and various monoenergetic neutron beams. This enabled them to test whether the LET or RBE of the radiation had any effect. Rat2 cells were transfected with various amounts of the bacterial plasmid pSV2-GPT along with carrier DNA for 24 hours

  11. Microarray-based analysis of survival of soil microbial community during ozonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Guanghe

    2010-05-17

    A 15 h ozonation was performed on bioremediated soil to remove recalcitrant residual oil. To monitor the survival of indigenous microorganisms in the soil during in-situ chemical oxidation(ISCO) culturing and a functional genearray, GeoChip, was used to examine the functional genes and structure of the microbial community during ozonation (0h, 2h, 4h, 6h, 10hand15h). Breakthrough ozonation decreased the population of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria by about 3 orders of magnitude. The total functional gene abundance and diversity decreased during ozonation, as the number of functional genes was reduced by 48percent after 15 h. However, functional genes were evenly distributed during ozonation as judged by the Shannon-Weaver Evenness index. A sharp decrease in gene number was observed in the first 6 h of ozonation followed by a slower decrease in the next 9 h, which was consistent with microbial populations measured by a culture based method. Functional genes involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphors and sulfur cycling, metal resistance and organic remediation were detected in all samples. Though the pattern of gene categories detected was similar for all time points, hierarchica lcluster of all functional genes and major functional categories all showed a time-serial pattern. Bacteria, archaea and fungi decreased by 96.1percent, 95.1percent and 91.3percent, respectively, after 15 h ozonation. Delta proteobacteria, which were reduced by 94.3percent, showed the highest resistance to ozonation while Actinobacteria, reduced by 96.3percent, showed the lowest resistance. Microorganisms similar to Rhodothermus, Obesumbacterium, Staphylothermus, Gluconobacter, and Enterococcus were dominant at all time points. Functional genes related to petroleum degradation decreased 1~;;2 orders of magnitude. Most of the key functional genes were still detected after ozonation, allowing a rapid recovery of the microbial community after ozonation. While ozone had a large impact on the

  12. Probing transcription factor binding activity and downstream gene silencing in living cells with a DNA nanoswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Guo, Junling; Oppmann, Nicolas; Glab, Agata; Ricci, Francesco; Caruso, Frank; Cavalieri, Francesca

    2018-01-25

    Transcription factor DNA binding activity is of pivotal importance in living systems because of its primary involvement in the regulation of genetic machinery. The analysis of transient expression levels of transcription factors in response to a certain cell status is a powerful means for investigating cellular dynamics at the biomolecular level. Herein, a DNA-based molecular switch that enables probing of transcription factor DNA binding activity is directly used in living cells. We demonstrate that the DNA nanoswitch allows for dynamic fluorescence imaging of NF-κB and quantification of downstream gene silencing in real time. The present strategy is based on a functional DNA nanodevice that transduces, through a binding-induced conformational change, the recognition of a specific transcription factor into a fluorescent signal. In addition, stochastic optical resolution microscopy, a super-resolution microscopy technique, is used to track the internalization and intracellular trafficking of the DNA nanodevice with high spatial resolution. Overall, it has been shown that a rationally designed DNA nanodevice can be used to achieve rapid, simple, and cost-effective real-time determination of transcription factor binding activity and downstream gene silencing.

  13. Designing and Implementing Algorithmic DNA Assembly Pipelines for Multi-Gene Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Szu-Yi; Smanski, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Advances in DNA synthesis and assembly technology allow for the high-throughput fabrication of hundreds to thousands of multi-part genetic constructs in a short time. This allows for rapid hypothesis-testing and genetic optimization in multi-gene biological systems. Here, we discuss key considerations to design and implement an algorithmic DNA assembly pipeline that provides the freedom to change nearly any design variable in a multi-gene system. In addition to considerations for pipeline design, we describe protocols for three useful molecular biology techniques in plasmid construction.

  14. DNA probe labeling with digoxigenin-dUTP and its application in gene diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoyang

    1992-01-01

    DNA probe labeling by the randomly primed incorporation of digoxigenin-dUTP is reported. The sensitivity of color reaction and hybridization were 32 fg and 200 fg, respectively, and both were specific for the target. Single-copy and multi-copy gene fragments among 2 μg human genomic DNA were detected by β IVS II, Fr 3-42 and 3'HVR labeled with digoxigenin-dUTP. The results were consistent with a radioactive control assay. This method has been successfully used in the gene diagnosis of adult polycystic kidney disease

  15. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  16. Circular DNA Intermediate in the Duplication of Nile Tilapia vasa Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Koji; Conte, Matthew A.; Kocher, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    vasa is a highly conserved RNA helicase involved in animal germ cell development. Among vertebrate species, it is typically present as a single copy per genome. Here we report the isolation and sequencing of BAC clones for Nile tilapia vasa genes. Contrary to a previous report that Nile tilapia have a single copy of the vasa gene, we find evidence for at least three vasa gene loci. The vasa gene locus was duplicated from the original site and integrated into two distant novel sites. For one of these insertions we find evidence that the duplication was mediated by a circular DNA intermediate. This mechanism of gene duplication may explain the origin of isolated gene duplicates during the evolution of fish genomes. These data provide a foundation for studying the role of multiple vasa genes in the development of tilapia gonads, and will contribute to investigations of the molecular mechanisms of sex determination and evolution in cichlid fishes. PMID:22216289

  17. Circular DNA intermediate in the duplication of Nile tilapia vasa genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Fujimura

    Full Text Available vasa is a highly conserved RNA helicase involved in animal germ cell development. Among vertebrate species, it is typically present as a single copy per genome. Here we report the isolation and sequencing of BAC clones for Nile tilapia vasa genes. Contrary to a previous report that Nile tilapia have a single copy of the vasa gene, we find evidence for at least three vasa gene loci. The vasa gene locus was duplicated from the original site and integrated into two distant novel sites. For one of these insertions we find evidence that the duplication was mediated by a circular DNA intermediate. This mechanism of gene duplication may explain the origin of isolated gene duplicates during the evolution of fish genomes. These data provide a foundation for studying the role of multiple vasa genes in the development of tilapia gonads, and will contribute to investigations of the molecular mechanisms of sex determination and evolution in cichlid fishes.

  18. Pseudogenization of the Humanin gene is common in the mitochondrial DNA of many vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ian S.

    2017-01-01

    In the human the peptide Humanin is produced from the small Humanin gene which is embedded as a gene-within-a-gene in the 16S ribosomal molecule of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The peptide itself appears to be significant in the prevention of cell death in many tissues and improve cognition in animal models. By using simple data mining techniques, it is possible to show that 99.4% of the human Humanin sequences in the GenBank database are unaffected by mutations. However, in other vertebrates, pseudogenization of the Humanin gene is a common feature; occurring apparently randomly in some species and not others. The persistence, or loss, of a functional Humanin gene may be an important factor in laboratory animals, especially if they are being used as animal models in studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The exact reason why Humanin underwent pseudogenization in some vertebrate species during their evolution remains to be determined. This study was originally planned to review the available information about Humanin and it was a surprise to be able to show that pseudogenization has occurred in a gene in the mtDNA and is not restricted solely to chromosomal genes. PMID:28825450

  19. Improved analytical methods for microarray-based genome-composition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles C; Joyce, Elizabeth A; Chan, Kaman; Falkow, Stanley

    2002-10-29

    Whereas genome sequencing has given us high-resolution pictures of many different species of bacteria, microarrays provide a means of obtaining information on genome composition for many strains of a given species. Genome-composition analysis using microarrays, or 'genomotyping', can be used to categorize genes into 'present' and 'divergent' categories based on the level of hybridization signal. This typically involves selecting a signal value that is used as a cutoff to discriminate present (high signal) and divergent (low signal) genes. Current methodology uses empirical determination of cutoffs for classification into these categories, but this methodology is subject to several problems that can result in the misclassification of many genes. We describe a method that depends on the shape of the signal-ratio distribution and does not require empirical determination of a cutoff. Moreover, the cutoff is determined on an array-to-array basis, accounting for variation in strain composition and hybridization quality. The algorithm also provides an estimate of the probability that any given gene is present, which provides a measure of confidence in the categorical assignments. Many genes previously classified as present using static methods are in fact divergent on the basis of microarray signal; this is corrected by our algorithm. We have reassigned hundreds of genes from previous genomotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni strains, and expect that the algorithm should be widely applicable to genomotyping data.

  20. REBASE--enzymes and genes for DNA restriction and modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2007-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. All newly sequenced genomes are analyzed for the presence of putative restriction systems and these data are included within the REBASE. The contents or REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com/rebase/rebase.ftp.html) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  1. Microarray-based genotyping of Salmonella: Inter-laboratory evaluation of reproducibility and standardization potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Hugo Ahlm; Riber, Leise; Vigre, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial food-borne infections in humans caused by Salmonella spp. are considered a crucial food safety issue. Therefore, it is important for the risk assessments of Salmonella to consider the genomic variationamong different isolates in order to control pathogen-induced infections. Microarray...... critical methodology parameters that differed between the two labs were identified. These related to printing facilities, choice of hybridization buffer,wash buffers used following the hybridization and choice of procedure for purifying genomic DNA. Critical parameters were randomized in a four......DNA and different wash buffers. However, less agreement (Kappa=0.2–0.6) between microarray results were observed when using different hybridization buffers, indicating this parameter as being highly criticalwhen transferring a standard microarray assay between laboratories. In conclusion, this study indicates...

  2. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures

  3. Genetic diversity and gene flow revealed by microsatellite DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dacryodes edulis is a multipurpose tree integrated in the cropping system of Central African region still dominated by subsistence agriculture. Some populations grown are wild which can provide information on the domestication process, and could also represent a potential source of gene flow. Leaves samples for DNA ...

  4. DNA methylation of PTEN gene promoter region is not correlated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTEN promoter hypermethylation has been found to be involved in many kinds of cancers. Up to date, no report about the relationships between methylation of PTEN promoter region and bladder cancer has been found. To investigate the methylation pattern of PTEN gene transcriptional regulation region (TRR), ...

  5. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of selected genes in endometrial carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chieh Chen

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Promoter methylation of ZNF177, COL14A1, HOXA9, DPYSL4, and TMEFF2 genes is a frequent epigenetic event in EC. Furthermore, the epigenetic hypermethylation of TMEFF2 may be a valuable marker for identifying undetected EC within endometrial hyperplasia.

  6. DNA polymorph isms in the bovine thyroglobulin gene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thyroglobulin gene is syntenic with the MYC and MOS protooncogenes and carbonic anhydrase II and maps to chromosome. 14 in cattle. Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 53, 32. VANDENPLAS, S., WIlD, I., GROBLER-RABIE, A., BREBNER, K.,. WALLIS, G., BESTER, AJ., BOYD, C.D. & MATHEW, e.G.P.,. 1984. Blot hybridisation ...

  7. [Correlation between histone H3-K9 methylation, DNA methylation and expression of gene MGMT in Hep-2 cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; He, Liria; Ji, Wenyue; Jin, Mingzhu; Zhao, Xudong

    2012-11-01

    To explore the correlation between histone H3-K9 methylation, DNA methylation and expression of carcinoma suppressor gene MGMT in laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cell line. 5-Aza-dC was used to deal with Hep-2 cell cultured in vitro. ChIP, MSP and Realtime-PCR were used to detect H3-K9 methylation, DNA methylation, of MGMT gene promoter region and MGMT gene expression before and after treatment with drugs. (1) In Hep-2 cell line, gene MGMT was characterized by DNA methylation and histone H3-K9 hypermethylation. (2) 5-Aza-dC was able to reduce H3-K9 methylation of MGMT gene histone in Hep-2 cell line, 5-Aza-dC was able to reverse DNA methylation of MGMT gene histone in Hep-2 cell line, 5-Aza-dC was able to upregulate the down-regulated gene expression of tumor suppressor genes MGMT. Promoter methylation of cancer suppressor gene MGMT may induce the gene inactivity. DNA methylation may increase H3-K9 methylation. 5-Aza-dC can reduce H3-K9 methylation of tumor suppressor gene MGMT histone by reversing DNA methylation of tumor suppressor gene MGMT, and then the expression of tumor suppressor genes is increased and tumor development is inhibited.

  8. Immunohistochemical and DNA sequencing analysis on human mismatch repair gene MLH1 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma with LOH of this gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, X.; Guo, Z.; Pang, T.; Li, Q.; Afink, G.; Pontén, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human MLH1 gene (hMLH1) is one of the DNA mismatch repair genes. Defects in these genes are believed to be the underlying cause of microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI has been demonstrated in many human cancers such as colon cancer and some female-specific tumors. The hMLH1 gene

  9. Comparative analysis of DNA nanoparticles and AAVs for ocular gene delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongchao Han

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a critical tool for the treatment of monogenic retinal diseases. However, the limited vector capacity of the current benchmark delivery strategy, adeno-associated virus (AAV, makes development of larger capacity alternatives, such as compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs, critical. Here we conduct a side-by-side comparison of self-complementary AAV and CK30PEG NPs using matched ITR plasmids. We report that although AAVs are more efficient per vector genome (vg than NPs, NPs can drive gene expression on a comparable scale and longevity to AAV. We show that subretinally injected NPs do not leave the eye while some of the AAV-injected animals exhibited vector DNA and GFP expression in the visual pathways of the brain from PI-60 onward. As a result, these NPs have the potential to become a successful alternative for ocular gene therapy, especially for the multitude of genes too large for AAV vectors.

  10. Epigenome profiling reveals significant DNA demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Ognenovski, Mikhail; Zhao, Wenpu; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Wren, Jonathan D; Kaplan, Mariana J; Sawalha, Amr H

    2015-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. The goal of this study was to characterize the epigenetic architecture, by studying the DNA methylome, of neutrophils and low density granulocytes (LDGs) in lupus patients. We studied 15 lupus patients and 15 healthy age, sex, and ethnicity matched controls. Genome-wide DNA methylation was assessed using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip array, which includes over 485,000 methylation sites across the entire genome. Bisulfite DNA sequencing was used to validate the array results. Statistical and bioinformatic analysis was performed to identify and characterize differentially methylated loci and genes. We identified 293 differentially methylated CG sites in neutrophils between lupus patients and controls. The majority (68%) of differentially methylated CG sites were hypomethylated in lupus neutrophils compared to controls, suggesting overall hypomethylation. We found a robust and consistent demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus neutrophils, and similar demethylation in the same genes in autologous LDGs. Indeed, the DNA methylome in lupus neutrophils and LDGs was almost identical, suggesting similar chromatin architecture in the two granulocyte subsets. A notable exception was the hypomethylation of a CG site in the promoter region of the cytoskeleton-regulating gene RAC1 in LDGs. Our findings demonstrate a pattern of robust demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus patients supporting a pathogenic role for neutrophils in lupus. We suggest a model whereby DNA from lupus neutrophils and LDGs externalized by NETosis enhance type-I IFN production via TLR-9 stimulation by hypomethylated DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of the epigenetic signal, DNA methylation, in gene regulation during erythroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginder, Gordon D; Gnanapragasam, Merlin N; Mian, Omar Y

    2008-01-01

    The sequence complexity of the known vertebrate genomes alone is insufficient to account for the diversity between individuals of a species. Although our knowledge of vertebrate biology has evolved substantially with the growing compilation of sequenced genomes, understanding the temporal and spatial regulation of genes remains fundamental to fully exploiting this information. The importance of epigenetic factors in gene regulation was first hypothesized decades ago when biologists posited that methylation of DNA could heritably alter gene expression [Holliday and Pugh, 1975. Science 187(4173), 226-232; Riggs, 1975. Cytogenet. and Cell Genet.14(1), 9-25; Scarano et al., 1967. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 57(5), 1394-1400)]. It was subsequently shown that vertebrate DNA methylation, almost exclusively at the 5' position of cytosine in the dinucleotide CpG, played a role in a number of processes including embryonic development, genetic imprinting, cell differentiation, and tumorigenesis. At the time of this writing, a large and growing list of genes is known to exhibit DNA methylation-dependent regulation, and we understand in some detail the mechanisms employed by cells in using methylation as a regulatory modality. In this context, we revisit one of the original systems in which the role of DNA methylation in vertebrate gene regulation during development was described and studied: erythroid cells. We briefly review the recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation and, in particular, its regulatory role in red blood cells during differentiation and development. We also address DNA methylation as a component of erythroid chromatin architecture, and the interdependence of CpG methylation and histone modification.

  13. Microarray-based classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Borup, Rehannah; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hierarchical clusterings of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) based on gene expression signatures have previously been used to classify DLBCL into Germinal Center B-cell (GCB) and Activated B-cell (ABC) types. To examine if it was feasible to perform a cross-platform validation...... for hierarchical clustering. In this way, three subtypes, including the GCB type (n = 20), the ABC type (n = 25) and an intermediate group, Type-3 (n = 5), were distinguished. The CD10 and Bcl-6 expression as well as t(14;18) translocation were prevalent, but not exclusive to the GCB type. By contrast, MUM1......;103:1862-1868) to exhibit a higher specificity than the original gene lists. CONCLUSION: We conclude that gene expression profiling with Affymetrix Genechips is efficient to distinguish between GCB and ABC types of DLBCL and that these are likely to represent separate biological entities. The Genechip platform is highly...

  14. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation

  15. Microarray-based transcriptomic analysis of differences between long-term gregarious and solitarious desert locusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Badisco

    Full Text Available Desert locusts (Schistocerca gregaria show an extreme form of phenotypic plasticity and can transform between a cryptic solitarious phase and a swarming gregarious phase. The two phases differ extensively in behavior, morphology and physiology but very little is known about the molecular basis of these differences. We used our recently generated Expressed Sequence Tag (EST database derived from S. gregaria central nervous system (CNS to design oligonucleotide microarrays and compare the expression of thousands of genes in the CNS of long-term gregarious and solitarious adult desert locusts. This identified 214 differentially expressed genes, of which 40% have been annotated to date. These include genes encoding proteins that are associated with CNS development and modeling, sensory perception, stress response and resistance, and fundamental cellular processes. Our microarray analysis has identified genes whose altered expression may enable locusts of either phase to deal with the different challenges they face. Genes for heat shock proteins and proteins which confer protection from infection were upregulated in gregarious locusts, which may allow them to respond to acute physiological challenges. By contrast the longer-lived solitarious locusts appear to be more strongly protected from the slowly accumulating effects of ageing by an upregulation of genes related to anti-oxidant systems, detoxification and anabolic renewal. Gregarious locusts also had a greater abundance of transcripts for proteins involved in sensory processing and in nervous system development and plasticity. Gregarious locusts live in a more complex sensory environment than solitarious locusts and may require a greater turnover of proteins involved in sensory transduction, and possibly greater neuronal plasticity.

  16. A method for construction, cloning and expression of intron-less gene from unannotated genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Gupta, Bharti; Banerjee, Uttam Chand; Roy, Nilanjan

    2008-11-01

    The present century has witnessed an unprecedented rise in genome sequences owing to various genome-sequencing programs. However, the same has not been replicated with cDNA or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Hence, prediction of protein coding sequence of genes from this enormous collection of genomic sequences presents a significant challenge. While robust high throughput methods of cloning and expression could be used to meet protein requirements, lack of intron information creates a bottleneck. Computational programs designed for recognizing intron-exon boundaries for a particular organism or group of organisms have their own limitations. Keeping this in view, we describe here a method for construction of intron-less gene from genomic DNA in the absence of cDNA/EST information and organism-specific gene prediction program. The method outlined is a sequential application of bioinformatics to predict correct intron-exon boundaries and splicing by overlap extension PCR for spliced gene synthesis. The gene construct so obtained can then be cloned for protein expression. The method is simple and can be used for any eukaryotic gene expression.

  17. Bidirectional gene sequences with similar homology to functional proteins of alkane degrading bacterium pseudomonas fredriksbergensis DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeed, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for two overlapping fragments of DNA from a clone of newly isolated alkanes degrading bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis encoding sequences with similar homology to two parts of functional proteins is described. One strand contains a sequence with high homology to alkanes monooxygenase (alkB), a member of the alkanes hydroxylase family, and the other strand contains a sequence with some homology to alcohol dehydrogenase gene (alkJ). Overlapping of the genes on opposite strands has been reported in eukaryotic species, and is now reported in a bacterial species. The sequence comparisons and ORFS results revealed that the regulation and the genes organization involved in alkane oxidation represented in Pseudomonas frederiksberghensis varies among the different known alkane degrading bacteria. The alk gene cluster containing homologues to the known alkane monooxygenase (alkB), and rubredoxin (alkG) are oriented in the same direction, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (alkJ) is oriented in the opposite direction. Such genomes encode messages on both strands of the DNA, or in an overlapping but different reading frames, of the same strand of DNA. The possibility of creating novel genes from pre-existing sequences, known as overprinting, which is a widespread phenomenon in small viruses. Here, the origin and evolution of the gene overlap to bacteriophages belonging to the family Microviridae have been investigated. Such a phenomenon is most widely described in extremely small genomes such as those of viruses or small plasmids, yet here is a unique phenomenon. (author)

  18. Analysis of metabolic and gene expression changes after hydrodynamic DNA injection into mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Maria Jose; Monleon, Daniel; Morales, Jose Manuel; Mata, Manuel; Serna, Eva; Aliño, Salvador Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamic injection in mice tail vein of a plasmid (40 µg DNA) bearing the human α1-antitrypsin gene mediates: a) good liver gene transfer resulting in therapeutic plasma levels of human protein (1 mg/ml, approximately) from days 1-10 after injection; b) low liver injury as demonstrated by a poor and transient increase of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in mouse plasma; 3) limited expression and metabolic changes in host liver genes and metabolites as evaluated on days 2 and 10 after injection. Groups of three mice were uninjected (control) or hydrodynamically injected with saline or plasmid DNA and then sacrificed on days 2 and 10 after injection. The results of principal component analysis (PCA) show, both in expression microarray and metabolomic analysis, that changes between control and hydrodynamically injected groups are not dramatic and tend to normalize after 10 d. The differences are even smaller between DNA and saline hydrodynamically injected mice. Hydrodynamic injection induces a complex but limited gene expression and metabolic change which includes variations in molecules related to energy metabolism and stress response. The results contribute to support that hydrodynamic method is a safe procedure of liver gene transfer but the long-term effect of hydrodynamic gene transfer procedure, remains to be studied.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF G10398A VARIAN OF ND3 GENE MITHOCONDRIA DNA IN BREAST CANCER PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wayan Tianing

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ND3  gene is a mitochondria DNA gene which code for NADH dehydrogenase enzime, part of complex 1  respiratory  chain  oxidation  and  involved  in  phosphorilation  prosess  to  synthesize ATP  (Adenosin Triphosphat. The present of G10398A variant at mtDNA result in changing the amino acid code for alanine (GCC to threonine (ACC. This changing induce elevation the ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species concentration in mitochondria. ROS can cause oxidation of DNA, mutation of DNA,oxidative stress and cancer. The other effect of ROS can affect redox-cycling estrogen metabolism. Individual   with G10398A variant has   60% risk for breast cancer.  The purpose of this research are to identify G10398A variant and its proportion in ND3 gene with non experimental descriptive method within 32 samples and 5 control. This research has done with sequence of steps with an isolation and total DNA amplification electrophoresis, sequencing and analysis by comparing with gene bank.  This research identify G10399A variant that causes changing code from serine (AGC amino acid in to asparagines (AAC in 16 samples. Another variant found in this research is C10401T variant the cause changing in codon that code from arginin (CGA in to triptopan (TGA within 14 samples. In the control groups 2 samples identify with G10399A variant, 2 samples with C10401T and 1 control match like gene-bank. For this research, ND3 gene homology that was amplified found in the average of  96%.

  20. Oxidative stress and DNA repair and detoxification gene expression in adolescents exposed to heavy metals living in the Milazzo-Valle del Mela area (Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Pizzino

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Continuous exposure at relatively low concentrations of heavy metals is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and impaired expression of DNA repair and detoxification genes in adolescents.

  1. Microarray-Based oncogenic pathway profiling in advanced serous papillary ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.B. Trinh; W.A.A. Tjalma (Wiebren); L. Dirix (Luc); P.B. Vermeulen (Peter); D. Peeters (Dieter); D. Bachvarov (Dimcho); M. Plante (Marie); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); J. Helleman (Jozien); S.J. van Laere (Steven); P.A. van Dam

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The identification of specific targets for treatment of ovarian cancer patients remains a challenge. The objective of this study is the analysis of oncogenic pathways in ovarian cancer and their relation with clinical outcome. Methodology: A meta-analysis of 6 gene

  2. Microarray based comparison of two Escherichia coli O157:H7 lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaki Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has identified the potential for the existence of two separate lineages of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Clinical isolates tended to cluster primarily within one of these two lineages. To determine if there are virulence related genes differentially expressed between the two lineages we chose to utilize microarray technology to perform an initial screening. Results Using a 610 gene microarray, designed against the E. coli O157 EDL 933 transcriptome, targeting primarily virulence systems, we chose 3 representative Lineage I isolates (LI groups mostly clinical isolates and 3 representative Lineage II isolates (LII groups mostly bovine isolates. Using standard dye swap experimental designs, statistically different expression (P in vitro anaerobic growth conditions, there is up-regulation of stx2b, ureD, curli (csgAFEG, and stress related genes (hslJ, cspG, ibpB, ibpA in Lineage I, which may contribute to enhanced virulence or transmission potential. Lineage II exhibits significant up-regulation of type III secretion apparatus, LPS, and flagella related transcripts. Conclusion These results give insight into comparative regulation of virulence genes as well as providing directions for future research. Ultimately, evaluating the expression of key virulence factors among different E. coli O157 isolates has inherent value and the interpretation of such expression data will continue to evolve as our understanding of virulence, pathogenesis and transmission improves.

  3. A comprehensive comparison of random forests and support vector machines for microarray-based cancer classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lily

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer diagnosis and clinical outcome prediction are among the most important emerging applications of gene expression microarray technology with several molecular signatures on their way toward clinical deployment. Use of the most accurate classification algorithms available for microarray gene expression data is a critical ingredient in order to develop the best possible molecular signatures for patient care. As suggested by a large body of literature to date, support vector machines can be considered "best of class" algorithms for classification of such data. Recent work, however, suggests that random forest classifiers may outperform support vector machines in this domain. Results In the present paper we identify methodological biases of prior work comparing random forests and support vector machines and conduct a new rigorous evaluation of the two algorithms that corrects these limitations. Our experiments use 22 diagnostic and prognostic datasets and show that support vector machines outperform random forests, often by a large margin. Our data also underlines the importance of sound research design in benchmarking and comparison of bioinformatics algorithms. Conclusion We found that both on average and in the majority of microarray datasets, random forests are outperformed by support vector machines both in the settings when no gene selection is performed and when several popular gene selection methods are used.

  4. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier J Becherel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2, plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops, and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  5. DNA methylation at stress-related genes is associated with exposure to early life institutionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, Amy L; Hollister, Brittany M; Humphreys, Kathryn L; Childebayeva, Ainash; Esteves, Kyle; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A; Drury, Stacy S

    2016-09-01

    Differences in DNA methylation have been associated with early life adversity, suggesting that alterations in methylation function as one pathway through which adverse early environments are biologically embedded. This study examined associations between exposure to institutional care, quantified as the proportion of time in institutional care at specified follow-up assessment ages, and DNA methylation status in two stress-related genes: FKBP5 and SLC6A4. We analyzed data from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, which is a prospective study in which children reared in institutional settings were randomly assigned (mean age 22 months) to either newly created foster care or care as usual (to remain in their current placement) and prospectively followed. A group of children from the same geographic area, with no history of institutionalized caregiving, were also recruited. DNA methylation status was determined in DNA extracted from buccal epithelial cells of children at age 12. An inverse association was identified such that more time spent in institutional care was associated with lower DNA methylation at specific CpG sites within both genes. These results suggest a lasting impact of early severe social deprivation on methylation patterns in these genes, and contribute to a growing literature linking early adversity and epigenetic variation in children. Am J Phys Anthropol 161:84-93, 2016.. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Combining SSH and cDNA microarray for identification of lung cancer related genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Baoxing; Zhang, Kaitai; Da, Jiping; Xie, Ling; Wang, Shengqi; Wu, Dechang

    2003-04-20

    To screen and identify differentially expressed genes among lung cancer tissues, paracancerous pulmonary tissues and some other kinds of tumor tissues using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA Microarray. One cDNA chip was made by gathering clones of three differentially expressed cDNA libraries which came from BEP2D cell lines during three different malignant transformed phases. Then the clones were hybridizated with cDNA probes which extracted from 15 cases of lung cancer tissues, 5 cases of paracancerous pulmonary tissues and 24 cases of other 8 kinds of tumor tissues respectively. Twenty-six cDNAs were obtained which expressed higher in lung cancer tissues than that in paracancerous pulmonary tissues. Thirty-one cDNAs expressed remarkably higher in paracancerous tissues than those in cancer tissues. Compared with other 8 kinds of tumors, paracancerous tissues had 63 overexpressed cDNAs and lung cancer tissues had 87 overexpressed cDNAs. The combination of SSH and cDNA microarray is rapid and effective for screening and identification of differentially expressed genes in different samples. It may be potentially useful for diagnosis of lung cancer to further study the differentially expressed genes among lung cancer tissues, paracancerous pulmonary tissues and other tumor tissues.

  7. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng [National Yang Ming Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Radiological Sciences] (and others)

    2001-12-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  8. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair genes polymorphisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Binková, Blanka; Chvátalová, Irena; Lněničková, Zdena; Milcová, Alena; Tulupová, Elena; Farmer, P. B.; Šrám, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 620, - (2007), s. 49-61 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SI/340/2/00; GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Grant - others:EU(GB) 2000-00091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : DNA adducts * genetic polymorphisms * metabolic genes Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.159, year: 2007

  9. Self-entanglement of long linear DNA vectors using transient non-B-DNA attachment points: a new concept for improvement of non-viral therapeutic gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2012-05-01

    The cell-specific and long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes often requires a full array of native gene control elements including distal enhancers, regulatory introns and chromatin organisation sequences. The delivery of such extended gene expression modules to human cells can be accomplished with non-viral high-molecular-weight DNA vectors, in particular with several classes of linear DNA vectors. All high-molecular-weight DNA vectors are susceptible to damage by shear stress, and while for some of the vectors the harmful impact of shear stress can be minimised through the transformation of the vectors to compact topological configurations by supercoiling and/or knotting, linear DNA vectors with terminal loops or covalently attached terminal proteins cannot be self-compacted in this way. In this case, the only available self-compacting option is self-entangling, which can be defined as the folding of single DNA molecules into a configuration with mutual restriction of molecular motion by the individual segments of bent DNA. A negatively charged phosphate backbone makes DNA self-repulsive, so it is reasonable to assume that a certain number of 'sticky points' dispersed within DNA could facilitate the entangling by bringing DNA segments into proximity and by interfering with the DNA slipping away from the entanglement. I propose that the spontaneous entanglement of vector DNA can be enhanced by the interlacing of the DNA with sites capable of mutual transient attachment through the formation of non-B-DNA forms, such as interacting cruciform structures, inter-segment triplexes, slipped-strand DNA, left-handed duplexes (Z-forms) or G-quadruplexes. It is expected that the non-B-DNA based entanglement of the linear DNA vectors would consist of the initial transient and co-operative non-B-DNA mediated binding events followed by tight self-ensnarement of the vector DNA. Once in the nucleoplasm of the target human cells, the DNA can be disentangled by type II

  10. Evaluation of the gene-specific dye bias in cDNA microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Aubert, Julie; Cabannes, Eric; Daudin, Jean-Jacques

    2005-05-01

    In cDNA microarray experiments all samples are labeled with either Cy3 or Cy5. Systematic and gene-specific dye bias effects have been observed in dual-color experiments. In contrast to systematic effects which can be corrected by a normalization method, the gene-specific dye bias is not completely suppressed and may alter the conclusions about the differentially expressed genes. The gene-specific dye bias is taken into account using an analysis of variance model. We propose an index, named label bias index, to measure the gene-specific dye bias. It requires at least two self-self hybridization cDNA microarrays. After lowess normalization we have found that the gene-specific dye bias is the major source of experimental variability between replicates. The ratio (R/G) may exceed 2. As a consequence false positive genes may be found in direct comparison without dye-swap. The stability of this artifact and its consequences on gene variance and on direct or indirect comparisons are addressed. http://www.inapg.inra.fr/ens_rech/mathinfo/recherche/mathematique

  11. Radioactive cDNA microarrys for gene expression profiles in antidepressant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. S.; Han, B. J.; Cha, J. H.; Ryu, Y. M.; Shin, E. K.; Park, J. H.; Park, Y. H.; Kim, M. K. [Korea University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Using radioactive cDNA microarray, we investigated a pattern of gene regulation under treatment of antidepressant on patients of depressive disoder. Basic microarray technology was performed as previously described in our research. The bioinformatic selection of human cDNAs, which is specifically designed for psychiatry, neurology, and signal transduction, were arrayed on nylon membranes. Using with 33P-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles of our interest including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signalings. Gene expression profiles were also classified into several categories in accordance with the gene-regulation of antidepressant. The gene profiles of our interest were significantly up- (16 genes, >2.0 of Z-ratio) or down- (24 genes, <-2.0 of Z ratio) regulated when compared the good responsed group with the bad-responsed one. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  12. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satparkash Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS, an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  13. The down regulation of target genes by photo activated DNA nanoscissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Tzeng, Yonhua; Htet, Khant; Chuang, Kao-Shu; Hwu, Jih Ru; Su, Wu-Chou

    2010-09-01

    An artificial, targeted, light-activated nanoscissor (ATLANS) was developed for precision photonic cleavage of DNA at selectable target sequences. The ATLANS is comprised of nanoparticle core and a monolayer of hydrazone-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), which recognize and capture the targeted DNA duplex. Upon photo-illumination (lambda = 460 nm), the attached hydrazone scissor specifically cleaves the targeted DNA at a pre-designed nucleotide pair. Electrophoretic mobility shift and co-precipitation assays revealed sequence-specific binding with the short-fragment and long-form plasmid DNA of both TFO and TFO-nanoparticle probes. Upon photo-illumination, ATLANS introduced a precise double-stranded break 12bp downstream the TFO binding sequence and down-regulated the target gene in HeLa cell system. Gold nanoparticles multiplexed the cutting efficiency and potential for simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets, as well as protected DNA from non-specific photo-damage. This photon-mediated DNA manipulation technology will facilitate high spatial and temporal precision in simultaneous silencing at the genome level, and advanced simultaneous manipulation of multiple targeted genes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer and nucleotide compositional anomaly in large DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Hiroyuki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA viruses have a wide range of genome sizes (5 kb up to 1.2 Mb, compared to 0.16 Mb to 1.5 Mb for obligate parasitic bacteria that do not correlate with their virulence or the taxonomic distribution of their hosts. The reasons for such large variation are unclear. According to the traditional view of viruses as gifted "gene pickpockets", large viral genome sizes could originate from numerous gene acquisitions from their hosts. We investigated this hypothesis by studying 67 large DNA viruses with genome sizes larger than 150 kb, including the recently characterized giant mimivirus. Given that horizontally transferred DNA often have anomalous nucleotide compositions differing from the rest of the genome, we conducted a detailed analysis of the inter- and intra-genome compositional properties of these viruses. We then interpreted their compositional heterogeneity in terms of possible causes, including strand asymmetry, gene function/expression, and horizontal transfer. Results We first show that the global nucleotide composition and nucleotide word usage of viral genomes are species-specific and distinct from those of their hosts. Next, we identified compositionally anomalous (cA genes in viral genomes, using a method based on Bayesian inference. The proportion of cA genes is highly variable across viruses and does not exhibit a significant correlation with genome size. The vast majority of the cA genes were of unknown function, lacking homologs in the databases. For genes with known homologs, we found a substantial enrichment of cA genes in specific functional classes for some of the viruses. No significant association was found between cA genes and compositional strand asymmetry. A possible exogenous origin for a small fraction of the cA genes could be confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction. Conclusion At odds with the traditional dogma, our results argue against frequent genetic transfers to large DNA viruses from their

  15. DNA methyltransferase 3B mutations linked to the ICF syndrome cause dysregulation of lymphogenesis genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrlich, M.; Buchanan, K.L.; Tsien, F.; Jiang, G.; Sun, B.; Uicker, W.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Sperling, K.; Belohradsky, B.H.; Tommerup, N.; Misek, D.E.; Rouillard, J.M.; Kuick, R.; Hanash, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    ICF (immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability and facial anomalies) is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the DNA methyltransferase 3B gene (DNMT3B). Patients have immunodeficiency, chromosome 1 (Chr1) and Chr16 pericentromeric anomalies in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes, a small

  16. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of two distinct Sox8 genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Sox9 gene attracts a lot of attention because of its connection with gonadal development and differentiation. However, Sox8, belonging to the same subgroup SoxE, has rarely been studied. To investigate the function as well as the evolutionary origin of SOXE subgroup, we amplified the genomic DNA of Paramisgurnus ...

  17. DNA repair gene XRCC7 G6721T variant and susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The human XRCC7 (MIM: 600899) is a DNA double-strand break repair gene, involved in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Polymorphism G6721T (rs7003908) is located in the intron 8 of the XRCC7. This polymorphism may regulate splicing and cause mRNA instability. Aim: The aim of the present study ...

  18. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation assay reveals novel candidate biomarker genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Sanja A; Milutin-Gašperov, Nina; Grce, Magdalena; Nilsson, Torbjörn K

    2013-11-01

    The oncogenic human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are associated with precancerous cervical lesions and development of cervical cancer. The DNA methylation signatures of the host genome in normal, precancerous and cervical cancer tissue may indicate tissue-specific perturbation in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify new candidate genes that are differentially methylated in squamous cell carcinoma compared with DNA samples from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) and normal cervical scrapes. The Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip method identifies genome-wide DNA methylation changes in CpG islands, CpG shores and shelves. Our findings showed an extensive differential methylation signature in cervical cancer compared with the CIN3 or normal cervical tissues. The identified candidate biomarker genes for cervical cancer represent several types of mechanisms in the cellular machinery that are epigenetically deregulated by hypermethylation, such as membrane receptors, intracellular signaling and gene transcription. The results also confirm extensive hypomethylation of genes in the immune system in cancer tissues. These insights into the functional role of DNA methylome alterations in cervical cancer could be clinically applicable in diagnostics and prognostics, and may guide the development of new epigenetic therapies.

  20. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Dalhoff, K; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, -DPB, the serologically defined HLA-A, B, C, DR antigens, and the primed lymphocyte typing defined HLA-DP antigens in 23 Danish patients with primary ...

  1. Specific mutation screening of TP53 gene by low-density DNA microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-López, Angélica; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Beattie, Kenneth L; Maldonado, Rogelio; Mendoza, Patricia; Vázquez, Guelaguetza; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Sánchez, Martha; Navarro, Guillermo; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. Approximately 90% of mutations in this gene are localized between domains encoding exons 5 to 8. The aim of this investigation was to examine the ability of the low density DNA microarray with the assistance of double tandem hybridization platform to characterize TP53 mutational hotspots in exons 5, 7, and 8 of the TP53. Nineteen capture probes specific to each potential mutation site were designed to hybridize to specific site. Virtual hybridization was used to predict the stability of hybridization of each capture probe with the target. Thirty-three DNA samples from different sources were analyzed for mutants in these exons. A total of 32 codon substitutions were found by DNA sequencing. 24 of them a showed a perfect correlation with the hybridization pattern system and DNA sequencing analysis of the regions scanned. Although in this work we directed our attention to some of the most representative mutations of the TP53 gene, the results suggest that this microarray system proved to be a rapid, reliable, and effective method for screening all the mutations in TP53 gene. PMID:24198462

  2. cDNA cloning and expression analysis of two distinct Sox8 genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-06

    Aug 6, 2010 ... cDNA cloning and expression analysis of two distinct Sox8 genes in. Paramisgurnus dabryanus (Cypriniformes). XIAOHUA XIA, JIE ZHAO, QIYAN DU and ZHONGJIE CHANG. ∗. Molecular and Genetic Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Henan Normal University, 46 East of Construction Road,. Xinxiang ...

  3. DNA repair gene XRCC7 G6721T variant and susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mostafa Saadat

    2016-02-20

    Feb 20, 2016 ... Abstract Background: The human XRCC7 (MIM: 600899) is a DNA double-strand break repair gene, involved in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Polymorphism G6721T (rs7003908) is located in the intron 8 of the XRCC7. This polymorphism may regulate splicing and cause mRNA instability. Aim: The ...

  4. ESTs, cDNA microarrays, and gene expression profiling: tools for dissecting plant physiology and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Rob; Fei, Zhangjun; Payton, Paxton; Liu, Yang; Moore, Shanna L; Debbie, Paul; Cohn, Jonathan; D'Ascenzo, Mark; Gordon, Jeffrey S; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Martin, Gregory; Tanksley, Steven D; Bouzayen, Mondher; Jahn, Molly M; Giovannoni, Jim

    2004-09-01

    Gene expression profiling holds tremendous promise for dissecting the regulatory mechanisms and transcriptional networks that underlie biological processes. Here we provide details of approaches used by others and ourselves for gene expression profiling in plants with emphasis on cDNA microarrays and discussion of both experimental design and downstream analysis. We focus on methods and techniques emphasizing fabrication of cDNA microarrays, fluorescent labeling, cDNA hybridization, experimental design, and data processing. We include specific examples that demonstrate how this technology can be used to further our understanding of plant physiology and development (specifically fruit development and ripening) and for comparative genomics by comparing transcriptome activity in tomato and pepper fruit.

  5. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette

    2004-01-01

    A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene......-gun immunization of BALB/c mice with this construct induced an antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell memory. After intranasal RSV challenge, accelerated CD8+ T-cell responses were observed in pulmonary lymph nodes and virus clearance from the lungs was enhanced. The construct induced weaker CD8+ T-cell responses than those...... elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion...

  6. DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment abrogates 17 beta-estradiol-induced cell growth and restores expression of DNA repair genes in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Treas, Justin; Tyagi, Tulika; Gao, Weimin

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged exposure to elevated levels of estrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer. Though increased cell growth and loss of DNA repair capacity is one of the proposed mechanisms for estrogen-induced cancers, the mechanism through which estrogen induces cell growth and decreases DNA repair capacity is not clear. DNA hypermethylation is known to inactivate DNA repair genes and apoptotic response in cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the role of DNA hypermethylation in estrogen-induced cell growth and regulation of DNA repair genes expression in breast cancer cells. To achieve this objective, the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells either pretreated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) or untreated (as control) were exposed to 17 beta-estradiol (E2), and its effect on cell growth and expression of DNA repair genes were measured. The result revealed that 5-aza-dC abrogates the E2-induced growth in MCF-7 cells. An increased expression of OGG1, MSH4, and MLH1 by 5-aza-dC treatment alone, suggest the DNA hypermethylation as a potential cause for decreased expression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. The decreased expression of ERCC1, XPC, OGG1, and MLH1 by E2 alone and its restoration by co-treatment with 5-aza-dC further suggest that E2 reduces the expression of these DNA repair genes potentially through promoter hypermethylation. Reactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and abrogation of E2-induced cell growth by 5-aza-dC treatment suggest that estrogen causes increased growth in breast cancer cells potentially through the inhibition of MMR-mediated apoptotic response. In summary, this study suggests that estrogen increases cell growth and decreases the DNA repair capacity in breast cancer cells, at least in part, through epigenetic mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prediction of DNA methylation in the promoter of gene suppressor tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Imane; Kasmi, Yassine; Allali, Karam; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2018-04-20

    The epigenetics methylation of cytosine is the most common epigenetic form in DNA sequences. It is highly concentrated in the promoter regions of the genes, leading to an inactivation of tumor suppressors regardless of their initial function. In this work, we aim to identify the highly methylated regions; the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) island located on the promoters and/or the first exon gene known for their key roles in the cell cycle, hence the need to study gene-gene interactions. The Frommer and hidden Markov model algorithms are used as computational methods to identify CpG islands with specificity and sensitivity up to 76% and 80%, respectively. The results obtained show, on the one hand, that the genes studied are suspected of developing hypermethylation in the promoter region of the gene involved in the case of a cancer. We then showed that the relative richness in CG results from a high level of methylation. On the other hand, we observe that the gene-gene interaction exhibits co-expression between the chosen genes. This let us to conclude that the hidden Markov model algorithm predicts more specific and valuable information about the hypermethylation in gene as a preventive and diagnostics tools for the personalized medicine; as that the tumor-suppresser-genes have relative co-expression and complementary relations which the hypermethylation affect in the samples studied in our work. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Katherine A; Yasseen, Akeel A; McKerr, George; Downes, C S; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1(+) and TK1(-) clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1(+) compared to TK1(-) cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK(+) cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1(+) cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents.

  9. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eDownes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1 is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumour suppressor (TP53 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene regions, over 1 hour after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, while levels of genomic DNA repair were consistant between the two cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 minute repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents.

  10. Optimizing hyaluronidase dose and plasmid DNA delivery greatly improves gene electrotransfer efficiency in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Vedel, Kenneth; Needham Andersen, Josefine

    2015-01-01

    Transfection of rat skeletal muscle in vivo is a widely used research model. However, gene electrotransfer protocols have been developed for mice and yield variable results in rats. We investigated whether changes in hyaluronidase pre-treatment and plasmid DNA delivery can improve transfection...... efficiency in rat skeletal muscle. We found that pre-treating the muscle with a hyaluronidase dose suitable for rats (0.56. U/g b.w.) prior to plasmid DNA injection increased transfection efficiency by >200% whereas timing of the pre-treatment did not affect efficiency. Uniformly distributing plasmid DNA...... with a homogenous distribution. We also show that transfection was stable over five weeks of regular exercise or inactivity. Our findings show that species-specific plasmid DNA delivery and hyaluronidase pre-treatment greatly improves transfection efficiency in rat skeletal muscle....

  11. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Soil DNA extraction procedure influences protist 18S rRNA gene community profiling outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Susana S.; Nunes, Ines Marques; Nielsen, Tue K.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies allow deeper studies of the soil protist diversity and function. However, little attention has been given to the impact of the chosen soil DNA extraction procedure to the overall results. We examined the effect of three acknowledged DNA recovery methods, two...... manual methods (ISOm-11063, GnS-GII) and one commercial kit (MoBio), on soil protist community structures obtained from different sites with different land uses. Results from 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing suggest that DNA extraction method significantly affect the replicate homogeneity, the total...... number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered and the overall taxonomic structure and diversity of soil protist communities. However, DNA extraction effects did not overwhelm the natural variation among samples, as the community data still strongly grouped by geographical location...

  13. Inactivation of DNA mismatch repair by variants of uncertain significance in the PMS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Mark; Koppejan, Hester; de Wind, Niels

    2013-11-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a common cancer predisposition caused by an inactivating mutation in one of four DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Frequently a variant of uncertain significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutation, is identified in one of these genes. The inability to define pathogenicity of such variants precludes targeted healthcare. Here, we have modified a cell-free assay to test VUS in the MMR gene PMS2 for functional activity. We have analyzed nearly all VUS in PMS2 found thus far and describe loss of MMR activity for five, suggesting the applicability of the assay for diagnosis of LS. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Species-level para- and polyphyly in DNA barcode gene trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutanen, Marko; Kivelä, Sami M.; Vos, Rutger A.

    2016-01-01

    between species and gene genealogies, as indicated by situations where conspecific individuals do not form a monophyletic cluster in a gene tree. In two previous reviews, non-monophyly has been reported as being common in mitochondrial DNA gene trees. We developed a novel web service "Monophylizer...... to their nearest neighbors or exceptionally high levels of intraspecific variability. Cases of polyphyly in COI trees arising as a result of deep intraspecific divergence are negligible, as the detected cases reflected misidentifications or methodological errors. Taking into consideration variation in sampling...

  15. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  16. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Gohlke

    Full Text Available Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes

  17. Microarray-based genomic profiling and in situ hybridization on fibrotic bone marrow biopsies for the identification of numerical chromosomal abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian Jpl; Hebeda, Konnie M; Verwiel, Eugène T; Kamping, Eveline J; van Cleef, Patricia H; Kuiper, Roland P; Groenen, Patricia Jta

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematological malignancies. In MDS patients with a fibrotic bone marrow the aspiration of cells often fails (dry-tap), which hampers standard karyotyping. Obtaining genetic data from these fibrotic marrows is therefore challenging, and up till now in situ hybridization applied to bone marrow biopsies is the only option. The microarray-based genomic profiling technology has already proven its value for bone marrow aspirates and peripheral blood samples, but has never been applied to the technically challenging bone marrow biopsies. We describe an approach for microarray-based genomic profiling on bone marrow biopsies and demonstrate its ability to obtain clinically relevant cytogenetic aberrations. In addition the data were compared with those obtained by in situ hybridization and karyotyping. We have evaluated the success rate of microarray-based genomic profiling by studying twenty-one bone marrow biopsies (7 fibrotic MDS, 12 non-fibrotic MDS and 2 reactive), by microarray-based genomic profiling and in situ hybridization (12 of 21 cases). The data obtained with these techniques were compared with conventional karyotyping data on corresponding bone marrow aspirates. Of the 15 copy number aberrations that were detected by in situ hybridization, 13 were concordant with microarray-based genomic profiling and karyotyping, whereas two hybridizations were misinterpreted. In 20 of 21 patients, the data obtained by microarray-based genomic profiling and karyotyping were identical or differences could be explained by the presence of marker chromosomes, complex karyotypes, clonal heterogeneity or disease progression. We demonstrate that genome wide microarray-based genomic profiling performed on bone marrow biopsies has a similar success rate compared to in situ hybridization, and prevents misinterpretation of chromosomal losses as observed by FISH. In addition, equal to even higher resolutions were

  18. Gene promoter methylation and DNA repair capacity in monozygotic twins with discordant smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottini, Laura; Rizzolo, Piera; Siniscalchi, Ester; Zijno, Andrea; Silvestri, Valentina; Crebelli, Riccardo; Marcon, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    The influence of DNA repair capacity, plasma nutrients and tobacco smoke exposure on DNA methylation was investigated in blood cells of twenty-one couples of monozygotic twins with discordant smoking habits. All study subjects had previously been characterized for mutagen sensitivity with challenge assays with ionizing radiation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Plasma levels of folic acid, vitamin B12 and homocysteine were also available from a previous investigation. In this work DNA methylation in the promoter region of a panel of ten genes involved in cell cycle control, differentiation, apoptosis and DNA repair (p16, FHIT, RAR, CDH1, DAPK1, hTERT, RASSF1A, MGMT, BRCA1 and PALB2) was assessed in the same batches of cells isolated for previous studies, using the methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting technique. Fairly similar profiles of gene promoter methylation were observed within co-twins compared to unrelated subjects (p= 1.23 × 10(-7)), with no significant difference related to smoking habits (p = 0.23). In a regression analysis the methylation index of study subjects, used as synthetic descriptor of overall promoter methylation, displayed a significant inverse correlation with radiation-induced micronuclei (p = 0.021) and plasma folic acid level (p = 0.007) both in smokers and in non-smokers. The observed association between repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and promoter methylation suggests the involvement of the DNA repair machinery in DNA modification. Data also highlight the possible modulating effect of folate deficiency on DNA methylation and the strong influence of familiarity on the individual epigenetic profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genomic survey, gene expression analysis and structural modeling suggest diverse roles of DNA methyltransferases in legumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Garg

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a crucial role in development through inheritable gene silencing. Plants possess three types of DNA methyltransferases (MTases, namely Methyltransferase (MET, Chromomethylase (CMT and Domains Rearranged Methyltransferase (DRM, which maintain methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sites. DNA MTases have not been studied in legumes so far. Here, we report the identification and analysis of putative DNA MTases in five legumes, including chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea, Medicago and Lotus. MTases in legumes could be classified in known MET, CMT, DRM and DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMT2 subfamilies based on their domain organization. First three MTases represent DNA MTases, whereas DNMT2 represents a transfer RNA (tRNA MTase. Structural comparison of all the MTases in plants with known MTases in mammalian and plant systems have been reported to assign structural features in context of biological functions of these proteins. The structure analysis clearly specified regions crucial for protein-protein interactions and regions important for nucleosome binding in various domains of CMT and MET proteins. In addition, structural model of DRM suggested that circular permutation of motifs does not have any effect on overall structure of DNA methyltransferase domain. These results provide valuable insights into role of various domains in molecular recognition and should facilitate mechanistic understanding of their function in mediating specific methylation patterns. Further, the comprehensive gene expression analyses of MTases in legumes provided evidence of their role in various developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle and response to various abiotic stresses. Overall, our study will be very helpful in establishing the specific functions of DNA MTases in legumes.

  20. DNA methylation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in children exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, Tania; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Lantz, Robert Clark; Chau, Binh T

    2017-08-15

    Several novel mechanistic findings regarding to arsenic's pathogenesis has been reported and some of them suggest that the etiology of some arsenic induced diseases are due in part to heritable changes to the genome via epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation, histone maintenance, and mRNA expression. Recently, we reported that arsenic exposure during in utero and early life was associated with impairment in the lung function and abnormal receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) sputum levels. Based on our results and the reported arsenic impacts on DNA methylation, we designed this study in our cohort of children exposed in utero and early childhood to arsenic with the aim to associate DNA methylation of MMP9, TIMP1 and RAGE genes with its protein sputum levels and with urinary and toenail arsenic levels. The results disclosed hypermethylation in MMP9 promotor region in the most exposed children; and an increase in the RAGE sputum levels among children with the mid methylation level; there were also positive associations between MMP9 DNA methylation with arsenic toenail concentrations; RAGE DNA methylation with iAs, and %DMA; and finally between TIMP1 DNA methylation with the first arsenic methylation. A negative correlation between MMP9 sputum levels with its DNA methylation was registered. In conclusion, arsenic levels were positive associated with the DNA methylation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes;, which in turn could modifies the biological process in which they are involved causing or predisposing to lung diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein inhibits DNA binding by the retinoblastoma gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirdivant, S M; Huber, H E; Patrick, D R; Defeo-Jones, D; McAvoy, E M; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Heimbrook, D C

    1992-05-01

    The human papillomavirus E7 gene can transform murine fibroblasts and cooperate with other viral oncogenes in transforming primary cell cultures. One biochemical property associated with the E7 protein is binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRB). Biochemical properties associated with pRB include binding to viral transforming proteins (E1A, large T, and E7), binding to cellular proteins (E2F and Myc), and binding to DNA. The mechanism by which E7 stimulates cell growth is uncertain. However, E7 binding to pRB inhibits binding of cellular proteins to pRB and appears to block the growth-suppressive activity of pRB. We have found that E7 also inhibits binding of pRB to DNA. A 60-kDa version of pRB (pRB60) produced in reticulocyte translation reactions or in bacteria bound quantitatively to DNA-cellulose. Recombinant E7 protein used at a 1:1 or 10:1 molar ratio with pRB60 blocked 50 or greater than 95% of pRB60 DNA-binding activity, respectively. A mutant E7 protein (E7-Ala-24) with reduced pRB60-binding activity exhibited a parallel reduction in its blocking of pRB60 binding to DNA. An E7(20-29) peptide that blocks binding of E7 protein to pRB60 restored the DNA-binding activity of pRB60 in the presence of E7. Peptide E7(2-32) did not block pRB60 binding to DNA, while peptide E7(20-57) and an E7 fragment containing residues 1 to 60 partially blocked DNA binding. E7 species containing residues 3 to 75 were fully effective at blocking pRB60 binding to DNA. These studies indicate that E7 protein specifically blocks pRB60 binding to DNA and suggest that the E7 region responsible for this property lies between residues 32 and 75. The functional significance of these observations is unclear. However, we have found that a point mutation in pRB60 that impairs DNA-binding activity also blocks the ability of pRB60 to inhibit cell growth. This correlation suggests that the DNA-binding activity of retinoblastoma proteins contributes to their biological

  2. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately...... has to be able to repeated systemic delivery of gene therapy to cancer cells in a both safe and efficient way. Non-viral delivery vectors fulfill many of these requirements except the latter. It is currently very difficult to systemically transport sufficient amounts of therapeutic DNA, by a non......-viral delivery system, to the nuclei of the SCLC cells. As a result, the gene therapy expression obtained is too low to have any clinical relevance. We have at the Department of Radiation Biology developed a transcriptionally targeting suicide gene therapy system which is built on a double stranded DNA plasmid...

  3. Assembly of a biocompatible triazole-linked gene by one-pot click-DNA ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Gale, Nittaya; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom; Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-11-01

    The chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides and their enzyme-mediated assembly into genes and genomes has significantly advanced multiple scientific disciplines. However, these approaches are not without their shortcomings; enzymatic amplification and ligation of oligonucleotides into genes and genomes makes automation challenging, and site-specific incorporation of epigenetic information and/or modified bases into large constructs is not feasible. Here we present a fully chemical one-pot method for the assembly of oligonucleotides into a gene by click-DNA ligation. We synthesize the 335 base-pair gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein iLOV from ten functionalized oligonucleotides that contain 5ʹ-azide and 3ʹ-alkyne units. The resulting click-linked iLOV gene contains eight triazoles at the sites of chemical ligation, and yet is fully biocompatible; it is replicated by DNA polymerases in vitro and encodes a functional iLOV protein in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the power and potential of our one-pot gene-assembly method by preparing an epigenetically modified variant of the iLOV gene.

  4. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  5. Horizontal gene transfer from macrophages to ischemic muscles upon delivery of naked DNA with Pluronic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vivek; Gaymalov, Zagit; Alakhova, Daria; Gupta, Richa; Zucker, Irving H; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of plasmid DNA (pDNA) with non-ionic Pluronic block copolymers increases gene expression in injected muscles and lymphoid organs. We studied the role of immune cells in muscle transfection upon inflammation. Local inflammation in murine hind limb ischemia model (MHLIM) drastically increased DNA, RNA and expressed protein levels in ischemic muscles injected with pDNA/Pluronic. The systemic inflammation (MHLIM or peritonitis) also increased expression of pDNA/Pluronic in the muscles. When pDNA/Pluronic was injected in ischemic muscles the reporter gene, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) co-localized with desmin(+) muscle fibers and CD11b(+) macrophages (MØs), suggesting transfection of MØs along with the muscle cells. P85 enhanced (∼ 4 orders) transfection of MØs with pDNA in vitro. Moreover, adoptively transferred MØs were shown to pass the transgene to inflamed muscle cells in MHLIM. Using a co-culture of myotubes (MTs) and transfected MØs expressing a reporter gene under constitutive (cmv-luciferase) or muscle specific (desmin-luciferase) promoter we demonstrated that P85 enhances horizontal gene transfer from MØ to MTs. Therefore, MØs can play an important role in muscle transfection with pDNA/Pluronic during inflammation, with both inflammation and Pluronic contributing to the increased gene expression. pDNA/Pluronic has potential for therapeutic gene delivery in muscle pathologies that involve inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterizing the DNA Methyltransferases of Haloferax volcanii via Bioinformatics, Gene Deletion, and SMRT Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ouellette

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methyltransferases (MTases, which catalyze the methylation of adenine and cytosine bases in DNA, can occur in bacteria and archaea alongside cognate restriction endonucleases (REases in restriction-modification (RM systems or independently as orphan MTases. Although DNA methylation and MTases have been well-characterized in bacteria, research into archaeal MTases has been limited. A previous study examined the genomic DNA methylation patterns (methylome of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii, a model archaeal system which can be easily manipulated in laboratory settings, via single-molecule real-time (SMRT sequencing and deletion of a putative MTase gene (HVO_A0006. In this follow-up study, we deleted other putative MTase genes in H. volcanii and sequenced the methylomes of the resulting deletion mutants via SMRT sequencing to characterize the genes responsible for DNA methylation. The results indicate that deletion of putative RM genes HVO_0794, HVO_A0006, and HVO_A0237 in a single strain abolished methylation of the sole cytosine motif in the genome (Cm4TAG. Amino acid alignments demonstrated that HVO_0794 shares homology with characterized cytosine CTAG MTases in other organisms, indicating that this MTase is responsible for Cm4TAG methylation in H. volcanii. The CTAG motif has high density at only one of the origins of replication, and there is no relative increase in CTAG motif frequency in the genome of H. volcanii, indicating that CTAG methylation might not have effectively taken over the role of regulating DNA replication and mismatch repair in the organism as previously predicted. Deletion of the putative Type I RM operon rmeRMS (HVO_2269-2271 resulted in abolished methylation of the adenine motif in the genome (GCAm6BN6VTGC. Alignments of the MTase (HVO_2270 and site specificity subunit (HVO_2271 demonstrate homology with other characterized Type I MTases and site specificity subunits, indicating that the rmeRMS operon is

  7. GENE TRANSFER ON Betta imbellis THROUGH TRANSFECTION METHOD WITH DIFFERENT DNA CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Kusrini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Big size betta (Giant have a high economic value compared to normal size betta, and over expression of growth hormone gene can produce giant fish.  As an initial step of giant transgenic betta productions, this study was conducted in order to obtain DNA plasmid concentration which provide higher hatching and survival rate of betta larvae.  Construction of PhGH pCcBA gene contains growth hormone gene of Siamese catfish (PhGH and it is controlled by the CCBA promoter. Betta imbellis broodstocks were spawned naturally, and embryos were collected 1-2 minutes after spawning time. One hundred embryos were dipped in 2 mL of transfectan X-treme gene which containp CcBA-PhGH construction genes (50 µg/mL, on room temperature for about 30 minutes. Treatments on this study were different transfectant : DNA plasmid ratiosnamely:A (0,75 µL: 0,25 µL; B (0,75 µL : 0,50 µL; C (0,75 µL: 0,75 µL, D as Control 1(without transfectant, 0,25 µL DNA; E.as Control 2(0,75 µL transfectant, without DNA, and Fas control 3 (without transfectant and without DNA. Every treatments was repeated three times.  Transfection embryos were hatched on a container (1L Volume. Study results showed that hatching rate and larvae survival rate  (4 days after hatching on treatment A were the same with the control, but slightly higher than B and C treatments. PCR analysis with DNA template showing that PhGH gene were found on embryos and larvae (pooled sample of treatment A, B and C. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis showing the existence of mRNA PhGH expression on embryos and larvae (pooled sample. Therefore, embryo transfection with transfectant ratio 0,75 µL and  DNA 0,25 µLshowing the best results.

  8. Atypical DNA methylation of genes encoding cysteine-rich peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Wanhui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, transposons and non-protein-coding repeats are epigenetically silenced by CG and non-CG methylation. This pattern of methylation is mediated in part by small RNAs and two specialized RNA polymerases, termed Pol IV and Pol V, in a process called RNA-directed DNA methylation. By contrast, many protein-coding genes transcribed by Pol II contain in their gene bodies exclusively CG methylation that is independent of small RNAs and Pol IV/Pol V activities. It is unclear how the different methylation machineries distinguish between transposons and genes. Here we report on a group of atypical genes that display in their coding region a transposon-like methylation pattern, which is associated with gene silencing in sporophytic tissues. Results We performed a methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis to search for targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana and identified several members of a gene family encoding cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs. In leaves, the CRP genes are silent and their coding regions contain dense, transposon-like methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts, which depends partly on the Pol IV/Pol V pathway and small RNAs. Methylation in the coding region is reduced, however, in the synergid cells of the female gametophyte, where the CRP genes are specifically expressed. Further demonstrating that expressed CRP genes lack gene body methylation, a CRP4-GFP fusion gene under the control of the constitutive 35 S promoter remains unmethylated in leaves and is transcribed to produce a translatable mRNA. By contrast, a CRP4-GFP fusion gene under the control of a CRP4 promoter fragment acquires CG and non-CG methylation in the CRP coding region in leaves similar to the silent endogenous CRP4 gene. Conclusions Unlike CG methylation in gene bodies, which does not dramatically affect Pol II transcription, combined CG and non-CG methylation in CRP coding regions is likely to

  9. Microarray-based oncogenic pathway profiling in advanced serous papillary ovarian carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Bich Trinh

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The identification of specific targets for treatment of ovarian cancer patients remains a challenge. The objective of this study is the analysis of oncogenic pathways in ovarian cancer and their relation with clinical outcome. METHODOLOGY: A meta-analysis of 6 gene expression datasets was done for oncogenic pathway activation scores: AKT, β-Catenin, BRCA, E2F1, EGFR, ER, HER2, INFα, INFγ, MYC, p53, p63, PI3K, PR, RAS, SRC, STAT3, TNFα, and TGFβ and VEGF-A. Advanced serous papillary tumours from uniformly treated patients were selected (N = 464 to find differences independent from stage-, histology- and treatment biases. Survival and correlations with documented prognostic signatures (wound healing response signature WHR/genomic grade index GGI/invasiveness gene signature IGS were analysed. RESULTS: The GGI, WHR, IGS score were unexpectedly increased in chemosensitive versus chemoresistant patients. PR and RAS activation score were associated with survival outcome (p = 0.002;p = 0.004. Increased activations of β-Catenin (p = 0.0009, E2F1 (p = 0.005, PI3K (p = 0.003 and p63 (p = 0.05 were associated with more favourable clinical outcome and were consistently correlated with three prognostic gene signatures. CONCLUSIONS: Oncogenic pathway profiling of advanced serous ovarian tumours revealed that increased β-Catenin, E2F1, p63, PI3K, PR and RAS-pathway activation scores were significantly associated with favourable clinical outcome. WHR, GGI and IGS scores were unexpectedly increased in chemosensitive tumours. Earlier studies have shown that WHR, GGI and IGS are strongly associated with proliferation and that high-proliferative ovarian tumours are more chemosensitive. These findings may indicate opposite confounding of prognostic versus predictive factors when studying biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  10. cDNA sequences reveal considerable gene prediction inaccuracy in the Plasmodium falciparum genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenzuela Jesus G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum genome represents a milestone in malaria research. The genome sequence allows for the development of genome-wide approaches such as microarray and proteomics that will greatly facilitate our understanding of the parasite biology and accelerate new drug and vaccine development. Designing and application of these genome-wide assays, however, requires accurate information on gene prediction and genome annotation. Unfortunately, the genes in the parasite genome databases were mostly identified using computer software that could make some erroneous predictions. Results We aimed to obtain cDNA sequences to examine the accuracy of gene prediction in silico. We constructed cDNA libraries from mixed blood stages of P. falciparum parasite using the SMART cDNA library construction technique and generated 17332 high-quality expressed sequence tags (EST, including 2198 from primer-walking experiments. Assembly of our sequence tags produced 2548 contigs and 2671 singletons versus 5220 contigs and 5910 singletons when our EST were assembled with EST in public databases. Comparison of all the assembled EST/contigs with predicted CDS and genomic sequences in the PlasmoDB database identified 356 genes with predicted coding sequences fully covered by EST, including 85 genes (23.6% with introns incorrectly predicted. Careful automatic software and manual alignments found an additional 308 genes that have introns different from those predicted, with 152 new introns discovered and 182 introns with sizes or locations different from those predicted. Alternative spliced and antisense transcripts were also detected. Matching cDNA to predicted genes also revealed silent chromosomal regions, mostly at subtelomere regions. Conclusion Our data indicated that approximately 24% of the genes in the current databases were predicted incorrectly, although some of these inaccuracies could represent alternatively

  11. Optimized cDNA libraries for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS using tobacco rattle virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Jonathan E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS has emerged as a method for performing rapid loss-of-function experiments in plants. Despite its expanding use, the effect of host gene insert length and other properties on silencing efficiency have not been systematically tested. In this study, we probed the optimal properties of cDNA fragments of the phytoene desaturase (PDS gene for efficient VIGS in Nicotiana benthamiana using tobacco rattle virus (TRV. Results NbPDS inserts of between 192 bp and 1304 bp led to efficient silencing as determined by analysis of leaf chlorophyll a levels. The region of the NbPDS cDNA used for silencing had a small effect on silencing efficiency with 5' and 3' located inserts performing more poorly than those from the middle. Silencing efficiency was reduced by the inclusion of a 24 bp poly(A or poly(G homopolymeric region. We developed a method for constructing cDNA libraries for use as a source of VIGS-ready constructs. Library construction involved the synthesis of cDNA on a solid phase support, digestion with RsaI to yield short cDNA fragments lacking poly(A tails and suppression subtractive hybridization to enrich for differentially expressed transcripts. We constructed two cDNA libraries from methyl-jasmonate treated N. benthamiana roots and obtained 2948 ESTs. Thirty percent of the cDNA inserts were 401–500 bp in length and 99.5% lacked poly(A tails. To test the efficiency of constructs derived from the VIGS-cDNA libraries, we silenced the nicotine biosynthetic enzyme, putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT, with ten different VIGS-NbPMT constructs ranging from 122 bp to 517 bp. Leaf nicotine levels were reduced by more than 90% in all plants infected with the NbPMT constructs. Conclusion Based on the silencing of NbPDS and NbPMT, we suggest the following design guidelines for constructs in TRV vectors: (1 Insert lengths should be in the range of ~200 bp to ~1300 bp, (2 they should be positioned in

  12. Correlation of SHOX2 Gene Amplification and DNA Methylation in Lung Cancer Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Katja U; Liebenberg, Volker; Kneip, Christoph; Seegebarth, Anke; Erdogan, Fikret; Rappold, Gudrun; Schmidt, Bernd; Dietrich, Dimo; Fleischhacker, Michael; Leschber, Gunda; Merk, Johannes; Schäper, Frank; Stapert, Henk R; Vossenaar, Erik R; Weickmann, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation in the SHOX2 locus was previously used to reliably detect lung cancer in a group of critical controls, including 'cytologically negative' samples with no visible tumor cell content, at a high specificity based on the analysis of bronchial lavage samples. This study aimed to investigate, if the methylation correlates with SHOX2 gene expression and/or copy number alterations. An amplification of the SHOX2 gene locus together with the observed tumor-specific hypermethylation might explain the good performance of this marker in bronchial lavage samples. SHOX2 expression, gene copy number and DNA methylation were determined in lung tumor tissues and matched morphologically normal adjacent tissues (NAT) from 55 lung cancer patients. Quantitative HeavyMethyl (HM) real-time PCR was used to detect SHOX2 DNA methylation levels. SHOX2 expression was assayed with quantitative real-time PCR, and copy numbers alterations were measured with conventional real-time PCR and array CGH. A hypermethylation of the SHOX2 locus in tumor tissue as compared to the matched NAT from the same patient was detected in 96% of tumors from a group of 55 lung cancer patients. This correlated highly significantly with the frequent occurrence of copy number amplification (p < 0.0001), while the expression of the SHOX2 gene showed no difference. Frequent gene amplification correlated with hypermethylation of the SHOX2 gene locus. This concerted effect qualifies SHOX2 DNA methylation as a biomarker for lung cancer diagnosis, especially when sensitive detection is needed, i.e. in bronchial lavage or blood samples

  13. The impact of endurance exercise on global and AMPK gene-specific DNA methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King-Himmelreich, Tanya S.; Schramm, Stefanie; Wolters, Miriam C.; Schmetzer, Julia; Möser, Christine V.; Knothe, Claudia [pharmazentrum frankfurt/ZAFES, Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Theodor Stern Kai 7, 60590, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Resch, Eduard [Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), Project Group for Translational Medicine & Pharmacology (TMP), 60596, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Peil, Johannes [Sports Clinic, Bad Nauheim, MCI GmbH, In der Aue 30-32, 61231, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Geisslinger, Gerd [pharmazentrum frankfurt/ZAFES, Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Theodor Stern Kai 7, 60590, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), Project Group for Translational Medicine & Pharmacology (TMP), 60596, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Niederberger, Ellen, E-mail: e.niederberger@em.uni-frankfurt.de [pharmazentrum frankfurt/ZAFES, Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Theodor Stern Kai 7, 60590, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-05-27

    Alterations in gene expression as a consequence of physical exercise are frequently described. The mechanism of these regulations might depend on epigenetic changes in global or gene-specific DNA methylation levels. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in maintenance of energy homeostasis and is activated by increases in the AMP/ATP ratio as occurring in skeletal muscles after sporting activity. To analyze whether exercise has an impact on the methylation status of the AMPK promoter, we determined the AMPK methylation status in human blood samples from patients before and after sporting activity in the context of rehabilitation as well as in skeletal muscles of trained and untrained mice. Further, we examined long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) as indicator of global DNA methylation changes. Our results revealed that light sporting activity in mice and humans does not alter global DNA methylation but has an effect on methylation of specific CpG sites in the AMPKα2 gene. These regulations were associated with a reduced AMPKα2 mRNA and protein expression in muscle tissue, pointing at a contribution of the methylation status to AMPK expression. Taken together, these results suggest that exercise influences AMPKα2 gene methylation in human blood and eminently in the skeletal muscle of mice and therefore might repress AMPKα2 gene expression. -- Highlights: •AMPK gene methylation increases after moderate endurance exercise in humans and mice. •AMPKα mRNA and protein decrease after moderate endurance exercise in mice. •Global DNA methylation is not affected under the same conditions.

  14. The impact of endurance exercise on global and AMPK gene-specific DNA methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King-Himmelreich, Tanya S.; Schramm, Stefanie; Wolters, Miriam C.; Schmetzer, Julia; Möser, Christine V.; Knothe, Claudia; Resch, Eduard; Peil, Johannes; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression as a consequence of physical exercise are frequently described. The mechanism of these regulations might depend on epigenetic changes in global or gene-specific DNA methylation levels. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in maintenance of energy homeostasis and is activated by increases in the AMP/ATP ratio as occurring in skeletal muscles after sporting activity. To analyze whether exercise has an impact on the methylation status of the AMPK promoter, we determined the AMPK methylation status in human blood samples from patients before and after sporting activity in the context of rehabilitation as well as in skeletal muscles of trained and untrained mice. Further, we examined long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) as indicator of global DNA methylation changes. Our results revealed that light sporting activity in mice and humans does not alter global DNA methylation but has an effect on methylation of specific CpG sites in the AMPKα2 gene. These regulations were associated with a reduced AMPKα2 mRNA and protein expression in muscle tissue, pointing at a contribution of the methylation status to AMPK expression. Taken together, these results suggest that exercise influences AMPKα2 gene methylation in human blood and eminently in the skeletal muscle of mice and therefore might repress AMPKα2 gene expression. -- Highlights: •AMPK gene methylation increases after moderate endurance exercise in humans and mice. •AMPKα mRNA and protein decrease after moderate endurance exercise in mice. •Global DNA methylation is not affected under the same conditions.

  15. Determination of mutated genes in the presence of wild-type DNA by using molecular beacons as probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghua; Ai, Junjie; Gu, Qiaorong; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2017-03-01

    Low-abundance mutations in the presence of wild-type DNA can be determined using molecular beacon (MB) as probe. A MB is generally used as DNA probe because it can distinguish single-base mismatched target DNA from fully matched target DNA. However, the probe can not determine low-abundance mutations in the presence of wild-type DNA. In this study, this limitation is addressed by enhancing the stability of unpaired base-containing dsDNA with a hydrogen-bonding ligand, which was added after hybridization of the MB to the target DNA. The ligand formed hydrogen bonds with unpaired bases and stabilized the unpaired base-containing dsDNA if target DNA is mutated one. As a result, more MBs were opened by the mutant genes in the presence of the ligand and a further increase in the fluorescence intensity was obtained. By contrast, fluorescence intensity did not change if target DNA is wild-type one. Consequent increase in the fluorescence intensity of the MB was regarded as a signal derived from mutant genes. The proposed method was applied in synthetic template systems to determine point mutation in DNA obtained from PCR analysis. The method also allows rapid and simple discrimination of a signal if it is originated in the presence of mutant gene or alternatively by a lower concentration of wild gene.

  16. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  17. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghia Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability.

  19. DNA repair genes RAD52 and SRS2, a cell wall synthesis regulator gene SMI1, and the membrane sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 are important in efficient Agrobacterium-mediated yeast transformation with chromosomal T-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmine, Yuta; Satoh, Yukari; Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2016-04-02

    Plant pathogenic Agrobacterium strains can transfer T-DNA regions of their Ti plasmids to a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, including fungi, in vitro. In the recent decade, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model host to reveal important host proteins for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). Further investigation is required to understand the fundamental mechanism of AMT, including interaction at the cell surface, to expand the host range, and to develop new tools. In this study, we screened a yeast mutant library for low AMT mutant strains by advantage of a chromosome type T-DNA, which transfer is efficient and independent on integration into host chromosome. By the mutant screening, we identified four mutant strains (srs2Δ, rad52Δ, smi1Δ and erg28Δ), which showed considerably low AMT efficiency. Structural analysis of T-DNA product replicons in AMT colonies of mutants lacking each of the two DNA repair genes, SRS2 and RAD52, suggested that the genes act soon after T-DNA entry for modification of the chromosomal T-DNA to stably maintain them as linear replicons and to circularize certain T-DNA simultaneously. The cell wall synthesis regulator SMI1 might have a role in the cell surface interaction between the donor and recipient cells, but the smi1Δ mutant exhibited pleiotropic effect, i.e. low effector protein transport as well as low AMT for the chromosomal T-DNA, but relatively high AMT for integrative T-DNAs. The ergosterol synthesis regulator/enzyme-scaffold gene ERG28 probably contributes by sensing a congested environment, because growth of erg28Δ strain was unaffected by the presence of donor bacterial cells, while the growth of the wild-type and other mutant yeast strains was suppressed by their presence. RAD52 and the DNA helicase/anti-recombinase gene SRS2 are necessary to form and maintain artificial chromosomes through the AMT of chromosomal T-DNA. A sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 is important in the high

  20. Role of gene 59 of bacteriophage T4 in repair of uv-irradiated and alkylated DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Wu, J.L.; Yeh, Y.C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonsense mutants in gene 59 (amC5, am HL628) were used to study the role of this gene in the repair of uv-damaged and alkylated DNA of bacteriophage T4 in vivo. The higher sensitivity to uv irradiation and alkylation of gene 59 mutants after exposure to these agents was established by a comparison of the survival fractions with wild type. Zonal centrifugal analysis of both parental and nascent mutant intracellular DNA molecules after uv irradiation showed that immediately after exposure the size of single-stranded DNA fragments was the same as the wild-type intracellular DNA. However, the capability of rejoining fragmented intracellular DNA was greatly reduced in the mutant. In contrast, the wild-type-infected cells under the same condition resumed DNA replication and repaired its DNA to normal size. Methyl methanesulfonate induced more randomly fragmented intracellular DNA, when compared to uv irradiation. The rate of rejoining under these conditions as judged from their sedimentation profiles was also greatly reduced in mutant-infected cells. Further evidence is presented that uv repair is not a simple consequence of arrested DNA replication, which is a phenotype of the mutant when infected in a nonpermissive host, Escherichia coli B(su - ), but rather that the DNA repair function of gene 59 is independent of the replication function. These and other data presented indicate that a product(s) of gene 59 is essential for both repair of uv lesions and repair of alkylation damage of DNA in vivo. It is suggested that gene 59 may have two functions during viral development: DNA replication and replication repair of DNA molecules

  1. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, K; Hisada, T; Takata, K; Hiraishi, A

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  2. Performance of amplicon-based next generation DNA sequencing for diagnostic gene mutation profiling in oncopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Daoud; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Gerrit A; Doeleman, Marije W; van Moorsel, Marinda I H; van Essen, Hendrik F; Eijk, Paul P; Grünberg, Katrien; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Thunnissen, Erik; Verheul, Henk M; Smit, Egbert F; Ylstra, Bauke; Heideman, Daniëlle A M

    2014-10-01

    Next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) holds promise for diagnostic applications, yet implementation in routine molecular pathology practice requires performance evaluation on DNA derived from routine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. The current study presents a comprehensive analysis of TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel-based NGS using a MiSeq Personal sequencer (TSACP-MiSeq-NGS) for somatic mutation profiling. TSACP-MiSeq-NGS (testing 212 hotspot mutation amplicons of 48 genes) and a data analysis pipeline were evaluated in a retrospective learning/test set approach (n = 58/n = 45 FFPE-tumor DNA samples) against 'gold standard' high-resolution-melting (HRM)-sequencing for the genes KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA. Next, the performance of the validated test algorithm was assessed in an independent, prospective cohort of FFPE-tumor DNA samples (n = 75). In the learning set, a number of minimum parameter settings was defined to decide whether a FFPE-DNA sample is qualified for TSACP-MiSeq-NGS and for calling mutations. The resulting test algorithm revealed 82% (37/45) compliance to the quality criteria and 95% (35/37) concordant assay findings for KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA with HRM-sequencing (kappa = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.81-1.03) in the test set. Subsequent application of the validated test algorithm to the prospective cohort yielded a success rate of 84% (63/75), and a high concordance with HRM-sequencing (95% (60/63); kappa = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.84-1.01). TSACP-MiSeq-NGS detected 77 mutations in 29 additional genes. TSACP-MiSeq-NGS is suitable for diagnostic gene mutation profiling in oncopathology.

  3. Spontaneous deletion of a 20-kilobase DNA segment carrying genes specifying isopropylbenzene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida RE204.

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, R W; Timmis, K N

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding isopropylbenzene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida RE204 are readily lost in two ways: by loss (curing) of plasmid pRE4 which specifies the catabolic pathway and by deletion from pRE4 of an approximately 20-kilobase segment of DNA carrying the catabolic genes. The presence of DNA sequences at the ends of the catabolic gene region sharing homology with one another suggests that the deletions result from recombination events between these homologous sequences.

  4. Gene delivery: A single nuclear localization signal peptide is sufficient to carry DNA to the cell nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Zanta, Maria Antonietta; Belguise-Valladier, Pascale; Behr, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of exogenous DNA through the nuclear membrane is a major concern of gene delivery technologies. To take advantage of the cellular import machinery, we have synthesized a capped 3.3-kbp CMVLuciferase-NLS gene containing a single nuclear localization signal peptide (PKKKRKVEDPYC). Transfection of cells with the tagged gene remained effective down to nanogram amounts of DNA. Transfection enhancement (10- to 1,000-fold) as a result of the signal peptide was observed irrespective of ...

  5. Defined DNA-mediated assemblies of gene-expressing giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadorn, M.; Boenzli, E.; Sørensen, Kristian T.

    2013-01-01

    of giant unilamellar vesicles functionalized with a basic cellular machinery to express green fluorescent protein and specified neighbor-to-neighbor interactions. We show both that the local and programmable DNA pairing rules on the nanoscale are able to direct the microscale vesicles into macroscale soft...... matter assemblies and that the highly sensitive gene-expression machinery remains intact and active during multiple experimental steps. An in silico model recapitulates the experiments performed in vitro and covers additional experimental setups highlighting the parameters that control the DNA...

  6. Comprehensive analysis of DNA repair gene variants and risk of meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bethke, L.; Murray, A.; Webb, E.

    2008-01-01

    of meningioma and exposure to ionizing radiation is also well known and led us to examine whether variants in DNA repair genes contribute to disease susceptibility. METHODS: We analyzed 1127 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected to capture most of the common variation in 136 DNA......(trend) = 8.95 x 10(-6); P = .009 after adjusting for multiple testing). CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel association between rs4968451 and meningioma risk. Because approximately 28% of the European population are carriers of at-risk genotypes for rs4968451, the variant is likely to make a substantial...

  7. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  8. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Dunoyer-Geindre

    Full Text Available Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb. In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC. However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter.

  9. CHH islands: de novo DNA methylation in near-gene chromatin regulation in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Jonathan I; Ellis, Nathanael A; Guo, Lin; Harkess, Alex E; Yao, Yingyin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Dawe, R Kelly

    2013-04-01

    Small RNA-mediated regulation of chromatin structure is an important means of suppressing unwanted genetic activity in diverse plants, fungi, and animals. In plants specifically, 24-nt siRNAs direct de novo methylation to repetitive DNA, both foreign and endogenous, in a process known as RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Many components of the de novo methylation machinery have been identified recently, including multiple RNA polymerases, but specific genetic features that trigger methylation remain poorly understood. By applying whole-genome bisulfite sequencing to maize, we found that transposons close to cellular genes (particularly within 1 kb of either a gene start or end) are strongly associated with de novo methylation, as evidenced both by 24-nt siRNAs and by methylation specifically in the CHH sequence context. In addition, we found that the major classes of transposons exhibited a gradient of CHH methylation determined by proximity to genes. Our results further indicate that intergenic chromatin in maize exists in two major forms that are distinguished based on proximity to genes-one form marked by dense CG and CHG methylation and lack of transcription, and one marked by CHH methylation and activity of multiple forms of RNA polymerase. The existence of the latter, which we call CHH islands, may have implications for how cellular gene expression could be coordinated with immediately adjacent transposon repression in a large genome with a complex organization of genes interspersed in a landscape of transposons.

  10. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level.

  11. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  12. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  13. An Arabidopsis jmjC domain protein protects transcribed genes from DNA methylation at CHG sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Asuka; Nakamura, Miyuki; Inagaki, Soichi; Kobayashi, Akie; Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2009-04-22

    Differential cytosine methylation of genes and transposons is important for maintaining integrity of plant genomes. In Arabidopsis, transposons are heavily methylated at both CG and non-CG sites, whereas the non-CG methylation is rarely found in active genes. Our previous genetic analysis suggested that a jmjC domain-containing protein IBM1 (increase in BONSAI methylation 1) prevents ectopic deposition of non-CG methylation, and this process is necessary for normal Arabidopsis development. Here, we directly determined the genomic targets of IBM1 through high-resolution genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation. The ibm1 mutation induced extensive hyper-methylation in thousands of genes. Transposons were unaffected. Notably, long transcribed genes were most severely affected. Methylation of genes is limited to CG sites in wild type, but CHG sites were also methylated in the ibm1 mutant. The ibm1-induced hyper-methylation did not depend on previously characterized components of the RNAi-based DNA methylation machinery. Our results suggest novel transcription-coupled mechanisms to direct genic methylation not only at CG but also at CHG sites. IBM1 prevents the CHG methylation in genes, but not in transposons.

  14. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Coordinate regulation of stromelysin and collagenase genes determined with cDNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, S.M.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Secreted proteinases are required for tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling during wound healing and embryonic growth. Thus, the regulation of the genes of secreted proteinases may serve as an interesting model for growth-controlled genes in general. The authors studied the genes of the secreted proteinases stromelysin and collagenase by using molecularly cloned cDNAs from each proteinase. Stromelysin cDNA was cloned by differential screening of a total cDNA library from rabbit synovial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which yielded a clone of 1.2 kilobase pairs; collagenase cDNA was obtained by cloning reverse transcripts of anti-collagenase-immunoadsorbed polysomal mRNA, which yielded a clone of 0.8 kilobase pairs. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA species of 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases, respectively, were detected on hybridization blots of RNA from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated but not untreated rabbit synovial cells. Expression of stromelysin mRNA was also induced in rabbit alveolar macrophages and rabbit brain capillary endothelial cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Stromelysin and collagenase mRNA were both induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and cytochalasin B at a constant ratio of the two gene products; this suggest coordinate regulation. The fact that induction was blocked after inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide implicates an indirect signal transduction pathway that requires new protein synthesis

  16. A novel Listeria monocytogenes-based DNA delivery system for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter

    2012-01-31

    Bacteria-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA to mammalian cells (bactofection) has been shown to have significant potential as an approach to express heterologous proteins in various cell types. This is achieved through entry of the entire bacterium into cells, followed by release of plasmid DNA. In a murine model, we show that Listeria monocytogenes can invade and spread in tumors, and establish the use of Listeria to deliver genes to tumors in vivo. A novel approach to vector lysis and release of plasmid DNA through antibiotic administration was developed. Ampicillin administration facilitated both plasmid transfer and safety control of vector. To further improve on the gene delivery system, we selected a Listeria monocytogenes derivative that is more sensitive to ampicillin, and less pathogenic than the wild-type strain. Incorporation of a eukaryotic-transcribed lysin cassette in the plasmid further increased bacterial lysis. Successful gene delivery of firefly luciferase to growing tumors in murine models and to patient breast tumor samples ex vivo was achieved. The model described encompasses a three-phase treatment regimen, involving (1) intratumoral administration of vector followed by a period of vector spread, (2) systemic ampicillin administration to induce vector lysis and plasmid transfer, and (3) systemic administration of combined moxifloxacin and ampicillin to eliminate systemic vector. For the first time, our results reveal the potential of Listeria monocytogenes for in vivo gene delivery.

  17. DNA Methylation Levels of Melanoma Risk Genes Are Associated with Clinical Characteristics of Melanoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica S. S. de Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In melanoma development, oncogenic process is mediated by genetic and epigenetic mutations, and few studies have so far explored the role of DNA methylation either as predisposition factor or biomarker. We tested patient samples for germline CDKN2A methylation status and found no evidence of inactivation by promoter hypermethylation. We have also investigated the association of clinical characteristics of samples with the DNA methylation pattern of twelve genes relevant for melanomagenesis. Five genes (BAP1, MGMT, MITF, PALB2, and POT1 presented statistical association between blood DNA methylation levels and either CDKN2A-mutation status, number of lesions, or Breslow thickness. In tumors, five genes (KIT, MGMT, MITF, TERT, and TNF exhibited methylation levels significantly different between tumor groups including acral compared to nonacral melanomas and matched primary lesions and metastases. Our data pinpoint that the methylation level of eight melanoma-associated genes could potentially represent markers for this disease both in peripheral blood and in tumor samples.

  18. DNA damage-induced alterations in chromatin contribute to genomic integrity and age-related changes in gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Michan, Shaday; McVay, Michael; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Vann, James; Park, Sang-Kyu; Hartlerode, Andrea; Stegmuller, Judith; Hafner, Angela; Loerch, Patrick; Wright, Sarah M.; Mills, Kevin D.; Bonni, Azad; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scully, Ralph; Prolla, Tomas A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Sinclair, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability and alterations in gene expression are hallmarks of eukaryotic aging. The yeast histone deacetylase Sir2 silences transcription and stabilizes repetitive DNA, but during aging or in response to a DNA break, the Sir complex relocalizes to sites of genomic instability, resulting in the desilencing of genes that cause sterility, a characteristic of yeast aging. Using embryonic stem cells, we show that mammalian Sir2, SIRT1, represses repetitive DNA and a functionally diverse set of genes across the mouse genome. In response to DNA damage, SIRT1 dissociates from these loci and relocalizes to DNA breaks to promote repair, resulting in transcriptional changes that parallel those in the aging mouse brain. Increased SIRT1 expression promotes survival in a mouse model of genomic instability and suppresses age-dependent transcriptional changes. Thus, DNA damage-induced redistribution of SIRT1 and other chromatin modifying proteins may be a conserved mechanism of aging in eukaryotes. PMID:19041753

  19. Altered histone mark deposition and DNA methylation at homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2014-10-01

    We recently reported a role of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC2 trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the regulation of homeobox (HOX) (Marcinkiewicz and Gudas, 2013, Exp Cell Res) gene transcript levels in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT1R) and tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. Here, we assessed both the levels of various histone modifications at a subset of homeobox genes and genome wide DNA methylation patterns in OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells by using ERRBS (enhanced reduced representation bisulfite sequencing). We detected the H3K9me3 mark at HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 at levels higher in OKF6-TERT1R than in SCC-9 cells; at IRX1 and SIX2 the H3K9me3 levels were conversely higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R. The H3K79me3 mark was detectable only at IRX1 in OKF6-TERT1R and at IRX4 in SCC-9 cells. The levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks correlate with the transcript levels of the assessed homeobox genes in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9. We detected generally lower CpG methylation levels on DNA in SCC-9 cells at annotated genomic regions which were differentially methylated between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells; however, some genomic regions, including the HOX gene clusters, showed DNA methylation at higher levels in SCC-9 than OKF6-TERT1R. Thus, both altered histone modification patterns and changes in DNA methylation are associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human oral cavity SCC cells, and this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic phenotype of oral keratinocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ATAD3 gene cluster deletions cause cerebellar dysfunction associated with altered mitochondrial DNA and cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Radha; Frazier, Ann E; Durigon, Romina; Patel, Harshil; Jones, Aleck W; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Lake, Nicole J; Compton, Alison G; Mountford, Hayley S; Tucker, Elena J; Mitchell, Alice L R; Jackson, Deborah; Sesay, Abdul; Di Re, Miriam; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Burke, Derek; Francis, David; Lunke, Sebastian; McGillivray, George; Mandelstam, Simone; Mochel, Fanny; Keren, Boris; Jardel, Claude; Turner, Anne M; Ian Andrews, P; Smeitink, Jan; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Heales, Simon J; Kohda, Masakazu; Ohtake, Akira; Murayama, Kei; Okazaki, Yasushi; Lombès, Anne; Holt, Ian J; Thorburn, David R; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2017-06-01

    Although mitochondrial disorders are clinically heterogeneous, they frequently involve the central nervous system and are among the most common neurogenetic disorders. Identifying the causal genes has benefited enormously from advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies; however, once the defect is known, researchers face the challenge of deciphering the underlying disease mechanism. Here we characterize large biallelic deletions in the region encoding the ATAD3C, ATAD3B and ATAD3A genes. Although high homology complicates genomic analysis of the ATAD3 defects, they can be identified by targeted analysis of standard single nucleotide polymorphism array and whole exome sequencing data. We report deletions that generate chimeric ATAD3B/ATAD3A fusion genes in individuals from four unrelated families with fatal congenital pontocerebellar hypoplasia, whereas a case with genomic rearrangements affecting the ATAD3C/ATAD3B genes on one allele and ATAD3B/ATAD3A genes on the other displays later-onset encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy, ataxia and dystonia. Fibroblasts from affected individuals display mitochondrial DNA abnormalities, associated with multiple indicators of altered cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, drug-induced perturbations of cholesterol homeostasis cause mitochondrial DNA disorganization in control cells, while mitochondrial DNA aggregation in the genetic cholesterol trafficking disorder Niemann-Pick type C disease further corroborates the interdependence of mitochondrial DNA organization and cholesterol. These data demonstrate the integration of mitochondria in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in which ATAD3 plays a critical role. The dual problem of perturbed cholesterol metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction could be widespread in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  1. In utero DNA damage from environmental pollution is associated with somatic gene mutation in newborns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Hemminki, K.; Jedrychowski, W.; Whyatt, R.; Campbell, U.; Hsu, Y.Z.; Santella, R.; Albertini, R.; O' Neill, J.P. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). School of Public Health

    2002-10-01

    Transplacental exposure to carcinogenic air pollutants from the combustion of fossil fuels is a growing health concern, given evidence of the heightened susceptibility of the fetus. These mutagenic/carcinogenic pollutants include aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that bind to DNA, forming chemical-DNA adducts. The genotoxic effects of transplacental exposure in humans has been investigated by analyzing aromatic-DNA adducts and the frequency of gene mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus in umbilical cord and maternal blood samples. Here the authors show, in a cross-sectional study of 67 mothers and 64 newborns from the Krakow Region of Poland, that aromatic-DNA adducts measured by P-32-postlabeling are positively associated with HPRT mutant frequency in the newborns (beta = 0.56, P = 0.03) after controlling for exposure to tobacco smoke, diet, and socioeconomic status. In contrast to the fetus, HPRT mutations and DNA adducts do not reflect similar exposure periods in the mother, and the maternal biomarkers were not correlated. Adducts were higher in the newborn than the mother, indicating differential susceptibility of the fetus to DNA damage; but HPRT mutation frequency was 4-fold lower, consistent with the long lifetime of the biomarker. These results provide the first demonstration of a molecular link between somatic mutation in the newborn and transplacental exposure to common air pollutants, a finding that is relevant to cancer risk assessment.

  2. Tagging genes for drought resistance by DNA markers in wheat (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, T.A.; Rahman, S.; Zafar, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Wheat families (F/sub 3) raised from the seed of drought resistant and susceptible F/sub 2/ plants developed from the cross of drought resistant and susceptible parents were grown under greenhouse conditions in polyethylene tubes filled with soil and sand mixture. Drought stress was imposed and monitored at the seedling stage. The relative water content and net photosynthesis was recorded with increasing drought stress until a significant part of the seedling population had zero or negative net photosynthesis. The seedling with zero or negative net photosynthesis were named as drought susceptible and the seedlings at the same drought stress showing net photosynthesis were named as drought resistance. Twenty each of the most susceptible and resistant seedlings were selected for DNA extraction. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique using bulked segregant analysis was used to identify DNA markers linked to drought resistance. The primers OPJ-05, OPJ-14, OPI-20 and OPA-19 produced polymorphic DNA fragments between the contrasting bulks. The polymorphic DNA fragment of 1.55kb produced by the primer OPA-19 was found linked to drought resistance. This DNA marker can be used in markers-assisted selection for drought resistance or to clone drought resistance gene. (author)

  3. Essential and non-essential DNA replication genes in the model halophilic Archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer systems in Archaea, including many components of the DNA replication machinery, are similar to those found in eukaryotes. Functional assignments of archaeal DNA replication genes have been primarily based upon sequence homology and biochemical studies of replisome components, but few genetic studies have been conducted thus far. We have developed a tractable genetic system for knockout analysis of genes in the model halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and used it to determine which DNA replication genes are essential. Results Using a directed in-frame gene knockout method in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we examined nineteen genes predicted to be involved in DNA replication. Preliminary bioinformatic analysis of the large haloarchaeal Orc/Cdc6 family, related to eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6, showed five distinct clades of Orc/Cdc6 proteins conserved in all sequenced haloarchaea. Of ten orc/cdc6 genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, only two were found to be essential, orc10, on the large chromosome, and orc2, on the minichromosome, pNRC200. Of the three replicative-type DNA polymerase genes, two were essential: the chromosomally encoded B family, polB1, and the chromosomally encoded euryarchaeal-specific D family, polD1/D2 (formerly called polA1/polA2 in the Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome sequence. The pNRC200-encoded B family polymerase, polB2, was non-essential. Accessory genes for DNA replication initiation and elongation factors, including the putative replicative helicase, mcm, the eukaryotic-type DNA primase, pri1/pri2, the DNA polymerase sliding clamp, pcn, and the flap endonuclease, rad2, were all essential. Targeted genes were classified as non-essential if knockouts were obtained and essential based on statistical analysis and/or by demonstrating the inability to isolate chromosomal knockouts except in the presence of a complementing plasmid copy of the gene. Conclusion The results showed that ten

  4. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2012-11-26

    In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer) domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  6. DNA-microarrays identification of Streptococcus mutans genes associated with biofilm thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feldman Mark

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A biofilm is a complex community of microorganisms that develop on surfaces in diverse environments. The thickness of the biofilm plays a crucial role in the physiology of the immobilized bacteria. The most cariogenic bacteria, mutans streptococci, are common inhabitants of a dental biofilm community. In this study, DNA-microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes associated with the thickness of S. mutans biofilms. Results Comparative transcriptome analyses indicated that expression of 29 genes was differentially altered in 400- vs. 100-microns depth and 39 genes in 200- vs. 100-microns biofilms. Only 10 S. mutans genes showed differential expression in both 400- vs. 100-microns and 200- vs. 100-microns biofilms. All of these genes were upregulated. As sucrose is a predominant factor in oral biofilm development, its influence was evaluated on selected genes expression in the various depths of biofilms. The presence of sucrose did not noticeably change the regulation of these genes in 400- vs. 100-microns and/or 200- vs. 100-microns biofilms tested by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression profile of selected biofilm thickness associated genes in the luxS- mutant strain. The expression of those genes was not radically changed in the mutant strain compared to wild-type bacteria in planktonic condition. Only slight downregulation was recorded in SMU.2146c, SMU.574, SMU.609, and SMU.987 genes expression in luxS- bacteria in biofilm vs. planktonic environments. Conclusion These findings reveal genes associated with the thickness of biofilms of S. mutans. Expression of these genes is apparently not regulated directly by luxS and is not necessarily influenced by the presence of sucrose in the growth media.

  7. Investigation of the effect of ionizing radiation on gene expression variation by the 'DNA chips': feasibility of a biological dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruel, G.

    2005-01-01

    After having described the different biological effects of ionizing radiation and the different approaches to biological dosimetry, and introduced 'DNA chips' or DNA micro-arrays, the author reports the characterization of gene expression variations in the response of cells to a gamma irradiation. Both main aspects of the use DNA chips are investigated: fundamental research and diagnosis. This research thesis thus proposes an analysis of the effect of ionizing radiation using DNA chips, notably by comparing gene expression modifications measured in mouse irradiated lung, heart and kidney. It reports a feasibility study of bio-dosimeter based on expression profiles

  8. Early Developmental and Evolutionary Origins of Gene Body DNA Methylation Patterns in Mammalian Placentas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane I Schroeder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20-80 million years the mammalian placenta has taken on a variety of morphologies through both divergent and convergent evolution. Recently we have shown that the human placenta genome has a unique epigenetic pattern of large partially methylated domains (PMDs and highly methylated domains (HMDs with gene body DNA methylation positively correlating with level of gene expression. In order to determine the evolutionary conservation of DNA methylation patterns and transcriptional regulatory programs in the placenta, we performed a genome-wide methylome (MethylC-seq analysis of human, rhesus macaque, squirrel monkey, mouse, dog, horse, and cow placentas as well as opossum extraembryonic membrane. We found that, similar to human placenta, mammalian placentas and opossum extraembryonic membrane have globally lower levels of methylation compared to somatic tissues. Higher relative gene body methylation was the conserved feature across all mammalian placentas, despite differences in PMD/HMDs and absolute methylation levels. Specifically, higher methylation over the bodies of genes involved in mitosis, vesicle-mediated transport, protein phosphorylation, and chromatin modification was observed compared with the rest of the genome. As in human placenta, higher methylation is associated with higher gene expression and is predictive of genic location across species. Analysis of DNA methylation in oocytes and preimplantation embryos shows a conserved pattern of gene body methylation similar to the placenta. Intriguingly, mouse and cow oocytes and mouse early embryos have PMD/HMDs but their placentas do not, suggesting that PMD/HMDs are a feature of early preimplantation methylation patterns that become lost during placental development in some species and following implantation of the embryo.

  9. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  10. Genes expression by using cDNA Microarray in Whallak-tang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol-kyung Sin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was undertaken to determine the effect of Whallak-tang on expression of CD/cytokine Genes. Methods : The expression of CD/Cytokine Genes were examined by cDNA microarray using the human mast cell line(HMC-l. Results : The expression of ATP5F1, FLJ20671, unknown, KIAA0342, OAS2, unknown genes were increased in 200~300% range. The expression of unknown, MDS006, IFITM1, MRPL3, ZNF207, FTH1, FBP1, NRGN, NR1H2, KIAA0747 genes were decreased in 0~33% range. Conclusion : These results would provide important basic data on the possibility of the clinical treatment of Whallaktang in musculoskeletal disease.

  11. Gene expression profile analysis in human hepatocellular carcinoma by cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Jung; Sung, Young Kwan; Farooq, Mohammad; Kim, Younghee; Im, Sanguk; Tak, Won Young; Hwang, Yoon Jin; Kim, Yang Il; Han, Hyung Soo; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2002-12-31

    We performed gene expression profiling of normal and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) liver tissues using a high-density microarray that contained 3,063 human cDNA. The results of a microarray hybridization experiment from eight different HCC tissues were analyzed and classified by the Cluster program. Among these differentially-expressed genes, the galectin-3, serine/threonine kinase SGK, translation factor eIF-4A, -4B, -3, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and ribosomal protein L35A were up-regulated; the mRNAs of Nip3, decorin, and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were down-regulated in HCC. The differential expression of these genes was further confirmed by an RT-PCR analysis. In addition, our data suggest that the gene expression profile of HCC varies according to the histological types.

  12. Moloney murine sarcoma virus MuSVts110 DNA: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, L; Chiocca, S M; Gilbreth, M A; Ainsworth, J R; Bishop, L A; Murphy, E C

    1992-09-01

    We have cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) MuSVts110 DNA by assembly of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified segments of integrated viral DNA from infected NRK cells (6m2 cells) and determined its complete sequence. Previously, by direct sequencing of MuSVts110 RNA transcribed in 6m2 cells, we established that the thermosensitive RNA splicing phenotype uniquely characteristic of MuSVts110 results from a deletion of 1,487 nucleotides of progenitor MuSV-124 sequences. As anticipated, the sequence obtained in this study contained precisely this same deletion. In addition, several other unexpected sequence differences were found between MuSVts110 and MuSV-124. For example, in the noncoding region upstream of the gag gene, MuSVts110 DNA contained a 52-nucleotide tract typical of murine leukemia virus rather than MuSV-124, suggesting that MuSVts110 originated as a MuSV-helper murine leukemia virus recombinant during reverse transcription rather than from a straightforward deletion within MuSV-124. In addition, both MuSVts110 long terminal repeats contained head-to-tail duplications of eight nucleotides in the U3 region. Finally, seven single-nucleotide substitutions were found scattered throughout MuSVts110 DNA. Three of the nucleotide substitutions were in the gag gene, resulting in one coding change in p15 and one in p30. All of the remaining nucleotide changes were found in the noncoding region between the 5' long terminal repeat and the gag gene. In NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the cloned MuSVts110 DNA, the pattern of viral RNA expression conformed with that observed in cells infected with authentic MuSVts110 virus in that viral RNA splicing was 30 to 40% efficient at growth temperatures between 28 and 33 degrees C but reduced to trace levels above 37 degrees C.

  13. Plasticity of the gene functions for DNA replication in the T4-like phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Vasiliy M; Nolan, James M; Bertrand, Claire; Levy, Dawn; Desplats, Carine; Krisch, H M; Karam, Jim D

    2006-08-04

    We have completely sequenced and annotated the genomes of several relatives of the bacteriophage T4, including three coliphages (RB43, RB49 and RB69), three Aeromonas salmonicida phages (44RR2.8t, 25 and 31) and one Aeromonas hydrophila phage (Aeh1). In addition, we have partially sequenced and annotated the T4-like genomes of coliphage RB16 (a close relative of RB43), A. salmonicida phage 65, Acinetobacter johnsonii phage 133 and Vibrio natriegens phage nt-1. Each of these phage genomes exhibited a unique sequence that distinguished it from its relatives, although there were examples of genomes that are very similar to each other. As a group the phages compared here diverge from one another by several criteria, including (a) host range, (b) genome size in the range between approximately 160 kb and approximately 250 kb, (c) content and genetic organization of their T4-like genes for DNA metabolism, (d) mutational drift of the predicted T4-like gene products and their regulatory sites and (e) content of open-reading frames that have no counterparts in T4 or other known organisms (novel ORFs). We have observed a number of DNA rearrangements of the T4 genome type, some exhibiting proximity to putative homing endonuclease genes. Also, we cite and discuss examples of sequence divergence in the predicted sites for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions of homologues of the T4 DNA replication proteins, with emphasis on the diversity in sequence, molecular form and regulation of the phage-encoded DNA polymerase, gp43. Five of the sequenced phage genomes are predicted to encode split forms of this polymerase. Our studies suggest that the modular construction and plasticity of the T4 genome type and several of its replication proteins may offer resilience to mutation, including DNA rearrangements, and facilitate the adaptation of T4-like phages to different bacterial hosts in nature.

  14. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein inhibits DNA binding by the retinoblastoma gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirdivant, S M; Huber, H E; Patrick, D R; Defeo-Jones, D; McAvoy, E M; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Heimbrook, D C

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus E7 gene can transform murine fibroblasts and cooperate with other viral oncogenes in transforming primary cell cultures. One biochemical property associated with the E7 protein is binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRB). Biochemical properties associated with pRB include binding to viral transforming proteins (E1A, large T, and E7), binding to cellular proteins (E2F and Myc), and binding to DNA. The mechanism by which E7 stimulates cell growt...

  15. Cloning of the DNA Repair Gene, Uvsf, by Transformation of Aspergillus Nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Oza, K.; Kafer, E.

    1990-01-01

    As a first step in the cloning of the DNA repair gene uvsF of Aspergillus nidulans, uvsF pyrG double mutant strains were transformed with a genomic library which carried the complementing Neurospora pyr-4 gene in the vector. Rare pyr(+) uvs(+) cotransformants were obtained on media lacking pyrimidines, overlayed with MMS (methyl-methane sulfonate) to which uvsF is hypersensitive. Among MMS-resistant transformants, Southerns revealed two types which showed single bands of different sizes when ...

  16. Sensitivity and fidelity of DNA microarray improved with integration of Amplified Differential Gene Expression (ADGE

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    Ile Kristina E

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ADGE technique is a method designed to magnify the ratios of gene expression before detection. It improves the detection sensitivity to small change of gene expression and requires small amount of starting material. However, the throughput of ADGE is low. We integrated ADGE with DNA microarray (ADGE microarray and compared it with regular microarray. Results When ADGE was integrated with DNA microarray, a quantitative relationship of a power function between detected and input ratios was found. Because of ratio magnification, ADGE microarray was better able to detect small changes in gene expression in a drug resistant model cell line system. The PCR amplification of templates and efficient labeling reduced the requirement of starting material to as little as 125 ng of total RNA for one slide hybridization and enhanced the signal intensity. Integration of ratio magnification, template amplification and efficient labeling in ADGE microarray reduced artifacts in microarray data and improved detection fidelity. The results of ADGE microarray were less variable and more reproducible than those of regular microarray. A gene expression profile generated with ADGE microarray characterized the drug resistant phenotype, particularly with reference to glutathione, proliferation and kinase pathways. Conclusion ADGE microarray magnified the ratios of differential gene expression in a power function, improved the detection sensitivity and fidelity and reduced the requirement for starting material while maintaining high throughput. ADGE microarray generated a more informative expression pattern than regular microarray.

  17. DNA-Mediated Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2B

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    Julia Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene for dysferlin cause a degenerative disorder of skeletal muscle known as limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B. To achieve gene delivery of plasmids encoding dysferlin to hind limb muscles of dysferlin knockout mice, we used a vascular injection method that perfused naked plasmid DNA into all major muscle groups of the hind limb. We monitored delivery by luciferase live imaging and western blot, confirming strong dysferlin expression that persisted over the 3-month time course of the experiment. Co-delivery of the follistatin gene, which may promote muscle growth, was monitored by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry documented the presence of dysferlin in muscle fibers in treated limbs, and PCR confirmed the presence of plasmid DNA. Because dysferlin is involved in repair of the sarcolemmal membrane, dysferlin loss leads to fragile sarcolemmal membranes that can be detected by permeability to Evan’s blue dye. We showed that after gene therapy with a plasmid encoding both dysferlin and follistatin, statistically significant reduction in Evan’s blue dye permeability was present in hamstring muscles. These results suggest that vascular delivery of plasmids carrying these therapeutic genes may lead to simple and effective approaches for improving the clinical condition of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B.

  18. Discovery of Phytophthora infestans Genes Expressed in Planta through Mining of cDNA Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Diego; Pinzón, Andrés; Grajales, Alejandro; Rojas, Alejandro; Mutis, Gabriel; Cárdenas, Martha; Burbano, Daniel; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana; Restrepo, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary causes late blight of potato and tomato, and has a broad host range within the Solanaceae family. Most studies of the Phytophthora – Solanum pathosystem have focused on gene expression in the host and have not analyzed pathogen gene expression in planta. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe in detail an in silico approach to mine ESTs from inoculated host plants deposited in a database in order to identify particular pathogen sequences associated with disease. We identified candidate effector genes through mining of 22,795 ESTs corresponding to P. infestans cDNA libraries in compatible and incompatible interactions with hosts from the Solanaceae family. Conclusions/Significance We annotated genes of P. infestans expressed in planta associated with late blight using different approaches and assigned putative functions to 373 out of the 501 sequences found in the P. infestans genome draft, including putative secreted proteins, domains associated with pathogenicity and poorly characterized proteins ideal for further experimental studies. Our study provides a methodology for analyzing cDNA libraries and provides an understanding of the plant – oomycete pathosystems that is independent of the host, condition, or type of sample by identifying genes of the pathogen expressed in planta. PMID:20352100

  19. Discovery of Phytophthora infestans genes expressed in planta through mining of cDNA libraries.

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    Roberto Sierra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary causes late blight of potato and tomato, and has a broad host range within the Solanaceae family. Most studies of the Phytophthora--Solanum pathosystem have focused on gene expression in the host and have not analyzed pathogen gene expression in planta. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe in detail an in silico approach to mine ESTs from inoculated host plants deposited in a database in order to identify particular pathogen sequences associated with disease. We identified candidate effector genes through mining of 22,795 ESTs corresponding to P. infestans cDNA libraries in compatible and incompatible interactions with hosts from the Solanaceae family. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We annotated genes of P. infestans expressed in planta associated with late blight using different approaches and assigned putative functions to 373 out of the 501 sequences found in the P. infestans genome draft, including putative secreted proteins, domains associated with pathogenicity and poorly characterized proteins ideal for further experimental studies. Our study provides a methodology for analyzing cDNA libraries and provides an understanding of the plant--oomycete pathosystems that is independent of the host, condition, or type of sample by identifying genes of the pathogen expressed in planta.

  20. Transcription and RNA processing during expression of genes preceding DNA ligase gene 30 in T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truncaite, Lidija; Zajanckauskaite, Aurelija; Arlauskas, Aivaras; Nivinskas, Rimas

    2006-01-20

    Early gene expression in bacteriophage T4 is controlled primarily by the unique early promoters, while T4-encoded RegB endoribonuclease promotes degradation of many early messages contributing to the rapid shift of gene expression from the early to middle stages. The regulatory region for the genes clustered upstream of DNA ligase gene 30 of T4 was known to carry two strong early promoters and two putative RegB sites. Here, we present the comparative analysis of the regulatory events in this region of 16 T4-type bacteriophages. The regulatory elements for control of this gene cluster, such as rho-independent terminator, at least one early promoter, the sequence for stem-loop structure, and the RegB cleavage sites have been found to be conserved in the phages studied. Also, we present experimental evidence that the initial cleavage by RegB of phages TuIa and RB69 enables degradation of early phage mRNAs by the major Escherichia coli endoribonuclease, RNase E.

  1. Early maternal alcohol consumption alters hippocampal DNA methylation, gene expression and volume in a mouse model.

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    Heidi Marjonen

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy are known, but the molecular events that lead to the phenotypic characteristics are unclear. To unravel the molecular mechanisms, we have used a mouse model of gestational ethanol exposure, which is based on maternal ad libitum ingestion of 10% (v/v ethanol for the first 8 days of gestation (GD 0.5-8.5. Early neurulation takes place by the end of this period, which is equivalent to the developmental stage early in the fourth week post-fertilization in human. During this exposure period, dynamic epigenetic reprogramming takes place and the embryo is vulnerable to the effects of environmental factors. Thus, we hypothesize that early ethanol exposure disrupts the epigenetic reprogramming of the embryo, which leads to alterations in gene regulation and life-long changes in brain structure and function. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression in the mouse hippocampus revealed altered expression of 23 genes and three miRNAs in ethanol-exposed, adolescent offspring at postnatal day (P 28. We confirmed this result by using two other tissues, where three candidate genes are known to express actively. Interestingly, we found a similar trend of upregulated gene expression in bone marrow and main olfactory epithelium. In addition, we observed altered DNA methylation in the CpG islands upstream of the candidate genes in the hippocampus. Our MRI study revealed asymmetry of brain structures in ethanol-exposed adult offspring (P60: we detected ethanol-induced enlargement of the left hippocampus and decreased volume of the left olfactory bulb. Our study indicates that ethanol exposure in early gestation can cause changes in DNA methylation, gene expression, and brain structure of offspring. Furthermore, the results support our hypothesis of early epigenetic origin of alcohol-induced disorders: changes in gene regulation may have already taken place in embryonic stem cells and therefore can be seen in

  2. Cloning of the DNA repair gene, uvsF, by transformation of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, K; Käfer, E

    1990-06-01

    As a first step in the cloning of the DNA repair gene uvsF of Aspergillus nidulans, uvsF pyrG double mutant strains were transformed with a genomic library which carried the complementing Neurospora pyr-4 gene in the vector. Rare pyr+ uvs+ cotransformants were obtained on media lacking pyrimidines, overlayed with MMS (methyl-methane sulfonate) to which uvsF is hypersensitive. Among MMS-resistant transformants, Southerns revealed two types which showed single bands of different sizes when BglII-digested genomic DNA was probed with the vector. Both types produced uvsF- recombinants without vector sequences in homozygous crosses, but only those with the larger band also produced haploid uvs+ progeny. Using BglII-digested genomic DNA to transform Escherichia coli, plasmids of the corresponding two sizes could be rescued. Their inserts had a short internal region in common, giving evidence of rearrangement(s). In secondary transformation of uvsF mutants, only the plasmids with the larger insert showed complementation and these were used to screen Aspergillus libraries. Three types of genomic and two overlapping cDNA clones were identified. The cDNAs hybridized not only to each other, but also to the common region of the rescued plasmids. Therefore, cDNA subclones were used to map the putative uvsF sequences to a short segment in one genomic clone. In Northerns, the complementing large plasmid hybridized to three mRNAs, while the cDNA subclone identified one of these as the probable uvsF message.

  3. [Construction of the female subtractive cDNA library and screening of the specific expressing genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-hai; Peng, Hong-juan; Chen, Xiao-guang; Shen, Shu-man

    2006-02-28

    To screen the Schistosoma japonicum female specific expressing genes. S. japonicum adult worms were collected from the rabbits' vein after six-week infection by affusing method. The adult worms were stabilized by RNA-later liquid, the male and female worms were carefully separated with nipper. The high quality total RNA was extracted and mRNA was obtained after purification. Double stranded cDNAs were synthesized after reverse transcription. Female subtractive (female as tester, male as driver) and male subtractive (male as tester, female as driver) cDNA libraries were constructed. The differentially expressed genes were further screened by dot-blot hybridization. The clones were selected and sequenced, which showed apparently higher signals when hybridizing with the female subtracting male probes, than those signals when hybridizing with the male subtracting female probes. The homology of these sequences was searched with BLAST program. The semi-quantitative PCR was applied to test the differential gene expression in female and male adult worms. Female subtracting male and male subtracting female cDNA libraries were constructed with SSH technique. After dot-blot hybridization, 50 clones were tested to be the potential female differentially expressed genes and were sequenced. 42 expressing sequence tags (ESTs) were received. After bioinformatics analysis, 17 fragments (about 40.5%) showed high identity with the S. japonicum egg-shell protein genes, 17 sequences (about 40.5%) were highly homologous to unknown S. japonicum genes and partly homologous to female specific 800 protein. 8 fragments (about 19.0%) showed high identity with other S. japonicum unknown genes. The fragments in clones of 577, 579, 668, 695, 720, and 708 were tested by RT-PCR to be the differentially expressed genes in female adult worms using S. japonicum actin gene as the internal standard. These fragments were highly homologous to S. japonicum egg shell protein gene AY222885, AY222895, AB

  4. DENV gene of bacteriophage T4 codes for both pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase and apyrimidinic endonuclease activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, S.; Edenberg, H.J.; Radany, E.H.; Friedberg, R.C.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that purified preparations of phage T4 UV DNA-incising activity (T4 UV endonuclease or endonuclease V of phase T4) contain a pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase activity that catalyzes hydrolysis of the 5' glycosyl bond of dimerized pyrimidines in UV-irradiated DNA. Such enzyme preparations have also been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds in UV-irradiated DNA at a neutral pH, presumably reflecting the action of an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease at the apyrimidinic sites created by the pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase. In this study we found that preparations of T4 UV DNA-incising activity contained apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity that nicked depurinated form I simian virus 40 DNA. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity was also found in extracts of Escherichia coli infected with T4 denV + phage. Extracts of cells infected with T4 denV mutants contained significantly lower levels of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity; these levels were no greater than the levels present in extracts of uninfected cells. Furthermore, the addition of DNA containing UV-irradiated DNA and T4 enzyme resulted in competition for pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase activity against the UV-irradiated DNA. On the basis of these results, we concluded that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity is encoded by the denV gene of phage T4, the same gene that codes for pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase activity

  5. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  6. Detection of Balamuthia mandrillaris DNA by real-time PCR targeting the RNase P gene

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    Lewin Astrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The free-living amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris may cause fatal encephalitis both in immunocompromised and in – apparently – immunocompetent humans and other mammalian species. Rapid, specific, sensitive, and reliable detection requiring little pathogen-specific expertise is an absolute prerequisite for a successful therapy and a welcome tool for both experimental and epidemiological research. Results A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan® probes (real-time PCR was established specifically targeting the RNase P gene of B. mandrillaris amoebae. The assay detected at least 2 (down to 0.5 genomes of B. mandrillaris grown in axenic culture. It did not react with DNA from closely related Acanthamoeba (3 species, nor with DNA from Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania major, Pneumocystis murina, Mycobacterium bovis (BCG, human brain, various mouse organs, or from human and murine cell lines. The assay efficiently detected B. mandrillaris DNA in spiked cell cultures, spiked murine organ homogenates, B. mandrillaris-infected mice, and CNS tissue-DNA preparations from 2 patients with proven cerebral balamuthiasis. This novel primer set was successfully combined with a published set that targets the B. mandrillaris 18S rRNA gene in a duplex real-time PCR assay to ensure maximum specificity and as a precaution against false negative results. Conclusion A real-time PCR assay for B. mandrillaris amoebae is presented, that is highly specific, sensitive, and reliable and thus suited both for diagnosis and for research.

  7. Melting profiles may affect detection of residual HPV L1 gene DNA fragments in Gardasil®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2014-03-01

    Gardasil® is a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) protein-based vaccine containing genotype-specific L1 capsid proteins of HPV-16, HPV-18, HPV-6 and HPV-11 in the form of virus-like-particles (VLPs) as the active ingredient. The VLPs are produced by a DNA recombinant technology. It is uncertain if the residual HPV L1 gene DNA fragments in the vaccine products are considered contaminants or excipients of the Gardasil® vaccine. Because naked viral DNA fragments, if present in the vaccine, may bind to the insoluble amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate (AAHS) adjuvant which may help deliver the foreign DNA into macrophages, causing unintended pathophysiologic effects, experiments were undertaken to develop tests for HPV L1 gene DNA fragments in the final products of Gardasil® by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct DNA sequencing. The results showed that while the HPV-11 and HPV-18 L1 gene DNA fragments in Gardasil® were readily amplified by the common GP6/MY11 degenerate consensus primers, the HPV-16 L1 gene DNA may need specially designed non-degenerate PCR primers for amplification at different regions of the L1 gene and different stringency conditions for detection. These variable melting profiles of HPV DNA in the insoluble fraction of the Gardasil® vaccine suggest that the HPV DNA fragments are firmly bound to the aluminum AAHS adjuvant. All methods developed for detecting residual HPV DNA in the vaccine Gardasil® for quality assurance must take into consideration the variable melting profiles of the DNA to avoid false negative results.

  8. A data mining approach for classifying DNA repair genes into ageing-related or non-ageing-related

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    Vasieva Olga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ageing of the worldwide population means there is a growing need for research on the biology of ageing. DNA damage is likely a key contributor to the ageing process and elucidating the role of different DNA repair systems in ageing is of great interest. In this paper we propose a data mining approach, based on classification methods (decision trees and Naive Bayes, for analysing data about human DNA repair genes. The goal is to build classification models that allow us to discriminate between ageing-related and non-ageing-related DNA repair genes, in order to better understand their different properties. Results The main patterns discovered by the classification methods are as follows: (a the number of protein-protein interactions was a predictor of DNA repair proteins being ageing-related; (b the use of predictor attributes based on protein-protein interactions considerably increased predictive accuracy of attributes based on Gene Ontology (GO annotations; (c GO terms related to "response to stimulus" seem reasonably good predictors of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; (d interaction with the XRCC5 (Ku80 protein is a strong predictor of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; and (e DNA repair genes with a high expression in T lymphocytes are more likely to be ageing-related. Conclusions The above patterns are broadly integrated in an analysis discussing relations between Ku, the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway, ageing and lymphocyte development. These patterns and their analysis support non-homologous end joining double strand break repair as central to the ageing-relatedness of DNA repair genes. Our work also showcases the use of protein interaction partners to improve accuracy in data mining methods and our approach could be applied to other ageing-related pathways.

  9. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragoszewski, Piotr; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Bartnik, Ewa; Rachinger, Andrea; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. We sequenced a 1320-base-pair DNA fragment of the mitochondrial genome (position 16,000-750) in 54 cancer samples and in 44 corresponding germline control samples. In addition, six transcripts (MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CYB, MT-ND1, MT-ND6, and MT-RNR1) were quantified in 62 cancer tissues by real-time RT-PCR. Somatic mutations in the D-loop sequence were found in 57% of ovarian cancers. Univariate analysis showed no association between mitochondrial DNA mutation status or mitochondrial gene expression and any of the examined clinicopathologic parameters. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the expression of the mitochondrial gene RNR1 might be used as a predictor of tumour sensitivity to chemotherapy. In contrast to many previously published papers, our study indicates rather limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial molecular analyses in ovarian carcinomas. These discrepancies in the clinical utility of mitochondrial molecular tests in ovarian cancer require additional large, well-designed validation studies

  10. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

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    Rachinger Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. Methods We sequenced a 1320-base-pair DNA fragment of the mitochondrial genome (position 16,000-750 in 54 cancer samples and in 44 corresponding germline control samples. In addition, six transcripts (MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CYB, MT-ND1, MT-ND6, and MT-RNR1 were quantified in 62 cancer tissues by real-time RT-PCR. Results Somatic mutations in the D-loop sequence were found in 57% of ovarian cancers. Univariate analysis showed no association between mitochondrial DNA mutation status or mitochondrial gene expression and any of the examined clinicopathologic parameters. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the expression of the mitochondrial gene RNR1 might be used as a predictor of tumour sensitivity to chemotherapy. Conclusion In contrast to many previously published papers, our study indicates rather limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial molecular analyses in ovarian carcinomas. These discrepancies in the clinical utility of mitochondrial molecular tests in ovarian cancer require additional large, well-designed validation studies.

  11. DNA inversion within the apolipoproteins AI/CIII/AIV-encoding gene cluster of certain patients with premature atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karathanasis, S.K.; Ferris, E.; Haddad, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    The genes coding for apolipoproteins (apo) AI, CIII, and AIV, designated APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4, respectively, are closely linked and tandemly organized in the long arm of the human chromosome 11. A DNA rearrangement involving the genes encoding apoAI and apoCIII in certain patients with premature atherosclerosis has been associated with deficiency of both apoAI and apoCIII in the plasma of these patients. Structural characterization of the genes for apoAI and apoCIII in one of these patients indicates that this rearrangement consists of a DNA inversion containing portions of the 3' ends of the apoAI and apoCIII genes, including the DNA region between these genes. The breakpoints of this DNA inversion are located within the fourth exon of the apoAI gene and the first intron of the apoCIII gene. Thus, this DNA inversion results in reciprocal fusion of the apoAI and apoCIII gene transcriptional units. Expression of these gene fusions in cultured mammalian cells results in stable mRNA transcripts with sequences representing fusions of the apoAI and apoCIII mRNAs. These results indicate that absence of transcripts with correct apoAI and apoCIII mRNA sequences causes apoAI and apoCIII deficiency in the plasma of these patients and suggest that these apolipoproteins are involved in cholesterol homeostasis and protection against premature atherosclerosis

  12. Multiple and variable NHEJ-like genes are involved in resistance to DNA damage in Streptomyces ambofaciens

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    Grégory Hoff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non homologous end-joining (NHEJ is a double strand break (DSB repair pathway which does not require any homologous template and can ligate two DNA ends together. The basic bacterial NHEJ machinery involves two partners: the Ku protein, a DNA end binding protein for DSB recognition and the multifunctional LigD protein composed a ligase, a nuclease and a polymerase domain, for end processing and ligation of the broken ends. In silico analyses performed in the 38 sequenced genomes of Streptomyces species revealed the existence of a large panel of NHEJ-like genes. Indeed, ku genes or ligD domain homologues are scattered throughout the genome in multiple copies and can be distinguished in two categories: the core NHEJ gene set constituted of conserved loci and the variable NHEJ gene set constituted of NHEJ-like genes present in only a part of the species. In Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, not only the deletion of core genes but also that of variable genes led to an increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by electron beam irradiation. Multiple mutants of ku, ligase or polymerase encoding genes showed an aggravated phenotype compared to single mutants. Biochemical assays revealed the ability of Ku-like proteins to protect and to stimulate ligation of DNA ends. RT-qPCR and GFP fusion experiments suggested that ku-like genes show a growth phase dependent expression profile consistent with their involvement in DNA repair during spores formation and/or germination.

  13. Exogenous DNA Loading into Extracellular Vesicles via Electroporation is Size-Dependent and Enables Limited Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Tek N; Raiker, Rahul S; Jay, Steven M

    2015-10-05

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) hold immense promise for utilization as biotherapeutics and drug delivery vehicles due to their nature as biological nanoparticles that facilitate intercellular molecular transport. Specifically, EVs have been identified as natural carriers of nucleic acids, sparking interest in their use for gene therapy and RNA interference applications. So far, small RNAs (siRNA and miRNA) have been successfully loaded into EVs for a variety of delivery applications, but the potential use of EVs for DNA delivery has scarcely been explored. Here, we report that exogenous linear DNA can be associated with EVs via electroporation in quantities sufficient to yield an average of hundreds of DNA molecules per vesicle. We determined that loading efficiency and capacity of DNA in EVs is dependent on DNA size, with linear DNA molecules less than 1000 bp in length being more efficiently associated with EVs compared to larger linear DNAs and plasmid DNAs using this approach. We further showed that EV size is also determinant with regard to DNA loading, as larger microvesicles encapsulated more linear and plasmid DNA than smaller, exosome-like EVs. Additionally, we confirmed the ability of EVs to transfer foreign DNA loaded via electroporation into recipient cells, although functional gene delivery was not observed. These results establish critical parameters that inform the potential use of EVs for gene therapy and, in agreement with other recent results, suggest that substantial barriers must be overcome to establish EVs as broadly applicable DNA delivery vehicles.

  14. The detection of HBV DNA with gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle gene probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Dong; Luo Xiaoping; Lu Qianghua; Yao Kailun; Liu Zuli; Ning Qin

    2008-01-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by the citrate reduction of tetra-chloroauric acid in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles which were added as seeds. With a fluorescence-based method, the maximal surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotides and the maximal percentage of hybridization strands on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were (120 ± 8) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and (14 ± 2%), respectively, which were comparable with those of (132 ± 10) and (22 ± 3%) in Au nanoparticle groups. Large network aggregates were formed when gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probe was applied to detect HBV DNA molecules as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and the high specificity was verified by blot hybridization. Our results further suggested that detecting DNA with iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic separator was feasible and might be an alternative effective method

  15. DNA methylation of the oxytocin receptor gene predicts neural response to ambiguous social stimuli

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    Allison eJack

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin and its receptor (OXTR play an important role in a variety of social perceptual and affiliative processes. Individual variability in social information processing likely has a strong heritable component, and as such, many investigations have established an association between common genetic variants of OXTR and variability in the social phenotype. However, to date, these investigations have primarily focused only on changes in the sequence of DNA without considering the role of epigenetic factors. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism by which cells control transcription through modification of chromatin structure. DNA methylation of OXTR decreases expression of the gene and high levels of methylation have been associated with autism spectrum disorders. This link between epigenetic variability and social phenotype allows for the possibility that social processes are under epigenetic control. We hypothesized that the level of DNA methylation of OXTR would predict individual variability in social perception. Using the brain’s sensitivity to displays of animacy as a neural endophenotype of social perception, we found significant associations between the degree of OXTR methylation and brain activity evoked by the perception of animacy. Our results suggest that consideration of DNA methylation may substantially improve our ability to explain individual differences in imaging genetic association studies.

  16. Efficacy of a DNA vaccine carrying Eimeria maxima Gam56 antigen gene against coccidiosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yan; Tao, Jianping

    2013-04-01

    To control coccidiosis without using prophylactic medications, a DNA vaccine targeting the gametophyte antigen Gam56 from Eimeria maxima in chickens was constructed, and the immunogenicity and protective effects were evaluated. The ORF of Gam56 gene was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(zeo)+. Expression of Gam56 protein in COS-7 cells transfected with recombinant plasmid pcDNA-Gam56 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The DNA vaccine was injected intramuscularly to yellow feathered broilers of 1-week old at 3 dosages (25, 50, and 100 µg/chick). Injection was repeated once 1 week later. One week after the second injection, birds were challenged orally with 5×10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. maxima, then weighed and killed at day 8 post challenge. Blood samples were collected and examined for specific peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation activity and serum antibody levels. Compared with control groups, the administration of pcDNA-Gam56 vaccine markedly increased the lymphocyte proliferation activity (Pcoccidiosis control.

  17. Discovery and validation of an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (INPROGAS) using antibody microarray-based oncoproteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Costa, Manuel; Codina-Cazador, Antonio; Cortés-Pastoret, Elisabet; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Flaquer, Sílvia; Llopis-Puigmarti, Francesca; Pujol-Amado, Eulalia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Ortiz, Rosa; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Queralt, Bernardo; Guardeño, Raquel; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Roig, Josep; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to improve gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis by identifying and validating an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (hereafter INPROGAS) using low-cost affinity proteomics. The detection of 120 cytokines, 43 angiogenic factors, 41 growth factors, 40 inflammatory factors and 10 metalloproteinases was performed using commercially available human antibody microarray-based arrays. We identified 21 inflammation-related proteins (INPROGAS) with significant differences in expression between GC tissues and normal gastric mucosa in a discovery cohort of matched pairs (n=10) of tumor/normal gastric tissues. Ingenuity pathway analysis confirmed the “inflammatory response”, “cellular movement” and “immune cell trafficking” as the most overrepresented biofunctions within INPROGAS. Using an expanded independent validation cohort (n = 22), INPROGAS classified gastric samples as “GC” or “non-GC” with a sensitivity of 82% (95% CI 59-94) and a specificity of 73% (95% CI 49-89). The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. Antibody microarray analyses of the GC-associated inflammatory proteome identified a 21-protein INPROGAS that accurately discriminated GC from noncancerous gastric mucosa. PMID:24722433

  18. Angelman Syndrome due to familial translocation: unexpected additional results characterized by Microarray-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama-Rebollar, Emiy; Ruiz-Herrera, Adriana; Lieberman-Hernández, Esther; Del Castillo-Ruiz, Victoria; Sánchez-Sandoval, Silvia; Ávila-Flores, Silvia M; Castrillo, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The 15q11q13 region is subject to imprinting and is involved in various structural rearrangements. Less than 1% of Angelman Syndrome patients are due to translocations involving 15q11q13. These translocations can arise de novo or result from the segregation of chromosomes involved in a familial balanced translocation. A 5-year-old Mexican girl presented with developmental delay, minor dysmorphic features and history of exotropia. G-banding chromosome analysis established the diagnosis of Angelman Syndrome resulting from a familial translocation t(10;15) involving the 15q11.2 region. The available family members were studied using banding and molecular cytogenetic techniques, including Microarray-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization, which revealed additional unexpected results: a coincidental and smaller 15q deletion, asymptomatic duplications in 15q11.2 and Xp22.31 regions. This report demonstrates the usefulness of array CGH for a detailed characterization of familial translocations, including the detection of submicroscopic copy number variations, which would otherwise be missed by karyotype analysis alone. Our report also expands two molecularly characterized rare patient cohorts: Angelman Syndrome patients due to familial translocations and patients with 15q11.2 duplications of paternal origin.

  19. Mutations in the SPG7 gene cause chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia through disordered mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Gorman, Gráinne S; Griffin, Helen; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Blakely, Emma L; Wilson, Ian; Sitarz, Kamil; Moore, David; Murphy, Julie L; Alston, Charlotte L; Pyle, Angela; Coxhead, Jon; Payne, Brendan; Gorrie, George H; Longman, Cheryl; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; McConville, John; Dick, David; Imam, Ibrahim; Hilton, David; Norwood, Fiona; Baker, Mark R; Jaiser, Stephan R; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Farrell, Michael; McCarthy, Allan; Lynch, Timothy; McFarland, Robert; Schaefer, Andrew M; Turnbull, Douglass M; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-05-01

    Despite being a canonical presenting feature of mitochondrial disease, the genetic basis of progressive external ophthalmoplegia remains unknown in a large proportion of patients. Here we show that mutations in SPG7 are a novel cause of progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions. After excluding known causes, whole exome sequencing, targeted Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis were used to study 68 adult patients with progressive external ophthalmoplegia either with or without multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. Nine patients (eight probands) were found to carry compound heterozygous SPG7 mutations, including three novel mutations: two missense mutations c.2221G>A; p.(Glu741Lys), c.2224G>A; p.(Asp742Asn), a truncating mutation c.861dupT; p.Asn288*, and seven previously reported mutations. We identified a further six patients with single heterozygous mutations in SPG7, including two further novel mutations: c.184-3C>T (predicted to remove a splice site before exon 2) and c.1067C>T; p.(Thr356Met). The clinical phenotype typically developed in mid-adult life with either progressive external ophthalmoplegia/ptosis and spastic ataxia, or a progressive ataxic disorder. Dysphagia and proximal myopathy were common, but urinary symptoms were rare, despite the spasticity. Functional studies included transcript analysis, proteomics, mitochondrial network analysis, single fibre mitochondrial DNA analysis and deep re-sequencing of mitochondrial DNA. SPG7 mutations caused increased mitochondrial biogenesis in patient muscle, and mitochondrial fusion in patient fibroblasts associated with the clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations. In conclusion, the SPG7 gene should be screened in patients in whom a disorder of mitochondrial DNA maintenance is suspected when spastic ataxia is prominent. The complex neurological phenotype is likely a result of the clonal

  20. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  1. Paradoxical DNA repair and peroxide resistance gene conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032.

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    Jason Gioia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, gamma-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes.

  2. Gene expression of panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells using radioactive cDNA microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Joong Youn; Yu, Su Jin; Soh, Jeong Won; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2001-01-01

    Polyacetylenic alcohols derived from Panax ginseng have been studied to be an anticancer reagent previously. One of the Panax ginseng polyacetylenic alcohols, i.e., panaxydol, has been studied to possess an antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-1). In ths study, radioactive cDNA microarrays enabled an efficient approach to analyze the pattern of gene expression (3.194 genes in a total) simultaneously. The bioinformatics selection of human cDNAs, which is specifically designed for immunology, apoptosis and signal transduction, were arrayed on nylon membranes. Using with 33 P labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles of our interest including apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell cycle, and signal transduction. Gene expression profiles were also classified into several categories in accordance with the duration of panaxydol treatment. Consequently, the gene profiles of our interest were significantly up (199 genes, > 2.0 of Z-ratio) or down-(196 genes, < 2.0 of Z-ratio) regulated in panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells

  3. Analysis of Canis mitochondrial DNA demonstrates high concordance between the control region and ATPase genes

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    White Bradley N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic studies of wild Canis species have relied heavily on the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR to infer species relationships and evolutionary lineages. Previous analyses of the CR provided evidence for a North American evolved eastern wolf (C. lycaon, that is more closely related to red wolves (C. rufus and coyotes (C. latrans than grey wolves (C. lupus. Eastern wolf origins, however, continue to be questioned. Therefore, we analyzed mtDNA from 89 wolves and coyotes across North America and Eurasia at 347 base pairs (bp of the CR and 1067 bp that included the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes. Phylogenies and divergence estimates were used to clarify the evolutionary history of eastern wolves, and regional comparisons of nonsynonomous to synonomous substitutions (dN/dS at the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes were used to elucidate the potential role of selection in shaping mtDNA geographic distribution. Results We found high concordance across analyses between the mtDNA regions studied. Both had a high percentage of variable sites (CR = 14.6%; ATP = 9.7% and both phylogenies clustered eastern wolf haplotypes monophyletically within a North American evolved lineage apart from coyotes. Divergence estimates suggest the putative red wolf sequence is more closely related to coyotes (DxyCR = 0.01982 ± 0.00494 SD; DxyATP = 0.00332 ± 0.00097 SD than the eastern wolf sequences (DxyCR = 0.03047 ± 0.00664 SD; DxyATP = 0.00931 ± 0.00205 SD. Neutrality tests on both genes were indicative of the population expansion of coyotes across eastern North America, and dN/dS ratios suggest a possible role for purifying selection in the evolution of North American lineages. dN/dS ratios were higher in European evolved lineages from northern climates compared to North American evolved lineages from temperate regions, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions These results demonstrate high concordance between coding

  4. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  5. Inhibition of SIRT1 reactivates silenced cancer genes without loss of promoter DNA hypermethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Pruitt

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The class III histone deactylase (HDAC, SIRT1, has cancer relevance because it regulates lifespan in multiple organisms, down-regulates p53 function through deacetylation, and is linked to polycomb gene silencing in Drosophila. However, it has not been reported to mediate heterochromatin formation or heritable silencing for endogenous mammalian genes. Herein, we show that SIRT1 localizes to promoters of several aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs in which 5' CpG islands are densely hypermethylated, but not to these same promoters in cell lines in which the promoters are not hypermethylated and the genes are expressed. Heretofore, only type I and II HDACs, through deactylation of lysines 9 and 14 of histone H3 (H3-K9 and H3-K14, respectively, had been tied to the above TSG silencing. However, inhibition of these enzymes alone fails to re-activate the genes unless DNA methylation is first inhibited. In contrast, inhibition of SIRT1 by pharmacologic, dominant negative, and siRNA (small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition in breast and colon cancer cells causes increased H4-K16 and H3-K9 acetylation at endogenous promoters and gene re-expression despite full retention of promoter DNA hypermethylation. Furthermore, SIRT1 inhibition affects key phenotypic aspects of cancer cells. We thus have identified a new component of epigenetic TSG silencing that may potentially link some epigenetic changes associated with aging with those found in cancer, and provide new directions for therapeutically targeting these important genes for re-expression.

  6. Maternal diet during pregnancy induces gene expression and DNA methylation changes in fetal tissues in sheep

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    Xianyong eLan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies in rats and mice have established that maternal nutrition induces epigenetic modifications, sometimes permanently, that alter gene expression in the fetus, which in turn leads to phenotypic changes. However, limited data is available on the influence of maternal diet on epigenetic modifications and gene expression in sheep. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the impact of different maternal dietary energy sources on the expression of imprinted genes in fetuses in sheep. Ewes were naturally bred to a single sire and from d 67 ± 3 of gestation until necropsy (d 130 ± 1, they were fed one of three diets of alfalfa haylage (HY; fiber, corn (CN; starch, or dried corn distiller’s grains (DG; fiber plus protein plus fat. A total of 26 fetuses were removed from the dams and longissimus dorsi, semitendinosus, perirenal adipose depot, and subcutaneous adipose depot tissues were collected for expression and DNA methylation analyses. Expression analysis of nine imprinted genes and three DNA methylatransferase (DNMTs genes showed significant effects of the different maternal diets on the expression of these genes. The methylation levels of CpG islands of both IGF2R and H19 were higher in HY and DG than CN fetuses in both males and females. This result is consistent with the low amino acid content of the CN diet, a source of methyl group donors, compared to HY and DG diets. Thus, results of this study provide evidence of association between maternal nutrition during pregnancy and transcriptomic and epigenomic alterations of imprinted genes and DNMTs in the fetal tissues.

  7. Eliciting specific humoral immunity from a plasmid DNA encoding infectious bursal disease virus polyprotein gene fused with avian influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccine coding for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) polyprotein gene and that for avian influenza virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA) gene have been shown to induce immunity and provide protection against the respective disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether an IBDV polyprotein gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene could trigger immune response to both IBDV and AIV. After transfection, VP2 and HA were detected in the cytoplasm and at cell membrane, respectively, by immunofluorescent antibody double staining method, suggesting the fusion strategy did not affect the location of protein expression. VP4 cleavage between VP2 and HA was confirmed by Western blot, indicating the fusion strategy did not affect VP4 function in transfected cells. After vaccination in chickens, the DNA construct VP24-HA/pcDNA induced ELISA and virus neutralizing antibodies against VP2 and hemagglutination inhibition antibody against the HA subtype. The results indicated that a single plasmid construct carrying IBDV VP243 gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene can elicit specific antibody responses to both IBDV and AIV by DNA vaccination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple markers for melanoma progression regulated by DNA methylation: insights from transcriptomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, William M; Bergin, Orla E; Rafferty, Mairin; Kelly, Zoë D; Nolan, Ilse-Maria; Fox, Edward J P; Culhane, Aedin C; McArdle, Linda; Fraga, Mario F; Hughes, Linda; Currid, Caroline A; O'Mahony, Fiona; Byrne, Aileen; Murphy, Alison A; Moss, Catherine; McDonnell, Susan; Stallings, Raymond L; Plumb, Jane A; Esteller, Manel; Brown, Robert; Dervan, Peter A; Easty, David J

    2005-11-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing rapidly, with advanced lesions generally failing to respond to conventional chemotherapy. Here, we utilized DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling techniques to identify molecular determinants of melanoma progression within a unique panel of isogenic human melanoma cell lines. When a poorly tumorigenic cell line, derived from an early melanoma, was compared with two increasingly aggressive derivative cell lines, the expression of 66 genes was significantly changed. A similar pattern of differential gene expression was found with an independently derived metastatic cell line. We further examined these melanoma progression-associated genes via use of a tailored TaqMan Low Density Array (LDA), representing the majority of genes within our cohort of interest. Considerable concordance was seen between the transcriptomic profiles determined by DNA microarray and TaqMan LDA approaches. A range of novel markers were identified that correlated here with melanoma progression. Most notable was TSPY, a Y chromosome-specific gene that displayed extensive down-regulation in expression between the parental and derivative cell lines. Examination of a putative CpG island within the TSPY gene demonstrated that this region was hypermethylated in the derivative cell lines, as well as metastatic melanomas from male patients. Moreover, treatment of the derivative cell lines with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC), restored expression of the TSPY gene to levels comparable with that found in the parental cells. Additional DNA microarray studies uncovered a subset of 13 genes from the above-mentioned 66 gene cohort that displayed re-activation of expression following DAC treatment, including TSPY, CYBA and MT2A. DAC suppressed tumor cell growth in vitro. Moreover, systemic treatment of mice with DAC attenuated growth of melanoma xenografts, with consequent re-expression of TSPY mRNA. Overall, our data support

  9. A novel method of differential gene expression analysis using multiple cDNA libraries applied to the identification of tumour endothelial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, John M J; Stekel, Dov; Sanderson, Sharon; Heath, Victoria L; Bicknell, Roy

    2008-04-07

    In this study, differential gene expression analysis using complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries has been improved. Firstly by the introduction of an accurate method of assigning Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) to genes and secondly, by using a novel likelihood ratio statistical scoring of differential gene expression between two pools of cDNA libraries. These methods were applied to the latest available cell line and bulk tissue cDNA libraries in a two-step screen to predict novel tumour endothelial markers. Initially, endothelial cell lines were in silico subtracted from non-endothelial cell lines to identify endothelial genes. Subsequently, a second bulk tumour versus normal tissue subtraction was employed to predict tumour endothelial markers. From an endothelial cDNA library analysis, 431 genes were significantly up regulated in endothelial cells with a False Discovery Rate adjusted q-value of 0.01 or less and 104 of these were expressed only in endothelial cells. Combining the cDNA library data with the latest Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) library data derived a complete list of 459 genes preferentially expressed in endothelium. 27 genes were predicted tumour endothelial markers in multiple tissues based on the second bulk tissue screen. This approach represents a significant advance on earlier work in its ability to accurately assign an EST to a gene, statistically measure differential expression between two pools of cDNA libraries and predict putative tumour endothelial markers before entering the laboratory. These methods are of value and available http://www.compbio.ox.ac.uk/data/diffex.html to researchers that are interested in the analysis of transcriptomic data.

  10. cDNA sequence of human transforming gene hst and identification of the coding sequence required for transforming activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, M.; Yoshida, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Terada, M.; Sugimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    The hst gene was originally identified as a transforming gene in DNAs from human stomach cancers and from a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa by DNA-mediated transfection assay using NIH3T3 cells. cDNA clones of hst were isolated from the cDNA library constructed from poly(A) + RNA of a secondary transformant induced by the DNA from a stomach cancer. The sequence analysis of the hst cDNA revealed the presence of two open reading frames. When this cDNA was inserted into an expression vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter, it efficiently induced the transformation of NIH3T3 cells upon transfection. It was found that one of the reading frames, which coded for 206 amino acids, was responsible for the transforming activity

  11. Nonviral Gene Targeting at rDNA Locus of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Youjin Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic modification, such as the addition of exogenous genes to the MSC genome, is crucial to their use as cellular vehicles. Due to the risks associated with viral vectors such as insertional mutagenesis, the safer nonviral vectors have drawn a great deal of attention. Methods. VEGF, bFGF, vitamin C, and insulin-transferrin-selenium-X were supplemented in the MSC culture medium. The cells’ proliferation and survival capacity was measured by MTT, determination of the cumulative number of cells, and a colony-forming efficiency assay. The plasmid pHr2-NL was constructed and nucleofected into MSCs. The recombinants were selected using G418 and characterized using PCR and Southern blotting. Results. BFGF is critical to MSC growth and it acted synergistically with vitamin C, VEGF, and ITS-X, causing the cells to expand significantly. The neomycin gene was targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs using a nonviral human ribosomal targeting vector. The recombinant MSCs retained multipotential differentiation capacity, typical levels of hMSC surface marker expression, and a normal karyotype, and none were tumorigenic in nude mice. Conclusions. Exogenous genes can be targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs while maintaining the characteristics of MSCs. This is the first nonviral gene targeting of hMSCs.

  12. Analysis of DNA polymorphism of CAST gene in Local Karnobat and Stara Zagora sheep breeds

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    D. Hristova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Considered calpastatin as a candidate gene for meat and growth traits in sheep production it is important to understand the genetic variability in this locus. The present work was oriented to identification of calpastatin gene polymorphism and analysis of genetic structure of the populations representing two bulgarian sheep breeds – Local Karnobat and Stara Zagora.The material involved 96 sheep of breeds and genomic DNA was isolated by commersial purified kit and used in order to estimate calpastatin genotypes by PCR-RFLP method. The PCR products were digested with MspI restriction enzyme as a result were detected two different genotypes in the observed locus – homozygous MM and heterozygous MN in Stara Zagora sheep population with frequencies 0.937 and 0.063, respectively. M and N allele frequencies were identified with 0.968 and 0.032. The observed heterozygosity in Stara Zagora sheep population was 0.063 and the chi-square test confirmed the existence of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in this population (P>0.05. In the total population of Local Karnobat sheep was detected homozygous MM only. The results presented in this study show polymorphism of the calpastatin gene in the population of Stara Zagora sheep. Therefore,we could be confirm the importance of this gene as a potential DNA marker in marker-assisted selection with respect to meat production.

  13. An accurate DNA marker assay for stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mago, R; Simkova, H; Brown-Guedira, G; Dreisigacker, S; Breen, J; Jin, Y; Singh, R; Appels, R; Lagudah, E S; Ellis, J; Dolezel, J; Spielmeyer, W

    2011-03-01

    The stem rust resistance gene Sr2 has provided broad-spectrum protection against stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici) since its wide spread deployment in wheat from the 1940s. Because Sr2 confers partial resistance which is difficult to select under field conditions, a DNA marker is desirable that accurately predicts Sr2 in diverse wheat germplasm. Using DNA sequence derived from the vicinity of the Sr2 locus, we developed a cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) marker that is associated with the presence or absence of the gene in 115 of 122 (95%) diverse wheat lines. The marker genotype predicted the absence of the gene in 100% of lines which were considered to lack Sr2. Discrepancies were observed in lines that were predicted to carry Sr2 but failed to show the CAPS marker. Given the high level of accuracy observed, the marker provides breeders with a selection tool for one of the most important disease resistance genes of wheat.

  14. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes predispose asbestos-exposed patients to malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Marta; Casalone, Elisabetta; Ferrante, Daniela; Aspesi, Anna; Morleo, Giulia; Biasi, Alessandra; Sculco, Marika; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Righi, Luisella; Grosso, Federica; Libener, Roberta; Pavesi, Mansueto; Mariani, Narciso; Casadio, Caterina; Boldorini, Renzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Pasini, Barbara; Magnani, Corrado; Matullo, Giuseppe; Dianzani, Irma

    2017-10-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive cancer caused by asbestos exposure. An inherited predisposition has been suggested to explain multiple cases in the same family and the observation that not all individuals highly exposed to asbestos develop the tumor. Germline mutations in BAP1 are responsible for a rare cancer predisposition syndrome that includes predisposition to mesothelioma. We hypothesized that other genes involved in hereditary cancer syndromes could be responsible for the inherited mesothelioma predisposition. We investigated the prevalence of germline variants in 94 cancer-predisposing genes in 93 MPM patients with a quantified asbestos exposure. Ten pathogenic truncating variants (PTVs) were identified in PALB2, BRCA1, FANCI, ATM, SLX4, BRCA2, FANCC, FANCF, PMS1 and XPC. All these genes are involved in DNA repair pathways, mostly in homologous recombination repair. Patients carrying PTVs represented 9.7% of the panel and showed lower asbestos exposure than did all the other patients (p = 0.0015). This suggests that they did not efficiently repair the DNA damage induced by asbestos and leading to carcinogenesis. This study shows that germline variants in several genes may increase MPM susceptibility in the presence of asbestos exposure and may be important for specific treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA methylation and gene expression of TXNIP in adult offspring of women with diabetes in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand-Oeregaard, Azadeh; Hjort, Line; Kelstrup, Louise

    2017-01-01

    was reported in subjects with impaired glucose metabolism or T2DM. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and skeletal muscle play a key role in the control of whole body glucose metabolism and insulin action. The extent to which TXNIP DNA methylation levels are decreased and/or gene expression levels increased......BACKGROUND: Fetal exposure to maternal diabetes increases the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), possibly mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Low blood TXNIP DNA methylation has been associated with elevated glucose levels and risk of T2DM, and increased skeletal muscle TXNIP gene expression...... after adjustment for confounders. Neither blood/muscle TXNIP DNA methylation nor muscle gene expression differed between groups. CONCLUSION: We found no evidence of decreased TXNIP DNA methylation or increased gene expression in metabolic target tissues of offspring exposed to maternal diabetes. Further...

  16. An Abundant Class of Non-coding DNA Can Prevent Stochastic Gene Silencing in the C. elegans Germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jain, Nimit; Hansen, Loren

    2016-01-01

    Cells benefit from silencing foreign genetic elements but must simultaneously avoid inactivating endogenous genes. Although chromatin modifications and RNAs contribute to maintenance of silenced states, the establishment of silenced regions will inevitably reflect underlying DNA sequence and/or s...

  17. DNA methyltransferase 3A gene polymorphism contributes to daily life stress susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barliana MI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Melisa I Barliana,1,2 Shintya N Amalya,1 Ivan S Pradipta,3 Sofa D Alfian,3 Arif SW Kusuma,1,2 Tiana Milanda,1,4 Rizky Abdulah3,4 1Department of Biological Pharmacy, Biotechnology Pharmacy Laboratory, 2Pharmacy Services Development Research Center, 3Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Clinical Pharmacy Laboratory, 4Center for Drug Discovery and Product Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, West Java, Indonesia Abstract: Daily life stress markedly affects the response toward stressful stimuli. DNA methy­lation is one of the factors that regulate this response, and is a normal mechanism of somatic cell growth, but its regulatory gene variations may cause alterations in the stress response. The aim of the present study was to investigate genotypic variants of the DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A gene in 129 healthy subjects and evaluate its association with daily life stress. Blood samples were collected, and genomic DNA was isolated. DNA was amplified using specific tetra primers for DNMT3A (C/T rs11683424 and visualized following 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. The association of DNMT3A genetic variants with daily life stress was analyzed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10. We observed that the distribution of subjects with genotype CC (wild type, CT (heteromutant, and TT (homomutant was 13.95%, 81.4%, and 4.65%, respectively. Genetic variations significantly affected the daily life stress condition (p=0.04 in Indonesian healthy subjects, but most of the subjects with the CT phenotype were classified in a stress condition. Keywords: daily life stressor, DNA methylation, epigenetic, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10, rs11683424, DNMT3A

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes and glioma susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zou, Peng; Zhao, Lin; Yan, Wei; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in DNA double-strand break repair genes can influence the ability of a cell to repair damaged DNA and alter an individual’s susceptibility to cancer. We studied whether polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes are associated with an increased risk of glioma development. We genotyped 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes (XRCC3, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in a case–control study including 384 glioma patients and 384 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform. In the single-locus analysis there was a significant association between gliomas and the LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2 +54C>T, Thr9Ile) TT genotype (adjusted OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.87-5.71), as well as the TC genotype (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-2.18). We also found that the homozygous variant genotype (GG) of XRCC4 rs1805377 (IVS7-1A>G, splice-site) was associated with a significantly increased risk of gliomas (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12-2.80). Interestingly, we detected a significant additive and multiplicative interaction effect between the LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377 polymorphisms with an increasing risk of gliomas. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, LIG4 rs1805388 was associated with an increased glioma risk among smokers. These results indicate for the first time that LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377, alone or in combination, are associated with a risk of gliomas

  19. DNA stabilization by the upregulation of estrogen signaling in BRCA gene mutation carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suba Z

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Zsuzsanna Suba Surgical and Molecular Tumor Pathology Centre, National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: Currently available scientific evidence erroneously suggests that mutagenic weakness or loss of the BRCA1/2 genes may liberate the proliferative effects of estrogen signaling, which provokes DNA damage and genomic instability. Conversely, BRCA mutation seems to be an imbalanced defect, crudely inhibiting the upregulation of estrogen receptor expression and liganded transcriptional activity, whereas estrogen receptor-repressor functions become predominant. In BRCA-proficient cases, estrogen signaling orchestrates the activity of cell proliferation and differentiation with high safety, while upregulating the expression and DNA-stabilizing impact of BRCA genes. In turn, BRCA proteins promote estrogen signaling by proper estrogen synthesis via CYP19 gene regulation and by induction of the appropriate expression and transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors. In this exquisitely organized regulatory system, the dysfunction of each player may jeopardize genome stability and lead to severe chronic diseases, such as cancer development. Female organs, such as breast, endometrium, and ovary, exhibiting regular cyclic proliferative activity are particularly vulnerable in case of disturbances in either estrogen signaling or BRCA-mediated DNA repair. BRCA mutation carrier women may apparently be healthy or exhibit clinical signs of deficient estrogen signaling in spite of hyperestrogenism. Even women who enjoy sufficient compensatory DNA-defending activities are at risk of tumor development because many endogenous and environmental factors may jeopardize the mechanisms of extreme compensatory processes. Natural estrogens have numerous benefits in tumor prevention and therapy even in BRCA mutation carriers. There are no toxic effects even in sky-high doses and all physiologic cellular functions are strongly upregulated, while malignant

  20. Cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation exposure of human fibroblasts with knocked-down expressions of various DNA damage signaling genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with up-regulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. Here, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yields of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of some of the selected genes in DSB and other DNA repair pathways. Knocked-down expression of other genes showed significant impact on cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  1. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

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    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  2. [Screening of specifically expressed genes in amphioxus neurula by construction of a subtractive cDNA library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2010-12-01

    To screen specifically expressed genes in the development of nerve, muscle, and body axis of amphioxus, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauenese. A subtractive cDNA library was constructed from the 12-hour amphioxus neurula cDNA after subtractively hybridized with the 6-hour amphioxus gastrula cDNA. The total RNA was extracted from the 12-hour neurula and 6-hour gastrula, then reverse transcribed into cDNA. The 12-hour neurula cDNA was designated as the experimental group (the tester) and the 6-hour gastrula cDNA as the control group (the driver). The differentially expressed sequences were exponentially amplified using suppression PCR. Background was subtracted and differentially expressed sequences were further enriched. The PCR products were ligated to the T Vector. After transformation of the recombinant plasmid carrying inserted amphioxus cDNA into E.coli host cells, the cDNA library was constructed successfully. Two hundred randomly chosen positive clones were sequenced and some of neurula-specifically expressed genes were obtained. SSH is an effective method for searching differentially expressed genes. The subtractive cDNA library we generated provides a tool for further study of regulatory mechanisms of amphioxus early embryonic development.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with and without hypermethylation of the DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, G; Rossi, D; Gaidano, G; Cecchin, E; Boiocchi, M; Carbone, A

    2003-01-01

    C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms have been suggested to affect susceptibility to malignant lymphoma, possibly by altering DNA methylation. The DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is transcriptionally silenced by promoter hypermethylation in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). We analyzed the MTHFR677 and MTHFR1298 genotypes in 111 DLBCL patients and 465 controls. No significant difference in the frequency of MTHFR polymorphisms between patients and controls and no significant association between MTHFR677 or MTHFR1298 genotypes and methylation of MGMT promoter were observed. These results indicate that MTHFR variants are not related to DLBCL development and MGMT hypermethylation.

  4. High-efficiency gene targeting in hexaploid wheat using DNA replicons and CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Humanes, Javier; Wang, Yanpeng; Liang, Zhen; Shan, Qiwei; Ozuna, Carmen V; Sánchez-León, Susana; Baltes, Nicholas J; Starker, Colby; Barro, Francisco; Gao, Caixia; Voytas, Daniel F

    2017-03-01

    The ability to edit plant genomes through gene targeting (GT) requires efficient methods to deliver both sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) and repair templates to plant cells. This is typically achieved using Agrobacterium T-DNA, biolistics or by stably integrating nuclease-encoding cassettes and repair templates into the plant genome. In dicotyledonous plants, such as Nicotinana tabacum (tobacco) and Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), greater than 10-fold enhancements in GT frequencies have been achieved using DNA virus-based replicons. These replicons transiently amplify to high copy numbers in plant cells to deliver abundant SSNs and repair templates to achieve targeted gene modification. In the present work, we developed a replicon-based system for genome engineering of cereal crops using a deconstructed version of the wheat dwarf virus (WDV). In wheat cells, the replicons achieve a 110-fold increase in expression of a reporter gene relative to non-replicating controls. Furthermore, replicons carrying CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases and repair templates achieved GT at an endogenous ubiquitin locus at frequencies 12-fold greater than non-viral delivery methods. The use of a strong promoter to express Cas9 was critical to attain these high GT frequencies. We also demonstrate gene-targeted integration by homologous recombination (HR) in all three of the homoeoalleles (A, B and D) of the hexaploid wheat genome, and we show that with the WDV replicons, multiplexed GT within the same wheat cell can be achieved at frequencies of ~1%. In conclusion, high frequencies of GT using WDV-based DNA replicons will make it possible to edit complex cereal genomes without the need to integrate GT reagents into the genome. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K.; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C.; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells. PMID:26036629

  6. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  7. Cloning, DNA sequence, and expression of Aeromonas caviae WS7b chitinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Amarila; Wenuganen, S; Suwanto, Antonius; Tjahjono, Budi

    2003-01-01

    A chitinase-producing bacterium, designated WS7b, was isolated from a soil sample obtained from a black-pepper plantation on Bangka Island, Indonesia. Fatty-acid methyl-ester analysis indicated that the isolate was Aeromonas caviae. A chitinase gene from WS7b was cloned in a pUC19-based plasmid vector, but without its natural promoter. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined, and the structural gene consisted of a 2748-bp region encoding 864 amino acids. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the gene had been cloned without its promoter, and this was confirmed by chitinase-plate assay of the truncated version of the gene in Escherichia coli. The chitinase gene product showed amino-acid sequence similarity to chiA from A. caviae. Chitinase enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically, using colloidal chitin azure as substrate for extracellular and intracellular fractions. The ability of the chitinase cloned in E. coli to hydrolyze chitin was less than that of the enzyme in its indigenous host.

  8. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  9. Gene expression profile analysis of genes in rat hippocampus from antidepressant treated rats using DNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Minkyu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular and biological mechanisms by which many antidepressants function are based on the monoamine depletion hypothesis. However, the entire cascade of mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants has not yet been elucidated. Results We used a genome-wide microarray system containing 30,000 clones to evaluate total RNA that had been isolated from the brains of treated rats to identify the genes involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of various antidepressants, a tricyclic antidepressant (imipramine. a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (phenelzine and psychoactive herbal extracts of Nelumbinis Semen (NS. To confirm the differential expression of the identified genes, we analyzed the amount of mRNA that was isolated from the hippocampus of rats that had been treated with antidepressants by real-time RT-PCR using primers specific for selected genes of interest. These data demonstrate that antidepressants interfere with the expression of a large array of genes involved in signaling, survival and protein metabolism, suggesting that the therapeutic effect of these antidepressants is very complex. Surprisingly, unlike other antidepressants, we found that the standardized herbal medicine, Nelumbinis Semen, is free of factors that can induce neurodegenerative diseases such as caspase 8, α-synuclein, and amyloid precursor protein. In addition, the production of the inflammatory cytokine, IFNγ, was significantly decreased in rat hippocampus in response to treatment with antidepressants, while the inhibitory cytokine, TGFβ, was significantly enhanced. Conclusions These results suggest that antidepressants function by regulating neurotransmission as well as suppressing immunoreactivity in the central nervous system.

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