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Sample records for dna haemagglutination test

  1. Reiter haemagglutination test: a screening test for syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qudah, A A; Mostratos, A

    1982-01-01

    Using an ultrasonicate of the Reiter treponeme as antigen the Reiter haemagglutination test (RHA) was evaluated as a serological test for syphilis. Comparison of the results of the cardiolipin Wassermann reaction, Reiter protein complement-fixation test, the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed (FTA-ABS) test, the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination test (TPHA) (at dilutions of 1/16 and 1/80), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test with those of the RHA showed that the RHA was...

  2. Factors influencing Haemagglutination Tests with Tetanus Antitoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulthorpe, A. J.

    1959-01-01

    The agglutinin titres of tetanus antitoxins tested with preserved sheep cells sensitized with tetanus toxoid have been found to be inversely proportional to the cell concentration used. The agglutinin titres per international unit of antitoxin were widely different among various electrophoretically separated globulin fractions of tetanus antitoxin. There were smaller differences between the agglutinating capacity of γ-globulin fractions of sera from different horses. With haemagglutination inhibition tests there was always a relative increase in test dose between the LA and LA/100 level of test. This relative increase was greatest where the sensitivity of the cell suspensions was high. Increased suspension sensitivity may be the result of treatment of cells with greater quantities of sensitizing antigen or of reduction in the concentration of sensitized cells in the suspension. A greater volume of serum was required to give a standard end point, when mixed with a test dose (LA) of toxin, if the mixtures were allowed to stand for increasing periods of time. These observations have been discussed. PMID:13653730

  3. Comparison of two solid-phase radioimmunoassay systems and a reverse passive haemagglutination test for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Z.; Coulepis, A.G.; Gust, I.D.

    1982-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of two commercially available radioimmunosay tests (Austria II-125, Abbott Laboratories; and International CIS, Commissariat Alenergie Atomique-Oris Laboratoire des Produits Biomedicaux) and a reverse passive haemagglutination test (Hepatest, Wellcome) for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen were evaluated using the Australian hepatitis B reference panel of 25 sera, and a panel of 257 sera collected from patients with acute hepatitis B, chronic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen and two populations in which hepatitis B virus infection is known to be endemic. The three techniques were found to be generally comparable in sensitivity and specificity. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed

  4. Detection of antibody responses by using haemagglutination inhibiton test and the protection titer of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Indriani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on the detection of antibody responses using haemagglutination inhibition (HI test and the protection titer to Avian influenza (AI virus H5N1 subtype local isolate has been conducted at the Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS. A total number of 50 village chicken (10 chicken served as un-injected controls and 30 quail were injected intramuscularly with inactivated virus of AI H5N1 subtype local isolate. Serum samples were collected 3 weeks after injection and were tested using haemagglutination inhibition tests. The correlation between antibody titer and its protection to AI virus H5N1 local isolate were measured by challenging the birds with AI virus H5N1 local isolate The HI test was then used to determine field serum samples. A total number of 48 village chicken from three (3 Districts (Bekasi, Tangerang and Bogor and 96 quails from two (2 farms in District of Sukabumi which were all vaccinated with commercial AI adjuvant vaccine were sampled. The study revealed that village chicken and quails showed antibody responses after 3 weeks vaccination and that titer of ≥ 3 log 2 was able to protect chicken and quails when they were challenged with local isolate virus. Based on this result, village chicken field samples from Districts of Tangerang, Bekasi and Bogor showed antibody titer which will protect 50, 100 and 85% of the flocks respectively. While quail field samples from Farm I and Farm II in District of Sukabumi showed antibody titer which will protect 60-100% and 0-80% of the flocks respectively. It is concluded that the study has successfully measured antibody titer to AI virus H5N1 subtype which protect village chicken and quails from local isolate virus challenge so that the results will be used to analyze field serum samples after vaccination program to eradicate AI from Indonesia.

  5. Forensic DNA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John M

    2011-12-01

    Forensic DNA testing has a number of applications, including parentage testing, identifying human remains from natural or man-made disasters or terrorist attacks, and solving crimes. This article provides background information followed by an overview of the process of forensic DNA testing, including sample collection, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, short tandem repeat (STR) allele separation and sizing, typing and profile interpretation, statistical analysis, and quality assurance. The article concludes with discussions of possible problems with the data and other forensic DNA testing techniques.

  6. HPV DNA test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Cancer of cervix - HPV DNA test References Hacker NF. Cervical dysplasia and cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  7. Evaluation of ELISA and haemagglutination inhibition as screening tests in serosurveillance for H5/H7 avian influenza in commercial chicken flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, M E; Slomka, M J; Breed, A C

    2018-01-01

    with an ELISA, which detects antibodies to all subtypes. Sera (n = 1055) from 74 commercial chicken flocks were tested by both methods. A Bayesian approach served to estimate diagnostic test sensitivities and specificities, without assuming any 'gold standard'. Sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA was 97......% and 99.8%, and for H5/H7 HI 43% and 99.8%, respectively, although H5/H7 HI sensitivity varied considerably between infected flocks. ELISA therefore provides superior sensitivity for the screening of chicken flocks as part of an algorithm, which subsequently utilises H5/H7 HI to identify infection...

  8. An indirect haemagglutination test for demonstration of gonococcal antibodies using gonococcal pili as antigen. II. Serological investigation of patients attending a dermato-venereological outpatients clinic in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, K; Lind, I; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1980-01-01

    A total of 1223 serum specimens were obtained from 649 consecutive patients attending a dermatovenereological out-patient clinic in Copenhagen with a request for venereal disease control. The sera were examined for gonococcal antibodies by both a gonococcal complement fixation test (GCF) and an i...

  9. A novel rapid direct haemagglutination-inhibition assay for measurements of humoral immune response against non-haemagglutinating Fowlpox virus strains in vaccinated chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambura, Philemon N; Mzula, Alexanda

    2017-10-01

    Fowlpox (FP) is a serious disease in chickens caused by Fowlpox virus (FPV). One method currently used to control FPV is vaccination followed by confirmation that antibody titres are protective using the indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA). The direct haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is not done because most FPV strains do not agglutinate chicken red blood cells (RBCs). A novel FPV strain TPV-1 which agglutinates chicken RBCs was discovered recently and enabled a direct HI assay to be conducted using homologous sera. This study is therefore aimed at assessing the direct HI assay using a recently discovered novel haemagglutinating FPV strain TPV-1 in chickens vaccinated with a commercial vaccine containing a non-haemagglutinating FPV.Chicks vaccinated with FPV at 1 day-old had antibody geometric mean titres (GMT) of log 2 3.7 at 7 days after vaccination and log 2 8.0 at 28 days after vaccination when tested in the direct HI. Chickens vaccinated at 6 weeks-old had antibody geometric mean titres (GMT) of log 2 5.0 at 7 days after vaccination and log 2 8.4 at 28 days after vaccination when tested in the direct HI. The GMT recorded 28 days after vaccination was slightly higher in chickens vaccinated at 6-week-old than in chicks vaccinated at one-day-old. However, this difference was not significant (P > 0.05). All vaccinated chickens showed "takes". No antibody response to FPV and "takes" were detected in unvaccinated chickens (GMT 0.05). These findings indicate that a simple and rapid direct HI assay using the FPV TPV-1 strain as antigen may be used to measure antibody levels in chickens vaccinated with non-haemagglutinating strains of FPV, and that the titres are comparable to those obtained by indirect IHA.

  10. Evaluation of two reverse passive haemagglutination techniques and a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, H [Beijing Medical College (China); Coulepis, A G; Gust, I D [Fairfield Hospital for Communicable Diseases, Melbourne (Australia)

    1972-08-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of two commercially available reverse passive haemagglutination tests (Hepatest and Raphadex B) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen, were compared with the most widely used radioimmunoassay (Ausria II-125). A selected group of 282 sera were tested: these included the Australian hepatitis B reference panel, and a batch of 257 sera collected from patients with acute hepatitis B, chronic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen and two populations in which hepatitis B virus infection is known to be endemic. The two reverse passive haemagglutination techniques were of comparable sensitivity but slightly less sensitive than radioimmunoassay. While radioimmunoassay still remains the test of choice for blood transfusion services, the reverse passive haemagglutination techniques are of great value for smaller laboratories and for field studies because of their longer shelf life, the absence of radioactive reagents and the lack of need to acquire a gammacounter.

  11. DNA testing in homicide investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahlow, Joseph A; Cameron, Thomas; Arendt, Alexander; Cornelis, Kenneth; Bontrager, Anthony; Suth, Michael S; Black, Lisa; Tobey, Rebbecca; Pollock, Sharon; Stur, Shawn; Cotter, Kenneth; Gabrielse, Joel

    2017-10-01

    Objectives With the widespread use of DNA testing, police, death investigators, and attorneys need to be aware of the capabilities of this technology. This review provides an overview of scenarios where DNA evidence has played a major role in homicide investigations in order to highlight important educational issues for police, death investigators, forensic pathologists, and attorneys. Methods This was a nonrandom, observational, retrospective study. Data were obtained from the collective files of the authors from casework during a 15-year period, from 2000 through 2014. Results A series of nine scenarios, encompassing 11 deaths, is presented from the standpoint of the police and death investigation, the forensic pathology autopsy performance, the subsequent DNA testing of evidence, and, ultimately, the final adjudication of cases. Details of each case are presented, along with a discussion that focuses on important aspects of sample collection for potential DNA testing, especially at the crime scene and the autopsy. The presentation highlights the diversity of case and evidence types in which DNA testing played a valuable role in the successful prosecution of the case. Conclusions By highlighting homicides where DNA testing contributed to the successful adjudication of cases, police, death investigators, forensic pathologists, and attorneys will be better informed regarding the types of evidence and situations where such testing is of potential value.

  12. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  13. The haemagglutination activity of equine herpesvirus type 1 glycoprotein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Kiyohiko; Hattori, Shiho; Mahmoud, Hassan Y A H; Takasugi, Maaya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Matsumura, Tomio; Kondo, Takashi; Kirisawa, Rikio; Mochizuki, Masami; Maeda, Ken

    2015-01-02

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) has haemagglutination (HA) activity toward equine red blood cells (RBCs), but the identity of its haemagglutinin is unknown. To identify the haemagglutinin of EHV-1, the major glycoproteins of EHV-1 were expressed in 293T cells, and the cells or cell lysates were mixed with equine RBCs. The results showed that only EHV-1 glycoprotein C (gC)-producing cells adsorbed equine RBCs, and that the lysate of EHV-1 gC-expressing cells agglutinated equine RBCs. EHV-1 lacking gC did not show HA activity. HA activity was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for gC, but not by antibodies directed against other glycoproteins. In addition, HA activity was not inhibited by the addition of heparin. These results indicate that EHV-1 gC can bind equine RBCs irrespective of heparin, in contrast to other herpesvirus gC proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Screening of Bunium bulbocastanum for antibacterial, antifungal, phytotoxic and haemagglutination activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ibrar; Ahmad, Haroon; Ali, Nasir; Ahmad, Bashir; Tanoli, Hamid

    2013-07-01

    The current study was aimed at screening the Bunium bulbocastanum for its antibacterial, antifungal, phytotoxic and haemagglutination activities.The crude methanolic extract and n-hexane fraction showed significant (89%) and good activity (61%) against Staphylococcus aureus while the CHCl3fraction was moderately active against S.aureus (53%). Moderate activitywas shown by the EtOAc fraction against B. subtilis (44%). This fraction was inactive against P.aerogenosa and S.aureus. The aqueous fraction showed significant activity against B. subtilis (85%), moderate against S.aureus(34 %) and E. coli (33%)and low activity against P.aerogenosa(29%). Our results for antifungal assay indicated that all the test samples were inactive against all the test fungi. The phytotoxic activity of the plant at 1000 and 100 μg/ml was: crude methanolic extract (53.33 and 46.66%), n-hexane (46.66 and 26.66%), CHCl3 (20 and 6.66%), EtOAc (46.66 and 26.66%) and aqueous (40 and 33.33%). All the test samples (crude methanolic extract and fractions) of B. bulbocastanum were unable to agglutinate RBCs of the human blood indicating that this species lack phytolectins.

  15. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measles antibody: a comparison with haemagglutination inhibition, immunofluorescence and plaque neutralization tests Reação imunoenzimática (ELISA para detecção de anticorpos para o vírus do sarampo: comparação com reações de inibição da hema-glutinação, imunofluorescência indireta e neutralização de placas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Akico Ueda Fick de Souza

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measles antibodies was compared with Plaque Neutralization (PRN, Haemagglutination inhibition (HI and Fluorescent antibody (IFA tests in 181 sera from vaccinated children and umbilical cord. Of 179 positive samples by the sensitive PRN, only two, with titers of 8, were negative by ELISA (copositivity of 98.9%. IFA and HI presented, respectively, copo-sitivities of 93.3% and 82.7%. The ELISA presented a high sensitivity as well as a good reproducibility and represents an alternative for the time consuming PRN for detection of low measles antibodies.A reação imunoenzimática (ELISA para determinação de anticorpos para o vírus do sarampo foi comparada com a reação de neutralização de placas (RNP, inibição da hemaglutinação (RIH e imunofluorescência indireta (RIF. Das 179 amostras positivas pela RNP, somente 2, com títulos iguais a 8, se apresentaram negativas por ELISA (copositividade de 98.9%. A RIF e RIH apresentaram, respectivamente, copositividade de 93.3 e 82.7%. ELISA apresentou sensibilidade equivalente à complexa RNP, boa reprodutibilidade e representa uma alternativa para a detecção de baixos títulos de anticorpos contra o sarampo.

  16. Comparison of indirect immunofluorescence test for measles antibodies with haemagglutination inhibition and plaque neutralization tests Comparação da reação de imunofluorescência indireta para o vírus do sarampo com as reações de inibição da hemaglutinação e neutralização por redução de placas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Akico Ueda Fick de Souza

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Indirect Immunofluorescence (IFA, Plaque Reduction Neutralization (PRN and Haemagglutination Inhibition (HI tests for measles antibodies were carried out in 197 sera obtained from umbilical cord and vaccinated children. The IFA was also applied to blood samples collected with filter paper. IFA results demonstrated that the test is relatively simple to perform, with good reproducibility for different antigen lots. Good correlation was obtained between IFA, PRN and HI antibody titers. Better correlation was demonstrated with IFA and PRN than with HI and PRN tests. Sensitivity of IFA in detecting antibody was less effective than PRN, however more effective than HI using rhesus monkey red blood cells. PRN antibody titers over 100 were detected by IFA but not by HI (9.7% with negative results. IFA may be of considerable practical use and able to substitute HI in Seroepidemiological surveys and to evaluate vaccine efficacy. It also can be simplified by employing filter paper collected samples.As reações de imunofluorescência indireta (RIF, neutralização por redução de placas (RNP e inibição da hemaglutinação (RIH para detecção de anticorpos para o vírus do sarampo foram aplicadas a 197 soros provenientes de cordão umbilical e de crianças vacinadas contra o sarampo. Avaliou-se ainda a aplicação da RIF em amostras colhidas em papel de filtro. A RIF apresentou-se como uma prova de execução relativamente simples, de boa reprodutibilidade com diferentes partidas de antígeno. Observou-se boa correlação entre os títulos de anticorpos obtidos por RIF, RNP e RIH. Com a RNP, a RIF apresentou maior correlação que a RIH. A sensibilidade da RIF na detecção de anticorpos contra o sarampo foi menor que RNP, porém superior à da RIH com hemácias de macaco rhesus. Anticorpos com títulos superiores a 100 pela RNP foram sistematicamente detectados pela RIF, mas não por RIH (9,7% de resultados negativos. A RIF pode ser de grande utilidade

  17. Detection of antibodies in human serum using trimellityl-erythrocytes: direct and indirect haemagglutination and haemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, E S; Pruzansky, J J; Patterson, R; Zeiss, C R; Roberts, M

    1980-02-01

    Utilizing trimellityl-erythrocytes (TM-E), antibodies were detected in sera of seven workers with trimellitic anhydride (TMA) induced airway syndromes by direct haemagglutination, indirect haemagglutination with anti-human IgG, IgA or IgM or by haemolysis. Detectable levels of antibody were obtained with all three methods. The most sensitive technique was indirect haemagglutination using anti-IgG. When added as an inhibitor, TM-human serum albumin produced a 10- to 800-fold reduction in titres. TM-ovalbumin of similar epitope density was less inhibitory and sodium trimellitate the least inhibitory on a molar basis. All of the assays using haptenized human red cells were also capable of detecting anti-TM antibodies in Rhesus monkeys whose airways had been exposed to TMA. These assays are useful for detecting anti-TM antibodies and may also be adapted to demonstrate antibodies induced against other inhaled haptens in sera of environmentally exposed individuals or in animal models of such exposure.

  18. Counting DNA: estimating the complexity of a test tube of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulhammer, D; Lipton, R J; Landweber, L F

    1999-10-01

    We consider the problem of estimation of the 'complexity' of a test tube of DNA. The complexity of a test tube is the number of different kinds of strands of DNA in the test tube. It is quite easy to estimate the number of total strands in a test tube, especially if the strands are all the same length. Estimation of the complexity is much less clear. We propose a simple kind of DNA computation that can estimate the complexity.

  19. Evaluation of Patients with an Apparent False Positive Stool DNA Test: The Role of Repeat Stool DNA Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory S; Markowitz, Sanford D; Chen, Zhengyi; Tuck, Missy; Willis, Joseph E; Berger, Barry M; Brenner, Dean E; Li, Li

    2018-03-07

    There is uncertainty as to the appropriate follow-up of patients who test positive on multimarker stool DNA (sDNA) testing and have a colonoscopy without neoplasia. To determine the prevalence of missed colonic or occult upper gastrointestinal neoplasia in patients with an apparent false positive sDNA. We prospectively identified 30 patients who tested positive with a commercially available sDNA followed by colonoscopy without neoplastic lesions. Patients were invited to undergo repeat sDNA at 11-29 months after the initial test followed by repeat colonoscopy and upper endoscopy. We determined the presence of neoplastic lesions on repeat evaluation stratified by results of repeat sDNA. Twelve patients were restudied. Seven patients had a negative second sDNA test and a normal second colonoscopy and upper endoscopy. In contrast, 5 of 12 subjects had a persistently positive second sDNA test, and 3 had positive findings, including a 3-cm sessile transverse colon adenoma with high-grade dysplasia, a 2-cm right colon sessile serrated adenoma with dysplasia, and a nonadvanced colon adenoma (p = 0.045). These corresponded to a positive predictive value of 0.60 (95% CI 0.17-1.00) and a negative predictive value of 1.00 (95% CI 1.00-1.00) for the second sDNA test. In addition, the medical records of all 30 subjects with apparent false positive testing were reviewed and no documented cases of malignant tumors were recorded. Repeat positive sDNA testing may identify a subset of patients with missed or occult colorectal neoplasia after negative colonoscopy for an initially positive sDNA. High-quality colonoscopy with careful attention to the right colon in patients with positive sDNA is critically important and may avoid false negative colonoscopy.

  20. DNA nanotechnology from the test tube to the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Groves, Benjamin; Muscat, Richard A; Seelig, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The programmability of Watson-Crick base pairing, combined with a decrease in the cost of synthesis, has made DNA a widely used material for the assembly of molecular structures and dynamic molecular devices. Working in cell-free settings, researchers in DNA nanotechnology have been able to scale up system complexity and quantitatively characterize reaction mechanisms to an extent that is infeasible for engineered gene circuits or other cell-based technologies. However, the most intriguing applications of DNA nanotechnology - applications that best take advantage of the small size, biocompatibility and programmability of DNA-based systems - lie at the interface with biology. Here, we review recent progress in the transition of DNA nanotechnology from the test tube to the cell. We highlight key successes in the development of DNA-based imaging probes, prototypes of smart therapeutics and drug delivery systems, and explore the future challenges and opportunities for cellular DNA nanotechnology.

  1. DNA nanotechnology from the test tube to the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Groves, Benjamin; Muscat, Richard A.; Seelig, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The programmability of Watson-Crick base pairing, combined with a decrease in the cost of synthesis, has made DNA a widely used material for the assembly of molecular structures and dynamic molecular devices. Working in cell-free settings, researchers in DNA nanotechnology have been able to scale up system complexity and quantitatively characterize reaction mechanisms to an extent that is infeasible for engineered gene circuits or other cell-based technologies. However, the most intriguing applications of DNA nanotechnology -- applications that best take advantage of the small size, biocompatibility and programmability of DNA-based systems -- lie at the interface with biology. Here, we review recent progress in the transition of DNA nanotechnology from the test tube to the cell. We highlight key successes in the development of DNA-based imaging probes, prototypes of smart therapeutics and drug delivery systems, and explore the future challenges and opportunities for cellular DNA nanotechnology.

  2. Value of DNA tests: a decision perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Franco; Bozza, Silvia; Bernard, Magali; Champod, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Before a Court of Law testifying in DNA-evidence cases, scientists are often challenged with the idea that the more markers (loci) the better, i.e., why does the scientist not use 16 or more markers? This paper introduces a new perspective, decision analysis, to deal with the problem of the number of markers to type in a criminal context. The decision-making process, which plays a key role in the routine work of a forensic scientist, consists of the rational choice, given personal objectives, between two or more possible outcomes when the consequences of the choice are uncertain. Simulated results support the hypothesis that analytical added value does not increase with the number of markers.

  3. 32P-labeling test for DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randerath, K.; Reddy, M.V.; Gupta, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Covalent adducts formed by the reaction of DNA with chemical carcinogens and mutagens may be detected by a 32 P-labeling test. DNA preparations exposed to chemicals known to bind covalently to DNA [N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, dimethyl sulfate, formaldehyde, β-propiolactone, propylene oxide, streptozotocin, nitrogen mustard, and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] were digested to a mixture of deoxynucleoside 3'-monophosphates by incubation with micrococcal endonuclease (EC 3.1.31.1) and spleen exonuclease (EC 3.1.16.1). The digests were treated with [γ- 32 P]ATP and T4 polynucleotide kinase (ATP:5'-dephosphopolynucleotide 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.78) to convert the monophosphates to 5'- 32 P-labeled deoxynucleoside 3',5'-bis-phosphates. These compounds were then separated on polyethyl-eneimine-cellulose thin layers in ammonium formate and ammonium sulfate solutions. Autoradiograms of the chromatograms obtained by this high-resolution procedure showed the presence of nucleotides derived from chemically altered, as well as normal, DNA constituents. Maps from DNA exposed to any of the chemicals used exhibited a spot pattern typical for the particular chemical. This method detected a single adduct in 10 5 DNA nucleotides without requiring that the compound under investigation be radioactive and thus provides a useful test to screen chemicals for their capacity to damage DNA by covalent binding

  4. Noninvasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) through maternal plasma DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Yifan; Li, Xuchao

    2016-01-01

    developed a noninvasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) based on SNP typing with maternal plasma DNA sequencing. We evaluated the influence factors (minor allele frequency (MAF), the number of total SNP, fetal fraction and effective sequencing depth) and designed three different selective SNP panels......Short tandem repeats (STRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been already used to perform noninvasive prenatal paternity testing from maternal plasma DNA. The frequently used technologies were PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and SNP typing array, respectively. Here, we...... paternity test using STR multiplex system. Our study here proved that the maternal plasma DNA sequencing-based technology is feasible and accurate in determining paternity, which may provide an alternative in forensic application in the future....

  5. Polymerase chain reaction and conventional DNA tests in detection of HPV DNA in cytologically normal and abnormal cervical scrapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalia, A.; Jalava, T.; Nieminen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Med.mikrobiologi, polymerase chain reaction, DNA tests, human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical smear, hybridisation, cytologi, affiProbe HPV test, ViraType test......Med.mikrobiologi, polymerase chain reaction, DNA tests, human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical smear, hybridisation, cytologi, affiProbe HPV test, ViraType test...

  6. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated...

  7. Neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses is determined by arginine 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mögling, Ramona; Richard, Mathilde J; Vliet, Stefan van der; Beek, Ruud van; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Spronken, Monique I; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing proportion of circulating human influenza A(H3N2) viruses exhibited haemagglutination activity that was sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. This change in haemagglutination as compared to older circulating A(H3N2) viruses prompted an investigation of the underlying molecular basis. Recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses were found to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes in a manner that could be blocked with either oseltamivir or neuraminidase-specific antisera, indicating that agglutination was driven by neuraminidase, with a low or negligible contribution of haemagglutinin. Using representative virus recombinants it was shown that the haemagglutinin of a recent A(H3N2) virus indeed had decreased activity to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes, while its neuraminidase displayed increased haemagglutinating activity. Viruses with chimeric and mutant neuraminidases were used to identify the amino acid substitution histidine to arginine at position 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site as the determinant of this neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination. An analysis of publicly available neuraminidase gene sequences showed that viruses with histidine at position 150 were rapidly replaced by viruses with arginine at this position between 2005 and 2008, in agreement with the phenotypic data. As a consequence of neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent A(H3N2) viruses and poor haemagglutination via haemagglutinin, haemagglutination inhibition assays with A(H3N2) antisera are no longer useful to characterize the antigenic properties of the haemagglutinin of these viruses for vaccine strain selection purposes. Continuous monitoring of the evolution of these viruses and potential consequences for vaccine strain selection remains important.

  8. Evaluation of the immunomodulatory and DNA protective activities of the shoots of Cynodon dactylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangathayaru, K; Umadevi, M; Reddy, C Umamaheswara

    2009-05-04

    Fresh juice of Cyanodon dactylon known as 'durva' grass is employed in India as a rejuvenator and for wound healing. To validate the traditional use of the herb through evaluation of DNA protective activity in vitro and immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Fresh juice of the grass was prepared as indicated for use in traditional medicine and standardized for solid content. Its total phenol content was estimated by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Freshly prepared juice was investigated for its effect on doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in vitro. Its immunomodulatory activity was tested on balb/c mice by the humoral antibody response which was determined by haemagglutination antibody titer and spleen cell assay. Fresh juice of Cyanodon dactylon of 1.46% (w/w) solid content had a phenolic content of 47+/-0.33 mg/kg GAE. At doses equivalent to 50, 100 and 200mg total solids/kg body weight the juice protected human DNA against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage as demonstrated in DNA spectral studies, where the ratio of absorbance of DNA at 260 and 280 nm in samples pretreated with the juice was 1.66, 1.53 and 1.63 respectively, while it was 1.37 for DNA treated with doxorubicin only. This indicates nucleic acid purity in the Cynodon dactylon treated samples. Oral administration of the juice at 250 and 500 mg/kg in balb/c mice increased humoral antibody response upon antigen challenge, as evidenced by a dose-dependent, statistically significant increase in antibody titer in the haemagglutination antibody assay and plaque forming cell assay. The present report demonstrated the DNA protective activity and immunomodulatory property of the fresh juice of Cynodon dactylon validating the traditional use of the herb as a 'rasayana' in ayurvedic system of medicine.

  9. Testing of DNA isolation for the identification of hemp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vyhnánek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemp is diploid organism (2n = 2x = 20, genome size 534 Mb with nine pairs of autosomes plus XX (♀ or XY (♂ chromosomes. Cannabis sativa L. is an important economic plant for the production of food, fibre, oils, and intoxicants. Genotypes (varieties or chemovar of hemp with low Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol content are used for industrial applications. Varieties with high Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or high cannabidiol content are used for medicinal applications. Biochemical and molecular methods can be used for identification and classification. An important step for molecular biology methods is to obtain the matrix of the native and sufficiently pure DNA. We tested two different experimental variant of samples (20 mg and 100 mg of seeds, oilcake and dried flowers for analysis of the Italian variety Carmagnola for analysis (harvested in 2014, Hempoint Ltd., Czech Republic. The DNeasy® Plant Mini Kit (Qiagen, GE was used to isolate the DNA. The DNA concentration and purity was assessed by agarose electrophoresis and via a spectrophotometer. Samples of lower weight yielded lower values of DNA concentration (average 16.30 - 38.90 ng.µL-1, but with better purity than samples of higher weight (ratio A260nm/A280nm for low-weight samples was near 1.80. To test the applicability of DNA analysis, we used two SSR markers (CAN1347 and CAN2913. PCR products were separated on 1% agarose and on 8% polyacrylamide electrophoresis. DNA samples obtained from samples of higher weight exhibited less PCR amplification than samples of lower weight. We found no effect of sample weight on the formation of non-specific amplification products during the PCR reaction. Based on our results we can be recommended for practical isolation procedure using DNeasy® Plant Mini Kit with lower of sample weight (20 mg. In future work the procedure for DNA isolating from wheat-cannabis products, e. g. breads, rolls or pasta, will be optimized.

  10. Relationship between haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titres and clinical protection against influenza: development and application of a bayesian random-effects model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudeville, Laurent; Bailleux, Fabrice; Riche, Benjamin; Megas, Françoise; Andre, Philippe; Ecochard, René

    2010-03-08

    Antibodies directed against haemagglutinin, measured by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay are essential to protective immunity against influenza infection. An HI titre of 1:40 is generally accepted to correspond to a 50% reduction in the risk of contracting influenza in a susceptible population, but limited attempts have been made to further quantify the association between HI titre and protective efficacy. We present a model, using a meta-analytical approach, that estimates the level of clinical protection against influenza at any HI titre level. Source data were derived from a systematic literature review that identified 15 studies, representing a total of 5899 adult subjects and 1304 influenza cases with interval-censored information on HI titre. The parameters of the relationship between HI titre and clinical protection were estimated using Bayesian inference with a consideration of random effects and censorship in the available information. A significant and positive relationship between HI titre and clinical protection against influenza was observed in all tested models. This relationship was found to be similar irrespective of the type of viral strain (A or B) and the vaccination status of the individuals. Although limitations in the data used should not be overlooked, the relationship derived in this analysis provides a means to predict the efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccines when only immunogenicity data are available. This relationship can also be useful for comparing the efficacy of different influenza vaccines based on their immunological profile.

  11. Relationship between haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titres and clinical protection against influenza: development and application of a bayesian random-effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megas Françoise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibodies directed against haemagglutinin, measured by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay are essential to protective immunity against influenza infection. An HI titre of 1:40 is generally accepted to correspond to a 50% reduction in the risk of contracting influenza in a susceptible population, but limited attempts have been made to further quantify the association between HI titre and protective efficacy. Methods We present a model, using a meta-analytical approach, that estimates the level of clinical protection against influenza at any HI titre level. Source data were derived from a systematic literature review that identified 15 studies, representing a total of 5899 adult subjects and 1304 influenza cases with interval-censored information on HI titre. The parameters of the relationship between HI titre and clinical protection were estimated using Bayesian inference with a consideration of random effects and censorship in the available information. Results A significant and positive relationship between HI titre and clinical protection against influenza was observed in all tested models. This relationship was found to be similar irrespective of the type of viral strain (A or B and the vaccination status of the individuals. Conclusion Although limitations in the data used should not be overlooked, the relationship derived in this analysis provides a means to predict the efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccines when only immunogenicity data are available. This relationship can also be useful for comparing the efficacy of different influenza vaccines based on their immunological profile.

  12. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ...] Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and... Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment, which is based on a risk analysis prepared to... biological product: Requester: Merial, Inc. Product: Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test...

  13. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  14. Injection molded nanofluidic chips: Fabrication method and functional tests using single-molecule DNA experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Persson, Karl Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels.......We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels....

  15. DNA methylome profiling of maternal peripheral blood and placentas reveal potential fetal DNA markers for non-invasive prenatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Junyu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xu, Mingqing; Xia, Shihui; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Utilizing epigenetic (DNA methylation) differences to differentiate between maternal peripheral blood (PBL) and fetal (placental) DNA has been a promising strategy for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have yet to be fully ascertained. In the present study, we performed genome-wide comparative methylome analysis between maternal PBL and placental DNA from pregnancies of first trimester by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays. A total of 36 931 DMRs and 45 804 differentially methylated sites (DMSs) covering the whole genome, exclusive of the Y chromosome, were identified via MeDIP-Seq and Infinium 450k array, respectively, of which 3759 sites in 2188 regions were confirmed by both methods. Not only did we find the previously reported potential fetal DNA markers in our identified DMRs/DMSs but also we verified fully the identified DMRs/DMSs in the validation round by MassARRAY EpiTYPER. The screened potential fetal DNA markers may be used for NIPT on aneuploidies and other chromosomal diseases, such as cri du chat syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, these potential markers may have application in the early diagnosis of placental dysfunction, such as pre-eclampsia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Investigating CSI: portrayals of DNA testing on a forensic crime show and their potential effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Barbara L; Jankowski, Natalie; Brewer, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    The popularity of forensic crime shows such as CSI has fueled debate about their potential social impact. This study considers CSI's potential effects on public understandings regarding DNA testing in the context of judicial processes, the policy debates surrounding crime laboratory procedures, and the forensic science profession, as well as an effect not discussed in previous accounts: namely, the show's potential impact on public understandings of DNA and genetics more generally. To develop a theoretical foundation for research on the "CSI effect," it draws on cultivation theory, social cognitive theory, and audience reception studies. It then uses content analysis and textual analysis to illuminate how the show depicts DNA testing. The results demonstrate that CSI tends to depict DNA testing as routine, swift, useful, and reliable and that it echoes broader discourses about genetics. At times, however, the show suggests more complex ways of thinking about DNA testing and genetics.

  17. Positive cell-free fetal DNA testing for trisomy 13 reveals confined placental mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, April L; Drendel, Holli M; Verbrugge, Jennifer L; Reese, Angela M; Schumacher, Katherine L; Griffith, Christopher B; Weaver, David D; Abernathy, Mary P; Litton, Christian G; Vance, Gail H

    2013-09-01

    We report on a case in which cell-free fetal DNA was positive for trisomy 13 most likely due to confined placental mosaicism. Cell-free fetal DNA testing analyzes DNA derived from placental trophoblast cells and can lead to incorrect results that are not representative of the fetus. We sought to confirm commercial cell-free fetal DNA testing results by chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis. These results were followed up by postnatal chromosome analysis of cord blood and placental tissue. First-trimester cell-free fetal DNA test results were positive for trisomy 13. Cytogenetic analysis of chorionic villus sampling yielded a mosaic karyotype of 47,XY,+13[10]/46,XY[12]. G-banded analysis of amniotic fluid was normal, 46,XY. Postnatal cytogenetic analysis of cord blood was normal. Karyotyping of tissues from four quadrants of the placenta demonstrated mosaicism for trisomy 13 in two of the quadrants and a normal karyotype in the other two. Our case illustrates several important aspects of this new testing methodology: that cell-free fetal DNA may not be representative of the fetal karyotype; that follow-up with diagnostic testing of chorionic villus sampling and/or amniotic fluid for abnormal test results should be performed; and that pretest counseling regarding the full benefits, limitations, and possible testing outcomes of cell-free fetal DNA screening is important.

  18. DNA-synthesis inhibition and repair DNA-synthesis in CHO Ade- C cells: An alternative approach to genotoxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slamenova, D.; Papsova, E.; Gabelova, A.; Dusinska, M.; Collins, A.; Wsolova, L.

    1997-01-01

    We describe an alternative assay to determine genotoxicity. Its main feature is that it combines two measures in a single experiment; the inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis together with the stimulation of DNA repair. We show that, in tests of four different genotoxic agents, the assay gives results that are entirely consistent with what is known about the mode of action of these agents. In addition, we have demonstrated that chemical carcinogens requiring metabolic activation can be examined using a standard procedure of incubation with a microsomal activating fraction. We consider the combined assay for DNA synthesis inhibition and repair synthesis to be a useful way for the rapid pre-screening of chemicals suspected of genotoxic activity on the level of mammalian cells. (author)

  19. Detection of complex hemoglobinopathies: recommendations on screening and DNA testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baysal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The following recommendations should be taken into account during the evaluation and elucidation of the complex hemoglobinopathies: a in complex hemoglobinopathies performing DNA studies on all family members might be essential; b complex gene-gene interactions offer major diagnostic challenges both at the technical and clinical level; c hematological & DNA analyses must be run in parallel. Some cases may be straight forward but others may require indepth DNA work-up; d co-inheritance of a-thalassemia offers added challenge as it may affect phenotype significantly; e sickle cell anemia (SS, co-inherited with a-thal, can be a phenocopy of Sβ0-thal. The HbA2 increase can be mistaken for Sβ-thal. DNA Sequencing is imperative; f only a selected number of normal MCV, MCH, borderline HbA2 cases must be referred for DNA analysis. However, in certain cases, following hematological and family evaluation, the β and d genes may need to be sequenced; g DNA Sequencing will increasingly become the method of choice for screening and DNA mutation analysis. However, new methods like MLPA-which analyzes gene dosage- must be used more commonly to rule out deletion mutants to avoid false negative sequencing results; h these recommendations should be reviewed every 2-3 years reflecting new methods, new findings and new findings from ethnic groups. 诊断和说明复杂血红蛋白病时,建议考虑以下几点: a)针对复杂的血红蛋白病,有必要对所有家庭成员开展DNA研究;b 复杂的基因-基因交互作用可能使诊断在技术和临床层面上颇受挑战;c 血液和DNA分析须同时进行。 有些病例简单,但另外一些病例可能需要开展深层次的DNA检查;d 由于α型地中海贫血可能严重影响表型,α型地中海贫血的共同继承特征更具挑战;e 共同继承α型地中海贫血的镰状细胞贫血(SS),可以作为Sβ0型地中海贫血的显型。 HbA2增

  20. Testing possibilities for establishing nanodiamond-DNA-conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, A.; Joch, S.; Michael, J.; Boschke, E.; Quenzel, P.; Schreiber, J.; Lapina, V.; Opitz, J.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the biofunctionalization of nanodiamond surfaces in a two step procedure: chemical modification, resulting in homogeneous and defined surface coating, with following addition of ssDNA. Carboxylation, thymidine coupling and amination methods for chemical modification of diamond surfaces for further functionalization experiments were applied. To enable the coupling process, biomolecules were also chemically modified with functional groups (-NH2). FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis were applied for characterizing modified ND particles and bioconjugates and for controlling the coupling success.

  1. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdenes-Pijl, Miranda; Dondorp, Wybo J; Timmermans, Danielle Rm; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2011-07-05

    This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3) and without (n = 1) a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2), and diabetes patients (n = 2). All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment (DNA test or obtaining family history) and also differ from

  2. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3 and without (n = 1 a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2, and diabetes patients (n = 2. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment

  3. Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Japan on the Determination of Blood Relationship via DNA Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Waki

    2017-01-01

    DNA paternity testing has recently become more widely available in Japan. The aim of this paper is to examine the issues surrounding (1) the implementing agency, whether the testing is conducted in a commercial direct-to-consumer (DTC) setting or a judicial non-DTC setting, and (2) the implementation conditions and more specifically the legal capacity of the proband (test subject). Literature research in Japanese and English was conducted. Some countries prohibit commercial DNA testing without the consent of the proband or her or his legally authorized representative. But as in some cases, the results of DTC paternity testing have proven to be unreliable. I propose a complete prohibition of DTC DNA paternity testing in Japan. In many cases of paternity testing, the proband is a minor. This has led to debate about whether proxy consent is sufficient for paternity testing or whether additional safeguards (such as a court order) are required. In cases where commercial DNA testing has been conducted and the test results are produced in court as evidence, the court must judge whether or not to admit these results as evidence. Another important issue is whether or not paternity testing should be legally mandated in certain cases. If we come to the conclusion that DNA test results are the only way to conclusively establish a parent-child relationship, then our society may prioritize even more genetic relatedness over other conceptions of a parent-child relationship. This prioritization could adversely affect families created through assisted reproductive technology (ART), especially in situations where children are not aware of their biological parentage. This paper argues for a complete prohibition of DTC DNA paternity testing in Japan, and highlights that broader ethical and legal deliberation on such genetic services is required.

  4. The Stool DNA Test is More Accurate than the Plasma Septin 9 Test in Detecting Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlquist, David A.; Taylor, William R.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Zou, Hongzhi; Domanico, Michael; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Boardman, Lisa A.; Berger, Barry M.; Lidgard, Graham P.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Several noninvasive tests have been developed for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We compared the sensitivities of a multi-marker test for stool DNA (sDNA) and a plasma test for methylated Septin 9 (SEPT9) in identifying patients with large adenomas or CRC. Methods We analyzed paired stool and plasma samples from 30 patients with CRC and 22 with large adenomas from Mayo Clinic archives. Stool (n=46) and plasma (n=49) samples from age- and sex-matched patients with normal colonoscopy results were used as controls. The sDNA test is an assay for methylated BMP3, NDRG4, vimentin, and TFPI2; mutant KRAS; the β-actin gene, and quantity of hemoglobin (by the porphyrin method). It was performed blindly at Exact Sciences (Madison WI); the test for SEPT9 was performed at ARUP Laboratories (Salt Lake City UT). Results were considered positive based on the manufacturer's specificity cutoff values of 90% and 89%, respectively. Results The sDNA test detected adenomas (median 2 cm, range 1–5 cm) with 82% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 60%–95%); SEPT9 had 14% sensitivity (95% CI, 3%–35%; P=.0001). The sDNA test identified patients with CRC with 87% sensitivity (95% CI, 69%–96%); SEPT9 had 60% sensitivity (95% CI, 41%–77%; P=.046). The sDNA test identified patients with stage I–III CRC with 91% sensitivity (95% CI, 71%–99%); SEPT9 had 50% sensitivity (95% CI, 28%–72%; P=.013); for stage IV CRC, sensitivity values were 75% (95% CI, 35%–97%) and 88% (95% CI, 47%–100%), respectively (P=.56). False-positive rates were 7% for the sDNA test and 27% for SEPT9. Conclusions Based on analyses of paired samples, the sDNA test detects non-metastatic CRC and large adenomas with significantly greater levels of sensitivity than the SEPT9 test. These findings might be used to modify approaches for CRC prevention and early detection. PMID:22019796

  5. Test of models for replication of SV40 DNA following UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The replication of SV40 DNA immediately after irradiation of infected monkey cells has been examined. SV40 DNA synthesis is inhibited in a UV fluence-dependent fashion, and the synthesis of completely replicated (Form I) SV40 molecules is more severely inhibited than is total SV40 DNA synthesis. Two models for DNA replication-inhibition have been tested. Experimental results have been compared to those predicted by mathematical models derived to describe two possible molecular mechanisms of replication inhibition. No effect of UV irradiation on the uptake and phosphorylation of 3 H-thymidine nor on the size of the intracellular deoxythymidine triphosphate pool of SV40-infected cells have been observed, validating the use of 3 H-thymidine incorporation as a measure of DNA synthesis in this system. In vitro studies have been performed to further investigate the mechanism of dimer-specific inhibition of completion of SV40 DNA synthesis observed in in vivo. The results of these studies are consistent with a mechanism of discontinuous synthesis past dimer sites, but it is equally possible that the mechanism of DNA replication of UV-damaged DNA in the in vitro system is different from that which occurs in vivo

  6. High-Risk Palliative Care Patients' Knowledge and Attitudes about Hereditary Cancer Testing and DNA Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, John M; Emidio, Oluwabunmi; Ma, Brittany; Bailey, Lauryn; Smith, Thomas J; Kang, In Guk; Yu, Brandon J; Owodunni, Oluwafemi Patrick; Abusamaan, Mohammed; Razzak, Rab; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2017-12-04

    Even at the end of life, testing cancer patients for inherited susceptibility may provide life-saving information to their relatives. Prior research suggests palliative care inpatients have suboptimal understanding of genetic importance, and testing may be underutilized in this clinical setting. These conclusions are based on limited research. This study aimed to estimate genetic testing prevalence among high-risk palliative care patients in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. We also aimed to understand these patients' understanding of, and attitudes toward, hereditary cancer testing and DNA banking. Palliative care in-patients with cancer completed structured interviews, and their medical records were reviewed. Among patients at high risk for hereditary cancer, we assessed history of genetic testing/DNA banking; and related knowledge and attitudes. Among 24 high-risk patients, 14 (58.3%) said they/their relatives had genetic testing or they had been referred for a genetics consultation. Of the remaining 10 patients, seven (70%) said they would "probably" or "definitely" get tested. Patients who had not had testing were least concerned about the impact of future testing on their family relationships; two (20%) said they were "extremely concerned" about privacy related to genetic testing. Of patients without prior testing, five (50%) said they had heard or read "a fair amount" about genetic testing. No high-risk patients had banked DNA. Overall, 23 (95.8%) said they had heard or read "almost nothing" or "relatively little" about DNA banking. Written materials and clinician discussion were most preferred ways to learn about genetic testing and DNA banking. Overall, this study demonstrates underutilization of genetics services at the end of life continues to be problematic, despite high patient interest.

  7. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ann-Charlotte Wallenhammar; Albin Gunnarson; Fredrik Hansson; Anders Jonsson

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR) in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to plantin...

  8. A likelihood ratio test for species membership based on DNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Mikhail V.; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    DNA barcoding as an approach for species identification is rapidly increasing in popularity. However, it remains unclear which statistical procedures should accompany the technique to provide a measure of uncertainty. Here we describe a likelihood ratio test which can be used to test if a sampled...... sequence is a member of an a priori specified species. We investigate the performance of the test using coalescence simulations, as well as using the real data from butterflies and frogs representing two kinds of challenge for DNA barcoding: extremely low and extremely high levels of sequence variability....

  9. Comparison of DNA testing strategies in monitoring human papillomavirus infection prevalence through simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Carol Y.; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background HPV DNA diagnostic tests for epidemiology monitoring (research purpose) or cervical cancer screening (clinical purpose) have often been considered separately. Women with positive Linear Array (LA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) research test results typically are neither informed nor referred for colposcopy. Recently, a sequential testing by using Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) HPV clinical test as a triage before genotype by LA has been adopted for monitoring HPV infections. Als...

  10. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffin, A.L.

    2009-06-01

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  11. A test of the transcription model for biased inheritance of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, H E; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1995-09-01

    Two strand-specific origins of replication appear to be required for mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. Structural equivalents of these origins are found in the rep sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA. These striking similarities have contributed to a universal model for the initiation of mtDNA replication in which a primer is created by cleavage of an origin region transcript. Consistent with this model are the properties of deletion mutants of yeast mtDNA ([rho-]) with a high density of reps (HS [rho-]). These mutant mtDNAs are preferentially inherited by the progeny resulting from the mating of HS [rho-] cells with cells containing wild-type mtDNA ([rho+]). This bias is presumed to result from a replication advantage conferred on HS [rho-] mtDNA by the high density of rep sequences acting as origins. To test whether transcription is indeed required for the preferential inheritance of HS [rho-] mtDNA, we deleted the nuclear gene (RPO41) for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, reducing transcripts by at least 1000-fold. Since [rho-] genomes, but not [rho+] genomes, are stable when RPO41 is deleted, we examined matings between HS [rho-] and neutral [rho-] cells. Neutral [rho-] mtDNAs lack rep sequences and are not preferentially inherited in [rho-] x [rho+] crosses. In HS [rho-] x neutral [rho-] matings, the HS [rho-] mtDNA was preferentially inherited whether both parents were wild type or both were deleted for RPO41. Thus, transcription from the rep promoter does not appear to be necessary for biased inheritance. Our results, and analysis of the literature, suggest that priming by transcription is not a universal mechanism for mtDNA replication initiation.

  12. Clinico-laboratory aspects of anti-nuclear and anti-native DNA antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, J

    1978-01-01

    Available techniques for detection of anti-nuclear antibodies are here briefly reviewed. The relatively insensitive LE cell test has been largely supplanted by the indirect immunofluorescent ANA test which should be reported in terms of titre and pattern. Specific measurement of nDNA antibodies is now a regular technique in SLE diagnosis and management.

  13. Comparison of DNA comet assay and germination test (half-embryo-test) in gamma-irradiated cherry seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoroki, Setsuko; Hayashi, Toru

    2002-01-01

    Cherry fruits were irradiated with gamma-rays at doses up to 200Gy (effective dose for disinfestation of codling moth), and DNA strand break in seed embryos was investigated by using alkaline comet assay. Immediately after irradiation (≥100Gy), DNA from embryos produced comets with a long and wide tail due to fragmentation. In control cells, DNA relaxed and produced comet with very short tail (with few strand break). After 72h storage, DNA from fruits irradiated at 200 Gy showed comets with little tail and tail moment of comets was same as un-irradiated control. These results indicate that the strand breaks of DNA caused by irradiation in fresh seed embryo are repaired during storage. On the contrary, the ability of germination lost by irradiation did not restored, a dose of 100Gy and more retarded shoot elongation. In cherries irradiated at 100Gy, the shooting percentage was less than 50% at 4th day after incubation. Germination test (Half embryo test) can be discriminate between irradiated and un-irradiated cherries. (author)

  14. Stretching chimeric DNA: A test for the putative S-form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Pronk, Sander; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2008-11-01

    Double-stranded DNA "overstretches" at a pulling force of about 65 pN, increasing in length by a factor of 1.7. The nature of the overstretched state is unknown, despite its considerable importance for DNA's biological function and technological application. Overstretching is thought by some to be a force-induced denaturation and by others to consist of a transition to an elongated, hybridized state called S-DNA. Within a statistical mechanical model, we consider the effect upon overstretching of extreme sequence heterogeneity. "Chimeric" sequences possessing halves of markedly different AT composition elongate under fixed external conditions via distinct, spatially segregated transitions. The corresponding force-extension data vary with pulling rate in a manner that depends qualitatively and strikingly upon whether the hybridized S-form is accessible. This observation implies a test for S-DNA that could be performed in experiment.

  15. Efficacy Testing of H56 cDNA Tattoo Immunization against Tuberculosis in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E; Domaszewska, Teresa; Schürer, Stefanie; Zedler, Ulrike; Brinkmann, Volker; Sijts, Alice J A M; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ), remains a global threat. The only approved vaccine against TB, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), provides insufficient protection and, being a live vaccine, can cause disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. Previously, we found that intradermal cDNA tattoo immunization with cDNA of tetanus toxoid fragment C domain 1 fused to cDNA of the fusion protein H56, comprising the Mtb antigens Ag85B, ESAT-6, and Rv2660c, induced antigen-specific CD8 + T cell responses in vivo . As cDNA tattoo immunization would be safer than a live vaccine in immunocompromised patients, we tested the protective efficacy of intradermal tattoo immunization against TB with H56 cDNA, as well as with H56_E, a construct optimized for epitope processing in a mouse model. As Mtb antigens can be used in combination with BCG to boost immune responses, we also tested the protective efficacy of heterologous prime-boost, using dermal tattoo immunization with H56_E cDNA to boost BCG immunization in mice. Dermal H56 and H56_E cDNA immunization induced H56-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cell responses and Ag85B-specific IgG antibodies, but did not reduce bacterial loads, although immunization with H56_E ameliorated lung pathology. Both subcutaneous and intradermal immunization with BCG resulted in broad cellular immune responses, with increased frequencies of CD4 + T effector memory cells, T follicular helper cells, and germinal center B cells, and resulted in reduced bacterial loads and lung pathology. Heterologous vaccination with BCG/H56_E cDNA induced increased H56-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cell cytokine responses compared to vaccination with BCG alone, and lung pathology was significantly decreased in BCG/H56_E cDNA immunized mice compared to unvaccinated controls. However, bacterial loads were not decreased after heterologous vaccination compared to BCG alone. CD4 + T cells responding to Ag85B- and ESAT-6

  16. Detection of colorectal serrated polyps by stool DNA testing: comparison with fecal immunochemical testing for occult blood (FIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell I Heigh

    Full Text Available Precursors to 1/3 of colorectal cancer (CRC, serrated polyps have been under-detected by screening due to their inconspicuous, non-hemorrhagic, and proximal nature. A new multi-target stool DNA test (multi-target sDNA shows high sensitivity for both CRC and advanced adenomas. Screen detection of serrated polyps by this approach requires further validation. We sought to assess and compare noninvasive detection of sessile serrated polyps (SSP ≥ 1 cm by sDNA and an occult blood fecal immunochemical test (FIT.In a blinded prospective study, a single stool sample used for both tests was collected from 456 asymptomatic adults prior to screening or surveillance colonoscopy (criterion standard. All 29 patients with SSP ≥ 1 cm were included as cases and all 232 with no neoplastic findings as controls. Buffered stool samples were processed and frozen on receipt; Exact Sciences performed sDNA in batches using optimized analytical methods. The sDNA multi-marker panel targets methylated BMP3 (mBMP3 and NDRG4, mutant KRAS, β-actin, and hemoglobin. FIT (Polymedco OC-FIT Check was performed in separate lab ≤ 2 days post defecation and evaluated at cutoffs of 50 (FIT-50 and 100 ng/ml (FIT-100.MEDIAN AGES: cases 61 (range 57-77, controls 62 (52-70, p = NS. Women comprised 59% and 51%, p = NS, respectively. SSP median size was 1.2 cm (1-3 cm, 93% were proximal, and 64% had synchronous diminutive polyps. Among multi-target sDNA markers, mBMP3 proved highly discriminant for detection of SSP ≥ 1 cm (AUC = 0.87, p<0.00001; other DNA markers provided no incremental sensitivity. Hemoglobin alone showed no discrimination (AUC = 0.50, p = NS. At matched specificities, detection of SSP ≥ 1 cm by stool mBMP3 was significantly greater than by FIT-50 (66% vs 10%, p = 0.0003 or FIT-100 (63% vs 0%, p<0.0001.In a screening and surveillance setting, SSP ≥ 1 cm can be detected noninvasively by stool assay of exfoliated DNA markers, especially mBMP3. FIT appears to

  17. Integrating prior knowledge in multiple testing under dependence with applications to detecting differential DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Pei Fen; Chiang, Derek Y

    2012-09-01

    DNA methylation has emerged as an important hallmark of epigenetics. Numerous platforms including tiling arrays and next generation sequencing, and experimental protocols are available for profiling DNA methylation. Similar to other tiling array data, DNA methylation data shares the characteristics of inherent correlation structure among nearby probes. However, unlike gene expression or protein DNA binding data, the varying CpG density which gives rise to CpG island, shore and shelf definition provides exogenous information in detecting differential methylation. This article aims to introduce a robust testing and probe ranking procedure based on a nonhomogeneous hidden Markov model that incorporates the above-mentioned features for detecting differential methylation. We revisit the seminal work of Sun and Cai (2009, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B (Statistical Methodology)71, 393-424) and propose modeling the nonnull using a nonparametric symmetric distribution in two-sided hypothesis testing. We show that this model improves probe ranking and is robust to model misspecification based on extensive simulation studies. We further illustrate that our proposed framework achieves good operating characteristics as compared to commonly used methods in real DNA methylation data that aims to detect differential methylation sites. © 2012, The International Biometric Society.

  18. Comparative evaluation of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test, version 1.5, by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test using venous blood sample has been used for many years in low resource settings for early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in children less than 18 months. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance characteristics of ...

  19. Design and Test of an Oscillation-based System Architecture for DNA Sensor Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Hongyuan; Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Richardson, Andrew; Zhang, X.; Nouet, Pascal; Azais, Florence

    2005-01-01

    A DfT strategy for MEMS-based DNA sensors is investigated in this paper. Based on a fault-free and defect model developed for a single sensing element and the VHDL-AMS simulation results, it is implied that an oscillation-based interface might be a potential solution for both testing and read out of

  20. Pitfalls of establishing DNA barcoding systems in protists: the cryptophyceae as a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoef-Emden, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5'-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene). In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC), have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed.

  1. Pitfalls of establishing DNA barcoding systems in protists: the cryptophyceae as a test case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hoef-Emden

    Full Text Available A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5'-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene. In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC, have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed.

  2. Pitfalls of Establishing DNA Barcoding Systems in Protists: The Cryptophyceae as a Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoef-Emden, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5′-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene). In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC), have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed. PMID:22970104

  3. The clinical utility of HPV DNA testing in cervical cancer screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatla, Neerja; Moda, Nidhi

    2009-09-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be the commonest cause of death among women in developing countries, largely due to the failure to the inability to sustain effective cytology-based screening programs. While this burden may come down following implementation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, screening will still be required. HPV DNA testing is a promising new technology for cervical cancer prevention and is the most reproducible of all cervical cancer screening tests. Presently, the two assays most widely used for the detection of genital types are the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Hybrid Capture 2 assays (hc2). Rapid, affordable tests are expected to be available soon. HPV DNA testing can be used in a variety of clinical scenarios that include primary screening in women older than 30 yr; as an adjunctive test to cytology; in the triage of women with an equivocal cytologic report, e.g., ASC-US; or for follow-up post-treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). HPV DNA testing can also be performed on self-collected samples, which allows screening in remote areas and also in women who refuse gynecologic examination.

  4. The usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid tests for neurosyphilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests for syphilis at a large academic hospital, clinical and laboratory data on 644 patients in whom such testing was requested over a 12-month period were analysed. In 198 cases (31 %) the Treponema paJlidum haemagglutination (TPHA) screening test could not ...

  5. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenhammar, Ann-Charlotte; Gunnarson, Albin; Hansson, Fredrik; Jonsson, Anders

    2016-04-22

    Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR) in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil(-1)) in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g(-1) soil) in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20%) showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g(-1) soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g(-1) soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of prevention of

  6. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Charlotte Wallenhammar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil−1 in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g−1 soil in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20% showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g−1 soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g−1 soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of

  7. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D.; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M.; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R.; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N.; Frost, Kathy L.; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K.; Maslow, Joel N.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Yao, Xiao-jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract. PMID:28589934

  8. Forensic individual age estimation with DNA: From initial approaches to methylation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Aradas, A; Phillips, C; Lareu, M V

    2017-07-01

    Individual age estimation is a key factor in forensic science analysis that can provide very useful information applicable to criminal, legal, and anthropological investigations. Forensic age inference was initially based on morphological inspection or radiography and only later began to adopt molecular approaches. However, a lack of accuracy or technical problems hampered the introduction of these DNA-based methodologies in casework analysis. A turning point occurred when the epigenetic signature of DNA methylation was observed to gradually change during an individual´s lifespan. In the last four years, the number of publications reporting DNA methylation age-correlated changes has gradually risen and the forensic community now has a range of age methylation tests applicable to forensic casework. Most forensic age predictor models have been developed based on blood DNA samples, but additional tissues are now also being explored. This review assesses the most widely adopted genes harboring methylation sites, detection technologies, statistical age-predictive analyses, and potential causes of variation in age estimates. Despite the need for further work to improve predictive accuracy and establishing a broader range of tissues for which tests can analyze the most appropriate methylation sites, several forensic age predictors have now been reported that provide consistency in their prediction accuracies (predictive error of ±4 years); this makes them compelling tools with the potential to contribute key information to help guide criminal investigations. Copyright © 2017 Central Police University.

  9. Determination of antinucleic factors and anti-DNA antibodies with immunefluorescence, radioimmunoassay and latex-test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, E.M.; Hoffmann, R.; Botzenhardt, U.; Mainz Univ.

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained with the 3 test methods are not completely equal. This is, on the one hand, based on the fact that at least in the fluorescence test other antibodies than in the DNS-compound test are also detected. Quantitatively, however, the two tests show a good correlation to the progress of the illness; strong positive DNA-compound is practically only found in SLE. The authors were able to prove that the addition of purified C1 or C1q components of the complementary system to the test can result in a DNA binding of over 50% and, consequently, in incorrect positive values in the compound test. The Latex test is less suitable for diagnosis and course observation since it relatively often renders negative results at established cases of SLE with distinct illness activity on the one hand, while on the other hand, quantitative evidence, which is desirable for assessing the illness activity, is not possible. (orig./GSE) [de

  10. DnaSAM: Software to perform neutrality testing for large datasets with complex null models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Andrew J; Liechty, John D; Tearse, Brandon R; Pande, Barnaly; Neale, David B

    2010-05-01

    Patterns of DNA sequence polymorphisms can be used to understand the processes of demography and adaptation within natural populations. High-throughput generation of DNA sequence data has historically been the bottleneck with respect to data processing and experimental inference. Advances in marker technologies have largely solved this problem. Currently, the limiting step is computational, with most molecular population genetic software allowing a gene-by-gene analysis through a graphical user interface. An easy-to-use analysis program that allows both high-throughput processing of multiple sequence alignments along with the flexibility to simulate data under complex demographic scenarios is currently lacking. We introduce a new program, named DnaSAM, which allows high-throughput estimation of DNA sequence diversity and neutrality statistics from experimental data along with the ability to test those statistics via Monte Carlo coalescent simulations. These simulations are conducted using the ms program, which is able to incorporate several genetic parameters (e.g. recombination) and demographic scenarios (e.g. population bottlenecks). The output is a set of diversity and neutrality statistics with associated probability values under a user-specified null model that are stored in easy to manipulate text file. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Field testing of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in cattle in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fuhui; Zhang, Yaobi; Lin, Jiaojiao; Zuo, Xin; Shen, Wei; Cai, Yiumin; Ye, Ping; Bickle, Quentin D; Taylor, Martin G

    2002-11-01

    Vaccines are needed to reduce the zoonotic reservoir of Schistosoma japonicum infection in bovines in China. We have developed two experimental DNA vaccines and have already shown these to be capable of inducing partial protection in water buffalo naturally exposed to the risk of S. japonicum infection in the field. We now report a similar field trial in cattle, the other major bovine reservoir host species in China. Groups of cattle were vaccinated with the VRSj28 vaccine or the VRSj23 vaccine, or, to test whether protection could be enhanced by combination vaccination, with both these DNA vaccines together. After vaccination, the cattle were exposed to natural infection in the field for a period of 54 days. Worm and egg counts carried out at the end of the experiment showed that each of the vaccine groups showed partial resistance, and that combined vaccination was not more effective than vaccination with the individual plasmids.

  12. Comparison of the cobas Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Test with the Hybrid Capture 2 and Linear Array HPV DNA Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadorra, Mark; LaMere, Brandon J.; Kail, Randi; Aldrich, Carrie; Kinney, Walter; Fetterman, Barbara; Lorey, Thomas; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    The cobas human papillomavirus (HPV) test (cobas) was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and identifies HPV16 and HPV18 separately as well as detecting a pool of 11 HR-HPV genotypes (HPV31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -68) and also HPV66. We compared cobas, Linear Array (LA), and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assays for detection of carcinogenic HPV DNA, and cobas and LA for detection of HPV16 and HPV18 DNA, among the first 1,852 women enrolled in the HPV Persistence and Progression Cohort (PaP Cohort) study. Specimens were tested by all 3 assays 1 year after an HC2-positive result. In 1,824 specimens with cobas results, cobas had an 85.9% agreement with HC2 and 91.0% agreement with LA for carcinogenic HPV detection. When results between cobas and HC2 disagreed, cobas tended to call more women HPV positive (P < 0.01). Categorizing cobas and LA results hierarchically according to cancer risk (HPV16, HPV18, other carcinogenic HPV genotypes, or carcinogen negative), there was a 90% agreement for all categories of HPV (n = 1,824). We found good agreement between the two U.S. FDA-approved HPV tests, with discrepancies between the two assays due to specific characteristics of the individual assays. Additional studies are needed to compare HC2 and cobas for detecting and predicting CIN3 to understand the clinical implications of the discrepant test results between the two tests. PMID:22075592

  13. Screening Test for Shed Skin Cells by Measuring the Ratio of Human DNA to Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Takahashi, Shirushi; Kurosu, Akira; Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A novel screening method for shed skin cells by detecting Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), which is a resident bacterium on skin, was developed. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected using real-time PCR. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in all 20 human skin surface samples. Although not present in blood and urine samples, S. epidermidis was detected in 6 of 20 saliva samples, and 5 of 18 semen samples. The ratio of human DNA to S. epidermidisDNA was significantly smaller in human skin surface samples than in saliva and semen samples in which S. epidermidis was detected. Therefore, although skin cells could not be identified by detecting only S. epidermidis, they could be distinguished by measuring the S. epidermidis to human DNA ratio. This method could be applied to casework touch samples, which suggests that it is useful for screening whether skin cells and human DNA are present on potential evidentiary touch samples. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Feasibility of testing DNA repair inhibitors for mutagenicity by a simple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sideropoulos, A.S.; Specht, S.M.; Jones, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    A simple screening methodology for the determination of mutagenicity of DNA repair inhibitors has been tested in this laboratory. Radiation-resistant E. coli B/r and WP2 hcr + and hcr - are suitable strains for mutagenicity testing. In these strains irradiated with 40-60 ergs/mm 2 , chemicals which interfere with repair of ultraviolet-induced pre-mutational lesions can be shown to enhance significantly the frequency of mutations to streptomycin resistance. This phenomenon is termed 'mutational synergism' [18,20]. We have attempted to apply the procedure for securing data for 'mutational synergism' between ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a number of antimalarial drugs including quinine hydrochloride (50 μg/ml), quinine hydrobromide (50 μg/ml), primaquine diphosphate (50 μg/ml), chloroquine (50 μg/ml), quinine (50 μg/ml) and quinacrine dihydrochloride (25 μg/ml). All drugs tested give synergistic effects with UV light. The synergistic activity ranges from 3- to 35-fold. Quinine and quinacrine dihydrochloride have been found to be much more efficient enhancers of the mutagenic effect of UV than caffeine. In general, we have found that the expression of synergistic action occurs at a concentration well below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) with the drugs tested. The implication of these observations in the establishment of a screening method for the evaluation of the mutagenicity of DNA repair inhibitors is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Feasibility of testing DNA repair inhibitors for mutagenicity by a simple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sideropoulos, A.S.; Specht, S.M.; Jones, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    A simple screening methodology for the determination of mutagenictity of DNA repair inhibitors has been tested in this laboratory. Radiation-resistant E. coli B/r and WP2 hcr + and hcr - are suitable strains for mutagenicity testing. In these strains irradiated with 40-60 ergs/mm 2 , chemicals which interfere with repair of ultraviolet-induced pre-mutational lesions can be shown to enhance significantly the frequency of mutations to streptomycin resistance. This phenomenon is termed mutational synergism. We have attempted to apply the procedure for securing data for mutational synergism between ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a number of antimalarial drugs including quinine hydrochloride (50 μg/ml), quinine hydrobromide (50 μg/ml), primaquine diphosphate (50 μg/ml), chloroquine (50μg/ml) and quinacrine dihydrochloride (25 μg/ml). All drugs tested give synergistic effets with UV light. The synergistic activity ranges from 3- to 35-fold. Quinine and quinacrine dihydrochloride have been found to be much more efficient enhancers of the mutagenic effect of UV than caffeine. In general, we have found that the expression of synergistic action occurs at a concentration well below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) with the drugs tested. The implication of these observations in the establishment of a screening method for the evaluation of the mutagenicity of DNA repair inhibitors is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Feasibility of testing DNA repair inhibitors for mutagenicity by a simple method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideropoulos, A S; Specht, S M; Jones, M T [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1980-04-01

    A simple screening methodology for the determination of mutagenictity of DNA repair inhibitors has been tested in this laboratory. Radiation-resistant E. coli B/r and WP2 hcr/sup +/ and hcr/sup -/ are suitable strains for mutagenicity testing. In these strains irradiated with 40-60 ergs/mm/sup 2/, chemicals which interfere with repair of ultraviolet-induced pre-mutational lesions can be shown to enhance significantly the frequency of mutations to streptomycin resistance. This phenomenon is termed mutational synergism. We have attempted to apply the procedure for securing data for mutational synergism between ultraviolet (uv) radiation and a number of antimalarial drugs including quinine hydrochloride (50 ..mu..g/ml), quinine hydrobromide (50 ..mu..g/ml), primaquine diphosphate (50 ..mu..g/ml), chloroquine (50..mu..g/ml) and quinacrine dihydrochloride (25 ..mu..g/ml). All drugs tested give synergistic effects with uv light. The synergistic activity ranges from 3- to 35-fold. Quinine and quinacrine dihydrochloride have been found to be much more efficient enhancers of the mutagenic effect of uv than caffeine. In general, we have found that the expression of synergistic action occurs at a concentration well below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) with the drugs tested. The implication of these observations in the establishment of a screening method for the evaluation of the mutagenicity of DNA repair inhibitors is discussed.

  17. Feasibility of testing DNA repair inhibitors for mutagenicity by a simple method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideropoulos, A S; Specht, S M; Jones, M T [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1980-04-01

    A simple screening methodology for the determination of mutagenicity of DNA repair inhibitors has been tested in this laboratory. Radiation-resistant E. coli B/r and WP2 hcr/sup +/ and hcr/sup -/ are suitable strains for mutagenicity testing. In these strains irradiated with 40-60 ergs/mm/sup 2/, chemicals which interfere with repair of ultraviolet-induced pre-mutational lesions can be shown to enhance significantly the frequency of mutations to streptomycin resistance. This phenomenon is termed 'mutational synergism' (18,20). We have attempted to apply the procedure for securing data for 'mutational synergism' between ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a number of antimalarial drugs including quinine hydrochloride (50 ..mu..g/ml), quinine hydrobromide (50 ..mu..g/ml), primaquine diphosphate (50 ..mu..g/ml), chloroquine (50 ..mu..g/ml), quinine (50 ..mu..g/ml) and quinacrine dihydrochloride (25 ..mu..g/ml). All drugs tested give synergistic effects with UV light. The synergistic activity ranges from 3- to 35-fold. Quinine and quinacrine dihydrochloride have been found to be much more efficient enhancers of the mutagenic effect of UV than caffeine. In general, we have found that the expression of synergistic action occurs at a concentration well below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) with the drugs tested. The implication of these observations in the establishment of a screening method for the evaluation of the mutagenicity of DNA repair inhibitors is discussed.

  18. A leukocyte activation test identifies food items which induce release of DNA by innate immune peripheral blood leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Irma; Weiss, Theresa R; Yousaf, Muhammad N; Ali, Ather; Mehal, Wajahat Z

    2018-01-01

    Leukocyte activation (LA) testing identifies food items that induce a patient specific cellular response in the immune system, and has recently been shown in a randomized double blinded prospective study to reduce symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We hypothesized that test reactivity to particular food items, and the systemic immune response initiated by these food items, is due to the release of cellular DNA from blood immune cells. We tested this by quantifying total DNA concentration in the cellular supernatant of immune cells exposed to positive and negative foods from 20 healthy volunteers. To establish if the DNA release by positive samples is a specific phenomenon, we quantified myeloperoxidase (MPO) in cellular supernatants. We further assessed if a particular immune cell population (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) was activated by the positive food items by flow cytometry analysis. To identify the signaling pathways that are required for DNA release we tested if specific inhibitors of key signaling pathways could block DNA release. Foods with a positive LA test result gave a higher supernatant DNA content when compared to foods with a negative result. This was specific as MPO levels were not increased by foods with a positive LA test. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors resulted in inhibition of positive food stimulated DNA release. Positive foods resulted in CD63 levels greater than negative foods in eosinophils in 76.5% of tests. LA test identifies food items that result in release of DNA and activation of peripheral blood innate immune cells in a PKC dependent manner, suggesting that this LA test identifies food items that result in release of inflammatory markers and activation of innate immune cells. This may be the basis for the improvement in symptoms in IBS patients who followed an LA test guided diet.

  19. Robust joint score tests in the application of DNA methylation data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Fu, Yuejiao; Wang, Xiaogang; Qiu, Weiliang

    2018-05-18

    Recently differential variability has been showed to be valuable in evaluating the association of DNA methylation to the risks of complex human diseases. The statistical tests based on both differential methylation level and differential variability can be more powerful than those based only on differential methylation level. Anh and Wang (2013) proposed a joint score test (AW) to simultaneously detect for differential methylation and differential variability. However, AW's method seems to be quite conservative and has not been fully compared with existing joint tests. We proposed three improved joint score tests, namely iAW.Lev, iAW.BF, and iAW.TM, and have made extensive comparisons with the joint likelihood ratio test (jointLRT), the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, and the AW test. Systematic simulation studies showed that: 1) the three improved tests performed better (i.e., having larger power, while keeping nominal Type I error rates) than the other three tests for data with outliers and having different variances between cases and controls; 2) for data from normal distributions, the three improved tests had slightly lower power than jointLRT and AW. The analyses of two Illumina HumanMethylation27 data sets GSE37020 and GSE20080 and one Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC data set GSE107080 demonstrated that three improved tests had higher true validation rates than those from jointLRT, KS, and AW. The three proposed joint score tests are robust against the violation of normality assumption and presence of outlying observations in comparison with other three existing tests. Among the three proposed tests, iAW.BF seems to be the most robust and effective one for all simulated scenarios and also in real data analyses.

  20. Dredging Research, Volume 3, No. 3. DNA Technology to Impact Dredged Material Projects through Faster, More Accurate Testing Methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonald, Allison

    2000-01-01

    .... Most people associate DNA with criminal cases and paternity testing, but thanks to research projects such as the Human Genome Project, which has isolated and identified thousands of genes, many...

  1. A Bayesian decision procedure for testing multiple hypotheses in DNA microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Villegas, Miguel A; Salazar, Isabel; Sanz, Luis

    2014-02-01

    DNA microarray experiments require the use of multiple hypothesis testing procedures because thousands of hypotheses are simultaneously tested. We deal with this problem from a Bayesian decision theory perspective. We propose a decision criterion based on an estimation of the number of false null hypotheses (FNH), taking as an error measure the proportion of the posterior expected number of false positives with respect to the estimated number of true null hypotheses. The methodology is applied to a Gaussian model when testing bilateral hypotheses. The procedure is illustrated with both simulated and real data examples and the results are compared to those obtained by the Bayes rule when an additive loss function is considered for each joint action and the generalized loss 0-1 function for each individual action. Our procedure significantly reduced the percentage of false negatives whereas the percentage of false positives remains at an acceptable level.

  2. Determination of antinucleic factors and anti-DNA and antibodies with immunefluorescence, radioimmunoassay and latex-test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, E M; Hoffmann, R; Botzenhardt, U

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained with the 3 test methods are not completely equal. This is, on the one hand, based on the fact that at least in the fluorescence test other antibodies than in the DNA-compound test are also detected. Quantitatively, however, the two tests show a good correlation to the progress of the illness; strong positive DNA-compound is practically only found in SLE. The authors were able to prove that the addition of purified C1 or C1q components of the complementary system to the test can result in a DNA binding of over 50% and, consequently, in incorrect positive values in the compound test. The Latex test is less suitable for diagnosis and course observation since it relatively often renders negative results at established cases of SLE with distinct illness activity on the one hand, while on the other hand, quantitative evidence, which is desirable for assessing the illness activity, is not possible.

  3. Forgotten evidence: A mixed methods study of why sexual assault kits (SAKs) are not submitted for DNA forensic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca; Fehler-Cabral, Giannina; Bybee, Deborah; Shaw, Jessica

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the United States, hundreds of thousands of sexual assault kits (SAKs) (also termed "rape kits") have not been submitted by the police for forensic DNA testing. DNA evidence can help sexual assault investigations and prosecutions by identifying offenders, revealing serial offenders through DNA matches across cases, and exonerating those who have been wrongly accused. In this article, we describe a 5-year action research project conducted with 1 city that had large numbers of untested SAKs-Detroit, Michigan-and our examination into why thousands of rape kits in this city were never submitted for forensic DNA testing. This mixed methods study combined ethnographic observations and qualitative interviews to identify stakeholders' perspectives as to why rape kits were not routinely submitted for testing. Then, we quantitatively examined whether these factors may have affected police practices regarding SAK testing, as evidenced by predictable changes in SAK submission rates over time. Chronic resource scarcity only partially explained why the organizations that serve rape victims-the police, crime lab, prosecution, and victim advocacy-could not test all rape kits, investigate all reported sexual assaults, and support all rape survivors. SAK submission rates significantly increased once criminal justice professionals in this city had full access to the FBI DNA forensic database Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), but even then, most SAKs were still not submitted for DNA testing. Building crime laboratories' capacities for DNA testing and training police on the utility of forensic evidence and best practices in sexual assault investigations can help remedy, and possibly prevent, the problem of untested rape kits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Utilization of DNA comet assay and half embryo test to identify irradiated lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Maria Fernanda; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Legumes make an important contribution to human nutrition on a worldwide basis. Insect infestation cause extensive damage to stored grains. Over the last few decades some countries adopted food irradiation as a safe food process. Radiation's processing on foods improves hygienic quality and extends their shelf life. The use of radiation treatment to reduce the microbial population and thereby extend the shelf life in legumes has been reported in many papers. Irradiation has been shown to be an effective pest control method for these commodities and a good alternative to prohibited methyl bromide. Radiation disinfestation can facilitate trade in foods that often harbor insect pests of quarantine importance. Although the wholesomeness of irradiated food is no longer a question there is a need for irradiation control in the international trade of foods, in order to enhance the consumer confidence in the regulation. As a screening methods to identify irradiated lentils, processed by e-beam as a food treatment to disinfestation, the DNA Comet Assay and Half Embryo tests were performed. The methodologies used in this work are based upon biological changes that occur in Brazilian lentils. The samples were irradiated in an electron beam accelerator facility of Radiation Dynamics Inc., USA (E=1,5 MeV, l=25 mA). The irradiation doses were 0,7; 1,4 and 3,0 kGy at dry conditions. The thickness of samples was less than 0,5 cm. A sensitive technique to detect DNA fragmentation is the microgel electrophoresis of single cells or nuclei, also called 'comet assay'. Since the large molecule of DNA is an easy target for ionizing radiation, changes in DNA offer potential as a detection method. It is restricted to foods that have not been subjected to heat or other treatments, which also cause DNA fragmentation. Lentil samples were crushed with a mortar and pestle and was transferred to 3ml ice-cold PBS. This suspension was stirred for 5 minutes and filtered. 100μl cell

  5. Potential of Environmental DNA to Evaluate Northern Pike (Esox lucius) Eradication Efforts: An Experimental Test and Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunker, Kristine J; Sepulveda, Adam J; Massengill, Robert L; Olsen, Jeffrey B; Russ, Ora L; Wenburg, John K; Antonovich, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Determining the success of invasive species eradication efforts is challenging because populations at very low abundance are difficult to detect. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has recently emerged as a powerful tool for detecting rare aquatic animals; however, detectable fragments of DNA can persist over time despite absence of the targeted taxa and can therefore complicate eDNA sampling after an eradication event. This complication is a large concern for fish eradication efforts in lakes since killed fish can sink to the bottom and slowly decay. DNA released from these carcasses may remain detectable for long periods. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of eDNA sampling to detect invasive Northern pike (Esox lucius) following piscicide eradication efforts in southcentral Alaskan lakes. We used field observations and experiments to test the sensitivity of our Northern pike eDNA assay and to evaluate the persistence of detectable DNA emitted from Northern pike carcasses. We then used eDNA sampling and traditional sampling (i.e., gillnets) to test for presence of Northern pike in four lakes subjected to a piscicide-treatment designed to eradicate this species. We found that our assay could detect an abundant, free-roaming population of Northern pike and could also detect low-densities of Northern pike held in cages. For these caged Northern pike, probability of detection decreased with distance from the cage. We then stocked three lakes with Northern pike carcasses and collected eDNA samples 7, 35 and 70 days post-stocking. We detected DNA at 7 and 35 days, but not at 70 days. Finally, we collected eDNA samples ~ 230 days after four lakes were subjected to piscicide-treatments and detected Northern pike DNA in 3 of 179 samples, with a single detection at each of three lakes, though we did not catch any Northern pike in gillnets. Taken together, we found that eDNA can help to inform eradication efforts if used in conjunction with multiple lines of inquiry and sampling

  6. Potential of Environmental DNA to Evaluate Northern Pike (Esox lucius Eradication Efforts: An Experimental Test and Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine J Dunker

    Full Text Available Determining the success of invasive species eradication efforts is challenging because populations at very low abundance are difficult to detect. Environmental DNA (eDNA sampling has recently emerged as a powerful tool for detecting rare aquatic animals; however, detectable fragments of DNA can persist over time despite absence of the targeted taxa and can therefore complicate eDNA sampling after an eradication event. This complication is a large concern for fish eradication efforts in lakes since killed fish can sink to the bottom and slowly decay. DNA released from these carcasses may remain detectable for long periods. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of eDNA sampling to detect invasive Northern pike (Esox lucius following piscicide eradication efforts in southcentral Alaskan lakes. We used field observations and experiments to test the sensitivity of our Northern pike eDNA assay and to evaluate the persistence of detectable DNA emitted from Northern pike carcasses. We then used eDNA sampling and traditional sampling (i.e., gillnets to test for presence of Northern pike in four lakes subjected to a piscicide-treatment designed to eradicate this species. We found that our assay could detect an abundant, free-roaming population of Northern pike and could also detect low-densities of Northern pike held in cages. For these caged Northern pike, probability of detection decreased with distance from the cage. We then stocked three lakes with Northern pike carcasses and collected eDNA samples 7, 35 and 70 days post-stocking. We detected DNA at 7 and 35 days, but not at 70 days. Finally, we collected eDNA samples ~ 230 days after four lakes were subjected to piscicide-treatments and detected Northern pike DNA in 3 of 179 samples, with a single detection at each of three lakes, though we did not catch any Northern pike in gillnets. Taken together, we found that eDNA can help to inform eradication efforts if used in conjunction with multiple lines of

  7. Potential of environmental DNA to evaluate Northern pike (Esox lucius) eradication efforts: An experimental test and case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunker, Kristine J.; Sepulveda, Adam; Massengill, Robert L.; Olsen, Jeffrey B.; Russ, Ora L.; Wenburg, John K.; Antonovich, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Determining the success of invasive species eradication efforts is challenging because populations at very low abundance are difficult to detect. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has recently emerged as a powerful tool for detecting rare aquatic animals; however, detectable fragments of DNA can persist over time despite absence of the targeted taxa and can therefore complicate eDNA sampling after an eradication event. This complication is a large concern for fish eradication efforts in lakes since killed fish can sink to the bottom and slowly decay. DNA released from these carcasses may remain detectable for long periods. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of eDNA sampling to detect invasive Northern pike (Esox lucius) following piscicide eradication efforts in southcentral Alaskan lakes. We used field observations and experiments to test the sensitivity of our Northern pike eDNA assay and to evaluate the persistence of detectable DNA emitted from Northern pike carcasses. We then used eDNA sampling and traditional sampling (i.e., gillnets) to test for presence of Northern pike in four lakes subjected to a piscicide-treatment designed to eradicate this species. We found that our assay could detect an abundant, free-roaming population of Northern pike and could also detect low-densities of Northern pike held in cages. For these caged Northern pike, probability of detection decreased with distance from the cage. We then stocked three lakes with Northern pike carcasses and collected eDNA samples 7, 35 and 70 days post-stocking. We detected DNA at 7 and 35 days, but not at 70 days. Finally, we collected eDNA samples ~ 230 days after four lakes were subjected to piscicide-treatments and detected Northern pike DNA in 3 of 179 samples, with a single detection at each of three lakes, though we did not catch any Northern pike in gillnets. Taken together, we found that eDNA can help to inform eradication efforts if used in conjunction with multiple lines of inquiry and sampling

  8. Evaluation of tests using DNA repair-deficient bacteria for predicting genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifer, Z.; Kada, T.; Mandel, M.; Zeiger, E.; Stafford, R.; Rosenkranz, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of DNA-damaging agents by repair-deficient bacterial assays is based on the differential inhibition of growth of repair-proficient and repair-deficient bacterial pairs. The various methodologies used are described and recommendations are made for their improved use. In a survey of the literature through April 1979, 91 of 276 papers evaluated contained usable data, resulting in an analysis of 611 compounds that had been assayed in 1 or more of 55 pairs of repair-proficient and repair-deficient strains. The results indicate that a liquid suspension assay is more sensitive than a spot (diffusion) test. There was a 78% correspondence between results obtained with E. coli polA and Bacillus subtilis (H17/M45, 17A/45T) rec assay and between E. coli polA and Proteus mirabilis. In a comparison of test results with carcinogenicity data, 44 of 71 (62%) carcinogenic compounds assayed by the polA system were positive, 10 (14%) were negative, and 17 (24%) gave No Test or doubtful results. The results were analyzed with respect to chemical classes. E. coli polA detected the highest percentage of hydroxylamines and alkyl epoxides. The B. subtilis rec assay detected the highest percentage of nitrosamines and sulfur and nitrogen oxides. It is concluded that some of these test systems are effective tools for the detection of DNA-damaging and potentially carcinogenic compounds, especially if the assay is done in liquid suspension and if more than 1 pair of tester strains is used. Advantages and disadvantages of the assay are discussed and suggestions are made for improvements in the system.

  9. Testing the Efficacy of DNA Barcodes for Identifying the Vascular Plants of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braukmann, Thomas W A; Kuzmina, Maria L; Sills, Jesse; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-01-01

    Their relatively slow rates of molecular evolution, as well as frequent exposure to hybridization and introgression, often make it difficult to discriminate species of vascular plants with the standard barcode markers (rbcL, matK, ITS2). Previous studies have examined these constraints in narrow geographic or taxonomic contexts, but the present investigation expands analysis to consider the performance of these gene regions in discriminating the species in local floras at sites across Canada. To test identification success, we employed a DNA barcode reference library with sequence records for 96% of the 5108 vascular plant species known from Canada, but coverage varied from 94% for rbcL to 60% for ITS2 and 39% for matK. Using plant lists from 27 national parks and one scientific reserve, we tested the efficacy of DNA barcodes in identifying the plants in simulated species assemblages from six biogeographic regions of Canada using BLAST and mothur. Mean pairwise distance (MPD) and mean nearest taxon distance (MNTD) were strong predictors of barcode performance for different plant families and genera, and both metrics supported ITS2 as possessing the highest genetic diversity. All three genes performed strongly in assigning the taxa present in local floras to the correct genus with values ranging from 91% for rbcL to 97% for ITS2 and 98% for matK. However, matK delivered the highest species discrimination (~81%) followed by ITS2 (~72%) and rbcL (~44%). Despite the low number of plant taxa in the Canadian Arctic, DNA barcodes had the least success in discriminating species from this biogeographic region with resolution ranging from 36% with rbcL to 69% with matK. Species resolution was higher in the other settings, peaking in the Woodland region at 52% for rbcL and 87% for matK. Our results indicate that DNA barcoding is very effective in identifying Canadian plants to a genus, and that it performs well in discriminating species in regions where floristic diversity is

  10. Effects of direct-to-consumer advertising and clinical guidelines on appropriate use of human papillomavirus DNA tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca Anhang; Frank, Richard G; Cleary, Paul D; Goldie, Sue J

    2011-02-01

    Both clinical guidelines and direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising influence the use of new health care technologies, but little is known about their relative effects. The introduction of a cervical cancer screening test in 2000 offered a unique opportunity to assess the 2 strategies. To evaluate the effects of clinical guidelines and a targeted DTC advertising campaign on overall and appropriate use of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA tests. Quasi-experimental study using difference-in-differences analysis. Data were MarketScan private insurance claims for 500,000 women aged 21 to 64 enrolled at least 12 consecutive months from January 2001 through December 2005. Both clinical guidelines and DTC advertising were associated with increases in overall HPV DNA test use. DTC advertising was associated with a statistically significant increase in HPV DNA test use in 2 groups of DTC cities (+5.57%, P advertising was associated with comparable increases in the probability of appropriate and inappropriate use of the HPV DNA test in primary screening. Clinical guideline releases from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and by a cosponsored panel, were associated with greater increases in HPV DNA tests for appropriate primary screening than for inappropriate primary screening (β = 0.3347, P advertising was associated with increased overall use of a cervical cancer screening test, whereas clinical guidelines were differentially associated with increased appropriate use. These findings suggest distinct influences of consumer marketing and professional guidelines on the use of health care products and services.

  11. Value of high-risk HPV-DNA testing in the triage of ASCUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverloo, Iréne; Andrae, Bengt; Wilander, Erik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) cells, occurring in organized cytological screening, may be either high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) positive or negative. To refine the assessment of women with ASCUS, a high-risk HPV-DNA test is recommended as triage in Sweden. A total of 197 consecutive women (mean age 39 years, range 21-60) with a diagnosis of ASCUS from the primary screening were selected for triage. Their cervical smears were collected and evaluated by using conventional cytological examination in combination with a high-risk HPV-DNA test (hybrid capture 2). The women were categorized into four groups: Group A, Cytology + /HPV + ; Group B, Cytology-/HPV + ; Group C, Cytology + /HPV-; and Group D, Cytology-/ HPV-. Women within Groups A-C were admitted for colposcopy and cervical biopsy. The women in Group D were considered as a low-risk group for tumor development, and were re-examined after three years in the next round of the organized screening. In women in Group A (n=58) the prevalence of histological verified CIN2-3 was 41%, in Group B (n=41) 20%, and in Group C (n=9) 0%. In Group D (n=89), repeated primary screening three years later revealed CIN2-3 in two biopsies from 74 women studied (age in women with ASCUS. It was 74% in women or =50 years. Adding a high-risk HPV test in secondary screening increased the identification of women with CIN2-3 lesions by 33% in comparison with repeat cytology (p=0.01). The clinical significance of the ASCUS diagnosis varied with age of the women.

  12. The DNA comet assay and the germination test in detection of food treated by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huachaca, Nelida Simona Marin

    2002-01-01

    Two methods of irradiated food detection, one biochemical, the comet assay and, other biological, the germination test, were applied in bovine meat and fruit samples. The comet assay detects the damage on DNA caused by ionizing radiation. The germination test evaluates the sensitivity to radiation of seeds as for germination ability, shooting and, rooting. The samples were irradiated in gamma font and electron accelerator. For bovine meat samples, the doses were 0.0; 2.5; 4.5 e 7.0 kGy at chilled condition and, 0.0; 2.5; 4.5; 7.0 e 8.5 kGy at frozen conditions. For fruit samples such as melon, watermelon, apple, orange, papaya and, tomato, the doses were: 0.0; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; 2.0 e 4.0 kGy. The differences between the gamma rays and the electron beam effects on extent of DNA migration and, on shooting and rooting, showed to be similar. The comet assay, under neutral conditions, permitted to discriminate between irradiated and unirradiated bovine meat samples, until one month of storage. Also, it was possible to distinguish, by the comet assay, the control sample with regard to irradiated fruit, at doses as low as 0,5 kGy. In the germination test, the root length was the best parameter to discriminate irradiated and unirradiated samples of melon, watermelon and tomato, while the germination percent was the best parameter for apple and orange. (author)

  13. Comparison of DNA testing strategies in monitoring human papillomavirus infection prevalence through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Carol Y; Li, Ling

    2016-11-07

    HPV DNA diagnostic tests for epidemiology monitoring (research purpose) or cervical cancer screening (clinical purpose) have often been considered separately. Women with positive Linear Array (LA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) research test results typically are neither informed nor referred for colposcopy. Recently, a sequential testing by using Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) HPV clinical test as a triage before genotype by LA has been adopted for monitoring HPV infections. Also, HC2 has been reported as a more feasible screening approach for cervical cancer in low-resource countries. Thus, knowing the performance of testing strategies incorporating HPV clinical test (i.e., HC2-only or using HC2 as a triage before genotype by LA) compared with LA-only testing in measuring HPV prevalence will be informative for public health practice. We conducted a Monte Carlo simulation study. Data were generated using mathematical algorithms. We designated the reported HPV infection prevalence in the U.S. and Latin America as the "true" underlying type-specific HPV prevalence. Analytical sensitivity of HC2 for detecting 14 high-risk (oncogenic) types was considered to be less than LA. Estimated-to-true prevalence ratios and percentage reductions were calculated. When the "true" HPV prevalence was designated as the reported prevalence in the U.S., with LA genotyping sensitivity and specificity of (0.95, 0.95), estimated-to-true prevalence ratios of 14 high-risk types were 2.132, 1.056, 0.958 for LA-only, HC2-only, and sequential testing, respectively. Estimated-to-true prevalence ratios of two vaccine-associated high-risk types were 2.359 and 1.063 for LA-only and sequential testing, respectively. When designated type-specific prevalence of HPV16 and 18 were reduced by 50 %, using either LA-only or sequential testing, prevalence estimates were reduced by 18 %. Estimated-to-true HPV infection prevalence ratios using LA-only testing strategy are generally higher than using HC2-only or

  14. Comparison of DNA testing strategies in monitoring human papillomavirus infection prevalence through simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Y. Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV DNA diagnostic tests for epidemiology monitoring (research purpose or cervical cancer screening (clinical purpose have often been considered separately. Women with positive Linear Array (LA polymerase chain reaction (PCR research test results typically are neither informed nor referred for colposcopy. Recently, a sequential testing by using Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2 HPV clinical test as a triage before genotype by LA has been adopted for monitoring HPV infections. Also, HC2 has been reported as a more feasible screening approach for cervical cancer in low-resource countries. Thus, knowing the performance of testing strategies incorporating HPV clinical test (i.e., HC2-only or using HC2 as a triage before genotype by LA compared with LA-only testing in measuring HPV prevalence will be informative for public health practice. Method We conducted a Monte Carlo simulation study. Data were generated using mathematical algorithms. We designated the reported HPV infection prevalence in the U.S. and Latin America as the “true” underlying type-specific HPV prevalence. Analytical sensitivity of HC2 for detecting 14 high-risk (oncogenic types was considered to be less than LA. Estimated-to-true prevalence ratios and percentage reductions were calculated. Results When the “true” HPV prevalence was designated as the reported prevalence in the U.S., with LA genotyping sensitivity and specificity of (0.95, 0.95, estimated-to-true prevalence ratios of 14 high-risk types were 2.132, 1.056, 0.958 for LA-only, HC2-only, and sequential testing, respectively. Estimated-to-true prevalence ratios of two vaccine-associated high-risk types were 2.359 and 1.063 for LA-only and sequential testing, respectively. When designated type-specific prevalence of HPV16 and 18 were reduced by 50 %, using either LA-only or sequential testing, prevalence estimates were reduced by 18 %. Conclusion Estimated-to-true HPV infection prevalence ratios using LA

  15. Validation of a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Cervical Screening Test That Provides Expanded HPV Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Maria; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Hyun, Noorie; Castle, Philip E; He, Xin; Dallal, Cher M; Chen, Jie; Gage, Julia C; Befano, Brian; Fetterman, Barbara; Lorey, Thomas; Poitras, Nancy; Raine-Bennett, Tina R; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schiffman, Mark

    2018-05-01

    As cervical cancer screening shifts from cytology to human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, a major question is the clinical value of identifying individual HPV types. We aimed to validate Onclarity (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, Sparks, MD), a nine-channel HPV test recently approved by the FDA, by assessing (i) the association of Onclarity types/channels with precancer/cancer; (ii) HPV type/channel agreement between the results of Onclarity and cobas (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA), another FDA-approved test; and (iii) Onclarity typing for all types/channels compared to typing results from a research assay (linear array [LA]; Roche). We compared Onclarity to histopathology, cobas, and LA. We tested a stratified random sample ( n = 9,701) of discarded routine clinical specimens that had tested positive by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen, Germantown, MD). A subset had already been tested by cobas and LA ( n = 1,965). Cervical histopathology was ascertained from electronic health records. Hierarchical Onclarity channels showed a significant linear association with histological severity. Onclarity and cobas had excellent agreement on partial typing of HPV16, HPV18, and the other 12 types as a pool (sample-weighted kappa value of 0.83); cobas was slightly more sensitive for HPV18 and slightly less sensitive for the pooled high-risk types. Typing by Onclarity showed excellent agreement with types and groups of types identified by LA (kappa values from 0.80 for HPV39/68/35 to 0.97 for HPV16). Onclarity typing results corresponded well to histopathology and to an already validated HPV DNA test and could provide additional clinical typing if such discrimination is determined to be clinically desirable. This is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Foreign copyrights may apply.

  16. Putting it all behind: long-term psychological impact of an inconclusive DNA test result for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Sandra; Otten, Wilma; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Asperen, Christi J; Tibben, Aad

    2008-10-01

    An inconclusive DNA-result for breast cancer may leave women with uncertainty that cannot be relieved. We assessed the influence of beliefs women held about their inconclusive DNA-result on psychological well-being and whether women had been able to put the period of DNA testing behind them. In total, 215 women completed a baseline and a follow-up questionnaire 2.5 till 7 years after DNA test disclosure. Within the group of 147 women who received an inconclusive result (either a personal result or the result of an affected family member) multiple regression analyses were applied to investigate the relevance of women's personal beliefs. Personal beliefs and ambivalence about an inconclusive DNA-result were associated with cancer-related worry and distress (P testing behind them, even after controlling for all measures of psychological distress (P Psychological distress measures may provide an important but incomplete picture of how women make sense of an inconclusive DNA-result. These findings underscore the importance of discussing counselees' beliefs and expectations openly to enhance well-being and adaptation on the long term.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Cervical Cancer Screening With Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing and HPV-16,18 Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Stout, Natasha K.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Goldie, Sue J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing and vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18 (HPV-16,18) motivates questions about the cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer prevention in the United States for unvaccinated older women and for girls eligible for vaccination. Methods An empirically calibrated model was used to assess the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), lifetime costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (2004 US dollars per QALY) of screening, vaccination of preadolescent girls, and vaccination combined with screening. Screening varied by initiation age (18, 21, or 25 years), interval (every 1, 2, 3, or 5 years), and test (HPV DNA testing of cervical specimens or cytologic evaluation of cervical cells with a Pap test). Testing strategies included: 1) cytology followed by HPV DNA testing for equivocal cytologic results (cytology with HPV test triage); 2) HPV DNA testing followed by cytology for positive HPV DNA results (HPV test with cytology triage); and 3) combined HPV DNA testing and cytology. Strategies were permitted to switch once at age 25, 30, or 35 years. Results For unvaccinated women, triennial cytology with HPV test triage, beginning by age 21 years and switching to HPV testing with cytology triage at age 30 years, cost $78 000 per QALY compared with the next best strategy. For girls vaccinated before age 12 years, this same strategy, beginning at age 25 years and switching at age 35 years, cost $41 000 per QALY with screening every 5 years and $188 000 per QALY screening triennially, each compared with the next best strategy. These strategies were more effective and cost-effective than screening women of all ages with cytology alone or cytology with HPV triage annually or biennially. Conclusions For both vaccinated and unvaccinated women, age-based screening by use of HPV DNA testing as a triage test for equivocal results in younger women and as a primary screening test in older women is expected to be more

  18. Analysis of fingerprint samples, testing various conditions, for forensic DNA identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Lana; Wurmbach, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Fingerprints can be of tremendous value for forensic biology, since they can be collected from a wide variety of evident types, such as handles of weapons, tools collected in criminal cases, and objects with no apparent staining. DNA obtained from fingerprints varies greatly in quality and quantity, which ultimately affects the quality of the resulting STR profiles. Additional difficulties can arise when fingerprint samples show mixed STR profiles due to the handling of multiple persons. After applying a tested protocol for sample collection (swabbing with 5% Triton X-100), DNA extraction (using an enzyme that works at elevated temperatures), and PCR amplification (AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® using 31cycles) extensive analysis was performed to better understand the challenges inherent to fingerprint samples, with the ultimate goal of developing valuable profiles (≥50% complete). The impact of time on deposited fingerprints was investigated, revealing that while the quality of profiles deteriorated, full STR profiles could still be obtained from samples after 40days of storage at room temperature. By comparing the STR profiles from fingerprints of the dominant versus the non-dominant hand, we found a slightly better quality from the non-dominant hand, which was not always significant. Substrates seem to have greater effects on fingerprints. Tests on glass, plastic, paper and metal (US Quarter dollar, made of Cu and Ni), common substrates in offices and homes, showed best results for glass, followed by plastic and paper, while almost no profiles were obtained from a Quarter dollar. Important for forensic casework, we also assessed three-person mixtures of touched fingerprint samples. Unlike routinely used approaches for sampling evidence, the surface of an object (bottle) was sectioned into six equal parts and separate samples were taken from each section. The samples were processed separately for DNA extraction and STR amplification. The results included a few single

  19. Rapid diagnostic tests as a source of DNA for Plasmodium species-specific real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Esbroeck Marjan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs as a source of DNA for Plasmodium species-specific real-time PCR. Methods First, the best method to recover DNA from RDTs was investigated and then the applicability of this DNA extraction method was assessed on 12 different RDT brands. Finally, two RDT brands (OptiMAL Rapid Malaria Test and SDFK60 malaria Ag Plasmodium falciparum/Pan test were comprehensively evaluated on a panel of clinical samples submitted for routine malaria diagnosis at ITM. DNA amplification was done with the 18S rRNA real-time PCR targeting the four Plasmodium species. Results of PCR on RDT were compared to those obtained by PCR on whole blood samples. Results Best results were obtained by isolating DNA from the proximal part of the nitrocellulose component of the RDT strip with a simple DNA elution method. The PCR on RDT showed a detection limit of 0.02 asexual parasites/μl, which was identical to the same PCR on whole blood. For all 12 RDT brands tested, DNA was detected except for one brand when a low parasite density sample was applied. In RDTs with a plastic seal covering the nitrocellulose strip, DNA extraction was hampered. PCR analysis on clinical RDT samples demonstrated correct identification for single species infections for all RDT samples with asexual parasites of P. falciparum (n = 60, Plasmodium vivax (n = 10, Plasmodium ovale (n = 10 and Plasmodium malariae (n = 10. Samples with only gametocytes were detected in all OptiMAL and in 10 of the 11 SDFK60 tests. None of the negative samples (n = 20 gave a signal by PCR on RDT. With PCR on RDT, higher Ct-values were observed than with PCR on whole blood, with a mean difference of 2.68 for OptiMAL and 3.53 for SDFK60. Mixed infections were correctly identified with PCR on RDT in 4/5 OptiMAL tests and 2/5 SDFK60 tests. Conclusions RDTs are a reliable source of DNA for Plasmodium real-time PCR. This study demonstrates the

  20. Using rapid diagnostic tests as source of malaria parasite DNA for molecular analyses in the era of declining malaria prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishengoma, Deus S; Lwitiho, Sudi; Madebe, Rashid A

    2011-01-01

    was conducted to examine if sufficient DNA could be successfully extracted from malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), used and collected as part of routine case management services in health facilities, and thus forming the basis for molecular analyses, surveillance and quality control (QC) testing of RDTs....... continued molecular surveillance of malaria parasites is important to early identify emerging anti-malarial drug resistance, it is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain parasite samples from ongoing studies, such as routine drug efficacy trials. To explore other sources of parasite DNA, this study...

  1. Improving enrichment of circulating fetal DNA for genetic testing: size fractionation followed by whole gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgez, Carolina J; Bischoff, Farideh Z

    2009-01-01

    Among the pitfalls of using cell-free fetal DNA in plasma for prenatal diagnosis is quality of the recovered DNA fragments and concomitant presence of maternal DNA (>95%). Our objective is to provide alternative methods for achieving enrichment and high-quality fetal DNA from plasma. Cell-free DNA from 31 pregnant women and 18 controls (10 males and 8 females) were size separated using agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA fragments of 100-300, 500-700 and 1,500-2,000 bp were excised and extracted, followed by whole genome amplification (WGA) of recovered fragments. Levels of beta-globin and DYS1 were measured. Distribution of beta-globin size fragments was similar among pregnant women and controls. Among control male cases, distribution of size fragments was the same for both beta-globin and DYS1. Among maternal cases confirmed to be male, the smallest size fragment (100-300 bp) accounted for nearly 50% (39.76 +/- 17.55%) of the recovered DYS1-DNA (fetal) and only 10% (10.40 +/- 6.49%) of beta-globin (total) DNA. After WGA of plasma fragments from pregnant women, DYS1 sequence amplification was best observed when using the 100-300 bp fragments as template. Combination of electrophoresis for size separation and WGA led to enriched fetal DNA from plasma. This novel combination of strategies is more likely to permit universal clinical applications of cell-free fetal DNA. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Effects of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Clinical Guidelines on Appropriate Use of Human Papillomavirus DNA Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Both clinical guidelines and direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising influence use of new health care technologies, but little is known about their relative effects. The introduction of a cervical cancer screening test in 2000 offered a unique opportunity to assess the two strategies. Objective To evaluate the effects of clinical guidelines and a targeted DTC advertising campaign on overall and appropriate use of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA tests. Research Design Quasi-experimental study using difference-in-differences analysis. Data were MarketScan private insurance claims for 500,000 women ages 21 to 64 enrolled at least 12 consecutive months from January 2001 through December 2005. Results Both clinical guidelines and DTC advertising were associated with increases in overall HPV DNA test use. DTC advertising was associated with a statistically significant increase in HPV DNA test use in two groups of DTC cities (+5.57 percent, padvertising was associated with comparable increases in the probability of appropriate and inappropriate use of the HPV DNA test in primary screening. Clinical guideline releases from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and by a co-sponsored panel, were associated with greater increases in HPV DNA tests for appropriate primary screening than for inappropriate primary screening (β=0.3347, padvertising was associated with increased overall use of a cervical cancer screening test, while clinical guidelines were differentially associated with increased appropriate use. These findings suggest distinct influences of consumer marketing and professional guidelines on the use of health care products and services. PMID:21150798

  3. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student’s t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  4. Origin-Dependent Inverted-Repeat Amplification: Tests of a Model for Inverted DNA Amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonita J Brewer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors are a major driver of evolution--from single nucleotide polymorphisms to large-scale copy number variations (CNVs. Here we test a specific replication-based model to explain the generation of interstitial, inverted triplications. While no genetic information is lost, the novel inversion junctions and increased copy number of the included sequences create the potential for adaptive phenotypes. The model--Origin-Dependent Inverted-Repeat Amplification (ODIRA-proposes that a replication error at pre-existing short, interrupted, inverted repeats in genomic sequences generates an extrachromosomal, inverted dimeric, autonomously replicating intermediate; subsequent genomic integration of the dimer yields this class of CNV without loss of distal chromosomal sequences. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the feasibility of the proposed replication error and its downstream consequences on chromosome structure in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the proposed replication error-the ligation of leading and lagging nascent strands to create "closed" forks-can occur in vitro at short, interrupted inverted repeats. The removal of molecules with two closed forks results in a hairpin-capped linear duplex that we show replicates in vivo to create an inverted, dimeric plasmid that subsequently integrates into the genome by homologous recombination, creating an inverted triplication. While other models have been proposed to explain inverted triplications and their derivatives, our model can also explain the generation of human, de novo, inverted amplicons that have a 2:1 mixture of sequences from both homologues of a single parent--a feature readily explained by a plasmid intermediate that arises from one homologue and integrates into the other homologue prior to meiosis. Our tests of key features of ODIRA lend support to this mechanism and suggest further avenues of enquiry to unravel the origins

  5. Origin-Dependent Inverted-Repeat Amplification: Tests of a Model for Inverted DNA Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Bonita J; Payen, Celia; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Higgins, Megan M; Ong, Giang; Dunham, Maitreya J; Raghuraman, M K

    2015-12-01

    DNA replication errors are a major driver of evolution--from single nucleotide polymorphisms to large-scale copy number variations (CNVs). Here we test a specific replication-based model to explain the generation of interstitial, inverted triplications. While no genetic information is lost, the novel inversion junctions and increased copy number of the included sequences create the potential for adaptive phenotypes. The model--Origin-Dependent Inverted-Repeat Amplification (ODIRA)-proposes that a replication error at pre-existing short, interrupted, inverted repeats in genomic sequences generates an extrachromosomal, inverted dimeric, autonomously replicating intermediate; subsequent genomic integration of the dimer yields this class of CNV without loss of distal chromosomal sequences. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the feasibility of the proposed replication error and its downstream consequences on chromosome structure in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the proposed replication error-the ligation of leading and lagging nascent strands to create "closed" forks-can occur in vitro at short, interrupted inverted repeats. The removal of molecules with two closed forks results in a hairpin-capped linear duplex that we show replicates in vivo to create an inverted, dimeric plasmid that subsequently integrates into the genome by homologous recombination, creating an inverted triplication. While other models have been proposed to explain inverted triplications and their derivatives, our model can also explain the generation of human, de novo, inverted amplicons that have a 2:1 mixture of sequences from both homologues of a single parent--a feature readily explained by a plasmid intermediate that arises from one homologue and integrates into the other homologue prior to meiosis. Our tests of key features of ODIRA lend support to this mechanism and suggest further avenues of enquiry to unravel the origins of interstitial

  6. Targeted ultrasound examination and DNA testing for Noonan syndrome, in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Pajkrt, E.; Mathijssen, I. B.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define sonographic criteria that may improve the prenatal diagnosis of Noonan syndrome by targeted DNA testing. METHODS: We searched our Fetal Medicine Unit records for all cases with a final diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. A literature review was undertaken to identify the sonographic

  7. Targeted ultrasound examination and DNA testing for Noonan syndrome, in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Merel; Pajkrt, E.; Mathijssen, I. B.; Bilardo, C. M.

    Objective To define sonographic criteria that may improve the prenatal diagnosis of Noonan syndrome by targeted DNA testing. Methods We searched our Fetal Medicine Unit records for all cases with a final diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. A literature review was undertaken to identify the sonographic

  8. Nonparametric testing for DNA copy number induced differential mRNA gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, W.N.; van de Wiel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology relates DNA with mRNA. Array CGH measures DNA copy number and gene expression microarrays measure the amount of mRNA. Methods that integrate data from these two platforms may uncover meaningful biological relationships that further our understanding of cancer.

  9. Positive view and increased likely uptake of follow-up testing with analysis of cell-free fetal DNA as alternative to invasive testing among Danish pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltoft, Caroline B; Rode, Line; Tabor, Ann

    2018-01-01

    AND METHODS: Unselected and high-risk women attending first-trimester screening (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital) were invited to fill out the questionnaire Antenatal testing for Down syndrome as an online survey. RESULTS: The survey included 203 unselected and 50 high-risk women (response...... of follow-up testing without a corresponding rise in the termination rate of affected fetuses as some women test for information only. However, both unselected and high-risk women had overwhelmingly positive views underlining attention to avoid routinization.......INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude (view, likely uptake and preferred strategy) towards cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) testing among pregnant women before a first-trimester risk assessment for trisomy 21 (unselected women) and after obtaining a high risk. MATERIAL...

  10. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  11. Horses for courses: a DNA-based test for race distance aptitude in thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Emmeline W; Ryan, Donal P; MacHugh, David E

    2012-12-01

    Variation at the myostatin (MSTN) gene locus has been shown to influence racing phenotypes in Thoroughbred horses, and in particular, early skeletal muscle development and the aptitude for racing at short distances. Specifically, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the first intron of MSTN (g.66493737C/T) is highly predictive of best race distance among Flat racing Thoroughbreds: homozygous C/C horses are best suited to short distance races, heterozygous C/T horses are best suited to middle distance races, and homozygous T/T horses are best suited to longer distance races. Patent applications for this gene marker association, and other linked markers, have been filed. The information contained within the patent applications is exclusively licensed to the commercial biotechnology company Equinome Ltd, which provides a DNA-based test to the international Thoroughbred horse racing and breeding industry. The application of this information in the industry enables informed decision making in breeding and racing and can be used to assist selection to accelerate the rate of change of genetic types among distinct populations (Case Study 1) and within individual breeding operations (Case Study 2).

  12. Human papillomavirus mRNA and DNA testing in women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louise T; Dehlendorff, Christian; Junge, Jette

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective cohort study, we compared the performance of human papillomavirus (HPV) mRNA and DNA testing of women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) during cervical cancer screening. Using a nationwide Danish pathology register, we identified women aged 30......-65 years with ASC-US during 2005-2011 who were tested for HPV16/18/31/33/45 mRNA using PreTect HPV-Proofer (n = 3,226) or for high-risk HPV (hrHPV) DNA using Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) (n = 9,405) or Linear Array HPV-Genotyping test (LA) (n = 1,533). Women with ≥1 subsequent examination in the register (n = 13...... those testing HC2 negative (3.2% [95% CI: 2.2-4.2%] versus 0.5% [95% CI: 0.3-0.7%]). Patterns were similar after 18 months and 5 years'; follow-up; for CIN2+ and cancer as outcomes; across all age groups; and when comparing mRNA testing to hrHPV DNA testing using LA. In conclusion, the HPV16...

  13. Test performance and acceptability of self- versus provider-collected swabs for high-risk HPV DNA testing in female-to-male trans masculine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Sari L; Deutsch, Madeline B; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; White Hughto, Jaclyn M; Cavanaugh, Timothy P; Pardee, Dana J; McLean, Sarah A; Panther, Lori A; Gelman, Marcy; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Potter, Jennifer E

    2018-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) causes virtually all cervical cancers. Trans masculine (TM) people (those assigned female at birth who identify with a gender other than female) have low uptake of conventional cervical cancer screening. Self-collected hrHPV DNA testing has high levels of acceptability among cisgender (non-transgender) females and may support increased cervical cancer screening uptake in TM individuals. To assess the test performance and acceptability of self-collected vaginal specimens in comparison to provider-collected cervical swabs for hrHPV DNA detection in TM individuals ages 21-64 years. Between March 2015-September 2016, 150 TM participants with a cervix (mean age = 27.5 years; SD = 5.7) completed a one-time study visit comprised of a self-report survey, self-collected vaginal HPV DNA swab, clinician-administered cervical HPV swab, and brief interview on acceptability of clinical procedures. Participants were randomized to complete either self- or provider-collection first to minimize ordering effects. Self- and provider-collected samples were tested for 13 hrHPV DNA types using a DNA Hybridization Assay. The primary outcome variable was the concordance (kappa statistic) and performance (sensitivity, specificity) of self-collected vaginal HPV DNA specimens versus provider-collected cervical HPV swabs as the gold standard. Of the 131 participants completing both the self- and provider-collected HPV tests, 21 cases of hrHPV were detected by the provider cervical swab (gold standard; 16.0% hrHPV prevalence); 15 of these cases were accurately detected by the self-collected vaginal swab (71.4% concordance) (Kappa = 0.75, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 0.59, 0.92; p<0.001). Compared to the provider-collected cervical hrHPV DNA sample (gold standard), the self-collected vaginal hrHPV DNA test demonstrated a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI: 0.52, 0.91; p = 0.0495) and specificity of 98.2% (95% CI: 0.96, 1.00; p<0.0001). Over 90% of participants

  14. The price of performance: a cost and performance analysis of the implementation of cell-free fetal DNA testing for Down syndrome in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, N; Teitelbaum, M; Huang, T; Dewa, C S; Hoch, J S

    2014-04-01

    To examine the cost and performance implications of introducing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) testing within modeled scenarios in a publicly funded Canadian provincial Down syndrome (DS) prenatal screening program. Two clinical algorithms were created: the first to represent the current screening program and the second to represent one that incorporates cffDNA testing. From these algorithms, eight distinct scenarios were modeled to examine: (1) the current program (no cffDNA), (2) the current program with first trimester screening (FTS) as the nuchal translucency-based primary screen (no cffDNA), (3) a program substituting current screening with primary cffDNA, (4) contingent cffDNA with current FTS performance, (5) contingent cffDNA at a fixed price to result in overall cost neutrality,(6) contingent cffDNA with an improved detection rate (DR) of FTS, (7) contingent cffDNA with higher uptake of FTS, and (8) contingent cffDNA with optimized FTS (higher uptake and improved DR). This modeling study demonstrates that introducing contingent cffDNA testing improves performance by increasing the number of cases of DS detected prenatally, and reducing the number of amniocenteses performed and concomitant iatrogenic pregnancy loss of pregnancies not affected by DS. Costs are modestly increased, although the cost per case of DS detected is decreased with contingent cffDNA testing. Contingent models of cffDNA testing can improve overall screening performance while maintaining the provision of an 11- to 13-week scan. Costs are modestly increased, but cost per prenatally detected case of DS is decreased. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Detection of excretory Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the urine, and detection of E. histolytica DNA and lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus for the diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairnar Krishna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amoebic liver abscess (ALA and pyogenic liver abscesses (PLA appear identical by ultrasound and other imaging techniques. Collection of blood or liver abscess pus for diagnosis of liver abscesses is an invasive procedure, and the procedure requires technical expertise and disposable syringes. Collection of urine is a noninvasive procedure. Therefore, there has been much interest shown towards the use of urine as an alternative clinical specimen for the diagnosis of some parasitic infections. Here, we report for the first time the detection of E. histolytica DNA excreted in the urine for diagnosis of the cases of ALA. Results E. histolytica DNA was detected in liver abscess pus specimen of 80.4% of ALA patients by a nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting 16S-like r RNA gene. The nested PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in all 37 (100% liver abscess pus specimens collected prior to metronidazole treatment, but were detected in only 53 of 75 (70.6% pus specimens collected after therapy with metronidazole. Similarly, the PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in 21 of 53 (39.6% urine specimens of ALA patients. The test detected E. histolytica DNA in only 4 of 23 (17.4% urine specimens collected prior to metronidazole treatment, but were detected in 17 of 30 (56.7% urine specimens collected after treatment with metronidazole. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of lectin E. histolytica antigen in the liver abscess pus showed a sensitivity of 50% and the indirect haemagglutination (IHA test for detection of amoebic antibodies in the serum showed a sensitivity of 76.8% for the diagnosis of the ALA. Conclusion The present study for the first time shows that the kidney barrier in ALA patients is permeable to E. histolytica DNA molecule resulting in excretion of E. histolytica DNA in urine which can be detected by PCR. The study also shows that the PCR for detection of E. histolytica DNA in urine of

  16. Quantitative Field Testing Rotylenchulus reniformis DNA from Metagenomic Samples Isolated Directly from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showmaker, Kurt; Lawrence, Gary W.; Lu, Shien; Balbalian, Clarissa; Klink, Vincent P.

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative PCR procedure targeting the β-tubulin gene determined the number of Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira 1940 in metagenomic DNA samples isolated from soil. Of note, this outcome was in the presence of other soil-dwelling plant parasitic nematodes including its sister genus Helicotylenchus Steiner, 1945. The methodology provides a framework for molecular diagnostics of nematodes from metagenomic DNA isolated directly from soil. PMID:22194958

  17. Statistical Modeling for Quality Assurance of Human Papillomavirus DNA Batch Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylerian, Emily N; Slavkovsky, Rose C; Holme, Francesca M; Jeronimo, Jose A

    2018-03-22

    Our objective was to simulate the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test results from a 96-well microplate assay to identify results that may be consistent with well-to-well contamination, enabling programs to apply specific quality assurance parameters. For this modeling study, we designed an algorithm that generated the analysis population of 900,000 to simulate the results of 10,000 microplate assays, assuming discrete HPV prevalences of 12%, 13%, 14%, 15%, and 16%. Using binomial draws, the algorithm created a vector of results for each prevalence and reassembled them into 96-well matrices for results distribution analysis of the number of positive cells and number and size of cell clusters (≥2 positive cells horizontally or vertically adjacent) per matrix. For simulation conditions of 12% and 16% HPV prevalence, 95% of the matrices displayed the following characteristics: 5 to 17 and 8 to 22 total positive cells, 0 to 4 and 0 to 5 positive cell clusters, and largest cluster sizes of up to 5 and up to 6 positive cells, respectively. Our results suggest that screening programs in regions with an oncogenic HPV prevalence of 12% to 16% can expect 5 to 22 positive results per microplate in approximately 95% of assays and 0 to 5 positive results clusters with no cluster larger than 6 positive results. Results consistently outside of these ranges deviate from what is statistically expected and could be the result of well-to-well contamination. Our results provide guidance that laboratories can use to identify microplates suspicious for well-to-well contamination, enabling improved quality assurance.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  18. A simple and cost-effective method of DNA extraction from small formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue for molecular oncologic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Anthony N; Stence, Aaron A; Pruessner, Jonathan A; Bossler, Aaron D; Ma, Deqin

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a critical step in molecular oncologic testing. As molecular oncology testing becomes more important for prognostic and therapeutic decision making and tissue specimens become smaller due to earlier detection of suspicious lesions and the use of fine needle aspiration methods for tissue collection, it becomes more challenging for the typical molecular pathology laboratory to obtain reliable test results. We developed a DNA extraction method to obtain sufficient quantity and high quality genomic DNA from limited FFPE tissue for molecular oncology testing using a combination of H&E stained slides, a matrix capture method and the Qiagen DNA column. THREE DNA EXTRACTION METHODS WERE COMPARED: our standard procedure of manually scraping tissue from unstained slides followed by DNA extraction using the QIAamp FFPE column (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), a glue capture method (Pinpoint Solution, Zymo Research Corp, Inc) on H&E stained slides followed by DNA extraction using either the QIAamp column or the column included with the Pinpoint kit (Zymo Research). The DNA extraction protocol was optimized. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired two-sample student's t-test. The combination of the matrix capture method with the QIAamp column gave an equivalent amount of DNA as our standard extraction method using the unstained slides and a 4.6-fold higher DNA yield than using the Zymo column included in the Pinpoint Slide Solution kit. Several molecular tests were performed and DNA purified using the new method gave the same results as for the previous methods. Using H&E stained slides allows visual confirmation of tumor cells during microdissection. The Pinpoint solution made removal of specific tissue from the slides easier and reduced the risk of contamination and tissue loss. This DNA extraction method is simple, cost-effective, and blends with our current workflow requiring no additional equipment.

  19. Identifying insects with incomplete DNA barcode libraries, African fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) as a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, Massimiliano; Jordaens, Kurt; Breman, Floris C; Backeljau, Thierry; De Meyer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We propose a general working strategy to deal with incomplete reference libraries in the DNA barcoding identification of species. Considering that (1) queries with a large genetic distance with their best DNA barcode match are more likely to be misidentified and (2) imposing a distance threshold profitably reduces identification errors, we modelled relationships between identification performances and distance thresholds in four DNA barcode libraries of Diptera (n = 4270), Lepidoptera (n = 7577), Hymenoptera (n = 2067) and Tephritidae (n = 602 DNA barcodes). In all cases, more restrictive distance thresholds produced a gradual increase in the proportion of true negatives, a gradual decrease of false positives and more abrupt variations in the proportions of true positives and false negatives. More restrictive distance thresholds improved precision, yet negatively affected accuracy due to the higher proportions of queries discarded (viz. having a distance query-best match above the threshold). Using a simple linear regression we calculated an ad hoc distance threshold for the tephritid library producing an estimated relative identification error DNA barcodes and should be used as cut-off mark defining whether we can proceed identifying the query with a known estimated error probability (e.g. 5%) or whether we should discard the query and consider alternative/complementary identification methods.

  20. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in horse meat from supermarkets in France and performance evaluation of two serological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroussi Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In France, some cases of severe toxoplasmosis have been linked to the consumption of horse meat that had been imported from the American continent where atypical strains of Toxoplasma gondii are more common than in Europe. Many seroprevalence studies are presented in the literature but risk assessment of T. gondii infection after horse meat consumption is not possible in the absence of validated serological tests and the unknown correlation between detection of antibodies against T. gondii and presence of tissue cysts. We performed magnetic-capture polymerase chain reaction (MC-PCR to detect T. gondii DNA in 231 horse meat samples purchased in supermarkets in France and evaluated the performance and level of agreement of the modified agglutination test (MAT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the meat juices. The serological tests lacked sensitivity, specificity, and agreement between them, and there was no correlation with the presence of T. gondii DNA in horse meat, raising concerns about the reliability of T. gondii seroprevalence data in horses from the literature. T. gondii DNA was detected in 43% of horse meat samples but the absence of strain isolation in mice following inoculation of more than 100 horse meat samples suggests a low distribution of cysts in skeletal muscles and a low risk of T. gondii infection associated with horse meat consumption. However, to avoid any risk of toxoplasmosis, thorough cooking of horse meat is recommended.

  1. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in horse meat from supermarkets in France and performance evaluation of two serological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroussi, Abdelkrim; Vignoles, Philippe; Dalmay, François; Wimel, Laurence; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Mercier, Aurélien; Ajzenberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In France, some cases of severe toxoplasmosis have been linked to the consumption of horse meat that had been imported from the American continent where atypical strains of Toxoplasma gondii are more common than in Europe. Many seroprevalence studies are presented in the literature but risk assessment of T. gondii infection after horse meat consumption is not possible in the absence of validated serological tests and the unknown correlation between detection of antibodies against T. gondii and presence of tissue cysts. We performed magnetic-capture polymerase chain reaction (MC-PCR) to detect T. gondii DNA in 231 horse meat samples purchased in supermarkets in France and evaluated the performance and level of agreement of the modified agglutination test (MAT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the meat juices. The serological tests lacked sensitivity, specificity, and agreement between them, and there was no correlation with the presence of T. gondii DNA in horse meat, raising concerns about the reliability of T. gondii seroprevalence data in horses from the literature. T. gondii DNA was detected in 43% of horse meat samples but the absence of strain isolation in mice following inoculation of more than 100 horse meat samples suggests a low distribution of cysts in skeletal muscles and a low risk of T. gondii infection associated with horse meat consumption. However, to avoid any risk of toxoplasmosis, thorough cooking of horse meat is recommended. © A. Aroussi et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2015.

  2. Data from complete mtDNA sequencing of Tunisian centenarians: testing haplogroup association and the "golden mean" to longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta D; Cherni, Lotfi; Fernandes, Verónica; Freitas, Fernando; Ammar El Gaaied, Amel Ben; Pereira, Luísa

    2009-04-01

    Since the mitochondrial theory of ageing was proposed, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity has been largely studied in old people, however complete genomes are still rare, being limited to Japanese and UK/US samples. In this work, we evaluated possible longevity associated polymorphisms/haplogroups in an African population, from Tunisia, by performing complete mtDNA sequencing. This population has a mixed Eurasian/sub-Saharan mtDNA gene pool, which could potentially facilitate the evaluation of association for sub-Saharan lineages. Sub-Saharan haplogroups were shown to be significantly less represented in centenarians (9.5%) than in controls (54.5%), but it is not possible to rule out an influence of population structure, which is high in these populations. No recurrent polymorphism were more frequent in centenarians than in controls, and although the Tunisian centenarians presented less synonymous and replacement polymorphisms than controls, this difference was not statistically significant. So far, it does not seem that centenarians have significantly less mildly deleterious substitutions, not only in Tunisia but also in Japanese and UK/US samples, as tested here, not favouring a "golden mean" to longevity.

  3. Testing the utility of matK and ITS DNA regions for discrimination of Allium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Allium L. has been mainly based on the nucleotide sequences of ITS region. In 2009 matK and rbcL were accepted as a two-locus DNA barcode to classify plant species by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) Plant Working Group. MatK region has been ...

  4. Diagnostic value of stool DNA testing for multiple markers of colorectal cancer and advanced adenoma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Xia, Bing-Qing; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Guozhen; Yang, Yi-Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Bing-Sheng; Xu, An-Gao; Huang, Yun-Bo; Wang, Xin-Ying

    2013-08-01

    The diagnostic value of stool DNA (sDNA) testing for colorectal neoplasms remains controversial. To compensate for the lack of large-scale unbiased population studies, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of sDNA testing for multiple markers of colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced adenoma. The PubMed, Science Direct, Biosis Review, Cochrane Library and Embase databases were systematically searched in January 2012 without time restriction. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model using sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic OR (DOR), summary ROC curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% CIs as effect measures. Heterogeneity was measured using the χ(2) test and Q statistic; subgroup analysis was also conducted. A total of 20 studies comprising 5876 individuals were eligible. There was no heterogeneity for CRC, but adenoma and advanced adenoma harboured considerable heterogeneity influenced by risk classification and various detection markers. Stratification analysis according to risk classification showed that multiple markers had a high DOR for the high-risk subgroups of both CRC (sensitivity 0.759 [95% CI 0.711 to 0.804]; specificity 0.883 [95% CI 0.846 to 0.913]; AUC 0.906) and advanced adenoma (sensitivity 0.683 [95% CI 0.584 to 0.771]; specificity 0.918 [95% CI 0.866 to 0.954]; AUC 0.946) but not for the average-risk subgroups of either. In the methylation subgroup, sDNA testing had significantly higher DOR for CRC (sensitivity 0.753 [95% CI 0.685 to 0.812]; specificity 0.913 [95% CI 0.860 to 0.950]; AUC 0.918) and advanced adenoma (sensitivity 0.623 [95% CI 0.527 to 0.712]; specificity 0.926 [95% CI 0.882 to 0.958]; AUC 0.910) compared with the mutation subgroup. There was no significant heterogeneity among studies for subgroup analysis. sDNA testing for multiple markers had strong diagnostic significance for CRC and advanced adenoma in high-risk subjects. Methylation makers had more diagnostic value than mutation

  5. Development and applications of Bacillus subtilis test systems for mutagens, involving DNA-repair deficiency and suppressible auxotrophic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.

    1977-01-01

    A mutagen-tester of Bacillus subtilis was constructed and tested with known carcinogens. The parental strain HA101 of Okubo and Yanagida carrying suppressible nonsense mutations in his and met genes was transformed to carry an excision-repair deficiency mutation. The constructed strain TKJ5211 showed a 20-30-fold higher sensitivity for His + reversion than the parental strain when treated with UV and UV-mimetic chemicals but unchanged mutation frequency with X-rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The tester strain was used in a spot test of 30 selected chemicals and also for testing with liver homogenate activation. The results showed an almost equivalent but somewhat broader detection spectrum than the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 system. Another test method used a pair of B. subtilis strains differing in their DNA-repair capacity, i.e. the most UV-sensitive mutant HJ-15 and a wild-type strain, to detect repair-dependent DNA damage produced by chemicals. Spores could be used in either test

  6. Informed decision making about predictive DNA tests: arguments for more public visibility of personal deliberations about the good life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenink, Marianne; van der Burg, Simone

    2010-05-01

    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of people's life. The decision whether or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes to supporting positive freedom, because it is usually framed in terms of risk and risk management. We show how this 'risk discourse' steers thinking on the good life in a particular way. We go on to argue that empirical research into the actual deliberation and decision making processes of individuals and families may be used to enrich the environment of personal deliberation in three ways: (1) it points at a richer set of values that deliberators can take into account, (2) it acknowledges the shared nature of genes, and (3) it shows how one might frame decisions in a non-binary way. We argue that the public sharing and discussing of stories about personal deliberations offers valuable input for others who face similar choices: it fosters their positive freedom to shape their view of the good life in relation to DNA-diagnostics. We conclude by offering some suggestions as to how to realize such public sharing of personal stories.

  7. Direct-to-consumer DNA testing: the fallout for individuals and their families unexpectedly learning of their donor conception origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Marilyn

    2017-07-11

    Increasing numbers of donor-conceived individuals (and/or parents) are seeking individuals genetically related through donor conception. One route is through 'direct-to-consumer' (DTC) DNA testing, prompting calls for fertility services to alert donors and prospective parents to the increasing unsustainability of anonymity and secrecy. The complexity of interpreting DNA results in this context has also been discussed, including their lack of absolute certainty, as has the need for professional and peer support. This commentary highlights a different 'threat', from individuals learning of their donor-conception origins through the use of such tests by themselves or relatives for such purposes as genealogy or health checks. It illustrates the personal complexities faced by three older women and their families on learning not only of their genetic relationship to each other but also to 15 more donor-related siblings. DTC DNA services are a growing feature of modern life. This commentary raises ethical questions about their responsibilities towards those inadvertently learning of donor conception origins and the responsibilities of fertility services to inform prospective parents and donors of this new phenomenon. Considerations of how and when parents should tell their children of their donor-conception origins here instead become how and when children should inform their parents.

  8. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Elbrecht

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate.

  9. DNA Barcoding for Species Identification of Insect Skins: A Test on Chironomidae (Diptera) Pupal Exuviae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekrem, Torbjørn; Stur, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chironomidae (Diptera) pupal exuviae samples are commonly used for biological monitoring of aquatic habitats. DNA barcoding has proved useful for species identification of chironomid life stages containing cellular tissue, but the barcoding success of chironomid pupal exuviae is unknown. We assessed whether standard DNA barcoding could be efficiently used for species identification of chironomid pupal exuviae when compared with morphological techniques and if there were differences in performance between temperate and tropical ecosystems, subfamilies, and tribes. PCR, sequence, and identification success differed significantly between geographic regions and taxonomic groups. For Norway, 27 out of 190 (14.2%) of pupal exuviae resulted in high-quality chironomid sequences that match species. For Costa Rica, 69 out of 190 (36.3%) Costa Rican pupal exuviae resulted in high-quality sequences, but none matched known species. Standard DNA barcoding of chironomid pupal exuviae had limited success in species identification of unknown specimens due to contaminations and lack of matching references in available barcode libraries, especially from Costa Rica. Therefore, we recommend future biodiversity studies that focus their efforts on understudied regions, to simultaneously use morphological and molecular identification techniques to identify all life stages of chironomids and populate the barcode reference library with identified sequences.

  10. Testing DNA barcodes in closely related species of Curcuma (Zingiberaceae) from Myanmar and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Zhao, Jietang; Erickson, David L; Xia, Nianhe; Kress, W John

    2015-03-01

    The genus Curcuma L. is commonly used as spices, medicines, dyes and ornamentals. Owing to its economic significance and lack of clear-cut morphological differences between species, this genus is an ideal case for developing DNA barcodes. In this study, four chloroplast DNA regions (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA and trnL-F) and one nuclear region (ITS2) were generated for 44 Curcuma species and five species from closely related genera, represented by 96 samples. PCR amplification success rate, intra- and inter-specific genetic distance variation and the correct identification percentage were taken into account to assess candidate barcode regions. PCR and sequence success rate were high in matK (89.7%), rbcL (100%), trnH-psbA (100%), trnL-F (95.7%) and ITS2 (82.6%) regions. The results further showed that four candidate chloroplast barcoding regions (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA and trnL-F) yield no barcode gaps, indicating that the genus Curcuma represents a challenging group for DNA barcoding. The ITS2 region presented large interspecific variation and provided the highest correct identification rates (46.7%) based on BLASTClust method among the five regions. However, the ITS2 only provided 7.9% based on NJ tree method. An increase in discriminatory power needs the development of more variable markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Single cells for forensic DNA analysis--from evidence material to test tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Simon; Evers, Heidrun; Heidorn, Frank; Müller, Ute; Kilper, Roland; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a method that, while providing morphological quality control, allows single cells to be obtained from the surfaces of various evidence materials and be made available for DNA analysis in cases where only small amounts of cell material are present or where only mixed traces are found. With the SteREO Lumar.V12 stereomicroscope and UV unit from Zeiss, it was possible to detect and assess single epithelial cells on the surfaces of various objects (e.g., glass, plastic, metal). A digitally operated micromanipulator developed by aura optik was used to lift a single cell from the surface of evidence material and to transfer it to a conventional PCR tube or to an AmpliGrid(®) from Advalytix. The actual lifting of the cells was performed with microglobes that acted as carriers. The microglobes were held with microtweezers and were transferred to the DNA analysis receptacles along with the adhering cells. In a next step, the PCR can be carried out in this receptacle without removing the microglobe. Our method allows a single cell to be isolated directly from evidence material and be made available for forensic DNA analysis. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Detection of anti-dsDNA by IgG ELISA test using two different sources of antigens: calf thymus versus E.coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anti-dsDNA antibodies frequently found in the sera Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients, particularly in active disease stage. Nowadays exploit different eukaryotic and prokaryotic dsDNA as antigen source and different reagents as binder. The aim of this study to compared two dsDNA different sources and tow different kinds of reagents for binder in ELISA test. "nMethods: In this study bacterial genomic DNA from E.coli (ATCC 25922 and genomic DNA from calf thymus extracted with high purity and were used as antigens for IgG anti-dsDNA detection by ELISA. To coat dsDNA in microtiter wells, tow different kinds of reagents including methylated -BSA and poly-l-lysine (for pre-coating are used. Sera from systemic lupus erythematosus patients and from normal blood donors are used to assess sensitivity and specificity of our ELISA test in compared with IF test and commercial kits. "nResults: Our results displayed pre-coating of microtiter plates with methylated -BSA reduce nonspecific binding reaction and the relative sensitivity and specificity of ELISA increased when calf thymus DNA is employed as antigenic source in compared with IF test and commercial kits 80%, 88% and 100%, 98% respectively, but when E.coli DNA is used 73%, 69% and 85%, 79%, respectively. "nConclusion: The genomic DNA from calf thymus is a potentially useful source of antigen for detection of anti-dsDNA by ELISA. Also the use of methylatted- BSA could have an effective role in reducing of nonspecific binding reactions.

  13. Assessment of the stability of DNA in specimens collected under conditions for drug testing-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert M; Mitchell, John M; Hart, E Dale; Evans, Amy; Meaders, Meredith; Norsworthy, Sarah E; Hayes, Eugene D; Flegel, Ron; Maha, George C; Shaffer, Megan D; Hall, Erin M; Rogers, Kelley

    2018-02-01

    For forensic biological sample collections, the specimen donor is linked solidly to his or her specimen through a chain of custody (CoC) sometimes referenced as a chain of evidence. Rarely, a donor may deny that a urine or oral fluid (OF) specimen is his or her specimen even with a patent CoC. The goal of this pilot study was to determine the potential effects of short-term storage on the quality and quantity of DNA in both types of specimen under conditions that may be encountered with employment-related drug testing specimens. Fresh urine and freshly collected oral fluid all produced complete STR profiles. For the "pad" type OF collectors, acceptable DNA was extractable both from the buffer/preservative and the pad. Although fresh urine and OF produced complete STR profiles, partial profiles were obtained after storage for most samples. An exception was the DNA in the Quantisal OF collector, from which a complete profile was obtained for both freshly collected OF and stored OF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The problem of false-positive human papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm

    2013-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been extensively studied in randomized controlled trials of primary cervical screening. Based on encouraging results concerning its high detection rates and a high negative predictive value for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), HPV testing...... will probably replace cytology in future primary cervical screening. However, HPV testing is associated with more frequent false-positive tests compared to cytology. False-positive tests are defined as positive screening tests which are not subsequently confirmed with high-grade CIN. Several authors have...

  15. DNA testing for parentage verification in a conservation nucleus of Pantaneiro horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Tavares Pires de Souza Sereno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the genealogy of the in situ conservation nucleus of the Pantaneiro horse using DNA microsatellites by evaluating 101 horses, the group consisting of 71 adult horses (3 stallions, 40 male and 31 mares and 27 foals (14 colts and 13 fillies. Genomic DNA was extracted from hair roots and genotyped using 12 microsatellite markers (AHT4, AHT5, ASB2, ASB17, ASB23, HMS3 HMS6, HMS7, HTG4, HTG10, LEX33 and VHL20. The number of alleles per locus varied from 6 to 13, with a mean of 7.8 and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.544 to 0.734 (mean 0.644. The VLH20, ASB2, HTG10, ASB23 markers had a high (> 0.8 polymorphism information content and the total exclusion probability of the 12 microsatellite loci was 0.99. The genealogical study of the Pantaneiro horse using genetic markers was efficient in detecting mistakes during paternity and maternity designation and is an important tool which can be used together with traditional systems of animal identification. The use of genetic markers is recommended in the systematic control of the genealogical registrations and conservation plans to improve genetic aspects of the Pantaneiro horse.

  16. DNA Barcoding Meets Nanotechnology: Development of a Universal Colorimetric Test for Food Authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Paola; Galimberti, Andrea; Mezzasalma, Valerio; De Mattia, Fabrizio; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Labra, Massimo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2017-07-03

    Food trade globalization and the growing demand for selected food varieties have led to the intensification of adulteration cases, especially in the form of species substitution and mixing with cheaper taxa. This phenomenon has huge economic impact and sometimes even public health implications. DNA barcoding represents a well-proven molecular approach to assess the authenticity of food items, although its use is hampered by analytical constraints and timeframes that are often prohibitive for the food market. To address such issues, we have introduced a new technology, named NanoTracer, that allows for rapid and naked-eye molecular traceability of any food and requires limited instrumentation and cost-effective reagents. Moreover, unlike sequencing, this method can be used to identify not only the substitution of a fine ingredient, but also its dilution with cheaper ones. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Introduction to Special Issue: The Human, Human Rights and DNA Identity Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaisman, Noa

    2018-01-01

    might these new ways of imagining the subject shape present and future human rights law and practice? The papers examine a variety of scientific technologies—personalized medicine and organ transplant, mitochondrial DNA replacement, and scaffolds and regenerative medicine—and their implications for our......This special issue examines the diverse realities created by the intersection of emerging technologies, new scientific knowledge, and the human being. It engages with two key questions: how is the human being shaped and constructed in new ways through advances in science and technology? and how...... conceptualization of the human subject. Each is then followed by a commentary that both brings to light new dimensions of the original paper and presents a new theoretical take on the topic. Together these papers offer a serious challenge to the vision of the human subject at the root of human rights law. Instead...

  18. A molecular phylogeny of the Cephinae (Hymenoptera, Cephidae based on mtDNA COI gene: a test of traditional classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Budak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cephinae is traditionally divided into three tribes and about 24 genera based on morphology and host utilization. There has been no study testing the monophyly of taxa under a strict phylogenetic criterion. A molecular phylogeny of Cephinae based on a total of 68 sequences of mtDNA COI gene, representing seven genera of Cephinae, is reconstructed to test the traditional limits and relationships of taxa. Monophyly of the traditional tribes is not supported. Monophyly of the genera are largely supported except for Pachycephus. A few host shift events are suggested based on phylogenetic relationships among taxa. These results indicate that a more robust phylogeny is required for a more plausible conclusion. We also report two species of Cephus for the first time from Turkey.

  19. Restriction of human papillomavirus DNA testing in primary cervical screening to women above age 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Njor, Sisse H; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Cervical screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is less specific for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (=CIN3) than cytology. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether a restriction of HPV testing to women aged at least 30 years would eliminate the problem...

  20. The DNA-instability test as a specific marker of malignancy and its application to detect cancer clones in borderline malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fukuda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in cytogenetic and biochemical mutator assay technologies has enabled us to detect single gene alterations and gross chromosomal rearrangements, and it became clear that all cancer cells are genetically unstable. In order to detect the genome-wide instability of cancer cells, a new simple method, the DNA-instability test, was developed. The methods to detect genomic instability so far reported have only demonstrated the presence of qualitative and quantitative alterations in certain specific genomic loci. In contrast to these commonly used methods to reveal the genomic instability at certain specific DNA regions, the newly introduced DNA-instability test revealed the presence of physical DNA-instability in the entire DNA molecule of a cancer cell nucleus as revealed by increased liability to denature upon HCl hydrolysis or formamide exposure. When this test was applied to borderline malignancies, cancer clones were detected in all cases at an early-stage of cancer progression. We proposed a new concept of “procancer” clones to define those cancer clones with “functional atypia” showing positivities for various cancer markers, as well as DNA-instability testing, but showing no remarkable ordinary “morphological atypia” which is commonly used as the basis of histopathological diagnosis of malignancy.

  1. An Economic Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing in the US General Pregnancy Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Benn

    Full Text Available Analyze the economic value of replacing conventional fetal aneuploidy screening approaches with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT in the general pregnancy population.Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared conventional screening to NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA analysis in the annual US pregnancy population. Sensitivity and specificity for fetal aneuploidies, trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and monosomy X, were estimated using published data and modeling of both first- and second trimester screening. Costs were assigned for each prenatal test component and for an affected birth. The overall cost to the healthcare system considered screening costs, the number of aneuploid cases detected, invasive procedures performed, procedure-related euploid losses, and affected pregnancies averted. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of variation in parameters. Costs were reported in 2014 US Dollars.Replacing conventional screening with NIPT would reduce healthcare costs if it can be provided for $744 or less in the general pregnancy population. The most influential variables were timing of screening entry, screening costs, and pregnancy termination rates. Of the 13,176 affected pregnancies undergoing screening, NIPT detected 96.5% (12,717/13,176 of cases, compared with 85.9% (11,314/13,176 by conventional approaches. NIPT reduced invasive procedures by 60.0%, with NIPT and conventional methods resulting in 24,596 and 61,430 invasive procedures, respectively. The number of procedure-related euploid fetal losses was reduced by 73.5% (194/264 in the general screening population.Based on our analysis, universal application of NIPT would increase fetal aneuploidy detection rates and can be economically justified. Offering this testing to all pregnant women is associated with substantial prenatal healthcare benefits.

  2. "It's our DNA, we deserve the right to test!" A content analysis of a petition for the right to access direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yeyang; Borry, Pascal; Otte, Ina C; Howard, Heidi C

    2013-09-01

    Various companies are currently advertising or selling genetic tests over the internet using a model of provision referred to as 'direct-to-consumer' (DTC). This commercial offer of DTC genetic testing (GT) has fueled a number of scientific, ethical and policy debates. To date there have been few studies published regarding the users' perspective. This study aimed to obtain information regarding the issues raised by individuals who signed a petition in support of DTC GT and the 'unrestricted' access to their genetic information. We conducted qualitative content analysis of comments written by individuals who signed a public online petition initiated by DIYgenomics (CA, USA) to support "personal access to genetic information". Of the 523 individuals who signed the petition sponsored by DIYgenomics, 247 individuals also wrote individual comments. A content analysis of these comments reveals that petitioners raised six main issues in support of unrestricted access to DTC GT: that their ownership of their DNA should allow them to have unrestricted access to their genomic information; that they should have the right to their genomic information; that the government has no place in (further) regulating DTC GT; that healthcare professionals should not be placed as intermediaries when purchasing DTC GT services; that many petioners who had already obtained DTC GT had positive experiences with this model of provision; and that genealogy or ancestry DNA testing is one of the main activities petitioners wish to have 'unrestricted' or 'direct' access. These results give insight into why individuals may support unrestricted access to their genomic information and confirm some of the motivations of users for purchasing DTC GT. Our analysis also brings to the forefront themes that have been raised less often in empirical studies involving motivations to purchase DTC GT services; these include the strongly held beliefs of some petitioners that, since they own their DNA, they

  3. In vitro test systems for the identification of gentoxic chemicals in the human environment: The proof of DNA repair synthesis in liver cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossberger, S.

    1986-01-01

    This work examines the possibilities of proving a DNA repair by gentoxic chemicals in primary hepatozytes and 2sFou liver cells of rates. Two different processes used for the in vitro mutagenic testing of alien substances for determining the DNA repair synthesis in primary hepatozytes, in the autoradiographic method and the gradient centrifuging method, are compared regarding their reliability and sensitivity. The rat hepatom cell line 2sFou was examined for its suitability for proving chemically induced DNA repair, instead of primary hepatozytes. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Tracing the geographic origin of traded leopard body parts in the indian subcontinent with DNA-based assignment tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, Samrat; Sridhar, Vanjulavalli; Yadav, Prasanjeet; Gubbi, Sanjay; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2015-04-01

    Illicit trade in wildlife products is rapidly decimating many species across the globe. Such trade is often underestimated for wide-ranging species until it is too late for the survival of their remaining populations. Policing this trade could be vastly improved if one could reliably determine geographic origins of illegal wildlife products and identify areas where greater enforcement is needed. Using DNA-based assignment tests (i.e., samples are assigned to geographic locations), we addressed these factors for leopards (Panthera pardus) on the Indian subcontinent. We created geography-specific allele frequencies from a genetic reference database of 173 leopards across India to infer geographic origins of DNA samples from 40 seized leopard skins. Sensitivity analyses of samples of known geographic origins and assignments of seized skins demonstrated robust assignments for Indian leopards. We found that confiscated pelts seized in small numbers were not necessarily from local leopards. The geographic footprint of large seizures appeared to be bigger than the cumulative footprint of several smaller seizures, indicating widespread leopard poaching across the subcontinent. Our seized samples had male-biased sex ratios, especially the large seizures. From multiple seized sample assignments, we identified central India as a poaching hotspot for leopards. The techniques we applied can be used to identify origins of seized illegal wildlife products and trade routes at the subcontinent scale and beyond. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Modification of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for DNA content data analysis through distribution alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuguang; Yeo, Adeline A; Li, Shuyu Dan

    2007-10-01

    The Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test is a statistical method often used for comparing two distributions. In high-throughput screening (HTS) studies, such distributions usually arise from the phenotype of independent cell populations. However, the K-S test has been criticized for being overly sensitive in applications, and it often detects a statistically significant difference that is not biologically meaningful. One major reason is that there is a common phenomenon in HTS studies that systematic drifting exists among the distributions due to reasons such as instrument variation, plate edge effect, accidental difference in sample handling, etc. In particular, in high-content cellular imaging experiments, the location shift could be dramatic since some compounds themselves are fluorescent. This oversensitivity of the K-S test is particularly overpowered in cellular assays where the sample sizes are very big (usually several thousands). In this paper, a modified K-S test is proposed to deal with the nonspecific location-shift problem in HTS studies. Specifically, we propose that the distributions are "normalized" by density curve alignment before the K-S test is conducted. In applications to simulation data and real experimental data, the results show that the proposed method has improved specificity.

  6. Non-invasive prenatal cell-free fetal DNA testing for down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Strah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis as definitive diagnostic procedures represent a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods are invasive and lead to a miscarriage and fetal loss in approximately 0.5–1 %. Non-invasive prenatal DNA testing (NIPT is based on the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA from maternal blood. It represents a highly accurate screening test for detecting the most common fetal chromosomal abnormalities. In our study we present the results of NIPT testing in the Diagnostic Center Strah, Slovenia, over the last 3 years.Methods: In our study, 123 pregnant women from 11th to 18th week of pregnancy were included. All of them had First trimester assessment of risk for trisomy 21, done before NIPT testing.Results: 5 of total 6 high-risk NIPT cases (including 3 cases of Down syndrome and 2 cases of Klinefelter’s syndrome were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. One case–Edwards syndrome was false positive. Patau syndrome, triple X syndrome or Turner syndrome were not observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, there were no false negative cases reported. In general, NIPT testing had 100 % sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 46.29 %–100.00 % and 98.95 % specificity (95 % confidence interval: 93.44 %–99.95 %. In determining Down syndrome alone, specificity (95 % confidence interval: 95.25 %- 100.00 % and sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 31.00 %–100.00 % turned out to be 100 %. In 2015, the average turnaround time for analysis was 8.3 days from the day when the sample was taken. Repeated blood sampling was required in 2 cases (redraw rate = 1.6 %.Conclusions: Our results confirm that NIPT represents a fast, safe and highly accurate advanced screening test for most common chromosomal abnormalities. In current clinical practice, NIPT would significantly decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures and the rate of fetal

  7. Validation of liquid biopsy: plasma cell-free DNA testing in clinical management of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veldore VH

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vidya H Veldore,1,* Anuradha Choughule,2,* Tejaswi Routhu,1 Nitin Mandloi,1 Vanita Noronha,2 Amit Joshi,2 Amit Dutt,3 Ravi Gupta,1 Ramprasad Vedam,1 Kumar Prabhash2 1MedGenome Labs Private Ltd,, Bangalore, India; 2Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, India; 3The Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, Tata Memorial Center, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Plasma cell-free tumor DNA, or circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA, from liquid biopsy is a potential source of tumor genetic material, in the absence of tissue biopsy, for EGFR testing. Our validation study reiterates the clinical utility of ctDNA next generation sequencing (NGS for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. A total of 163 NSCLC cases were included in the validation, of which 132 patients had paired tissue biopsy and ctDNA. We chose to validate ctDNA using deep sequencing with custom designed bioinformatics methods that could detect somatic mutations at allele frequencies as low as 0.01%. Benchmarking allele specific real time PCR as one of the standard methods for tissue-based EGFR mutation testing, the ctDNA NGS test was validated on all the plasma derived cell-free DNA samples. We observed a high concordance (96.96% between tissue biopsy and ctDNA for oncogenic driver mutations in Exon 19 and Exon 21 of the EGFR gene. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy of the assay were 91.1%, 100% 100%, 95.6%, and 97%, respectively. A false negative rate of 3% was observed. A subset of mutations was also verified on droplet digital PCR. Sixteen percent EGFR mutation positivity was observed in patients where only liquid biopsy was available, thus creating options for targeted therapy. This is the first and largest study from India, demonstrating successful validation of circulating cell-free DNA as a clinically

  8. Problem-Based Test: Replication of Mitochondrial DNA during the Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setalo, Gyorgy, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cell cycle, generation time, S-phase, cell culture synchronization, isotopic pulse-chase labeling, density labeling, equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation, buoyant density, rate-zonal centrifugation, nucleoside, nucleotide, kinase enzymes, polymerization of nucleic acids,…

  9. Comparison of human papillomavirus DNA tests, liquid-based cytology and conventional cytology for the early detection of cervix uteri cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girianelli, Vania R; Thuler, Luiz Claudio S; Szklo, Moyses; Donato, Alexandre; Zardo, Lucilia M G; Lozana, José A; Almeida Neto, Olimpio F; Carvalho, Aurenice C L; Matos, Jorge H; Figueiredo, Valeska

    2006-12-01

    To compare the performance of human papillomavirus DNA tests (samples collected by a healthcare professional and self-collected) and liquid-based cytology with conventional cytology in the detection of cervix uteri cancer and its precursor lesions. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 1777 women living in poor communities in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Eligibility criteria included ages 25-59 years and not having had a Papanicolau test within at least 3 years prior to the study. Cytology (conventional or liquid-based) and human papillomavirus DNA (collected by a healthcare professional or self-collected) tests were performed using samples collected in a single visit. Women with abnormalities in at least one test and a systematic sample of 70 women with negative test results were referred to a colposcopic examination. Test readings were double-masked, and the outcome of interest was high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse. The pathology report was used as the gold standard. The prevalence of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse was 2.0%. Human papillomavirus DNA test collected by a health professional alone or combined with conventional cytology had the highest sensitivity (91.4 and 97.1%, respectively). The highest specificity was found for conventional cytology (91.6%) and for a human papillomavirus DNA test collected by a healthcare professional (90.2%). On the basis of only test performance, the use of human papillomavirus DNA tests, alone or combined with cytology, would seem to be recommended. Its population-wide implementation, however, is conditional on a cost-effectiveness analysis.

  10. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification on Crude DNA as a Point-of-Care Test for the Diagnosis of Mycoplasma-Related Vaginitis During Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichao; Zhang, Bumei; Sun, Yan; Liu, Yunde; Gu, Yajun

    2017-12-20

    Mycoplasma-related vaginitis gradually has been growing as a threat in adults-genitourinary infection contributes to funisitis, spontaneous abortion, and low birth weight. Until now, use of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to detect Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU), Mycoplasma hominis (MH), or Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) has been reported by some researchers. However, previous studies focused on purified DNA as the template for LAMP assay, which is usually extracted via commercial kit. We developed a LAMP assay for rapid detection of UU, MH, and MG genital mycoplasmas using a simple boiling method for DNA extraction, in a cohort of pregnant women with mycoplasma-related vaginitis. We monitored amplicons with the naked eye using SYBR Green I. The cohort in our study showed a prevalence of 22.6% in pregnant women, as detected by UU-LAMP assay. Compared to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test with purified DNA, the sensitivity of the UU-LAMP in clinical specimens with crude DNA was 87.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64.6%->99.9). For crude DNA specimens, UU-LAMP was more sensitive and reliable than PCR, with a higher agreement rate (96.8%) and Youden index value (0.88). As a point-of-care test, LAMP is a useful, specific, and efficient way to detect genital mycoplasmas in resource-limited settings, especially for crude DNA. © American Society for Clinical Pathology 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Development and validation of a multiplex reaction analyzing eight miniSTRs of the X chromosome for identity and kinship testing with degraded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, María; Odriozola, Adrián; Gómez, Javier; Zarrabeitia, María T

    2013-07-01

    We report the development of an effective system for analyzing X chromosome-linked mini short tandem repeat loci with reduced-size amplicons (less than 220 bp), useful for analyzing highly degraded DNA samples. To generate smaller amplicons, we redesigned primers for eight X-linked microsatellites (DXS7132, DXS10079, DXS10074, DXS10075, DXS6801, DXS6809, DXS6789, and DXS6799) and established efficient conditions for a multiplex PCR system (miniX). The validation tests confirmed that it has good sensitivity, requiring as little as 20 pg of DNA, and performs well with DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues, thus showing potential for improved analysis and identification of highly degraded and/or very limited DNA samples. Consequently, this system may help to solve complex forensic cases, particularly when autosomal markers convey insufficient information.

  12. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Clinical Value of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA Assay as a Triage Test for Cervical Cytology and HPV DNA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, Maria; Vocaturo, Amina; Caraceni, Donatella; French, Deborah; Rosini, Sandra; Zappacosta, Roberta; Terrenato, Irene; Ciccocioppo, Lucia; Frega, Antonio; Rossi, Paolo Giorgi

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA is more specific than testing for HPV DNA. A retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the PreTect HPV-Proofer E6/E7 mRNA assay (Norchip) as a triage test for cytology and HPV DNA testing. This study analyzed 1,201 women, 688 of whom had a colposcopy follow-up and 195 of whom had histology-confirmed high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia or worse (CIN2+). The proportion of positive results and the sensitivity and specificity for CIN2+ were determined for HPV mRNA in comparison to HPV DNA and cytology. All data were adjusted for follow-up completeness. Stratified by cytological grades, the HPV mRNA sensitivity was 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 63 to 94%) in ASC-US (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), 62% (95% CI = 47 to 75%) in L-SIL (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion), and 67% (95% CI = 57 to 76%) in H-SIL (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). The corresponding figures were 99, 91, and 96%, respectively, for HPV DNA. The specificities were 82, 76, and 45%, respectively, for HPV mRNA and 29, 13, and 4%, respectively, for HPV DNA. Used as a triage test for ASC-US and L-SIL, mRNA reduced colposcopies by 79% (95% CI = 74 to 83%) and 69% (95% CI = 65 to 74%), respectively, while HPV DNA reduced colposcopies by 38% (95% CI = 32 to 44%) and by 15% (95% CI = 12 to 19%), respectively. As a HPV DNA positivity triage test, mRNA reduced colposcopies by 63% (95% CI = 60 to 66%), having 68% sensitivity (95% CI = 61 to 75%), whereas cytology at the ASC-US+ threshold reduced colposcopies by 23% (95% CI = 20 to 26%), showing 92% sensitivity (95% CI = 87 to 95%). In conclusion, PreTect HPV-Proofer mRNA can serve as a better triage test than HPV DNA to reduce colposcopy referral in both ASC-US and L-SIL. It is also more efficient than cytology for the triage of HPV DNA-positive women. Nevertheless, its low sensitivity demands a strict follow-up of

  13. Human Papillomavirus Infection Among 2460 Men in Denmark: Prevalence in Relation to Age Using 2 Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebnes, Julie Buchholt; Munk, Christian; Nøhr, Bugge; Nielsen, Ann; Jørgensen, Hans Ole; Iftner, Thomas; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to understand the epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in both men and women, to prevent the increasing HPV-related disease burden in men. Data on HPV prevalence among men in the general population are limited. In this cross-sectional population-based study, we aimed to estimate genital HPV infection prevalence in Danish men using 2 different test methods. Penile swab samples from 2460 male employees and conscripts at military barracks in Denmark were tested for HPV DNA with the hybrid capture 2 (HC2) method, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, Inno-LiPA. The overall and age- and type-specific prevalence of HPV infection with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and the correlation between the 2 assays was assessed. The overall HPV prevalence was 22.2% (95% CI, 20.6-23.9) in the HC2 test and 41.8% (95% CI, 39.9-43.8) with PCR. Of the PCR-positive samples, 50.9% were negative in the HC2 test. Of 183 PCR-positive samples that could not be genotyped (HPVX), 88.0% (95% CI, 83.2-92.7) were HC2 negative. The most prevalent types were HPV-51, HPV-16, HPV-66, HPV-53, and HPV-6. The prevalence of high-risk and low-risk HPV peaked among men aged 20 to 29 years, whereas the HPVX prevalence increased with age. Human papillomavirus is highly prevalent in the general male population of Denmark, with HPV-16 and HPV-51 being the most prevalent. Polymerase chain reaction detects twice as many positive samples as HC2 but includes HPVX, possibly representing cutaneous HPV types found on normal genital skin.

  14. Distribution of Plasmodium species on the island of Grande Comore on the basis of DNA extracted from rapid diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa Mze Nasserdine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Union of Comoros, interventions for combating malaria have contributed to a spectacular decrease in the prevalence of the disease. We studied the current distribution of Plasmodium species on the island of Grande Comore using nested PCR. The rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs currently used in the Comoros are able to identify Plasmodium falciparum but no other Plasmodium species. In this study, we tested 211 RDTs (158 positive and 53 negative. Among the 158 positive RDTs, 22 were positive for HRP2, 3 were positive only for pLDH, and 133 were positive for HRP2 and pLDH. DNA was extracted from a proximal part of the nitrocellulose membrane of RDTs. A total of 159 samples were positive by nested PCR. Of those, 156 (98.11% were positive for P. falciparum, 2 (1.25% were positive for P. vivaxI, and 1 (0.62% was positive for P. malariae. None of the samples were positive for P. ovale. Our results show that P. falciparum is still the most dominant species on the island of Grande Comore, but P. vivax and P. malariae are present at a low prevalence.

  15. Development of a dual test procedure for DNA typing and methamphetamine detection using a trace amount of stimulant-containing blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irii, Toshiaki; Maebashi, Kyoko; Fukui, Kenji; Sohma, Ryoko; Matsumoto, Sari; Takasu, Shojiro; Iwadate, Kimiharu

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of drug-related crimes, such as violation of the Stimulant Drug Control Law, requires identifying the used drug (mainly stimulant drugs, methamphetamine hydrochloride) from a drug solution and the DNA type of the drug user from a trace of blood left in the syringe used to inject the drug. In current standard test procedures, DNA typing and methamphetamine detection are performed as independent tests that use two separate portions of a precious sample. The sample can be entirely used up by either analysis. Therefore, we developed a new procedure involving partial lysis of a stimulant-containing blood sample followed by separation of the lysate into a precipitate for DNA typing and a liquid-phase fraction for methamphetamine detection. The method enables these two tests to be run in parallel using a single portion of sample. Samples were prepared by adding methamphetamine hydrochloride water solution to blood. Samples were lysed with Proteinase K in PBS at 56°C for 20min, cooled at -20°C after adding methanol, and then centrifuged at 15,000rpm. Based on the biopolymer-precipitating ability of alcohol, the precipitate was used for DNA typing and the liquid-phase fraction for methamphetamine detection. For DNA typing, the precipitate was dissolved and DNA was extracted, quantified, and subjected to STR analysis using the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. For methamphetamine detection, the liquid-phase fraction was evaporated with N2 gas after adding 20μL acetic acid and passed through an extraction column; the substances captured in the column were eluted with a solvent, derivatized, and quantitatively detected using gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. This method was simple and could be completed in approximately 2h. Both DNA typing and methamphetamine detection were possible, which suggests that this method may be valuable for use in criminal investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  17. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test; Phenotypage de la reparation de l'ADN de lignees Xeroderma pigmentosum, par un test in vitro multiparametrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffin, A.L.

    2009-06-15

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  18. Comparison of the clinical performance of an HPV mRNA test and an HPV DNA test in triage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrom, M; Ornskov, D

    2012-01-01

    The effect of triaging women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing has been well documented. New tests detecting HPV E6/E7 mRNA are emerging, claiming to be more specific for detecting high-grade disease. We evaluated the cl...

  19. "I think we've got too many tests!": Prenatal providers' reflections on ethical and clinical challenges in the practice integration of cell-free DNA screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, B L; Kraft, S A; Michie, M; Allyse, M

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of cell-free DNA-based non-invasive prenatal screening (cfDNA screening) into clinical practice was expected to revolutionize prenatal testing. cfDNA screening for fetal aneuploidy has demonstrated higher test sensitivity and specificity for some conditions than conventional serum screening and can be conducted early in the pregnancy. However, it is not clear whether and how clinical practices are assimilating this new type of testing into their informed consent and counselling processes. Since the introduction of cfDNA screening into practice in 2011, the uptake and scope have increased dramatically. Prenatal care providers are under pressure to stay up to date with rapidly changing cfDNA screening panels, manage increasing patient demands, and keep up with changing test costs, all while attempting to use the technology responsibly and ethically. While clinical literature on cfDNA screening has shown benefits for specific patient populations, it has also identified significant misunderstandings among providers and patients alike about the power of the technology. The unique features of cfDNA screening, in comparison to established prenatal testing technologies, have implications for informed decision-making and genetic counselling that must be addressed to ensure ethical practice. This study explored the experiences of prenatal care providers at the forefront of non-invasive genetic screening in the United States to understand how this testing changes the practice of prenatal medicine. We aimed to learn how the experience of providing and offering this testing differs from established prenatal testing methodologies. These differences may necessitate changes to patient education and consent procedures to maintain ethical practice. We used the online American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Physician Directory to identify a systematic sample of five prenatal care providers in each U.S. state and the District of Columbia. Beginning

  20. Clinical experience of laboratory follow-up with noninvasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA and positive microdeletion results in 349 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S; Kohan, M; Pasion, R; Papenhausen, P R; Platt, L D

    2018-02-01

    Screening via noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) involving the analysis of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from plasma has become readily available to screen for chromosomal and DNA aberrations through maternal blood. This report reviews a laboratory's experience with follow-up of positive NIPT screens for microdeletions. Patients that were screened positive by NIPT for a microdeletion involving 1p, 4p, 5p, 15q, or 22q who underwent diagnostic studies by either chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis were evaluated. The overall positive predictive value for 349 patients was 9.2%. When a microdeletion was confirmed, 39.3% of the cases had additional abnormal microarray findings. Unrelated abnormal microarray findings were detected in 11.8% of the patients in whom the screen positive microdeletion was not confirmed. Stretches of homozygosity in the microdeletion were frequently associated with a false positive cfDNA microdeletion result. Overall, this report reveals that while cfDNA analysis will screen for microdeletions, the positive predictive value is low; in our series it is 9.2%. Therefore, the patient should be counseled accordingly. Confirmatory diagnostic microarray studies are imperative because of the high percentage of false positives and the frequent additional abnormalities not delineated by cfDNA analysis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Development of a microarray-based assay for efficient testing of new HSP70/DnaK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Ostad-Kalayeh, Sona; Hrupins, Vjaceslavs; Helmsen, Sabine; Ahlbrecht, Christin; Stahl, Frank; Scheper, Thomas; Preller, Matthias; Surup, Frank; Stadler, Marc; Kirschning, Andreas; Zeilinger, Carsten

    2017-12-15

    A facile method for testing ATP binding in a highly miniaturized microarray environment using human HSP70 and DnaK from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as biological targets is reported. Supported by molecular modelling studies we demonstrate that the position of the fluorescence label on ATP has a strong influence on the binding to human HSP70. Importantly, the label has to be positioned on the adenine ring and not to the terminal phosphate group. Unlabelled ATP displaced bound Cy5-ATP from HSP70 in the micromolar range. The affinity of a well-known HSP70 inhibitor VER155008 for the ATP binding site in HSP70 was determined, with a EC 50 in the micromolar range, whereas reblastin, a HSP90-inhibitor, did not compete for ATP in the presence of HSP70. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by screening a small compound library of natural products. This unraveled that terphenyls rickenyl A and D, recently isolated from cultures of the fungus Hypoxylon rickii, are inhibitors of HSP70. They compete with ATP for the chaperone in the range of 29 µM (Rickenyl D) and 49 µM (Rickenyl A). Furthermore, the microarray-based test system enabled protein-protein interaction analysis using full-length HSP70 and HSP90 proteins. The labelled full-length human HSP90 binds with a half-maximal affinity of 5.5 µg/ml (∼40 µM) to HSP70. The data also demonstrate that the microarray test has potency for many applications from inhibitor screening to target-oriented interaction studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Susceptibility Testing by Polymerase Chain Reaction DNA Quantitation: A Method to Measure Drug Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J.; Gorczyca, Paul; Kaplan, Joan C.; D'Aquila, Richard T.

    1992-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA quantitation (PDQ) susceptibility testing rapidly and directly measures nucleoside sensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. PCR is used to quantitate the amount of HIV-1 DNA synthesized after in vitro infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA in cell lysates from cultures maintained at different drug concentrations reflect drug inhibition of virus replication. The results of PDQ susceptibility testing of 2- or 3-day cultures are supported by assays measuring HIV-1 p24 antigen production in supernatants of 7- or 10-day cultures. DNA sequence analyses to identify mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene that cause resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine also support the PDQ results. With the PDQ method, both infectivity titration and susceptibility testing can be performed on supernatants from primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PDQ susceptibility testing should facilitate epidemiologic studies of the clinical significance of drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates.

  3. Determination of alkylation of bacterial DNA as a rapid test for toxicological evaluation of alkylating xenobiotic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botzenhart, K.; Waldner-Sander, S.; Schweinsberg, F.

    1986-05-01

    Alkylated purine bases from hydrolized DNA can be separated by HPLC and quantified with a fluorescence detector. We applied this method to bacterial DNA. 7-methylguanine was detected after treatment of Serratia marcescens with iodoacetamide, dimethyl sulfate and with polluted air.

  4. Sex differences in DNA methylation and expression in zebrafish brain: a test of an extended 'male sex drive' hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Lagisz, Malgorzata; Rodger, Euan J; Zhen, Li; Stockwell, Peter A; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Horsfield, Julia A; Jeyakani, Justin; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan; Ozaki, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-09-30

    The sex drive hypothesis predicts that stronger selection on male traits has resulted in masculinization of the genome. Here we test whether such masculinizing effects can be detected at the level of the transcriptome and methylome in the adult zebrafish brain. Although methylation is globally similar, we identified 914 specific differentially methylated CpGs (DMCs) between males and females (435 were hypermethylated and 479 were hypomethylated in males compared to females). These DMCs were prevalent in gene body, intergenic regions and CpG island shores. We also discovered 15 distinct CpG clusters with striking sex-specific DNA methylation differences. In contrast, at transcriptome level, more female-biased genes than male-biased genes were expressed, giving little support for the male sex drive hypothesis. Our study provides genome-wide methylome and transcriptome assessment and sheds light on sex-specific epigenetic patterns and in zebrafish for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Testing efficacy of distance and tree-based methods for DNA barcoding of grasses (Poaceae tribe Poeae) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Joanne L; Walsh, Neville G; Cantrill, David J; Holmes, Gareth D; Murphy, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    In Australia, Poaceae tribe Poeae are represented by 19 genera and 99 species, including economically and environmentally important native and introduced pasture grasses [e.g. Poa (Tussock-grasses) and Lolium (Ryegrasses)]. We used this tribe, which are well characterised in regards to morphological diversity and evolutionary relationships, to test the efficacy of DNA barcoding methods. A reference library was generated that included 93.9% of species in Australia (408 individuals, [Formula: see text] = 3.7 individuals per species). Molecular data were generated for official plant barcoding markers (rbcL, matK) and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. We investigated accuracy of specimen identifications using distance- (nearest neighbour, best-close match, and threshold identification) and tree-based (maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference) methods and applied species discovery methods (automatic barcode gap discovery, Poisson tree processes) based on molecular data to assess congruence with recognised species. Across all methods, success rate for specimen identification of genera was high (87.5-99.5%) and of species was low (25.6-44.6%). Distance- and tree-based methods were equally ineffective in providing accurate identifications for specimens to species rank (26.1-44.6% and 25.6-31.3%, respectively). The ITS marker achieved the highest success rate for specimen identification at both generic and species ranks across the majority of methods. For distance-based analyses the best-close match method provided the greatest accuracy for identification of individuals with a high percentage of "correct" (97.6%) and a low percentage of "incorrect" (0.3%) generic identifications, based on the ITS marker. For tribe Poeae, and likely for other grass lineages, sequence data in the standard DNA barcode markers are not variable enough for accurate identification of specimens to species rank. For recently diverged grass species similar challenges are

  6. DNA typing for personal identification of urine after long-term preservation for testing in doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kimiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    When the tampering of a urine sample is suspected in doping control, personal identification of the sample needs to be determined by short tandem repeat (STR) analysis using DNA. We established a method for extracting DNA from urine samples stored at -20 °C without using any additives or procedures, which is consistent with how samples are required to be managed for doping control. The method, using the Puregene® Blood Core kit followed by NucleoSpin® gDNA Clean-up or NucleoSpin® gDNA Clean-up XS kit, does not need any special instrument and can provide a purified extract with high-quality DNA from up to 40 mL of urine suitable for STR analysis using an AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® PCR amplification kit. Storing urine at -20 °C is detrimental to the stability of DNA. The DNA concentration of preserved urine could not be predicted by specific gravity or creatinine level at the time of urine collection. The DNA concentration of a purified extract (10 μL) was required to be >0.06 ng/μL to ensure a successful STR analysis. Thus, the required extraction volumes of urine preserved for 3-7 years at -20 °C were estimated to be 30 mL and 20 mL to succeed in at least 86% of men and 91% of women, respectively. Considering the long half-life of DNA during long-term preservation, our extraction method is applicable to urine samples stored even for 10 years, which is currently the storage duration allowed (increased from 8 years) before re-examination in doping control. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The use of novel DNA nanotracers to determine groundwater flow paths - a test study at the Grimsel Deep Underground Geothermal (DUG) Laboratory in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittilä, Anniina; Evans, Keith; Puddu, Michela; Mikutis, Gediminas; Grass, Robert N.; Deuber, Claudia; Saar, Martin O.

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater flow in fractured media is heterogeneous and takes place in structures with complex geometry and scale effects, which make the characterization and modeling of the groundwater flow technically challenging. Surface geophysical surveys have limited resolution of permeable structures, and often provide ambiguous results, whereas the interpretation of borehole flow logs to infer hydraulic flow paths within fractured reservoirs is usually non-unique. Nonetheless, knowledge of the hydraulic properties of individual fractures and the role they play in determining the larger-scale flow within the fracture network (i.e. the overall flow conditions) is required in many hydrogeological and geo-engineering situations, such as in geothermal reservoir studies. Tracer tests can overcome some of the aforementioned limitations by providing strong constraints on the geometry and characteristics of flow paths linking boreholes within both porous media and fracture-dominated types of reservoirs. In the case of geothermal reservoirs, tracer tests are often used to provide estimates of the pore/fracture volume swept by flow between injection and production wells. This in turn places constraints on the swept surface area, a parameter that is key for estimating the commercial longevity of the geothermal system. A problem with conventional tracer tests is that the solute species used as the tracer tend to persist in detectable quantities within the reservoir for a long time, thereby impeding repeat tracer tests. DNA nanotracers do not suffer from this problem as they can be designed with a unique signature for each test. DNA nanotracers are environmentally friendly, sub-micron sized silica particles encapsulating small fragments of synthetic DNA which can be fabricated to have a specified, uniquely detectable configuration. For this reason, repeat tracer tests conducted with a differently-encoded DNA fragment to that used in the original will not suffer interference from the

  8. Cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA primary screening test: Results of a population-based screening programme in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Basilio; Gustinucci, Daniela; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Cesarini, Elena; Bulletti, Simonetta; Carlani, Angela; Martinelli, Nadia; Broccolini, Massimo; D'Angelo, Valentina; D'Amico, Maria Rosaria; Di Dato, Eugenio; Galeazzi, Paola; Malaspina, Morena; Spita, Nicoletta; Tintori, Beatrice; Giaimo, Maria Donata

    2017-09-01

    Objective To present the results of the first and second round human papilloma virus (HPV)-based screening programme in the Umbria region after three years. Methods From August 2010 to November 2011, the entire female population aged 35-64 in a local health district was invited for HPV testing (HPV-DNA cobas4800 on a liquid-based cytology sample). HPV-negative women were re-invited after three years. For HPV-positive women, a slide was prepared and interpreted. Positive cytologies were referred to colposcopy; negatives were referred to repeat HPV after one year. If HPV was persistently positive, women were referred to colposcopy; if negative, to normal screening. Indicators of the first and second round are compared with those of cytology screening in the same area in the preceding three years. Results Participation was 56.5%, the same as cytology (56.6%). HPV-positivity was 6.4% (396/6272), cytology triage positivity was 35.6%; 251 cytology negative women were referred to one-year HPV retesting, 84.1% complied, and 55.5% were positive. Total colposcopy referral was 4.1%, and for cytology 1%. The detection rate for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or more severe was 10‰, compared with 3.7‰ using cytology. After three years, HPV-positivity was 3.4% (129/3831), overall colposcopy referral was 2.3% (most at one-year follow-up), and detection rate was 0.5/1000. Conclusions The first round detection rate was more than twice that of cytology screening, while colposcopy referral increased fourfold. At the second round, the detection rate decreased dramatically, showing that longer interval and more conservative protocols are needed.

  9. Acceptability of self-collection sampling for HPV-DNA testing in low-resource settings: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansil, Pooja; Wittet, Scott; Lim, Jeanette L; Winkler, Jennifer L; Paul, Proma; Jeronimo, Jose

    2014-06-12

    Vaginal self-sampling with HPV-DNA tests is a promising primary screening method for cervical cancer. However, women's experiences, concerns and the acceptability of such tests in low-resource settings remain unknown. In India, Nicaragua, and Uganda, a mixed-method design was used to collect data from surveys (N = 3,863), qualitative interviews (N = 72; 20 providers and 52 women) and focus groups (N = 30 women) on women's and providers' experiences with self-sampling, women's opinions of sampling at home, and their future needs. Among surveyed women, 90% provided a self- collected sample. Of these, 75% reported it was easy, although 52% were initially concerned about hurting themselves and 24% were worried about not getting a good sample. Most surveyed women preferred self-sampling (78%). However it was not clear if they responded to the privacy of self-sampling or the convenience of avoiding a pelvic examination, or both. In follow-up interviews, most women reported that they didn't mind self-sampling, but many preferred to have a provider collect the vaginal sample. Most women also preferred clinic-based screening (as opposed to home-based self-sampling), because the sample could be collected by a provider, women could receive treatment if needed, and the clinic was sanitary and provided privacy. Self-sampling acceptability was higher when providers prepared women through education, allowed women to examine the collection brush, and were present during the self-collection process. Among survey respondents, aids that would facilitate self-sampling in the future were: staff help (53%), additional images in the illustrated instructions (31%), and a chance to practice beforehand with a doll/model (26%). Self-and vaginal-sampling are widely acceptable among women in low-resource settings. Providers have a unique opportunity to educate and prepare women for self-sampling and be flexible in accommodating women's preference for self-sampling.

  10. The DNA comet assay and the germination test in detection of food treated by ionizing radiation; Teste do cometa e teste de germinacao na deteccao do tratamento de alimentos com a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huachaca, Nelida Simona Marin

    2002-07-01

    Two methods of irradiated food detection, one biochemical, the comet assay and, other biological, the germination test, were applied in bovine meat and fruit samples. The comet assay detects the damage on DNA caused by ionizing radiation. The germination test evaluates the sensitivity to radiation of seeds as for germination ability, shooting and, rooting. The samples were irradiated in gamma font and electron accelerator. For bovine meat samples, the doses were 0.0; 2.5; 4.5 e 7.0 kGy at chilled condition and, 0.0; 2.5; 4.5; 7.0 e 8.5 kGy at frozen conditions. For fruit samples such as melon, watermelon, apple, orange, papaya and, tomato, the doses were: 0.0; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; 2.0 e 4.0 kGy. The differences between the gamma rays and the electron beam effects on extent of DNA migration and, on shooting and rooting, showed to be similar. The comet assay, under neutral conditions, permitted to discriminate between irradiated and unirradiated bovine meat samples, until one month of storage. Also, it was possible to distinguish, by the comet assay, the control sample with regard to irradiated fruit, at doses as low as 0,5 kGy. In the germination test, the root length was the best parameter to discriminate irradiated and unirradiated samples of melon, watermelon and tomato, while the germination percent was the best parameter for apple and orange. (author)

  11. Multicenter evaluation of a commercial multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for screening plasma donations for parvovirus B19 DNA and hepatitis A virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelman, Marco H G M; Cuijpers, H Theo M; Wessberg, Susanna; Valkeajärvi, Anne; Pichl, Lutz; Schottstedt, Volkmar; Saldanha, John

    2012-07-01

    Three European laboratories evaluated the TaqScreen DPX test (DPX test), a multiplex nucleic acid test assay for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of parvovirus B19 (B19V) DNA and the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) RNA. The 95% limit of detection of the test for B19V and HAV was determined using the respective WHO International Standards. The reproducibility of the test was evaluated by testing replicate samples of B19V at log 4.0 and 40 IU/mL and HAV at 5 IU/mL. The accuracy of the DPX test for B19V was evaluated by replicate testing of B19V samples containing log 3.0, log 4.0, and log 5.0 IU/mL. Panels of B19V Genotypes 1, 2, and 3 and HAV genotypes were evaluated. Cross-contamination was evaluated. For comparison of the DPX test and the established tests, the sites tested plasma samples in pools of either 96 or 480 donations. The mean 95% lower limits of detection of the three laboratories for B19V and HAV were 20.30 and 1.85 IU/mL. The test showed good reproducibility with the major part of the variance of the test being attributed to intermediate assay variation. The test showed great accuracy for B19V, especially at log 4.0 IU/mL. Spiking of test pools of 480 donations and manufacturing pools with log 4.0 IU/mL B19 DNA and 4 IU/mL HAV RNA showed that the DPX assay was robust. The test was able to detect the three genotypes of B19V and HAV genotypes. No cross-contamination was seen. Test results of routine samples correlated well with those of the established tests. The DPX test is a robust and sensitive test for the detection of B19V and HAV in plasma samples. The quantitative B19V results obtained with the test are accurate, and the test is able to detect all the known genotypes of B19V and HAV and fulfills all the European Pharmacopoeia and Food and Drug Administration requirements for a B19V and HAV test for screening of plasma donations and samples from plasma pools for manufacture. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Towards Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Drug Susceptibility Testing by Whole Genome Sequencing of DNA Isolated from Sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayzad S. Nilgiriwala

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary screening of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB in India still relies on sputum microscopy, which has low sensitivity leading to high rate of false negatives. Moreover, conventional phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST is conducted over a period of weeks leading to delays in correct treatment. Next generation sequencing technologies (Illumina and Oxford Nanopore have made it possible to sequence miniscule amount of DNA and generate enough data within a day for detecting specific microbes and their DST profile. Sputum samples from two pulmonary TB patients were processed by decontamination and DNA was isolated from the decontaminated sputum sediments. The isolated DNA was used for sequencing by Illumina and by MinION (Oxford Nanopore Technologies. The sequence data was used to diagnose TB and to determine the DST profiles for the first- and second-line drugs by Mykrobe Predictor. Validation was conducted by sequencing DNA (by Illumina isolated from pure growth culture from both the samples individually. DNA sequencing data (for both, Ilumina and MinION from one of the sputum samples indicated the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb resistant to streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol and its lineage was predicted to be Beijing East Asia. The second sample indicated the presence of M. tb sensitive to the first- and second-line drugs by MinION and showed minor resistance call only to rifampicin by Illumina. Lineage of the second sample was predicted to be East Africa Indian Ocean, whereas Illumina data indicated it to be Delhi Central Asia. The two samples were correctly diagnosed for the presence of M. tb in the sputum DNA. Their DST profiles and lineage were also successfully determined from both the sequencing platforms (with minor discrepancies paving the way towards diagnosis and DST of TB from DNA isolated from sputum samples at point-of-care. Nanopore sequencing currently requires skilled personnel for DNA

  13. Implications of failure to achieve a result from prenatal maternal serum cell-free DNA testing: a historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, N; Smet, M-E; Sandow, R; da Silva Costa, F; McLennan, A

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of women who failed to obtain a result in non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Historical cohort study. A multicentre private practice in Sydney, Australia. Women who failed to obtain a result from NIPT (n = 131). The maternal characteristics, antenatal investigations and pregnancy outcomes for these women were compared with those who obtained a result at the same practice and to the general Australian obstetric population. Antenatal investigations: pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), free β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-hCG), placental growth factor (PlGF), uterine artery pulsatility index (PI), mean arterial pressure (MAP). Pregnancy outcomes: chromosomal abnormality, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, small-for-gestational-age (SGA), preterm delivery. Only 1.1% of NIPT samples failed to return a result. This cohort was significantly older and had significantly increased weight compared with the general Australian obstetric population. Pregnancy outcomes were available for 94% of the cohort. There were significantly higher rates of chromosomal aneuploidies (6.5% versus 0.2%, P < 0.0001), pre-eclampsia (11% versus 1.5%, P < 0.0001) and gestational diabetes (23% versus 7.5%, P < 0.0001) compared with the general obstetric population. Rates of preterm delivery and SGA were elevated but did not reach significance. Antenatal investigations demonstrated decreased PAPP-A MoM (0.75 versus 1.14, P < 0.0001), decreased free β-hCG (0.71 versus 1.01, P < 0.0001) and increased uterine artery PI (1.79 versus 1.65, P = 0.02). Women who fail to obtain a result from NIPT are at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, in particular chromosomal aneuploidy, gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia. None received. Women who fail to obtain a result from cell-free DNA NIPT are at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. © 2017 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Using DNA to test the utility of pellet-group counts as an index of deer counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. J. Brinkman; D. K. Person; W. Smith; F. Stuart Chapin; K. McCoy; M. Leonawicz; K. Hundertmark

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread use of fecal pellet-group counts as an index of ungulate density, techniques used to convert pellet-group numbers to ungulate numbers rarely are based on counts of known individuals, seldom evaluated across spatial and temporal scales, and precision is infrequently quantified. Using DNA from fecal pellets to identify individual deer, we evaluated the...

  15. A test of the utility of DNA barcoding in the radiation of the freshwater stingray genus Potamotrygon (Potamotrygonidae, Myliobatiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Toffoli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding is a recently proposed global standard in taxonomy based on DNA sequences. The two main goals of DNA barcoding methodology are assignment of specimens to a species and discovery of new species. There are two main underlying assumptions: i reciprocal monophyly of species, and ii intraspecific divergence is always less than interspecific divergence. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of the family Potamotrygonidae based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene, sampling 10 out of the 18 to 20 valid species including two non-described species. Potamotrygonidae systematics is still not fully resolved with several still-to-be-described species while some other species are difficult to delimit due to overlap in morphological characters and because of sharing a complex color patterns. Our results suggest that the family passed through a process of rapid speciation and that the species Potamotrygon motoro, P. scobina, and P. orbignyi share haplotypes extensively. Our results suggest that systems of identification of specimens based on DNA sequences, together with morphological and/or ecological characters, can aid taxonomic studies, but delimitation of new species based on threshold values of genetic distances are overly simplistic and misleading.

  16. Design and performance testing of a DNA extraction assay for sensitive and reliable quantification of acetic acid bacteria directly in red wine using real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eLONGIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although strategies exist to prevent AAB contamination, the increased interest for wines with low sulfite addition leads to greater AAB spoilage. Hence there is a real need for a rapid, specific, sensitive and reliable method for detecting these spoilage bacteria. All these requirements are met by real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (or quantitative PCR; qPCR. Here, we compare existing methods of isolating DNA and their adaptation to a red wine matrix. Two different protocols for isolating DNA and three PCR mix compositions were tested to select the best method. The addition of insoluble polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP at 1% (v/v during DNA extraction using a protocol succeeded in eliminating PCR inhibitors from red wine. We developed a bacterial internal control which was efficient in avoiding false negative results due to decreases in the efficiency of DNA isolation and/or amplification. The specificity, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility of the method were evaluated. A standard curve was established for the enumeration of AAB inoculated into red wines. The limit of quantification in red wine was 3.7 log AAB/mL and about 2.8 log AAB/mL when the volume of the samples was increased from 1 mL to 10 mL. Thus the DNA extraction method developed in this paper allows sensitive and reliable AAB quantification without underestimation thanks to the presence of an internal control. Moreover, monitoring of both the AAB population and the amount of acetic acid in ethanol medium and red wine highlighted that a minimum about 6.0 log cells/mL of AAB is needed to significantly increase the production of acetic acid leading to spoilage.

  17. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  18. Evaluation of the 8th TNM classification on p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas in the Netherlands, and the importance of additional HPV DNA-testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, I H; Rietbergen, M M; van Bokhoven, A A J D; Bloemena, E; Witte, B I; Heideman, D A M; Baatenburg de Jong, R J; Brakenhoff, R H; Leemans, C R

    2018-02-09

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) are traditionally caused by smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. However, in the last decades high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections play an increasingly important role in tumorigenesis. HPV-driven OPSCCs are known to have a more favorable prognosis, which has led to important and marked changes in the recently released TNM-8. In this edition, OPSCCs are divided based on p16-immunostaining, with p16-overexpression as surrogate marker for the presence of HPV. The aims of this study are to evaluate TNM-8 on a Dutch consecutive cohort of patients with p16-positive OPSCC and to determine the relevance of additional HPV DNA-testing. All OPSCC patients without distant metastases at diagnosis and treated with curative intent at VU University Medical Center (2000-2015) and Erasmus Medical Center (2000-2006) were included (N = 1,204). HPV-status was established by p16-immunostaining followed by HPV DNA-PCR on the p16-immunopositive cases. We compared TNM-7 and TNM-8 using the Harrell's C index. In total, 388 of 1,204 (32.2%) patients were p16-immunopositive. In these patients, TNM-8 had a markedly better predictive prognostic power than TNM-7 (Harrell's C index 0.63 versus 0.53). Of the 388 p16-positive OPSCCs, 48 tumors (12.4%) were HPV DNA-negative. This subgroup had distinct demographic, clinical and morphologic characteristics and showed a significantly worse five-year overall survival compared to the HPV DNA-positive tumors (P HPV DNA-negative subgroup with distinct features and a worse overall survival, indicating the importance to perform additional HPV DNA-testing when predicting prognosis and particularly for selecting patients for de-intensified treatment regimens. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. DNA Damage Potential of Engine Emissions Measured In Vitro by Micronucleus Test in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červená, Tereza; Rössnerová, Andrea; Sikorová, Jitka; Beránek, V.; Vojtíšek-Lom, M.; Cigánek, M.; Topinka, Jan; Rössner ml., Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, SI (2017), s. 102-108 ISSN 1742-7835 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1508; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-01438S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : saliva DNA * methylation patterns * cancer-patients Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality OBOR OECD: Public and environmental health Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2016

  20. Triage of HR-HPV positive women with minor cytological abnormalities: a comparison of mRNA testing, HPV DNA testing, and repeat cytology using a 4-year follow-up of a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K Miriam; Brismar Wendel, Sophia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA) to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. Liquid-based (PreservCyt) cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. Nine of 25 (36%) women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36%) women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74%) women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100%) and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8%) groups, although specificity was insufficient (cytology were more specific than APTIMA. The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL.

  1. A transcontinental challenge--a test of DNA barcode performance for 1,541 species of Canadian Noctuoidea (Lepidoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Zahiri

    Full Text Available This study provides a first, comprehensive, diagnostic use of DNA barcodes for the Canadian fauna of noctuoids or "owlet" moths (Lepidoptera: Noctuoidea based on vouchered records for 1,541 species (99.1% species coverage, and more than 30,000 sequences. When viewed from a Canada-wide perspective, DNA barcodes unambiguously discriminate 90% of the noctuoid species recognized through prior taxonomic study, and resolution reaches 95.6% when considered at a provincial scale. Barcode sharing is concentrated in certain lineages with 54% of the cases involving 1.8% of the genera. Deep intraspecific divergence exists in 7.7% of the species, but further studies are required to clarify whether these cases reflect an overlooked species complex or phylogeographic variation in a single species. Non-native species possess higher Nearest-Neighbour (NN distances than native taxa, whereas generalist feeders have lower NN distances than those with more specialized feeding habits. We found high concordance between taxonomic names and sequence clusters delineated by the Barcode Index Number (BIN system with 1,082 species (70% assigned to a unique BIN. The cases of discordance involve both BIN mergers and BIN splits with 38 species falling into both categories, most likely reflecting bidirectional introgression. One fifth of the species are involved in a BIN merger reflecting the presence of 158 species sharing their barcode sequence with at least one other taxon, and 189 species with low, but diagnostic COI divergence. A very few cases (13 involved species whose members fell into both categories. Most of the remaining 140 species show a split into two or three BINs per species, while Virbia ferruginosa was divided into 16. The overall results confirm that DNA barcodes are effective for the identification of Canadian noctuoids. This study also affirms that BINs are a strong proxy for species, providing a pathway for a rapid, accurate estimation of animal diversity.

  2. Cell-type specific role of the RNA-binding protein, NONO, in the DNA double-strand break response in the mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Shu, Feng-Jue; Li, Zhentian; Jaafar, Lahcen; Zhao, Shourong; Dynan, William S

    2017-03-01

    The tandem RNA recognition motif protein, NONO, was previously identified as a candidate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor in a biochemical screen for proteins with end-joining stimulatory activity. Subsequent work showed that NONO and its binding partner, SFPQ, have many of the properties expected for bona fide repair factors in cell-based assays. Their contribution to the DNA damage response in intact tissue in vivo has not, however, been demonstrated. Here we compare DNA damage sensitivity in the testes of wild-type mice versus mice bearing a null allele of the NONO homologue (Nono gt ). In wild-type mice, NONO protein was present in Sertoli, peritubular myoid, and interstitial cells, with an increase in expression following induction of DNA damage. As expected for the product of an X-linked gene, NONO was not detected in germ cells. The Nono gt/0 mice had at most a mild testis developmental phenotype in the absence of genotoxic stress. However, following irradiation at sublethal, 2-4 Gy doses, Nono gt/0 mice displayed a number of indicators of radiosensitivity as compared to their wild-type counterparts. These included higher levels of persistent DSB repair foci, increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the seminiferous tubules, and partial degeneration of the blood-testis barrier. There was also an almost complete loss of germ cells at later times following irradiation, evidently arising as an indirect effect reflecting loss of stromal support. Results demonstrate a role for NONO protein in protection against direct and indirect biological effects of ionizing radiation in the whole animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the efficacy of the four tests (p16 immunochemistry, PCR, DNA and RNA In situ Hybridization) to evaluate a Human Papillomavirus infection in head and neck cancers: a cohort of 348 French squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Jérémy; Outh-Gauer, Sophie; Mandavit, Marion; Gasne, Cassandre; Grard, Ophélie; Denize, Thomas; Nervo, Marine; Mirghani, Haïtham; Laccourreye, Ollivier; Bonfils, Pierre; Bruneval, Patrick; Veyer, David; Péré, Hélène; Tartour, Eric; Badoual, Cécile

    2018-04-20

    It is now established that HPV plays a role in the development of a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), notably oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, it is not clear which test one should use to detect HPV in oropharyngeal (OP) and non-OP SCCs. In this study, using 348 HNSCCs (126 OP SCCs and 222 non-OP SCCs), we evaluated diagnostic performances of different HPV tests in OP and non-OP SCCs: PCR, p16 immunostaining, in situ hybridization targeting DNA (DNA-CISH) and RNA (RNA-CISH), combined p16 + DNA-CISH, and combined p16 + RNA-CISH. HPV DNA (PCR) was detected in 26% of all tumors (44% of OP SCCs and 17% of non-OP SCCs). For OP SCCs, RNA-CISH was the most sensitive standalone test (88%), but p16 + RNA-CISH was even more sensitive (95%). Specificities were the same for RNA-CISH and DNA-CISH (97%) but it was better for p16 + RNA-CISH (100%). For non-OP SCCs, all tests had sensitivities below 50%, and RNA-CISH, DNA-CISH and p16 + DNA-CISH had respectively 100%, 97% and 99% specificities. As a standalone test, RNA-CISH is the most performant assay to detect HPV in OP SCCs, and combined p16 + RNA-CISH test slightly improves its performances. However, RNA-CISH has the advantage of being one single test. Like p16 and DNA-CISH, RNA-CISH performances are poor in non-OP SCCs to detect HPV, and combining tests does not improve performances. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Testing DNA barcode performance in 1000 species of European lepidoptera: large geographic distances have small genetic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Peter; Mutanen, Marko; Sefc, Kristina M; Hebert, Paul D N

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the performance of DNA barcodes (mt cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene) in the identification of 1004 species of Lepidoptera shared by two localities (Finland, Austria) that are 1600 km apart. Maximum intraspecific distances for the pooled data were less than 2% for 880 species (87.6%), while deeper divergence was detected in 124 species. Despite such variation, the overall DNA barcode library possessed diagnostic COI sequences for 98.8% of the taxa. Because a reference library based on Finnish specimens was highly effective in identifying specimens from Austria, we conclude that barcode libraries based on regional sampling can often be effective for a much larger area. Moreover, dispersal ability (poor, good) and distribution patterns (disjunct, fragmented, continuous, migratory) had little impact on levels of intraspecific geographic divergence. Furthermore, the present study revealed that, despite the intensity of past taxonomic work on European Lepidoptera, nearly 20% of the species shared by Austria and Finland require further work to clarify their status. Particularly discordant BIN (Barcode Index Number) cases should be checked to ascertain possible explanatory factors such as incorrect taxonomy, hybridization, introgression, and Wolbachia infections.

  5. Testing DNA barcode performance in 1000 species of European lepidoptera: large geographic distances have small genetic impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Huemer

    Full Text Available This study examines the performance of DNA barcodes (mt cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene in the identification of 1004 species of Lepidoptera shared by two localities (Finland, Austria that are 1600 km apart. Maximum intraspecific distances for the pooled data were less than 2% for 880 species (87.6%, while deeper divergence was detected in 124 species. Despite such variation, the overall DNA barcode library possessed diagnostic COI sequences for 98.8% of the taxa. Because a reference library based on Finnish specimens was highly effective in identifying specimens from Austria, we conclude that barcode libraries based on regional sampling can often be effective for a much larger area. Moreover, dispersal ability (poor, good and distribution patterns (disjunct, fragmented, continuous, migratory had little impact on levels of intraspecific geographic divergence. Furthermore, the present study revealed that, despite the intensity of past taxonomic work on European Lepidoptera, nearly 20% of the species shared by Austria and Finland require further work to clarify their status. Particularly discordant BIN (Barcode Index Number cases should be checked to ascertain possible explanatory factors such as incorrect taxonomy, hybridization, introgression, and Wolbachia infections.

  6. Comparison of the clinical performances of the AdvanSure HPV Screening Real-Time PCR, the Abbott Real-Time High-Risk HPV Test, and the Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA Test for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Hahm, Chorong; Lee, Miae

    2014-09-01

    The clinical performance of three human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA commercial assays for cervical cancer screening was evaluated; the AdvanSure HPV Screening Real-Time PCR (AdvanSure PCR; LG Life Sciences) that was developed recently for the detection of both high-risk and low-risk genotypes, the Abbott RealTime High-Risk HPV Test (Abbott PCR; Abbott Molecular) and the Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA test (HC2; Qiagen). The three different HPV DNA tests were compared using cytology samples obtained from 619 women who underwent routine cervical cancer screening. The gold-standard assay was histopathological confirmation of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse. The clinical sensitivities of the AdvanSure PCR, the Abbott PCR and the HC2 for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse were 95.5%, 95.5% and 100%, respectively, while the clinical specificities were 61.6%, 86.4% and 83.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the clinical sensitivities of the Abbott PCR and the AdvanSure PCR compared to the HC2. The clinical specificities of the Abbott PCR and the AdvanSure PCR for the detection of HPV types 16/18 were 97.8% and 98.5%, respectively. For cervical cancer screening, all three tests showed relatively good clinical sensitivities, but the AdvanSure PCR had lower clinical specificity than the Abbott PCR and the HC2. The AdvanSure PCR and the Abbott PCR assays have the advantage of being automated and the ability to distinguish between HPV types 16/18 and other HPV types. The two real-time PCR assays could be useful tools in HPV testing for cervical cancer screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Post-mortem diagnosis of chronic Chagas's disease comparative evaluation of three serological tests on pericardial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, E R; Chapadeiro, E; Batista, S M; Cunha, J G; Rocha, A; Miziara, L; Ribeiro, J U; Patto, R J

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the post-mortem diagnosis of Chagas's disease the authors performed haemagglutination tests (HAT), fluorescent Trypanosoma cruzi antibody tests (FAT), and complement fixation tests (CFT) on the pericardial fluid obtained at autopsy of 50 individuals with Chagas's heart disease, and 93 patients in whom this disease was not thought to be present. The results demonstrate that all three tests are efficient for the post-mortem diagnosis of Chagas's disease but suggest that their combined use would detect more cases than would one isolated reaction only.

  8. Validation of a new test for Schistosoma haematobium based on detection of Dra1 DNA fragments in urine: evaluation through latent class analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmilola Ibironke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis in chronically infected adults is challenging but important, especially because long term infection of the bladder and urinary tract can have dire consequences. We evaluated three tests for viable infection: detection of parasite specific DNA Dra1 fragments, haematuria and presence of parasite eggs for sensitivity (Se and specificity (Sp.Over 400 urine specimens collected from adult volunteers in an endemic area in Western Nigeria were assessed for haematuria then filtered in the field, the filter papers dried and later examined for eggs and DNA. The results were stratified according to sex and age and subjected to Latent Class analysis.Presence of Dra1 in males (Se=100%; Sp=100% exceeded haematuria (Se=87.6%: Sp=34.7% and detection of eggs (Se=70.1%; Sp=100%. In females presence of Dra1 was Se=100%: Sp=100%, exceeding haematuria (Se=86.7%: Sp=77.0% and eggs (Se=70.1%; Sp=100%. Dra1 became undetectable 2 weeks after praziquantel treatment. We conclude detection of Dra1 fragment is a definitive test for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium infection.

  9. The usefulness of DNA sequencing after extraction by Whatman FTA filter matrix technology and phenotypic tests for differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, Nuri; Oz, Yasemin; Aslan, Huseyin; Muslumanoglu, Hamza

    2014-02-01

    Since C. dubliniensis is similar to C. albicans phenotypically, it can be misidentified as C. albicans. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of C. dubliniensis among isolates previously identified as C. albicans in our stocks and to compare the phenotypic methods and DNA sequencing of D1/D2 region on the ribosomal large subunit (rLSU) gene. A total of 850 isolates included in this study. Phenotypic identification was performed based on germ tube formation, chlamydospore production, colony colors on chromogenic agar, inability of growth at 45 °C and growth on hypertonic Sabouraud dextrose agar. Eighty isolates compatible with C. dubliniensis by at least one phenotypic test were included in the sequence analysis. Nested PCR amplification of D1/D2 region of the rLSU gene was performed after the fungal DNA extraction by Whatman FTA filter paper technology. The sequencing analysis of PCR products carried out by an automated capillary gel electrophoresis device. The rate of C. dubliniensis was 2.35 % (n = 20) among isolates previously described as C. albicans. Consequently, none of the phenotypic tests provided satisfactory performance alone in our study, and molecular methods required special equipment and high cost. Thus, at least two phenotypic methods can be used for identification of C. dubliniensis, and molecular methods can be used for confirmation.

  10. Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Kemel, Yelena; Stadler, Zsofia K; Joseph, Vijai; Zehir, Ahmet; Pradhan, Nisha; Arnold, Angela; Walsh, Michael F; Li, Yirong; Balakrishnan, Anoop R; Syed, Aijazuddin; Prasad, Meera; Nafa, Khedoudja; Carlo, Maria I; Cadoo, Karen A; Sheehan, Meg; Fleischut, Megan H; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Trottier, Magan; Lipkin, Steven M; Lincoln, Anne; Mukherjee, Semanti; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Cambria, Roy; Galle, Jesse; Abida, Wassim; Arcila, Marcia E; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak; Yu, Kenneth; Bajorin, Dean F; Coleman, Jonathan A; Leach, Steven D; Lowery, Maeve A; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kantoff, Philip W; Sawyers, Charles L; Dickler, Maura N; Saltz, Leonard; Motzer, Robert J; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Scher, Howard I; Baselga, Jose; Klimstra, David S; Solit, David B; Hyman, David M; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth

    2017-09-05

    Guidelines for cancer genetic testing based on family history may miss clinically actionable genetic changes with established implications for cancer screening or prevention. To determine the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using simultaneous sequencing of the tumor and normal tissue ("tumor-normal sequencing") compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines. From January 2014 until May 2016 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 10 336 patients consented to tumor DNA sequencing. Since May 2015, 1040 of these patients with advanced cancer were referred by their oncologists for germline analysis of 76 cancer predisposition genes. Patients with clinically actionable inherited mutations whose genetic test results would not have been predicted by published decision rules were identified. Follow-up for potential clinical implications of mutation detection was through May 2017. Tumor and germline sequencing compared with the predicted yield of targeted germline sequencing based on clinical guidelines. Proportion of clinically actionable germline mutations detected by universal tumor-normal sequencing that would not have been detected by guideline-directed testing. Of 1040 patients, the median age was 58 years (interquartile range, 50.5-66 years), 65.3% were male, and 81.3% had stage IV disease at the time of genomic analysis, with prostate, renal, pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer as the most common diagnoses. Of the 1040 patients, 182 (17.5%; 95% CI, 15.3%-19.9%) had clinically actionable mutations conferring cancer susceptibility, including 149 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations; 101 patients tested (9.7%; 95% CI, 8.1%-11.7%) would not have had these mutations detected using clinical guidelines, including 65 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations. Frequency of inherited mutations was related to case mix, stage, and founder mutations. Germline findings led to discussion or initiation of

  11. A Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) analysis on the clinical utility of sperm DNA fragmentation testing in specific male infertility scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C; Agarwal, Ashok; Cho, Chak-Lam; Majzoub, Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is recognized as a leading cause of male infertility because it can impair the paternal genome through distinct pathophysiological mechanisms. Current evidence supports SDF as a major factor in the pathophysiology of several conditions, including varicocele, unexplained infertility, assisted reproductive technology failure, and environmental lifestyle factors, although the mechanisms involved have not been fully described yet. Measurement of the levels of DNA fragmentation in semen provides valuable information on the integrity of paternal chromatin and may guide therapeutic strategies. A recently published clinical practice guideline (CPG) highlighted how to use the information provided by SDF testing in daily practice, which triggered a series of commentaries by leading infertility experts. These commentaries contained an abundance of information and conflicting views about the clinical utility of SDF testing, which underline the complex nature of SDF. A search of papers published in response to the CPG entitled "Clinical utility of sperm DNA fragmentation testing: practice recommendations based on clinical scenarios" was performed within the Translational Andrology and Urology ( TAU ) website (http://tau.amegroups.com/). The start and end dates for the search were May 2017 and August 2017, respectively. Each commentary meeting our inclusion criteria was rated as "supportive without reservation", "supportive with reservation", "not supportive" or "neutral". We recorded whether articles discussed either SDF characteristics as a laboratory test method or clinical scenarios, or both. Subsequently, we extracted the particulars from each commentary and utilized the 'Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats' (SWOT) analysis to understand the perceived advantages and drawbacks of SDF as a specialized sperm function method in clinical practice. Fifty-eight fertility experts from six continents and twenty-two countries contributed

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility determined by the E test, Löwenstein-Jensen proportion, and DNA sequencing methods among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates discrepancies, preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Moura Freixo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to streptomycin (SM, isoniazid (INH, and/or rifampin (RIF as determined by the conventional Löwenstein-Jensen proportion method (LJPM were compared with the E test, a minimum inhibitory concentration susceptibility method. Discrepant isolates were further evaluated by BACTEC and by DNA sequence analyses for mutations in genes most often associated with resistance to these drugs (rpsL, katG, inhA, and rpoB. Preliminary discordant E test results were seen in 75% of isolates resistant to SM and in 11% to INH. Discordance improved for these two drugs (63% for SM and none for INH when isolates were re-tested but worsened for RIF (30%. Despite good agreement between phenotypic results and sequencing analyses, wild type profiles were detected on resistant strains mainly for SM and INH. It should be aware that susceptible isolates according to molecular methods might contain other mechanisms of resistance. Although reproducibility of the LJPM susceptibility method has been established, variable E test results for some M. tuberculosis isolates poses questions regarding its reproducibility particularly the impact of E test performance which may vary among laboratories despite adherence to recommended protocols. Further studies must be done to enlarge the evaluated samples and looked possible mutations outside of the hot spot sequenced gene among discrepant strains.

  13. Polymorphism of κ-Casein in Italian Goat Breeds: A New ACRS-PCR Designed DNA Test for Discrimination of A and B Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Cubric-Curik

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a DNA test for rapid characterisation of goat κ-casein (κ-CN A and B variants and to study this polymorphism in Italian goat breeds. Genetic polymorphism of κ-CN gene was, in addition to isoelectric focusing, analysed according to a new technique designated as amplification created restriction site. Two alleles that differ in one nucleotide mutation (G Ø A in exon 4 were characterised. The 167-bp PCR product surrounding the nucleotide mutation was amplified from genomic DNA and the PCR product was digested with MaeIII. After digestion the A allele gives three fragments of 77, 65 and 25 bp in comparison with the B allele which gives two fragments of 90 and 77 bp. The analysis of allele frequency distribution at κ-CN locus, based on 401 individual samples, revealed significant differences among three goat breeds from the north of Italy (Nera di Verzasca, Frontalasca and Alpine with frequency of κ-CN B allele around 0.3, versus two goat breeds from the south of Italy (Maltese and Sarda with frequency of κ-CN B allele around 0.5. While two goat breeds (Maltese and Nera di Verzasca did not show significant deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, a highly significant excess of heterozygote genotype (AB was observed in Alpine, Frontalasca and Sarda goats. Here the developed DNA method and observed relatively high frequency of κ-CN B allele give a prerequisite for the assessment of research related to the simultaneous estimation of the effects of composite αs1/κ-CN genotypes on milk production and cheese-making properties.

  14. Can DNA-Based Ecosystem Assessments Quantify Species Abundance? Testing Primer Bias and Biomass--Sequence Relationships with an Innovative Metabarcoding Protocol.

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    Vasco Elbrecht

    Full Text Available Metabarcoding is an emerging genetic tool to rapidly assess biodiversity in ecosystems. It involves high-throughput sequencing of a standard gene from an environmental sample and comparison to a reference database. However, no consensus has emerged regarding laboratory pipelines to screen species diversity and infer species abundances from environmental samples. In particular, the effect of primer bias and the detection limit for specimens with a low biomass has not been systematically examined, when processing samples in bulk. We developed and tested a DNA metabarcoding protocol that utilises the standard cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI barcoding fragment to detect freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa. DNA was extracted in bulk, amplified in a single PCR step, and purified, and the libraries were directly sequenced in two independent MiSeq runs (300-bp paired-end reads. Specifically, we assessed the influence of specimen biomass on sequence read abundance by sequencing 31 specimens of a stonefly species with known haplotypes spanning three orders of magnitude in biomass (experiment I. Then, we tested the recovery of 52 different freshwater invertebrate taxa of similar biomass using the same standard barcoding primers (experiment II. Each experiment was replicated ten times to maximise statistical power. The results of both experiments were consistent across replicates. We found a distinct positive correlation between species biomass and resulting numbers of MiSeq reads. Furthermore, we reliably recovered 83% of the 52 taxa used to test primer bias. However, sequence abundance varied by four orders of magnitudes between taxa despite the use of similar amounts of biomass. Our metabarcoding approach yielded reliable results for high-throughput assessments. However, the results indicated that primer efficiency is highly species-specific, which would prevent straightforward assessments of species abundance and biomass in a sample. Thus, PCR

  15. Study of HIV-1 subtypes in serodiscordant couples attending an integrated counselling and testing centre in Mumbai using heteroduplex mobility analysis and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the prevalent subtypes of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples. Setting: Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre (ICTC, Department of Microbiology. Study Design: Prospective pilot study. Participants: Thirty HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Inclusion Criteria: a Documentation of HIV-1 infection in one partner and seronegative status in the other, current history of continued unprotected sexual activity within the partnership, demonstration that they have been in a partnership for at least 1 year and are not currently on highly active antiretroviral therapy HAART; b willingness of both partners to provide written informed consent including consent to continued couple counselling for 3 months. Materials and Methods: HIV-1 subtyping was carried out by heteroduplex mobility analysis (HMA by amplifying env region; and DNA sequencing by amplifying gag region. Results: HIV-1 env gene was amplified successfully in 10/30 samples; gag gene, in 25/30 samples; and both env and gag gene were amplified successfully in 5/30 samples. HIV-1 subtype C was detected from 21 samples; subtype B, from 7; and subtype A, from 2. Sample from 1 positive partner was detected as subtype C by env HMA and subtype B by gag sequencing. Conclusion: HIV-1 subtype C was found to be the predominant subtype of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples attending our ICTC, followed by HIV-1 subtype B and HIV-1 subtype A, respectively. DNA sequencing was found to be the most reliable method for determining the subtypes of HIV-1.

  16. Conectando famílias de construções genéticas: testes de DNA na reunificação da família somali na Finlândia Connecting genes-building families: DNA testing in somali family reunification in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Hautaniemi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Os temas centrais desse artigo, reunificação familiar em geral e teste de DNA em particular, surgiram a partir de uma pesquisa em andamento acerca de jovens da Somália na Finlândia. Desde 1996, realizo uma pesquisa etnográfica - em escolas, clubes de jovens, ruas e cafés - com jovens da Somália que chegaram à Finlândia por volta de 1994 e que freqüentam escolas finlandesas nos subúrbios de Helsinki. Meu interesse geral nesta pesquisa longitudinal era conhecer as experiências de passagem para a vida adulta em contextos altamente diferenciados, não apenas do ponto de vista do país anfitrião, mas também cultural e transnacionalmente. O tema, testes de DNA, toca na questão central desta pesquisa de modo profundo. Aqui, crescer não é visto como uma simples questão biológica. É um processo social no qual as relações, como laços de parentesco, são constituídas, vivenciadas e contestadas. Essas relações são poderosas para a identificação individual e social. A testagem-DNA pode violar simbólica e fisicamente o processo social de identificações íntimas e de integridade pessoal.The central themes of this article, family reunification in general, and DNA testing in particular, came to the fore during a research project about young Somalians in Finland. Since 1996, I have been conducting ethnographic research - in schools, youth clubs, streets and cafés - with youngsters from Somalia who arrived in Finland around 1994, and who attend Finnish schools in the suburbs of Helsinki. My general interest in this longitudinal study was to learn about the experiences of coming of age in highly dispersed settings, not only in the vein of a local host country, but also culturally and transnationally. Here, growing up is seen not as a simple biological question. It is a social process in which relationships such as kinship ties are constituted, experienced, and contested. These are powerful relations for individual and social

  17. Comprehensive analysis of sperm DNA fragmentation by five different assays: TUNEL assay, SCSA, SCD test and alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Prada, E; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2013-09-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is becoming an important test to assess male infertility. Several different tests are available, but no consensus has yet been reached as to which tests are most predictive of infertility. Few publications have reported a comprehensive analysis comparing these methods within the same population. The objective of this study was to analyze the differences between the five most common methodologies, to study their correlations and to establish their cut-off values, sensitivity and specificity in predicting male infertility. We found differences in SDF between fertile donors and infertile patients in TUNEL, SCSA, SCD and alkaline Comet assays, but none with the neutral Comet assay. The alkaline COMET assay was the best in predicting male infertility followed by TUNEL, SCD and SCSA, whereas the neutral COMET assay had no predictive power. For our patient population, threshold values for infertility were 20.05% for TUNEL assay, 18.90% for SCSA, 22.75% for the SCD test, 45.37% for alkaline Comet and 34.37% for neutral Comet. This work establishes in a comprehensive study that the all techniques except neutral Comet are useful to distinguish fertile and infertile men. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  18. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in horse meat from supermarkets in France and performance evaluation of two serological tests

    OpenAIRE

    Aroussi Abdelkrim; Vignoles Philippe; Dalmay François; Wimel Laurence; Dardé Marie-Laure; Mercier Aurélien; Ajzenberg Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In France, some cases of severe toxoplasmosis have been linked to the consumption of horse meat that had been imported from the American continent where atypical strains of Toxoplasma gondii are more common than in Europe. Many seroprevalence studies are presented in the literature but risk assessment of T. gondii infection after horse meat consumption is not possible in the absence of validated serological tests and the unknown correlation between detection of antibodies against T. gondii an...

  19. Atypical Squamous Cells in Liquid-Based Cervical Cytology: Microbiology, Inflammatory Infiltrate, and Human Papillomavirus-DNA Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes de Oliveira, Geilson; Eleutério, Renata Mirian Nunes; Silveira Gonçalves, Ana Katherine; Giraldo, Paulo César; Eleutério, José

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between atypical squamous cells (ASC) and inflammatory infiltrate and vaginal microbiota using cervical liquid-based cytological (SurePath®) and high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) tests. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a 6-year database from a laboratory in Fortaleza (Brazil). Files from 1,346 ASC cases were divided into subgroups and results concerning inflammation and vaginal microorganisms diagnosed by cytology were compared with HR-HPV test results. An absence of specific microorganisms (ASM) was the most frequent finding (ASC of undetermined significance, ASC-US = 74%; ASC - cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, ASC-H = 68%), followed by bacterial vaginosis (ASC-US = 20%; ASC- H = 25%) and Candida spp. (ASC-US = 6%; ASC-H = 5%). Leukocyte infiltrate was present in 71% of ASC-US and 85% of ASC-H (p = 0.0040), and in these specific cases HR-HPV tests were positive for 65 and 64%, respectively. A positive HR-HPV test was relatively more frequent when a specific microorganism was present, and Candida spp. was associated with HR-HPV-positive results (p = 0.0156), while an ASM was associated with negative HR-HPV results (p = 0.0370). ASC-US is associated with an absence of inflammation or vaginosis, while ASC-H smears are associated with Trichomonas vaginalis and inflammatory infiltrate. A positive HR-HPV is associated with Candida spp. in ASC cytology. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S K

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  1. Prevalence of human papilloma virus in cervical smear by DNA PCR testing and its comparison with pap smear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Discussion: The study reveals HPV prevalence rate of 28.3% in women attending gynaecology OPD of a tertiary care hospital and also prevalence of HPV was found to be highest in sexually active individuals with parity of 3 or more. These results are in agreement to many published national and international studies [12,13,14]. The study results also indicate lower sensitivity and higher specificity of Pap smear in detecting HPV infection, however it still remains the most important practicably available test in early detection of cervical carcinoma.

  2. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  3. Quantification of intrahepatic total HBV DNA in liver biopsies of HBV-infected patients by a modified version of COBAS® Ampliprep/COBAS®TaqMan HBV test v2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpini, Romina; Piermatteo, Lorenzo; Gill, Upkar; Battisti, Arianna; Stazi, Francesca; Guenci, Tania; Giannella, Sara; Serafini, Valentina; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Perno, Carlo Federico; Svicher, Valentina; Ciotti, Marco

    2017-08-01

    Intrahepatic total HBV DNA (it-HBV DNA) level might reflect the size of virus reservoir and correlate with the histological status of the liver. To quantitate it-HBV DNA in a series of 70 liver biopsies obtained from hepatitis B chronic patients, a modified version of the COBAS ® Ampliprep/COBAS ® TaqMan HBV test v2.0 was used for this purpose. The linearity and reproducibility of the modified protocol was tested by quantifying serial dilutions of a full-length HBV containing plasmid and it-HBV DNA from a reference patient. A good linear trend between the expected values and those generated by the assay was observed at different concentrations of both plasmid and reference patient (R 2  = 0.994 and 0.962, respectively). Differences between the values obtained in two independent runs were ≤0.3 log IU for the plasmid and ≤0.6 log IU/mg for the reference patient, showing a high inter-run reproducibility. In the 70 liver biopsies, it-HBV DNA level ranged from 1.4 to 5.4 log IU/mg, with a good linearity and reproducibility between the values obtained in two runs [R 2  = 0.981; median (IQR) difference of it-HBV DNA 0.05 (0.02-0.09) IU/mg]. The modified COBAS ® Ampliprep/COBAS ® TaqMan HBV test v2.0 allows an accurate quantitation of it-HBV DNA. Its determination may have prognostic value and may be a useful tool for the new therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating the HBV infection.

  4. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Launaea acanthodes on DNA Oxidative Damage and Antioxidant Enzymes Activities in Diabetic Rats Testes Tissue

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    S. Tafakko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As one of the most prevalent disorders in the adolescents, the comorbidity of social anxiety disorder and depression leads to bad outcomes for them. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the midfulness-based cognitive therapy on the cognitive-behavioral avoidance and mental rumination in patients with comorbidity of social anxiety and depression. Materials & Methods: In the controlled follow-up pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study, 30 female high-school students with the social anxiety and depression comorbiduty were studied in Khorramabad in the academic year 2015-16. The subjects, selected via purposeful sampling method, were randomly divided into two 15-person groups including experimental and control groups. Data was collected by the structured clinical interview for Axis 1 disorders, the social anxiety questionnaire for the adolescents, Beck depression inventory- second edition, the cognitive-behavioral avoidance scale, and the ruminative responces scale. Eight 2-hour group mindfulness-based cognitive-therapy training sessions (one session per week were conducted in experimental group, while control group received no intervention. Finally, posttest was conducted in both groups and a follow-up step was conducted 2 month latter. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using multi-variable covariance analysis test. Findings: The mean scores of the cognitive-behavioral avoidance and mental rumination items in the posttest and follow-up steps significantly decreased in experimental group compared to control group (p<0.01. Conclusion: The mindfulness-based cognitive therapy reduces the cognitive-behavioral avoidance, as well as the mental rumination, in the patients with the social anxiety and depression comorbidity.

  5. Model-based analysis of costs and outcomes of non-invasive prenatal testing for Down's syndrome using cell free fetal DNA in the UK National Health Service.

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    Stephen Morris

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT for Down's syndrome (DS using cell free fetal DNA in maternal blood has the potential to dramatically alter the way prenatal screening and diagnosis is delivered. Before NIPT can be implemented into routine practice, information is required on its costs and benefits. We investigated the costs and outcomes of NIPT for DS as contingent testing and as first-line testing compared with the current DS screening programme in the UK National Health Service.We used a pre-existing model to evaluate the costs and outcomes associated with NIPT compared with the current DS screening programme. The analysis was based on a hypothetical screening population of 10,000 pregnant women. Model inputs were taken from published sources. The main outcome measures were number of DS cases detected, number of procedure-related miscarriages and total cost.At a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing detects slightly fewer DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and costs the same as current DS screening (around UK£280,000 at a cost of £500 per NIPT. As first-line testing NIPT detects more DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and is more expensive than current screening at a cost of £50 per NIPT. When NIPT uptake increases, NIPT detects more DS cases with a small increase in procedure-related miscarriages and costs.NIPT is currently available in the private sector in the UK at a price of £400-£900. If the NHS cost was at the lower end of this range then at a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing would be cost neutral or cost saving compared with current DS screening. As first-line testing NIPT is likely to produce more favourable outcomes but at greater cost. Further research is needed to evaluate NIPT under real world conditions.

  6. Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization and p16/Ki67 Dual Staining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Specimens: Correlation with HPV-DNA Test, E6/E7 mRNA Test, and Potential Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Zappacosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HPV-DNA test and E6/E7 mRNA analyses remain the current standard for the confirmation of human papillomavirus (HPV infections in cytological specimens, no universally adopted techniques exist for the detection of HPV in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Particularly, in routine laboratories, molecular assays are still time-consuming and would require a high level of expertise. In this study, we investigated the possible use of a novel HPV tyramide-based chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH technology to locate HPV on tissue specimens. Then, we evaluate the potential usefulness of p16INK4a/Ki-67 double stain on histological samples, to identify cervical cells expressing HPV E6/E7 oncogenes. In our series, CISH showed a clear signal in 95.2% of the specimens and reached a sensitivity of 86.5%. CISH positivity always matched with HPV-DNA positivity, while 100% of cases with punctated signal joined with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+. p16/Ki67 immunohistochemistry gave an interpretable result in 100% of the cases. The use of dual stain significantly increased the agreement between pathologists, which reached 100%. Concordance between dual stain and E6/E7 mRNA test was 89%. In our series, both CISH and p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain demonstrated high grade of performances. In particular, CISH would help to distinguish episomal from integrated HPV, in order to allow conclusions regarding the prognosis of the lesion, while p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain approach would confer a high level of standardization to the diagnostic procedure.

  7. Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization and p16/Ki67 Dual Staining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Specimens: Correlation with HPV-DNA Test, E6/E7 mRNA Test, and Potential Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, Roberta; Colasante, Antonella; Viola, Patrizia; D'Antuono, Tommaso; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Capanna, Serena; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Rosini, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Although HPV-DNA test and E6/E7 mRNA analyses remain the current standard for the confirmation of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in cytological specimens, no universally adopted techniques exist for the detection of HPV in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Particularly, in routine laboratories, molecular assays are still time-consuming and would require a high level of expertise. In this study, we investigated the possible use of a novel HPV tyramide-based chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) technology to locate HPV on tissue specimens. Then, we evaluate the potential usefulness of p16INK4a/Ki-67 double stain on histological samples, to identify cervical cells expressing HPV E6/E7 oncogenes. In our series, CISH showed a clear signal in 95.2% of the specimens and reached a sensitivity of 86.5%. CISH positivity always matched with HPV-DNA positivity, while 100% of cases with punctated signal joined with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). p16/Ki67 immunohistochemistry gave an interpretable result in 100% of the cases. The use of dual stain significantly increased the agreement between pathologists, which reached 100%. Concordance between dual stain and E6/E7 mRNA test was 89%. In our series, both CISH and p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain demonstrated high grade of performances. In particular, CISH would help to distinguish episomal from integrated HPV, in order to allow conclusions regarding the prognosis of the lesion, while p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain approach would confer a high level of standardization to the diagnostic procedure. PMID:24369532

  8. Establishing diagnostic cut-off criteria for the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Qualitative test through validation against the Amplicor DNA test v1.5 for infant diagnosis using dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Jean; Preiser, Wolfgang; van Zyl, Gert U

    2012-02-01

    As antibody testing cannot confirm HIV-1 infection in children less than 18 months of age, diagnosis in these children depends on nucleic acid testing. The COBAS(®) AmpliPrep/COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) (CAP/CTM, Roche(®) Molecular Systems, Inc., Branchburg, NJ) HIV-1 Qualitative test is a total nucleic acid real-time PCR assay utilising whole EDTA blood or dried blood spots (DBS), which recently replaced the Roche(®) AMPLICOR(®) DNA test v1.5 (Amplicor) as the diagnostic HIV PCR assay in many South African laboratories. For the Amplicor assay, stringent diagnostic criteria were previously formulated for the local population, and a comparison reported the CAP/CTM's sensitivity at 99.7% and specificity at 100% for both sample types compared to these Amplicor criteria. To validate the assay prior to introduction in our laboratory and to define stringent diagnostic cut-off criteria. Whole EDTA blood samples from patients younger than 18 months sent for routine HIV-1 diagnosis were tested by Amplicor, and positive results were confirmed from DBS. CAP/CTM assays were subsequently performed from DBS. The CAP/CTM had a sensitivity of 98.8% and a specificity of 97.1%, but a positive predictive value (PPV) of only 78.7% compared to the Amplicor assay. Samples positive by CAP/CTM but negative by Amplicor displayed poor amplification curves compared to concordant positive samples. Upon re-testing those with sufficient material available by CAP/CTM, all showed negative results. The decreased PPV may either be due to false positive CAP/CTM results, or increased sensitivity compared to the Amplicor assay. Criteria were formulated for defining presumed false-positive results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Verification of a decrease in the rigidity of the phage lambda DNA polymeric chain in low ionic strength aqueous solutions by testing the polymer-polymer interlink interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutiunian, A V; Ivanova, M A; Kurliand, D I; Kapshin, Iu S; Landa, S B; Poshekhonov, S T; Drobchenko, E A; Shevelev, I V

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the rigidity of the polymetric chain of phage lambda double-strand DNA have been studied by laser correlation spectroscopy. It was shown that, as the ionic strength increases, the effect of the screening of the hydrodynamic interaction of the links of the polymeric chain specific for polymeric coils arises in a DNA solution. It is assumed that the screening occurs when the threshold of the overlapping of DNA coils is achieved. The overlapping of coils is the result of a previously observed significant rise of DNA coil size from abnormally small DNA coils in low ionic strength buffers (about 10(-2) M Na+ or less) to maximum possible large coils in the 5SSC and 5SSC-like buffers. Further analysis of the far interlink interactions in linear lambda phage DNA coils in similar buffers at pH 7 and 4 confirms the earlier proposal about the role of H+ ions in the appearance of abnormally small DNA coils. The abnormal decrease in the DNA coil size in low ionic strength buffers is not a specific feature of lambda phage DNA only.

  10. The radioimmunoassay of a pregnancy specific-β1-glycoprotein in plasma as a pregnancy test for subfertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, F.; Masson, G.M.; Wood, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    A pregnancy specific-β 1 -glycoprotein (SP 1 ) radioimmunoassay was used to monitor 72 menstrual cycles of 38 apparently subfertile women who were trying to become pregnant. Blood samples were taken up to day 42 from the start of the previous menstrual cycle. Using serum SP 1 levels greater than 6 μg/l as indicative of pregnancy, 16 positive results were obtained of which 11 were later confirmed by a human chorionic gonadotrophin haemagglutination pregnancy test. Three of the five women whose pregnancies were not confirmed had a subsequent history of spontaneous abortion. (author)

  11. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  12. Tumor mismatch repair immunohistochemistry and DNA MLH1 methylation testing of patients with endometrial cancer diagnosed at age younger than 60 years optimizes triage for population-level germline mismatch repair gene mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Daniel D; Tan, Yen Y; Walsh, Michael D; Clendenning, Mark; Metcalf, Alexander M; Ferguson, Kaltin; Arnold, Sven T; Thompson, Bryony A; Lose, Felicity A; Parsons, Michael T; Walters, Rhiannon J; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Cummings, Margaret; Oehler, Martin K; Blomfield, Penelope B; Quinn, Michael A; Kirk, Judy A; Stewart, Colin J; Obermair, Andreas; Young, Joanne P; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-01-10

    Clinicopathologic data from a population-based endometrial cancer cohort, unselected for age or family history, were analyzed to determine the optimal scheme for identification of patients with germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Endometrial cancers from 702 patients recruited into the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and for MLH1 gene promoter methylation in MLH1-deficient cases. MMR mutation testing was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-protein deficient tumors. Prediction of germline mutation status was compared for combinations of tumor characteristics, age at diagnosis, and various clinical criteria (Amsterdam, Bethesda, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, ANECS). Tumor MMR-protein deficiency was detected in 170 (24%) of 702 cases. Germline testing of 158 MMR-deficient cases identified 22 truncating mutations (3% of all cases) and four unclassified variants. Tumor MLH1 methylation was detected in 99 (89%) of 111 cases demonstrating MLH1/PMS2 IHC loss; all were germline MLH1 mutation negative. A combination of MMR IHC plus MLH1 methylation testing in women younger than 60 years of age at diagnosis provided the highest positive predictive value for the identification of mutation carriers at 46% versus ≤ 41% for any other criteria considered. Population-level identification of patients with MMR mutation-positive endometrial cancer is optimized by stepwise testing for tumor MMR IHC loss in patients younger than 60 years, tumor MLH1 methylation in individuals with MLH1 IHC loss, and germline mutations in patients exhibiting loss of MSH6, MSH2, or PMS2 or loss of MLH1/PMS2 with absence of MLH1 methylation.

  13. Real-time ed end-point Polymerase Chain Reaction per la quantizzazione del DNA di Citomegalovirus: confronto tra metodi e con il test per l’antigene pp65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Allice

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitave Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR for Cytomegalovirus (CMV DNA provides highly sensitive and specific data for detecting CMV as well as monitoring the infection and determining the appropriate antiviral strategy.To determine the clinical application of a recently introduced real-time (RT PCR assay for CMV DNA quantitation in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs and defining its correlation with the commercial quantitative end-point (EP PCR method COBAS AMPLICOR CMV Monitor and pp65 antigen test. Sequential PBL samples (n=158 from 32 liver transplanted patients with CMV asymptomatic infection and positive for CMV DNA by EP-PCR were retrospectively analysed with RT-PCR and studied according to pp65 antigen levels. A good correlation was found between RT-PCR and pp65 antigen test (r=0.691 and between the two PCR assays (r=0.761. RT-PCR data were significantly higher in pre-emptive treated patients (those with >20 pp65+positive cells, median value: 3.8 log10 copies/500,000 PBLs than in not-treated ones (2.9 logs.According to pp65 levels of 0, 1-10, 11-20, 21-50, 51-100 and >100 positive cells/200,000 PBLs, median CMV DNA load by RT-PCR was 2.6, 3.0, 3.6, 4.0. 4.2 and 4.8, log10 copies/ 500,000 PBLs, respectively (EP-PCR CMV DNA levels: 2. 8, 2.9, 3.8, 3.7, 3.9 and 4.0 logs. For samples with >20 pp65+cells, that is above the level at which pre-emptive therapy was started, RT-PCR values were significantly higher than in groups with less than 20 pp65+cells, whereas EP-PCR values did not significantly differ and showed a slower progression rate. Dilutions of DNA from CMV AD169 strain were used to probe RT-PCR reproducibility (between and intra-assay variability < 2% and sensitivity (100% detection rate at 10 copies/reaction, 28.5% with EP-PCR. A significant improvement is coming from the introduction of RT-PCR to the study of CMV DNA dynamics in differently CMV infected patients due to a more reliable quantitation of CMV DNA for moderate and high

  14. DNA Camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...10 1 + Cre 1 500 1,000 length (bp) chromatogram alignment template − Cre   4 Supplementary Figure 3 DNA camouflage with a switchable

  15. Individual sensitivity to radiations and DNA repair proficiency: the comet assay contribution; Sensibilite individuelle aux radiations et reparation de l`ADN: apport du test des cometes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alapetite, C. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-09-01

    Some are hereditary syndromes demonstrate high cancer risk and hypersensitivity in response to exposures to agents such as ultraviolet or ionising radiation, and are characterized by a defective processing of DNA damage. They highlight the importance of the individual risk associated to exposures. The comet assay, a simple technique that detects DNA strand breaks, requires few cells and allows examination of DNA repair capacities in established cell lines, in blood samples or biopsies. The assay has been validated on cellular systems with known repair defects such as xeroderma pigmentosum defective in nucleotide excision repair, on mutant rodent cell lines defective in DNA single strand breaks rejoining (XRCC5/Ku80 and XRCC7/DNAPKcs) (neutral conditions). This assay does not allow to distinguish a defective phenotype in ataxia telangiectasia cells. It shows in homozygous mouse embryo fibroblasts Brca2-/- an impaired DNA double strand break rejoining. Simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity of the alkaline comet assay allow to examine the response of lymphocytes. It has been applied to the analysis of the role of DNA repair in the pathogenesis of collagen diseases, and the involvement of individual DNA repair proficiency in the thyroid tumorigenesis induced in some patients after therapeutic irradiation at childhood has been questioned. Preliminary results of these studies suggest that this type of approach could help for adapting treatment modalities and surveillance in subgroups of patients defective in DNA repair process. It could also have some incidence in the radioprotection field. (author)

  16. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  17. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  18. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  19. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  20. EGFR T790M mutation testing of non-small cell lung cancer tissue and blood samples artificially spiked with circulating cell-free tumor DNA: results of a round robin trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassunke, Jana; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Lenze, Dido; Lehmann, Annika; Hummel, Michael; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Penzel, Roland; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Endris, Volker; Jung, Andreas; Lehmann, Ulrich; Zeugner, Silke; Baretton, Gustavo; Kreipe, Hans; Schirmacher, Peter; Kirchner, Thomas; Dietel, Manfred; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2017-10-01

    The European Commision (EC) recently approved osimertinib for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR T790M mutations. Besides tissue-based testing, blood samples containing cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can be used to interrogate T790M status. Herein, we describe the conditions and results of a round robin trial (RRT) for T790M mutation testing in NSCLC tissue specimens and peripheral blood samples spiked with cell line DNA mimicking tumor-derived ctDNA. The underlying objectives of this two-staged external quality assessment (EQA) approach were (a) to evaluate the accuracy of T790M mutations testing across multiple centers and (b) to investigate if a liquid biopsy-based testing for T790M mutations in spiked blood samples is feasible in routine diagnostic. Based on a successfully completed internal phase I RRT, an open RRT for EGFR T790M mutation testing in tumor tissue and blood samples was initiated. In total, 48 pathology centers participated in the EQA. Of these, 47 (97.9%) centers submitted their analyses within the pre-defined time frame and 44 (tissue), respectively, 40 (plasma) successfully passed the test. The overall success rates in the RRT phase II were 91.7% (tissue) and 83.3% (blood), respectively. Thirty-eight out of 48 participants (79.2%) successfully passed both parts of the RRT. The RRT for blood-based EGFR testing initiated in Germany is, to the best of our knowledge, the first of his kind in Europe. In summary, our results demonstrate that blood-based genotyping for EGFR resistance mutations can be successfully integrated in routine molecular diagnostics complementing the array of molecular methods already available at pathology centers in Germany.

  1. Performance of the cobas Hepatitis B virus (HBV) test using the cobas 4800 system and comparison of HBV DNA quantification ability between the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HBV test version 2.0 and cobas HBV test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyun-Ji; Chang, Chulhun L; Kim, Hyung-Hoi

    2018-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels are used to predict the response to therapy, determine therapy initiation, monitor resistance to therapy, and establish treatment success. To verify the performance of the cobas HBV test using the cobas 4800 system for HBV DNA quantification and to compare the HBV DNA quantification ability between the cobas HBV test and COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HBV version 2.0 (CAP/CTM v2.0). The precision, linearity, and limit of detection of the cobas HBV test were evaluated using the 4th World Health Organization International Standard material and plasma samples. Clinical samples that yielded quantitative results using the CAP/CTM v2.0 and cobas HBV tests were subjected to correlational analysis. Three hundred forty-nine samples were subjected to correlational analysis, among which 114 samples showed results above the lower limit of quantification. Comparable results were obtained ([cobas HBV test] = 1.038 × [CAP/CTM v2.0]-0.173, r = 0.914) in 114 samples, which yielded values above the lower limit of quantification. The results for 86.8% of the samples obtained using the cobas HBV test were within 0.5 log 10 IU/mL of the CAP/CTM v2.0 results. The total precision values against the low and high positive controls were 1.4% (mean level: 2.25 log 10 IU/mL) and 3.2% (mean level: 6.23 log 10 IU/mL), respectively. The cobas HBV test demonstrated linearity (1.15-6.75 log 10 IU/mL, y = 0.95 × 6 + 0.17, r 2  = 0.994). The cobas HBV test showed good correlation with CAP/CTM v2.0, and had good precision and an acceptable limit of detection. The cobas HBV test using the cobas 4800 is a reliable method for quantifying HBV DNA levels in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. FBI's DNA analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John R.

    1994-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling technology is a significant law enforcement tool due to its superior discriminating power. Applying the principles of population genetics to the DNA profile obtained in violent crime investigations results in low frequency of occurrence estimates for the DNA profile. These estimates often range from a frequency of occurrence of 1 in 50 unrelated individuals to 1 in a million unrelated individuals or even smaller. It is this power to discriminate among individuals in the population that has propelled forensic DNA technology to the forefront of forensic testing in violent crime cases. Not only is the technology extremely powerful in including or excluding a criminal suspect as the perpetrator, but it also gives rise to the potential of identifying criminal suspects in cases where the investigators of unknown suspect cases have exhausted all other available leads.

  3. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde. This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers.

  4. Comparative mtDNA phylogeography of neotropical freshwater fishes: testing shared history to infer the evolutionary landscape of lower Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, E; Martin, A P

    1998-04-01

    Historical biogeography seeks to explain contemporary distributions of taxa in the context of intrinsic biological and extrinsic geological and climatic factors. To decipher the relative importance of biological characteristics vs. environmental conditions, it is necessary to ask whether groups of taxa with similar distributions share the same history of diversification. Because all of the taxa will have shared the same climatic and geological history, evidence of shared history across multiple species provides an estimate of the role of extrinsic factors in shaping contemporary biogeographic patterns. Similarly, differences in the records of evolutionary history across species will probably be signatures of biological differences. In this study, we focus on inferring the evolutionary history for geographical populations and closely related species representing three genera of primary freshwater fishes that are widely distributed in lower Central America (LCA) and northwestern Colombia. Analysis of mitochondrial gene trees provides the opportunity for robust tests of shared history across taxa. Moreover, because mtDNA permits inference of the temporal scale of diversification we can test hypotheses regarding the chronological development of the Isthmian corridor linking North and South America. We have focused attention on two issues. First, we show that many of the distinct populations of LCA fishes diverged in a relatively brief period of time thus limiting the phylogenetic signal available for tests of shared history. Second, our results provide reduced evidence of shared history when all drainages are included in the analysis because of inferred dispersion events that obscure the evolutionary history among drainage basins. When we restrict the analysis to areas that harbour endemic mitochondrial lineages, there is evidence of shared history across taxa. We hypothesize that there were two to three distinct waves of invasion into LCA from putative source

  5. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  6. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  7. DNA double-strand break repair of blood lymphocytes and normal tissues analysed in a preclinical mouse model: implications for radiosensitivity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübe, Claudia E; Grudzenski, Saskia; Kühne, Martin; Dong, Xiaorong; Rief, Nicole; Löbrich, Markus; Rübe, Christian

    2008-10-15

    Radiotherapy is an effective cancer treatment, but a few patients suffer severe radiation toxicities in neighboring normal tissues. There is increasing evidence that the variable susceptibility to radiation toxicities is caused by the individual genetic predisposition, by subtle mutations, or polymorphisms in genes involved in cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Double-strand breaks (DSB) are the most deleterious form of radiation-induced DNA damage, and DSB repair deficiencies lead to pronounced radiosensitivity. Using a preclinical mouse model, the highly sensitive gammaH2AX-foci approach was tested to verify even subtle, genetically determined DSB repair deficiencies known to be associated with increased normal tissue radiosensitivity. By enumerating gammaH2AX-foci in blood lymphocytes and normal tissues (brain, lung, heart, and intestine), the induction and repair of DSBs after irradiation with therapeutic doses (0.1-2 Gy) was investigated in repair-proficient and repair-deficient mouse strains in vivo and blood samples irradiated ex vivo. gammaH2AX-foci analysis allowed to verify the different DSB repair deficiencies; even slight impairments caused by single polymorphisms were detected similarly in both blood lymphocytes and solid tissues, indicating that DSB repair measured in lymphocytes is valid for different and complex organs. Moreover, gammaH2AX-foci analysis of blood samples irradiated ex vivo was found to reflect repair kinetics measured in vivo and, thus, give reliable information about the individual DSB repair capacity. gammaH2AX analysis of blood and tissue samples allows to detect even minor genetically defined DSB repair deficiencies, affecting normal tissue radiosensitivity. Future studies will have to evaluate the clinical potential to identify patients more susceptible to radiation toxicities before radiotherapy.

  8. Performance of ProEx C and PreTect HPV-Proofer E6/E7 mRNA tests in comparison with the hybrid capture 2 HPV DNA test for triaging ASCUS and LSIL cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghehbandan, Reza; Fontaine, Daniel; Bentley, James; Escott, Nicholas; Ghatage, Prafull; Lear, Adrian; Coutlee, Francois; Ratnam, Samuel

    2013-09-01

    The clinical usefulness of the ProEx C (Becton Dickinson) and PreTect HPV-Proofer E6/E7 mRNA tests (Proofer; Norchip) for the triage of ASCUS and LSIL cytology was determined in comparison with the Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA test (HC2; Qiagen). The study population consisted of women with a history of abnormal cytology referred to colposcopy. Histology-confirmed CIN 2+ served as the disease endpoint. The study was based on 1,360 women (mean age 30.7 years), of whom 380 had CIN 2+. Among 315 with ASCUS (CIN 2+, n = 67), the sensitivities of ProEx C, Proofer, and HC2 to detect CIN 2+ were, 71.6, 71.6, and 95.5%, respectively, with a corresponding specificity of 74.6, 74.2, and 35.1%. Among 363 with LSIL (CIN 2+, n = 108), the sensitivities of ProEx C, Proofer, and HC2 were, 67.6, 74.1, and 96.3%, respectively, with a corresponding specificity of 60, 68.2, and 18.4%. Among 225 HC2-positive ASCUS (CIN 2+, n = 64), 105 tested positive by ProEx C, reducing colposcopy referral by 53.3% and detecting 71.9% of CIN 2+; Proofer was positive in 112/225, reducing colposcopy referral by 50.2% and detecting 75.0% of CIN 2+. Among 312 HC2-positive LSIL (CIN 2+, n = 104), 160 tested positive by ProEx C, reducing coloposcopy referral by 48.7% and detecting 66.3% of CIN 2+; Proofer was positive in 159/312, reducing colposcopy referral by 49.0% and detecting 75.0% of CIN 2+. In conclusion, both ProEx C and Proofer have a similar performance profile with a significantly higher specificity but lower sensitivity than HC2 for the detection of CIN 2+. Consequently, although they can reduce colposcopy referral, they will miss a proportion of CIN 2+ cases. This is a major limitation and should be taken into account if these tests are considered for ASCUS or LSIL triage. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  9. Delayed effects of low level acute irradiation and chronic environmental radioactive contamination on DNA lymphocytes of people living in Dolon, a settlement located in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenal, C.; Legue, F.; Nourgalieva, K. [UMR CNRS 6553 ' Ecobio' , Equipe Radiations Environnement Adaptation. Universite de RENNES 1, Campus de Beaulieu, Bat 14, RENNES Cedex F 35042 (France)

    2006-10-01

    During 42 years several hundred nuclear tests were performed by the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS, Kazakhstan), of which more than 100 were done in the atmosphere. We report here the late genetic damage of external exposure to radiation and environmental radioactive contamination in people living in Dolon, a small settlement situated in the vicinity of the STS. The comet assay was applied on DNA lymphocytes of 20 exposed women and 32 non-exposed women living at 500 km from the STS. We observed a statistically significant difference between the exposed and control groups for mean tail moment (MTM) and DNA% in the tail. The mean values of all comet assay parameters (MTM, DNA% in the tail and score) were higher in the group of women born before 1949 as compared to those born after 1950, which could reflect an effect of external irradiation in 1949 due to the most contaminating explosion. These results suggest that people exposed 50 years ago to relatively small doses of external irradiation and/or still living in an environment contaminated by small amounts of long life radionuclides, still present DNA damage which is in agreement with other cytogenetical studies performed at the same site, on the same population. (author)

  10. Delayed effects of low level acute irradiation and chronic environmental radioactive contamination on DNA lymphocytes of people living in Dolon, a settlement located in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenal, C.; Legue, F.; Nourgalieva, K.

    2006-01-01

    During 42 years several hundred nuclear tests were performed by the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS, Kazakhstan), of which more than 100 were done in the atmosphere. We report here the late genetic damage of external exposure to radiation and environmental radioactive contamination in people living in Dolon, a small settlement situated in the vicinity of the STS. The comet assay was applied on DNA lymphocytes of 20 exposed women and 32 non-exposed women living at 500 km from the STS. We observed a statistically significant difference between the exposed and control groups for mean tail moment (MTM) and DNA% in the tail. The mean values of all comet assay parameters (MTM, DNA% in the tail and score) were higher in the group of women born before 1949 as compared to those born after 1950, which could reflect an effect of external irradiation in 1949 due to the most contaminating explosion. These results suggest that people exposed 50 years ago to relatively small doses of external irradiation and/or still living in an environment contaminated by small amounts of long life radionuclides, still present DNA damage which is in agreement with other cytogenetical studies performed at the same site, on the same population

  11. Thyroid nodules, polymorphic variants in DNA repair and RET-related genes, and interaction with ionizing radiation exposure from nuclear tests in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Alice J.; Land, Charles E.; Bhatti, Parveen; Pineda, Marbin; Brenner, Alina; Carr, Zhanat; Gusev, Boris I.; Zhumadilov, Zhaxibay; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Rutter, Joni L.; Ron, Elaine; Struewing, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for thyroid cancer remain largely unknown except for ionizing radiation exposure during childhood and a history of benign thyroid nodules. Because thyroid nodules are more common than thyroid cancers and are associated with thyroid cancer risk, we evaluated several polymorphisms potentially relevant to thyroid tumors and assessed interaction with ionizing radiation exposure to the thyroid gland. Thyroid nodules were detected in 1998 by ultrasound screening of 2997 persons who lived near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan when they were children (1949-62). Cases with thyroid nodules (n=907) were frequency matched (1:1) to those without nodules by ethnicity (Kazakh or Russian), gender, and age at screening. Thyroid gland radiation doses were estimated from fallout deposition patterns, residence history, and diet. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in 13 genes and assessed interaction with ionizing radiation exposure using likelihood ratio tests (LRT). Elevated thyroid nodule risks were associated with the minor alleles of RET S836S (rs1800862, p = 0.03) and GFRA1 -193C>G (rs not assigned, p = 0.05) and decreased risk with XRCC1 R194W (rs1799782, p-trend = 0.03) and TGFB1 T263I (rs1800472, p = 0.009). Similar patterns of association were observed for a small number of papillary thyroid cancers (n=25). Ionizing radiation exposure to the thyroid gland was associated with significantly increased risk of thyroid nodules (age and gender adjusted excess odds ratio/Gy = 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.56), with evidence for interaction by genotype found for XRCC1 R194W (LRT p value = 0.02). Polymorphisms in RET signaling, DNA repair, and proliferation genes may be related to risk of thyroid nodules, consistent with some previous reports on thyroid cancer. Borderline support for gene-radiation interaction was found for a variant in XRCC1, a key base excision repair protein. Other pathways, such as genes in double strand break repair, apoptosis, and

  12. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  13. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  14. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  15. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  16. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  17. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in φX174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  18. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in {phi}X174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  19. Testing the ability of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus to evade the protective immune response induced in rainbow trout by DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepulveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    , this work aims to evaluate whether VHSV is able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination. Earlier studies have demonstrated that VHSV can evade the neutralizing effect of monoclonal antibodies by mutations in the glycoprotein gene. One approach of the present study is therefore...... to try to isolate VHSV variants which can escape the neutralizing activity of serum from fish immunized with the DNA vaccine. To do so, a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate (DK3592B) will be repeatedly passaged in fish cell cultures in the presence of neutralizing fish serum. Another approach comprises...

  20. Routine screening of blood donations at Qingdao central blood bank, China, for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA with a real-time, multiplex nucleic acid test for HBV, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus Types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongsi; Xu, Lei; Liu, Li; Feng, Qiuxia; Zhang, Longmu; Ma, Weijuan; Saldanha, John; Wang, Mingmin; Zhao, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The Roche cobas TaqScreen MPX test was used to evaluate the rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donations that were hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA reactive from June 2010 to January 2011 in Qingdao, China. HBsAg-negative samples from 65,800 voluntary blood donors were tested with the cobas TaqScreen MPX test in pools of 6 on the Roche cobas s 201 blood screening platform. Samples positive for HBV DNA and negative for HBsAg were quantitated with the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HBV test. In addition, serologic tests for HBsAg, hepatitis B surface antibody, anti-hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), anti-hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe), and hepatitis B e antigen (HBe) were done using the Roche electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. A total of 80 nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) test-reactive pools were identified and 59 pools (74%) resolved to a reactive sample. All samples were HBV DNA reactive and the viral load in each sample was quantitated. The viral loads of the samples ranged from less than 20 to 34,600 IU/mL; 13 samples (22%) had viral loads of more than 20 IU/mL, 27 samples (45.8%) had viral loads of less than 20 IU/mL, and 19 samples (32.2%) had undetectable viral loads. Of the 59 NAT-reactive samples, 40 (67.8%) were anti-HBc positive. Fifteen of the 59 samples could not be confirmed as NAT reactive either by an alternative NAT test or by serology. The HBV NAT yield in blood donors in Qingdao is 0.06% (38/65,800). This study confirmed the value of NAT for interdicting HBV-positive donations and preventing transfusion-transmitted HBV infections. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Ames and random amplified polymorphic DNA tests for the validation of the mutagenic and/or genotoxic potential of the drinking water disinfection by-products chloroform and bromoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallef, Messaouda; Cenkci, Süleyman; Akyil, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Konuk, Muhsin; Benouareth, Djamel Eddine

    2018-01-28

    Chloroform and Bromoform are two abundant trihalomethanes found in Algerian drinking water. The investigation of the mutagenic hazard of these disinfection by-products was studied by Ames test as prokaryotic bioassay to show their mutagenic effects. For this, Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains were employed. Both chloroform and bromoform showed a direct mutagenic effect since the number of revertant colonies gradually increase in dose-dependent manner with all concentrations tested with the two bacterial strains and these were both in the absence and presence of S9 metabolic activation. The genotoxic hazard was also studied by random amplified polymorphic DNA test on the root cells of Allium cepa as eukaryotic bioassay. DNA extracted from the roots of the onion were incubated at different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction. This was based on demonstrating a major effect of disappearance of bands compared to roots incubated in the negative control (distilled water). The results showed that these two compounds affected genomic DNA by breaks although by mutations.

  2. Development of a novel approach for the production of dried genomic DNA for use as standards for qualitative PCR testing of food-borne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapmann, S.; Catalani, P.; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    As part of a multi-centre European project, FOOD-PCR, the feasibility of a novel approach for production of dried bacterial DNA that could be used as certified reference materials (CRM) was assessed. Selected strains of Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157...

  3. Using mitochondrial DNA to test the hypothesis of a European post-glacial human recolonization from the Franco-Cantabrian refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, O; Fregel, R; Larruga, J M; Álvarez, V; Yurrebaso, I; Cabrera, V M; González, A M

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that the distribution patterns and coalescence ages found in Europeans for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups V, H1 and H3 are the result of a post-glacial expansion from a Franco-Cantabrian refuge that recolonized central and northern areas. In contrast, in this refined mtDNA study of the Cantabrian Cornice that contributes 413 partial and 9 complete new mtDNA sequences, including a large Basque sample and a sample of Asturians, no experimental evidence was found to support the human refuge-expansion theory. In fact, all measures of gene diversity point to the Cantabrian Cornice in general and the Basques in particular, as less polymorphic for V, H1 and H3 than other southern regions in Iberia or in Central Europe. Genetic distances show the Cantabrian Cornice is a very heterogeneous region with significant local differences. The analysis of several minor subhaplogroups, based on complete sequences, also suggests different focal expansions over a local and peninsular range that did not affect continental Europe. Furthermore, all detected clinal trends show stronger longitudinal than latitudinal profiles. In Northern Iberia, it seems that the highest diversity values for some haplogroups with Mesolithic coalescence ages are centred on the Mediterranean side, including Catalonia and South-eastern France.

  4. Rapid point-of-care testing for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in patients with lung cancer using cell-free DNA from cytology specimen supernatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Shiho; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Saito, Kazusa; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Negishi, Tatsuya; Nakata, Rie; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Yamaguchi, Akemi; Honda, Takayuki

    2018-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are associated with responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our previous study revealed a rapid point-of-care system for detecting EGFR mutations. This system analyzes cell pellets from cytology specimens using droplet-polymerase chain reaction (d-PCR), and has a reaction time of 10 min. The present study aimed to validate the performance of the EGFR d-PCR assay using cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from supernatants obtained from cytology specimens. Assay results from cfDNA supernatant analyses were compared with those from cell pellets for 90 patients who were clinically diagnosed with, or suspected of having, lung cancer (80 bronchial lavage fluid samples, nine pleural effusion samples and one spinal fluid sample). EGFR mutations were identified in 12 and 15 cases using cfDNA supernatants and cell pellets, respectively. The concordance rates between cfDNA-supernatant and cell‑pellet assay results were 96.7% [kappa coefficient (K)=0.87], 98.9% (K=0.94), 98.9% (K=0.79) and 98.9% (K=0.79) for total EGFR mutations, L858R, E746_A750del and T790M, respectively. All 15 patients with EGFR mutation-positive results, as determined by EGFR d-PCR assay using cfDNA supernatants or cell pellets, also displayed positive results by conventional EGFR assays using tumor tissue or cytology specimens. Notably, EGFR mutations were even detected in five cfDNA supernatants for which the cytological diagnoses of the corresponding cell pellets were 'suspicious for malignancy', 'atypical' or 'negative for malignancy.' In conclusion, this rapid point-of-care system may be considered a promising novel screening method that may enable patients with NSCLC to receive EGFR-TKI therapy more rapidly, whilst also reserving cell pellets for additional morphological and molecular analyses.

  5. Probing DNA interactions with proteins using a single-molecule toolbox: inside the cell, in a test tube and in a computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-interacting proteins have roles in multiple processes, many operating as molecular machines which undergo dynamic meta-stable transitions to bring about their biological function. To fully understand this molecular heterogeneity, DNA and the proteins that bind to it must ideally be interrogated at a single molecule level in their native in vivo environments, in a time-resolved manner, fast enough to sample the molecular transitions across the free-energy landscape. Progress has been made over the past decade in utilizing cutting-edge tools of the physical sciences to address challenging biological questions concerning the function and modes of action of several different proteins which bind to DNA. These physiologically relevant assays are technically challenging but can be complemented by powerful and often more tractable in vitro experiments which confer advantages of the chemical environment with enhanced detection signal-to-noise of molecular signatures and transition events. In the present paper, we discuss a range of techniques we have developed to monitor DNA-protein interactions in vivo, in vitro and in silico. These include bespoke single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques to elucidate the architecture and dynamics of the bacterial replisome and the structural maintenance of bacterial chromosomes, as well as new computational tools to extract single-molecule molecular signatures from live cells to monitor stoichiometry, spatial localization and mobility in living cells. We also discuss recent developments from our laboratory made in vitro, complementing these in vivo studies, which combine optical and magnetic tweezers to manipulate and image single molecules of DNA, with and without bound protein, in a new super-resolution fluorescence microscope.

  6. (UVB)-induced DNA damage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-17

    dependent cytogenetic lesions were assessed by the micronucleus test (MNT). It was found that POE effectively reduced the extent of DNA breakages and cytogenetic lesions upon exposure to UVB (erythemal ultraviolet (EUV);.

  7. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL .... tein vaccines require expensive virus/protein purification tech- niques as ... sphere continue to remain major health hazards in developing nations. ... significance since it can be produced at a very low cost and can be stored ...

  8. DNA Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  9. Early diagnosis of HIV in children below 18 months using DNA PCR test--assessment of the effectiveness of PMTCT interventions and challenges in early initiation of ART in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil; Singh, Girraj; Kaushik, Pratap; Joshi, Bipin; Kalra, Kamlesh; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess efficacy of the current Indian Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) protocol in 217 HIV-exposed infants, and to assess challenges in the early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in 18 (8.3%) infants with HIV, as determined by the HIV-1 DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test at ≥ 6 weeks to ART was initiated in 10 (55.6%) HIV-infected children at a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 10.45 ± 4.9 (range: 4-17.5) months; delay resulted in opportunistic infections in one-third of the children. A single-dose nevirapine PMTCT regimen should be replaced by a triple antiretroviral regimen; DBS DNA PCR-positive infants may be given ART, and simultaneously a whole blood specimen should be taken to determine whether ART should be continued.

  10. Haemagglutination assay of some human and animal arcobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arcobacter are emerging food borne enteropathogens which can cause severe diarrhea and occasional systemic infection such as bacteraemia and peritonitis in humans. To understand the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen, putative adhesive factors in the organism were studied by examining their ability to ...

  11. Validation of liquid biopsy: plasma cell-free DNA testing in clinical management of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Veldore,Vidya; Choughule,Anuradha; Routhu,Tejaswi; Mandloi,Nitin; Noronha,Vanita; Joshi,Amit; Dutt,Amit; Gupta,Ravi; Vedam,Ramprasad; Prabhash,Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Vidya H Veldore,1,* Anuradha Choughule,2,* Tejaswi Routhu,1 Nitin Mandloi,1 Vanita Noronha,2 Amit Joshi,2 Amit Dutt,3 Ravi Gupta,1 Ramprasad Vedam,1 Kumar Prabhash2 1MedGenome Labs Private Ltd,, Bangalore, India; 2Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, India; 3The Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, Tata Memorial Center, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Plasma cell-free tumor DNA, or circulating tumo...

  12. Dynamics of interaction between complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes and erythrocytes. In vitro studies and potential general applications to clinical immune complex testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Hooper, M.; Burge, J.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble antibody/ 3 H-double-stranded PM2 DNA (dsDNA) immune complexes were briefly opsonized with complement and then allowed to bind to human erythrocytes (via complement receptors). The cells were washed and subsequently a volume of autologous blood in a variety of media was added, and the release of the bound immune complexes from the erythrocytes was studied as a function of temperature and time. After 1-2 h, the majority of the bound immune complexes were not released into the serum during blood clotting at either 37 degrees C or room temperature, but there was a considerably greater release of the immune complexes into the plasma of blood that was anticoagulated with EDTA. Similar results were obtained using various conditions of opsonization and also using complexes that contained lower molecular weight dsDNA. Thus, the kinetics of release of these antibody/dsDNA immune complexes differed substantially from the kinetics of release of antibody/bovine serum albumin complexes that was reported by others. Studies using the solution phase C1q immune complex binding assay confirmed that in approximately half of the SLE samples that were positive for immune complexes, there was a significantly higher level of detectable immune complexes in plasma vs. serum. Freshly drawn erythrocytes from some SLE patients exhibiting this plasma/serum discrepancy had IgG antigen on their surface that was released by incubation in EDTA plasma. Thus, the higher levels of immune complexes observed in EDTA plasma vs. serum using the C1q assay may often reflect the existence of immune complexes circulating in vivo bound to erythrocytes

  13. DNA damage in hemodialysis patients with chronic kidney disease; a test of the role of diabetes mellitus; a comet assay investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamur, Sevcan; Unal, Fatma; Altok, Kadriye; Deger, Serpil Muge; Yuzbasioglu, Deniz

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing rapidly. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most important cause of CKD. We studied the possible role of DM in CKD patients with respect to DNA damage, as assessed by the comet assay in 60 CKD patients (with or without DM) undergoing hemodialysis and in 26 controls. Effects of other factors, such as age, sex, hypertension, duration of hemodialysis, body mass index (BMI), and levels of hemoglobin (HB), intact parathormone (iPTH), and ferritin (FER), were also examined. Primary DNA damage measured by the comet assay was significantly higher in CKD patients than in controls. Among CKD patients, the following correlations were observed. (1) There was no difference in comet tail length or tail intensity between diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. (2) Age, sex, hemoglobin, hypertension, duration of hemodialysis, and ferritin levels affected neither tail length nor intensity. (3) BMI values above 25kg/m(2) and iPTH levels above 300pg/ml were associated with significantly greater comet tail length. Our results indicate that primary DNA damage is increased in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis, compared to controls; however, DM had no additional effect. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Use of arbitrary DNA primers, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining for identity testing, gene discovery and analysis of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gresshoff, P.

    1998-01-01

    To understand chemically-induced genomic differences in soybean mutants differing in their ability to enter the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis involving Bradyrhizobium japonicum, molecular techniques were developed to aid the map-based, or positional, cloning. DNA marker technology involving single arbitrary primers was used to enrich regional RFLP linkage data. Molecular techniques, including two-dimensional pulse field gel electrophoresis, were developed to ascertain the first physical mapping in soybean, leading to the conclusion that in the region of marker pA-36 on linkage group H, 1 cM equals about 500 cM. High molecular weight DNA was isolated and cloned into yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes (YACs/ BACs). YACs were used to analyze soybean genome structure, revealing that over half of the genome contains repetitive DNA. Genetic and molecular tools are now available to facilitate the isolation of plant genes directly involved in symbiosis. The further characterization of these genes, along with the determination of the mechanisms that lead to the mutation, will be of value to other plants and induced mutation research. (author)

  15. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  16. Clinical strains of acinetobacter classified by DNA-DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjernberg, I.; Ursing, J.

    1989-01-01

    A collection of Acinetobacter strains consisting of 168 consecutive clinical strains and 30 type and reference strains was studied by DNA-DNA hybridization and a few phenotypic tests. The field strains could be allotted to 13 DNA groups. By means of reference strains ten of these could be identified with groups described by Bouvet and Grimont (1986), while three groups were new; they were given the numbers 13-15. The type strain of A. radioresistens- recently described by Nishimura et al. (1988) - was shown to be a member of DNA group 12, which comprised 31 clinical isolates. Of the 19 strains of A. junii, eight showed hemolytic acitivity on sheep and human blood agar and an additional four strains on human blood agar only. Strains of this species have previously been regarded as non-hemolytic. Reciprocal DNA pairing data for the reference strains of the DNA gropus were treated by UPGMA clustering. The reference strains for A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii and DNA groups 3 and 13 formed a cluster with about 70% relatedness within the cluster. Other DNA groups joined at levels below 60%. (author)

  17. Clinical strains of acinetobacter classified by DNA-DNA hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjernberg, I; Ursing, J [Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Malmoe General Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1989-01-01

    A collection of Acinetobacter strains consisting of 168 consecutive clinical strains and 30 type and reference strains was studied by DNA-DNA hybridization and a few phenotypic tests. The field strains could be allotted to 13 DNA groups. By means of reference strains ten of these could be identified with groups described by Bouvet and Grimont (1986), while three groups were new; they were given the numbers 13-15. The type strain of A. radioresistens- recently described by Nishimura et al. (1988) - was shown to be a member of DNA group 12, which comprised 31 clinical isolates. Of the 19 strains of A. junii, eight showed hemolytic acitivity on sheep and human blood agar and an additional four strains on human blood agar only. Strains of this species have previously been regarded as non-hemolytic. Reciprocal DNA pairing data for the reference strains of the DNA gropus were treated by UPGMA clustering. The reference strains for A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii and DNA groups 3 and 13 formed a cluster with about 70% relatedness within the cluster. Other DNA groups joined at levels below 60%. (author).

  18. Relationships within the Proteobacteria of plant pathogenic Acidovorax species and subspecies, Burkholderia species, and Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA, numerical analysis and determinative tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, F P; Young, J M; Triggs, C M; Park, D C; Saul, D J

    2001-12-01

    Sequence data for 16S rDNA of the type strains of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae, A. avenae subsp. cattleyae, A. avenae subsp. citrulli, A. konjaci and Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans were compared with GenBank library accessions of Burkholderia spp., Comamonas sp., Ralstonia solanacearum and Variovorax sp. Maximum Parsimony analysis produced two clusters: 1. Acidovorax spp., Comamonas sp., and Variovorax sp. (all in the Comamonadaceae), and 2. Burkholderia spp., Ralstonia solanacearum, and Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans. Maximum Likelihood analysis produced only one cluster (of the Comamonadaceae). Using nutritional and laboratory tests, all Acidovorax spp., Burkholderia spp., and Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans were discriminated in distinct clusters at the species level, and could be identified by selected determinative tests. There were no phenotypic tests constituted as a circumscription of the genera and which permitted the allocation of strains to genera. Strain identification as species allowed allocation to genera only by inference. The nomenclatural implications of these data are discussed.

  19. Clinical and serological tests for arboviruses in free-living domestic pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Bruna Alves; Chiang, Jannifer Oliveira; Martins, Lívia Carício; Chagas, Liliane Leal das; Silva, Franko de Arruda E; Ferreira, Milene Silveira; Freitas, Maria Nazaré Oliveira; Alcantara, Bianca Nascimento de; Silva, Sandro Patroca da; Miranda, Stefânia Araújo; Sepulvreda, Barbara Alves; Corrêa, Layna Thayssa Guimarães; Negrão, Andréa Maria Góes; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Casseb, Alexandre do Rosário

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of free-living domestic pigeons (Columba livia) as a reservoir of arboviruses in the city of Belém, state of Pará, Brazil. We investigated the presence of antibodies against the most prevalent arboviruses. This study was aimed at evaluating some clinical and physical parameters of domestic pigeons, including the presence of antibodies to Amazon-endemic arboviruses. Eighty-five healthy pigeons were captured in Mangal das Garças Park, in Belém, and were bled. Upon capture, the birds were subjected to a clinical examination in search of alterations that could indicate the presence of arboviruses. Blood samples were converted to serum and tested using the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) technique with a panel of 19 antigens of arboviruses circulating in the Amazon. The confirmation assay for the positive reactions to the viral species tested by HI was a neutralisation test in new-born Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus) [mouse neutralisation test (MNT)]. A total of 10 (11.8%) serum samples tested positive for antiflavivirus antibodies by HI. All the samples positive for the HI test were subjected to MNT for detection of viruses and yielded negative results (logarithmic neutralisation index < 1.7). The results represent the first serological detection of antiarbovirus antibodies in domestic pigeons as potential hosts of arboviruses in Brazil. The detection of haemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies against genus Flavivirus indicated that there was recent contact between the analysed domestic pigeons and these arboviruses. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of free-living pigeons in the maintenance cycle and spread of arboviruses in the Amazon.

  20. Detection of different categories of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a multi-regional study comparing the clinical sensitivity of hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV-DNA testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lelie, Nico; Bruhn, Roberta; Busch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Twenty-two users of individual donation nucleic acid amplification technology (ID-NAT) in six geographical regions provided detailed hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection data in first-time, lapsed, and repeat donations and classified confirmed HBV-positive donors into different infection...... categories. These data were used to compare the clinical sensitivity of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV-DNA testing. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In total 10,981,776 donations from South Africa, Egypt, the Mediterranean, North and Central Europe, South East Asia, and Oceania were screened for HBV...

  1. Authentication of forensic DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Davidson, Ariane; Grafit, Arnon

    2010-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, DNA analysis has revolutionized forensic science, and has become a dominant tool in law enforcement. Today, DNA evidence is key to the conviction or exoneration of suspects of various types of crime, from theft to rape and murder. However, the disturbing possibility that DNA evidence can be faked has been overlooked. It turns out that standard molecular biology techniques such as PCR, molecular cloning, and recently developed whole genome amplification (WGA), enable anyone with basic equipment and know-how to produce practically unlimited amounts of in vitro synthesized (artificial) DNA with any desired genetic profile. This artificial DNA can then be applied to surfaces of objects or incorporated into genuine human tissues and planted in crime scenes. Here we show that the current forensic procedure fails to distinguish between such samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces with artificial DNA, and corresponding samples with in vivo generated (natural) DNA. Furthermore, genotyping of both artificial and natural samples with Profiler Plus((R)) yielded full profiles with no anomalies. In order to effectively deal with this problem, we developed an authentication assay, which distinguishes between natural and artificial DNA based on methylation analysis of a set of genomic loci: in natural DNA, some loci are methylated and others are unmethylated, while in artificial DNA all loci are unmethylated. The assay was tested on natural and artificial samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces, with complete success. Adopting an authentication assay for casework samples as part of the forensic procedure is necessary for maintaining the high credibility of DNA evidence in the judiciary system.

  2. Verification of self-report of zygosity determined via DNA testing in a subset of the NAS-NRC twin registry 40 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Terry; Plassman, Brenda L; Tanner, Caroline M; Dick, Danielle M; Rinehart, Shannon A; Nichols, William C

    2005-08-01

    The National Academy of Sciences -- National Research Council (NAS-NRC) twin panel, created nearly 50 years ago, had twin zygosity determined primarily via a similarity questionnaire that has been estimated to correctly classify at least 95% of twins. In the course of a study on the genetics of healthy ageing in the NAS-NRC twins, DNA was collected for genome-wide scanning and zygosity confirmation was examined in 343 participating pairs. The sample was supplemented from two other studies using NAS-NRC twins where one or both co-twins were suspected to have Alzheimer disease or another dementia, or Parkinson's disease. Overall 578 twin pairs with DNA were analyzed. Zygosity assignment for 96.8% (519/536) was confirmed via questionnaire. Among 42 pairs whose questionnaire responses were inconclusive for assigning zygosity, 50% were found to be monozygous (MZ) and 50% were dizygous (DZ). There was some evidence for greater misclassification of presumed DZ pairs in the healthy ageing study where participation favored pairs who were similar in having a favorable health history and willingness to volunteer without any element of perceived risk for a specific disease influencing participation.

  3. Performance testing of a semi-automatic card punch system, using direct STR profiling of DNA from blood samples on FTA™ cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Samantha J; Horton, Jeffrey K; Stubbs, Simon L; Tatnell, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The 1.2 mm Electric Coring Tool (e-Core™) was developed to increase the throughput of FTA(™) sample collection cards used during forensic workflows and is similar to a 1.2 mm Harris manual micro-punch for sampling dried blood spots. Direct short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling was used to compare samples taken by the e-Core tool with those taken by the manual micro-punch. The performance of the e-Core device was evaluated using a commercially available PowerPlex™ 18D STR System. In addition, an analysis was performed that investigated the potential carryover of DNA via the e-Core punch from one FTA disc to another. This contamination study was carried out using Applied Biosystems AmpflSTR™ Identifiler™ Direct PCR Amplification kits. The e-Core instrument does not contaminate FTA discs when a cleaning punch is used following excision of discs containing samples and generates STR profiles that are comparable to those generated by the manual micro-punch. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. DNA adducts in senescent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubatz, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Perturbations in DNA repair and other metabolic processes during development and aging might affect the steady-state level of genomic damage. The persistence or accumulation of DNA lesions in postmitotic cells could have a significant impact on proper cellular function, interfering with gene regulation for example. To test the notion that DNA damage increases as a function of age in non-dividing cells, DNA was purified from heart tissue of C57BL/6Nia mice at different ages and analyzed by post labeling techniques to detect DNA adducts. In the present experiments, four-dimensional, thin-layer chromatography was used to isolate aromatic adducts that were labeled with carrier-free (γ- 32 P) ATP under DNA-P excess conditions. The complexity and frequency of aromatic adducts varied between DNA samples. Several adducts were present in all preparations and were clearly more abundant in nucleotide maps of mature and old heart DNA. However, a direct correlation with age was not observed. In contrast, experiments in which aromatic adducts were first isolated by phase-transfer to 1-butanol, then labeled with excess (γ- 32 P)ATP indicated that there was an age-related increase in these adducts. The results are consistent with their earlier studies that showed alkyl adducts increased during aging of mouse myocardium and suggest that a common repair pathway might be involved

  5. Recovery of DNA for forensic analysis from lip cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, L G; Egan, S E; Turbett, G R

    2001-11-01

    To obtain a reference DNA profile from a missing person, we analyzed a variety of personal effects, including two lip cosmetics, both of which gave full DNA profiles. Further investigations were undertaken to explore this previously unreported source of DNA. We have tested a range of brands and types of lip cosmetics. Our studies have revealed that lip cosmetics are an excellent source of DNA, with almost 80% of samples giving a result. However, artifacts are frequently observed in the DNA profiles when Chelex is used for the DNA extraction and additional DNA purification procedures are required to ensure that an accurate DNA profile is obtained.

  6. DNA: The Strand that Connects Us All

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Matt [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Genetics Core Facility

    2011-03-29

    Learn how the methods and discoveries of human population genetics are applied for personal genealogical reconstruction and anthropological testing. Dr. Kaplan starts with a short general review of human genetics and the biology behind this form of DNA testing. He looks at how DNA testing is performed and how samples are processed in the University of Arizona laboratory. He also examines examples of personal genealogical results from Family Tree DNA and personal anthropological results from the Genographic Project. Finally, he describes the newest project in the UA laboratory, the DNA Shoah Project.

  7. Retrospective analysis of Newcastle disease diagnosed at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2015-10-22

    Solomon et al., 2012;. Snoeck et al., 2013). Vaccination is practiced widely and ... books. Postmortem examination, microbiology and haemagglutination activity of tracheal swabs or serology (haemagglutination inhibition test) was.

  8. Fragmentation of DNA affects the accuracy of the DNA quantitation by the commonly used methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlackova Tatiana

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific applications and modern technologies, like non-invasive prenatal testing, non-invasive cancer diagnostic and next generation sequencing, are currently in the focus of researchers worldwide. These have common characteristics in use of highly fragmented DNA molecules for analysis. Hence, for the performance of molecular methods, DNA concentration is a crucial parameter; we compared the influence of different levels of DNA fragmentation on the accuracy of DNA concentration measurements. Results In our comparison, the performance of the currently most commonly used methods for DNA concentration measurement (spectrophotometric, fluorometric and qPCR based were tested on artificially fragmented DNA samples. In our comparison, unfragmented and three specifically fragmented DNA samples were used. According to our results, the level of fragmentation did not influence the accuracy of spectrophotometric measurements of DNA concentration, while other methods, fluorometric as well as qPCR-based, were significantly influenced and a decrease in measured concentration was observed with more intensive DNA fragmentation. Conclusions Our study has confirmed that the level of fragmentation of DNA has significant impact on accuracy of DNA concentration measurement with two of three mostly used methods (PicoGreen and qPCR. Only spectrophotometric measurement was not influenced by the level of fragmentation, but sensitivity of this method was lowest among the three tested. Therefore if it is possible the DNA quantification should be performed with use of equally fragmented control DNA.

  9. DNA vaccines for aquacultured fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    of licensing and public acceptance of the technology. The potential benefits of DNA vaccines for farmed fish include improved animal welfare, reduced environmental impacts of aquaculture activities, increased food quality and quantity, and more sustainable production. Testing under commercial production......Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccination is based on the administration of the gene encoding the vaccine antigen, rather than the antigen itself. Subsequent expression of the antigen by cells in the vaccinated hosts triggers the host immune system. Among the many experimental DNA vaccines tested...... in various animal species as well as in humans, the vaccines against rhabdovirus diseases in fish have given some of the most promising results. A single intramuscular (IM) injection of microgram amounts of DNA induces rapid and long-lasting protection in farmed salmonids against economically important...

  10. The future of forensic DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The author's thoughts and opinions on where the field of forensic DNA testing is headed for the next decade are provided in the context of where the field has come over the past 30 years. Similar to the Olympic motto of ‘faster, higher, stronger’, forensic DNA protocols can be expected to become more rapid and sensitive and provide stronger investigative potential. New short tandem repeat (STR) loci have expanded the core set of genetic markers used for human identification in Europe and the USA. Rapid DNA testing is on the verge of enabling new applications. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to provide greater depth of coverage for information on STR alleles. Familial DNA searching has expanded capabilities of DNA databases in parts of the world where it is allowed. Challenges and opportunities that will impact the future of forensic DNA are explored including the need for education and training to improve interpretation of complex DNA profiles. PMID:26101278

  11. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  12. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  13. From nonspecific DNA-protein encounter complexes to the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Gao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA-protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA-protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA-protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA-protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA-protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA-protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Calpha deviation from native is up to 5 A from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA-protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein.

  14. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  15. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  16. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-l...

  17. Comparison of the diagnostic value of cervical cytology and HPV HR DNA testing for the diagnosis of low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions across different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Pruski, Dominik; Iwaniec, Kinga; Kędzia, Witold

    2017-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of cervical cytology and HPV HR DNA testing for the diagnosis of low grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions across different age groups. The study included 1103 patients, age 25-70 years. All patients underwent in-depth diagnostic tests following either an abnormal Pap test result or a clinically suspicious cervical lesion. In all women the following examinations were performed: a molecular test detecting 14 high-risk types of HPV, a colposcopy examination, as well as directed-biopsy of the cervix. The studied population was subdivided into four age groups. It was observed that the percentage of high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and cancers increased with women's age. Sensitivity of both methods for detecting high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was highest for women aged 40-49 years. Sensitivity values of HPV testing was higher than that of cervical cytology among women under age 50. Specificity of HPV testing increased significantly with age of women and was several fold higher across all age groups than the specificity of cervical cytology.

  18. DNA Fingerprinting To Improve Data Collection Efficiency and Yield in a Host-Specificity Test of a Weed Biological Control Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    An open-field test was conducted in southern France to assess the host-specificity of Ceratapion basicorne, a candidate for biological control of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis; YST). Test plants were infested by naturally occurring populations of C. basicorne but were also exposed to s...

  19. Origin and evolution of Petrocosmea (Gesneriaceae) inferred from both DNA sequence and novel findings in morphology with a test of morphology-based hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Jing; Lu, Yuan-Xue; Li, Chao-Qun; Dong, Yang; Smith, James F; Wang, Yin-Zheng

    2015-07-03

    Petrocosmea Oliver (Gesneriaceae) currently comprises 38 species with four non-nominate varieties, nearly all of which have been described solely from herbarium specimens. However, the dried specimens have obscured the full range of extremely diverse morphological variation that exists in the genus and has resulted in a poor subgeneric classification system that does not reflect the evolutionary history of this group. It is important to develop innovative methods to find new morphological traits and reexamine and reevaluate the traditionally used morphological data based on new hypothesis. In addition, Petrocosmea is a mid-sized genus but exhibits extreme diverse floral variants. This makes the genus of particular interest in addressing the question whether there are any key factors that is specifically associated with their evolution and diversification. Here we present the first phylogenetic analyses of the genus based on dense taxonomic sampling and multiple genes combined with a comprehensive morphological investigation. Maximum-parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of molecular data from two nuclear DNA and six cpDNA regions support the monophyly of Petrocosmea and recover five major clades within the genus, which is strongly corroborated by the reconstruction of ancestral states for twelve new morphological characters directly observed from living material. Ancestral area reconstruction shows that its most common ancestor was likely located east and southeast of the Himalaya-Tibetan plateau. The origin of Petrocosmea from a potentially Raphiocarpus-like ancestor might have involved a series of morphological modifications from caulescent to acaulescent habit as well as from a tetrandrous flower with a long corolla-tube to a diandrous flower with a short corolla-tube, also evident in the vestigial caulescent habit and transitional floral form in clade A that is sister to the remainder of the genus. Among the five clades in Petrocosmea, the

  20. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  1. Testing potential effects of maize expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab endotoxin (Bt maize) on mycorrhizal fungal communities via DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing and molecular fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Erik; Kuramae, Eiko E; Hillekens, Remy; de Hollander, Mattias; Kiers, E Toby; Röling, Wilfred F M; Kowalchuk, George A; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2012-10-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops has increased significantly over the last decades. However, concerns have been raised that some GM traits may negatively affect beneficial soil biota, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), potentially leading to alterations in soil functioning. Here, we test two maize varieties expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab endotoxin (Bt maize) for their effects on soil AM fungal communities. We target both fungal DNA and RNA, which is new for AM fungi, and we use two strategies as an inclusive and robust way of detecting community differences: (i) 454 pyrosequencing using general fungal rRNA gene-directed primers and (ii) terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling using AM fungus-specific markers. Potential GM-induced effects were compared to the normal natural variation of AM fungal communities across 15 different agricultural fields. AM fungi were found to be abundant in the experiment, accounting for 8% and 21% of total recovered DNA- and RNA-derived fungal sequences, respectively, after 104 days of plant growth. RNA- and DNA-based sequence analyses yielded most of the same AM fungal lineages. Our research yielded three major conclusions. First, no consistent differences were detected between AM fungal communities associated with GM plants and non-GM plants. Second, temporal variation in AMF community composition (between two measured time points) was bigger than GM trait-induced variation. Third, natural variation of AMF communities across 15 agricultural fields in The Netherlands, as well as within-field temporal variation, was much higher than GM-induced variation. In conclusion, we found no indication that Bt maize cultivation poses a risk for AMF.

  2. Impact of age on the false negative rate of human papillomavirus DNA test in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hye-Yon; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) test was incorporated into the triage of lesser abnormal cervical cytologies: atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of age on the efficacy of HPV testing in patients with lesser abnormal cervical cytologies. Methods A total of 439 patients with ASCUS or LSIL were included. The association between age groups and the diagnostic performances of ...

  3. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Zhu, Y.F.; Chung, C.N.; Allman, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, the authors recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Snager`s enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. The preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possibly be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, the authors applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  4. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  5. The characterization of four gene expression analysis in circulating tumor cells made by Multiplex-PCR from the AdnaTest kit on the lab-on-a-chip Agilent DNA 1000 platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škereňová, Markéta; Mikulová, Veronika; Čapoun, Otakar; Zima, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis is a routine method for the detection of PCR fragments. The Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer was one of the first commercial devices in this field. Our project was designed to study the characteristics of Agilent DNA 1000 kit in PCR fragment analysis as a part of circulating tumour cell (CTC) detection technique. Despite the common use of this kit a complex analysis of the results from a long-term project is still missing. A commercially available Agilent DNA 1000 kit was used as a final step in the CTC detection (AdnaTest) for the determination of the presence of PCR fragments generated by Multiplex PCR. Data from 30 prostate cancer patients obtained during two years of research were analyzed to determine the trueness and precision of the PCR fragment size determination. Additional experiments were performed to demonstrate the precision (repeatability, reproducibility) and robustness of PCR fragment concentration determination. The trueness and precision of the size determination was below 3% and 2% respectively. The repeatability of the concentration determination was below 15%. The difference in concentration determination increases when Multiplex-PCR/storage step is added between the two measurements of one sample. The characteristics established in our study are in concordance with the manufacturer's specifications established for a ladder as a sample. However, the concentration determination may vary depending on chip preparation, sample storage and concentration. The 15% variation of concentration determination repeatability was shown to be partly proportional and can be suppressed by proper normalization.

  6. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  7. Validation of a modification to Performance-Tested Method 010403: microwell DNA hybridization assay for detection of Listeria spp. in selected foods and selected environmental surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Susan; Peng, Linda X; Mozola, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    A modification to Performance-Tested Method 010403, GeneQuence Listeria Test (DNAH method), is described. The modified method uses a new media formulation, LESS enrichment broth, in single-step enrichment protocols for both foods and environmental sponge and swab samples. Food samples are enriched for 27-30 h at 30 degrees C, and environmental samples for 24-48 h at 30 degrees C. Implementation of these abbreviated enrichment procedures allows test results to be obtained on a next-day basis. In testing of 14 food types in internal comparative studies with inoculated samples, there were statistically significant differences in method performance between the DNAH method and reference culture procedures for only 2 foods (pasteurized crab meat and lettuce) at the 27 h enrichment time point and for only a single food (pasteurized crab meat) in one trial at the 30 h enrichment time point. Independent laboratory testing with 3 foods showed statistical equivalence between the methods for all foods, and results support the findings of the internal trials. Overall, considering both internal and independent laboratory trials, sensitivity of the DNAH method relative to the reference culture procedures was 90.5%. Results of testing 5 environmental surfaces inoculated with various strains of Listeria spp. showed that the DNAH method was more productive than the reference U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) culture procedure for 3 surfaces (stainless steel, plastic, and cast iron), whereas results were statistically equivalent to the reference method for the other 2 surfaces (ceramic tile and sealed concrete). An independent laboratory trial with ceramic tile inoculated with L. monocytogenes confirmed the effectiveness of the DNAH method at the 24 h time point. Overall, sensitivity of the DNAH method at 24 h relative to that of the USDA-FSIS method was 152%. The DNAH method exhibited extremely high specificity, with only 1% false

  8. Impact of age on the false negative rate of human papillomavirus DNA test in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hye-Yon; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong-Beom

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) test was incorporated into the triage of lesser abnormal cervical cytologies: atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of age on the efficacy of HPV testing in patients with lesser abnormal cervical cytologies. A total of 439 patients with ASCUS or LSIL were included. The association between age groups and the diagnostic performances of HPV test for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) was evaluated. Median age was 44 years (range, 17 to 75 years). ASCUS was more frequently observed in older patients while LSIL was more common in younger patients (P=0.002). CIN2+ was found in 11.3% (32/284) of the ASCUS patients and 12.9% (20/155) of patients with LSIL. Older patients with ASCUS showed lower HPV infection rates (P=0.025), but not LSIL (P=0.114). However, the prevalence of CIN2+ was similar between the age groups with ASCUS or LSIL. In patients with ASCUS, the false negative rate of HPV test for CIN2+ was 6.2%. The false negative rate of the HPV test became higher with increasing of the age after the age of 50 (P=0.034). Our findings suggest that false negative rate of the HPV test for CIN2+ in ASCUS patients older than 50 years might become higher with increasing of the age. Negative HPV results in patients of the age >50 years with ASCUS should be carefully interpreted.

  9. Haplotype-based approach for noninvasive prenatal tests of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yan; Li, Xuchao; Ge, Hui-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose:This study demonstrates noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) using a newly developed haplotype-based approach.Methods:Eight families at risk for DMD were recruited for this study. Parental haplotypes were constructed using target-region sequencing data...

  10. Decision-analytic modeling to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HPV-DNA testing in primary cervical cancer screening in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krämer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persistent infections with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV are associated with the development of cervical neoplasia. Compared to cytology HPV testing is more sensitive in detecting high-grade cervical cancer precursors, but with lower specificity. HPV based primary screening for cervical cancer is currently discussed in Germany. Decisions should be based on a systematic evaluation of the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HPV based primary screening. Research questions: What is the long-term clinical effectiveness (reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer and death due to cervical cancer, life years gained of HPV testing and what is the cost-effectiveness in Euro per life year gained (LYG of including HPV testing in primary cervical cancer screening in the German health care context? How can the screening program be improved with respect to test combination, age at start and end of screening and screening interval and which recommendations should be made for the German health care context? Methods: A previously published and validated decision-analytic model for the German health care context was extended and adapted to the natural history of HPV infection and cervical cancer in order to evaluate different screening strategies that differ by screening interval, and tests, including cytology alone, HPV testing alone or in combination with cytology, and HPV testing with cytology triage for HPV-positive women. German clinical, epidemiological and economic data were used. In the absence of individual data, screening adherence was modelled independently from screening history. Test accuracy data were retrieved from international meta-analyses. Predicted outcomes included reduction in lifetime-risk for cervical cancer cases and deaths, life expectancy, lifetime costs, and discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER. The perspective of the third party payer and 3% annual discount rate were

  11. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn2+, but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5′-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3′ side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA. PMID:24203707

  12. Syphilis testing practices in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thuy T; Kamb, Mary L; Luu, Minh; Ham, D Cal; Perez, Freddy

    2017-09-01

    To present the findings of the Pan American Health Organization's 2014 survey on syphilis testing policies and practices in the Americas. Representatives of national/regional reference and large, lower-level laboratories from 35 member states were invited to participate. A semi-structured, electronically administered questionnaire collected data on syphilis tests, algorithms, equipment/commodities, challenges faced and basic quality assurance (QA) strategies employed (i.e. daily controls, standard operating procedures, technician training, participating in external QA programmes, on-site evaluations). The 69 participating laboratories from 30 (86%) member states included 41 (59%) national/regional reference and 28 (41%) lower-level laboratories. Common syphilis tests conducted were the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) (62% of surveyed laboratories), venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) (54%), fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) (41%) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) (32%). Only three facilities reported using direct detection methods, and 28 (41% overall, 32% of lower-level facilities) used rapid tests. Most laboratories (62%) used only traditional testing algorithms (non-treponemal screening and treponemal confirmatory testing); however, 12% used only a reverse sequence algorithm (treponemal test first), and 14% employed both algorithms. Another nine (12%) laboratories conducted only one type of serologic test. Although most reference (97%) and lower-level (89%) laboratories used at least one QA strategy, only 16% reported using all five basic strategies. Commonly reported challenges were stock-outs of essential reagents or commodities (46%), limited staff training (73%) and insufficient equipment (39%). Many reference and clinical laboratories in the Americas face challenges in conducting appropriate syphilis testing and in ensuring quality of testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd The Pan-American Health Organization retains

  13. Recruitment of DNA methyltransferase I to DNA repair sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortusewicz, Oliver; Schermelleh, Lothar; Walter, Joachim; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the replication of genetic and epigenetic information is directly coupled; however, little is known about the maintenance of epigenetic information in DNA repair. Using a laser microirradiation system to introduce DNA lesions at defined subnuclear sites, we tested whether the major DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt1) or one of the two de novo methyltransferases (Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b) are recruited to sites of DNA repair in vivo. Time lapse microscopy of microirradiated mammalian cells expressing GFP-tagged Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, or Dnmt3b1 together with red fluorescent protein-tagged proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) revealed that Dnmt1 and PCNA accumulate at DNA damage sites as early as 1 min after irradiation in S and non-S phase cells, whereas recruitment of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b was not observed. Deletion analysis showed that Dnmt1 recruitment was mediated by the PCNA-binding domain. These data point to a direct role of Dnmt1 in the restoration of epigenetic information during DNA repair. PMID:15956212

  14. The DNA Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-09

    The DNA Files is a radio documentary which disseminates genetics information over public radio. The documentaries explore subjects which include the following: How genetics affects society. How human life began and how it evolved. Could new prenatal genetic tests hold the key to disease prevention later in life? Would a national genetic data base sacrifice individual privacy? and Should genes that may lead to the cure for cancer be privately owned? This report serves as a project update for the second quarter of 1998. It includes the spring/summer 1998 newsletter, the winter 1998 newsletter, the program clock, and the latest flyer.

  15. What?s Happening to Your DNA Data?: Genetic Testing Services Abound, but Consumers Opting to Use Them Should Be Aware of the Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, technology advances in the field of genetics have led to cheaper and more accurate testing. Public interest in personal genetics has grown thanks to media coverage and high-profile stories, such as actress Angelina Jolie's decision to undergo a double mastectomy as a preventative measure against breast cancer when she learned she carries the BRCA1 mutation (relating to breast cancer type 1 susceptibility).

  16. Single-stranded DNA aptamer targeting and neutralization of anti-D alloantibody: a potential therapeutic strategy for haemolytic diseases caused by Rhesus alloantibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinze; Wu, Fan; Wang, Manni; Zhuang, Naibao; Zhou, Huayou; Xu, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Rhesus (Rh) D antigen is the most important antigen in the Rh blood group system because of its strong immunogenicity. When RhD-negative individuals are exposed to RhD-positive blood, they may produce anti-D alloantibody, potentially resulting in delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions and Rh haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn, which are difficult to treat. Inhibition of the binding of anti-D antibody with RhD antigens on the surface of red blood cells may effectively prevent immune haemolytic diseases. In this study, single-stranded (ss) DNA aptamers, specifically binding to anti-D antibodies, were selected via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology. After 14 rounds of selection, the purified ssDNA was sequenced using a Personal Genome Machine system. Haemagglutination inhibition assays were performed to screen aptamers for biological activity in terms of blocking antigen-antibody reactions: the affinity and specificity of the aptamers were also determined. In addition to high specificity, the aptamers which were selected showed high affinity for anti-D antibodies with dissociation constant (K d ) values ranging from 51.46±14.90 to 543.30±92.59 nM. By the combined use of specific ssDNA aptamer 7 and auxiliary ssDNA aptamer 2, anti-D could be effectively neutralised at low concentrations of the aptamers. Our results demonstrate that ssDNA aptamers may be a novel, promising strategy for the treatment of delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions and Rh haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn.

  17. Evaluation of the Aptima HBV Quant assay vs. the COBAS TaqMan HBV test using the high pure system for the quantitation of HBV DNA in plasma and serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalasta, Gunnar; Börner, Anna; Speicher, Andrea; Enders, Martin

    2018-03-28

    Proper management of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection requires monitoring of plasma or serum HBV DNA levels using a highly sensitive nucleic acid amplification test. Because commercially available assays differ in performance, we compared herein the performance of the Hologic Aptima HBV Quant assay (Aptima) to that of the Roche Cobas TaqMan HBV test for use with the high pure system (HPS/CTM). Assay performance was assessed using HBV reference panels as well as plasma and serum samples from chronically HBV-infected patients. Method correlation, analytical sensitivity, precision/reproducibility, linearity, bias and influence of genotype were evaluated. Data analysis was performed using linear regression, Deming correlation analysis and Bland-Altman analysis. Agreement between the assays for the two reference panels was good, with a difference in assay values vs. target 0.98). The two assays had similar bias and precision across the different genotypes tested at low viral loads (25-1000 IU/mL). Aptima has a performance comparable with that of HPS/CTM, making it suitable for use for HBV infection monitoring. Aptima runs on a fully automated platform (the Panther system) and therefore offers a significantly improved workflow compared with HPS/CTM.

  18. Characterization of Rocks and Grouts to Support DNA's Verification Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, J

    2000-01-01

    .... Specifically, test data was generated for use with DNA's HYDROPLUS program. The tests performed included unconfined compression tests, uniaxial strain tests, physical properties, ultrasonic velocities, XRD mineralogy, and lithologic descriptions...

  19. Testing Testing Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Craig; O'Neill, Thomas; Wright, Benjamin D.; Woodcock, Richard W.; Munoz-Sandoval, Ana; Gershon, Richard C.; Bergstrom, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Articles in this special section consider (1) flow in test taking (Craig Deville); (2) testwiseness (Thomas O'Neill); (3) test length (Benjamin Wright); (4) cross-language test equating (Richard W. Woodcock and Ana Munoz-Sandoval); (5) computer-assisted testing and testwiseness (Richard Gershon and Betty Bergstrom); and (6) Web-enhanced testing…

  20. Mitochondrial DNA alteration in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacedonia, Donato; Carpagnano, Giovanna E; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Cotugno, Grazia; Palladino, Grazia P; Patricelli, Giulia; Sabato, Roberto; Foschino Barbaro, Maria P

    2015-04-07

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSAS) is a disease associated with the increase of cardiovascular risk and it is characterized by repeated episodes of Intermittent Hypoxia (IH) which inducing oxidative stress and systemic inflammation. Mitochondria are cell organelles involved in the respiratory that have their own DNA (MtDNA). The aim of this study was to investigate if the increase of oxidative stress in OSAS patients can induce also MtDNA alterations. 46 OSAS patients (age 59.27 ± 11.38; BMI 30.84 ± 3.64; AHI 36.63 ± 24.18) were compared with 36 control subjects (age 54.42 ± 6.63; BMI 29.06 ± 4.7; AHI 3.8 ± 1.10). In blood cells Content of MtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA) was measured in OSAS patients by Real Time PCR. The ratio between MtDNA/nDNA was then calculated. Presence of oxidative stress was evaluated by levels of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (ROMs), measured by diacron reactive oxygen metabolite test (d-ROM test). MtDNA/nDNA was higher in patients with OSAS than in the control group (150.94 ± 49.14 vs 128.96 ± 45.8; p = 0.04), the levels of ROMs were also higher in OSAS subjects (329.71 ± 70.17 vs 226 ± 36.76; p = 0.04) and they were positively correlated with MtDNA/nDNA (R = 0.5, p DNA damage induced by the increase of oxidative stress. Intermittent hypoxia seems to be the main mechanism which leads to this process.

  1. Evolution of DNA Methylation across Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Adam J; Vogel, Kevin J; Moore, Allen J; Schmitz, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation contributes to gene and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, and therefore has been hypothesized to facilitate the evolution of plastic traits such as sociality in insects. However, DNA methylation is sparsely studied in insects. Therefore, we documented patterns of DNA methylation across a wide diversity of insects. We predicted that underlying enzymatic machinery is concordant with patterns of DNA methylation. Finally, given the suggestion that DNA methylation facilitated social evolution in Hymenoptera, we tested the hypothesis that the DNA methylation system will be associated with presence/absence of sociality among other insect orders. We found DNA methylation to be widespread, detected in all orders examined except Diptera (flies). Whole genome bisulfite sequencing showed that orders differed in levels of DNA methylation. Hymenopteran (ants, bees, wasps and sawflies) had some of the lowest levels, including several potential losses. Blattodea (cockroaches and termites) show all possible patterns, including a potential loss of DNA methylation in a eusocial species whereas solitary species had the highest levels. Species with DNA methylation do not always possess the typical enzymatic machinery. We identified a gene duplication event in the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) that is shared by some Hymenoptera, and paralogs have experienced divergent, nonneutral evolution. This diversity and nonneutral evolution of underlying machinery suggests alternative DNA methylation pathways may exist. Phylogenetically corrected comparisons revealed no evidence that supports evolutionary association between sociality and DNA methylation. Future functional studies will be required to advance our understanding of DNA methylation in insects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Decrease DNA contamination in the laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we tested various approaches to remove DNA from hard laboratory surfaces. We contaminated clean surfaces with four different concentrations of massively parallel sequencing libraries. The DNA was dried and left for 45 min and for 24 h, respectively, before any treatment. The surfaces.......9–1.8% hypochlorite in order to eliminate laboratory contamination and simultaneously minimise any poisonous gases....

  3. Detection of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood: Viruses or DNA remnants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar-de Backer, M W A; Russcher, A; Kroes, A C M; Koppelman, M H G M; Lanfermeijer, M; Zaaijer, H L

    2016-11-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) DNA can be detected in blood over a long period after acute infection. Several reports associate the presence of B19V DNA with disease, irrespective of timing of the initial B19V infection. This study aims to analyze the properties of B19V DNA in blood, differentiating between bare, non-infectious strands of DNA and B19V DNA in viable virions. Ten blood donors with asymptomatic acute B19V infection were followed and sampled up to 22 months after infection. The samples were treated with and without an endonuclease and tested for B19V DNA, to distinguish between DNA in virions and naked DNA. In the acute phase of infection, high levels of B19V DNA were detected, concurrent with B19V IgM antibodies. B19V DNA apparently was encapsidated, as indicated by resistance to endonuclease degradation. Subsequently, B19V DNA remained detectable for more than one year in all donors at low levels (<10 5 IU/mL). Approximately 150days after infection B19V DNA became degradable by an endonuclease, indicating that this concerned naked DNA. In some donors a second endonuclease-resistant peak occurred. Detection of B19V DNA in blood by PCR does not necessarily imply that B19V replication takes place and that infectious B19V virions are present. We propose that remnant B19V DNA strands can be released from tissues without active replication. This finding urges to reconsider an assumed role of B19V infection mainly based on B19V DNA detection in blood, a much debated subject in clinical syndromes such as myocarditis and arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Combining Push Pull Tracer Tests and Microbial DNA and mRNA Analysis to Assess In-Situ Groundwater Nitrate Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, W.; Graham, W. D.; Huang, L.; Ogram, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen transformation mechanisms in the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA) are still poorly understood because of karst aquifer complexity and spatiotemporal variability in nitrate and carbon loading. Transformation rates have not been directly measured in the aquifer. This study quantifies nitrate-nitrogen transformation potential in the UFA using single well push-pull tracer injection (PPT) experiments combined with microbial characterization of extracted water via qPCR and RT-qPCR of selected nitrate reduction genes. Tracer tests with chloride and nitrate ± carbon were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end members in a spring groundwater contributing area. A significant increase in number of microbes with carbon addition suggests stimulated growth. Increases in the activities of denitrification genes (nirK and nirS) as measured by RT-qPCR were not observed. However, only microbes suspended in the tracer were obtained, ignoring effects of aquifer material biofilms. Increases in nrfA mRNA and ammonia concentrations were observed, supporting Dissimilatory Reduction of Nitrate to Ammonia (DNRA) as a reduction mechanism. In the oxic aquifer, zero order nitrate loss rates ranged from 32 to 89 nmol /L*hr with no added carbon and 90 to 240 nmol /L*hr with carbon. In the anoxic aquifer, rates ranged from 18 to 95 nmol /L*hr with no added carbon and 34 to 207 nmol /L*hr with carbon. These loss rates are low; 13 orders of magnitude less than the loads applied in the contributing area each year, however they do indicate that losses can occur in oxic and anoxic aquifers with and without carbon. These rates may include, ammonia adsorption, uptake, or denitrification in aquifer material biofilms. Rates with and without carbon addition for both aquifers were similar, suggesting aquifer redox state and carbon availability alone are insufficient to predict response to nutrient additions without characterization of microbial response. Surprisingly, these

  5. DESIGN OF ELECTROPHORESIS DEVICE FOR OPTIMATION OF DNA VISUALIZATION AND DNA CONCENTRATION USING SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P. Kusumaningrum

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molekul DNA menunjukkan polarisasi yang kuat sehingga memungkinkan baik gerak elektroforesis berdasarkan muatan negatifnya maupun gerak dielektroforesis berdasarkan induksi polarisasi. Perancangan alat menggunakan kombinasi prinsip elektroforesis dan dielektroforesis dilengkapi perangkat lunak untuk mengukur konsentrasinya sangat diperlukan. Utamanya mengingat uji kualitatif DNA berbasis visualisasi pada gel elektroforesis bersifat sangat subyektif dan kurang terukur. Pengukuran konsentrasi DNA menggunakan spektrofotometer UV/VIS sangat tergantung oleh ketersediaannya di laboratorium. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mendesain piranti untuk mengukur konsentrasi DNA berdasarkan visualisasinya pada gel elektroforesis menggunakan perangkat lunak berbasis MatLab. Pengukuran konsentrasi DNA didasarkan visualisasinya pada gel elektroforesis lalu dibandingkan dengan hasil penghitungan spektrofotometer UV/VIS. Hasil penelitian menggunakan piranti tersebut memperlihatkan visualisasi DNA yang lebih optimal. Hasil pengukuran jumlah DNA menggunakan spektrofotometer memiliki kecenderungan yang sama dengan hasil pengukuran menggunakan perangkat lunak berbasis MatLab meskipun terdapat perbedaan nilai kuantitatif.ABSTRACTMolecules of deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA show a strong polarization allowing for both motions of the dielectrophoresis induced by polarization and electrophoresis based on its negative charge. Considering high subjective and less quantifiable result of the visualization based qualitative test of DNA on gel electrophoresis, designing the tool using a combination of the principles of electrophoresis and dielectrophoresis completed with a software for optimization of DNA visualization and to measure the concentration of small and large–sized DNA fragment is very needed. Accuracy of measurement of DNA concentration using a spectrophotometer UV /VIS is depend on its availability in the laboratory. The aim of this study was to design device for

  6. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, S.G.; Chao Ho; Woodgate, R.

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD' fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD' antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium u mu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umuDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention

  7. A versatile non-radioactive assay for DNA methyltransferase activity and DNA binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauer, Carina; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple, non-radioactive assay for DNA methyltransferase activity and DNA binding. As most proteins are studied as GFP fusions in living cells, we used a GFP binding nanobody coupled to agarose beads (GFP nanotrap) for rapid one-step purification. Immobilized GFP fusion proteins were subsequently incubated with different fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. The absolute amounts and molar ratios of GFP fusion proteins and bound DNA substrates were determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition to specific DNA binding of GFP fusion proteins, the enzymatic activity of DNA methyltransferases can also be determined by using suicide DNA substrates. These substrates contain the mechanism-based inhibitor 5-aza-dC and lead to irreversible covalent complex formation. We obtained covalent complexes with mammalian DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), which were resistant to competition with non-labeled canonical DNA substrates, allowing differentiation between methyltransferase activity and DNA binding. By comparison, the Dnmt1C1229W catalytic site mutant showed DNA-binding activity, but no irreversible covalent complex formation. With this assay, we could also confirm the preference of Dnmt1 for hemimethylated CpG sequences. The rapid optical read-out in a multi-well format and the possibility to test several different substrates in direct competition allow rapid characterization of sequence-specific binding and enzymatic activity. PMID:19129216

  8. DNA preservation in silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawen; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Gong, He; Liu, Meng; Guo, Shaozhe; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2017-06-27

    The structure of DNA is susceptible to alterations at high temperature and on changing pH, irradiation and exposure to DNase. Options to protect and preserve DNA during storage are important for applications in genetic diagnosis, identity authentication, drug development and bioresearch. In the present study, the stability of total DNA purified from human dermal fibroblast cells, as well as that of plasmid DNA, was studied in silk protein materials. The DNA/silk mixtures were stabilized on filter paper (silk/DNA + filter) or filter paper pre-coated with silk and treated with methanol (silk/DNA + PT-filter) as a route to practical utility. After air-drying and water extraction, 50-70% of the DNA and silk could be retrieved and showed a single band on electrophoretic gels. 6% silk/DNA + PT-filter samples provided improved stability in comparison with 3% silk/DNA + filter samples and DNA + filter samples for DNA preservation, with ∼40% of the band intensity remaining at 37 °C after 40 days and ∼10% after exposure to UV light for 10 hours. Quantitative analysis using the PicoGreen assay confirmed the results. The use of Tris/borate/EDTA (TBE) buffer enhanced the preservation and/or extraction of the DNA. The DNA extracted after storage maintained integrity and function based on serving as a functional template for PCR amplification of the gene for zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750) and for transgene expression of red fluorescence protein (dsRed) in HEK293 cells. The high molecular weight and high content of a crystalline beta-sheet structure formed on the coated surfaces likely accounted for the preservation effects observed for the silk/DNA + PT-filter samples. Although similar preservation effects were also obtained for lyophilized silk/DNA samples, the rapid and simple processing available with the silk-DNA-filter membrane system makes it appealing for future applications.

  9. Force induced DNA melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2009-01-01

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f m , at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  10. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  11. DNA Open states and DNA hydratation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lema-Larre, B. de; Martin-Landrove, M

    1995-01-01

    It is a very well-known fact that an protonic exchange exists among natural DNA filaments and synthetic polynucleotides with the solvent (1--2). The existence of DNA open states, that is to say states for which the interior of the DNA molecule is exposed to the external environment, it has been demonstrated by means of proton-deuterium exchange (3). This work has carried out experiments measuring the dispersion of the traverse relaxation rate (4), as a pulsation rate function in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulses sequence rate, to determine changes in the moist layer of the DNA molecule. The experiments were carried out under different experimental conditions in order to vary the probability that open states occurs, such as temperature or the exposure to electromagnetic fields. Some theoretical models were supposed to adjust the experimental results including those related to DNA non linear dynamic [es

  12. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage binding protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Keeney; A.P.M. Eker (André); T. Brody; W. Vermeulen (Wim); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Linn

    1994-01-01

    textabstractCells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells

  13. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the open-quotes Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNAclose quotes

  14. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparro, F.P.; Santella, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA). (author)

  15. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, F P; Santella, R M

    1988-09-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA).

  16. DNA computing models

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, Zoya; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this excellent text, the reader is given a comprehensive introduction to the field of DNA computing. The book emphasizes computational methods to tackle central problems of DNA computing, such as controlling living cells, building patterns, and generating nanomachines.

  17. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  18. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  19. Using mitochondrial and ribosomal DNA sequences to test the taxonomic validity of Clinostomum complanatum Rudolphi, 1814 in fish-eating birds and freshwater fishes in Mexico, with the description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno-Uribe, Ana L; Pinacho-Pinacho, Carlos D; García-Varela, Martín; de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce

    2013-08-01

    The taxonomic history and species composition of the genus Clinostomum has been unstable. Two species, Clinostomum complanatum Rudolphi, 1814 and Clinostomum marginatum Rudolphi, 1819, have been particularly problematic and its validity has been disputed for nearly 200 years. In this paper, we have made use of an integrative taxonomy approach, and we used, in first instance, DNA sequences of two genes (cox1 and ITS) to test the validity of C. complanatum, a species apparently widely distributed in Mexico and to link the metacercariae and adult forms of the recognized species of Clinostomum. Combining molecular data with morphology, host association, and geographical distribution, we searched for the potential existence of undescribed species. A new species of Clinostomum is described based on adults found in the mouthy cavity of three species of fish-eating birds as well as in metacercariae found in freshwater and estuarine fishes. A few morphological characteristics distinguish the new species from other congeners even though reciprocal monophyly in a phylogenetic tree based on maximum-likelihood and Bayesian analysis, genetic divergence, and a multivariate analysis of variance and a principal component analysis of 18 morphometric traits for adults and metacercariae demonstrates the validity of the new species. Based on our results, it seems that C. complanatum is not currently distributed in Mexico, although this requires further verification with a more thoroughful sampling in other areas of the country, but it is plausible to support the hypothesis that C. marginatum is the American form, as previously suggested by other authors.

  20. Specific Detection of Serum Antibodies against BKPyV, A Small DNA Tumour Virus, in Patients Affected by Choroidal Nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pietrobon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocular or choroidal nevus (CN is a rare benign neoplastic lesion of the eye. The cause of CN onset/progression, which arises from the transformation of ocular melanocytes, is not known. A fraction of CN patients may develop uveal melanoma. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between CN and BK polyomavirus (BKPyV, a small DNA tumor virus. Serum IgG antibodies which react with BKPyV antigens were analyzed. An indirect E.L.I.S.A. using synthetic peptides that mimic BKPyV antigens was employed. Serum antibodies against BKPyV were also investigated by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay. Sera were from CN patients and healthy subject (HS were the control. A statistically significant higher prevalence of antibodies against BKPyV capsid protein antigens in serum samples from CN patients was detected, compared to HS, using two independent techniques, indirect E.L.I.S.A. and HAI (87.3% CN vs. 62.1% HS and 91.5% CN vs. 64.4% HS, respectively; p < 0.005. Our data suggest an association exists between CN and BKPyV indicating that this small DNA tumor virus could be responsible in the onset of this benign neoplastic lesion affecting eye melanocytes. This investigation reports the association between choroidal nevi and BKPyV infection for the first time. These data are innovative in this field and may represent a starting point for further investigation into the putative role of BKPyV in CN onset/progression.

  1. Two potential Petunia hybrida mitochondrial DNA replication origins show structural and in vitro functional homology with the animal mitochondrial DNA heavy and light strand replication origins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Jan M. de; Hille, Jacques; Kors, Frank; Meer, Bert van der; Kool, Ad J.; Folkerts, Otto; Nijkamp, H. John J.

    1991-01-01

    Four Petunia hybrida mitochondrial (mt) DNA fragments have been isolated, sequenced, localized on the physical map and analyzed for their ability to initiate specific DNA synthesis. When all four mtDNA fragments were tested as templates in an in vitro DNA synthesizing lysate system, developed from

  2. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...

  3. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  4. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  5. Radiation and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riabchenko, N I

    1979-01-01

    Consideration is given to the effects of ionizing radiation on the structure of DNA. Physical and chemical methods of determining radiation damage to the primary (polynucleotide chain and nitrogenous base) and secondary (helical) structure of DNA are discussed, and the effects of ionizing radiation on deoxyribonucleoprotein complexes are considered. The radiolysis of DNA in vitro and in bacterial and mammalian cells is examined and cellular mechanisms for the repair of radiation-damaged DNA are considered, taking into account single-strand and double-strand breaks, gamma-radiation damage and deoxyribonucleoprotein-membrane complex damage. Postradiation DNA degradation in bacteria and lymphatic cells is also discussed.

  6. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  7. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  8. DNA Polymerases Drive DNA Sequencing-by-Synthesis Technologies: Both Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yao eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. E. coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ⱷ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ⱷ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  9. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Shi, Linchun; Xu, Xiaolan; Li, Huan; Xing, Hang; Liang, Dong; Jiang, Kun; Pang, Xiaohui; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR) code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications.

  10. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    Full Text Available The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications.

  11. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  12. Interaction of E. coli DNA with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyn, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    This chapter is part of a dissertation dealing with the interaction of DNA with protoplasts. Having established the length of time during which tobacco mesophyll protoplasts do not synthesize DNA following their isolation, it is important to know the extent of DNA uptake just before the onset of DNA synthesis (and possible integration) and to find optimal conditions for this uptake. Therefore, the association of E. coli DNA with tobacco protoplasts was studied. Care should be taken with the interpretation of ''uptake'' results: adsorption phenomena play a very important role and may do so at the plasmalemma of naked protoplasts. To solve the problems involved, the use of radiation-damaged DNA was attempted. With E. coli DNA possessing a large number of thymine containing pyrimidine dimers, the loss of dimers from DNA recovered from treated protoplasts was tested in order to obtain an indication of ''real'' uptake. The results are reported

  13. Paternity testing with VNTR DNA systems. I. Matching criteria and population frequencies of the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11 in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth

    1993-01-01

    -systems D2S44 (YNH24), D5S43 (MS8), D7S21 (MS31), D7S22 (g3), and D12S11 (MS43a). The intra gel variability of 970 duplicate investigations on the same gel of DNA from 122 individuals showed no differences exceeding 1.25 mm between the positions of the corresponding DNA fragments. The comparison of 1...

  14. Microbial food safety: Potential of DNA extraction methods for use in diagnostic metagenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hasseldam; Andersen, Sandra Christine; Christensen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    ) yielding protocols. The PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit performed significantly better than all other protocols tested. Selected protocols were modified, i.e., extended heating and homogenization, resulting in increased yields of total DNA. For QIAamp Fast DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) a 7-fold...... of the protocols to extract DNA was observed. The highest DNA yield was obtained with the PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, whereas the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Feces (MP Biomedicals) resulted in the highest amount of PCR-amplifiable C. jejuni DNA....

  15. Development of biometric DNA ink for authentication security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiyada, Masaki

    2004-10-01

    Among the various types of biometric personal identification systems, DNA provides the most reliable personal identification. It is intrinsically digital and unchangeable while the person is alive, and even after his/her death. Increasing the number of DNA loci examined can enhance the power of discrimination. This report describes the development of DNA ink, which contains synthetic DNA mixed with printing inks. Single-stranded DNA fragments encoding a personalized set of short tandem repeats (STR) were synthesized. The sequence was defined as follows. First, a decimal DNA personal identification (DNA-ID) was established based on the number of STRs in the locus. Next, this DNA-ID was encrypted using a binary, 160-bit algorithm, using a hashing function to protect privacy. Since this function is irreversible, no one can recover the original information from the encrypted code. Finally, the bit series generated above is transformed into base sequences, and double-stranded DNA fragments are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to protect against physical attacks. Synthesized DNA was detected successfully after samples printed in DNA ink were subjected to several resistance tests used to assess the stability of printing inks. Endurance test results showed that this DNA ink would be suitable for practical use as a printing ink and was resistant to 40 hours of ultraviolet exposure, performance commensurate with that of photogravure ink. Copyright 2004 Tohoku University Medical Press

  16. DNA/SNLA commonality program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, D.V.; Watts, A.J.; Rice, D.A.; Powe, J.; Beezhold, W.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the Commonality program, initiated by DNA in 1978, was to evaluate e-beam material testing procedures and techniques by comparing material stress and spall data from various US and UK e-beam facilities and experimenters. As part of this joint DNA/SNL/UK Commonality effort, Sandia and Ktech used four different electron-beam machines to investigate various aspects of e-beam energy deposition in three materials. The deposition duration and the deposition profiles were varied, and the resulting stresses were measured. The materials studied were: (1) a low-Z material (A1), (2) a high-Z material (Ta), and (3) a typical porous material, a cermet. Aluminium and tantalum were irradiated using the DNA Blackjack 3 accelerator (60 ns pulse width), the DNA Blackjack 3' accelerator (30 ns pulse width), and the SNLA REHYD accelerator (100 ns pulse width). Propagating stresses were measured using x-cut quartz gauges, carbon gauges, and laser interferometry techniques. Data to determine the influence of deposition duration were obtained over a wide range of energy loadings. The cermet material was studied using the SNLA REHYD and HERMES II accelerators. The e-beam from REHYD generated propagating stresses which were monitored with quartz gauges as a function of sample thickness and energy loadings. The HERMES II accelerator was used to uniformly heat the cermet to determine the Grueneisen parameter and identify the incipient spall condition. Results of these experiments are presented

  17. Studying DNA looping by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung T; Kim, Harold D

    2014-06-28

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with many important biological processes such as DNA-protein recognition and DNA packaging into nucleosomes. Thermodynamics of dsDNA bending has been studied by a method called cyclization which relies on DNA ligase to covalently join short sticky ends of a dsDNA. However, ligation efficiency can be affected by many factors that are not related to dsDNA looping such as the DNA structure surrounding the joined sticky ends, and ligase can also affect the apparent looping rate through mechanisms such as nonspecific binding. Here, we show how to measure dsDNA looping kinetics without ligase by detecting transient DNA loop formation by FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). dsDNA molecules are constructed using a simple PCR-based protocol with a FRET pair and a biotin linker. The looping probability density known as the J factor is extracted from the looping rate and the annealing rate between two disconnected sticky ends. By testing two dsDNAs with different intrinsic curvatures, we show that the J factor is sensitive to the intrinsic shape of the dsDNA.

  18. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry have been used to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on investigating irradiated systems of DNA constituents. In this year's effort we have concentrated on radiation effects on DNA itself. In addition studies of radiation effects on lipids and model compounds have been performed which shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane

  19. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  20. Failure to detect circulating DNA-anti-DNA complexes by four radioimmunological methods in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izui, S.; Lambert, P.H.; Miescher, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The presence of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated by two new radioimmunoassays (RIA) developed for this purpose and by measuring the CLq and DNA binding activity of serum before and after treatment with DNAse. Two direct RIA developed in this study were based on the reactivity of [ 3 H]actinomycin D ([ 3 H]ACT-D) or solid-phase methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) with DNA-anti-DNA complexes. DNA-anti-DNA complexes prepared in vitro could be efficiently detected at various antigen-antibody ratios by these two RIA. Increased levels of circulating immune complexes as indicated by the CLq binding test were found in 52% of SLE sera. However, the frequency of specific DNA-anti-DNA complexes detected in SLE sera was very low. Only 6% of sera exhibited an increased value deviating by more than three s.d. from the normal mean when tested with the [ 3 H]ACT-D binding RIA or the solid-phase mBSA RIA. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the serum CLq or DNA binding activity after treatment with DNAse. These results suggest that DNA-anti-DNA complexes do not occur frequently in circulating blood and represent only a very small portion of the immune complexes detected in serum from patients with SLE. (author)

  1. Failure to detect circulating DNA-anti-DNA complexes by four radioimmunological methods in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izui, S; Lambert, P H; Miescher, P A [Hopital Cantonal Geneve (Switzerland)

    1977-12-01

    The presence of The DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated by two new radioimmunoassays (RIA) developed for this purpose and by measuring the CLq and DNA binding activity of serum before and after treatment with DNAse. Two direct RIA developed in this study were based on the reactivity of (/sup 3/H)actinomycin D ((/sup 3/H)ACT-D) or solid-phase methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) with DNA-anti-DNA complexes. DNA-anti-DNA complexes prepared in vitro could be efficiently detected at various antigen-antibody ratios by these two RIA. Increased levels of circulating immune complexes as indicated by the CLq binding test were found in 52% of the SLE sera. However, the frequency of specific DNA-anti-DNA complexes detected in the SLE sera was very low. Only 6% of the sera exhibited an increased value deviating by more than three s.d. from the normal mean when tested with the (/sup 3/H)ACT-D binding RIA or the solid-phase mBSA RIA. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the serum CLq or DNA binding activity after treatment with DNAse. These results suggest that DNA-anti-DNA complexes do not occur frequently in circulating blood and represent only a very small portion of the immune complexes detected in serum from patients with SLE.

  2. DNA repair studies in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sega, G.A.; Owens, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    In submammalian test systems, nitrosocarbamates (NEC) are 100-fold more mutagenic than are their corresponding nitrosourea homologues. To learn more about its interaction with germ-cell DNA in the mouse testis, male mice were given i.p. injections of NEC. Testicular injections of [ 3 H]dThd were given along with the NEC. Sixteen days after treatment, sperm were recovered from the caudal epididymides and assayed for an unscheduled-DNA-synthesis

  3. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  4. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  5. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  6. DNA repair and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, Shakuntla; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Gaur, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair refers to a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecule that encode it's genome. In human cells, both normal metabolic activities and environmental factors such as UV light and radiation can cause DNA damage, resulting in as many one million individual molecular lesions per day. Many of these lesions cause structural damage to the DNA molecule and can alter or eliminate the cell's ability to transcribe the gene that the affected DNA encodes. Other lesions include potentially harmful mutation in cell's genome which affect the survival of it's daughter cells after it undergoes mitosis. As a consequence, the DNA repair process is constantly active as it responds to damage in the DNA structure. Inherited mutation that affect DNA repair genes are strongly associated with high cancer risks in humans. Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is strongly associated with specific mutation in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. BRCA1, BRCA2 two famous mutation conferring a hugely increased risk of breast cancer on carrier, are both associated with a large number of DNA repair pathway, especially NHEJ and homologous recombination. Cancer therapy procedures such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy work by overwhelming the capacity of the cell to repair DNA damage, resulting in cell death. Cells that are most rapidly dividing most typically cancer cells are preferentially affected. The side effect is that other non-cancerous but rapidly dividing cells such as stem cells in the bone marrow are also affected. Modern cancer treatment attempt to localize the DNA damage to cells and tissue only associated with cancer, either by physical means (concentrating the therapeutic agent in the region of the tumor) or by biochemical means (exploiting a feature unique to cancer cells in the body). (author)

  7. Twisting, supercoiling and stretching in protein bound DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2018-04-01

    We have calculated theoretical results for the torque and slope of the twisted DNA, with various proteins bound on it, using the Neukirch-Marko model, in the regime where plectonemes exist. We found that the torque in the protein bound DNA decreases compared to that in the bare DNA. This is caused by the decrease in the free energy g(f) , and hence the smaller persistence lengths, in the case of protein bound DNA. We hope our results will encourage experimental investigations of supercoiling in protein bound DNA, which can provide further tests of the Neukirch-Marko model.

  8. The effect of low radiation doses on DNA repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.

    1978-08-01

    Error free DNA repair processes are an important preprequisite for the maintenance of genetic integrity of cells. They are of special importance for persons therapeutically or occupationally exposed to radiation. Therefore the effect of radiation therapy and elevated natural background radiation on unscheduled DNA synthesis was tested in peripheral lymphocytes of exposed persons. Both, autoradiographic studies of unscheduled DNA synthesis and measurement of 3 H-thymidine uptake into double stranded and single-strand containing DNA fractions revealed an increase of capacity for DNA repair. (author)

  9. Nonisotopic DNA probe techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kricka, Larry J

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this book is to bring together descriptions of the principal nonisotopic methods for DNA hybridization assays, together with experimental details of the methods, including labelling...

  10. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  11. Structure of DNA toroids and electrostatic attraction of DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherstvy, A G

    2005-01-01

    DNA-DNA electrostatic attraction is considered as the driving force for the formation of DNA toroids in the presence of DNA condensing cations. This attraction comes from the DNA helical charge distribution and favours hexagonal toroidal cross-sections. The latter is in agreement with recent cryo-electron microscopy studies on DNA condensed with cobalt hexammine. We treat the DNA-DNA interactions within the modern theory of electrostatic interaction between helical macromolecules. The size and thickness of the toroids is calculated within a simple model; other models of stability of DNA toroids are discussed and compared

  12. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  13. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masudur; Neff, David; Green, Nathaniel; Norton, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material. PMID:28335324

  14. DNA cards: determinants of DNA yield and quality in collecting genetic samples for pharmacogenetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Sergi; Crescenti, Anna; Gassó, Patricia; Vidal-Taboada, Jose M; Lafuente, Amalia

    2007-08-01

    As pharmacogenetic studies frequently require establishment of DNA banks containing large cohorts with multi-centric designs, inexpensive methods for collecting and storing high-quality DNA are needed. The aims of this study were two-fold: to compare the amount and quality of DNA obtained from two different DNA cards (IsoCode Cards or FTA Classic Cards, Whatman plc, Brentford, Middlesex, UK); and to evaluate the effects of time and storage temperature, as well as the influence of anticoagulant ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on the DNA elution procedure. The samples were genotyped by several methods typically used in pharmacogenetic studies: multiplex PCR, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, single nucleotide primer extension, and allelic discrimination assay. In addition, they were amplified by whole genome amplification to increase genomic DNA mass. Time, storage temperature and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid had no significant effects on either DNA card. This study reveals the importance of drying blood spots prior to isolation to avoid haemoglobin interference. Moreover, our results demonstrate that re-isolation protocols could be applied to increase the amount of DNA recovered. The samples analysed were accurately genotyped with all the methods examined herein. In conclusion, our study shows that both DNA cards, IsoCode Cards and FTA Classic Cards, facilitate genetic and pharmacogenetic testing for routine clinical practice.

  15. A nuclear DNA-based species determination and DNA quantification assay for common poultry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S

    2014-12-01

    DNA testing for food authentication and quality control requires sensitive species-specific quantification of nuclear DNA from complex and unknown biological sources. We have developed a multiplex assay based on TaqMan® real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for species-specific detection and quantification of chicken (Gallus gallus), duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) nuclear DNA. The multiplex assay is able to accurately detect very low quantities of species-specific DNA from single or multispecies sample mixtures; its minimum effective quantification range is 5 to 50 pg of starting DNA material. In addition to its use in food fraudulence cases, we have validated the assay using simulated forensic sample conditions to demonstrate its utility in forensic investigations. Despite treatment with potent inhibitors such as hematin and humic acid, and degradation of template DNA by DNase, the assay was still able to robustly detect and quantify DNA from each of the three poultry species in mixed samples. The efficient species determination and accurate DNA quantification will help reduce fraudulent food labeling and facilitate downstream DNA analysis for genetic identification and traceability.

  16. Structural Transformation of Wireframe DNA Origami via DNA Polymerase Assisted Gap-Filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nayan P; Matthies, Michael; Joffroy, Bastian; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2018-03-27

    The programmability of DNA enables constructing nanostructures with almost any arbitrary shape, which can be decorated with many functional materials. Moreover, dynamic structures can be realized such as molecular motors and walkers. In this work, we have explored the possibility to synthesize the complementary sequences to single-stranded gap regions in the DNA origami scaffold cost effectively by a DNA polymerase rather than by a DNA synthesizer. For this purpose, four different wireframe DNA origami structures were designed to have single-stranded gap regions. This reduced the number of staple strands needed to determine the shape and size of the final structure after gap filling. For this, several DNA polymerases and single-stranded binding (SSB) proteins were tested, with T4 DNA polymerase being the best fit. The structures could be folded in as little as 6 min, and the subsequent optimized gap-filling reaction was completed in less than 3 min. The introduction of flexible gap regions results in fully collapsed or partially bent structures due to entropic spring effects. Finally, we demonstrated structural transformations of such deformed wireframe DNA origami structures with DNA polymerases including the expansion of collapsed structures and the straightening of curved tubes. We anticipate that this approach will become a powerful tool to build DNA wireframe structures more material-efficiently, and to quickly prototype and test new wireframe designs that can be expanded, rigidified, or mechanically switched. Mechanical force generation and structural transitions will enable applications in structural DNA nanotechnology, plasmonics, or single-molecule biophysics.

  17. Action of some drugs on enzymes involved in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawra, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Weniger, P.

    1975-07-01

    Different antirheumatic and cytostatic drugs had been tested by measurement of the thymidine incorporation into DNA of spleen cells under conditions, under which either DNA-synthesis or repair after gamma- or UV-irradiation takes place. There are substances, which inhibit either only the semiconservative DNA-synthesis (vinblastine, isonicotinic acid hydracide) or only DNA-repair after gamma-irradiation (mixture of penicillin-G and procaine-penicillin-G) or both (cyclophosphamide, phenylbutazone, procarbazine, nalidixic acid). Vincristine shows no effect on the thymidine incorporation in DNA, but by density gradient centrifugation it has been found that it influences the ligase reaction. Two DNA polymerases had been isolated from spleen cells, one of the low molecular and one of the high molecular weight type. The influences of the described drugs on these enzymes and on a deoxyribonuclease I from beef pancreas have been tested in ''in vitro'' systems. In all cases, it has been found that there is no effect or only a very small one, compared with the action of well known inhibitors as e.g. ethidium bromide and p-chloromercuribenzoate, and this cannot be responsible for the suppressions found in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis. (author)

  18. Simulation of 125I-induced DNA strand breaks in a CAP-DNA complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.; Friedland, W.; Jacob, P.

    2000-01-01

    DNA strand breakage induced by decay of 125 I incorporated into the pyrimidine of a small piece of DNA with a specific base pair sequence has been investigated theoretically and experimentally (Lobachevsky and Martin 2000a, 2000b; Nikjoo et al., 1996; Pomplun and Terrissol, 1994; Charlton and Humm, 1988). Recently an attempt was made to analyse the DNA kinks in a CAP-DNA complex with 125 I induced DNA strand breakage (Karamychev et al., 1999). This method could be used as a so called radioprobing for such DNa distortions like other chemical and biological assays, provided that it has been tested and confirmed in a corresponding theoretical simulation. In the measurement, the distribution of the first breaks on the DNA strands starting from their labeled end can be determined. Based on such first breakage distributions, the simulation calculation could then be used to derive information on the structure of a given DNA-protein complex. The biophysical model PARTRAC has been applied successfully in simulating DNA damage induced by irradiation (Friedland et al., 1998; 1999). In the present study PARTRAC is adapted to a DNA-protein complex in which a specific sequence of 30 base pairs of DNA is connected with the catabolite gene activator protein (CAP). This report presents the first step of the analysis in which the CAP-DNA model used in NIH is overlaid with electron track structures in liquid water and the strand breaks due to direct ionization and due to radical attack are simulated. The second step will be to take into account the neutralization of the heavily charged tellurium and the protective effect of the CAP protein against radical attack. (orig.)

  19. Application of the microbiological method DEFT/APC and DNA comet assay to detect ionizing radiation processing of minimally processed vegetables; Aplicacao do metodo microbiologico DEFT/APC e do teste do cometa na deteccao do tratamento com radiacao ionizante de hortalicas minimamente processadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Michel Mozeika

    2008-07-01

    Marketing of minimally processed vegetables (MPV) are gaining impetus due to its convenience, freshness and apparent healthy. However, minimal processing does not reduce pathogenic microorganisms to safe levels. Food irradiation is used to extend the shelf life and inactivation of food-borne pathogens, Its combination with minimal processing could improve the safety and quality of MPV. Two different food irradiation detection methods, a biological, the DEFT/APC, and another biochemical, the DNA Comet Assay were applied to MPV in order to test its applicability to detect irradiation treatment. DEFT/APC is a microbiological screening method based on the use of the direct epi fluorescent filter technique (DEFT) and the aerobic plate count (APC). DNA Comet Assay detects DNA damage due to ionizing radiation. Samples of lettuce, chard, watercress, dandelion, kale, chicory, spinach, cabbage from retail market were irradiated O.5 kGy and 1.0 kGy using a {sup 60} Co facility. Irradiation treatment guaranteed at least 2 log cycle reduction for aerobic and psychotropic microorganisms. In general, with increasing radiation doses, DEFT counts remained similar independent of irradiation processing while APC counts decreased gradually. The difference of the two counts gradually increased with dose increment in all samples. It could be suggested that a DEFT/APC difference over 2.0 log would be a criteria to judge if a MPV was treated by irradiation. DNA Comet Assay allowed distinguishing non-irradiated samples from irradiated ones, which showed different types of comets owing to DNA fragmentation. Both DEFT/APC method and DNA Comet Assay would be satisfactorily used as a screening method for indicating irradiation processing. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the diagnostic performance and operational characteristics of four rapid immunochromatographic syphilis tests in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocoum, Fadima Yaya; Ouédraogo, Henri; Tarnagda, Grissoum; Kiba, Alice; Tiendrebeogo, Simon; Bationo, Fabrice; Liestman, Benjamin; Diagbouga, Serge; Zarowsky, Christina; Traoré, Ramata Ouédraogo; Kouanda, Séni

    2015-06-01

    Little information is available on the rapid diagnostic testing for syphilis in Burkina Faso. The objectives of the study were (i) to assess the sensitivity and specificity of four on site rapid tests in comparison with Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) as a gold standard and (ii) to evaluate the operational characteristics of those tests among health workers in a maternity unit. Four rapid syphilis tests commercially available in Burkina Faso were evaluated using archived serum samples and Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) as the gold standard. Blood samples were collected between November 2011 and June 2012 from blood donors at the Regional Blood Transfusion Center of Ouagadougou. The sensitivity and specificity of the tests were calculated. Evaluation of operational characteristics such as clarity of pamphlet, complexity of technique, duration, was conducted in a first-level healthcare center with health workers in maternity unit. Alere DetermineTM Syphilis was the most sensitive of the four rapid syphilis tests evaluated. It was followed by SD Bioline Syphilis 3.0, Cypress Diagnostics Syphilis Quick test and Accu-Tell ® Rapid Anti-TP, which was the least sensitive. The four tests demonstrated a good diagnostic specificity for syphilis (95-98%), and healthcare workers found them easy to use. The study allowed confirming the good performance of three of four rapid syphilis tests in Burkina Faso. More research will be conducted to assess the feasibility of introducing selected rapid tests for syphilis in antenatal care services.

  1. Sequence analysis of Leukemia DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacong, Nasria; Lusiyanti, Desy; Irawan, Muhammad. Isa

    2018-03-01

    Cancer is a very deadly disease, one of which is leukemia disease or better known as blood cancer. The cancer cell can be detected by taking DNA in laboratory test. This study focused on local alignment of leukemia and non leukemia data resulting from NCBI in the form of DNA sequences by using Smith-Waterman algorithm. SmithWaterman algorithm was invented by TF Smith and MS Waterman in 1981. These algorithms try to find as much as possible similarity of a pair of sequences, by giving a negative value to the unequal base pair (mismatch), and positive values on the same base pair (match). So that will obtain the maximum positive value as the end of the alignment, and the minimum value as the initial alignment. This study will use sequences of leukemia and 3 sequences of non leukemia.

  2. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  3. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  4. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  5. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  6. Dna fingerprinting - review paper

    OpenAIRE

    Blundell, Renald

    2006-01-01

    Before the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was established, DNA fingerprinting technology has relied for years on Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Variable Number of Tandom Repeats (VNTR) analysis, a very efficient technique but quite laborious and not suitable for high throughput mapping. Since its, development, PCR has provided a new and powerful tool for DNA fingerprinting.

  7. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thanks to the pioneering research work of Lindahl, Sancar, Modrich and their colleagues, we now have an holistic awareness of how DNA damage occurs and how the damage is rectified in bacteria as well as in higher organisms including human beings. A comprehensive understanding of DNA repair has proven crucial ...

  8. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  9. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2018-05-15

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  10. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange

  11. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  12. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  13. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (hrHPV) E6/E7 mRNA Testing by PreTect HPV-Proofer for Detection of Cervical High-Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Cancer among hrHPV DNA-Positive Women with Normal Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkaart, D. C.; Heideman, D. A. M.; Coupe, V. M. H.; Brink, A. A. T. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.; Skomedal, H.; Karlsen, F.; Morland, E.; Snijders, P. J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether high-risk HPV (hrHPV) mRNA detection by PreTect HPV-Proofer can be used to stratify hrHPV DNA-positive women of different cytology classes for risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or worse (cervical precancer or cancer, i.e., cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher [≥CIN2]). A total of 375 women participating in population-based screening, with a GP5+/6+-PCR hrHPV DNA-positive cervical scrape with normal cytology (n = 202), borderline or mild dyskaryosis (BMD) (n = 88), or moderate dyskaryosis or worse (>BMD) (n = 85), were enrolled. Cervical scrapes were additionally subjected to HPV16/18/31/33/45 E6/E7 mRNA analysis by PreTect HPV-Proofer (mRNA test). Referral and follow-up policies were based on cytology, hrHPV DNA, and mRNA testing. The primary study endpoint was the number of ≥CIN2 detected within 3 years of follow-up. The mRNA positivity increased with the severity of cytological abnormality, ranging from 32% (64/202) in hrHPV DNA-positive women with normal cytology to 47% (41/88) in BMD and 68% (58/85) in >BMD groups (P cytology, i.e., 0.55 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.34 to 0.76) in mRNA-positive versus 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.33) in mRNA-negative women. In hrHPV DNA-positive women with BMD or >BMD, the result of the mRNA test did not influence the ≥CIN2 risk. In conclusion, mRNA testing by PreTect HPV-Proofer might be of value to select hrHPV DNA-positive women with normal cytology in need of immediate referral for colposcopy. PMID:22553244

  14. The Need for Cervical Cancer Control in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women from Romania by Primary Prevention and by Early Detection Using Clinically Validated HPV/DNA Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Gabriela Ursu

    Full Text Available In Romania, a country with no organized national surveillance program regarding cervical cancer, the early diagnosis of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus infections is a major requirement, especially in HIV-infected women. The objective of this study was to determine the HPV prevalence and type distribution in young HIV-positive women and to assess the difference in the risk factors for developing cervical cancer compared to those of HIV-negative women.We conducted one cross-sectional cohort study from June 2013-September 2014, including 1,032 women: 992 HIV- women who were 36.5 years old (limits: 17 ÷ 84 and 40 HIV + women who were 22.9 years old (limits: 17 ÷ 30 with iatrogenic HIV infected. We detected HPV types with the Linear Array HPV Genotyping test (Roche, Romania.DNA/HPV was detected in 18/40 (45% of the HIV+ patients and in 350/992 (35.2% of the HIV- patients (OR = 1.5, 95%CI 0.76÷2.96. After age adjustment, the overall HPV prevalence was 51.6% in HIV+ versus 63.2% in HIV- women aged under 25, and 22.2% in HPV+ versus 47.2% in HIV- women aged 25-34. We detect HIV being a risk factor for acquiring multiple HPV type infections (OR = 2.30, 95% CI 0.88÷5.97. The eight most common HPV types (high-risk, and low-risk for women below age 30, HIV+ / - were: HPV 16, 18, 31, 51, 58, 68, and 6 and 82 respectively. To assess the risk factors of HIV-positive women for acquiring HPV infection, we analyzed the CD4/μL, ARN/HIV copies/μL, the age group, the number of sexual partners, smoking, and the type of HPV infection (single versus multiple infections. We found that the number of sexual partners and smoking are statistically significant risk factors.Even though there are no significant differences regarding the prevalence of HPV infection in HIV + versus HIV - patients, multiple infections were more frequent in the first group. In our study group young HIV-infected patients under HAART therapy, high number of sexual partners (more than 3 and smoking

  15. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly...... talk considerably different languages. It thus is fundamental to address this issue of communication about results of forensic DNA analyses, and open a dialogue with practicing non-scientists at large who need to make meaningful use of scientific results to approach and help solve judicial cases...

  16. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  17. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Structure determination of uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Hege Lynum; Johnson, Kenneth A; McVey, Colin E; Leiros, Ingar; Moe, Elin

    2015-10-01

    Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) is a DNA-repair enzyme in the base-excision repair (BER) pathway which removes uracil from DNA. Here, the crystal structure of UNG from the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrUNG) in complex with DNA is reported at a resolution of 1.35 Å. Prior to the crystallization experiments, the affinity between DrUNG and different DNA oligonucleotides was tested by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). As a result of this analysis, two 16 nt double-stranded DNAs were chosen for the co-crystallization experiments, one of which (16 nt AU) resulted in well diffracting crystals. The DNA in the co-crystal structure contained an abasic site (substrate product) flipped into the active site of the enzyme, with no uracil in the active-site pocket. Despite the high resolution, it was not possible to fit all of the terminal nucleotides of the DNA complex into electron density owing to disorder caused by a lack of stabilizing interactions. However, the DNA which was in contact with the enzyme, close to the active site, was well ordered and allowed detailed analysis of the enzyme-DNA interaction. The complex revealed that the interaction between DrUNG and DNA is similar to that in the previously determined crystal structure of human UNG (hUNG) in complex with DNA [Slupphaug et al. (1996). Nature (London), 384, 87-92]. Substitutions in a (here defined) variable part of the leucine loop result in a shorter loop (eight residues instead of nine) in DrUNG compared with hUNG; regardless of this, it seems to fulfil its role and generate a stabilizing force with the minor groove upon flipping out of the damaged base into the active site. The structure also provides a rationale for the previously observed high catalytic efficiency of DrUNG caused by high substrate affinity by demonstrating an increased number of long-range electrostatic interactions between the enzyme and the DNA. Interestingly, specific interactions between residues

  19. DNA Profiles from Fingerprint Lifts-Enhancing the Evidential Value of Fingermarks Through Successful DNA Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Zuhaib; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2018-05-25

    This study evaluated the compatibility of the most common enhancement methods and lifting techniques with DNA profiling. Emphasis is placed on modern lifting techniques (i.e., gelatin lifters and Isomark™) and historical fingerprint lifts for which limited research has been previously conducted. A total of 180 fingerprints were deposited on a glass surface, enhanced, lifted, and processed for DNA typing. DNA could be extracted and profiled for all the powders and lifts tested and from both groomed fingerprints and natural prints with no significant difference in the percentage of profile recovered. DNA profiles could also be obtained from historical fingerprint lifts (79.2% of 72 lifts) with one or more alleles detected. These results demonstrate the compatibility between different powder/lift combinations and DNA profiling therefore augmenting the evidential value of fingerprints in forensic casework. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-Rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S.; Pham, M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses. Experimental Mycology 17, 309-322. Isolates of Colletotrichum were grouped into 10 separate species based on arbitrarily primed PCR (ap-PCR), A + T-rich DNA (AT-DNA) and nuclear DNA banding patterns. In general, the grouping of Colletotrichum isolates by these molecular approaches corresponded to that done by classical taxonomic identification, however, some exceptions were observed. PCR amplification of genomic DNA using four different primers allowed for reliable differentiation between isolates of the 10 species. HaeIII digestion patterns of AT-DNA also distinguished between species of Colletotrichum by generating species-specific band patterns. In addition, hybridization of the repetitive DNA element (GcpR1) to genomic DNA identified a unique set of Pst 1-digested nuclear DNA fragments in each of the 10 species of Colletotrichum tested. Multiple isolates of C. acutatum, C. coccodes, C. fragariae, C. lindemuthianum, C. magna, C. orbiculare, C. graminicola from maize, and C. graminicola from sorghum showed 86-100% intraspecies similarity based on ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses. Interspecies similarity determined by ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses varied between 0 and 33%. Three distinct banding patterns were detected in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry. Similarly, three different banding patterns were observed among isolates of C. musae from diseased banana.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF ANIMAL ADHESIVES USING DNA AMPLIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Anne Marie; Kristensen, Hans Viborg; Bøllingtoft, Peder

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether DNA was degraded in the manufacturing of animal glue. To test this, two different types of sturgeon glue (Acipenser sp.) were manufactured using historic recipes. One glue was boiled for a substantial amount of time and the other was kept under 75°C. DNA...... of the glue and in 18 out of 24 samples collected of the canvas. In four out of the five cases where it was not possible amplify DNA, the sample belongs to the smallest size of the canvas investigated. As shown in this study it is possible to get DNA out of boiled animal glue and glue applied onto canvas...

  2. DNA content in radiation-associated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorowski, R.A.; Deaconson, T.F.; Vetsch, R.; Cerletty, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    DNA content has been reported to be of prognostic significance in differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since malignant tumors with irradiation as an initiator often contain DNA aberrations, the DNA content of well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma in patients with a prior history of low-dose head and neck irradiation was determined and compared with similar nonradiation-associated lesions. The DNA content of thyroid cancers from 53 patients was determined with use of flow cytometry. Sixteen radiation-associated thyroid carcinomas (11 papillary, 3 follicular, and 2 medullary) all were diploid. In a group of 37 nonradiation-associated tumors, 10 were aneuploid (10 of 29 papillary carcinomas and 0 of 2 follicular or 6 medullary carcinomas). This difference in DNA content is significant (p less than 0.02, Fisher's exact test). These findings were unexpected and suggest that if the initiating irradiation causes a DNA aberration, this aberration is not reflected in DNA content as measured by means of flow cytometry

  3. Environmental DNA (eDNA sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive burmese pythons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Hunter

    Full Text Available Environmental DNA (eDNA methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus, Northern African python (P. sebae, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor, and the green (Eunectes murinus and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus. Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive

  4. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive burmese pythons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Dorazio, Robert M; Fike, Jennifer A; Smith, Brian J; Hunter, Charles T; Reed, Robert N; Hart, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), Northern African python (P. sebae), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and the green (Eunectes murinus) and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus). Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive constrictors

  5. Environmental DNA (eDNA) Detection Probability Is Influenced by Seasonal Activity of Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lesley S; Godwin, James C; Renshaw, Mark A; Larson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) holds great promise for conservation applications like the monitoring of invasive or imperiled species, yet this emerging technique requires ongoing testing in order to determine the contexts over which it is effective. For example, little research to date has evaluated how seasonality of organism behavior or activity may influence detection probability of eDNA. We applied eDNA to survey for two highly imperiled species endemic to the upper Black Warrior River basin in Alabama, US: the Black Warrior Waterdog (Necturus alabamensis) and the Flattened Musk Turtle (Sternotherus depressus). Importantly, these species have contrasting patterns of seasonal activity, with N. alabamensis more active in the cool season (October-April) and S. depressus more active in the warm season (May-September). We surveyed sites historically occupied by these species across cool and warm seasons over two years with replicated eDNA water samples, which were analyzed in the laboratory using species-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. We then used occupancy estimation with detection probability modeling to evaluate both the effects of landscape attributes on organism presence and season of sampling on detection probability of eDNA. Importantly, we found that season strongly affected eDNA detection probability for both species, with N. alabamensis having higher eDNA detection probabilities during the cool season and S. depressus have higher eDNA detection probabilities during the warm season. These results illustrate the influence of organismal behavior or activity on eDNA detection in the environment and identify an important role for basic natural history in designing eDNA monitoring programs.

  6. Nanostructures via DNA scaffold metallization

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, C.; Zinchenko, A.; Baigl, D.; Pyshkina, O.; Sergeyev, V.; Endo, Kazunaka; Yoshikawa, K.

    2005-01-01

    The critical role of polymers in process of noble metals nanostructures formation is well known, however, the use of DNA chain template in this process is yet largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate different ways of silver deposition on DNA template and report the influence of silver nanostructures formation on DNA conformational state. Metallization of DNA chain proceeds by two different scenarios depending on DNA conformation. If DNA chain is unfolded (elongated) chain, silver reduct...

  7. Beware of the possibility of fingerprinting techniques transferring DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorschot, Roland A H; Treadwell, Sally; Beaurepaire, James; Holding, Nicole L; Mitchell, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Fingerprinting brushes have the potential to collect and transfer DNA during powdering. Squirrel-hair fingerprint brushes exposed to specific sets of saliva stains and brushes used in routine casework were tested for their ability to collect and transfer DNA containing material using standard DNA extraction procedures and AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus amplification and typing procedures. The tests found that the risk of transferring DNA during powdering and having a detrimental impact on the analysis increases if the examiner powders over either biological stains (such as blood or saliva) or very fresh prints and uses more sensitive PCR amplification and typing procedures. We advocate caution when powdering prints from which DNA may also be collected and provide options for consideration to limit the risk of transferred DNA contamination while fingerprinting.

  8. DNA damage and polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jeremy; Poon, Randy Y C

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that polyploidization triggers chromosomal instability and contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA damage is increasingly being recognized for its roles in promoting polyploidization. Although elegant mechanisms known as the DNA damage checkpoints are responsible for halting the cell cycle after DNA damage, agents that uncouple the checkpoints can induce unscheduled entry into mitosis. Likewise, defects of the checkpoints in several disorders permit mitotic entry even in the presence of DNA damage. Forcing cells with damaged DNA into mitosis causes severe chromosome segregation defects, including lagging chromosomes, chromosomal fragments and chromosomal bridges. The presence of these lesions in the cleavage plane is believed to abort cytokinesis. It is postulated that if cytokinesis failure is coupled with defects of the p53-dependent postmitotic checkpoint pathway, cells can enter S phase and become polyploids. Progress in the past several years has unraveled some of the underlying principles of these pathways and underscored the important role of DNA damage in polyploidization. Furthermore, polyploidization per se may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to DNA damage, thereby may offer an opportunity for novel therapies.

  9. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  10. Mutagenesis and repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janion, C.; Grzesiuk, E.; Fabisiewicz, A.; Tudek, B.; Ciesla, J.; Graziewicz, M.; Wojcik, A.; Speina, E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. The discovery that the mfd gene codes for a transcription-coupling repair factor (TRCF) prompted us to re-investigate the MFD (mutation frequency decline) phenomenon in E.coli K-12 strain when mutations were induced by ultraviolet light, halogen light or MMS-treatment. These studies revealed that: (i) the process of MFD involves the proofreading activity of DNA pol III and the mismatch repair system, as well as, TRCF and the UvrABC-excinuclease (ii) a semi-rich plate test may be replaced by a rich liquid medium, (iii) the T-T pyrimidine dimers are the lesions excised with the highest activity, and (iv) overproduction of UmuD(D'C) proteins leads to a great increase in mutant frequency in irradiated and MMS-treated cells. The role of mismatch repair (MR) in MMS-induced mutagenesis is obscured by the fact that the spectra of mutational specificity are different in bacteria proficient and deficient in MR. It has been found that transposons Tn10 (and Tn5) when inserted into chromosomal DNA of E. coli influence the phenotype lowering the survival and frequency of mutations induced by UV or halogen light irradiation. This is connected with a deficiency of UmuD(D') and UmuC proteins. Transformation of bacteria with plasmids bearing the umuD(D')C genes, suppresses the effects of the transposon insertion, a phenomenon which has not been described before. Single-stranded DNA of M13mp18 phage was oxidized in vitro by a hydroxyl radical generating system including hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase/Fe3+/EDTA, and it was found that Fapy-Ade, Fapy-Gua, 8-oxyAde and thymine glycol were the main products formed. Replication of the oxidized template by T7 phage DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, or polymerase beta from bovine thymus has revealed that oxidized pyrimidines are stronger blockers than oxidized purines for T7 phage and Klenow fragment polymerases and the blocking potency depends on the neighboring bases and on the type of polymerase. Studies of

  11. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  13. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  14. Extraction of genomic DNA from Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Meliponinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Waldschmidt, Ana Maria; Salomão, Tânia Maria Fernandes; Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves de; Campos, Lúcio de Antônio Oliveira

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to test three different procedures for DNA extraction of Melipona quadrifasciata based on existing methods for DNA extraction of Apis, plants and fungi. These methods differ in the concentrations of specific substances in the extraction buffer. The results demonstrate that the method used for Apis is not adequate for DNA extraction from M. quadrifasciata. On the other hand, with minor modifications this method and the methods for plants and fungi were ad...

  15. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  16. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... with viral-vectored vaccines, various synergistic components may need to be incorporated into DNA vaccines. From the perspective of the future clinical use of DNA vaccines, it has been suggested that antigen presentation should be improved and cytokine coadministration attempted. However, even...

  17. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  18. Retroviral DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  19. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelow, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10 4 fold

  20. DNA-Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2010-01-01

    DNA-nanostrukturer giver nye muligheder for studier af individuelle molekyler. Ved at udnytte DNAs unikke selvsamlende egenskaber kan man designe systemer, hvorpå der kan studeres kemiske reaktioner, fluoroforer og biiomolekyler på enkeltmolekyle-niveau....

  1. DNA Microarray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content DNA Microarray Technology Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  2. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  3. Close encounters with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  4. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  5. Close encounters with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C; Yoo, J; Comer, J; Wells, D B; Luan, B; Aksimentiev, A

    2014-10-15

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena. We also discuss the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field.

  6. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  7. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  8. DNA to DNA transcription might exist in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gao-De

    2016-01-01

    Till now, in biological sciences, the term, transcription, mainly refers to DNA to RNA transcription. But our recently published experimental findings obtained from Plasmodium falciparum strongly suggest the existence of DNA to DNA transcription in the genome of eukaryotic cells, which could shed some light on the functions of certain noncoding DNA in the human and other eukaryotic genomes.

  9. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Niederstätter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster C...... a laboratory-specific optimization process is indicated to reach a comparable sensitivity for the analysis of minute amounts of DNA....

  10. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  11. Das DNA-Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  12. Racemic DNA Crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal , Pradeep K.; Collie , Gavin W.; Kauffmann , Brice; Huc , Ivan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of Land D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propens...

  13. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Introduction to DNA methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this session is to discuss the various possibilities for detecting modifications in DNA after irradiation and whether these changes can be utilized as an indicator for the irradiation treatment of foods. The requirement to be fulfilled is that the method be able to distinguish irradiated food without the presence of a control sample, thus the measured response after irradiation must be large enough to supersede background levels from other treatments. Much work has been performed on the effects of radiation on DNA, particularly due to its importance in radiation biology. The main lesions of DNA as a result of irradiation are base damage, damage of the sugar moiety, single strand and double strand breaks. Crosslinking between bases also occurs, e.g. production of thymine dimers, or between DNA and protein. A valuable review on how to utilize these DNA changes for detection purposes has already appeared. Tables 1, 2 and 3 list the proposed methods of detecting changes in irradiated DNA, some identified products as examples for a possible irradiation indicator, in the case of immunoassay the substance used as antigen, and some selected literature references. In this short review, it is not intended to provide a complete literature survey

  15. Variations in brain DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus eAvila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain.

  16. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  17. Extrachromosomal circles of satellite repeats and 5S ribosomal DNA in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Sarit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrachomosomal circular DNA (eccDNA is ubiquitous in eukaryotic organisms and was detected in every organism tested, including in humans. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis facilitates the detection of eccDNA in preparations of genomic DNA. Using this technique we have previously demonstrated that most of eccDNA consists of exact multiples of chromosomal tandemly repeated DNA, including both coding genes and satellite DNA. Results Here we report the occurrence of eccDNA in every tested human cell line. It has heterogeneous mass ranging from less than 2 kb to over 20 kb. We describe eccDNA homologous to human alpha satellite and the SstI mega satellite. Moreover, we show, for the first time, circular multimers of the human 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA, similar to previous findings in Drosophila and plants. We further demonstrate structures that correspond to intermediates of rolling circle replication, which emerge from the circular multimers of 5S rDNA and SstI satellite. Conclusions These findings, and previous reports, support the general notion that every chromosomal tandem repeat is prone to generate eccDNA in eukryoric organisms including humans. They suggest the possible involvement of eccDNA in the length variability observed in arrays of tandem repeats. The implications of eccDNA on genome biology may include mechanisms of centromere evolution, concerted evolution and homogenization of tandem repeats and genomic plasticity.

  18. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    a transient peak at 6 hours, and in Rheinheimera the concentration peaked at 12 hours and remained high. Interestingly, the Rheinheimera biofilm dispersed immediately after the eDNA concentration peaked. The antimicrobial effect of eDNA was tested in growth experiments, and Rheinheimera was strongly affected...

  19. Biophysical and biochemical studies of modification of damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.S. Jr.; Warnick, A.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: tests of a proposed chemical mechanism by which incorporated 5-bromouracil may sensitize DNA to ionizing radiation; a serologic determination of uridine in irradiatd BU-substituted DNA; and reactivity of aminothiol radioprotectants with hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals

  20. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sperm DNA fragmentation, recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is increasing that the integrity of sperm DNA may also be related to implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage (RM. To investigate this, the sperm DNA fragmentation in partners of 35 women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF following in vitro fertilization, 16 women diagnosed with RM and seven recent fathers (control were examined. Sperm were examined pre- and post-density centrifugation by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD test and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. There were no significant differences in the age of either partner or sperm concentration, motility or morphology between three groups. Moreover, there were no obvious differences in sperm DNA fragmentation measured by either test. However, whilst on average sperm DNA fragmentation in all groups was statistically lower in prepared sperm when measured by the SCD test, this was not seen with the results from the TUNEL assay. These results do not support the hypothesis that sperm DNA fragmentation is an important cause of RIF or RM, or that sperm DNA integrity testing has value in such patients. It also highlights significant differences between test methodologies and sperm preparation methods in interpreting the data from sperm DNA fragmentation tests.

  2. Blood extracellular DNA after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.G.; Tishchenko, L.I.; Surkova, E.A.; Vasil'eva, I.N.

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that blood extracellular DNA of irradiated rats largely consists of the low-molecular DNA and its oligomers. Molecular masses of oligomers are multiple to molecular mass of monomer fragment with nucleosome size. The low-molecular DNA has linear form. The average content of GC-pairs in low-molecular DNA is higher than in total rat's DNA (48.5% against 41.5%). The low-molecular DNA is a part of complex containing RNA, acidic proteins and lipids. It is assumed that the formation of low-molecular DNA is a result of Ca/Mg - dependent nuclear endonuclease action

  3. DNA Knots: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, D. W.

    Cellular DNA is a long, thread-like molecule with remarkably complex topology. Enzymes that manipulate the geometry and topology of cellular DNA perform many vital cellular processes (including segregation of daughter chromosomes, gene regulation, DNA repair, and generation of antibody diversity). Some enzymes pass DNA through itself via enzyme-bridged transient breaks in the DNA; other enzymes break the DNA apart and reconnect it to different ends. In the topological approach to enzymology, circular DNA is incubated with an enzyme, producing an enzyme signature in the form of DNA knots and links. By observing the changes in DNA geometry (supercoiling) and topology (knotting and linking) due to enzyme action, the enzyme binding and mechanism can often be characterized. This paper will discuss some personal research history, and the tangle model for the analysis of site-specific recombination experiments on circular DNA.

  4. Weathered antlers as a source of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy G. Lopez; Paul Beier

    2012-01-01

    We tested antlers of Coues white-tailed (Odocoileus virginianus couesi) and mule deer (O. hemionus) in various stages of natural decomposition to determine the degree of weathering that cast antlers could endure and still yield usable DNA. Based on physical characteristics, we partitioned antlers into 7 weathering categories ranging from freshly cast (class 1) to...

  5. Prenatal Cell-Free DNA Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poses no physical risks for you or your baby. While prenatal cell-free DNA screening might cause anxiety, it might help you avoid the need for more invasive tests, treatment or monitoring during your pregnancy. Keep in mind, however, that ...

  6. Alkylation Induced DNA Repair and Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-23

    unrepaired 3-methyladenine in DNA 29 2.4.1 Cytotoxic effects of persisting m3A in DNA 30 2.4.2 Mutagenic bypass synthesis of depurinat ,d DNA 30 3 CONCLUDING...induced by a single exposure to the ca’rcinogen N- methyl-N- nitrosourea (MNU) due to activation of the malignant Ha-ras-i locus. Analysis of the induced...ing CO:A uolymerase I for repair synthesis . Since DNA polymerase I would be required to complete repair after the in~uial activity of TagII, we tested

  7. Comparison of Suitability of the Most Common Ancient DNA Quantification Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzobohatá, Kristýna; Drozdová, Eva; Smutný, Jiří; Zeman, Tomáš; Beňuš, Radoslav

    2017-04-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) extracted from historical bones is damaged and fragmented into short segments, present in low quantity, and usually copurified with microbial DNA. A wide range of DNA quantification methods are available. The aim of this study was to compare the five most common DNA quantification methods for aDNA. Quantification methods were tested on DNA extracted from skeletal material originating from an early medieval burial site. The tested methods included ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on SYBR ® green detection, real-time qPCR based on a forensic kit, quantification via fluorescent dyes bonded to DNA, and fragmentary analysis. Differences between groups were tested using a paired t-test. Methods that measure total DNA present in the sample (NanoDrop ™ UV spectrophotometer and Qubit ® fluorometer) showed the highest concentrations. Methods based on real-time qPCR underestimated the quantity of aDNA. The most accurate method of aDNA quantification was fragmentary analysis, which also allows DNA quantification of the desired length and is not affected by PCR inhibitors. Methods based on the quantification of the total amount of DNA in samples are unsuitable for ancient samples as they overestimate the amount of DNA presumably due to the presence of microbial DNA. Real-time qPCR methods give undervalued results due to DNA damage and the presence of PCR inhibitors. DNA quantification methods based on fragment analysis show not only the quantity of DNA but also fragment length.

  8. Incorporating DNA sequencing into current prenatal screening practice for Down's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prenatal screening for Down's syndrome is performed using biochemical and ultrasound markers measured in early pregnancy such as the Integrated test using first and second trimester markers. Recently, DNA sequencing methods have been introduced on free DNA in maternal plasma, yielding a high screening performance. These methods are expensive and there is a test failure rate. We determined the screening performance of merging the Integrated test with the newer DNA techniques in a protocol that substantially reduces the cost compared with universal DNA testing and still achieves high screening performance with no test failures. METHODS: Published data were used to model screening performance of a protocol in which all women receive the first stage of the Integrated test at about 11 weeks of pregnancy. On the basis of this higher risk women have reflex DNA testing and lower risk women as well as those with a failed DNA test complete the Integrated test at about 15 weeks. RESULTS: The overall detection rate was 95% with a 0.1% false-positive rate if 20% of women were selected to receive DNA testing. If all women had DNA testing the detection rate would be 3 to 4 percentage points higher with a false-positive rate 30 times greater if women with failed tests were treated as positive and offered a diagnostic amniocentesis, or 3 times greater if they had a second trimester screening test (Quadruple test and treated as positive only if this were positive. The cost per women screened would be about one-fifth, compared with universal DNA testing, if the DNA test were 20 times the cost of the Integrated test. CONCLUSION: The proposed screening protocol achieves a high screening performance without programme test failures and at a substantially lower cost than offering all women DNA testing.

  9. Rapid assessment of the effect of ciprofloxacin on chromosomal DNA from Escherichia coli using an in situ DNA fragmentation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosalvez Jaime

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones are extensively used antibiotics that induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by trapping DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV on DNA. This effect is usually evaluated using biochemical or molecular procedures, but these are not effective at the single-cell level. We assessed ciprofloxacin (CIP-induced chromosomal DNA breakage in single-cell Escherichia coli by direct visualization of the DNA fragments that diffused from the nucleoid obtained after bacterial lysis in an agarose microgel on a slide. Results Exposing the E. coli strain TG1 to CIP starting at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 0.012 μg/ml and at increasing doses for 40 min increased the DNA fragmentation progressively. DNA damage started to be detectable at the MIC dose. At a dose of 1 μg/ml of CIP, DNA damage was visualized clearly immediately after processing, and the DNA fragmentation increased progressively with the antibiotic incubation time. The level of DNA damage was much higher when the bacteria were taken from liquid LB broth than from solid LB agar. CIP treatment produced a progressively slower rate of DNA damage in bacteria in the stationary phase than in the exponentially growing phase. Removing the antibiotic after the 40 min incubation resulted in progressive DSB repair activity with time. The magnitude of DNA repair was inversely related to CIP dose and was noticeable after incubation with CIP at 0.1 μg/ml but scarce after 10 μg/ml. The repair activity was not strictly related to viability. Four E. coli strains with identified mechanisms of reduced sensitivity to CIP were assessed using this procedure and produced DNA fragmentation levels that were inversely related to MIC dose, except those with very high MIC dose. Conclusion This procedure for determining DNA fragmentation is a simple and rapid test for studying and evaluating the effect of quinolones.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of conventional cytology and HPV DNA testing for cervical cancer screening in Colombia Costo-efectividad de la citología y la tamización con pruebas de ADN-VPH para cáncer de cuello uterino en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Andrés-Gamboa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess cost-effectiveness of conventional cytology and HPV DNA testing for cervical-cancer screening in Colombia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The National Cancer Institute of Colombia (NCIC in 2007 developed a Markov model on the natural history of cervical cancer; no screening, conventional cytology, and HPV DNA testing were compared. Only direct costs were used. Outcomes comprise cervical cancer mortality, years of life saved, and lifetime costs. Discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were estimated and sensitivity analyses were conducted for key parameters. RESULTS: Depending on the screening strategy a 69-81% mortality reduction might be expected. The HPV DNA testing every five years is a cost-effective strategy (Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER: USD$44/YLS if the cost per test is under USD$31. The effectiveness was sensitive to coverage and primarily to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: HPV DNA testing is a cost-effective alternative for screening in Colombia. Not only high coverage but high follow-up rates are critical for successful screening programs.OBJETIVO: evaluar el costo-efectividad de la citología convencional y la prueba de ADN-VPH para tamización de cáncer cervical en Colombia. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología de Colombia construyó en 2007 un modelo de Markov de historia natural del cáncer cervical. Se comparó "no tamización", citología convencional y prueba de ADN-VPH. Se utilizaron costos directos. Los desenlaces fueron mortalidad, años de vida ganados y costos. Se calcularon razones de costo-efectividad incremental. Se realizaron análisis de sensibilidad para parámetros clave. RESULTADOS: la mortalidad se redujo 69-81% según la estrategia. La tamización con ADN-VPH cada cinco años es costo-efectiva (ICER (Razón de Costo-Efectividad incremental por sus siglas en inglés: 44 dólares por año de vida saludable si los costos por prueba son menores a 31 dólares. La

  11. Transcription-induced DNA supercoiling: New roles of intranucleosomal DNA loops in DNA repair and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, N S; Pestov, N A; Kulaeva, O I; Clark, D J; Studitsky, V M

    2016-05-26

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription through chromatin is accompanied by formation of small intranucleosomal DNA loops. Pol II captured within a small loop drives accumulation of DNA supercoiling, facilitating further transcription. DNA breaks relieve supercoiling and induce Pol II arrest, allowing detection of DNA damage hidden in chromatin structure.

  12. Sensitive Leptospira DNA detection using tapered optical fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Nurul H; Chee, Hui Y; Ahmad, Muhammad Z; Mahdi, Mohd A; Abu Bakar, Muhammad H; Yaacob, Mohd H

    2018-03-23

    This paper presents the development of tapered optical fiber sensor to detect a specific Leptospira bacteria DNA. The bacteria causes Leptospirosis, a deadly disease but with common early flu-like symptoms. Optical single mode fiber (SMF) of 125 μm diameter is tapered to produce 12 μm waist diameter and 15 cm length. The novel DNA-based optical fiber sensor is functionalized by incubating the tapered region with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde. Probe DNA is immobilized onto the tapered region and subsequently hybridized by its complementary DNA (cDNA). The transmission spectra of the DNA-based optical fiber sensor are measured in the 1500 to 1600 nm wavelength range. It is discovered that the shift of the wavelength in the SMF sensor is linearly proportional with the increase in the cDNA concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0 nM. The sensitivity of the sensor toward DNA is measured to be 1.2862 nm/nM and able to detect as low as 0.1 fM. The sensor indicates high specificity when only minimal shift is detected for non-cDNA testing. The developed sensor is able to distinguish between actual DNA of Leptospira serovars (Canicola and Copenhageni) against Clostridium difficile (control sample) at very low (femtomolar) target concentrations. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Damaging the Integrated HIV Proviral DNA with TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Strong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrates its proviral DNA genome into the host genome, presenting barriers for virus eradication. Several new gene-editing technologies have emerged that could potentially be used to damage integrated proviral DNA. In this study, we use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the transactivation response element (TAR of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. We demonstrated that TALENs cleave a DNA template with the HIV-1 proviral target site in vitro. A GFP reporter, under control of HIV-1 TAR, was efficiently inactivated by mutations introduced by transfection of TALEN plasmids. When infected cells containing the full-length integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA were transfected with TALENs, the TAR region accumulated indels. When one of these mutants was tested, the mutated HIV-1 proviral DNA was incapable of producing detectable Gag expression. TALEN variants engineered for degenerate recognition of select nucleotide positions also cleaved proviral DNA in vitro and the full-length integrated proviral DNA genome in living cells. These results suggest a possible design strategy for the therapeutic considerations of incomplete target sequence conservation and acquired resistance mutations. We have established a new strategy for damaging integrated HIV proviral DNA that may have future potential for HIV-1 proviral DNA eradication.

  14. DNA hybridization sensor based on pentacene thin film transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Min; Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Chand, Rohit; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2011-01-15

    A DNA hybridization sensor using pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs) is an excellent candidate for disposable sensor applications due to their low-cost fabrication process and fast detection. We fabricated pentacene TFTs on glass substrate for the sensing of DNA hybridization. The ss-DNA (polyA/polyT) or ds-DNA (polyA/polyT hybrid) were immobilized directly on the surface of the pentacene, producing a dramatic change in the electrical properties of the devices. The electrical characteristics of devices were studied as a function of DNA immobilization, single-stranded vs. double-stranded DNA, DNA length and concentration. The TFT device was further tested for detection of λ-phage genomic DNA using probe hybridization. Based on these results, we propose that a "label-free" detection technique for DNA hybridization is possible through direct measurement of electrical properties of DNA-immobilized pentacene TFTs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-destructive sampling of ancient insect DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Elias, Scott; Gilbert, Tom

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major challenge for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies on insect remains is that sampling procedures involve at least partial destruction of the specimens. A recent extraction protocol reveals the possibility of obtaining DNA from past insect remains without causing visual morphological...... of 77-204 base pairs (-bp) in size using species-specific and general insect primers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The applied non-destructive DNA extraction method shows promising potential on insect museum specimens of historical age as far back as AD 1820, but less so on the ancient permafrost......-preserved insect fossil remains tested, where DNA was obtained from samples up to ca. 26,000 years old. The non-frozen sediment DNA approach appears to have great potential for recording the former presence of insect taxa not normally preserved as macrofossils and opens new frontiers in research on ancient...

  16. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.; Oke, Muse; Hamdan, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  17. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  18. Absence of specificity in inhibition of DNA repair replication by DNA-binding agents, cocarcinogens, and steroids in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Painter, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Although many chemicals, including cocarcinogens, DNA-binding agents, and steroids, inhibit repair replication of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA in human lymphocytes and proliferating cells in culture, none of these chemicals is specific. Our results show that all the chemicals we tested inhibit normal DNA synthesis as much as or more than they inhibit repair replication. There is thus no evidence in our results to support the hypothesis that cocarcinogens are specific inhibitors of DNA repair or that any of the chemicals studied might be useful adjuncts to tumor therapy merely because of specific inhibition of radiation repair mechanisms

  19. Comparative analysis of the end-joining activity of several DNA ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Bauer

    Full Text Available DNA ligases catalyze the repair of phosphate backbone breaks in DNA, acting with highest activity on breaks in one strand of duplex DNA. Some DNA ligases have also been observed to ligate two DNA fragments with short complementary overhangs or blunt-ended termini. In this study, several wild-type DNA ligases (phage T3, T4, and T7 DNA ligases, Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV1 DNA ligase, human DNA ligase 3, and Escherichia coli DNA ligase were tested for their ability to ligate DNA fragments with several difficult to ligate end structures (blunt-ended termini, 3'- and 5'- single base overhangs, and 5'-two base overhangs. This analysis revealed that T4 DNA ligase, the most common enzyme utilized for in vitro ligation, had its greatest activity on blunt- and 2-base overhangs, and poorest on 5'-single base overhangs. Other ligases had different substrate specificity: T3 DNA ligase ligated only blunt ends well; PBCV1 DNA ligase joined 3'-single base overhangs and 2-base overhangs effectively with little blunt or 5'- single base overhang activity; and human ligase 3 had highest activity on blunt ends and 5'-single base overhangs. There is no correlation of activity among ligases on blunt DNA ends with their activity on single base overhangs. In addition, DNA binding domains (Sso7d, hLig3 zinc finger, and T4 DNA ligase N-terminal domain were fused to PBCV1 DNA ligase to explore whether modified binding to DNA would lead to greater activity on these difficult to ligate substrates. These engineered ligases showed both an increased binding affinity for DNA and increased activity, but did not alter the relative substrate preferences of PBCV1 DNA ligase, indicating active site structure plays a role in determining substrate preference.

  20. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D.; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100–200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how “normal” copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a “normal” rDNA copy number. PMID:28915237

  1. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  2. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Salim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  3. DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts requires DNA polymerase delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, C.; Reinhard, P.; Linn, S.

    1988-01-01

    When UV-irradiated cultured diploid human fibroblasts were permeabilized with Brij-58 then separated from soluble material by centrifugation, conservative DNA repair synthesis could be restored by a soluble factor obtained from the supernatant of similarly treated HeLa cells. Extensive purification of this factor yielded a 10.2 S, 220,000-dalton polypeptide with the DNA polymerase and 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activities reported for DNA polymerase delta II. Monoclonal antibody to KB cell DNA polymerase alpha, while binding to HeLa DNA polymerase alpha, did not bind to the HeLa DNA polymerase delta. Moreover, at micromolar concentrations N2-(p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BuPdGTP) and 2-(p-n-butylanilino)-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate (BuAdATP) were potent inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha, but did not inhibit the DNA polymerase delta. Neither purified DNA polymerase alpha nor beta could promote repair DNA synthesis in the permeabilized cells. Furthermore, under conditions which inhibited purified DNA polymerase alpha by greater than 90%, neither monoclonal antibodies to DNA polymerase alpha, BuPdGTP, nor BuAdATP was able to inhibit significantly the DNA repair synthesis mediated by the DNA polymerase delta. Thus, it appears that a major portion of DNA repair synthesis induced by UV irradiation might be catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta. When xeroderma pigmentosum human diploid fibroblasts were utilized, DNA repair synthesis dependent upon ultraviolet light could be restored by addition of both T4 endonuclease V and DNA polymerase delta, but not by addition of either one alone

  4. DNA biosensor by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and DNA to detect riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Zhang Yunhuai, E-mail: xp2031@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Yang Tongyi [School of Life Science. NanJing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang Huai [Liming Research Institute of Chemical Industry, LuoYang, 471001 (China); Yang Yixuan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering. Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xiao Peng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The fabrication of biosensors via self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and DNA on a platinum electrode was presented in this paper. The carboxylic SWNTs were assembled on an amine-modified platinum electrode surface and followed by the assembly of NH{sub 2}-DNA with the carboxyl-amine coupling. The decorated surface was characterized by Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electrochemical experiments, which showed that the reaction of DNA-SWNTs biosensor was quasi-reversible. The mechanism of DNA and riboflavin (VB{sub 2}) was studied by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The fabricated SWNTs-reinforced biosensor exhibits high sensitivity and low detection limit for the tested VB{sub 2} compared to the reported methods.

  5. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  6. Recombinant DNA. Rifkin's regulatory revivalism runs riot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, P

    Jeremy Rifkin, activist opponent of genetic engineering, has adopted tactics of litigation, persuasion, and confrontation in his campaign to halt genetic experimentation. The Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health has often been the target of his criticism, most recently for its failure to prepare an environmental risk assessment for some DNA tests it approved. Rifkin has won support for his position from religious organizations in the United States, and in June 1983 persuaded an ecumenical group of religious leaders to ask Congress to ban genetic experiments that would affect the human germ line.

  7. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA) from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James L.; Corcoran, Claire; Brown, Helen; Sharpe, Alan D.; Musilova, Milena; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options. Materials & Methods Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits. Results 2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g) reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA). Reduced “contamination” and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT) (Streck), after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield. Conclusion This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous. PMID:26918901

  8. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options.Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits.2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA. Reduced "contamination" and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT (Streck, after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield.This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous.

  9. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, O A; Pyshnyi, D V

    2012-01-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  10. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  11. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  12. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  13. Functional Dissection of the DNA Interface of the Nucleotidyltransferase Domain of Chlorella Virus DNA Ligase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samai, Poulami; Shuman, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase (ChVLig) has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function. ChVLig consists of three structural modules that envelop nicked DNA as a C-shaped protein clamp: a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase) domain and an OB domain (these two are common to all DNA ligases) as well as a distinctive β-hairpin latch module. The NTase domain, which performs the chemical steps of ligation, binds the major groove flanking the nick and the minor groove on the 3′-OH side of the nick. Here we performed a structure-guided mutational analysis of the NTase domain, surveying the effects of 35 mutations in 19 residues on ChVLig activity in vivo and in vitro, including biochemical tests of the composite nick sealing reaction and of the three component steps of the ligation pathway (ligase adenylylation, DNA adenylylation, and phosphodiester synthesis). The results highlight (i) key contacts by Thr-84 and Lys-173 to the template DNA strand phosphates at the outer margins of the DNA ligase footprint; (ii) essential contacts of Ser-41, Arg-42, Met-83, and Phe-75 with the 3′-OH strand at the nick; (iii) Arg-176 phosphate contacts at the nick and with ATP during ligase adenylylation; (iv) the role of Phe-44 in forming the protein clamp around the nicked DNA substrate; and (v) the importance of adenine-binding residue Phe-98 in all three steps of ligation. Kinetic analysis of single-turnover nick sealing by ChVLig-AMP underscored the importance of Phe-75-mediated distortion of the nick 3′-OH nucleoside in the catalysis of DNA 5′-adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester synthesis (step 3). Induced fit of the nicked DNA into a distorted conformation when bound within the ligase clamp may account for the nick-sensing capacity of ChVLig. PMID:21335605

  14. Functional dissection of the DNA interface of the nucleotidyltransferase domain of chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samai, Poulami; Shuman, Stewart

    2011-04-15

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase (ChVLig) has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function. ChVLig consists of three structural modules that envelop nicked DNA as a C-shaped protein clamp: a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase) domain and an OB domain (these two are common to all DNA ligases) as well as a distinctive β-hairpin latch module. The NTase domain, which performs the chemical steps of ligation, binds the major groove flanking the nick and the minor groove on the 3'-OH side of the nick. Here we performed a structure-guided mutational analysis of the NTase domain, surveying the effects of 35 mutations in 19 residues on ChVLig activity in vivo and in vitro, including biochemical tests of the composite nick sealing reaction and of the three component steps of the ligation pathway (ligase adenylylation, DNA adenylylation, and phosphodiester synthesis). The results highlight (i) key contacts by Thr-84 and Lys-173 to the template DNA strand phosphates at the outer margins of the DNA ligase footprint; (ii) essential contacts of Ser-41, Arg-42, Met-83, and Phe-75 with the 3'-OH strand at the nick; (iii) Arg-176 phosphate contacts at the nick and with ATP during ligase adenylylation; (iv) the role of Phe-44 in forming the protein clamp around the nicked DNA substrate; and (v) the importance of adenine-binding residue Phe-98 in all three steps of ligation. Kinetic analysis of single-turnover nick sealing by ChVLig-AMP underscored the importance of Phe-75-mediated distortion of the nick 3'-OH nucleoside in the catalysis of DNA 5'-adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester synthesis (step 3). Induced fit of the nicked DNA into a distorted conformation when bound within the ligase clamp may account for the nick-sensing capacity of ChVLig.

  15. Whole Genome Amplification of Day 3 or Day 5 Human Embryos Biopsies Provides a Suitable DNA Template for PCR-Based Techniques for Genotyping, a Complement of Preimplantation Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Schaeffer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine if whole genome amplification (WGA provides suitable DNA for qPCR-based genotyping for human embryos. Single blastomeres (Day 3 or trophoblastic cells (Day 5 were isolated from 342 embryos for WGA. Comparative Genomic Hybridization determined embryo sex as well as Trisomy 18 or Trisomy 21. To determine the embryo’s sex, qPCR melting curve analysis for SRY and DYS14 was used. Logistic regression indicated a 4.4%, 57.1%, or 98.8% probability of a male embryo when neither gene, SRY only, or both genes were detected, respectively (accuracy = 94.1%, kappa = 0.882, and p<0.001. Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis for the amelogenin genes (AMEL was also used to determine sex. AMELY peak’s height was higher and this peak’s presence was highly predictive of male embryos (AUC = 0.93, accuracy = 81.7%, kappa = 0.974, and p<0.001. Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 21 were determined using the threshold cycle difference for RPL17 and TTC3, respectively, which were significantly lower in the corresponding embryos. The Ct difference for TTC3 specifically determined Trisomy 21 (AUC = 0.89 and RPL17 for Trisomy 18 (AUC = 0.94. Here, WGA provides adequate DNA for PCR-based techniques for preimplantation genotyping.

  16. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  17. Quality Analysis of DNA from Cord Blood Buffy Coat: The Best Neonatal DNA Source for Epidemiological Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangdi; Li, Qin; Huang, Lisu; Wu, Yuhang; Wu, Meiqin; Wang, Weiye C

    2016-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood is an economical and easy to obtain source of high-quality neonatal genomic DNA. However, although large numbers of cord blood samples have been collected, information on the yield and quality of the DNA extracted from cord blood is scarce. Moreover, considerable doubt still exists on the utility of the buffy coat instead of whole blood as a DNA source. We compared the sample storage and DNA extraction costs for whole blood, buffy coat, and all-cell pellet. We evaluated three different DNA purification kits and selected the most suitable one to purify 1011 buffy coat samples. We determined the DNA yield and optical density (OD) ratios and analyzed 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS). We also analyzed eight possible preanalytical variables that may correlate with DNA yield or quality. Buffy coat was the most economical and least labor-intensive source for sample storage and DNA extraction. The average yield of genomic DNA from 200 μL of buffy coat sample was 16.01 ± 8.00 μg, which is sufficient for analytic experiments. The mean A260/A280 ratio and the mean A260/A230 ratio were 1.89 ± 0.09 and 1.95 ± 0.66, respectively. More than 99.5% of DNA samples passed the TOF MS test. Only hemolysis showed a strong correlation with OD ratios of DNA, but not with yield. Our findings show that cord blood buffy coat yields high-quality DNA in sufficient quantities to meet the requirements of experiments. Buffy coat was also found to be the most economic, efficient, and stable source of genomic DNA.

  18. Evidence that yeast SGS1, DNA2, SRS2, and FOB1 interact to maintain rDNA stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Weitao; Budd, Martin; Campbell, Judith L.

    2003-01-01

    We and others have proposed that faulty processing of arrested replication forks leads to increases in recombination and chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Now we use the ribosomal DNA locus, which is a good model for all stages of DNA replication, to test this hypothesis. We showed previously that DNA replication pausing at the ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier (RFB) is accompanied by the occurrence of double-strand breaks near the RFB. Both pausing and breakage are elevated in the hypomorphic dna2-2 helicase mutant. Deletion of FOB1 suppresses the elevated pausing and DSB formation. Our current work shows that mutation inactivating Sgs1, the yeast RecQ helicase ortholog, also causes accumulation of stalled replication forks and DSBs at the rDNA RFB. Either deletion of FOB1, which suppresses fork blocking and certain types of rDNA recombination, or an increase in SIR2 gene dosage, which suppresses rDNA recombination, reduces the number of forks persisting at the RFB. Although dna2-2 sgs1Δ double mutants are conditionally lethal, they do not show enhanced rDNA defects compared to sgs1Δ alone. However, surprisingly, the dna2-2 sgs1Δ lethality is suppressed by deletion of FOB1. On the other hand, the dna2-2 sgs1Δ lethality is only partially suppressed by deletion of rad51Δ. We propose that the replication-associated defects that we document in the rDNA are characteristic of similar events occurring either stochastically throughout the genome or at other regions where replication forks move slowly or stall, such as telomeres, centromeres, or replication slow zones

  19. Evidence that yeast SGS1, DNA2, SRS2, and FOB1 interact to maintain rDNA stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Weitao; Budd, Martin; Campbell, Judith L

    2003-11-27

    We and others have proposed that faulty processing of arrested replication forks leads to increases in recombination and chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Now we use the ribosomal DNA locus, which is a good model for all stages of DNA replication, to test this hypothesis. We showed previously that DNA replication pausing at the ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier (RFB) is accompanied by the occurrence of double-strand breaks near the RFB. Both pausing and breakage are elevated in the hypomorphic dna2-2 helicase mutant. Deletion of FOB1 suppresses the elevated pausing and DSB formation. Our current work shows that mutation inactivating Sgs1, the yeast RecQ helicase ortholog, also causes accumulation of stalled replication forks and DSBs at the rDNA RFB. Either deletion of FOB1, which suppresses fork blocking and certain types of rDNA recombination, or an increase in SIR2 gene dosage, which suppresses rDNA recombination, reduces the number of forks persisting at the RFB. Although dna2-2 sgs1{delta} double mutants are conditionally lethal, they do not show enhanced rDNA defects compared to sgs1{delta} alone. However, surprisingly, the dna2-2 sgs1{delta} lethality is suppressed by deletion of FOB1. On the other hand, the dna2-2 sgs1{delta} lethality is only partially suppressed by deletion of rad51{delta}. We propose that the replication-associated defects that we document in the rDNA are characteristic of similar events occurring either stochastically throughout the genome or at other regions where replication forks move slowly or stall, such as telomeres, centromeres, or replication slow zones.

  20. DNA profiling of trace DNA recovered from bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricevic, Susan F; Bright, Jo-Anne; Cockerton, Sarah L

    2006-05-25

    Trace DNA is often detected on handled items and worn clothing examined in forensic laboratories. In this study, the potential transfer of trace DNA to bedding by normal contact, when an individual sleeps in a bed, is examined. Volunteers slept one night on a new, lower bed sheet in their own bed and one night in a bed foreign to them. Samples from the sheets were collected and analysed by DNA profiling. The results indicate that the DNA profile of an individual can be obtained from bedding after one night of sleeping in a bed. The DNA profile of the owner of the bed could also be detected in the foreign bed experiments. Since mixed DNA profiles can be obtained from trace DNA on bedding, caution should be exercised when drawing conclusions from DNA profiling results obtained from such samples. This transfer may have important repercussions in sexual assault investigations.

  1. On site DNA barcoding by nanopore sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Menegon

    Full Text Available Biodiversity research is becoming increasingly dependent on genomics, which allows the unprecedented digitization and understanding of the planet's biological heritage. The use of genetic markers i.e. DNA barcoding, has proved to be a powerful tool in species identification. However, full exploitation of this approach is hampered by the high sequencing costs and the absence of equipped facilities in biodiversity-rich countries. In the present work, we developed a portable sequencing laboratory based on the portable DNA sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies, the MinION. Complementary laboratory equipment and reagents were selected to be used in remote and tough environmental conditions. The performance of the MinION sequencer and the portable laboratory was tested for DNA barcoding in a mimicking tropical environment, as well as in a remote rainforest of Tanzania lacking electricity. Despite the relatively high sequencing error-rate of the MinION, the development of a suitable pipeline for data analysis allowed the accurate identification of different species of vertebrates including amphibians, reptiles and mammals. In situ sequencing of a wild frog allowed us to rapidly identify the species captured, thus confirming that effective DNA barcoding in the field is possible. These results open new perspectives for real-time-on-site DNA sequencing thus potentially increasing opportunities for the understanding of biodiversity in areas lacking conventional laboratory facilities.

  2. Phylogenetic reconstruction in the order Nymphaeales: ITS2 secondary structure analysis and in silico testing of maturase k (matK) as a potential marker for DNA bar coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Debnath, Manish; Kumar, Shakti; Tandon, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    The Nymphaeales (waterlilly and relatives) lineage has diverged as the second branch of basal angiosperms and comprises of two families: Cabombaceae and Nymphaceae. The classification of Nymphaeales and phylogeny within the flowering plants are quite intriguing as several systems (Thorne system, Dahlgren system, Cronquist system, Takhtajan system and APG III system (Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III system) have attempted to redefine the Nymphaeales taxonomy. There have been also fossil records consisting especially of seeds, pollen, stems, leaves and flowers as early as the lower Cretaceous. Here we present an in silico study of the order Nymphaeales taking maturaseK (matK) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) as biomarkers for phylogeny reconstruction (using character-based methods and Bayesian approach) and identification of motifs for DNA barcoding. The Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian approach yielded congruent fully resolved and well-supported trees using a concatenated (ITS2+ matK) supermatrix aligned dataset. The taxon sampling corroborates the monophyly of Cabombaceae. Nuphar emerges as a monophyletic clade in the family Nymphaeaceae while there are slight discrepancies in the monophyletic nature of the genera Nymphaea owing to Victoria-Euryale and Ondinea grouping in the same node of Nymphaeaceae. ITS2 secondary structures alignment corroborate the primary sequence analysis. Hydatellaceae emerged as a sister clade to Nymphaeaceae and had a basal lineage amongst the water lilly clades. Species from Cycas and Ginkgo were taken as outgroups and were rooted in the overall tree topology from various methods. MatK genes are fast evolving highly variant regions of plant chloroplast DNA that can serve as potential biomarkers for DNA barcoding and also in generating primers for angiosperms with identification of unique motif regions. We have reported unique genus specific motif regions in the Order Nymphaeles from matK dataset which can be further validated for

  3. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  4. Properties of the chromatin assembled on DNA injected into Xenopus oocytes and eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, G.; Wasserman, W.; Worcel, A.

    1983-01-01

    The onset of DNA synthesis occurs between 10 and 30 minutes after activation of the egg and thus the transition from nuclease-sensitive to nuclease-resistant supercoils may take place on the newly replicated DNA. To test this possibility, the nonradioactive circular 5-kb DNA carrying the Drosophila histone gene repeat and [α -32 P]dCTP were coinjected into fertilized eggs. Such protocol labels both the injected, replicated heterologous DNA and the replicated endogenous, maternal Xenopus DNA. The labeled, presumably replicated, supercoiled DNA is resistant to micrococcal nuclease as expected. The endogenous, high-molecular-weight Xenopus DNA is degraded to 180-bp nucleosomal DNA. Thus, the nuclease resistance is not a general property of chromatin during the cleavage stage of the Xenopus embryo but is a peculiar feature of the injected DNA. 42 references, 5 figures

  5. The dynamic interplay between DNA topoisomerases and DNA topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-11-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell, DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes, including DNA replication and repair, not only alter the topology of the genome but also introduce additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that has established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, scientists have begun to explore the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology-dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparisons with Other Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T.Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site (Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains), Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  8. The persistence of human DNA in soil following surface decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Alexandra L; DeBruyn, Jennifer M; Mundorff, Amy Z; Cobaugh, Kelly L; Cabana, Graciela S

    2017-09-01

    Though recent decades have seen a marked increase in research concerning the impact of human decomposition on the grave soil environment, the fate of human DNA in grave soil has been relatively understudied. With the purpose of supplementing the growing body of literature in forensic soil taphonomy, this study assessed the relative persistence of human DNA in soil over the course of decomposition. Endpoint PCR was used to assess the presence or absence of human nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, while qPCR was used to evaluate the quantity of human DNA recovered from the soil beneath four cadavers at the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility (ARF). Human nuclear DNA from the soil was largely unrecoverable, while human mitochondrial DNA was detectable in the soil throughout all decomposition stages. Mitochondrial DNA copy abundances were not significantly different between decomposition stages and were not significantly correlated to soil edaphic parameters tested. There was, however, a significant positive correlation between mitochondrial DNA copy abundances and the human associated bacteria, Bacteroides, as estimated by 16S rRNA gene abundances. These results show that human mitochondrial DNA can persist in grave soil and be consistently detected throughout decomposition. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by

  10. Melting curves of gammairradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, H.; Altmann, H.; Kehrer, M.

    1978-08-01

    Melting curves of gammairradiated DNA and data derived of them, are reported. The diminished stability is explained by basedestruction. DNA denatures completely at room temperature, if at least every fifth basepair is broken or weakened by irradiation. (author)

  11. An Introduction to DNA Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepfer, Carol Ely; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides background information on DNA fingerprinting, and describes exercises for introducing general biology students at the high school or college level to the methodology and applications of DNA fingerprinting. (PR)

  12. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  13. Like-charge attraction and opposite-charge decomplexation between polymers and DNA molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2016-01-01

    We scrutinize the effect of polyvalent ions on polymer-DNA interactions. We extend a recently developed test charge theory to the case of a stiff polymer interacting with a DNA molecule in an electrolyte mixture. The theory accounts for one-loop level electrostatic correlation effects such as the ionic cloud deformation around the strongly charged DNA molecule as well as image-charge forces induced by the low DNA permittivity. Our model can reproduce and explain various characteristics of the...

  14. Probing the DNA Structural Requirements for Facilitated Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein. PMID:25495964

  15. DNA in the Criminal Justice System: The DNA Success Story in Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Anna A; Kloosterman, Ate D; de Poot, Christianne J

    2015-07-01

    Current figures on the efficiency of DNA as an investigative tool in criminal investigations only tell part of the story. To get the DNA success story in the right perspective, we examined all forensic reports from serious (N = 116) and high-volume crime cases (N = 2791) over the year 2011 from one police region in the Netherlands. These data show that 38% of analyzed serious crime traces (N = 384) and 17% of analyzed high-volume crime traces (N = 386) did not result in a DNA profile. Turnaround times (from crime scene to DNA report) were 66 days for traces from serious crimes and 44 days for traces from high-volume crimes. Suspects were truly identified through a match with the Offender DNA database of the Netherlands in 3% of the serious crime cases and in 1% of the high-volume crime cases. These data are important for both the forensic laboratory and the professionals in the criminal justice system to further optimize forensic DNA testing as an investigative tool. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Voltammetric Detection of Damage to DNA by Arsenic Compounds at a DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wennrich

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA biosensor can serve as a powerfull tool for simple in vitro tests of chemicaltoxicity. In this paper, damage to DNA attached to the surface of screen-printed carbonelectrode by arsenic compounds in solution is described. Using the Co(III complex with1,10-phenanthroline, [Co(phen3]3+ , as an electrochemical DNA marker and the Ru(IIcomplex with bipyridyne, [Ru(bipy3]2+ , as a DNA oxidation catalyst, the portion of originaldsDNA which survives an incubation of the biosensor in the cleavage medium was evaluated.The model cleavage mixture was composed of an arsenic compound at 10-3 mol/Lconcentration corresponding to real contaminated water, 2x10-4 mol/L Fe(II or Cu(II ions asthe redox catalyst, and 1.5x10-2 mol/L hydrogen peroxide. DNA damage by arsenite,dimethylarsinic acid as the metabolic product of inorganic arsenic and widely used herbicide,as well as phenylarsonic acid and p-arsanilic acid as the representatives of feed additives wasfound in difference to arsenate.

  17. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-06-21

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg(2+) ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg(2+) or Na(+), benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg(2+) bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.

  18. Alterations of ultraviolet irradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, C.; Garces, F.

    1980-01-01

    Thymine dimers production has been studied in several DNA- 3 H irradiated at various wave lenght of U.V. Light. The influence of dimers on the hydrodynamic and optic properties, thermal structural stability and transformant capacity of DNA have been studied too. At last the recognition and excision of dimers by the DNA-UV-Endonuclease and DNA-Polimerase-I was also studied. (author)

  19. Identification of Amazonian trees with DNA barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mailyn Adriana; Baraloto, Christopher; Engel, Julien; Mori, Scott A; Pétronelli, Pascal; Riéra, Bernard; Roger, Aurélien; Thébaud, Christophe; Chave, Jérôme

    2009-10-16

    Large-scale plant diversity inventories are critical to develop informed conservation strategies. However, the workload required for classic taxonomic surveys remains high and is particularly problematic for megadiverse tropical forests. Based on a comprehensive census of all trees in two hectares of a tropical forest in French Guiana, we examined whether plant DNA barcoding could contribute to increasing the quality and the pace of tropical plant biodiversity surveys. Of the eight plant DNA markers we tested (rbcLa, rpoC1, rpoB, matK, ycf5, trnL, psbA-trnH, ITS), matK and ITS had a low rate of sequencing success. More critically, none of the plastid markers achieved a rate of correct plant identification greater than 70%, either alone or combined. The performance of all barcoding markers was noticeably low in few species-rich clades, such as the Laureae, and the Sapotaceae. A field test of the approach enabled us to detect 130 molecular operational taxonomic units in a sample of 252 juvenile trees. Including molecular markers increased the identification rate of juveniles from 72% (morphology alone) to 96% (morphology and molecular) of the individuals assigned to a known tree taxon. We conclude that while DNA barcoding is an invaluable tool for detecting errors in identifications and for identifying plants at juvenile stages, its limited ability to identify collections will constrain the practical implementation of DNA-based tropical plant biodiversity programs.

  20. A cargo-sorting DNA robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thubagere, Anupama J; Li, Wei; Johnson, Robert F; Chen, Zibo; Doroudi, Shayan; Lee, Yae Lim; Izatt, Gregory; Wittman, Sarah; Srinivas, Niranjan; Woods, Damien; Winfree, Erik; Qian, Lulu

    2017-09-15

    Two critical challenges in the design and synthesis of molecular robots are modularity and algorithm simplicity. We demonstrate three modular building blocks for a DNA robot that performs cargo sorting at the molecular level. A simple algorithm encoding recognition between cargos and their destinations allows for a simple robot design: a single-stranded DNA with one leg and two foot domains for walking, and one arm and one hand domain for picking up and dropping off cargos. The robot explores a two-dimensional testing ground on the surface of DNA origami, picks up multiple cargos of two types that are initially at unordered locations, and delivers them to specified destinations until all molecules are sorted into two distinct piles. The robot is designed to perform a random walk without any energy supply. Exploiting this feature, a single robot can repeatedly sort multiple cargos. Localization on DNA origami allows for distinct cargo-sorting tasks to take place simultaneously in one test tube or for multiple robots to collectively perform the same task. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Isolation of DNA methyltransferase from plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Malbroue, C.

    1987-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DMT) were isolated from nuclei of cauliflower, soybean, and pea by extraction with 0.35 M NaCl. Assays were performed on hemimethylated Micrococcus luteus DNA or on M. luteus DNA to test for maintenance or de novo methylase activity, respectively. Fully methylated DNA was used as a substrate to determine background levels of methylation. Based on these tests, yields of maintenance DMT activity in the crude extract from pea hypocotyl, soybean hypocotyl, and cauliflower inflorescence were 2.8, 0.9, and 1.6 units per g wet tissue (one unit equals 1 pmol of methyl from [ 3 H]AdoMet incorporated into acid precipitable material per h at 30 0 ). Two peaks of DMT activity were detected in the soybean nuclear extract following phosphocellulose chromatography. One eluted at 0.4 M and the other at 0.8 M KCl. With both fractions maintenance activity was approximately 2 times that of the de novo activity. Using gel filtration the DMT eluted at 220,000 Daltons. The optimal pH for activity was between 6.5 and 7.0, and the optimal temperature was 30 0

  2. The Ins and Outs of DNA Fingerprinting the Infectious Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, David R.

    2000-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting methods have evolved as major tools in fungal epidemiology. However, no single method has emerged as the method of choice, and some methods perform better than others at different levels of resolution. In this review, requirements for an effective DNA fingerprinting method are proposed and procedures are described for testing the efficacy of a method. In light of the proposed requirements, the most common methods now being used to DNA fingerprint the infectious fungi are described and assessed. These methods include restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), RFLP with hybridization probes, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and other PCR-based methods, electrophoretic karyotyping, and sequencing-based methods. Procedures for computing similarity coefficients, generating phylogenetic trees, and testing the stability of clusters are then described. To facilitate the analysis of DNA fingerprinting data, computer-assisted methods are described. Finally, the problems inherent in the collection of test and control isolates are considered, and DNA fingerprinting studies of strain maintenance during persistent or recurrent infections, microevolution in infecting strains, and the origin of nosocomial infections are assessed in light of the preceding discussion of the ins and outs of DNA fingerprinting. The intent of this review is to generate an awareness of the need to verify the efficacy of each DNA fingerprinting method for the level of genetic relatedness necessary to answer the epidemiological question posed, to use quantitative methods to analyze DNA fingerprint data, to use computer-assisted DNA fingerprint analysis systems to analyze data, and to file data in a form that can be used in the future for retrospective and comparative studies. PMID:10756003

  3. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  4. Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with of the DNA double helix during April 2003. James D. Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins were company Celera announced the completion of a "working draft" reference DNA sequence of the human

  5. My journey to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas

    2013-02-01

    I completed my medical studies at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm but have always been devoted to basic research. My longstanding interest is to understand fundamental DNA repair mechanisms in the fields of cancer therapy, inherited human genetic disorders and ancient DNA. I initially measured DNA decay, including rates of base loss and cytosine deamination. I have discovered several important DNA repair proteins and determined their mechanisms of action. The discovery of uracil-DNA glycosylase defined a new category of repair enzymes with each specialized for different types of DNA damage. The base excision repair pathway was first reconstituted with human proteins in my group. Cell-free analysis for mammalian nucleotide excision repair of DNA was also developed in my laboratory. I found multiple distinct DNA ligases in mammalian cells, and led the first genetic and biochemical work on DNA ligases I, III and IV. I discovered the mammalian exonucleases DNase III (TREX1) and IV (FEN1). Interestingly, expression of TREX1 was altered in some human autoimmune diseases. I also showed that the mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)mG) is repaired without removing the guanine from DNA, identifying a surprising mechanism by which the methyl group is transferred to a residue in the repair protein itself. A further novel process of DNA repair discovered by my research group is the action of AlkB as an iron-dependent enzyme carrying out oxidative demethylation. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Genetic exchanges caused by ultraviolet photoproducts in phage lamda DNA molecules: the role of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.F.; Howard-Flanders, P.; Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.

    1976-01-01

    Genetic recombination induced by structural damage in DNA molecules was investigated in E. coli K12(lamda) lysogens infected with genetically marked phage lamda. Photoproducts were induced in the phage DNA before infection by exposing them either to 313 nm light in the presence of acetophenone or to 254 nm light. To test the role of the replication of the damage phage DNA on the frequency of the induced recombination , both heteroimmune and homoimmune crosses were performed, and scored for P + recombinants. In heteroimmune crosses, recombination was less frequent in infected cells exposed to visible light and in wild type cells able to perform excision repair than in excision-defective lysogens. Therefore, much of the induced recombination can be attributed to the pyrimidine dimers in the phage DNA. In homoimmune crosses, replication of the phage DNA containing ultraviolet photoproducts was represented by lamda immunity, and was further blocked by the lack of the P gene product needed for replication. The 254 nm photoproducts increased the frequency of recombination in these homoimmune crosses, even though phage DNA replication was blocked. Irradiation with 313 nm light and acetophenone M, w