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Sample records for dna final technical

  1. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, Alan H. [Fusion Theory and Computation Inc., Kingston, WA (United States)

    2018-02-02

    Final technical report on DE-SC0016106. This is the final technical report for a portion of the multi-institutional CEMM project. This report is centered around 3 publications and a seminar presentation, which have been submitted to E-Link.

  2. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs

  3. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Ross

    2003-04-30

    The Final Technical Report summarizes research accomplishments and Publications in the period of 5/1/99 to 4/30/03 done on the grant. Extensive progress was made in the period covered by this report in the areas of chemical kinetics of non-linear systems; spatial structures, reaction - diffusion systems, and thermodynamic and stochastic theory of electrochemical and general systems.

  4. 48 CFR 252.235-7011 - Final scientific or technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... technical report. 252.235-7011 Section 252.235-7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.235-7011 Final scientific or technical report. As prescribed in 235.072(d), use the following clause: Final Scientific or Technical Report (NOV 2004) The Contractor...

  5. Guidelines for Preparing Final Technical Reports

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    fdieudonne

    Prior to submitting the Final Technical Report, any outstanding issues related to dissemination in accordance with ... The report should be an opportunity to reflect on the management of the project from various perspectives: .... of poor quality.

  6. Technical evaluation report of the Fort St. Vrain final draft upgraded technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1989-01-01

    This report is a technical evaluation of the final draft of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Upgraded Technical Specifications (UT/S) as issued by Public Service of Colorado (PSC) on May 27, 1988 with subsequent supplemental updates issued on June 15, 1988 and August 5, 1988. It has been compared for consistency, and safety conservatism with the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Updated Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), the FSV Safety Evaluation Report (SER), the Facility Operating License, DPR-34, and all amendments to the Facility Operating License issued as of June 1, 1988, and Appendix A to the Operating License DPR-34, Technical Specifications. Because of the age of the plant, no supplements to the Fort St. Vrain SER have been issued since the original SER was not issued as a WASH or a NUREG report. This made it necessary to review all amendments to the Facility Operating License since they would contain the safety evaluations done to support changes to the Facility Operating License. The upgraded Fort St. Vrain Technical Specifications were also broadly compared with the latest Westinghouse Standard Technical Specifications (WSTS) to assure that what was proposed for Fort St. Vrain was consistent with the latest NRC staff practices for standard technical specifications

  7. Immunochemical approach to the study of DNA repair. Proposed technical program and technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A simple immunochemical assay to quantify DNA lesions is being developed in order to facilitate the study of DNA repair. Antibodies have been raised to 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine and to thymine dimers and these have been used to measure DNA damages produced by osmium tetroxide and ultraviolet light, respectively. An enzyme immunoassay has been developed and the sensitivity of this method will be compared to physical, enzymatic, and chemical methods using PM2 bacteriophage DNA. Finally DNA repair will be assayed in several model systems

  8. Final technical report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    gas jet chamber and laser beam path from the final focusing mirror. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1: Fundamental studies of cutting front mechanisms, beam propagation, nozzle design and chemical reactions in the cut kerf with special emphasize on high laser powers and thick sections...... cutting nozzle which can be adjusted independently to the laser beam has been developed. The position of the focus relative the workpiece can be adjusted to cutting applications with relatively large processing windows, i.e. both mild and stainless steels, and of a broad thickness range. A build-in auto......This project entails research with the goal to extend laser cutting of steel based metals to thickness above 20 mm and laser powers in the 10 kW range, with adequate accuracy and economically viable cutting speeds. The technical approach is to develop mirror based cutting heads with truly coaxial...

  9. Systems study 'Alternative Entsorgung'. Final report. Technical annex 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartje, B.; Kronschnabel, H.; Mueller, W.F.W.

    1984-01-01

    There is an investigation whether accessibility can be produced to fuel elements stored in a salt mine. All solutions of the problem were followed up until the technically best one was found. Two conditions must be fulfilled for access to the final storage barrel: - There must be a climate which is suitable for people. The Mining Order is the basis for this. - The pit building must be fixed, in the convergence in the salt mine should not lead to it becoming impossible to reach part of the mine. Due to heat-producing waste, rock temperatures are caused in the salt mine, in which mining is no longer possible. Building on the idea of cooling the whole final storage area using concentric sections, the amount of heat to be removal was first estimated. Cooling of the whole final storage area proved to be technically unjustifiable and uninteresting at present. (orig./HP) [de

  10. 10 CFR 52.157 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; technical information in final safety analysis report. The application must contain a final safety analysis... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.157 Section 52.157 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES...

  11. 10 CFR 52.79 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; technical information in final safety analysis report. (a) The application must contain a final safety... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.79 Section 52.79 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.235-73 - Final Scientific and Technical Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Final Scientific and Technical Reports. 1852.235-73 Section 1852.235-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL..., including recommendations and conclusions based on the experience and results obtained. The final report...

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  14. Vertically integrated analysis of human DNA. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, M.

    1997-10-01

    This project has been oriented toward improving the vertical integration of the sequential steps associated with the large-scale analysis of human DNA. The central focus has been on an approach to the preparation of {open_quotes}sequence-ready{close_quotes} maps, which is referred to as multiple-complete-digest (MCD) mapping, primarily directed at cosmid clones. MCD mapping relies on simple experimental steps, supported by advanced image-analysis and map-assembly software, to produce extremely accurate restriction-site and clone-overlap maps. We believe that MCD mapping is one of the few high-resolution mapping systems that has the potential for high-level automation. Successful automation of this process would be a landmark event in genome analysis. Once other higher organisms, paving the way for cost-effective sequencing of these genomes. Critically, MCD mapping has the potential to provide built-in quality control for sequencing accuracy and to make possible a highly integrated end product even if there are large numbers of discontinuities in the actual sequence.

  15. DOE final technical report 3/1997 to 2/2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Franz L.

    2005-01-01

    DOE final technical report 3/1997 to 2/2005 This grant supported basic theoretical research into the derivation (from relativistic field theories) of relativistic equations for few body systems, with practical applications to the properties of 2 and 3 nucleon systems and to the nature of few-quark systems

  16. 77 FR 47495 - Final Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting-National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting--National IDEA Technical... 34 CFR Chapter III [CFDA Number 84.373Z] Final Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting--National IDEA Technical Assistance Center on Early Childhood...

  17. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M.; Darnell, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities

  18. 76 FR 18624 - Research, Technical Assistance and Training Programs: Notice of Final Circular

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... to FTA Circular 6100.1D, Research and Technical Assistance Training Program: Application Instructions... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Research, Technical Assistance and Training Programs: Notice of Final Circular AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION...

  19. AIMES Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Daniel S [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA); Jha, Shantenu [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Weissman, Jon [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Turilli, Matteo [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This is the final technical report for the AIMES project. Many important advances in science and engineering are due to large-scale distributed computing. Notwithstanding this reliance, we are still learning how to design and deploy large-scale production Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). This is evidenced by missing design principles for DCI, and an absence of generally acceptable and usable distributed computing abstractions. The AIMES project was conceived against this backdrop, following on the heels of a comprehensive survey of scientific distributed applications. AIMES laid the foundations to address the tripartite challenge of dynamic resource management, integrating information, and portable and interoperable distributed applications. Four abstractions were defined and implemented: skeleton, resource bundle, pilot, and execution strategy. The four abstractions were implemented into software modules and then aggregated into the AIMES middleware. This middleware successfully integrates information across the application layer (skeletons) and resource layer (Bundles), derives a suitable execution strategy for the given skeleton and enacts its execution by means of pilots on one or more resources, depending on the application requirements, and resource availabilities and capabilities.

  20. NCSU reactor sharing program. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities. This report is the Final Technical Report for the DOE award reference number DE-FG05-95NE38136 which covers the period September 30, 1995 through September 30, 1996

  1. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development

  2. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development.

  3. Technical approach to finalizing sensible soil cleanup levels at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, D.; Hertel, B.; Jewett, M.; Janke, R.; Conner, B.

    1996-01-01

    The remedial strategy for addressing contaminated environmental media was recently finalized for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) following almost 10 years of detailed technical analysis. The FEMP represents one of the first major nuclear facilities to successfully complete the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) phase of the environmental restoration process. A critical element of this success was the establishment of sensible cleanup levels for contaminated soil and groundwater both on and off the FEMP property. These cleanup levels were derived based upon a strict application of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) regulations and guidance, coupled with positive input from the regulatory agencies and the local community regarding projected future land uses for the site. The approach for establishing the cleanup levels was based upon a Feasibility Study (FS) strategy that examined a bounding range of viable future land uses for the site. Within each land use, the cost and technical implications of a range of health-protective cleanup levels for the environmental media were analyzed. Technical considerations in driving these cleanup levels included: direct exposure routes to viable human receptors; cross- media impacts to air, surface water, and groundwater; technical practicality of attaining the levels; volume of affected media; impact to sensitive environmental receptors or ecosystems; and cost. This paper will discuss the technical approach used to support the finalization of the cleanup levels for the site. The final cleanup levels provide the last remaining significant piece to the puzzle of establishing a final site-wide remedial strategy for the FEMP, and positions the facility for the expedient completion of site-wide remedial activities

  4. Audit of Wolf Creek Generating Station, Unit 1 technical specifications. Final technical evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromberg, H.M.

    1985-07-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the assumptions of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented, and the Comments and Responses to the Wolf Creek Technical Specification Draft Inspection Report. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, the SER as supplemented, and the Draft Inspection Report was performed with the Wolf Creek T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through discussions with the cognizant NRC reviewer, NRC staff reviewers and/or utility representatives. The Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR, SER, and Draft Inspection Report

  5. 78 FR 12955 - Final Requirements, Definitions, and Selection Criteria-Native American Career and Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... career and technical education programs (20 U.S.C. 2326(e)). This notice does not preclude us from... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter IV [Docket ID ED-2012-OVAE-0053] Final Requirements, Definitions, and Selection Criteria--Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP) [Catalog...

  6. Technical planning activity: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  7. Technical planning activity: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements

  8. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-08-01

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

  9. 77 FR 30512 - Native American Career and Technical Education Program; Final Waivers and Extension of Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Native American Career and Technical Education Program; Final Waivers and... American Career and Technical Education Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84... and Technical Education Program (NACTEP), the Secretary waives 34 CFR 75.250 and 75.261(c)(2) in order...

  10. Multi-Threaded DNA Tag/Anti-Tag Library Generator for Multi-Core Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    base pair)  Watson ‐ Crick  strand pairs that bind perfectly within pairs, but poorly across pairs. A variety  of  DNA  strand hybridization metrics...AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2009-131 Final Technical Report May 2009 MULTI-THREADED DNA TAG/ANTI-TAG LIBRARY GENERATOR FOR MULTI-CORE PLATFORMS...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jun 08 – Feb 09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MULTI-THREADED DNA TAG/ANTI-TAG LIBRARY GENERATOR FOR MULTI-CORE

  11. "Type Ia Supernovae: Tools for Studying Dark Energy" Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Lick Observatory, San Jose, CA (United States); Kasen, Dan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Final technical report for project "Type Ia Supernovae: Tools for the Study of Dark Energy" awarded jointly to scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz and Berkeley, for computer modeling, theory and data analysis relevant to the use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles for cosmology.

  12. Key technical issues associated with a method of pulse compression. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.O. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    Key technical issues for angular multiplexing as a method of pulse compression in a 100 KJ KrF laser have been studied. Environmental issues studied include seismic vibrations man-made vibrations, air propagation, turbulence, and thermal gradient-induced density fluctuations. These studies have been incorporated in the design of mirror mounts and an alignment system, both of which are reported. A design study and performance analysis of the final amplifier have been undertaken. The pulse compression optical train has been designed and assessed as to its performance. Individual components are described and analytical relationships between the optical component size, surface quality, damage threshold and final focus properties are derived. The optical train primary aberrations are obtained and a method for aberration minimization is presented. Cost algorithms for the mirrors, mounts, and electrical hardware are integrated into a cost model to determine system costs as a function of pulse length, aperture size, and spot size

  13. The Michigan high-level radioactive waste program: Final technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report comprises the state of Michigan's final technical report on the location of a proposed high-level radioactive waste disposal site. Included are a list of Michigan's efforts to review the DOE proposal and a detailed report on the application of geographic information systems analysis techniques to the review process

  14. Final Technical Report, Wind Generator Project (Ann Arbor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler, Nathan [City of Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-20

    A Final Technical Report (57 pages) describing educational exhibits and devices focused on wind energy, and related outreach activities and programs. Project partnership includes the City of Ann Arbor, MI and the Ann Arbor Hands-on Museum, along with additional sub-recipients, and U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Report relays key milestones and sub-tasks as well as numerous graphics and images of five (5) transportable wind energy demonstration devices and five (5) wind energy exhibits designed and constructed between 2014 and 2016 for transport and use by the Ann Arbor Hands-on Museum.

  15. Iowa Hill Pumped Storage Project Investigations - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, David [Sacramento Municipal Unitlity District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This Final Technical Report is a summary of the activities and outcome of the Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement DE-EE0005414 with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The Assistance Agreement was created in 2012 to support investigations into the Iowa Hill Pumped-storage Project (Project), a new development that would add an additional 400 MW of capacity to SMUD’s existing 688MW Upper American River Hydroelectric Project (UARP) in the Sierra Nevada mountains east of Sacramento, California.

  16. Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collar, Craig [Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Everett, WA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    This document represents the final report for the Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, located in Puget Sound, Washington, United States. The Project purpose was to license, permit, and install a grid-connected deep-water tidal turbine array (two turbines) to be used as a platform to gather operational and environmental data on tidal energy generation. The data could then be used to better inform the viability of commercial tidal energy generation from technical, economic, social, and environmental standpoints. This data would serve as a critical step towards the responsible advancement of commercial scale tidal energy in the United States and around the world. In late 2014, Project activities were discontinued due to escalating costs, and the DOE award was terminated in early 2015. Permitting, licensing, and engineering design activities were completed under this award. Final design, deployment, operation, and monitoring were not completed. This report discusses the results and accomplishments achieved under the subject award.

  17. 77 FR 30514 - Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program; Final Waiver and Extension of Project Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program; Final Waiver and... Career and Technical Education Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.259A... Technical Education Program (NHCTEP), the Secretary hereby waives 34 CFR 75.261(c)(2) in order to extend the...

  18. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  19. Characterization of the radon source in North-Central Florida. Final report part 1 -- Final project report; Final report part 2 -- Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report contains two separate parts: Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (final report part 1 -- final project report); and Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (technical report). The objectives were to characterize the radon 222 source in a region having a demonstrated elevated indoor radon potential and having geology, lithology, and climate that are different from those in other regions of the U.S. where radon is being studied. Radon availability and transport in this region were described. Approaches for predicting the radon potential of lands in this region were developed

  20. Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Andria [City of Portland; Cyr, Shirley [Clean Energy Works

    2013-12-31

    In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOE’s program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

  1. Energy Impact Illinois - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Daniel [Senior Energy Efficiency Planner; Plagman, Emily [Senior Energy Planner; Silberhorn, Joey-Lin [Energy Efficiency Program Assistant

    2014-02-18

    Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) is an alliance of government organizations, nonprofits, and regional utility companies led by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) that is dedicated to helping communities in the Chicago metropolitan area become more energy efficient. Originally organized as the Chicago Region Retrofit Ramp-Up (CR3), EI2 became part of the nationwide Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) in May 2010 after receiving a $25 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) authorized through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The program’s primary goal was to fund initiatives that mitigate barriers to energy efficiency retrofitting activities across residential, multifamily, and commercial building sectors in the seven-county CMAP region and to help to build a sustainable energy efficiency marketplace. The EI2 Final Technical Report provides a detailed review of the strategies, implementation methods, challenges, lessons learned, and final results of the EI2 program during the initial grant period from 2010-2013. During the program period, EI2 successfully increased direct retrofit activity in the region and was able to make a broader impact on the energy efficiency market in the Chicago region. As the period of performance for the initial grant comes to an end, EI2’s legacy raises the bar for the region in terms of helping homeowners and building owners to take action on the continually complex issue of energy efficiency.

  2. Sequencing of megabase plus DNA by hybridization: Method development ENT. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-01-31

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is the only sequencing method based on the experimental determination of the content of oligonucleotide sequences. The data acquisition relies on the natural process of base pairing. It is possible to determine the content of complementary oligosequences in the target DNA by the process of hybridization with oligonucleotide probes of known sequences.

  3. Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-98ER45737

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Harald W.

    2018-04-24

    Final Technical Report For DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER45737 Development of a Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscope Polymer Thin Films and Self Assembled Monolayers: Pattern Formation and Surface Interactions NEXAFS Microscopy and Resonant Scattering of Polymeric Materials Organic Heterojunction Devices: Structure, Composition, and Performance at <20 nm Resolution Fundamental Science of High Open Circuit Voltage Excitonic Solar Cells Control of Interface- and Mesoscopic Structure in High Performance Organic Solar Cells: Towards a Predictive Device Paradigm

  4. Summary report of the final technical meeting on 'International Reactor Dosimetry File: IRDF-2002'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Patrick J.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R.

    2003-10-01

    Presentations, recommendations and conclusions of the Final Technical Meeting on 'International Reactor Dosimetry File: IRDF-2002' are summarized in this report. The main aims of this meeting were to discuss scientific and technical matters related to reactor dosimetry and to assign responsibilities for the preparation of the final version of the IRDF- 2002 library and the associated TECDOC. Tasks were assigned and deadlines were agreed. Participants emphasized that accurate and complete nuclear data for reactor dosimetry are essential to improve the assessment accuracies for reactor pressure vessel service lifetimes in nuclear power plants, as well as for other neutron metrology applications such as boron neutron capture therapy, therapeutic use of medical isotopes, nuclear physics measurements, and reactor safety applications. (author)

  5. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggeman, Tim [ZeaChem Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States); O' Neill, Brian [ZeaChem Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    2016-08-17

    ZeaChem Inc. and US DOE successfully demonstrated the ZeaChem process for producing sugars and ethanol from high-impact biomass feedstocks. The project was executed over a 5-year period under a $31.25 million cooperative agreement (80:20 Federal:ZeaChem cost share). The project was managed by dividing it into three budget periods. Activities during Budget Period 1 were limited to planning, permitting, and other pre-construction planning. Budget Period 2 activities included engineering, procurement, construction, commissioning, start-up and initial operations through the Independent Engineer Test Runs. The scope of construction was limited to the Chem Frac and Hydrogenolysis units, as the Core Facility was already in place. Construction was complete in December 2012, and the first cellulosic ethanol was produced in February 2013. Additional operational test runs were conducted during Budget Period 3 (completed June 2015) using hybrid poplar, corn stover, and wheat straw feedstocks, resulting in the production of cellulosic ethanol and various other biorefinery intermediates. The research adds to the understanding of the Chem Frac and Hydrogenolysis technologies in that the technical performance of each unit was measured, and the resulting data and operational experience can be used as the basis for engineering designs, thus mitigating risks for deployment in future commercial facilities. The Chem Frac unit was initially designed to be operated as two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, with first stage conditions selected to remove the hemicellulose fraction of the feedstock, and the second stage conditions selected to remove the cellulose fraction. While the Chem Frac unit met or exceeded the design capacity of 10 ton(dry)/day, the technical effectiveness of the Chem Frac unit was below expectations in its initial two-stage dilute acid configuration. The sugars yields were low, the sugars were dilute, and the sugars had poor fermentability caused by excessive inhibitors

  6. DE-FG02-04ER63746 FinalTechnicalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    2009-09-05

    This is the final technical report for a project involving the study of stress response systems in the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. Three stresses of importance for a mixed waste treatment strain were studied, heat shock, solvent shock, and phosphate starvation. In each case, specific genes involved in the ability to survive the stress were identified using a systems biology approach, and analysis of mutants was used to understand mechanisms. This study has led to increased understanding of the ways in which a potential treatment strain could be manipulated to survive multiple stresses for treatment of mixed wastes.

  7. Technical reproducibility of single-nucleotide and size-based DNA biomarker assessment using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenli; Tan, Iain B; Sapari, Nur S; Grabsch, Heike I; Okines, Alicia; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Aoyama, Toru; Hewitt, Lindsay C; Inam, Imran; Bottomley, Dan; Nankivell, Matthew; Stenning, Sally P; Cunningham, David; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Soong, Richie; Tan, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues has been used in the past to analyze genetic polymorphisms. We evaluated the technical reproducibility of different types of assays for gene polymorphisms using DNA extracted from FFPE material. By using the MassARRAY iPLEX system, we investigated polymorphisms in DPYD (rs1801159 and rs3918290), UMPS (rs1801019), ERCC1 (rs11615), ERCC1 (rs3212986), and ERCC2 (rs13181) in 56 FFPE DNA samples. By using PCR, followed by size-based gel electrophoresis, we also examined TYMS 5' untranslated region 2R/3R repeats and GSTT1 deletions in 50 FFPE DNA samples and 34 DNAs extracted from fresh-frozen tissues and cell lines. Each polymorphism was analyzed by two independent runs. We found that iPLEX biomarker assays measuring single-nucleotide polymorphisms provided consistent concordant results. However, by using FFPE DNA, size-based PCR biomarkers (GSTT1 and TYMS 5' untranslated region) were discrepant in 32.7% (16/49, with exact 95% CI, 19.9%-47.5%; exact binomial confidence limit test) and 4.2% (2/48, with exact 95% CI, 0.5%-14.3%) of cases, respectively, whereas no discrepancies were observed using intact genomic DNA. Our findings suggest that DNA from FFPE material can be used to reliably test single-nucleotide polymorphisms. However, results based on size-based PCR biomarkers, and particularly GSTT1 deletions, using FFPE DNA need to be interpreted with caution. Independent repeated assays should be performed on all cases to assess potential discrepancies. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS). Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This final technical report appears in two parts: the report for the 1995 summer MISS program and the report for the 1996 summer MISS program. Copies of the US Department of Energy Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 1995 Entry Form and 1996 Entry Form completed by all participants were sent to the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education in the fall of 1995 and 1996 respectively. Those forms are on file should they be needed. Attached also is a copy of the Summary of ideas for panel discussions, problem-solving sessions, or small group discussions presented at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program Project Directors Meeting held in San Antonio, TX, November 12--14, 1995.

  9. Technical and economic assessment of solar hybrid repowering. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) has performed a Technical and Economic Assessment of Solar Hybrid Repowering under funding by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Western Energy Supply and Transmission (WEST) Associates, and a number of southwestern utilities. Solar hybrid repowering involves placement of solar hardware adjacent to and connected to existing gas- and oil-fueled electric generation units to displace some of or all the fossil fuel normally used during daylight hours. The subject study assesses the technical economic viability of the solar hybrid repowering concept within the southwestern United States and the PNM system. This document is a final report on the study and its results. The study was divided into the six primary tasks to allow a systematic investigation of the concept: (1) market survey and cost/benefit analysis, (2) study unit selection, (3) conceptual design and cost estimates, (4) unit economic analysis, (5) program planning, future phases, and (6) program management. Reeves Station No. 2 at Albuquerque, New Mexico, was selected for repowering with a design goal of 50 percent (25 MWe). The solar system design is based on the 10 MW solar central receiver pilot plant preliminary design for Barstow, California. SAN--1608-4-2 contains the technical drawings. (WHK)

  10. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  11. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  12. Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric Sounding Measurements using Unmanned Systems (ERASMUS): Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, Gijs [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lawrence, Dale [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Palo, Scott [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Argrow, Brian [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); LoDolce, Gabriel [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Curry, Nathan [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Weibel, Douglas [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Finamore, William [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); D' Amore, Phillip [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Borenstein, Steven [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Nichols, Tevis [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Elston, Jack [Blackswift Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Ivey, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bendure, Albert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmid, Beat [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Long, Charles [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Telg, Hagen [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Gao, Ru-Shan [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Hock, Terry [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Bland, Geoff [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2017-03-29

    This final technical report details activities undertaken as part of the referenced project. Included is information on the preparation of aircraft for deployment to Alaska, summaries of the three deployments covered under this project, and a brief description of the dataset and science directions pursued. Additionally, we provide information on lessons learned, publications, and presentations resulting from this work.

  13. Final Technical Report for contract number DE-FG02-05ER15670

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazebrook, Jane [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-02-29

    This is the final technical report for contract number DE-FG02-05ER15670. The project is now complete, and results of the project have been published. Two papers were published based on work done in the last three-year funding period. The DOIs of these papers are included below. The abstracts of the papers, providing summaries of the work, are included in the body of the report.

  14. Technical and logistic provisions for the delivery of radioactive wastes in the final repository Konrad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppinghaus, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The beginning of radioactive waste delivery to the final repository Konrad is planned for 2019. The main issue for the technical and logistic provisions is the development of a concept for the transport of the licensed radioactive waste containers to the site, including a turning concept for cylindrical waste forms and planning, construction and manufacture of transport equipment. Further issues include a logistic concept considering specific boundary conditions as administrative processes, priorities, special features of the delivering institutions and technical requirements of the repository.

  15. Precise Sequential DNA Ligation on A Solid Substrate: Solid-Based Rapid Sequential Ligation of Multiple DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takita, Eiji; Kohda, Katsunori; Tomatsu, Hajime; Hanano, Shigeru; Moriya, Kanami; Hosouchi, Tsutomu; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Shibata, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Ligation, the joining of DNA fragments, is a fundamental procedure in molecular cloning and is indispensable to the production of genetically modified organisms that can be used for basic research, the applied biosciences, or both. Given that many genes cooperate in various pathways, incorporating multiple gene cassettes in tandem in a transgenic DNA construct for the purpose of genetic modification is often necessary when generating organisms that produce multiple foreign gene products. Here, we describe a novel method, designated PRESSO (precise sequential DNA ligation on a solid substrate), for the tandem ligation of multiple DNA fragments. We amplified donor DNA fragments with non-palindromic ends, and ligated the fragment to acceptor DNA fragments on solid beads. After the final donor DNA fragments, which included vector sequences, were joined to the construct that contained the array of fragments, the ligation product (the construct) was thereby released from the beads via digestion with a rare-cut meganuclease; the freed linear construct was circularized via an intra-molecular ligation. PRESSO allowed us to rapidly and efficiently join multiple genes in an optimized order and orientation. This method can overcome many technical challenges in functional genomics during the post-sequencing generation. PMID:23897972

  16. Correlated charge-changing uion-atom collisions. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Tanis

    2005-01-01

    This document comprises the final technical report for atomic collisions research supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG02-87ER13778 from September 1, 2001 through August 31, 2004. The research involved the experimental investigation of excitation and charge-changing processes occurring in ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions. Major emphases of the study were: (1) interference effects resulting from coherent electron emission in H2, (2) production of doubly vacant K-shell (hollow ion) states due to electron correlation, and (3) formation of long-lived metastable states in electron transfer processes. During the period of the grant, this research resulted in 23 publications, 12 invited presentations, and 39 contributed presentations at national and international meetings and other institutions. Brief summaries of the completed research are presented below

  17. FERMI(at)Elettra FEL Design Technical Optimization Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Allaria, Enrico; De Ninno, Giovanni; Graves, William

    2006-01-01

    This is the final report of the FEL Design Group for the Technical Optimization Study for the FERMI(at)ELETTRA project. The FERMI(at)ELETTRA project is based on the principle of harmonic upshifting of an initial ''seed'' signal in a single pass, FEL amplifier employing multiple undulators. There are a number of FEL physics principles which underlie this approach to obtaining short wavelength output: (1) the energy modulation of the electron beam via the resonant interaction with an external laser seed (2) the use of a chromatic dispersive section to then develop a strong density modulation with large harmonic overtones (3) the production of coherent radiation by the microbunched beam in a downstream radiator. Within the context of the FERMI project, we discuss each of these elements in turn

  18. SIMS study on statistics and environmental factors in health. Final technical report to Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This final technical report to DOE consists of five individual technical reports and one working paper by members of the SIMS Study at Stanford. Research topics include testing goodness-of-fit for the distribution of errors in regression models, mathematical models of cancer and their use in risk assessment, pollutant standards index (Psi), osteosarcomas among beagles exposed to 239 Plutonium, air pollution and respiratory disease, and models of human exposure to air pollution. Individual summaries of the six reports are indexed separately

  19. Final Technical Report DOE/GO/13142-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Mulvihill; Quang Nguyen

    2010-09-15

    This research adds to the understanding of the areas of residual starch and biomass conversion to alcohol, by providing data from pilot plant equipment of larger scale than the minimum required to give commercially scalable data. Instrumentation and control is in place to capture the information produced, for economic and technical evaluation. The impact of rheology, recycle streams, and residence time distributions on the technical and economic performance can be assessed. Various processes can be compared technically and economically because the pilot plants are readily modifiable. Several technologies for residual starch yield improvement have been identified, implemented, and patent applications filed. Various biomass-to-ethanol processes have been compared and one selected for technical optimization and commercialization. The technical and economic feasibility of the current simplified biomass conversion process is being confirmed by intensive pilot plant efforts as of this writing. Optimization of the feedstock handling and pretreatment is occurring to increase the alcohol yield above the minimum commercially viable level already demonstrated. Samples of biomass residue and reactor blowdown condensate are being collected to determine the technical and economic performance of the high-water-recycle waste treatment system being considered for the process. The project is of benefit to the public because it is advancing the efforts to achieve low-cost fermentable substrates for conversion to transportation fuels. This process combines the hydrolysis of agricultural residues with novel enzymes and organisms to convert the sugars released to transportation fuels. The process development is taking place at a scale allowing commercial development to proceed at a rapid pace.

  20. DOE FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT RP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUSS PETERMAN

    2012-01-01

    The City of Georgetown Utility Systems (GUS) patnered with the private sector, the American Public Power Association (APPA) and Southwestern University to design, construct, test and monitor a solar co-generation system directly connected to the GUS electric distribution system. This report consists of the Primary Technical Report and 3 attachments.

  1. Technical support document for the surface disposal of sewage sludge. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the surface disposal of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in sewage sludge placed on surface disposal sites. The management practices associated with surface disposal are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through surface disposal are discussed

  2. Technical support document for the surface disposal of sewage sludge. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the surface disposal of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in sewage sludge placed on surface disposal sites. The management practices associated with surface disposal are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through surface disposal are discussed.

  3. Technical assistance contractor Management Plan. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project comprises Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (JEG) and its major teaming partners [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (RFW), Sergent, Hauskins & Beckwith Agra, Inc. (SHB Agra), and Geraghty & Miller, Inc. (G&M)]. The first three companies have worked together effectively on the UMTRA Project for more than 10 years. With the initiation of the UMTRA Groundwater Project in April 1991, a need arose to increase the TAC`s groundwater technical breadth and depth, so G&M was brought in to augment the team`s capabilities. The TAC contract`s scope is to provide technical, analytical, environmental, engineering, design, inspection, and management support services to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for both surface and groundwater projects. The TAC team continues to support the DOE in completing surface remedial actions and initiating groundwater remediation work for start-up, characterization, design, construction oversight, and remedial operations. A key feature of the TAC`s management approach is the extensive set of communication systems implemented for the UMTRA Project. These systems assist all functional disciplines in performing UMTRA Project tasks associated with management, technical support, administrative support, and financial/project controls.

  4. Experimental Program Final Technical Progress Report: 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Edward R. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

    2014-09-12

    This is the final technical report of the grant DE-FG02-04ER41301 to the University of Colorado at Boulder entitled "Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics" and describes the results of our funded activities during the period 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012. These activities were primarily carried out at Fermilab, RHIC, and the German lab DESY. Significant advances in these experiments were carried out by members of the Colorado group and are described in detail.

  5. Technical Report - FINAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara Luke, Director, UNLV Engineering Geophysics Laboratory

    2007-04-25

    Improve understanding of the earthquake hazard in the Las Vegas Valley and to assess the state of preparedness of the area's population and structures for the next big earthquake. 1. Enhance the seismic monitoring network in the Las Vegas Valley 2. Improve understanding of deep basin structure through active-source seismic refraction and reflection testing 3. Improve understanding of dynamic response of shallow sediments through seismic testing and correlations with lithology 4. Develop credible earthquake scenarios by laboratory and field studies, literature review and analyses 5. Refine ground motion expectations around the Las Vegas Valley through simulations 6. Assess current building standards in light of improved understanding of hazards 7. Perform risk assessment for structures and infrastructures, with emphasis on lifelines and critical structures 8. Encourage and facilitate broad and open technical interchange regarding earthquake safety in southern Nevada and efforts to inform citizens of earthquake hazards and mitigation opportunities

  6. An Approach to Developing Independent Learning and Non-Technical Skills Amongst Final Year Mining Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobbs, C. G.; Grayson, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to show that engineers need more than technical skills to succeed in industry. This paper describes a curriculum innovation in which so-called "soft" skills, specifically inter-personal and intra-personal skills, were integrated into a final year mining engineering course. The instructional approach was…

  7. Final Technical Report for SISGR: Ultrafast Molecular Scale Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Guest, Jeffrey R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Guisinger, Nathan P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Hla, Saw Wai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Schatz, George C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Seideman, Tamar [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Van Duyne, Richard P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-10

    The Northwestern-Argonne SISGR program utilized newly developed instrumentation and techniques including integrated ultra-high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-TERS/STM) and surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS) to advance the spatial and temporal resolution of chemical imaging for the study of photoinduced dynamics of molecules on plasmonically active surfaces. An accompanying theory program addressed modeling of charge transfer processes using constrained density functional theory (DFT) in addition to modeling of SE-FSRS, thereby providing a detailed description of the excited state dynamics. This interdisciplinary and highly collaborative research resulted in 62 publications with ~ 48% of them being co-authored by multiple SISGR team members. A summary of the scientific accomplishments from this SISGR program is provided in this final technical report.

  8. DIMEC - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1997-01-01

    Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF.......Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF....

  9. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Karen I.

    2007-05-12

    This project contributed significantly to the development of new codes and standards, both domestically and internationally. The NHA collaborated with codes and standards development organizations to identify technical areas of expertise that would be required to produce the codes and standards that industry and DOE felt were required to facilitate commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure. NHA staff participated directly in technical committees and working groups where issues could be discussed with the appropriate industry groups. In other cases, the NHA recommended specific industry experts to serve on technical committees and working groups where the need for this specific industry expertise would be on-going, and where this approach was likely to contribute to timely completion of the effort. The project also facilitated dialog between codes and standards development organizations, hydrogen and fuel cell experts, the government and national labs, researchers, code officials, industry associations, as well as the public regarding the timeframes for needed codes and standards, industry consensus on technical issues, procedures for implementing changes, and general principles of hydrogen safety. The project facilitated hands-on learning, as participants in several NHA workshops and technical meetings were able to experience hydrogen vehicles, witness hydrogen refueling demonstrations, see metal hydride storage cartridges in operation, and view other hydrogen energy products.

  10. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard D.

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  11. Technical support document for land application of sewage sludge. Volume 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.; Beyer, L.; Rookwood, M.; Pacenka, J.; Bergin, J.

    1992-11-01

    The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land applied sewage sludge. The management practices associated with land application are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through land application are discussed

  12. Final Technical Progress Report: Development of Low-Cost Suspension Heliostat; December 7, 2011 - December 6, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, W.

    2013-01-01

    Final technical progress report of SunShot Incubator Solaflect Energy. The project succeeded in demonstrating that the Solaflect Suspension Heliostat design is viable for large-scale CSP installations. Canting accuracy is acceptable and is continually improving as Solaflect improves its understanding of this design. Cost reduction initiatives were successful, and there are still many opportunities for further development and further cost reduction.

  13. NEET-AMM Final Technical Report on Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Scott; Baca, Georgina; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Final technical report summarizes the program progress and technical accomplishments of the Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components project. A series of experiments varying build process parameters (scan speed and laser power) were conducted at the outset to establish the optimal build conditions for each of the alloys. Fabrication was completed in collaboration with Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory (QCML). The density of all sample specimens was measured and compared to literature values. Optimal build process conditions giving fabricated part densities close to literature values were chosen for making mechanical test coupons. Test coupons whose principal axis is on the x-y plane (perpendicular to build direction) and on the z plane (parallel to build direction) were built and tested as part of the experimental build matrix to understand the impact of the anisotropic nature of the process.. Investigations are described 316L SS, Inconel 600, 718 and 800 and oxide dispersion strengthed 316L SS (Yttria) alloys.

  14. NEET-AMM Final Technical Report on Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Denver, CO (United States). Space Systems Company; Baca, Georgina [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Denver, CO (United States). Space Systems Company; O' Connor, Michael [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Denver, CO (United States). Space Systems Company

    2015-12-31

    Final technical report summarizes the program progress and technical accomplishments of the Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components project. A series of experiments varying build process parameters (scan speed and laser power) were conducted at the outset to establish the optimal build conditions for each of the alloys. Fabrication was completed in collaboration with Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory (QCML). The density of all sample specimens was measured and compared to literature values. Optimal build process conditions giving fabricated part densities close to literature values were chosen for making mechanical test coupons. Test coupons whose principal axis is on the x-y plane (perpendicular to build direction) and on the z plane (parallel to build direction) were built and tested as part of the experimental build matrix to understand the impact of the anisotropic nature of the process.. Investigations are described 316L SS, Inconel 600, 718 and 800 and oxide dispersion strengthed 316L SS (Yttria) alloys.

  15. Technical basis for the ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) is the 4th major milestone, representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Detailed Design Report (DDR), the design work was concentrated on the requirements of operation, with only relatively minor changes to design concepts of major components. The FDR is the culmination of almost 6 years collaborative design and supporting technical work by the ITER Joint Central Team and Home Teams under the terms of the ITER EDA Agreement. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Technical basis for the ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) is the 4th major milestone, representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Detailed Design Report (DDR), the design work was concentrated on the requirements of operation, with only relatively minor changes to design concepts of major components. The FDR is the culmination of almost 6 years collaborative design and supporting technical work by the ITER Joint Central Team and Home Teams under the terms of the ITER EDA Agreement

  17. Technical review of externalities issues. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemeyer, V.

    1994-12-01

    Externalities has become the catchword for a major experiment in electric utility regulation. Together with increased competition as a means for economic regulation, this experiment represents a potential revolution in how electric utilities are regulated. It is very important for utilities and policy makers to understand the technical issues and arguments driving the externality experiment. This Technical Review presents four papers covering topics in economics that may play important roles in this revolution. The four papers are: Economic Issues in the Application of Externalities to Electricity Resource Selection; Climate Change, the Marginal Cost of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and the Implications for Carbon Dioxide Emissions Adders; Positive Externalities and Benefits from Electricity; and Socioeconomic Effects of Externality Adders for Electric Utility Emissions

  18. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  19. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  20. Technical study gas storage. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowka, J.; Moeller, A.; Zander, W.; Koischwitz, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    This study will answer the following questions: (a) For what uses was the storage facility designed and for what use is it currently applied? Provide an overview of the technical data per gas storage facility: for instance, what is its capacity, volume, start-up time, etc.; (b) How often has this facility been used during the past 10 years? With what purpose was the facility brought into operation at the time? How much gas was supplied at the time from the storage facility?; (c) Given the characteristics and the use of the storage facility during the past 10 years and projected gas consumption in the future, how will the storage facility be used in the future?; (d) Are there other uses for which the gas storage facility can be deployed, or can a single facility be deployed for numerous uses? What are the technical possibilities in such cases? Questions (a) and (b) are answered separately for every storage facility. Questions (c) and (d) in a single chapter each (Chapter 2 and 3). An overview of the relevant storage data relating to current use, use in the last 10 years and use in future is given in the Annex

  1. 78 FR 29239 - Final Priority; Technical Assistance To Improve State Data Capacity-National Technical Assistance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... Assistance To Improve State Data Capacity--National Technical Assistance Center To Improve State Capacity To... Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Technical Assistance to Improve State... (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus attention on an identified national need to...

  2. Final waste classification and waste form technical position papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    The waste classification technical position paper describes overall procedures acceptable to NRC staff which may be used by licensees to determine the presence and concentrations of the radionuclides listed in section 61.55, and thereby classifying waste for near-surface disposal. This technical position paper also provides guidance on the types of information which should be included in shipment manifests accompanying waste shipments to near-surface disposal facilities. The technical position paper on waste form provides guidance to waste generators on test methods and results acceptable to NRC staff for implementing the 10 CFR Part 61 waste form requirements. It can be used as an acceptable approach for demonstrating compliance with the 10 CFR Part 61 waste structural stability criteria. This technical position paper includes guidance on processing waste into an acceptable stable form, designing acceptable high-integrity containers, packaging cartridge filters, and minimizing radiation effects on organic ion-exchange resins. The guidance in the waste form technical position paper may be used by licensees as the basis for qualifying process control programs to meet the waste form stability requirements, including tests which can be used to demonstrate resistance to degradation arising from the effects of compression, moisture, microbial activity, radiation, and chemical changes. Generic test data (e.g., topical reports prepared by vendors who market solidification technology) may be used for process control program qualification where such generic data is applicable to the particular types of waste generated by a licensee

  3. Alumina reinforced tetragonal zirconia (TZP) composites. Final technical report, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    This final technical report summarizes the significant research results obtained during the period July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1996 in the DOE-supported research project entitled, open-quotes Alumina Reinforced Tetragonal Zirconia (TZP) Compositesclose quotes. The objective of the research was to develop high-strength and high-toughness ceramic composites by combining mechanisms of platelet, whisker or fiber reinforcement with transformation toughening. The approach used included reinforcement of Celia- or yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (Ce-TZP or Y-TZP) with particulates, platelets, or continuous filaments of alumina

  4. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, Mayda [Northwestern University

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  5. State child health; revisions to the regulations implementing the State Children's Health Insurance Program. Interim final rule with comment period; revisions, delay of effective date, and technical amendments to final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-25

    Title XXI authorizes the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) to assist State efforts to initiate and expand the provision of child health assistance to uninsured, low-income children. On January 11, 2001 we published a final rule in the Federal Register to implement SCHIP that has not gone into effect. This interim final rule further delays the effective date, revises certain provisions and solicits public comment, and makes technical corrections and clarifications to the January 2001 final rule based on further review of the comments received and applicable law. Only the provisions set forth in this document have changed. All other provisions set forth in the January 2001 final rule will be implemented without change.

  6. Final priority. Rehabilitation Training: Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-19

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Rehabilitation Training program to establish a Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center (JDVRTAC). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus on training in an area of national need. Specifically, this priority responds to the Presidential Memorandum to Federal agencies directing them to take action to address job-driven training for the Nation's workers. The JDVRTAC will provide technical assistance (TA) to State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to help them develop for individuals with disabilities training and employment opportunities that meet the needs of today's employers.

  7. Final priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection--IDEA Data Management Center. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-05

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) announces a priority under the Technical Assistance on State Data Collection program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to fund a cooperative agreement to establish and operate an IDEA Data Management Center (Center) that will provide technical assistance (TA) to improve the capacity of States to meet the data collection requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, John

    2011-07-15

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurwein, J.

    2011-01-01

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  10. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role......, this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references...... in cooperation and development of ICTs seems to pass unnoticed. However, since they are aligned into ICTs, technicities impact innovation....

  11. Application of DNA based marker mutations for improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop plants. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and Other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants represents the first of three CRPs dealing with the application of molecular markers to mutations and plant breeding and was implemented between 1992 and 1996. A second companion CRP entitled Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops devoted to the application of molecular markers in vegetatively propagated crops species was implemented between 1993 and 1997. One positive consequence of these two CRPs has been the implementation of a third CRP entitled Radioactively Labeled DNA Probes for Crop Improvement, which began in 1995 and aims to provide enabling technologies, in the form of probes and primers, to laboratories in developing countries. The rapid development of molecular marker technologies has also resulted in a dramatic increase in request from developing Member States for technical co-operation projects utilizing molecular markers to improve local varieties for biotic and abiotic stresses and other traits of relevance. With the intensified use of induced mutations in genetic studies, it will be important to continue the important work of understanding induced mutations at the molecular level. Evidence of the progress made in implementing molecular marker technologies in laboratories around the world is presented in this publication, which contains the results presented by the participants at the fourth and final Research Co-ordination Meeting of the CRP held in Vienna, 4-8 November 1996. The FAO and IAEA wish to express their sincere appreciation to the participants of the meeting for their work during the project period resulting in the summary and scientific reports presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Application of DNA based marker mutations for improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop plants. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and Other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants represents the first of three CRPs dealing with the application of molecular markers to mutations and plant breeding and was implemented between 1992 and 1996. A second companion CRP entitled Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops devoted to the application of molecular markers in vegetatively propagated crops species was implemented between 1993 and 1997. One positive consequence of these two CRPs has been the implementation of a third CRP entitled Radioactively Labeled DNA Probes for Crop Improvement, which began in 1995 and aims to provide enabling technologies, in the form of probes and primers, to laboratories in developing countries. The rapid development of molecular marker technologies has also resulted in a dramatic increase in request from developing Member States for technical co-operation projects utilizing molecular markers to improve local varieties for biotic and abiotic stresses and other traits of relevance. With the intensified use of induced mutations in genetic studies, it will be important to continue the important work of understanding induced mutations at the molecular level. Evidence of the progress made in implementing molecular marker technologies in laboratories around the world is presented in this publication, which contains the results presented by the participants at the fourth and final Research Co-ordination Meeting of the CRP held in Vienna, 4-8 November 1996. The FAO and IAEA wish to express their sincere appreciation to the participants of the meeting for their work during the project period resulting in the summary and scientific reports presented in this publication

  13. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-01-01

    The project entitled, 'Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors', was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A and M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  14. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  15. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon Silver

    2009-05-28

    The work done with DOE support during this 15 year period was extensive and successful. It is best summarized by the list of 58 publications (below) which reported progress made with DOE support. These are from the grant period and a few more recent reporting on grant research. Mostly these are primary research reports in reviewed journals. There are also, however, many summary reviews in review journals and in scientific monographs, as they also are key places for reporting research progress. What we did during this grant period (and much longer) was to characterize genetic determinants for bacterial resistances to additional toxic heavy metals of DOE concern, through starting with phenotypic properties of the resistant bacteria to DNA sequence determination and characterization of the genes involved. Over the years (and as shown in the list of publications), the toxic metal-forming elements we have studied included Ag, As, Cd, Cr, and Hg. In each case, we started with basically nothing (or very little) known, progressed through quite detailed understanding, until other laboratory groups also became strongly involved in related studies. More recently, with DOE support, we were the first laboratory group in the world to identify genes for bacterial resistance to silver salts (sil genes) and the closely related silver-and-copper resistance genes cus. This was initially reported in detail in Gupta et al. (1999; see publications list below). We also identified the first toxic metal 'gene island' (multiple transcripts and perhaps 25 genes each in need of detailed study) which encodes the subunits of arsenite oxidase (which we called aso; Silver and Phung, 2005; but most other researchers have subsequently settled on aox for the gene mnemonic). Both of these systems were firsts. Now a few years later, a search on GenBank shows that each is now represented by gene families with more than a dozen examples that have been identified and sequenced. Most of the

  16. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that were responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The studies were based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA

  17. A fully automated 384 capillary array for DNA sequencer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, T

    2003-03-20

    Phase I SpectruMedix has successfully developed an automatic 96-capillary array DNA prototype based on the multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system originated from Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University. With computer control of all steps involved in a 96-capillary array running cycle, the prototype instrument (the SCE9600) is now capable of sequencing 450 base pairs (bp) per capillary, or 48,000 bp per instrument run within 2 hrs. Phase II of this grant involved the advancement of the core 96 capillary technologies, as well as designing a high density 384 capillary prototype. True commercialization of the 96 capillary instrument involved finalization of the gel matrix, streamlining the instrument hardware, creating a more reliable capillary cartridge, and further advancement of the data processing software. Together these silos of technology create a truly commercializable product (the SCE9610) capable of meeting the operation needs of the sequencing centers.

  18. Programs of Study as a State Policy Mandate: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Personal Pathways to Success Initiative. Final Technical Report: Major Findings and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Cathy; Drew, Sam F.; Withington, Cairen; Griffith, Cathy; Swiger, Caroline M.; Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Stringfield, Samuel C.; Stipanovic, Natalie; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This is the final technical report from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education's (NRCCTE's) five-year longitudinal study of South Carolina's Personal Pathway to Success initiative, which was authorized by the state's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) in 2005. NRCCTE-affiliated researchers at the National…

  19. Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

    2007-10-31

    The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

  20. Energy-related inventions program invention 637. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The final technical report for the Pegasus plow, a stalk and root embedding apparatus, describes progress from the development stage to the product support stage. The US Department of Agriculture - Agriculture Research Service (ARS) is now in the second year of a three year study comparing the Pegasus to conventional tillage. So far, no downside has been with the Pegasus and the following benefits have been documented: (1) Energy savings of 65.0 kilowatt hours per hectare over conventional tillage. This is when the Pegasus plow is used to bury whole stalks, and represents a 70% savings over conventional tillage (92.5 kilowatt hours per hectare). (2) Four to seven fewer passes of tillage, depending on the particular situation. This represents a substantial time savings to farmers. (3) So far, no differences in cotton yields. Recent cotton boll counts in one study indicate a higher yield potential with the Pegasus. (4) No disease problems. (5) Significantly higher levels of organic matter in the soil. A hypothesis of the study is that whole stalk burial may reduce plant disease problems. This hypothesis has not yet been proven. (6) Significantly higher levels of nitrate nitrogen. Total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen trended higher but were not significantly different. This shows that whole stalk burial does not adversely affect the nitrogen cycle in the soil and may actually improve it. The marketing support stage of the project is also described in the report.

  1. Technical considerations associated with spent fuel acceptance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supko, E.M.

    1996-06-01

    This study was initiated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to identify technical considerations associated with spent fuel acceptance and implementation of a waste management system that includes the use of transportable storage systems, and to serve as an opening dialogue among Standard Contract Holders and the department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste management (OCRWM) prior to the development of waste acceptance criteria or issuance of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking by OCRWM to amend the Standard Contract. The original purpose of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking was to address changes to the Standard Contract to implement a multi-purpose canister based system and to address other issues that were not adequately addressed in the standard contract. Even if DOE does not develop a multi-purpose canister based system for waste acceptance, it will still be necessary to develop waste acceptance criteria in order to accept spent fuel in transportable storage systems that are being deployed for at-reactor storage. In this study, technical issues associated with spent fuel acceptance will be defined and potential options and alternatives for resolution of technical considerations will be explored

  2. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Isaac [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fueglistaler, Stephan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  3. Final technical report; Mercury Release from Organic matter (OM) and OM-Coated Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, George

    2014-10-02

    This document is the final technical report for a project designed to address fundamental processes controlling the release of mercury from flood plain soils associated with East Fork Poplar Creek, Tennessee near the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge facility. The report summarizes the activities, findings, presentations, and publications resulting from an award to the U.S. Geological that were part of a larger overall effort including Kathy Nagy (University of Illinois, Chicago, Ill) and Joseph Ryan (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO). The specific charge for the U.S.G.S. portion of the study was to provide analytical support for the larger group effort (Nagy and Ryan), especially with regard to analyses of Hg and dissolved organic matter, and to provide information about the release of mercury from the floodplain soils.

  4. Rapid DNA analysis for automated processing and interpretation of low DNA content samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turingan, Rosemary S; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Hogan, Catherine; Jiang, Hua; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of casework samples with low DNA content include those resulting from the transfer of epithelial cells from the skin to an object (e.g., cells on a water bottle, or brim of a cap), blood spatter stains, and small bone and tissue fragments. Low DNA content (LDC) samples are important in a wide range of settings, including disaster response teams to assist in victim identification and family reunification, military operations to identify friend or foe, criminal forensics to identify suspects and exonerate the innocent, and medical examiner and coroner offices to identify missing persons. Processing LDC samples requires experienced laboratory personnel, isolated workstations, and sophisticated equipment, requires transport time, and involves complex procedures. We present a rapid DNA analysis system designed specifically to generate STR profiles from LDC samples in field-forward settings by non-technical operators. By performing STR in the field, close to the site of collection, rapid DNA analysis has the potential to increase throughput and to provide actionable information in real time. A Low DNA Content BioChipSet (LDC BCS) was developed and manufactured by injection molding. It was designed to function in the fully integrated Accelerated Nuclear DNA Equipment (ANDE) instrument previously designed for analysis of buccal swab and other high DNA content samples (Investigative Genet. 4(1):1-15, 2013). The LDC BCS performs efficient DNA purification followed by microfluidic ultrafiltration of the purified DNA, maximizing the quantity of DNA available for subsequent amplification and electrophoretic separation and detection of amplified fragments. The system demonstrates accuracy, precision, resolution, signal strength, and peak height ratios appropriate for casework analysis. The LDC rapid DNA analysis system is effective for the generation of STR profiles from a wide range of sample types. The technology broadens the range of sample

  5. Microscopic heavy-ion theory. Final technical report, June 1, 1993 - May 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, D.J.; Oberacker, V.E.; Umar, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    In this Final Technical Report, the authors summarize the research activities of the three Principal Investigators (Professors Ernst, Oberacker, and Umar) at Vanderbilt University since the last reporting period through the subject award expiration date (Dec. 31, 1996) under contract DE-FG05-87ER40376 with the Department of Energy. The research effort is divided between the following three areas: nuclear structure and astrophysics (microscopic nuclear structure studies and properties of exotic nuclei at HRIBF, supernovae calculations in connection with nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear viscosity studies via muon-induced fission at PSI); pion and kaon interactions with the nucleus at high energies (interaction of pions and kaons with nuclei from low energies to 1 GeV, propagation of excited hadrons in the nuclear medium as probed by pion and electron induced reactions); nuclear physics at high energies (dynamical string-parton model to study multi-particle production at RHIC, electromagnetic lepton pair production at RHIC)

  6. Head Start Impact Study. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed to provide technical detail to support the analysis and findings presented in the "Head Start Impact Study Final Report" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 2010). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Head Start Impact Study and its findings. Chapter 2 provides technical information on the…

  7. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  8. Nanomechanical molecular devices made of DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Ohya, Yuichi

    2014-06-17

    different cell lines, open their shell, and bind to their target. An intelligent DNA origami "sheath" can mimic the function of suppressors in a transcription regulation system to control the expression of a loaded gene. DNA origami "rolls" are created to construct precisely arranged plasmonic devices with metal nanoparticles. All of their functions are derived from their nanomechanical movement, which is programmable by designing the DNA sequence or by using the significant repository of technical achievements in nucleic acid chemistry. Finally, some studies on detailed structural parameters of DNA origami or their mechanical properties in nanoscale are discussed, which may be useful and inspiring for readers who intend to design new nanomechanical DNA origami devices.

  9. Photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yun-bo

    1988-03-01

    This thesis consists of three main parts and totally eight chapters. In Part I, The author will present studies on the photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, specifically, the wavelength dependencies for the photoreversals of thymidine-HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4, 5', 8-trimenthylpsoralen) monoadducts and diadduct and the same adducts incorporated in DNA helices and the wavelength dependecies for the photocrossslinking of thymidine-HMT monoadducts in double-stranded helices. In Part II, The author will report some biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, i.e., the effects on double-stranded DNA stability, DNA structure, and transcription by E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases. Finally, The author will focus on the applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry to investigation of protein-DNA interaction during transcription, which includes the interaction of E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases with DNA in elongation complexes arrested at specific psoralen-DNA adduct sites as revealed by DNase I footprinting experiments. 123 refs., 52 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yun-bo.

    1988-03-01

    This thesis consists of three main parts and totally eight chapters. In Part I, The author will present studies on the photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, specifically, the wavelength dependencies for the photoreversals of thymidine-HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4, 5', 8-trimenthylpsoralen) monoadducts and diadduct and the same adducts incorporated in DNA helices and the wavelength dependecies for the photocrossslinking of thymidine-HMT monoadducts in double-stranded helices. In Part II, The author will report some biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, i.e., the effects on double-stranded DNA stability, DNA structure, and transcription by E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases. Finally, The author will focus on the applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry to investigation of protein-DNA interaction during transcription, which includes the interaction of E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases with DNA in elongation complexes arrested at specific psoralen-DNA adduct sites as revealed by DNase I footprinting experiments. 123 refs., 52 figs., 12 tabs

  11. Technical advisory panel for the large acceptance spectrometer: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Technical Advisory Panel for the Large Acceptance Spectrometer met on November 17--19, 1988, at CEBAF to perform a second review of the status of this project. The charge to the Panel was ''to provide technical advice to the CEBAF directorate on the design, construction, cost, schedule, and implementation of the Large Acceptance Spectrometer.'' In this written report, an overview of the entire project is given. Specific comments on the major components, data handling and analysis, assembly and installation, and management are presented. The Panel's conclusions are contained in the Executive Summary at the beginning of the report

  12. System-Cost-Optimized Smart EVSE for Residential Application: Final Technical Report including Manufacturing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Charles [Delta Products, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In the 2nd quarter of 2012, a program was formally initiated at Delta Products to develop smart-grid-enabled Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) product for residential use. The project was funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under award DE-OE0000590. Delta products was the prime contractor to DOE during the three year duration of the project. In addition to Delta Products, several additional supplier-partners were engaged in this research and development (R&D) program, including Detroit Edison DTE, Mercedes Benz Research and Development North America, and kVA. This report summarizes the program and describes the key research outcomes of the program. A technical history of the project activities is provided, which describes the key steps taken in the research and the findings made at successive stages in the multi-stage work. The evolution of an EVSE prototype system is described in detail, culminating in prototypes shipped to Department of Energy Laboratories for final qualification. After the program history is reviewed, the key attributes of the resulting EVSE are described in terms of functionality, performance, and cost. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of this EVSE to meet or exceed DOE's targets for this program, including: construction of a working product-intent prototype of a smart-grid-enabled EVSE, with suitable connectivity to grid management and home-energy management systems, revenue-grade metering, and related technical functions; and cost reduction of 50% or more compared to typical market priced EVSEs at the time of DOE's funding opportunity announcement (FOA), which was released in mid 2011. In addition to meeting all the program goals, the program was completed within the original budget and timeline established at the time of the award. The summary program budget and timeline, comparing plan versus actual values, is provided for reference, along with several supporting explanatory notes. Technical

  13. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's review of Atlas Corporation's proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs

  14. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair

  15. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  16. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling/ Transport and Dynamics in Torodial Fusion System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanck, Dalton D.

    2010-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended MHD Modeling, DE-FC02-06ER54870, for the period 7/1/06 to 2/15/08. Principal results for this period are: 1. Development of a model for computational modeling for the primitive form of the extended MMD equations. This was reported as Phys. Plasmas 13, 058103 (2006). 2. Comparison between the NIMROD and M3D codes for simulation of the nonlinear sawtooth crash in the CDXU tokamak. This was reported in Phys. Plasmas 14, 056105 (2006). 3. Demonstration of 2-fluid and gyroviscous stabilization of interchange modes using computational extended MHD models. This was reported in Phys. Rev. Letters 101, 085005 (2008). Each of these publications is attached as an Appendix of this report. They should be consulted for technical details.

  17. Technical aspects of typing for HLA-DP alleles using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of single base mismatches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells...... was extracted with either a simple salting out method or phenol/chloroform. Both DNAs could be readily used for PCR. The MgC2 concentration of the PCR buffer and the annealing temperature of the thermal cycle of the PCR were the two most important variables. The MgCl2 concentration and the temperature must...... be carefully titrated for each primer pair in the PCR. The influence of mismatches between the primer and the DNA template were studied and we found that, by using primers differing only from each other at the 3' end, cross-amplification of closely homologous alleles could be avoided. Thus, single base...

  18. DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Mikheikin, Andrey; Olsen, Anita; Leslie, Kevin; Russell-Pavier, Freddie; Yacoot, Andrew; Picco, Loren; Payton, Oliver; Toor, Amir; Chesney, Alden; Gimzewski, James K.; Mishra, Bud; Reed, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Progress in whole-genome sequencing using short-read (e.g., <150 bp), next-generation sequencing technologies has reinvigorated interest in high-resolution physical mapping to fill technical gaps that are not well addressed by sequencing. Here, we report two technical advances in DNA nanotechnology and single-molecule genomics: (1) we describe a labeling technique (CRISPR-Cas9 nanoparticles) for high-speed AFM-based physical mapping of DNA and (2) the first successful demonstration of usin...

  19. Structural Transformation of Wireframe DNA Origami via DNA Polymerase Assisted Gap-Filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nayan P; Matthies, Michael; Joffroy, Bastian; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2018-03-27

    The programmability of DNA enables constructing nanostructures with almost any arbitrary shape, which can be decorated with many functional materials. Moreover, dynamic structures can be realized such as molecular motors and walkers. In this work, we have explored the possibility to synthesize the complementary sequences to single-stranded gap regions in the DNA origami scaffold cost effectively by a DNA polymerase rather than by a DNA synthesizer. For this purpose, four different wireframe DNA origami structures were designed to have single-stranded gap regions. This reduced the number of staple strands needed to determine the shape and size of the final structure after gap filling. For this, several DNA polymerases and single-stranded binding (SSB) proteins were tested, with T4 DNA polymerase being the best fit. The structures could be folded in as little as 6 min, and the subsequent optimized gap-filling reaction was completed in less than 3 min. The introduction of flexible gap regions results in fully collapsed or partially bent structures due to entropic spring effects. Finally, we demonstrated structural transformations of such deformed wireframe DNA origami structures with DNA polymerases including the expansion of collapsed structures and the straightening of curved tubes. We anticipate that this approach will become a powerful tool to build DNA wireframe structures more material-efficiently, and to quickly prototype and test new wireframe designs that can be expanded, rigidified, or mechanically switched. Mechanical force generation and structural transitions will enable applications in structural DNA nanotechnology, plasmonics, or single-molecule biophysics.

  20. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Addendum to the final technical report, May 1--December 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This Addendum to the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program Final Technical Progress Report describes activities performed during the period 1 May 1998 through 31 December 1998, including effort reflecting contract modification M058. These activities include Earth Gravity Assist (EGA) reentry and related analyses which are detailed in Part A, and effort related to the installation of CAGO equipment within Lockheed Martin`s Building 100 facility in Valley Forge, PA, which is detailed in Part B.

  1. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Addendum to the final technical report, May 1-December 31, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This Addendum to the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program Final Technical Progress Report describes activities performed during the period 1 May 1998 through 31 December 1998, including effort reflecting contract modification M058. These activities include Earth Gravity Assist (EGA) reentry and related analyses which are detailed in Part A, and effort related to the installation of CAGO equipment within Lockheed Martin's Building 100 facility in Valley Forge, PA, which is detailed in Part B

  2. Modular Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Program. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the MOD-RTG reference flight design, and Section 3.0 discusses the Ground Demonstration System design. Multicouple technology development is discussed in Section 4.0, and Section 5.0 lists all published technical papers prepared during the course of the contract.

  3. Final report on a study of coherence in acceptability criteria for the technical aspects of risks associated with potentially hazardous installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicken, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the results of the study that was made, under Contract No ECI-1390-B7221-85D, for the European Atomic Energy Community. The aim of the study was to examine and assess the feasibility of developing coherent and uniform criteria for judging the acceptability of the technical aspects of the risks associated with potentially hazardous installations. The report is arranged in five main parts. First the nature of hazardous installations is considered and this provides the basis for examination of the currently-used technical risk acceptability criteria. Next, the possible forms of criteria are explored and then universally consistent partial and overall technical risk acceptability criteria are proposed. Following this the implications of using the criteria proposed at the design, regulatory and operating levels are examined. Then, by testing the criteria against some real decisions, the practical problems of using the proposed criteria are explored. This leads to consideration of possible alternatives to the proposed criteria. Finally the conclusions that appear to be justified are summarized and the need for further work is identified

  4. Protein Science by DNA Sequencing: How Advances in Molecular Biology Are Accelerating Biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Sean A; Savage, David F

    2018-01-09

    A fundamental goal of protein biochemistry is to determine the sequence-function relationship, but the vastness of sequence space makes comprehensive evaluation of this landscape difficult. However, advances in DNA synthesis and sequencing now allow researchers to assess the functional impact of every single mutation in many proteins, but challenges remain in library construction and the development of general assays applicable to a diverse range of protein functions. This Perspective briefly outlines the technical innovations in DNA manipulation that allow massively parallel protein biochemistry and then summarizes the methods currently available for library construction and the functional assays of protein variants. Areas in need of future innovation are highlighted with a particular focus on assay development and the use of computational analysis with machine learning to effectively traverse the sequence-function landscape. Finally, applications in the fundamentals of protein biochemistry, disease prediction, and protein engineering are presented.

  5. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Gary [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Albritton, John [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Denton, David [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Turk, Brian [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gupta, Raghubir [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2018-01-31

    technology has great potential to provide clean syngas from coal and petcoke-based gasification at increased efficiency and at significantly lower capital and operating costs than conventional syngas cleanup technologies. However, before the technology can be deemed ready for scale-up to a full commercial-scale demonstration, additional R&D testing is needed at the site to address the following critical technical risks: WDP sorbent stability and performance; Impact of WDP on downstream cleanup and conversion steps; Metallurgy and refractory; Syngas cleanup performance and controllability; Carbon capture performance and additional syngas cleanup The proposed plan to acquire this additional R&D data involves: Operation of the units to achieve an additional 3,000 hours of operation of the system within the performance period, with a target of achieving 1,000 hours of those hours via continuous operation of the entire integrated pre-commercial demonstration system; Rapid turnaround of repairs and/or modifications required as necessary to return any specific unit to operating status with documentation and lessons learned to support technology maturation, and; Proactive performance of maintenance activities during any unplanned outages and if possible while operating.

  6. NetView technical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report for the NetView Technical Research task. This report is prepared in accordance with Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item A002. NetView assistance was provided and details are presented under the following headings: NetView Management Systems (NMS) project tasks; WBAFB IBM 3090; WPAFB AMDAHL; WPAFB IBM 3084; Hill AFB; McClellan AFB AMDAHL; McClellan AFB IBM 3090; and Warner-Robins AFB.

  7. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. The application of DNA microarrays in gene expression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hal, van N.L.W.; Vorst, O.; Houwelingen, van A.M.M.L.; Kok, E.J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Aharoni, A.; Tunen, van A.J.; Keijer, J.

    2000-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is a new and powerful technology that will substantially increase the speed of molecular biological research. This paper gives a survey of DNA microarray technology and its use in gene expression studies. The technical aspects and their potential improvements are discussed.

  9. Final priority; technical assistance to improve state data capacity--National Technical Assistance Center to improve state capacity to accurately collect and report IDEA data. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Technical Assistance to Improve State Data Capacity program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus attention on an identified national need to provide technical assistance (TA) to States to improve their capacity to meet the data collection and reporting requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). We intend this priority to establish a TA center to improve State capacity to accurately collect and report IDEA data (Data Center).

  10. Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) types in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, L.H.; Koh, C.L.; Lim, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each human cell contains hundreds of mitochondria and thousands of double-stranded circular mtDNA. The delineation of human mtDNA variation and genetics over the past decade has provided unique and often startling insights into human evolution, degenerative diseases, and aging. Each mtDNA of 16,569 base pairs, encodes 13 polypeptides essential to the enzymes of the mitochondrial energy generating pathway, plus the necessary tRNAs and rRNAs. The highly polymorphic noncoding D-(displacement) loop region, also called the control region, is approximately 1.2 kb long. It contains two well-characterized hypervariable (HV-) regions, HV1 and HV2. MtDNA identification is usually based on these sequence differences. According to the TWTGDAM (Technical Working Group for DNA Analysis Methods), the minimum requirement for a mtDNA database for HV1 is from positions 16024 to 16365 and for HV2, from positions 00073 to 00340. The targeted Malaysian population subgroups for this study were mainly the Malays, Chinese, Indians, and indigenous Ibans, Bidayuhs, Kadazan-Dusuns, and Bajaus. Research methodologies undertaken included DNA extraction of samples from unrelated individuals, amplification of the specific regions via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and preparation of template DNA for sequencing by using an automated DNA sequencer. Sufficient nucleotide sequence data were generated from the mtDNA analysis. When the sequences were analyzed, sequence variations were found to be caused by nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Of the three causes of the sequence variations, nucleotide substitutions (86.1%) accounted for the vast majority of polymorphism. It is noted that transitions (83.5%) were predominant when compared to the significantly lower frequencies of transversions (2.6%). Insertions (0.9%) and deletions (13.0%) were rather rare and found only in HV2. The data generated will also form the basis of a Malaysian DNA sequence database of mtDNA D

  11. Scientific publications about DNA structure-function and PCR technique in Costa Rica: a historic view (1953-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertazzi, Federico J

    2004-09-01

    The spreading of knowledge depends on the access to the information and its immediate use. Models are useful to explain specific phenomena. The scientific community accepts some models in Biology after a period of time, once it has evidence to support it. The model of the structure and function of the DNA proposed by Watson & Crick (1953) was not the exception, since a few years later the DNA model was finally accepted. In Costa Rica, DNA function was first mentioned in 1970, in the magazine Biologia Tropical (Tropical Biology Magazine), more than 15 years after its first publication in a scientific journal. An opposite situation occurs with technical innovations. If the efficiency of a new scientific technique is proved in a compelling way, then the acceptance by the community comes swiftly. This was the case of the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR. The first PCR machine in Costa Rica arrived in 1991, only three years after its publication.

  12. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  13. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, 'Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative', was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding

  14. AU2EU : Privacy-preserving matching of DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignatenko, T.; Petkovic, M.; Naccache, D.; Sauveron, D.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing create new opportunities for the use of DNA data in healthcare for diagnostic and treatment purposes, but also in many other health and well-being services. This brings new challenges with regard to the protection and use of this sensitive data. Thus, special technical

  15. Systems study 'Alternative Entsorgung'. Final report. Technical annex 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    In the conditioning plant, fuel elements which have been stored for ten years are loaded into transport containers, unloaded, identified and welded into a dry storage box. The dry store barrel is introduced into a final storage container, which, after being closed, is packed in lost shielding. This so-called final storage barrel is finally placed in a transport container and leaves the conditioning plant in this form by rail for transport to the final storage mine. The fuel element method of treatment 'packing of three complete fuel elements' was used as the reference process. In addition, the method of treatment 'fuel elements dismantled into fuel rods' was also examined. The handling of fuel elements and secondary waste treatment in the reference process are described in detail. (orig./HP) [de

  16. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  17. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  18. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Carelli

    2003-11-03

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed

  19. Immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    We are studying damages that have been shown to be stable radiolysis products found in x-irradiation DNA and thus products that have potential biological consequences. Four thymine ring saturation or fragmentation products were chosen as models for pyrimidine radiolysis products. The first product we synthesized and to which antibodies were elicited was thymine glycol. Thymine glycols are the major stable radiolysis products produced in DNA x-radiation in vitro. Although they retain base pairing characteristics, the stacking properties of thymine glycols are altered due to the saturation of the 5.6 double bond. Thymine glucol is also a useful model because alternative assay proceudres are available and they can selectively be produced in DNA by osmium tetroxide oxidation allowing the development of standards for subsequent measurement of DNA damage in x-irradiated DNA. We have also raised antibodies to dihydrothymine, a major radiolysis product produced in NDA under anaerobic conditions, to 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantoin, the second most predominant stable radiolysis product producted under aerobic conditions, and to urea, a totally non-instructive DNA fragmentation product of thymine hydroperoxides. 29 refs., 2 figs

  20. Technical oversight for installation of TNX piezometers, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidcoe, W.W. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-06-05

    Science Applications International Corporation was tasked under subcontract C002025P to provide technical oversight for the drilling of one pilot borehole, and the drilling and installation of five piezometers in the TNX Area Swamp. The work was performed in accordance with the Statement of Work in Task Order Proposal No. ER39-129 dated August 6, 1996. This report describes the activities associated with the performance of the task.

  1. DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheikin, Andrey; Olsen, Anita; Leslie, Kevin; Russell-Pavier, Freddie; Yacoot, Andrew; Picco, Loren; Payton, Oliver; Toor, Amir; Chesney, Alden; Gimzewski, James K; Mishra, Bud; Reed, Jason

    2017-11-21

    Progress in whole-genome sequencing using short-read (e.g., <150 bp), next-generation sequencing technologies has reinvigorated interest in high-resolution physical mapping to fill technical gaps that are not well addressed by sequencing. Here, we report two technical advances in DNA nanotechnology and single-molecule genomics: (1) we describe a labeling technique (CRISPR-Cas9 nanoparticles) for high-speed AFM-based physical mapping of DNA and (2) the first successful demonstration of using DVD optics to image DNA molecules with high-speed AFM. As a proof of principle, we used this new "nanomapping" method to detect and map precisely BCL2-IGH translocations present in lymph node biopsies of follicular lymphoma patents. This HS-AFM "nanomapping" technique can be complementary to both sequencing and other physical mapping approaches.

  2. Antioxidant Evaluation of Methanolic Extract of Black Nightshades Ripe Fruits against Technical and Formulated Parathion-Induced Damage in Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahiml, E.A.; Abdel-Rahim, G.A.; Atia, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Parathion in technical or formulated form at a sub-lethal dose of 1/20 LD 50 was applied orally or dermally at 2-day interval for three months to determine its effect on RNA, DNA and protein content as well as RNA ase and DNA ase activity in different organs liver, brain and kidneys of adult male albino rats. Also, serum GOT, GPT and ALP activity as well as serum total soluble protein, albumin, globulin, bilirubin and uric acid content were determined in adult male albino rats (Rattus norvegicus). In addition, the present studies were undertaken to investigate different biological activities of the above parameters of black nightshades (Solanum nigrum L) methanolic extract. Two kinds of experimental works were taken off (antioxidants and protective). The results showed that technical and formulated parathion increased RNA and protein content but the content of DNA was insignificantly decreased in all rat organs tissue (liver, brain and kidneys) relative to control. The activity of RNA ase was also stimulated. In case of liver and kidney functions the present data observed that serum GOT, GPT and ALP activity was stimulated but total soluble protein, albumin and globulin content was decreased but the urea, uric acid and bilirubin content of serum was increased. Also, liver lipid peroxidation was elevated significantly either by technical or formulated parathion (ingested orally or induced dermally). It should be noted that formulated parathion ingested orally was the most effective, but the technical one had the lowest toxicity. The results of the present studies showed that crude methanolic extract of black nightshades ripe fruits has a strong antioxidant activity as showed by DPPH, nitric oxide scavenging, total reducing power, Fenton's reaction and total antioxidant capacity assay. Finally the the methanolic extract of the present medicinal plant observed a valuable influence as a protective agent in vivo in serum, liver, brain and kidneys damage of parathion

  3. Volatiles combustion in fluidized beds. Final technical report, 4 September 1992--4 June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, R.A. II; Raffensperger, C.; Hesketh, R.P.

    1996-02-29

    The goal of this project is to investigate the conditions in which volatiles will burn within both the dense and freeboard regions of fluidized beds. Experiments using a fluidized bed operated at incipient fluidization are being conducted to characterize the effect of particle surface area, initial fuel concentration, and particle type on the inhibition of volatiles within a fluidized bed. A review of the work conducted under this grant is presented in this Final Technical Report. Both experimental and theoretical work have been conducted to examine the inhibition of the combustion by the fluidized bed material, sand. It has been shown that particulate phase at incipient fluidization inhibits the combustion of propane by free radical destruction at the surface of sand particles within the particulate phase. The implications of these findings is that at bed temperatures lower than the critical temperatures, gas combustion can only occur in the bubble phase or at the top surface of a bubbling fluidized bed. In modeling fluidized bed combustion this inhibition by the particulate phase should be included.

  4. [Single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication based on DNA origami].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Youjie; Li, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) as the template of DNA replication was attached to DNA origami by a hybridization reaction based on the complementary base-pairing principle. DNA replication catalyzed by E.coli DNA polymerase I Klenow Fragment (KF) was detected using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The height variations between the ssDNA and the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the distribution of KF during DNA replication and biotin-streptavidin (BA) complexes on the DNA strand after replication were detected. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to analyze the changes in the DNA after replication. The designed ssDNA could be anchored on the target positions of over 50% of the DNA origami. The KF was capable of binding to the ssDNA fixed on DNA origami and performing its catalytic activities, and was finally dissociated from the DNA after replication. The height of DNA strand increased by about 0.7 nm after replication. The addition of streptavidin also resulted in an DNA height increase to about 4.9 nm due to the formation of BA complexes on the biotinylated dsDNA. The resulting dsDNA and BA complex were subsequently confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of AFM and DNA origami allows detection and characterization of DNA replication at the single molecule level, and this approach provides better insights into the mechanism of DNA polymerase and the factors affecting DNA replication.

  5. Development of the biosphere code BIOMOD: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, P.

    1983-05-01

    Final report to DoE on the development of the biosphere code BIOMOD. The work carried out under the contract is itemised. Reference is made to the six documents issued along with the final report. These consist of two technical notes issued as interim consultative documents, a user's guide and a programmer's guide to BIOMOD, a database description, program test document and a technical note entitled ''BIOMOD - preliminary findings''. (author)

  6. A Detector for Combined SPECT/CT. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Nagarkar

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the Phase I research was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a high performance SPECT/CT detector module based on a combination of microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an EMCCD readout. We are very pleased to report that our Phase I research has demonstrated the technical feasibility of our approach with a very high degree of success. Specifically, we were able to implement a back-thinned EMCCD with a fiberoptic window which was successfully used to demonstrate the feasibility of near simultaneous radionuclide/CT using the proposed concept. Although significantly limited in imaging area (24 x 24 mm 2 ) and pixel resolution (512 x 512), this prototype has shown exceptional capabilities such as a single optical photon sensitivity, very low noise, an intrinsic resolution of 64 (micro)m for radionuclide imaging, and a resolution in excess of 10 lp/mm for x-ray imaging. Furthermore, the combination of newly developed, thick, microcolumnar CsI and an EMCCD has shown to be capable of operating in a photon counting mode, and that the position and energy information obtained from these data can be used to improve resolution in radionuclide imaging. Finally, the prototype system has successfully been employed for near simultaneous SPECT/CT imaging using both, 125 I and 99m Tc radioisotopes. The tomographic reconstruction data obtained using a mouse heart phantom and other phantoms clearly demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the detector in small animal research. The following were the objectives specified in the Phase I proposal: (1) In consultation with Professor Hasegawa, develop specifications for the Phase I/Phase II prototype detector; (2) Modify current vapor deposition protocols to fabricate ∼2 mm thick microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillators with excellent columnar structure, high light yield, and high spatial resolution; (3) Perform detailed characterization of the film morphology, light output, and spatial resolution, and use

  7. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  8. Final Technical Report: "Representing Endogenous Technological Change in Climate Policy Models: General Equilibrium Approaches"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Sue Wing

    2006-04-18

    The research supported by this award pursued three lines of inquiry: (1) The construction of dynamic general equilibrium models to simulate the accumulation and substitution of knowledge, which has resulted in the preparation and submission of several papers: (a) A submitted pedagogic paper which clarifies the structure and operation of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models (C.2), and a review article in press which develops a taxonomy for understanding the representation of technical change in economic and engineering models for climate policy analysis (B.3). (b) A paper which models knowledge directly as a homogeneous factor, and demonstrates that inter-sectoral reallocation of knowledge is the key margin of adjustment which enables induced technical change to lower the costs of climate policy (C.1). (c) An empirical paper which estimates the contribution of embodied knowledge to aggregate energy intensity in the U.S. (C.3), followed by a companion article which embeds these results within a CGE model to understand the degree to which autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) is attributable to technical change as opposed to sub-sectoral shifts in industrial composition (C.4) (d) Finally, ongoing theoretical work to characterize the precursors and implications of the response of innovation to emission limits (E.2). (2) Data development and simulation modeling to understand how the characteristics of discrete energy supply technologies determine their succession in response to emission limits when they are embedded within a general equilibrium framework. This work has produced two peer-reviewed articles which are currently in press (B.1 and B.2). (3) Empirical investigation of trade as an avenue for the transmission of technological change to developing countries, and its implications for leakage, which has resulted in an econometric study which is being revised for submission to a journal (E.1). As work commenced on this topic, the U.S. withdrawal

  9. Scaling up DNA data storage and random access retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalan, Parikshit; Ceze, Luis; Nguyen, Bichlien; Takahashi, Christopher; Newman, Sharon; Parker, Hsing-Yeh; Rashtchian, Cyrus; Seelig, Georg; Stewart, Kendall; Gupta, Gagan; Carlson, Robert; Mulligan, John; Carmean, Douglas; Yekhanin, Sergey; Makarychev, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Current storage technologies can no longer keep pace with exponentially growing amounts of data. Synthetic DNA offers an attractive alternative due to its potential information density of ~ 1018B/mm3, 107 times denser than magnetic tape, and potential durability of thousands of years. Recent advances in DNA data storage have highlighted technical challenges, in particular, coding and random access, but have stored only modest amounts of data in synthetic DNA. This paper demonstrates an end-to...

  10. Virginia Solar Pathways Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Katharine; Cosby, Sarah

    2018-03-28

    This Report provides a technical review of the final results of a funding award to Virginia Electric and Power Company (Dominion Energy Virginia (DEV) or the Company) for a project under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technologies Office. The three-year project was formally known as the Virginia Solar Pathways Project (VSPP or the Project). The purpose of the VSPP was to develop a collaborative utility-administered solar strategy (Solar Strategy) for DEV’s service territory in the Commonwealth that could serve as a replicable model for other states with similar policy environments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding award enabled DEV to take a focused approach to developing the Solar Strategy for its Virginia service territory. The structure and funding from the DOE award also facilitated valuable input from a formal stakeholder team convened to serve as advisors (Advisory Team) to the VSPP and contribute their perspectives and expertise to both the analysis and strategy development aspects of the Project. The development of the Solar Strategy involved three main goals: • Establish a policy and program framework that would integrate existing solar programs with new options appropriate for the Commonwealth’s policy environment and broader economic development objectives; • Promote wider deployment of solar within a low retail electric rate environment; and • Serve as a sustainable, utility-administered solar model that could be replicated in other states with similar policy environments, including, but not limited to, the entire Southeast region. In support of the VSPP goals, the Project Team commissioned four studies to support the Solar Strategy development. Two studies, completed by Navigant Consulting, focused on the integration of solar into the electric grid. The first solar integration study focused on integration of solar into the distribution grid where the utility system directly connects to and serves end-use customers

  11. FOREX trading strategy formation using technical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Klimavičius, Domas

    2010-01-01

    FOREX technical analysis indicators, their characteristics and capabilities are researched in this final master thesis. The main goal of this thesis is to determine if technical analysis indicators can recognise patterns in price movements and if they can predict future price movement. The first part of the thesis presents with FOREX theoretical aspects, its characteristics and participants. In the second part of the thesis FOREX analysis tools are overviewed, focusing on technical analysis. ...

  12. Final Technical Report for Year 5 Early Career Research Project "Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The Section below summarizes research activities and achievements during the fifth (last) year of the PI’s Early Career Research Project (ECRP). Unlike the first four years of the project, the last year was not funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The ECRP advanced two main areas: i) radiative 3 ↔ 2 radiative transport, via development of a new computer code MPC/Grid that solves the Boltzmann transport equation in full 6+1D (3X+3V+time); and ii) application of relativistic hydrodynamics, via development of a self-consistent framework to convert viscous fluids to particles. In Year 5 we finalized thermalization studies with radiative gg ↔ ggg transport (Sec. 1.1.1) and used nonlinear covariant transport to assess the accuracy of fluid-to-particle conversion models (Sec. 1.1.2), calculated observables with self-consistent fluid-to-particle conversion from realistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution (Secs. 1.2.1 and 1.2.2), extended the covariant energy loss formulation to heavy quarks (Sec. 1.4.1) and studied energy loss in small systems (Sec. 1.4.2), and also investigated how much of the elliptic flow could have non-hydrodynamic origin (Sec 1.3). Years 1-4 of the ECRP were ARRA-funded and, therefore, they have their own report document ’Final Technical Report for Years 1-4 of the Early Career Research Project “Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter”’ (same award number DE-SC0004035). The PI’s group was also part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration, a multi-institution project that overlapped in time significantly with the ECRP. Purdue achievements as part of the JET Top- ical Collaboration are in a separate report “Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration” (award DE-SC0004077).

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitelegge, JP; Faull, KF

    2005-06-01

    ultimately define the entire proteome. While some of the IMTs were matched to masses calculated from translations of genomic open-reading frames allowing reasonably confident identification of about half of them (hypothetical IMTs), we are currently validating identifications using a combination of peptide mass fingerprinting after cyanogen bromide cleavage and LC-MSMS after trypsin, of protein in fractions collected during LC-MS+. In order to gain more complete proteome coverage we are applying a liquid separation in front of the LC-MS+ experiment. Size-exclusion chromatography is the first separation technology to be employed, yielding immediate benefits, while still not satisfactory for overall resolution of complexes. Total membranes were solubilized with dodecyl maltoside (1.5%) and separated on deactivated silica (G 4000 SW). LC-MS+ analysis of less-retained chlorophyll-containing fractions, using reverse-phase and size-exclusion technologies, yielded intact protein mass spectra of the two large photosystem I subunits PsaA and PsaB as well as many other IMTs (Figures 1 & 2). These integral membrane proteins have eleven transmembrane helices and, at 81 and 83 kDa, represented one of the most significant challenges to the intact protein molecular weight approach. The identities of the proteins were confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting and while there is good general agreement between measured and calculated masses it is noted that modest post-translational modifications are necessary to account for the measured molecular weights of the intact proteins. Whether these discrepancies are due to genuine post-translational modifications or DNA sequence errors remains to be determined. The data have been published allowing us to claim to be the first to have completed high-resolution electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry of the core subunits of Photosystem II, Photosystem I and the cytochrome b{sub 6}f complex providing effective proof-of-principle for application of

  14. 75 FR 33682 - Export Administration Regulations; Technical Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ...-01] RIN 0694-AE93 Export Administration Regulations; Technical Amendments AGENCY: Bureau of Industry... Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) makes a technical amendment to the Export Administration... review of final decisions and orders issued in BIS export control administrative enforcement proceedings...

  15. Health care fraud and abuse data collection program: technical revisions to Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank data collection activities. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-21

    The rule finalizes technical changes to the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) data collection reporting requirements by clarifying the types of personal numeric identifiers that may be reported to the data bank in connection with adverse actions. The rule clarifies that in lieu of a Social Security Number (SSN), an individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN) may be reported to the data bank when, in those limited situations, an individual does not have an SSN.

  16. The evaluation of a framework for measuring the non-technical ward round skills of final year nursing students: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kara; McKenzie, Karen; Kelleher, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The importance of non-technical skills (NTS) to patient outcomes is increasingly being recognised, however, there is limited research into how such skills can be taught and evaluated in student nurses in relation toward rounds. This pilot study describes an evaluation of a NTS framework that could potentially be used to measure ward round skills of student nurses. The study used an observational design. Potential key NTS were identified from existing literature and NTS taxonomies. The proposed framework was then used to evaluate whether the identified NTS were evident in a series of ward round simulations that final year general nursing students undertook as part of their training. Finally, the views of a small group of qualified nurse educators, qualified nurses and general nursing students were sought about whether the identified NTS were important and relevant to practice. The proposed NTS framework included seven categories: Communication, Decision Making, Situational Awareness, Teamwork and Task Management, Student Initiative and Responsiveness to Patient. All were rated as important and relevant to practice. The pilot study suggests that the proposed NTS framework could be used as a means of evaluating student nurse competencies in respect of many non-technical skills required for a successful ward round. Further work is required to establish the validity of the framework in educational settings and to determine the extent to which it is of use in a non-simulated ward round setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry - From DNA to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    2013-01-01

    A brief review of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presented. The present work touches on a few technical aspects and recent developments of AMS, and describes two specific applications of AMS, the dating of human DNA with the 14 C bomb peak and the search for superheavy elements in nature. Since two extended general reviews on technical developments in AMS [1] and applications of AMS [2] will appear in 2013, frequent reference to these reviews is made. (authors)

  18. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting. Final Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-01-01

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 (micro)m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of ∼ 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light

  19. Polar source analysis : technical memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The following technical memorandum describes the development, testing and analysis of various polar source data sets. The memorandum also includes recommendation for potential inclusion in future releases of AEDT. This memorandum is the final deliver...

  20. Vehicle infrastructure integration proof of concept : technical description--vehicle : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-19

    This report provides the technical description of the VII system developed for the Cooperative Agreement VII Program between the USDOT and the VII Consortium. The basic architectural elements are summarized and detailed descriptions of the hardware a...

  1. The application of DNA microarrays in gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, N L; Vorst, O; van Houwelingen, A M; Kok, E J; Peijnenburg, A; Aharoni, A; van Tunen, A J; Keijer, J

    2000-03-31

    DNA microarray technology is a new and powerful technology that will substantially increase the speed of molecular biological research. This paper gives a survey of DNA microarray technology and its use in gene expression studies. The technical aspects and their potential improvements are discussed. These comprise array manufacturing and design, array hybridisation, scanning, and data handling. Furthermore, it is discussed how DNA microarrays can be applied in the working fields of: safety, functionality and health of food and gene discovery and pathway engineering in plants.

  2. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Final report, June 1, 1986--August 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 10 years significant advances have been made impacting the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The principal objective of this work was the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of radiation damage to DNA through the direct and indirect effects. Recently the work concentrated on the direct effect of radiation damage on DNA. The objective was to elucidate the ultimate radiation chemical damage to DNA arising from the direct effect. In this effort the focus was on the application of three techniques. ESR spectroscopic measurement of initial radicals formed in DNA and its hydration layer at low temperatures. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were employed to give highly accurate theoretical predictions of early events such as electron and hole localization sites which serve to test and to clarify the experimental observations. HPLC and GC-mass spectroscopic assays of DNA base products formation provide the ultimate chemical outcome of the initial radiation events. The bridge between the early ion radical species and the non-radical products is made in ESR studies which follow the chemistry of the early species as they react with water and or other DNA bases. The use of these techniques has resulted in a new and fundamental understanding of the radiation damage to DNA on a molecular scale. From this work, a working model for DNA damage from the initial ionization event to the eventual formation of molecular base damage products and strand breaks has been formulated. Results over the past several years which have led to the formulation of this model are described

  3. Final Scientific and Technical Report State and Regional Biomass Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

    2008-12-29

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

  4. NUSC Technical Publications Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    Facility personnel especially that of A. Castelluzzo, E. Deland, J. Gesel , and E. Szlosek (all of Code 4343). Reviewed and Approved: 14 July 1980 D...their technical content and format. Review and approve the manual outline, the review manuscript, and the final camera - reproducible copy. Conduct in

  5. [Sequencing by hybridization methods to generate large arrays of oligonucleotides]. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The subject of this project is to address a pressing need for custom DNA microarrays (chips) which can be easily and at low cost formatted and revised for research. In this sense, the term custom means chips for which there is need for limited quantities (less than hundreds) of any particular chip design which contains a large number of different, users defined sequences. Of the three principal approaches to fabricate DNA microarrays, the two which have been commercialized (a and b below) are not particularly suited to research purposes because of the significant time and costs required, once a result is obtained, to utilize that result in the design of a new and better chip: (a) the photodeprotection scheme used by Affymetrix; and (b) the spotting of pre-synthesized oligos or c-DNA onto surfaces.

  6. Medium energy measurements of N-N parameters. Final technical report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrose, D.; Betts, W.; Coffey, P.; Glass, G.; McDonough, J.; Riley, P.; Tang, J.L.

    1998-08-01

    This document is a final technical report describing the accomplishments of the medium/high energy nuclear physics research program at the University of Texas at Austin. The research program had four main thrusts, only one of which can be considered as measurements of N-N parameters: (1) finishing the data analyses associated with recent LAMPF and TRIUMPF N-N experiments, whose overall purpose has been the determination of the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes, both for isospin 0 and 1 at medium energies; (2) continuing work on BNL E871, a search for rare decay modes of the K L ; (3) work on the RHIC-STAR project, an experiment to create and study a quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter at high energy density; (4) beginning a new AGS experiment (E896) which will search for the lowest mass state of the predicted strange di-baryons, the Ho, and other exotic states of nuclear matter through nucleus-nucleus collisions

  7. NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Holbert, Connie [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Petrolino, Joseph [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Watkins, Bart [Power Source Technologies Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Irick, David [Power Source Technologies Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2011-12-31

    The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engine's commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector

  8. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R. C.; McCarley, T. M.

    2006-05-04

    . Platform teams organize faculty and students for cross-disciplinary, systems-oriented research and collaborative learning. To date, nine platforms have been developed, although these will most likely be reorganized into a smaller number of broader topics. In the spring of 2004, BRT faculty initiated a regional partnership and collaborative learning program with colleagues at the University of Minnesota, Kansas State University, and South Dakota State University to develop distance education courses in biorenewable resources and technology. As a fledgling graduate program, the BRT graduate program didn’t have the breadth of resources to offer a large number of courses in biorenewables. Other schools faced a similar problem. The academic consortium as first conceived would allow students from the member schools to enroll in biorenewables courses from any of the participating schools, which would assure the necessary enrollment numbers to offer specialized course work. Since its inception, the collaborative curriculum partnership has expanded to include Louisiana State University and the University of Wisconsin. A second international curriculum development campaign was also initiated in the spring of 2004. In particular, several BRT faculty teamed with colleagues at the University of Arkansas, University of Washington, University of Gent (Belgium), National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse (France), and Technical University of Graz (Austria) to develop an EU-US exchange program in higher education and vocational education/training (entitled “Renewable Resources and Clean Technology”).

  9. DNA Self-Assembly: From Chirality to Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient or long-term DNA self-assembly participates in essential genetic functions. The present review focuses on tight DNA-DNA interactions that have recently been found to play important roles in both controlling DNA higher-order structures and their topology. Due to their chirality, double helices are tightly packed into stable right-handed crossovers. Simple packing rules that are imposed by DNA geometry and sequence dictate the overall architecture of higher order DNA structures. Close DNA-DNA interactions also provide the missing link between local interactions and DNA topology, thus explaining how type II DNA topoisomerases may sense locally the global topology. Finally this paper proposes that through its influence on DNA self-assembled structures, DNA chirality played a critical role during the early steps of evolution.

  10. Multagenicity of radon and radon daughters. Final technical report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the dose-response relationship with regard to the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose-rate dependence was studied, as well as the nature of the DNA lesions. The effect of DNA repair on the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure and on the character of the DNA lesions was investigated by comparing the response of L5178Y strains that differ in their ability to rejoin X radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. The nature of radon/radon daughter-induced mutational lesions in human lymphoblasts was also investigated

  11. Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-08

    This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

  12. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

  13. Minutes of the IFMIF technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Takeda, M.; Ida, M.; Maebara, S.; Yutani, T.; Sugimoto, M.

    2004-03-01

    The IFMIF Technical Meeting was held on December 4-5, 2003 at Shiran-kaikan, Kyoto University. The main objectives are 1) to finalize the Comprehensive Design Report (CDR), 2) to discuss IFMIF cost and organization, 3) to review technical status of major systems, transition phase activities and EVEDA plan. This report presents a brief summary of the results of the meeting. Agenda, participants list and presentation materials are attached as Appendix. (author)

  14. Establishment of the International Power Institute. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julius E. Coles

    2000-08-04

    The International Power Institute, in collaboration with American industries, seeks to address technical, political, economic and cultural issues of developing countries in the interest of facilitating profitable transactions in power related infrastructure projects. IPI works with universities, governments and commercial organizations to render project-specific recommendations for private-sector investment considerations. IPI also established the following goals: Facilitate electric power infrastructure transactions between developing countries and the US power industry; Collaborate with developing countries to identify development strategies to achieve energy stability; and Encourage market driven solutions and work collaboratively with other international trade energy, technology and banking organizations.

  15. High tracking resolution detectors. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, Stefan; Li, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution tracking detectors based on Active Pixel Sensor (APS) have been valuable tools in Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics research, and have contributed to major discoveries. Their integration time, radiation length and readout rate is a limiting factor for the planed luminosity upgrades in nuclear and high-energy physics collider-based experiments. The goal of this program was to demonstrate and develop high-gain, high-resolution tracking detector arrays with faster readout, and shorter radiation length than APS arrays. These arrays may operate as direct charged particle detectors or as readouts of high resolution scintillating fiber arrays. During this program, we developed in CMOS large, high-resolution pixel sensor arrays with integrated readout, and reset at pixel level. Their intrinsic gain, high immunity to surface and moisture damage, will allow operating these detectors with minimal packaging/passivation requirements and will result in radiation length superior to APS. In Phase I, we designed and fabricated arrays with calorimetric output capable of sub-pixel resolution and sub-microsecond readout rate. The technical effort was dedicated to detector and readout structure development, performance verification, as well as to radiation damage and damage annealing.

  16. Expectation and task for constructing the volume reduction system of removed soils. In search of the technical integrity from the intermediate storage to final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hisaki

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate storage volume of the removed soils and incineration ash in Fukushima is supposed about 22 million cubic meters. Within 30 years after starting the intermediate storage, the final disposal outside Fukushima prefecture to these removed soils and incineration ash is determined by the law. Because these removed soils are the very-very low radio activity, the volume reduction method is most effective to reduce the burden of the final disposal. As the volume reduction technology is the stage of research and development, the possibility of the introduction of the volume reduction technology that has the consistency of the final disposal technology is evaluated from the point of view of cost. Since this business is accompanied by economic and technical risk to implement private companies, this project is considered appropriate to be implemented as a national project. (author)

  17. Scalable data management, analysis and visualization (SDAV) Institute. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2017-03-28

    The purpose of the SDAV institute is to provide tools and expertise in scientific data management, analysis, and visualization to DOE’s application scientists. Our goal is to actively work with application teams to assist them in achieving breakthrough science, and to provide technical solutions in the data management, analysis, and visualization regimes that are broadly used by the computational science community. Over the last 5 years members of our institute worked directly with application scientists and DOE leadership-class facilities to assist them by applying the best tools and technologies at our disposal. We also enhanced our tools based on input from scientists on their needs. Many of the applications we have been working with are based on connections with scientists established in previous years. However, we contacted additional scientists though our outreach activities, as well as engaging application teams running on leading DOE computing systems. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: first considering the application of existing tools, followed by the customization necessary for each particular application, and then the deployment in real frameworks and infrastructures. The institute is organized into three areas, each with area leaders, who keep track of progress, engagement of application scientists, and results. The areas are: (1) Data Management, (2) Data Analysis, and (3) Visualization. Kitware has been involved in the Visualization area. This report covers Kitware’s contributions over the last 5 years (February 2012 – February 2017). For details on the work performed by the SDAV institute as a whole, please see the SDAV final report.

  18. Medicare and Medicaid programs; salary equivalency guidelines for physical therapy, respiratory therapy, speech language pathology, and occupational therapy services; revised effective date and technical correction--HCFA. Final rule; delay of effective date and correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-31

    This document delays the effective date of the final rule on salary equivalency guidelines, published in the Federal Register (63 FR 5106) on January 30, 1998, from April 1, 1998 to April 10, 1998. In addition, we are making a technical correction in the preamble to the January 30, 1998 final rule.

  19. LET-effects in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.

    1994-11-01

    In this contribution, an introductory view on the physical properties of ions is given and the cellular response to high LET radiation is summarized. Then the measurements of strand break induction of DNA in solution and in intracellular DNA are reported and compared to cell survival. The possibility of changes in the quality of the lesions is discussed and finally the present status of model calculations in comparison to the experiments is given. (orig./HSI)

  20. Summary of the ITER final design report. July 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a summary of the ITER final design report foreseen during the current, Engineering Design Activities (EDA), phase of the ITER project. The report presents the results of collaborative design and supporting technical work undertaken by the ITER Joint Central team (JCT) and the Home Teams (HT) of the parties to the agreement on co-operation in the Engineering Design Activities for ITER (the ITER EDA Agreement). This report marks the achievement of the full technical scope of activities indicated in the ITER EDA Agreement, with a final design which meets the programmatic objective defined in the Agreement and satisfies detailed scientific, technical and costing objectives set by ITER Council in 1998

  1. New usable technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, S.A.; Tomasi, L.T.; Bernier, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    After 2 yr of preparation, 1988 finally saw the nuclear industry writing operator-oriented technical specifications. This effort is a continuation of previous efforts to develop improved and usable standard technical specifications (STSs), and is being conducted by the four nuclear steam supply system vendor owners' groups under the auspices of the Nuclear Management Resources Council. Each participant is currently preparing a set of improved STSs based on a writer's guide that was developed through a combined industry effort. In May of 1987, a Human Factors Improvements to Technical Specifications (HFITS) task group was formed to prepare a writer's guide for improved, industrywide STSs. This task group was composed of two representatives from each owners' group, one with a human factors background and one with some operations background. Two documents were prepared in 6 months, a human factors report laying the groundwork for the considerations to go into technical specifications and a writer's guide for their preparation. This paper reports on the application of this writer's guide to the writing of improved STS

  2. TADS Final Evaluation Report, 1980-81. Appendix S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Tanya M.; And Others

    The document contains the final report of the Technical Assistance Development System (TADS), a program which provided technical assistance (TA) services to 53 Handicapped Children's Early Education Program (HCEEP) demonstration projects and 13 State Implementation Grants (SIGs). The evaluation report is divided into five sections. Section 1…

  3. Final report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities. April 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. USDOE Grant No. DE-FG01-99-EE35098

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2002-03-22

    This is the final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association, and the Washington State University Energy Program.

  4. Fifth technical meeting on quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, A.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports on the 5th Technical Meeting on Quality which was held in San Diego on 20-22 October 1997 and which was attended by representatives of the Home and Joint Central Team and of manufacturers currently involved in the Large R and D projects. The meeting made progress towards the finalization of the ITER Quality Manual document for inclusion in the Final Design Report and the definition of the quality necessary for ITER procurement and construction

  5. Functional criteria for emergency response facilities. Technical report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report describes the facilities and systems to be used by nuclear power plant licensees to improve responses to emergency situations. The facilities include the Technical Support Center (TSC), Onsite Operational Support Center (OSC), and Nearsite Emergency Operations Facility (EOF), as well as a brief discussion of the emergency response function of the control room. The data systems described are the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) and Nuclear Data Link (NDL). Together, these facilities and systems make up the total Emergency Response Facilities (ERFs). Licensees should follow the guidance provided both in this report and in NUREG-0654 (FEMA-REP-1), Revision 1, for design and implementation of the ERFs

  6. Plasmid fermentation process for DNA immunization applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2014-01-01

    Plasmid DNA for immunization applications must be of the highest purity and quality. The ability of downstream purification to efficiently produce a pure final product is directly influenced by the performance of the upstream fermentation process. While several clinical manufacturing facilities already have validated fermentation processes in place to manufacture plasmid DNA for use in humans, a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale fermentation process can be valuable for in-house production of plasmid DNA for use in animal efficacy studies. This chapter describes a simple fed-batch fermentation process for producing bacterial cell paste enriched with high-quality plasmid DNA. A constant feeding strategy results in a medium cell density culture with continuously increasing plasmid amplification towards the end of the process. Cell banking and seed culture preparation protocols, which can dramatically influence final product yield and quality, are also described. These protocols are suitable for production of research-grade plasmid DNA at the 100 mg-to-1.5 g scale from a typical 10 L laboratory benchtop fermentor.

  7. Final Technical Report for Award DESC0011912, "Trimodal Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy: Simultaneous 4D Mapping of Conservative and Dissipative Probe-Sample Interactions of Energy-Relevant Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solares, Santiago D. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-22

    The final project report covering the period 7/1/14-6/30/17 provides an overview of the technical accomplishments in the areas of (i) fundamental viscoelasticity, (ii) multifrequency atomic force microscopy, and (iii) characterization of energy-relevant materials with atomic force microscopy. A list of publications supported by the project is also provided.

  8. The role of non-technical skills in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Riaz A; Fowler, Alexander J; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-12-01

    Non-technical skills are of increasing importance in surgery and surgical training. A traditional focus on technical skills acquisition and competence is no longer enough for the delivery of a modern, safe surgical practice. This review discusses the importance of non-technical skills and the values that underpin successful modern surgical practice. This narrative review used a number of sources including written and online, there was no specific search strategy of defined databases. Modern surgical practice requires; technical and non-technical skills, evidence-based practice, an emphasis on lifelong learning, monitoring of outcomes and a supportive institutional and health service framework. Finally these requirements need to be combined with a number of personal and professional values including integrity, professionalism and compassionate, patient-centred care.

  9. The role of non-technical skills in surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Riaz A.; Fowler, Alexander J.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Non-technical skills are of increasing importance in surgery and surgical training. A traditional focus on technical skills acquisition and competence is no longer enough for the delivery of a modern, safe surgical practice. This review discusses the importance of non-technical skills and the values that underpin successful modern surgical practice. This narrative review used a number of sources including written and online, there was no specific search strategy of defined databases. Modern surgical practice requires; technical and non-technical skills, evidence-based practice, an emphasis on lifelong learning, monitoring of outcomes and a supportive institutional and health service framework. Finally these requirements need to be combined with a number of personal and professional values including integrity, professionalism and compassionate, patient-centred care. PMID:26904193

  10. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  11. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Lee, Yueh-Luen; Lai, Yi-Hua; Chen, Jeremy J W; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  12. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yu Wang

    Full Text Available The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone (MGBG enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  13. AIPM Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mookken

    2006-06-30

    The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

  14. ITER technical advisory committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.

    2001-01-01

    The 17th Meeting of the ITER Technical Advisory Committee (TAC-17) was held on February 19-22, the ITER Garching Work Site in Germany. The objective of the meeting was to review the Draft Final Design Report of ITER-FEAT and assess the ability of the self-consistent overall design both to satisfy the technical objectives previously defined and to meet the cost limitations. TAC-17 was also organized to confirm that the design and critical elements, with emphasis on the key recommendations made at previous TAC meetings, are such as to extend the confidence in starting ITER construction. It was also intended to provide the ITER Council, scheduled to meet on 27 and 28 February in Toronto, with a technical assessment and key recommendations of the above mentioned report

  15. Repair of abasic sites in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianov, Grigory L.; Sleeth, Kate M.; Dianova, Irina I.; Allinson, Sarah L

    2003-10-29

    Repair of both normal and reduced AP sites is activated by AP endonuclease, which recognizes and cleaves a phosphodiester bond 5' to the AP site. For a short period of time an incised AP site is occupied by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and then DNA polymerase {beta} adds one nucleotide into the repair gap and simultaneously removes the 5'-sugar phosphate. Finally, the DNA ligase III/XRCC1 complex accomplishes repair by sealing disrupted DNA ends. However, long-patch BER pathway, which is involved in the removal of reduced abasic sites, requires further DNA synthesis resulting in strand displacement and the generation of a damage-containing flap that is later removed by the flap endonuclease. Strand-displacement DNA synthesis is accomplished by DNA polymerase {delta}/{epsilon} and DNA ligase I restores DNA integrity. DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase {delta}/{epsilon} is dependent on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, which also stimulates the DNA ligase I and flap endonuclease. These repair events are supported by multiple protein-protein interactions.

  16. Technical specification improvements to containment heat removal and emergency core cooling systems: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, W.P.; Ha, C.; Pentzien, D.C.; Visweswaran, S.

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis for technical specification improvements to the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) and containment heat removal systems (EPRI Research Project 2142-3). The objective of this project is to further develop a reliability- and risk-based methodology to provide improvements by considering groups of surveillance test intervals and allowed out-of-service times jointly. This was done for the technical specifications for the ECCS, containment heat removal equipment, and supporting systems of a boiling water reactor plant. The project (1) developed a methodology for optimizing groups of surveillance test intervals and allowed out-of-service times jointly, (2) applied the methodology in a case study of a specific operating plant, Hatch-2, and (3) evaluated benefits of the application. The results of the case study demonstrate that beneficial technical specification improvements can be realized with application of the methodology. By tightening a small group of sensitive surveillance test intervals (STIs) and allowed out-of-service times (AOTs), a larger group of less sensitive STIs and AOTs can be extended resulting in an overall plant operating cost improvement without reducing the plant safety. The reliability- and risk-based methodology and results from this project can be effectively applied for technical specification improvements at other operating plants

  17. ITER EDA technical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Six years of technical work under the ITER EDA Agreement have resulted in a design which constitutes a complete description of the ITER device and of its auxiliary systems and facilities. The ITER Council commented that the Final Design Report provides the first comprehensive design of a fusion reactor based on well established physics and technology

  18. Anti-DNA antibody in serum measured by radioimmunoassay (Farr technique)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manthorpe, R; Palit, J; Bendixen, G [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1978-01-01

    The anti DNA antibody determination in serum is increasingly used because it supports the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with high selectivity. The present work evaluates several of the technical variables of the Farr radioimmunoassay for anti-DNA antibody determination and describes a recommendable procedure. The most important sources of error are emphasized and the range for normal blood donors and a group of hospital patients without SLE is given.

  19. Anti-DNA antibody in serum measured by radioimmunoassay (Farr technique)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthorpe, R.; Palit, J.; Bendixen, G.

    1978-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibody determination in serums is increasingly used because it supports the diagnosis of systemic lupres erythematosus (SLE) with high selectivity. The present work evaluates several of the technical variables of the Farr radioimmunoassay for anti-DNA antibody determination and describes a recommendable procedure, emphasizes the most important sources of error and gives the range of normal blood donors and a group of hospital patients without SLE. (author)

  20. DOE Utility Matching Program Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighat, Alireza

    2002-01-01

    This is the Final report for the DOE Match Grant (DE-FG02-99NE38163) awarded to the Nuclear and Radiological Engineering (NRE) Department, University of Florida, for the period of September 1999 to January 2002. This grant has been instrumental for maintaining high-quality graduate and undergraduate education at the NRE department. The grant has been used for supporting student entry and retention and for upgrading nuclear educational facilities, nuclear instrumentation, computer facilities, and computer codes to better enable the incorporation of experimental experiences and computer simulations related to advanced light water fission reactor engineering and other advanced reactor concepts into the nuclear engineering course curricula

  1. Microfluidic magnetic fluidized bed for DNA analysis in continuous flow mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Neuta, Iván; Pereiro, Iago; Ahlford, Annika; Ferraro, Davide; Zhang, Qiongdi; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Descroix, Stéphanie; Nilsson, Mats

    2018-04-15

    Magnetic solid phase substrates for biomolecule manipulation have become a valuable tool for simplification and automation of molecular biology protocols. However, the handling of magnetic particles inside microfluidic chips for miniaturized assays is often challenging due to inefficient mixing, aggregation, and the advanced instrumentation required for effective actuation. Here, we describe the use of a microfluidic magnetic fluidized bed approach that enables dynamic, highly efficient and simplified magnetic bead actuation for DNA analysis in a continuous flow platform with minimal technical requirements. We evaluate the performance of this approach by testing the efficiency of individual steps of a DNA assay based on padlock probes and rolling circle amplification. This assay comprises common nucleic acid analysis principles, such as hybridization, ligation, amplification and restriction digestion. We obtained efficiencies of up to 90% for these reactions with high throughput processing up to 120μL of DNA dilution at flow rates ranging from 1 to 5μL/min without compromising performance. The fluidized bed was 20-50% more efficient than a commercially available solution for microfluidic manipulation of magnetic beads. Moreover, to demonstrate the potential of this approach for integration into micro-total analysis systems, we optimized the production of a low-cost polymer based microarray and tested its analytical performance for integrated single-molecule digital read-out. Finally, we provide the proof-of-concept for a single-chamber microfluidic chip that combines the fluidized bed with the polymer microarray for a highly simplified and integrated magnetic bead-based DNA analyzer, with potential applications in diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vadose zone microbial community structure and activity in metal/radionuclide contaminated sediments. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkwill, David L.

    2002-08-17

    This final technical report describes the research carried out during the final two months of the no-cost extension ending 11/14/01. The primary goals of the project were (1) to determine the potential for transformation of Cr(VI) (oxidized, mobile) to Cr(III) (reduced, immobile) under unsaturated conditions as a function of different levels and combinations of (a) chromium, (b) nitrate (co-disposed with Cr), and (c) molasses (inexpensive bioremediation substrate), and (2) to determine population structure and activity in experimental treatments by characterization of the microbial community by signature biomarker analysis and by RT-PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. It was determined early in the one-year no-cost extension period that the T-RFLP approach was problematic in regard to providing information on the identities of microorganisms in the samples examined. As a result, it could not provide the detailed information on microbial community structure that was needed to assess the effects of treatments with chromium, nitrate, and/or molasses. Therefore, we decided to obtain the desired information by amplifying (using TR-PCR, with the same primers used for T-RFLP) and cloning 16S rRNA gene sequences from the same RNA extracts that were used for T-RFLP analysis. We also decided to use a restriction enzyme digest procedure (fingerprinting procedure) to place the clones into types. The primary focus of the research carried out during this report period was twofold: (a) to complete the sequencing of the clones, and (b) to analyze the clone sequences phylogenetically in order to determine the relatedness of the bacteria detected in the samples to each other and to previously described genera and species.

  3. High-fidelity target sequencing of individual molecules identified using barcode sequences: de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA from cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukita, Yoji; Matoba, Ryo; Uchida, Junji; Hamakawa, Takuya; Doki, Yuichiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kato, Kikuya

    2015-08-01

    Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an emerging field of cancer research. However, current ctDNA analysis is usually restricted to one or a few mutation sites due to technical limitations. In the case of massively parallel DNA sequencers, the number of false positives caused by a high read error rate is a major problem. In addition, the final sequence reads do not represent the original DNA population due to the global amplification step during the template preparation. We established a high-fidelity target sequencing system of individual molecules identified in plasma cell-free DNA using barcode sequences; this system consists of the following two steps. (i) A novel target sequencing method that adds barcode sequences by adaptor ligation. This method uses linear amplification to eliminate the errors introduced during the early cycles of polymerase chain reaction. (ii) The monitoring and removal of erroneous barcode tags. This process involves the identification of individual molecules that have been sequenced and for which the number of mutations have been absolute quantitated. Using plasma cell-free DNA from patients with gastric or lung cancer, we demonstrated that the system achieved near complete elimination of false positives and enabled de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  4. DNA: The Strand that Connects Us All

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Matt [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Genetics Core Facility

    2011-03-29

    Learn how the methods and discoveries of human population genetics are applied for personal genealogical reconstruction and anthropological testing. Dr. Kaplan starts with a short general review of human genetics and the biology behind this form of DNA testing. He looks at how DNA testing is performed and how samples are processed in the University of Arizona laboratory. He also examines examples of personal genealogical results from Family Tree DNA and personal anthropological results from the Genographic Project. Finally, he describes the newest project in the UA laboratory, the DNA Shoah Project.

  5. Technical-tactical analysis of youth olympic taekwondo combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornello, Francesco; Capranica, Laura; Minganti, Carlo; Chiodo, Salvatore; Condello, Giancarlo; Tessitore, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the technical and tactical profiles of official youth taekwondo competitions played under the most recent rules of the International Taekwondo Federation. Tactical actions (i.e., attack, defense, and block), technical executions (from 1- to 4-point scores), kicking legs (i.e., front/rear and right/left), and overall technical effectiveness were investigated in relation to match outcome of semifinal and final competitions (n = 50) of youth (aged 13-14 years) black belt athletes during the Italian Taekwondo Cadet Championship. Differences (p technical exchanges showed differences (p technical executions. Winners resulted more efficient (p technical and tactical variables. In general, these findings showed that Cadets tend to adopt an offensive strategy. In considering that the adoption of the new electronic system requires athletes to execute correct technical actions to have a score assigned, coaches should emphasize the effectiveness of scoring techniques and help athletes to effectively improve their defense and counterattack capabilities.

  6. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W; Taylor, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates.

  7. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett eWagner Mackenzie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation, with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates.

  8. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjoernsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas; Fogedby, Hans C

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation bubbles and selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins.

  9. Astrobee Periodic Technical Review (PTR) Delta 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Christopher; Smith, Marion F.; Smith, Ernest Everett; Bualat, Maria Gabriele; Barlow, Jonathan Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Astrobee is a free flying robot for the inside of the International Space Station (ISS). The Periodic Technical Review (PTR) delta 3 is the final design review of the system presented to stakeholders.

  10. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Kaiserski; Dan Lloyd

    2012-02-28

    The funds allocated through the Wind Powering America (WPA) grant were utilized by the State of Montana to support broad outreach activities communicating the benefits and opportunities of increased wind energy and transmission development. The challenges to increased wind development were also clearly communicated with the understanding that a clearer comprehension of the challenges would be beneficial in overcoming the obstacles to further development. The ultimate purpose of these activities was to foster the increased development of Montana's rich wind resources through increased public acceptance and wider dissemination of technical resources.

  11. A passive physical model for DnaK chaperoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Lionel; Dumont, Audrey; Dukan, Sam

    2018-03-01

    Almost all living organisms use protein chaperones with a view to preventing proteins from misfolding or aggregation either spontaneously or during cellular stress. This work uses a reaction-diffusion stochastic model to describe the dynamic localization of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK in Escherichia coli cells during transient proteotoxic collapse characterized by the accumulation of insoluble proteins. In the model, misfolded (‘abnormal’) proteins are produced during alcoholic stress and have the propensity to aggregate with a polymerization-like kinetics. When aggregates diffuse more slowly they grow larger. According to Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics, DnaK has the propensity to bind with misfolded proteins or aggregates in order to catalyse refolding. To match experimental fluorescence microscopy data showing clusters of DnaK-GFP localized in multiple foci, the model includes spatial zones with local reduced diffusion rates to generate spontaneous assemblies of DnaK called ‘foci’. Numerical simulations of our model succeed in reproducing the kinetics of DnaK localization experimentally observed. DnaK starts from foci, moves to large aggregates during acute stress, resolves those aggregates during recovery and finally returns to its initial punctate localization pattern. Finally, we compare real biological events with hypothetical repartitions of the protein aggregates or DnaK. We then notice that DnaK action is more efficient on protein aggregates than on protein homogeneously distributed.

  12. Final Technical Report for subcontract number B612144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayali, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marcu, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The original statement of work stipulated that the Subcontractor shall perform bacterial and algal cultivation and manipulation, microbe isolation, preparation of samples for sequencing and isotopic analysis, data analysis, and manuscript preparation. The Subcontractor shall work closely with Dr. Mayali and other LLNL scientists, and shall participate in monthly SFA meetings (either in person or by telephone). The Subcontractor shall deliver a final report at the conclusion of the work.

  13. Final Scientific/Technical Report for award DE-FC--07-00AL67053

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    The project ''Creating an Educational Consortium to Support the Recruitment and Retention of Expertise for the Nuclear Weapons Complex'' was also known as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) University Fellowship Program. Since its inception, the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program and its predecessor, the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) program, have engaged university researchers and students in the sciences necessary to answer technical questions related to reducing high-level waste volumes, optimizing the economics and performance of Yucca Mountain, reducing the technical need for a second repository, reducing the long-term inventories of plutonium in spent fuel, and enabling the proliferation-resistant recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The Advanced Fuel Cycle University Fellowship Program is intended to support top students across the nation in a variety of disciplines that will be required to support transmutation research and technology development in the coming decades

  14. Non-invasive aneuploidy detection using free fetal DNA and RNA in maternal plasma: recent progress and future possibilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Go, A.T.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Oudejans, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell-free fetal DNA (cff DNA) and RNA can be detected in maternal plasma and used for non-invasive prenatal diagnostics. Recent technical advances have led to a drastic change in the clinical applicability and potential uses of free fetal DNA and RNA. This review summarizes the latest

  15. Basic concepts for crew resource management and non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flin, Rhona; Maran, Nikki

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we explain the conceptual background to non-technical skills and show how they can influence job performance in anaesthesia. We then describe the taxonomy of anaesthetists' non-technical skills (ANTS) and related systems, such as ANTS-AP for anaesthetic practitioners. We discuss the training courses that have been designed to teach these non-technical skills, which are called crew resource management (CRM), crisis resource management (CRM) or crisis avoidance resource management (CARMA). Finally, we discuss the application of non-technical skills assessment systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration......, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments...... for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation...

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeder, Richard [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Phillips, Brian [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-10-18

    A variety of calcifying organisms produce a transient or metastable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase that is assembled and subsequently transformed into a crystalline biomineral, typically calcite or aragonite. The complex shapes, hierarchical structures, and unique physical properties of the biominerals that result from this calcification pathway have stimulated interest in adapting these concepts for the design and creation of bio-inspired functional materials in the laboratory. ACC also forms as a reactive precursor in diverse inorganic systems and is likely to play a much broader role in calcium carbonate formation. Knowledge of the structure, composition, and behavior of this metastable phase is critical for establishing a structural and mechanistic framework for calcium carbonate formation and its role in biogeochemical processes, including carbon cycling. Minor additives, such as magnesium, phosphorus, and organic macromolecules, are known to play important roles in controlling ACC stability, transformation kinetics, and selection of final crystalline polymorph. Molecular water also occurs in many types of ACC and is thought to play a structural role in its stability and transformation behavior. One of the major challenges that remain unresolved is identification of the structural basis for the role of these minor additives and molecular water. The absence of long-range order in ACC, and other amorphous phases, has posed a challenge for study by techniques commonly used for crystalline solids. Preliminary studies in our group show that the combination of two techniques, synchrotron X-ray-based pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide entirely new insight to structural properties of synthetic ACC over length scales that are most relevant for understanding its transformation properties. Building on preliminary experiments, we propose a systematic study of synthesis, structure, and

  18. Final Technical Report: "Achieving Regional Energy Efficiency Potential in the Southeast”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Mandy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA), Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2018-03-07

    The overall objective of this award was to facilitate sharing of DOE resources and best practices as well as provide technical assistance to key stakeholders to support greater compliance with energy efficiency standards and increased energy savings. The outcomes of this award include greater awareness among key stakeholders on energy efficiency topics, increased deployment and utilization of DOE resources, and effective policies and programs to support energy efficiency in the Southeast.

  19. The future of human DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-12-31

    DNA vaccines have evolved greatly over the last 20 years since their invention, but have yet to become a competitive alternative to conventional protein or carbohydrate based human vaccines. Whilst safety concerns were an initial barrier, the Achilles heel of DNA vaccines remains their poor immunogenicity when compared to protein vaccines. A wide variety of strategies have been developed to optimize DNA vaccine immunogenicity, including codon optimization, genetic adjuvants, electroporation and sophisticated prime-boost regimens, with each of these methods having its advantages and limitations. Whilst each of these methods has contributed to incremental improvements in DNA vaccine efficacy, more is still needed if human DNA vaccines are to succeed commercially. This review foresees a final breakthrough in human DNA vaccines will come from application of the latest cutting-edge technologies, including "epigenetics" and "omics" approaches, alongside traditional techniques to improve immunogenicity such as adjuvants and electroporation, thereby overcoming the current limitations of DNA vaccines in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ITER technical basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    Following on from the Final Report of the EDA(DS/21), and the summary of the ITER Final Design report(DS/22), the technical basis gives further details of the design of ITER. It is in two parts. The first, the Plant Design specification, summarises the main constraints on the plant design and operation from the viewpoint of engineering and physics assumptions, compliance with safety regulations, and siting requirements and assumptions. The second, the Plant Description Document, describes the physics performance and engineering characteristics of the plant design, illustrates the potential operational consequences foe the locality of a generic site, gives the construction, commissioning, exploitation and decommissioning schedule, and reports the estimated lifetime costing based on data from the industry of the EDA parties.

  1. ITER technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following on from the Final Report of the EDA(DS/21), and the summary of the ITER Final Design report(DS/22), the technical basis gives further details of the design of ITER. It is in two parts. The first, the Plant Design specification, summarises the main constraints on the plant design and operation from the viewpoint of engineering and physics assumptions, compliance with safety regulations, and siting requirements and assumptions. The second, the Plant Description Document, describes the physics performance and engineering characteristics of the plant design, illustrates the potential operational consequences foe the locality of a generic site, gives the construction, commissioning, exploitation and decommissioning schedule, and reports the estimated lifetime costing based on data from the industry of the EDA parties

  2. Characterization of ionizing radiation damage in DNA. Final report, February 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental method for the measurement of covalent DNA-protein cross-links in bacteriophage T7 based on phenol-water countercurrent distribution has been developed and a statistical model for quantitative interpretation of these measurements has been devised. It has been found that DNA-protein cross links accumulate linearly with dose in response to exposure to 60 Co gamma radiation at a rate .05 to .20 times the rate of accumulation of double strand breaks if phage are exposed in highly protective medium (tryptone broth). It has been found that fast neutrons also induce DNA-protein cross-linkage. Furthermore, cross-link and double strand break lesions induced by neutrons occur in multiple clusters in randomly chosen phage, in contrast to those induced by gamma radiation, which occur singly in randomly chosen phage. It also appears that neutrons induce double strand breaks in the phage with an efficiency 50 times that of gamma rays. It was found that protein-DNA cross-links occur 30 times more frequently per lethal lesion after exposure to gamma rays than after exposure to ultraviolet light. Investigations of the occurrence of double strand breaks, protein-DNA cross-links and other DNA lesions in eucaryotic cells currently being pursued are also described

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, Jane M

    2011-09-10

    The purpose of the Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications grant was to promote better communications among stakeholders; address infrastructure barriers to solar energy; and coordinate with industry, the U.S. Department of Energy, national laboratories, states, cities and counties. The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC), a non-profit organization formed in 1982, approached this grant project by establishing a wide range of communication and outreach activities including newsletters, workshops, webinars, model practices and publications; by advancing easy and fair hook-up rules to the utility grid; and by upgrading training based on industry competency standards. The Connecting to the Grid project and the Solar Codes and Standards Public Hearings project offered communication coupled with technical assistance to overcome interconnection, net metering and other regulatory and program barriers. The Workforce Development Project tackled building a strong workforce through quality training and competency assessment programs. IREC's web site, the semi-monthly state and stakeholder newsletter and the metrics report resulted in better communications among stakeholders. Workshops and phone seminars offered technical assistance and kept stakeholders up-to-date on key issues. All of these activities resulted in implementing sustainable solutions to institutional and market barriers to solar energy and getting the right information to the right people.

  4. 800,000 year old mammoth DNA, modern elephant DNA or PCR artefact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binladen, Jonas; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Poulakakis and colleagues (Poulakakis et al. 2006: Biol. Lett. 2, 451-454), report the recovery of 'authentic' mammoth DNA from an 800,000-year-old fragment of bone excavated on the island of Crete. In light of results from other ancient DNA studies that indicate how DNA survival is unlikely...... in samples, which are recovered from warm environments and are relatively old (e.g. more than 100,000 years), these findings come as a great surprise. Here, we show that problems exist with the methodological approaches used in the study. First, the nested PCR technique as reported is nonsensical...... polymorphisms. Finally, we demonstrate using a simple BLAST search in GenBank that the claimed 'uniquely derived character state' for mammoths is in fact also found within modern elephants. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb-22...

  5. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Chagas Prevention in Central America

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carlota Monroy

    INFORME FINAL: PROYECTO ID 106531 - 001. CORRESPONDIENTE AL PERIODO DEL 1 DE MARZO 2011 AL 31 DE MARZO 2014. CONTENIDO. 1. Información general ……………………………………………………………1. 2. Resumen del proyecto ………………………………………………………….2. 3. Metas objetivos ...

  6. AISI Direct Steelmaking Program. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aukrust, E.

    1994-08-01

    This final report deals with the results of a 5-yr project for developing a more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly, less costly process for producing hot metal than current coke ovens and blast furnaces. In the process, iron ore pellets are smelted in a foamy slag created by reaction of coal char with molten slag to produce CO. The CO further reacts with oxygen, which also reacts with coal volatile matter, to produce the heat necessary to sustain the endothermic reduction reaction. The uncombusted CO and H{sub 2} from the coal are used to preheat and prereduce hematite pellets for the most efficient use of the energy in the coal. Laboratory programs confirmed that the process steps worked. Pilot plant studies were successful. Economic analysis for a 1 million tpy plant is promising.

  7. PCR fidelity of pfu DNA polymerase and other thermostable DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, J; Braman, J C; Hogrefe, H H

    1996-09-15

    The replication fidelities of Pfu, Taq, Vent, Deep Vent and UlTma DNA polymerases were compared using a PCR-based forward mutation assay. Average error rates (mutation frequency/bp/duplication) increased as follows: Pfu (1.3 x 10(-6)) Pfu and UlTma (approximately 5 x 10(-5)). Buffer optimization experiments indicated that Pfu fidelity was highest in the presence of 2-3 mM MgSO4 and 100-300 microM each dNTP and at pH 8.5-9.1. Under these conditions, the error rate of exo- Pfu was approximately 40-fold higher (5 x 10(-5)) than the error rate of Pfu. As the reaction pH was raised from pH 8 to 9, the error rate of Pfu decreased approximately 2-fold, while the error rate of exo- Pfu increased approximately 9-fold. An increase in error rate with pH has also been noted for the exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases Taq and exo- Klenow, suggesting that the parameters which influence replication error rates may be similar in pol l- and alpha-like polymerases. Finally, the fidelity of 'long PCR' DNA polymerase mixtures was examined. The error rates of a Taq/Pfu DNA polymerase mixture and a Klentaq/Pfu DNA polymerase mixture were found to be less than the error rate of Taq DNA polymerase, but approximately 3-4-fold higher than the error rate of Pfu DNA polymerase.

  8. National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baxter, Ivan [US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)., Washington, DC (United States); Brown, Judith [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Carleton, Michael [Matrix Genetics, Seattle, WA (United States); Cattolico, Rose Anne [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Taraka, Dale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Detter, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devarenne, Timothy P. [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Dutcher, Susan K. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Fox, David T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodenough, Ursula [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Jaworski, Jan [Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Kramer, David [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Lipton, Mary S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCormick, Margaret [Matrix Genetics, Seattle, WA (United States); Merchant, Sabeeha [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Molnar, Istvan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pellegrini, Matteo [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Polle, Juergen [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States). Brooklyn College; Sabarsky, Martin [Cellana, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Sayre, Richard T. [New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Starkenburg,, Shawn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stormo, Gary [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Twary, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unkefer, Clifford J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unkefer, Pat J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yuan, Joshua S. [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Arnold, Bob [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Bai, Xuemei [Cellana, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Boeing, Wiebke [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Brown, Lois [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Gujarathi, Ninad [Reliance Industries Limited, Mumbai (India); Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lammers, Pete [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Laur, Paul [Eldorado Biofuels, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Khandan, Nirmala [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Parsons, Ronald [Solix BioSystems, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Samocha, Tzachi [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Thomasson, Alex [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Unc, Adrian [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Waller, Pete [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Bonner, James [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States); Coons, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernando, Sandun [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Goodall, Brian [Valicor Renewables, Dexter, MI (United States); Kadam, Kiran [Valicor Renewables, Dexter, MI (United States); Lacey, Ronald [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Wei, Liu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Marrone, Babs [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikolov, Zivko [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Trewyn, Brian [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Albrecht, Karl [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Capareda, Sergio [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Cheny, Scott [Diversified Energy, Gilbert, AZ (United States); Deng, Shuguang [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cesar, Granda [Terrabon, LLC, Bryan, TX (United States); Hallen, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lupton, Steven [UOP Honeywell Co, LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Lynch, Sharry [UOP Honeywell Co, LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Marchese, Anthony [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Nieweg, Jennifer [Albemarle Catilin, Ames, IA (United States); Ogden, Kimberly [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Oyler, James [Genifuel, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Reardon, Ken [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Roberts, William [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Sams, David [Albemarle Catilin, Ames, IA (United States); Schaub, Tanner [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Silks, Pete [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Archibeque, Shawn [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Foster, James [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Gaitlan, Delbert [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Lawrence, Addison [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Lodge-Ivey, Shanna [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Wickersham, Tyron [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Blowers, Paul [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Davis, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Downes, C. Meghan [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Dunlop, Eric [Pan Pacific Technologies Pty. Ltd., Adelaide (Australia); Frank, Edward [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Handler, Robert [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Newby, Deborah [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pienkos, Philip [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Richardson, James [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Seider, Warren [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shonnard, David [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Skaggs, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The main objective of NAABB was to combine science, technology, and engineering expertise from across the nation to break down critical technical barriers to commercialization of algae-based biofuels. The approach was to address technology development across the entire value chain of algal biofuels production, from selection of strains to cultivation, harvesting, extraction, fuel conversion, and agricultural coproduct production. Sustainable practices and financial feasibility assessments ununderscored the approach and drove the technology development.

  9. 76 FR 4645 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department...: This notice announces a meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). HTAC... Agenda: (Subject to change; updates will be posted on http://hydrogen.energy.gov and copies of the final...

  10. 76 FR 60478 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department...: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) was established under section 807 of... website at: http://hydrogen.energy.gov and copies of the final agenda will available the date of the...

  11. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  12. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  13. Review and future prospects for DNA barcoding methods in forensic palynology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen L; Burgess, Kevin S; Okamoto, Kazufusa C; Aranda, Roman; Brosi, Berry J

    2016-03-01

    Pollen can be a critical forensic marker in cases where determining geographic origin is important, including investigative leads, missing persons cases, and intelligence applications. However, its use has previously been limited by the need for a high level of specialization by expert palynologists, slow speeds of identification, and relatively poor taxonomic resolution (typically to the plant family or genus level). By contrast, identification of pollen through DNA barcoding has the potential to overcome all three of these limitations, and it may seem surprising that the method has not been widely implemented. Despite what might seem a straightforward application of DNA barcoding to pollen, there are technical issues that have delayed progress. However, recent developments of standard methods for DNA barcoding of pollen, along with improvements in high-throughput sequencing technology, have overcome most of these technical issues. Based on these recent methodological developments in pollen DNA barcoding, we believe that now is the time to start applying these techniques in forensic palynology. In this article, we discuss the potential for these methods, and outline directions for future research to further improve on the technology and increase its applicability to a broader range of situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Final Scientific Technical Report Crowder College MARET Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyt, Art [Crowder College, Neosho, MO (United States); Eberle, Dan [Crowder College, Neosho, MO (United States); Hudson, Pam [Crowder College, Neosho, MO (United States); Hopper, Russ [Crowder College, Neosho, MO (United States)

    2013-06-30

    , exploring and validating new applications of solar and other renewable technologies, the MARET Facility will house a wide variety of programs which will advance implementation of renewable energy throughout the region. These program goals include; Curriculum in renewable energy for pre-engineering transfer programs; Certification and degree programs for technical degrees for Energy Efficiency, Wind, Photovoltaic and Solar Thermal professionals; Short courses and workshops for building management and design professionals; Public education and demonstration projects in renewable energy through conferences and K-12 educational outreach; Technical degree offering in building construction incorporating “best practices” for energy efficiency and renewables; and Business incubators for new renewable energy businesses and new product development The new MARET facility will support the mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Program, “to improve America’s security, environmental quality, and economic prosperity through public-private partnerships that bring reliable and affordable solar energy technologies to the marketplace,” through a variety of educational and business assistance programs. Further, technical innovations planned for the MARET facility and its applied research activities will advance the Solar Program strategic goals to “reduce the cost of solar energy to the point it becomes competitive in relevant energy markets (e.g., buildings, power plants) and for solar technology to enable a sustainable solar industry.” Overarching Goals relative to program needs, future expansion, flexibility, quality of materials, and construction and operational costs:; Experimental: The structure and systems of the building operate as an educational resource. The systems are meant to be a source for data collection and study for building users and instructors; Educational: Part of the evolution of this building and its ongoing goals is to use the building as an

  15. Pan-cancer analysis reveals technical artifacts in TCGA germline variant calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Alexandra R; Standish, Kristopher A; Bhutani, Kunal; Ideker, Trey; Lasken, Roger S; Carter, Hannah; Harismendy, Olivier; Schork, Nicholas J

    2017-06-12

    Cancer research to date has largely focused on somatically acquired genetic aberrations. In contrast, the degree to which germline, or inherited, variation contributes to tumorigenesis remains unclear, possibly due to a lack of accessible germline variant data. Here we called germline variants on 9618 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database representing 31 cancer types. We identified batch effects affecting loss of function (LOF) variant calls that can be traced back to differences in the way the sequence data were generated both within and across cancer types. Overall, LOF indel calls were more sensitive to technical artifacts than LOF Single Nucleotide Variant (SNV) calls. In particular, whole genome amplification of DNA prior to sequencing led to an artificially increased burden of LOF indel calls, which confounded association analyses relating germline variants to tumor type despite stringent indel filtering strategies. The samples affected by these technical artifacts include all acute myeloid leukemia and practically all ovarian cancer samples. We demonstrate how technical artifacts induced by whole genome amplification of DNA can lead to false positive germline-tumor type associations and suggest TCGA whole genome amplified samples be used with caution. This study draws attention to the need to be sensitive to problems associated with a lack of uniformity in data generation in TCGA data.

  16. The role of non-technical skills in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz A. Agha

    2015-12-01

    This narrative review used a number of sources including written and online, there was no specific search strategy of defined databases. Modern surgical practice requires; technical and non-technical skills, evidence-based practice, an emphasis on lifelong learning, monitoring of outcomes and a supportive institutional and health service framework. Finally these requirements need to be combined with a number of personal and professional values including integrity, professionalism and compassionate, patient-centred care.

  17. An alternative method for cDNA cloning from surrogate eukaryotic cells transfected with the corresponding genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Yong; Cui, Chen-Chen; Song, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiang-Guo; Jin, Ya-Ping; Wang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2012-07-01

    cDNA is widely used in gene function elucidation and/or transgenics research but often suitable tissues or cells from which to isolate mRNA for reverse transcription are unavailable. Here, an alternative method for cDNA cloning is described and tested by cloning the cDNA of human LALBA (human alpha-lactalbumin) from genomic DNA. First, genomic DNA containing all of the coding exons was cloned from human peripheral blood and inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector. Next, by delivering the plasmids into either 293T or fibroblast cells, surrogate cells were constructed. Finally, the total RNA was extracted from the surrogate cells and cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR. The human LALBA cDNA that was obtained was compared with the corresponding mRNA published in GenBank. The comparison showed that the two sequences were identical. The novel method for cDNA cloning from surrogate eukaryotic cells described here uses well-established techniques that are feasible and simple to use. We anticipate that this alternative method will have widespread applications.

  18. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  19. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program for DOE`s nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE`s technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D&D services.

  20. Final report of the UMTRA independent technical review of TAC audit programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This report details the findings of an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of practices and procedures for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project audit program. The audit program is conducted by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the UMTRA Project. The purpose of the ITR was to ensure that the TAC audit program is effective and is conducted efficiently. The ITR was conducted from May 16-20, 1994. A review team observed audit practices in the field, reviewed the TAC audit program's documentation, and discussed the program with TAC staff and management. The format of this report has been developed around EPA guidelines; they comprise most of the major section headings. Each section begins by identifying the criteria that the TAC program is measured against, then describing the approach used by the ITR team to measure each TAC audit program against the criteria. An assessment of each type of audit is then summarized for each component in the following order: Radiological audit summary; Health and safety audit summary; Environmental audit summary; Quality assurance audit summary

  1. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) program for DOE's nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE's technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D ampersand D services

  2. One-Step PCR Sequencing. Final Technical Progress Report for February 15, 1997 - November 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, B. R.

    2004-04-16

    We investigated new chemistries and alternate approaches for direct gene sequencing and detection based on the properties of boron-substituted nucleotides as chain delimiters in lieu of conventional chain terminators. Chain terminators, such as the widely used Sanger dideoxynucleotide truncators, stop DNA synthesis during replication and hence are incompatible with further PCR amplification. Chain delimiters, on the other hand, are chemically-modified, ''stealth'' nucleotides that act like normal nucleotides in DNA synthesis and PCR amplification, but can be unmasked following chain extension and exponential amplification. Specifically, chain delimiters give rise to an alternative sequencing strategy based on selective degradation of DNA chains generated by PCR amplification with modified nucleotides. The method as originally devised employed template-directed enzymatic, random incorporation of small amounts of boron-modified nucleotides (e.g., 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-alpha-[P-borano]- triphosphates) during PCR amplification. Rather than incorporation of dideoxy chain terminators, which are less efficiently incorporated in PCR-based amplification than natural deoxynucleotides, our method is based on selective incorporation and exonuclease degradation of DNA chains generated by efficient PCR amplification of chemically-modified ''stealth'' nucleotides. The stealth nucleotides have a boranophosphate group instead of a normal phosphate, yet behave like normal nucleotides during PCR-amplification. The unique feature of our method is that the position of the stealth nucleotide, and hence DNA sequencing fragments, are revealed at the desired, appropriate moment following PCR amplification. During the current grant period, a variety of new boron-modified nucleotides were synthesized, and new chemistries and enzymatic methods and combinations thereof were explored to improve the method and study the effects of borane modified

  3. Highly multiplexed targeted DNA sequencing from single nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Marco L; Wang, Yong; Kim, Charissa; Gao, Ruli; Jiang, Jerry; Sei, Emi; Navin, Nicholas E

    2016-02-01

    Single-cell DNA sequencing methods are challenged by poor physical coverage, high technical error rates and low throughput. To address these issues, we developed a single-cell DNA sequencing protocol that combines flow-sorting of single nuclei, time-limited multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), low-input library preparation, DNA barcoding, targeted capture and next-generation sequencing (NGS). This approach represents a major improvement over our previous single nucleus sequencing (SNS) Nature Protocols paper in terms of generating higher-coverage data (>90%), thereby enabling the detection of genome-wide variants in single mammalian cells at base-pair resolution. Furthermore, by pooling 48-96 single-cell libraries together for targeted capture, this approach can be used to sequence many single-cell libraries in parallel in a single reaction. This protocol greatly reduces the cost of single-cell DNA sequencing, and it can be completed in 5-6 d by advanced users. This single-cell DNA sequencing protocol has broad applications for studying rare cells and complex populations in diverse fields of biological research and medicine.

  4. Technical improvement to prevent DNA degradation of Leptospira spp. in pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, R L; Machry, L; Brazil, J M V; Ramos, T M V; Avelar, K E S; Pereira, M M

    2009-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a public health problem. Infection with pathogenic Leptospira occurs by exposure to many environments and is traditionally associated with occupational risk activities. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the epidemiological relatedness among Leptospira isolates. However, analysis by PFGE yielded inconclusive data as a result of extensive DNA degradation. This degradation can be significantly reduced by the inclusion of thiourea in the electrophoresis buffer, improving the analysis of DNA banding patterns.

  5. Technical writing versus technical writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingham, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Two terms, two job categories, 'technical writer' and 'technical author' are discussed in terms of industrial and business requirements and standards. A distinction between 'technical writing' and technical 'writing' is made. The term 'technical editor' is also considered. Problems inherent in the design of programs to prepare and train students for these jobs are discussed. A closer alliance between industry and academia is suggested as a means of preparing students with competent technical communication skills (especially writing and editing skills) and good technical skills.

  6. Technical procedures for utilities and solid waste: Environmental Field Program, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The evaluation of environmental issues and concerns and the addressing of statutory requirements are fundamental parts in the characterization of the site in Deaf Smith County, Texas for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). To ensure that the environmental field program comprehensively addresses the issues and requirements of the project, a site study plan (SSP) has been prepared for Utilities and Solid Waste considerations. This technical procedure (TP) has been developed to implement the field program described in the Utilities and Solid Waste Site Study Plan. The purpose and scope of the Utilities and Solid Waste Technical Procedure is to develop and implement a data collection procedure to fulfill the data base needs of the Utilities and Solid Waste SSP. The procedure describes a method of obtaining, assessing and verifying the capabilities of the regional service utilities and disposal contractors. This data base can be used to identify a preferred service source for the engineering contractor. The technical procedure was produced under the guidelines established in Technical Administrative Procedure No. 1.0, Preparation, Review and Approval of Technical Procedures

  7. Repair of DNA treated with γ-irradiation and chemical carcinogens. Final report, June 1, 1981-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldthwait, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Work done in the past three years has been on DNA repair, on genetic transposition and on the effect of carcinogens on alu sequence transcription. DNA repair work was completed on β-propiolactone DNA adducts, on procaryotic and eucaryotic enzymes capable of removal of 3-methyladenine from DNA, and on in vitro repair of neucleosomal core particle DNA and chromatin DNA. Attempts were made to isolate a human transposable element through the isolation of double stranded RNA and probing of a human library. Experiments were also done to determine whether carcinogens altered the expression of alu sequences in human DNA

  8. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells

  9. KBS Technical report 1-120 (1977-1978). Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear utilities started early in 1977 the KBS (nuclear fuel safety) project to study the high level waste problem and report on how and where a safe final storage could be arranged in Sweden. The docummentation produced by the project during 1977 and 1978 has been collected in a series of technical reports numbered from 1 to 120. The English summaries of the technical reports have been collected in this separate volume, No. 121. (G.B.)

  10. Specified radioactive waste final disposal act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Masaya

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive wastes must be finally and safely disposed far from human activities. Disposal act is a long-range task and needs to be understood and accepted by public for site selection. This paper explains basic policy of Japanese Government for final disposal act of specified radioactive wastes, examination for site selection guidelines to promote residential understanding, general concept of multi-barrier system for isolating the specific radioactive wastes, and research and technical development for radioactive waste management. (S. Ohno)

  11. Programmable motion of DNA origami mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Su, Hai-Jun; Castro, Carlos E

    2015-01-20

    DNA origami enables the precise fabrication of nanoscale geometries. We demonstrate an approach to engineer complex and reversible motion of nanoscale DNA origami machine elements. We first design, fabricate, and characterize the mechanical behavior of flexible DNA origami rotational and linear joints that integrate stiff double-stranded DNA components and flexible single-stranded DNA components to constrain motion along a single degree of freedom and demonstrate the ability to tune the flexibility and range of motion. Multiple joints with simple 1D motion were then integrated into higher order mechanisms. One mechanism is a crank-slider that couples rotational and linear motion, and the other is a Bennett linkage that moves between a compacted bundle and an expanded frame configuration with a constrained 3D motion path. Finally, we demonstrate distributed actuation of the linkage using DNA input strands to achieve reversible conformational changes of the entire structure on ∼ minute timescales. Our results demonstrate programmable motion of 2D and 3D DNA origami mechanisms constructed following a macroscopic machine design approach.

  12. Programmable motion of DNA origami mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Alexander E.; Zhou, Lifeng; Su, Hai-Jun; Castro, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami enables the precise fabrication of nanoscale geometries. We demonstrate an approach to engineer complex and reversible motion of nanoscale DNA origami machine elements. We first design, fabricate, and characterize the mechanical behavior of flexible DNA origami rotational and linear joints that integrate stiff double-stranded DNA components and flexible single-stranded DNA components to constrain motion along a single degree of freedom and demonstrate the ability to tune the flexibility and range of motion. Multiple joints with simple 1D motion were then integrated into higher order mechanisms. One mechanism is a crank–slider that couples rotational and linear motion, and the other is a Bennett linkage that moves between a compacted bundle and an expanded frame configuration with a constrained 3D motion path. Finally, we demonstrate distributed actuation of the linkage using DNA input strands to achieve reversible conformational changes of the entire structure on ∼minute timescales. Our results demonstrate programmable motion of 2D and 3D DNA origami mechanisms constructed following a macroscopic machine design approach. PMID:25561550

  13. Current study on ionizing radiation-induced mitochondial DNA damage and mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xin; Wang Zhenhua; Zhang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Current advance in ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial DNA damage and mutations is reviewed, in addition with the essential differences between mtDNA and nDNA damage and mutations. To extent the knowledge about radiation induced mitochondrial alterations, the researchers in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences developed some technics such as real-time PCR, long-PCR for accurate quantification of radiation induced damage and mutations, and in-depth investigation about the functional changes of mitochondria based on mtDNA damage and mutations were also carried out. In conclusion, the important role of mitochondrial study in radiation biology is underlined, and further study on mitochondrial study associated with late effect and metabolism changes in radiation biology is pointed out. (authors)

  14. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Human Genome Project is to sequence all 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. Progress in this has been rapid; GenBank(reg s ign) finished 1994 with 286 million bases of sequence and grew by 2470 in the first quarter of 1995. The challenge to the scientific community is to understand the biological relevance of this genetic information. In most cases the sequence being generated for any single region of the genome represents the genotype of a single individual. A complete understanding of the function of specific genes and other regions of the genome and their role in human disease and development will only become apparent when the sequence of many more individuals is known. Access to genetic information is ultimately limited by the ability to screen DNA sequence. Although the pioneering sequencing methods of Sanger et al. (15) and Maxam and Gilbert (11) have become standard in virtually all molecular biology laboratories, the basic protocols remain largely unchanged. The throughput of this sequencing technology is now becoming the rate-limiting step in both large-scale sequencing projects such as the Human Genome Project and the subsequent efforts to understand genetic diversity. This has inspired the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies (9), Incremental improvements to Sanger sequencing have been made in DNA labeling and detection. High-speed electrophoresis methods using ultrathin gels or capillary arrays are now being more widely employed. However, these methods are throughput-limited by their sequential nature and the speed and resolution of separations. This limitation will become more pronounced as the need to rapidly screen newly discovered genes for biologically relevant polymorphisms increases. An alternative to gel-based sequencing is to use high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Oligonucleotide probe arrays display specific oligonucleotide probes at precise locations in a high density, information-rich format (5

  15. PH- and salt-dependent molecular combing of DNA: experiments and phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benke, Annegret; Pompe, Wolfgang; Mertig, Michael

    2011-01-01

    λ-DNA as well as plasmids can be successfully deposited by molecular combing on hydrophobic surfaces, for pH values ranging from 4 to 10. On polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates, the deposited DNA molecules are overstretched by about 60-100%. There is a significant influence of sodium ions (NaCl) on the surface density of the deposited DNA, with a maximum near to 100 mM NaCl for a DNA solution (28 ng μl -1 ) at pH 8. The combing process can be described by a micromechanical model including: (i) the adsorption of free moving coiled DNA at the substrate; (ii) the stretching of the coiled DNA by the preceding meniscus; (iii) the relaxation of the deposited DNA to the final length. The sticky ends of λ-DNA cause an adhesion force in the range of about 400 pN which allows a stable overstretching of the DNA by the preceding meniscus. The exposing of hidden hydrophobic bonds of the overstretched DNA leads to a stable deposition on the hydrophobic substrate. The pH-dependent density of deposited DNA as well as the observed influence of sodium ions can be explained by their screening of the negatively charged DNA backbone and sticky ends, respectively. The final DNA length can be derived from a balance of the stored elastic energy of the overstretched molecules and the energy of adhesion.

  16. Dissemination of Continuing Education Materials Via Television Delivery Systems. Final Technical Report and Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munushian, Jack

    In 1972, the University of Southern California School of Engineering established a 4-channel interactive instructional television network. It was designed to allow employees of participating industries to take regular university science and engineering courses and special continuing education courses at or near their work locations. Final progress…

  17. Final Report: The DNA Files: Unraveling the mysteries of genetics, January 1, 1998-March 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bari

    1999-05-01

    The DNA Files is an award-winning radio documentary series on genetics created by SoundVision Productions. The DNA Files was hosted by John Hockenberry and was presented in documentary and discussion format. The programs covered a range of topics from prenatal and predictive gene testing, gene therapy, and commercialization of genetic information to new evolutionary genetic evidence, transgenic vegetables and use of DNA in forensics.

  18. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  19. A semi-nested real-time PCR method to detect low chimerism percentage in small quantity of hematopoietic stem cell transplant DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, Michelangelo; Bortot, Barbara; Gandin, Ilaria; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Athanasakis, Emmanouil

    2017-02-01

    Chimerism status evaluation of post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation samples is essential to predict post-transplant relapse. The most commonly used technique capable of detecting small increments of chimerism is quantitative real-time PCR. Although this method is already used in several laboratories, previously described protocols often lack sensitivity and the amount of the DNA required for each chimerism analysis is too high. In the present study, we compared a novel semi-nested allele-specific real-time PCR (sNAS-qPCR) protocol with our in-house standard allele-specific real-time PCR (gAS-qPCR) protocol. We selected two genetic markers and analyzed technical parameters (slope, y-intercept, R2, and standard deviation) useful to determine the performances of the two protocols. The sNAS-qPCR protocol showed better sensitivity and precision. Moreover, the sNAS-qPCR protocol requires, as input, only 10 ng of DNA, which is at least 10-fold less than the gAS-qPCR protocols described in the literature. Finally, the proposed sNAS-qPCR protocol could prove very useful for performing chimerism analysis with a small amount of DNA, as in the case of blood cell subsets.

  20. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992 - June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work

  1. Assessment of technical risks and R and D requirements for a magnetic confinement fusion fuel system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFreece, D.A.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents a specific use and results of a novel technique for assessing the technical risks associated with the hardware development of a possible future commercial fusion power plant fuel system. Technical risk is defined as the risk that a particular technology or component which is currently under development will not achieve a set of required technical specifications. A technical risk assessment is the quantification of this risk. This Technical Risk Assessment (TRA) methodology was applied to a deuterium-tritium fuel system for a magnetic-confinement fusion power plant. The fuel system is defined to support a generic commercial reactor with at least two viable options for each critical subsystem. Each subsystem option is defined in detail including nominal performance requirements and subsystem interfaces. Subsystem experts were canvassed to obtain values for past, present and future technical performance parameters for each of the subsystem options. These forecasts are presented as probabilities of achieving given levels of performance in specific time periods for assumed funding scenarios. Several funding scenarios were examined to discern whether performance limitations are caused by funding or technology. A computerized Fuel System simulation is described which uses these subsystem performance parameter forecasts as inputs

  2. Final disposal of radioactive wastes. Site selection criteria. Technical and economical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granero, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    General considerations, geological and socioeconomical criteria for final disposal of radioactive wastes in geological formations are treated. More attention is given to the final disposal of high level radioactive wastes and different solutions searched abroad which seems of interest for Spain. (author)

  3. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  4. DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    using deoxyribonucleic acid complex as an electron blocking layer App. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 171109. 23. F.H.C. Crick , J.D. Watson . The complementary...9550-09-1-0647 final 01-09-2009 ; 30-11-2011 DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells FA 9550-09-1-0647 Pawlicka, Agnieszka, J. Instituto de...Available. DNA is an abundant natural product with very good biodegradation properties and can be used to obtain gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) with high

  5. A unique uracil-DNA binding protein of the uracil DNA glycosylase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Pau Biak; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Patil, Aravind Goud; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-09-30

    Uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are an important group of DNA repair enzymes, which pioneer the base excision repair pathway by recognizing and excising uracil from DNA. Based on two short conserved sequences (motifs A and B), UDGs have been classified into six families. Here we report a novel UDG, UdgX, from Mycobacterium smegmatis and other organisms. UdgX specifically recognizes uracil in DNA, forms a tight complex stable to sodium dodecyl sulphate, 2-mercaptoethanol, urea and heat treatment, and shows no detectable uracil excision. UdgX shares highest homology to family 4 UDGs possessing Fe-S cluster. UdgX possesses a conserved sequence, KRRIH, which forms a flexible loop playing an important role in its activity. Mutations of H in the KRRIH sequence to S, G, A or Q lead to gain of uracil excision activity in MsmUdgX, establishing it as a novel member of the UDG superfamily. Our observations suggest that UdgX marks the uracil-DNA for its repair by a RecA dependent process. Finally, we observed that the tight binding activity of UdgX is useful in detecting uracils in the genomes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. 77 FR 42637 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 84 and 115 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0306] RIN 1625-AB86 Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments...), the Coast Guard published a final rule entitled ``Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical...

  7. Evaluation of the neutral comet assay for detection of alpha-particle induced DNA-double-strand-breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofbauer, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study was to differentiate DNA-double-strand-breaks from DNA-single-strand-breaks on a single cell level, using the comet assay after α- and γ-irradiation. Americium-241 was used as a alpha-irradiation-source, Caesium-137 was used for γ-irradiation. Because of technical problems with both the neutral and alkaline comet assay after irradiation of gastric cancer cells and human lymphocytes, no definite differentiation of DNA-damage was possible.

  8. Carcinogen-DNA interaction study by base sequence footprinting. Final report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies on acetylaminofluorene (AAF) modified DNA demonstrated three kinds of structural changes in DNA of defined base sequence. For example, adduct formation by N-Aco-AAF was found at each guanine. We studied the interaction of IgG specific for AAF guanosine in an in vitro system using AAF modified phi X-174 rf DNA. We had expected to find protection against DNAase I digestion. Instead, when the DNA was immunobound to an inert matrix via the IgG, DNAase I digestion was enhanced 20 fold without changing the base sequence pattern of digestion. DNAase I hypersensitive sites are a necessary but not a sufficient condition for transcription. Moreover, some hypersensitive sites are stably propagated, independent of the continued presence of the inducer. Stability of these hypersensitive sites in the absence of their inducer suggests that they can be propagated. It appeared likely that distortion of DNA by a carcinogen adduct such as AAF, and the interaction of this modified DNA with a specific protein such as IgG or cellular proteins might inappropriately enhance the transcription of specific genes. That hypothesis will be tested; surprisingly, little is known about the early action of carcinogens on expression of specific genes. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Evaluation of effects of phenol recovery on biooxidation and tertiary treatment of SRC-I wastewater. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Watt, J.C.; Cowan, W.F.; Schuyler, S.E.

    1983-09-01

    Addition of phenol recovery to the wastewater treatment scheme in the Baseline Design for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was evaluated as a major post-Baseline effort. Phenol recovery affects many downstream processes, but this study was designed to assess primarily its effects on biooxidation and subsequent tertiary treatment. Two parallel treatment schemes were set up, one to treat dephenolated wastewaters and the other for processed nondephenolated wastewaters, a simulation of the Baseline Design. The study focused on comparisons of five areas: effluent quality; system stability; the need for continuous, high-dose powdered activated carbon (PAC) augmentation to the bioreactor; minimum bioreactor hydraulic residence time (HRT); and tertiary treatment requirements. The results show that phenol recovery improves the quality of the bioreactor effluent in terms of residual organics and color. With phenol recovery, PAC augmentation is not required; without phenol recovery, PAC is needed to produce a comparable effluent. Dephenolization also enhances the stability of biooxidation, and reduces the minimum HRT required. With tertiary treatment, both schemes can meet the effluent concentrations published in the SRC-I Final Envivornmental Impact Statement, as well as the anticipated effluent limits. However, phenol recovery does provide a wider safety margin and could eliminate the need for some of the tertiary treatment steps. Based solely on the technical merits observed in this study, phenol recovery is recommended. The final selection should, however, also consider economic tradeoffs and results of other studies such as toxicology testing of the effluents. 34 references, 30 figures and 26 tables.

  10. Final Technical Report for Quantum Embedding for Correlated Electronic Structure in Large Systems and the Condensed Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-04-30

    This is the final technical report. We briefly describe some selected results below. Developments in density matrix embedding. DMET is a quantum embedding theory that we introduced at the beginning of the last funding period, around 2012-2013. Since the first DMET papers, which demonstrated proof-of- principle calculations on the Hubbard model and hydrogen rings, we have carried out a number of different developments, including: Extending the DMET technology to compute broken symmetry phases, including magnetic phases and super- conductivity (Pub. 13); Calibrating the accuracy of DMET and its cluster size convergence against other methods, and formulation of a dynamical cluster analog (Pubs. 4, 10) (see Fig. 1); Implementing DMET for ab-initio molecular calculations, and exploring different self-consistency criteria (Pubs. 9, 14); Using embedding to defi ne quantum classical interfaces Pub. 2; Formulating DMET for spectral functions (Pub. 7) (see Fig. 1); Extending DMET to coupled fermion-boson problems (Pub. 12). Together with these embedding developments, we have also implemented a wide variety of impurity solvers within our DMET framework, including DMRG (Pub. 3), AFQMC (Pub. 10), and coupled cluster theory (CC) (Pub. 9).

  11. Scientific-technical cooperation with foreign (esp. Europe and INSC partner countries) nuclear regulatory authorities and their technical support organizations in the fields of nuclear safety of operating nuclear power plants and on the concept evaluation of generation 3+ plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The BMUB/BfS-Project 3614I01512 forms the frame of the GRS for the scientific-technical cooperation with Technical Support Organisations and Nuclear Regulatory Authorities in the field of nuclear safety in operating NPPs and for the concept evaluation of generation 3 + plants in Europe and INSC Partner Countries. In the present final project report results are described which were gained within the project duration 15.10.2014 up to the 30.09.2016 in the following working packages: Investigations following the catastrophe of Fukushima Daiichi, Evaluation of selected National Action Plans, DBA and severe accident analyses for NPP with PWR (WWER-440, WWER-1000), cooperation with INSC partner countries on DBA, BDBA and severe accident analyses for WWER plants of generation 3 + and building NRA and safety evaluation capacities and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and disposal of radioactive waste. The results are preceded by an outline on the activities related to the project management and to the planning of the bilateral work.

  12. Concentrating and labeling genomic DNA in a nanofluidic array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Mir, Kalim U.

    2018-01-01

    , however, hinder the polymerase activity. We demonstrate a device and a protocol for the enzymatic labeling of genomic DNA arranged in a dense array of single molecules without attaching the enzyme or the DNA to a surface. DNA molecules accumulate in a dense array of pits embedded within a nanoslit due...... to entropic trapping. We then perform ϕ29 polymerase extension from single-strand nicks created on the trapped molecules to incorporate fluorescent nucleotides into the DNA. The array of entropic traps can be loaded with λ-DNA molecules to more than 90% of capacity at a flow rate of 10 pL min-1. The final...

  13. TCR as supervisor of technical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Laeger, H

    1998-01-01

    Our Technical Control Room (TCR) provides continuous supervision of CERN's technical infrastructure. It also serves the inhabitants of CERN's premises as a contact point in case of problems. Every year we initiate eleven thousand recorded corrective interventions; about half subsequent to user phone calls, the other half to automatic alarms. TCR tasks are essentially fourfold: collect and distribute information on abnormal operation states; supervise those technical systems for which we have a mandate; initiate corrective interventions; and perform corrective on-site interventions outside normal working hours. A TCR operator normally has an education corresponding to a French BTS and initially little professional experience. He holds short-term contracts, up to a maximum of six years. This paper outlines TCR tasks and presents some statistical data. It also indicates relations between users, equipment groups, contract firms and the TCR as go-between. Finally, it gives an account of our seven years experience ...

  14. Modular Electric Vehicle Program (MEVP). Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    The Modular Electric Vehicle Program (MEVP) was an EV propulsion system development program in which the technical effort was contracted by DOE to Ford Motor Company. The General Electric Company was a major subcontractor to Ford for the development of the electric subsystem. Sundstrand Power Systems was also a subcontractor to Ford, providing a modified gas turbine engine APU for emissions and performance testing as well as a preliminary design and producibility study for a Gas Turbine-APU for potential use in hybrid/electric vehicles. The four-year research and development effort was cost-shared between Ford, General Electric, Sundstrand Power Systems and DOE. The contract was awarded in response to Ford`s unsolicited proposal. The program objective was to bring electric vehicle propulsion system technology closer to commercialization by developing subsystem components which can be produced from a common design and accommodate a wide range of vehicles; i.e., modularize the components. This concept would enable industry to introduce electric vehicles into the marketplace sooner than would be accomplished via traditional designs in that the economies of mass production could be realized across a spectrum of product offerings. This would eliminate the need to dedicate the design and capital investment to a limited volume product offering which would increase consumer cost and/or lengthen the time required to realize a return on the investment.

  15. Technical bid evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchhausen, E. v.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown which kind of problems arise for the owners of the project and what is the recommendable method of approach. A detailed description of the necessary working team, information in delegation of work and tasks of procedure, criteria of valuation and classification method. Examples of schemes are shown which are the basis of the technical bid evaluation: tables 'data of system/component' and 'scope of supply'. The procedure of normalization of the bids and of specifying the owners supplies are explained. The content of the final report is described. (HP) [de

  16. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  17. Final Technical Report for DE-SC0012297

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Antonio, Ian [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This is the final report on the work performed in award DE-SC0012297, Cosmic Frontier work in support of the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration's work to develop algorithms, simulations, and statistical tests to ensure optimal extraction of the dark energy properties from galaxy clusters observed with LSST. This work focused on effects that could produce a systematic error on the measurement of cluster masses (that will be used to probe the effects of dark energy on the growth of structure). These effects stem from the deviations from pure ellipticity of the gravitational lensing signal and from the blending of light of neighboring galaxies. Both these effects are expected to be more significant for LSST than for the stage III experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey. We calculate the magnitude of the mass error (or bias) for the first time and demonstrate that it can be treated as a multiplicative correction and calibrated out, allowing mass measurements of clusters from gravitational lensing to meet the requirements of LSST's dark energy investigation.

  18. Inhibiting DNA Polymerases as a Therapeutic Intervention against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Berdis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting DNA synthesis is an important therapeutic strategy that is widely used to treat a number of hyperproliferative diseases including viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. This chapter describes two major categories of therapeutic agents used to inhibit DNA synthesis. The first category includes purine and pyrmidine nucleoside analogs that directly inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The second category includes DNA damaging agents including cisplatin and chlorambucil that modify the composition and structure of the nucleic acid substrate to indirectly inhibit DNA synthesis. Special emphasis is placed on describing the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitory effects against chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA polymerases. Discussions are also provided on the mechanisms associated with resistance to these therapeutic agents. A primary focus is toward understanding the roles of specialized DNA polymerases that by-pass DNA lesions produced by DNA damaging agents. Finally, a section is provided that describes emerging areas in developing new therapeutic strategies targeting specialized DNA polymerases.

  19. Development of DNA Pillar Chip Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2035-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ness, K. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Long, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Tetracore, to demonstrate a proof of principal device for the capture and controlled release of DNA moving within a flow stream.

  20. CEEM Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, John [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2014-11-26

    concentrating photovoltaic applications thathave substantially higher efficiency than single substrate cells made of elemental semiconductors such as silicon. This task required the development of new cell bonding methods with excellent coupling of both photons and electrons between the sub-cells. To accomplish this, we developed (1) GaInN solar cells with enhanced performance by using quantum-well absorbers and front-surface optical texturing, (2) a hybrid "pillar-array" bond which uses an array of metal pillars for electrical coupling, and (3) a "hybrid moth-eye" optical coating which combines the benefits of nano-imprinted moth-eye coatings and traditional multilayer coatings. The technical effectiveness was assessed by measurement of the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cells made using these techniques; the ultrahigh efficiencies targeted by this work are of compelling economic value for concentrating photovoltaics.

  1. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based

  2. Economic Reform Orchestra And Technical Manpower Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined economic reform issues in Nigeria since 1986 and the impact on technical manpower development in Rivers State in particular. Two sets of structured questionnaire were used to elicit responses from target respondents who ultimately comprised 105 instructors and 340 final year students in the four ...

  3. [Review comments on the Draft DOE Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project]: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutch, S.I.; Stiegliltz, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Research performed under the grant primarily involved review and comment on the Draft Area Recommendations Report (DARR). However, because data and ''recommendations'' included in the DARR are unquestionably tied to years of research and dozens of technical reports and documents, i.e., Screening Methodologies, Regional characterization Reports, etc., it is essential that consultants to the Menominee Tribe review all the relevant DOE documents, working papers, etc. Given the short period provided for technical comment and limited funds available to the Tribe, a well designed and thorough technical review was (and is) without question impossible. What review and comment that did occur on a geotechnical level is included in this report

  4. Electrochemical DNA probe for Hg(2+) detection based on a triple-helix DNA and Multistage Signal Amplification Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yihe; Ma, Hongmin; Ren, Xiang; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for detection of Hg(2+). Gold nanoparticles decorated bovine serum albumin reduction of graphene oxide (AuNP-BSA-rGO) were used as subsurface material for the immobilization of triple-helix DNA. The triple-helix DNA containing a thiol labelled single-stranded DNA (sDNA) and a thymine-rich DNA (T-rich DNA), which could be unwinded in the present of Hg(2+) to form more stable thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) complex. T-Hg(2+)-T complex was then removed and the sDNA was left on the electrode. At this time, gold nanoparticle carrying thiol labelled cytosine-rich complementary DNA (cDNA-AuNP) could bind with the free sDNA. Meanwhile, the other free cDNA on AuNP could bind with each other in the present of Ag(+) to form the stable cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex and circle amplification. Plenty of C-Ag(+)-C could form silver nanoclusters by electrochemical reduction and the striping signal of Ag could be measured for purpose of the final electrochemical detection of Hg(2+). This sensor could detect Hg(2+) over a wide concentration range from 0.1 to 130nM with a detection limit of 0.03nM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved Barriers to Turbine Engine Fragments: Final Annual Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shockey, Donald

    2002-01-01

    This final annual technical report describes the progress rnade during year 4 of the SPI International Phase II effort to develop a computational capability for designing lightweight fragment barriers...

  6. Rapid and inexpensive method for isolating plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljanabi, S. M.; Al-Awadi, S. J.; Al-Kazaz, A. A.; Baghdad Univ.

    1997-01-01

    A small-scale and economical method for isolating plasmid DNA from bacteria is described. The method provides DNA of suitable quality for most DNA manipulation techniques. This DNA can be used for restriction endonuclease digestion, southern blot hybridization, nick translation and end labeling of DNA probes, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) -based techniques, transformation, DNA cycle-sequencing, and Chain-termination method for DNA sequencing. The entire procedure is adapted to 1.5 ml microfuge tubes and takes approximately 30 mins. The DNA isolated by this method has the same purity produced by CTAB and cesium chloride precipitation and purification procedures respectively. The two previous methods require many hours to obtain the final product and require the use of very expensive equipment as ultracentrifuge. This method is well suited for the isolation of plasmid DNA from a large number of bacterial samples and in a very short time and low cost in laboratories where chemicals, expensive equipment and finance are limited factors in conducting molecular research. (authors). 11refs. 11refs

  7. How to be an Effective Technical Writer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Solaiman Ali

    2012-07-01

    (patterns of organization of information to suit the technical writing task, checking for technical accuracy and following three levels of editing to help increase the readability of a technical text. Finally, in part 8 (Ethical/legal considerations for the technical writer, the authors suggest ways for the technical writer to overcome ethical/legal dilemmas on the job.

  8. Technical Report Cellulosic Based Black Liquor Gasification and Fuels Plant Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornetti, Micheal [Escanaba Paper Company, MI (United States); Freeman, Douglas [Escanaba Paper Company, MI (United States)

    2012-10-31

    The Cellulosic Based Black Liquor Gasification and Fuels Plant Project was developed to construct a black liquor to Methanol biorefinery in Escanaba, Michigan. The biorefinery was to be co-located at the existing pulp and paper mill, NewPage’s Escanaba Paper Mill and when in full operation would: • Generate renewable energy for Escanaba Paper Mill • Produce Methanol for transportation fuel of further refinement to Dimethyl Ether • Convert black liquor to white liquor for pulping. Black liquor is a byproduct of the pulping process and as such is generated from abundant and renewable lignocellulosic biomass. The biorefinery would serve to validate the thermochemical pathway and economic models for black liquor gasification. It was a project goal to create a compelling new business model for the pulp and paper industry, and support the nation’s goal for increasing renewable fuels production and reducing its dependence on foreign oil. NewPage Corporation planned to replicate this facility at other NewPage Corporation mills after this first demonstration scale plant was operational and had proven technical and economic feasibility. An overview of the process begins with black liquor being generated in a traditional Kraft pulping process. The black liquor would then be gasified to produce synthesis gas, sodium carbonate and hydrogen sulfide. The synthesis gas is then cleaned with hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide removed, and fed into a Methanol reactor where the liquid product is made. The hydrogen sulfide is converted into polysulfide for use in the Kraft pulping process. Polysulfide is a known additive to the Kraft process that increases pulp yield. The sodium carbonate salts are converted to caustic soda in a traditional recausticizing process. The caustic soda is then part of the white liquor that is used in the Kraft pulping process. Cellulosic Based Black Liquor Gasification and Fuels Plant project set out to prove that black liquor gasification could

  9. Simple Laboratory methods to measure cell proliferation using DNA synthesis property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan H N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a mini-review on the techniques to measure proliferation of cells by estimation of DNA synthesis. This is not an exhaustive review of literature, but a bird’s eye view of a few selected articles which may provide the technical details to the readers.The nucleus of a cell occupies about 10-30% of the cells space, depends on the type of genetic material (DNA -DeoxyriboNucleic Acid. DNA is a long, double-stranded, helical molecule which carries the genetic information. Duplication of the DNA takes place by the phenomena of replication. One copy of double-stranded DNA molecule forms two double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA replication is the fundamental process used in all living organisms as it is the basis for biological inheritance. This process is known also as Mitosis in somatic cells. In Mitosis, the duplication process results in two genetically identical "daughter" cells from a single "parent" cell. The resulting double-stranded DNA molecules are identical; proof reading and error-checking mechanisms exist to ensure near perfect pair. Mitosis is divided into six phases: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis.

  10. Optimized mtDNA Control Region Primer Extension Capture Analysis for Forensically Relevant Samples and Highly Compromised mtDNA of Different Age and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Eduardoff

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has proven useful in forensic genetics and ancient DNA (aDNA studies, where specimens are often highly compromised and DNA quality and quantity are low. In forensic genetics, the mtDNA control region (CR is commonly sequenced using established Sanger-type Sequencing (STS protocols involving fragment sizes down to approximately 150 base pairs (bp. Recent developments include Massively Parallel Sequencing (MPS of (multiplex PCR-generated libraries using the same amplicon sizes. Molecular genetic studies on archaeological remains that harbor more degraded aDNA have pioneered alternative approaches to target mtDNA, such as capture hybridization and primer extension capture (PEC methods followed by MPS. These assays target smaller mtDNA fragment sizes (down to 50 bp or less, and have proven to be substantially more successful in obtaining useful mtDNA sequences from these samples compared to electrophoretic methods. Here, we present the modification and optimization of a PEC method, earlier developed for sequencing the Neanderthal mitochondrial genome, with forensic applications in mind. Our approach was designed for a more sensitive enrichment of the mtDNA CR in a single tube assay and short laboratory turnaround times, thus complying with forensic practices. We characterized the method using sheared, high quantity mtDNA (six samples, and tested challenging forensic samples (n = 2 as well as compromised solid tissue samples (n = 15 up to 8 kyrs of age. The PEC MPS method produced reliable and plausible mtDNA haplotypes that were useful in the forensic context. It yielded plausible data in samples that did not provide results with STS and other MPS techniques. We addressed the issue of contamination by including four generations of negative controls, and discuss the results in the forensic context. We finally offer perspectives for future research to enable the validation and accreditation of the PEC MPS

  11. Organisation, Quality and Challenges in the B. Ed Technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technical) degree programme rated the organization and quality of the industrial attachment component of the programme. Challenges students faced during industrial attachment were also examined. A case study design was used. Twenty-five final ...

  12. Evolution of DNA Methylation across Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Adam J; Vogel, Kevin J; Moore, Allen J; Schmitz, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation contributes to gene and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, and therefore has been hypothesized to facilitate the evolution of plastic traits such as sociality in insects. However, DNA methylation is sparsely studied in insects. Therefore, we documented patterns of DNA methylation across a wide diversity of insects. We predicted that underlying enzymatic machinery is concordant with patterns of DNA methylation. Finally, given the suggestion that DNA methylation facilitated social evolution in Hymenoptera, we tested the hypothesis that the DNA methylation system will be associated with presence/absence of sociality among other insect orders. We found DNA methylation to be widespread, detected in all orders examined except Diptera (flies). Whole genome bisulfite sequencing showed that orders differed in levels of DNA methylation. Hymenopteran (ants, bees, wasps and sawflies) had some of the lowest levels, including several potential losses. Blattodea (cockroaches and termites) show all possible patterns, including a potential loss of DNA methylation in a eusocial species whereas solitary species had the highest levels. Species with DNA methylation do not always possess the typical enzymatic machinery. We identified a gene duplication event in the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) that is shared by some Hymenoptera, and paralogs have experienced divergent, nonneutral evolution. This diversity and nonneutral evolution of underlying machinery suggests alternative DNA methylation pathways may exist. Phylogenetically corrected comparisons revealed no evidence that supports evolutionary association between sociality and DNA methylation. Future functional studies will be required to advance our understanding of DNA methylation in insects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. FOLDNA, a Web Server for Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructure Autoscaffolds and Autostaples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA self-assembly is a nanotechnology that folds DNA into desired shapes. Self-assembled DNA nanostructures, also known as origami, are increasingly valuable in nanomaterial and biosensing applications. Two ways to use DNA nanostructures in medicine are to form nanoarrays, and to work as vehicles in drug delivery. The DNA nanostructures perform well as a biomaterial in these areas because they have spatially addressable and size controllable properties. However, manually designing complementary DNA sequences for self-assembly is a technically demanding and time consuming task, which makes it advantageous for computers to do this job instead. We have developed a web server, FOLDNA, which can automatically design 2D self-assembled DNA nanostructures according to custom pictures and scaffold sequences provided by the users. It is the first web server to provide an entirely automatic design of self-assembled DNA nanostructure, and it takes merely a second to generate comprehensive information for molecular experiments including: scaffold DNA pathways, staple DNA directions, and staple DNA sequences. This program could save as much as several hours in the designing step for each DNA nanostructure. We randomly selected some shapes and corresponding outputs from our server and validated its performance in molecular experiments.

  14. Program of technical assistance to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons - lessons learned from the U.S. program of technical assistance to IAEA safeguards. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency is sponsoring a technical study of the requirements of a vehicle to meet the OPCW`s future needs for enhanced chemical weapons verification capabilities. This report provides information about the proven mechanisms by which the U.S. provided both short- and long-term assistance to the IAEA to enhance its verification capabilities. Much of the technical assistance has generic application to international organizations verifying compliance with disarmament treaties or conventions. In addition, some of the equipment developed by the U.S. under the existing arrangements can be applied in the verification of other disarmament treaties or conventions. U.S. technical assistance to IAEA safeguards outside of the IAEA`s regular budget proved to be necessary. The U.S. technical assistance was successful in improving the effectiveness of IAEA safeguards for its most urgent responsibilities and in providing the technical elements for increased IAEA {open_quotes}readiness{close_quotes} for the postponed responsibilities deemed important for U.S. policy objectives. Much of the technical assistance was directed to generic subjects and helped to achieve a system of international verification. It is expected that the capabilities of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to verify a state`s compliance with the {open_quotes}Chemical Weapons Convention{close_quotes} will require improvements. This report presents 18 important lessons learned from the experience of the IAEA and the U.S. Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), organized into three tiers. Each lesson is presented in the report in the context of the difficulty, need and history in which the lesson was learned. Only the most important points are recapitulated in this executive summary.

  15. Design and Assembly of DNA Nano-Objects and 2D DNA Origami Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenyan

    DNA, which plays a central role in biology as the carrier of genetic information, is also an excellent candidate for structural nanotechnology. Researches have proven that a variety of complicated DNA assemblies, such as objects, 2D & 3D crystals, and nanomechanical devices, can be fabricated through the combination of robust branched DNA motifs and sticky ends. This dissertation focuses on the design and construction of DNA nano--objects and 2D DNA origami arrays. In this dissertation, we first describe the formation of a triangular species that has four strands per edge, held together by PX interactions. We demonstrate by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that we can combine a partial triangle with other strands to form a robust four--stranded molecule. By combining them with a novel three--domain molecule, we also demonstrate by AFM that these triangles can be self--assembled into a linear array. Second, we demonstrate our attempts to design and self--assemble 2D DNA origami arrays using several different strategies. Specifically, we introduce the self--assembly of 2D DNA origami lattices using a symmetric cross--like design. This design strategy resulted in a well--ordered woven latticework array with edge dimensions of 2--3 mum. This size is likely to be large enough to connect bottom-up methods of patterning with top--down approaches. Third, we illustrate the design and construction of DNA nano--objects for exploring the substrate preferences of topoisomerase (topo) II. We designed and fabricated four double rhombus--like DNA molecules, each of which contains a different conformation of crossover in the middle, as possible substrates to establish the structural preferences for topo II. We characterized the formation of each substrate molecule by gel electrophoresis. Finally, we study the effect of M13 DNA knotting on the formation of the DNA origami tiles. We demonstrate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that knotted M13

  16. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lever, Mark; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world...... DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample...

  17. Technical activities, 1990: Surface Science Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The report summarizes technical activities and accomplishments of the NIST Surface Science Division during Fiscal Year 1990. Overviews are presented of the Division and of its three constituent groups: Surface Dynamical Processes, Thin Films and Interfaces, and Surface Spectroscopies and Standards. These overviews are followed by reports of selected technical accomplishments during the year. A summary is given of Division outputs and interactions that includes lists of publications, talks, committee assignments, seminars (including both Division seminars and Interface Science seminars arranged through the Division), conferences organized, and a standard reference material certified. Finally, lists are given of Division staff and of guest scientists who have worked in the Division during the past year

  18. Toward quantitative fluorescence microscopy with DNA origami nanorulers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beater, Susanne; Raab, Mario; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic development of fluorescence microscopy has created a large number of new techniques, many of which are able to overcome the diffraction limit. This chapter describes the use of DNA origami nanostructures as scaffold for quantifying microscope properties such as sensitivity and resolution. The DNA origami technique enables placing of a defined number of fluorescent dyes in programmed geometries. We present a variety of DNA origami nanorulers that include nanorulers with defined labeling density and defined distances between marks. The chapter summarizes the advantages such as practically free choice of dyes and labeling density and presents examples of nanorulers in use. New triangular DNA origami nanorulers that do not require photoinduced switching by imaging transient binding to DNA nanostructures are also reported. Finally, we simulate fluorescence images of DNA origami nanorulers and reveal that the optimal DNA nanoruler for a specific application has an intermark distance that is roughly 1.3-fold the expected optical resolution. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Technical approach document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604 (PL95-604), grants the Secretary of Energy the authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards caused by inactive uranium mill sites. This Technical Approach Document (TAD) describes the general technical approaches and design criteria adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement remedial action plans (RAPS) and final designs that comply with EPA standards. It does not address the technical approaches necessary for aquifer restoration at processing sites; a guidance document, currently in preparation, will describe aquifer restoration concerns and technical protocols. This document is a second revision to the original document issued in May 1986; the revision has been made in response to changes to the groundwater standards of 40 CFR 192, Subparts A--C, proposed by EPA as draft standards. New sections were added to define the design approaches and designs necessary to comply with the groundwater standards. These new sections are in addition to changes made throughout the document to reflect current procedures, especially in cover design, water resources protection, and alternate site selection; only minor revisions were made to some of the sections. Sections 3.0 is a new section defining the approach taken in the design of disposal cells; Section 4.0 has been revised to include design of vegetated covers; Section 8.0 discusses design approaches necessary for compliance with the groundwater standards; and Section 9.0 is a new section dealing with nonradiological hazardous constituents. 203 refs., 18 figs., 26 tabs

  20. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    , and hydrogen fueling) are effective for engaging target audiences, and (3) a clear path forward is needed for state and local agencies interested in project implementation (funding, financing, preliminary design, technical assistance, etc.).

  1. Sources of pre-analytical variations in yield of DNA extracted from blood samples: analysis of 50,000 DNA samples in EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Caboux

    Full Text Available The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88% performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies.

  2. The final checkpoint. Cancer as an adaptive evolutionary mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumena Petkova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms for identification of DNA damage and repair usually manage DNA damage very efficiently. If damaged cells manage to bypass the checkpoints where the integrity of the genome is assessed and the decisions whether to proceed with the cell cycle are made, they may evade the imperative to stop dividing and to die. As a result, cancer may develop. Warding off the potential sequence-altering effects of DNA damage during the life of the individual or the existence span of the species is controlled by a set of larger checkpoints acting on a progressively increasing scale, from systematic removal of damaged cells from the proliferative pool by means of repair of DNA damage/programmed cell death through ageing to, finally, cancer. They serve different purposes and act at different levels of the life cycle, safeguarding the integrity of the genetic backup of the individual, the genetic diversity of the population, and, finally, the survival of the species and of life on Earth. In the light of the theory that cancer is the final checkpoint or the nature's manner to prevent complex organisms from living forever at the expense of genetic stagnation, the eventual failure of modern anti-cancer treatments is only to be expected. Nevertheless, the medicine of today and the near future has enough potential to slow down the progression to terminal cancer so that the life expectancy and the quality of life of cancer-affected individuals may be comparable to those of healthy aged individuals.

  3. Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) implementation, Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, W.; Akers, D.W.

    1985-06-01

    A review of the Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) for the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant was performed. The principal review guidelines used were NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants,'' and Draft 7'' of NUREG-0472, Revision 3, ''Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Pressurized Water Reactors.'' Draft submittals were discussed with the Licensee by the NRC staff until all items requiring changes to the Technical Specifications were resolved. The Licensee then submitted final proposed RETS to the NRC which were evaluated and found to be in compliance with the NRC review guidelines. The proposed Offsite Dose Calculation Manual and the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Manual were reviewed and generally found to be in compliance with the NRC review guidelines

  4. A multi-domain protein for beta1 integrin-targeted DNA delivery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Fortunati (Elisabetta); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); N.D. van Loo; C. Wyman (Claire); J.A. Eble; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); B.J. Scholte (Bob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe development of effective receptor-targeted nonviral vectors for use in vivo is complicated by a number of technical problems. One of these is the low efficiency of the conjugation procedures used to couple protein ligands to the DNA condensing carrier molecules. We have made and

  5. SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-03-11

    The SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing attracted 164 domestic and international researchers, from academia, industry, and government. It provided a stimulating forum in which to learn about the latest developments, to discuss exciting new research directions, and to forge stronger ties between theory and applications. Final Report

  6. 77 FR 8095 - Technical Corrections to Commission Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 2 [Docket No. RM11-30-000; Order No. 756] Technical Corrections to Commission Regulations Issued February 8, 2012. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, DOE. ACTION: Final rule: correcting amendment. SUMMARY: This document adds...

  7. 76 FR 16235 - Corporate Credit Unions, Technical Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... inadvertently included particular investments that did not--when subject to the other credit risk and asset... NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 707 RIN 3133-AD58 Corporate Credit Unions, Technical Corrections AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In...

  8. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: Artificial Nanostructures for Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Castro, Carlos; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2018-04-04

    Structural DNA nanotechnology utilizes synthetic or biologic DNA as designer molecules for the self-assembly of artificial nanostructures. The field is founded upon the specific interactions between DNA molecules, known as Watson-Crick base pairing. After decades of active pursuit, DNA has demonstrated unprecedented versatility in constructing artificial nanostructures with significant complexity and programmability. The nanostructures could be either static, with well-controlled physicochemical properties, or dynamic, with the ability to reconfigure upon external stimuli. Researchers have devoted considerable effort to exploring the usability of DNA nanostructures in biomedical research. We review the basic design methods for fabricating both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, along with their biomedical applications in fields such as biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Volume 20 is June 4, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. DNAzyme-Based Logic Gate-Mediated DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-13

    Controlling DNA self-assembly processes using rationally designed logic gates is a major goal of DNA-based nanotechnology and programming. Such controls could facilitate the hierarchical engineering of complex nanopatterns responding to various molecular triggers or inputs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a series of DNAzyme-based logic gates to control DNA tile self-assembly onto a prescribed DNA origami frame. Logic systems such as "YES," "OR," "AND," and "logic switch" are implemented based on DNAzyme-mediated tile recognition with the DNA origami frame. DNAzyme is designed to play two roles: (1) as an intermediate messenger to motivate downstream reactions and (2) as a final trigger to report fluorescent signals, enabling information relay between the DNA origami-framed tile assembly and fluorescent signaling. The results of this study demonstrate the plausibility of DNAzyme-mediated hierarchical self-assembly and provide new tools for generating dynamic and responsive self-assembly systems.

  10. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Tang, K.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Chang, L.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The application of DNA fingerprinting has become very broad in forensic analysis, patient identification, diagnostic medicine, and wildlife poaching, since every individual`s DNA structure is identical within all tissues of their body. DNA fingerprinting was initiated by the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). In 1987, Nakamura et al. found that a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) often occurred in the alleles. The probability of different individuals having the same number of tandem repeats in several different alleles is very low. Thus, the identification of VNTR from genomic DNA became a very reliable method for identification of individuals. DNA fingerprinting is a reliable tool for forensic analysis. In DNA fingerprinting, knowledge of the sequence of tandem repeats and restriction endonuclease sites can provide the basis for identification. The major steps for conventional DNA fingerprinting include (1) specimen processing (2) amplification of selected DNA segments by PCR, and (3) gel electrophoresis to do the final DNA analysis. In this work we propose to use laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA fingerprinting. The process and advantages are discussed.

  11. DNA methylation results depend on DNA integrity – role of post mortem interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias eRhein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Major questions of neurological and psychiatric mechanisms involve the brain functions on a molecular level and cannot be easily addressed due to limitations in access to tissue samples. Post mortem studies are able to partly bridge the gap between brain tissue research retrieved from animal trials and the information derived from peripheral analysis (e.g. measurements in blood cells in patients. Here, we wanted to know how fast DNA degradation is progressing under controlled conditions in order to define thresholds for tissue quality to be used in respective trials. Our focus was on the applicability of partly degraded samples for bisulfite sequencing and the determination of simple means to define cut-off values.After opening the brain cavity, we kept two consecutive pig skulls at ambient temperature (19-21°C and removed cortex tissue up to a post mortem interval (PMI of 120h. We calculated the percentage of degradation on DNA gel electrophoresis of brain DNA to estimate quality and relate this estimation spectrum to the quality of human post-mortem control samples. Functional DNA quality was investigated by bisulfite sequencing of two functionally relevant genes for either the serotonin receptor 5 (SLC6A4 or aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2.Testing our approach in a heterogeneous collective of human blood and brain samples, we demonstrate integrity of measurement quality below the threshold of 72h PMI.While sequencing technically worked for all timepoints irrespective of conceivable DNA degradation, there is a good correlation between variance of methylation to degradation levels documented in the gel (R2=0.4311, p=0.0392 for advancing post mortem intervals (PMI. This otherwise elusive phenomenon is an important prerequisite for the interpretation and evaluation of samples prior to in-depth processing via an affordable and easy assay to estimate identical sample quality and thereby comparable methylation measurements.

  12. Biotrans functional and technical description. Report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tilburg, X.; Egging, R.; Londo, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels and to identify the possibilities and strategies towards large scale sustainable production, use and trading of biofuels for the transport sector in Europe, including Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC). The report supplements the two other reports in the work package: 'Biofuel and Bio-energy implementation scenarios - final report of VIEWLS WP5' (2005) and 'VIEWLS modelling and analysis, technical data for biofuel production chains' (2005). This document contains a functional and technical description of the BioTrans model, accompanied by a description of the system. Section 2 contains a conceptual and functional description of the biofuel model. Section 3 describes the optimisation method in technical terms, discussing aspects like the target function and constraints used. Finally, section 4 discusses the input and output requirements for the BioTrans system

  13. SUSTAINING OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION FOR CAREER CHOICE AND DEVELOPMENT IN STUDENTS OF TECHNICAL COLLEGES IN ENUGU STATE, NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Moses Ikebe Odo

    2015-01-01

    This study takes on the issue of sustaining occupational information for career choice and development in students of technical colleges in Enugu State, Nigeria. The method adopted for this study was the survey design and the population included were all final year students of the three government technical colleges in Enugu State of Nigeria. The technical colleges were sampled as follows: Government Technical College, Enugu (156 students); Government Technical College, Nsukka (148 students);...

  14. Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements. Volume 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CASH, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, basis thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  15. Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements [VOL 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CASH, R.J.

    2000-12-28

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, basis thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  16. Digital PCR for direct quantification of viruses without DNA extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Pav?i?, Jernej; ?el, Jana; Milavec, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    DNA extraction before amplification is considered an essential step for quantification of viral DNA using real-time PCR (qPCR). However, this can directly affect the final measurements due to variable DNA yields and removal of inhibitors, which leads to increased inter-laboratory variability of qPCR measurements and reduced agreement on viral loads. Digital PCR (dPCR) might be an advantageous methodology for the measurement of virus concentrations, as it does not depend on any calibration mat...

  17. RNA-directed DNA methylation: Mechanisms and functions

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2010-07-01

    Epigenetic RNA based gene silencing mechanisms play a major role in genome stability and control of gene expression. Transcriptional gene silencing via RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) guides the epigenetic regulation of the genome in response to disease states, growth, developmental and stress signals. RdDM machinery is composed of proteins that produce and modify 24-nt- long siRNAs, recruit the RdDM complex to genomic targets, methylate DNA and remodel chromatin. The final DNA methylation pattern is determined by either DNA methyltransferase alone or by the combined action of DNA methyltransferases and demethylases. The dynamic interaction between RdDM and demethylases may render the plant epigenome plastic to growth, developmental, and environmental cues. The epigenome plasticity may allow the plant genome to assume many epigenomes and to have the right epigenome at the right time in response to intracellular or extracellular stimuli. This review discusses recent advances in RdDM research and considers future perspectives.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrs, S.M.

    2000-05-01

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA) n and (GA) n , and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a dimeric

  19. 78 FR 22269 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Draft Guidance on M7 Assessment and Control of DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``M7 Assessment and Control of DNA Reactive (Mutagenic) Impurities in Pharmaceuticals to Limit Potential Carcinogenic Risk.'' The draft guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The draft guidance emphasizes considerations of both safety and quality risk management in establishing levels of mutagenic impurities that are expected to pose negligible carcinogenic risk. It outlines recommendations for assessment and control of mutagenic impurities that reside or are reasonably expected to reside in a final drug substance or product, taking into consideration the intended conditions of human use. The draft guidance is intended to provide guidance for new drug substances and new drug products during their clinical development and subsequent applications for marketing.

  20. 7 CFR 1944.419 - Final grantee evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants § 1944.419 Final grantee...HA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 employees or an organization under contract to Fm... determine how successful the grantee was in meeting goals and objectives as defined in the agreement...

  1. 78 FR 41304 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 105 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0397] RIN 1625-AC06 Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard published a final rule...

  2. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50

  3. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  4. DNA testing in homicide investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahlow, Joseph A; Cameron, Thomas; Arendt, Alexander; Cornelis, Kenneth; Bontrager, Anthony; Suth, Michael S; Black, Lisa; Tobey, Rebbecca; Pollock, Sharon; Stur, Shawn; Cotter, Kenneth; Gabrielse, Joel

    2017-10-01

    Objectives With the widespread use of DNA testing, police, death investigators, and attorneys need to be aware of the capabilities of this technology. This review provides an overview of scenarios where DNA evidence has played a major role in homicide investigations in order to highlight important educational issues for police, death investigators, forensic pathologists, and attorneys. Methods This was a nonrandom, observational, retrospective study. Data were obtained from the collective files of the authors from casework during a 15-year period, from 2000 through 2014. Results A series of nine scenarios, encompassing 11 deaths, is presented from the standpoint of the police and death investigation, the forensic pathology autopsy performance, the subsequent DNA testing of evidence, and, ultimately, the final adjudication of cases. Details of each case are presented, along with a discussion that focuses on important aspects of sample collection for potential DNA testing, especially at the crime scene and the autopsy. The presentation highlights the diversity of case and evidence types in which DNA testing played a valuable role in the successful prosecution of the case. Conclusions By highlighting homicides where DNA testing contributed to the successful adjudication of cases, police, death investigators, forensic pathologists, and attorneys will be better informed regarding the types of evidence and situations where such testing is of potential value.

  5. Fiscal 2000 pioneering research report on the basic technology for novel DNA drug creation using anti-gene engineering; 2000 nendo anti gene kogaku ni yoru shinki DNA drug soshutsu kiban gijutsu chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Research is conducted concerning the possibility of anti-gene engineering basic to the application of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) drugs capable of serving as functional DNAs to the control of the expression of industrially useful substance producing genes or of anomalous genes and concerning the possibility of novel industry creation on the strength of the said engineering. The specific research items are described below. Technical seeds are investigated relating to the tissue- and cell-specific drug delivery system for the expression of the molecular device function of the DNA drug. Concerning molecular target technologies such as the anti-sense method, possibilities are studied of utilizing the currently available technical seeds for the eventual creation of novel industries. Concerning novel designing methods utilizing genome information such as SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), investigations are conducted to determine if they would help novel technology development and novel material development. The domestic state is surveyed in relation to DNA drugs, and possibilities are investigated of novel substance production and novel medicine creation with the aid of anti-gene engineering. (NEDO)

  6. Development of a Foam OTEC System. Final technical report for Fiscal Year 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Research on Development of a Foam OTEC System, as carried out at Carnegie-Mellon University from October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979, is described. To a brief section summarizing highlights of research results are appended 12 technical reports which detail specific sections of the program. The work described is continuing and a proposal is currently being submitted to provide support in fiscal 1980.

  7. In vitro enzymatic studies on the nature and repair of x-ray-induced damages in DNA. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    An enzyme has been purified some 4000 fold from Escherichia coli which recognizes alkali stable base damages in x-irradiated DNA. The enzyme has broad specificity incising: DNA damaged by OsO 4 which produces thymine glycols, DNA treated with heat and acid which produces apurinic sites, and DNA uv-irradiated with high fluences which produces a variety of damages including the above. These activities co-chromatograph through Fraction VII the most purified form; however, the optimum reaction parameters differ among the various substrates suggesting the presence of more than one active site. Similar studies have been done with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several apurinic activities have been elucidated in this organism, one of which, Endonuclease E, has been purified over 1000 fold. Endonuclease E has been characterized with respect to various reaction parameters as well as by gel electrophoresis. Both the E. coli and yeast enzymes have been used to quantify DNA damage. Apurinic PM2 DNA and OsO 4 -treated PM2 DNA have also been used in a transfection system to estimate the inactivation efficiencies of AP sites and thymine glycols. AP sites have a relatively high inactivation efficiency and contribute about 15% to the inactivation of x-irradiated PM2 phage while thymine glycols contribute significantly less

  8. DNA synthesis in the imaginal wing discs of the American bollworm ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The effect of two insect growth regulators of plant origin viz. plumbagin and azadirachtin and the ecdysteroids. 20-hydroxyecdysone, makisterone A and a phytoecdysteroid on DNA synthesis in imaginal wing discs of day 4 final instar Helicoverpa armigera larvae was studied. DNA synthesis increased with increase in time of.

  9. Regulation Mechanism of HBV cccDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Covalently closed circular (ccc DNA of hepatitis B virus (HBV existed in the nuclei of HBV infected hepatocytes with a half-life time of 14.3 years in a mathematic model. Viral protein feedback regulation in HBV life cycle to maintain vital viral replication is an important mechanism. Interleukin-6, epithelial growth factor, heme oxygenase-1, histones, and hepatocyte nuclear factors are demonstrated as the key regulators for HBV life cycle. CpG island structure and methylation status are involved in the regulation of HBV DNA replication. Nucleos(tide analogues are widely used in the clinical practice for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients, although no evidence indicating a direct inhibiton of HBV cccDNA. In the future, along with the study of HBV life cycle, new drugs including RNA interference technique, will pave the way to eliminate the HBV cccDNA from infected hepatocytes resulting final cure of chronic hepatitis B.

  10. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, Habib [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Viselli, Anthony [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Goupee, Andrew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Thaler, Jeffrey [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Brady, Damian [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Browne, Peter [HDR, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Browning, James [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chung, Jade [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Coulling, Alexander [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Deese, Heather [Island Institute, Rockland, ME (United States); Fowler, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Holberton, Rebecca [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Anant, Jain [Intertek, Duluth, GA (United States); Jalbert, Dustin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Johnson, Theresa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Karlson, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kimball, Richard [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Koo, Bonjun [Technip, Paris (France); Lackner, Matthew [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lambrakos, Kostas [Technip, Paris (France); Lankowski, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Leopold, Adrienne [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Lim, Ho-Joon [Technip, Paris (France); Mangum, Linda [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Martin, Heather [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Masciola, Marco [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Maynard, Melissa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); McCleave, James [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Mizrahi, Robert [New Jersey Audubon Society, Bernardsville, NJ (United States); Molta, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Pershing, Andrew [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Pettigrew, Neal [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Prowell, Ian [MMI Engineering, Oakland, CA (United States); Qua, Andrew [Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States); Sherwood, Graham [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Snape, Thomas [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Steneck, Robert [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Stewart, Gordon [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Stockwell, Jason [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Swift, Andrew H. P. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Thomas, Dale [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Viselli, Elizabeth [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zydlewski, Gayle [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  11. Development of biometric DNA ink for authentication security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiyada, Masaki

    2004-10-01

    Among the various types of biometric personal identification systems, DNA provides the most reliable personal identification. It is intrinsically digital and unchangeable while the person is alive, and even after his/her death. Increasing the number of DNA loci examined can enhance the power of discrimination. This report describes the development of DNA ink, which contains synthetic DNA mixed with printing inks. Single-stranded DNA fragments encoding a personalized set of short tandem repeats (STR) were synthesized. The sequence was defined as follows. First, a decimal DNA personal identification (DNA-ID) was established based on the number of STRs in the locus. Next, this DNA-ID was encrypted using a binary, 160-bit algorithm, using a hashing function to protect privacy. Since this function is irreversible, no one can recover the original information from the encrypted code. Finally, the bit series generated above is transformed into base sequences, and double-stranded DNA fragments are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to protect against physical attacks. Synthesized DNA was detected successfully after samples printed in DNA ink were subjected to several resistance tests used to assess the stability of printing inks. Endurance test results showed that this DNA ink would be suitable for practical use as a printing ink and was resistant to 40 hours of ultraviolet exposure, performance commensurate with that of photogravure ink. Copyright 2004 Tohoku University Medical Press

  12. DNA fragments assembly based on nicking enzyme system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3'-end or 5'-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB.

  13. Beowawe Bottoming Binary Unit - Final Technical Report for EE0002856

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Dale Edward

    2013-02-12

    This binary plant is the first high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a butane based cycle are not necessary. The unit is modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. This project proves the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy for Nevada, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.

  14. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  15. Final Technical Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-91ER20038

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, T. M.

    2001-03-15

    The existence of species within the plant genus Flaveria with differing leaf cell arrangements and photosynthetic schemes (C3, C4, C3-C4) enabled us to identify genetic elements (promoters, 3'UTRs) that are responsible for the regulation of pre-existing metabolic genes in the pattern required for the high-efficiency C4 photosynthetic scheme. We analyzed DNA elements regulating the rbcS, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase gene families in several species of Flaveria, using transient and stable transformation methods.

  16. 800,000 year old mammoth DNA, modern elephant DNA or PCR artefact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binladen, Jonas; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-02-22

    Poulakakis and colleagues (Poulakakis et al. 2006: Biol. Lett. 2, 451-454), report the recovery of 'authentic' mammoth DNA from an 800,000-year-old fragment of bone excavated on the island of Crete. In light of results from other ancient DNA studies that indicate how DNA survival is unlikely in samples, which are recovered from warm environments and are relatively old (e.g. more than 100,000 years), these findings come as a great surprise. Here, we show that problems exist with the methodological approaches used in the study. First, the nested PCR technique as reported is nonsensical--one of the second round 'nested' primers falls outside the amplicon of the first round PCR. More worryingly, the binding region of one of the first round primers (Elcytb320R) falls within the short 43 base pair reported mammoth sequence, specifically covering two of the three reportedly diagnostic Elephas polymorphisms. Finally, we demonstrate using a simple BLAST search in GenBank that the claimed 'uniquely derived character state' for mammoths is in fact also found within modern elephants.

  17. DNA Array-Based Gene Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Provenzano, Maurizio; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Pilati, Pierluigi; Nitti, Donato; Lise, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease in most respects, including its cellularity, different genetic alterations, and diverse clinical behaviors. Traditional molecular analyses are reductionist, assessing only 1 or a few genes at a time, thus working with a biologic model too specific and limited to confront a process whose clinical outcome is likely to be governed by the combined influence of many genes. The potential of functional genomics is enormous, because for each experiment, thousands of relevant observations can be made simultaneously. Accordingly, DNA array, like other high-throughput technologies, might catalyze and ultimately accelerate the development of knowledge in tumor cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of DNA array technology in cancer research has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to carcinogenesis, tumor aggressiveness, and sensitivity to antiblastic agents. Given the revolutionary implications that the use of this technology might have in the clinical management of patients with cancer, principles of DNA array-based tumor gene profiling need to be clearly understood for the data to be correctly interpreted and appreciated. In the present work, we discuss the technical features characterizing this powerful laboratory tool and review the applications so far described in the field of oncology. PMID:15621987

  18. DNA Methylation Modulates Nociceptive Sensitization after Incision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Sun

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling DNA accessibility and gene expression. Blockade of DNA methylation can significantly affect pain behaviors implicated in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of DNA methylation with regard to postoperative pain has not yet been explored. In this study we sought to investigate the role of DNA methylation in modulating incisional pain and identify possible targets under DNA methylation and contributing to incisional pain. DNA methyltranferase (DNMT inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine significantly reduced incision-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal sensitivity. Aza-2'-deoxycytidine also reduced hindpaw swelling after incision, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. Global DNA methylation and DNMT3b expression were increased in skin after incision, but none of DNMT1, DNMT3a or DNMT3b was altered in spinal cord or DRG. The expression of proopiomelanocortin Pomc encoding β-endorphin and Oprm1 encoding the mu-opioid receptor were upregulated peripherally after incision; moreover, Oprm1 expression was further increased under DNMT inhibitor treatment. Finally, local peripheral injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone significantly exacerbated incision-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results suggest that DNA methylation is functionally relevant to incisional nociceptive sensitization, and that mu-opioid receptor signaling might be one methylation regulated pathway controlling sensitization after incision.

  19. Biological dosimeter for cellular damage and repair by ionizing radiation. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1993 - April 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have investigated the alteration of chromatin domains in Human T and B cells after ionizing radiation using three DNA specific dyes, Feulgen, Hoechst and 7-amino actinomycin D. Characterization and differentiation of T and B cells was accomplished using only 4 of a possible 32 image features with the CAS and Quaritex QX7 Digital Image Systems. Human B and T cells were irradiated with 1, 5 and 10 Gy and analyzed during a 1.5 hour recovery period. The chosen features detect a dose dependent change in DNA domains which can be observed as early as 1.5 hours after a 1Gv exposure. The results suggest that the ability of DNA specific dyes to stain chromatin can be used as an early sensitive indicator of DNA damage. The observed alteration of chromatin staining suggests that chromatin structure does observably change in a significant manner during a DNA repair interval. Since these alteration can be detected with DNA specific dyes that stain both AT rich, GC rich or total DNA, these data suggest that a global alteration of the chromatin is occurring after exposure to ionizing radiation

  20. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-01-01

    The key source of uncertainty in assessing actinide mobility is the relative importance of transport by: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depends on several environmental factors and they compete with one another. A scientific assessment of the long-term risks associated with actinides in surface soils depends on better quantifying each of these three modes of mobility. The objective from our EMSP study was to quantify the mobility of soil actinides by wind erosion, water erosion, and vertical migration at three semiarid sites where actinide mobility is a key technical, social and legal issue. This EMSP project was the first to evaluate all three factors at a site. The approach has been to investigate both short- and long-term issues based on field and lab studies and model comparisons. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating threshold responses into a modeling framework that accounts for environmental factors and natural disturbances that trigger large changes in actinide mobility. The study measured erosional losses of sediment and fallout cesium (an actinide analogue) from field plots located near WIPP in 1998. The results highlight the large effect of burning as a disturbance on contaminant transport and mobility via runoff and erosion. The results show that runoff, erosion, and actinide transport are (1) strongly site specific-differences in radionuclide transport between WIPP and Rocky Flats differed by a factor of twelve because of soil and vegetation differences, and (2) are strongly impacted by disturbances such as fire, which can increase runoff, erosion, and actinide transport by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, a laboratory experiment using soil columns was conducted to investigate the vertical transport of contaminants in sandy soils. Nine columns of soil collected from the vicinity of the WIPP site were prepared. The column consisted of a piece of PVC pipe 20 cm

  1. Technical co-operation report for 2000. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers three separate topics. Part one fulfills the Agency's obligation under the General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/18 to report on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation. It covers the period from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001. The report examines the finalization of the 2001-2002 technical co-operation programme and several key concepts of the Technical Co-operation Strategy such as Partners in Development, Technical Co-operation among Developing Countries, and the continuing evolution of Regional Resource Centres. Reflecting an important trend in the technical co-operation programme, which was mandated by the General Conference, the report describes the results achieved in several programmes in least developed countries. Part two reports on the major achievements of the technical co-operation programme in 2000 in the different regions of the world. Part three presents a summary of the financial and non-financial parameters of the technical co-operation programme. The supplement to the report provides a more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements and non-financial indicators

  2. Technical co-operation report for 2000. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report covers three separate topics. Part one fulfills the Agency's obligation under the General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/18 to report on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation. It covers the period from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001. The report examines the finalization of the 2001-2002 technical co-operation programme and several key concepts of the Technical Co-operation Strategy such as Partners in Development, Technical Co-operation among Developing Countries, and the continuing evolution of Regional Resource Centres. Reflecting an important trend in the technical co-operation programme, which was mandated by the General Conference, the report describes the results achieved in several programmes in least developed countries. Part two reports on the major achievements of the technical co-operation programme in 2000 in the different regions of the world. Part three presents a summary of the financial and non-financial parameters of the technical co-operation programme. The supplement to the report provides a more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements and non-financial indicators.

  3. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    determined the baseline level of DNA strand breaks (SBs)/alkaline labile sites and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites in coded samples of mononuclear blood cells (MNBCs) from healthy volunteers. There were technical problems in seven laboratories in adopting the standard protocol...... analysed by the standard protocol. The SBs and FPG-sensitive sites were measured in the same experiment, indicating that the large spread in the latter lesions was the main reason for the reduced inter-laboratory variation. However, it remains worrying that half of the participating laboratories obtained...

  4. Profiling soil microbial communities with next-generation sequencing: the influence of DNA kit selection and technician technical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Taha; Yang, Sung-Yin; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Jenke-Kodama, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Structure and diversity of microbial communities are an important research topic in biology, since microbes play essential roles in the ecology of various environments. Different DNA isolation protocols can lead to data bias and can affect results of next-generation sequencing. To evaluate the impact of protocols for DNA isolation from soil samples and also the influence of individual handling of samples, we compared results obtained by two researchers (R and T) using two different DNA extraction kits: (1) MO BIO PowerSoil ® DNA Isolation kit (MO_R and MO_T) and (2) NucleoSpin ® Soil kit (MN_R and MN_T). Samples were collected from six different sites on Okinawa Island, Japan. For all sites, differences in the results of microbial composition analyses (bacteria, archaea, fungi, and other eukaryotes), obtained by the two researchers using the two kits, were analyzed. For both researchers, the MN kit gave significantly higher yields of genomic DNA at all sites compared to the MO kit (ANOVA; P  technicians for thorough microbial analyses and to obtain accurate estimates of microbial diversity.

  5. The monomeric form of Neisseria DNA mimic protein DMP19 prevents DNA from binding to the histone-like HU protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tzu-Ping; Liao, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Kai-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    DNA mimicry is a direct and effective strategy by which the mimic competes with DNA for the DNA binding sites on other proteins. Until now, only about a dozen proteins have been shown to function via this strategy, including the DNA mimic protein DMP19 from Neisseria meningitides. We have shown previously that DMP19 dimer prevents the operator DNA from binding to the transcription factor NHTF. Here, we provide new evidence that DMP19 monomer can also interact with the Neisseria nucleoid-associated protein HU. Using BS3 crosslinking, gel filtration and isothermal titration calorimetry assays, we found that DMP19 uses its monomeric form to interact with the Neisseria HU dimer. Crosslinking conjugated mass spectrometry was used to investigate the binding mode of DMP19 monomer and HU dimer. Finally, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that the DNA binding affinity of HU is affected by DMP19. These results showed that DMP19 is bifunctional in the gene regulation of Neisseria through its variable oligomeric forms. PMID:29220372

  6. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiolo, Pablo R. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Conway, Lawarence E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Oriani, Luca [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Lahoda, Edward J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; DeSilva, Greg [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Hu, Min H. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Hartz, Josh [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Bachrach, Uriel [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Smith, Larry [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Dudek, Daniel F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Toman, Gary J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Feng, Dandong [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kazimi, Mujid S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a standard 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (~600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output.

  7. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubiolo, Pablo R.; Conway, Lawarence E.; Oriani, Luca; Lahoda, Edward J.; DeSilva, Greg; Hu, Min H.; Hartz, Josh; Bachrach, Uriel; Smith, Larry; Dudek, Daniel F.; Toman, Gary J.; Feng, Dandong; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2006-01-01

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a ''standard'' 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (∼600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output

  8. Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

  9. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-01-01

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed

  10. Review of technical issues related to the failure of Rosemount pressure transmitters due to fill oil loss. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.W.; Gaertner, J.P.; Burns, E.T.; Horn, A.; Lee, L.K.

    1994-08-01

    Rosemount pressure transmitters are extensively used in both safety and non-safety applications in US nuclear power plants. They are used to measure pressure, flow, and water level. Rosemount pressure transmitter models 1151, 1152, 1153A, 1153, and 1154 use a fill oil to hydraulically transmit process pressure exerted on outer isolating diaphragms to internal diaphragms. The resulting deflection of the internal diaphragms changes the distance between them and a central diaphragm separating the transmitter interior into two volumes. The change in distance is measured as a change in electrical capacitance between the isolating diaphragms and the central diaphragm and can be related to differential pressure. The fill oil also functions as a dielectric. It has been well established that this fill oil can potentially leak over time, decreasing transmitter accuracy and increasing transmitter response time. Ultimately, the transmitter can fail. An extensive effort has been expended by the nuclear power industry collectively to analyze this issue and develop technically sound and reasonable requirements to mitigate the effects of oil loss in Rosemount pressure transmitters. Despite this, technical concerns have still been raised regarding the technical validity of the past analyses of this problem and its scope. In May 1993, the NRC created an internal group to comprehensively review the Rosemount issue and the NRC's action in addressing it to ensure that all available technical information has been considered. Because this issue remains of active technical interest and because the past work on this subject has been done by many different groups and organizations, EPRI has prepared this report to thoroughly document the current technical understanding of this issue, to perform additional analysis, and to identify any appropriate additional technical research activities regarding oil loss in Rosemount pressure transmitters

  11. Inaccurate DNA synthesis in cell extracts of yeast producing active human DNA polymerase iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Alena V; Grabow, Corinn; Gening, Leonid V; Tarantul, Vyacheslav Z; Tahirov, Tahir H; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Pavlov, Youri I

    2011-01-31

    Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn(2+) ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates "G" opposite template "T" more frequently than incorporates the correct "A." We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of "G" versus "A" method of Gening, abbreviated as "misGvA"). We provide unambiguous proof of the "misGvA" approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The "misGvA" activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts.

  12. Inaccurate DNA synthesis in cell extracts of yeast producing active human DNA polymerase iota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena V Makarova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn(2+ ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates "G" opposite template "T" more frequently than incorporates the correct "A." We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of "G" versus "A" method of Gening, abbreviated as "misGvA". We provide unambiguous proof of the "misGvA" approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The "misGvA" activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts.

  13. Template-directed covalent conjugation of DNA to native antibodies, transferrin and other metal-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Christian B.; Kodal, Anne L. B.; Nielsen, Jesper S.; Schaffert, David H.; Scavenius, Carsten; Okholm, Anders H.; Voigt, Niels V.; Enghild, Jan J.; Kjems, Jørgen; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt V.

    2014-09-01

    DNA-protein conjugates are important in bioanalytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics and bionanotechnology, as the DNA provides a unique handle to identify, functionalize or otherwise manipulate proteins. To maintain protein activity, conjugation of a single DNA handle to a specific location on the protein is often needed. However, preparing such high-quality site-specific conjugates often requires genetically engineered proteins, which is a laborious and technically challenging approach. Here we demonstrate a simpler method to create site-selective DNA-protein conjugates. Using a guiding DNA strand modified with a metal-binding functionality, we directed a second DNA strand to the vicinity of a metal-binding site of His6-tagged or wild-type metal-binding proteins, such as serotransferrin, where it subsequently reacted with lysine residues at that site. This method, DNA-templated protein conjugation, facilitates the production of site-selective protein conjugates, and also conjugation to IgG1 antibodies via a histidine cluster in the constant domain.

  14. DNA-encoded chemical libraries - achievements and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Nicholas; Bassi, Gabriele; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2018-04-23

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) are collections of compounds, individually coupled to DNA tags serving as amplifiable identification barcodes. Since individual compounds can be identified by the associated DNA tag, they can be stored as a mixture, allowing the synthesis and screening of combinatorial libraries of unprecedented size, facilitated by the implementation of split-and-pool synthetic procedures or other experimental methodologies. In this review, we briefly present relevant concepts and technologies, which are required for the implementation and interpretation of screening procedures with DNA-encoded chemical libraries. Moreover, we illustrate some success stories, detailing how novel ligands were discovered from encoded libraries. Finally, we critically review what can realistically be achieved with the technology at the present time, highlighting challenges and opportunities for the future. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O' Brien, Kathleen

    2011-09-28

    working, utility distribution feeder. To address the technical challenges related to the integration of distributed PV when PV penetration levels reach or exceed 30% of the total load, technologies and methods to ensure the stable and safe operation of the feeder will be evaluated. Lessons learned will enable APS to improve the framework for future PV integration on its system and may also aid other utilities across the United States energy sector in accelerating the adoption of distributed photovoltaic generation.

  16. Advising students in technical projects - recognizing problem scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jacob Andreas; Singh, Karan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the advisor’s role during the technical work and the thesis preparation for a student in the final phase of a course of study in an engineering education. We initially claim that there is a marked difference between the learning that takes place in regular course work...

  17. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-02-16

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation.

  18. PVWatts Version 1 Technical Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobos, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    The NREL PVWatts(TM) calculator is a web application developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that estimates the electricity production of a grid-connected photovoltaic system based on a few simple inputs. PVWatts combines a number of sub-models to predict overall system performance, and makes several hidden assumptions about performance parameters. This technical reference details the individual sub-models, documents assumptions and hidden parameters, and explains the sequence of calculations that yield the final system performance estimation.

  19. Extraction of Chromosomal DNA from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-05-02

    Extraction of DNA from Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells is required for various uses, including templating polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), Southern blotting, library construction, and high-throughput sequencing. To purify high-quality DNA, the cell wall is removed by digestion with Zymolyase or Lyticase and the resulting spheroplasts lysed using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Cell debris, SDS, and SDS-protein complexes are subsequently precipitated by the addition of potassium acetate and removed by centrifugation. Finally, DNA is precipitated using isopropanol. At this stage, purity is usually sufficient for PCR. However, for more sensitive procedures, such as restriction enzyme digestion, additional purification steps, including proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform extraction, are recommended. All of these steps are described in detail here. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Technical indicators of financial performance in the dairy herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Erling Lundager; Østergaard, Søren; Krogh, Mogens Agerbo

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was used to predict the long-term financial performance related to the technical performance of dairy herds. The indicators addressed were derived from data collected routinely in the herd. They indicated technical performance that can be affected by the farmer...... or the consultant, and they were derived from expected cause-effect relations between technical performance and financial performance at the herd level. The study included the indicators shape of lactation curve, reproduction efficiency, heifer management, variation between cows in lactation curve persistency...... cow was analyzed as the measure of financial performance. The potential effects of the selected indicators on the gross margin were estimated by means of an ANOVA. The final model allowed estimation of the financial value of specific changes within the key performance indicators. This study indicated...

  1. MYC and the Control of DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Sola, David; Gautier, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The MYC oncogene is a multifunctional protein that is aberrantly expressed in a significant fraction of tumors from diverse tissue origins. Because of its multifunctional nature, it has been difficult to delineate the exact contributions of MYC’s diverse roles to tumorigenesis. Here, we review the normal role of MYC in regulating DNA replication as well as its ability to generate DNA replication stress when overexpressed. Finally, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which replication stress induced by aberrant MYC expression could contribute to genomic instability and cancer. PMID:24890833

  2. Photosensitized oxidation of DNA and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decarroz, Chantal.

    1982-09-01

    Chemical changes in DNA components during the photodynamic effect are responsible for Mutagenic and carcinogenic phenomena. Basically two competitive mechanisns involving respectively a charge transfer (type I) and singlet oxygen (type II) are implicated in reactions photo-sensitized by different agents (acridines, phenothiazines, porphyrins, flavins, psoralenes...). A study of the photosensitized oxidation of DNA itself was approached through characterization of the main final products in the case of purine nucleosides. Methyl-2 naphthoquinone - 1,4 (vitamin K 3 ) displays a special photosensitization mechanism involving a cation radical type of intermediary [fr

  3. HFBR: Review of the technical specifications against the FSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Boss, S.B.; Claiborne, E.R.; Darby, J.L.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to determine the adequacy of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Technical Specifications for 40 MW operation by comparison with the HFBR Final Safety Analysis Report, particularly the accident analyses chapter. Specifically, the Technical Specifications were compared against the Design Basis Accident (DBA) Analyses presented in the Addendum to the HFBR FSAR for 60 MW Operation. The 60 MW DBA analyses was used since it is more current and complete than the analyses presented in the original FSAR which is considered obsolete. A listing of the required systems and equipment was made for each of the accidents analyzed. Additionally, the Technical Specification instrument setpoints were compared to the DBA analyses parametric values. Also included in this review was a comparison of the Technical Specification Bases against the FSAR and the identification of any differences. The HFBR Operations Procedures Manual (OPM) was also reviewed for any inconsistencies between the FSAR or the Technical Specifications. Upon completion of this review it was determined that the Technical Specifications are well written and the items commented on should not delay the low power restart (40 MW). Additionally, the OPM is also well written and does not require further modification before restart

  4. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starrs, S.M

    2000-05-01

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA){sub n} and (GA){sub n}, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the adsorption of DNA segments onto graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Shude; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the dynamic process of DNA segments’ adsorption on graphene oxide (GO) in aqueous solution. We find that DNA segments finally ‘stand on’ GO’s surface. Due to energy penalty and electrostatic repulsion, DNA segments cannot lie on the surface of GO with their helical axes parallel to GO’s surface. Both π–π stacking and electrostatic interactions contribute to their binding affinity between the contacting basepair and GO. The results are of great importance to understand the interactions between DNA segments and GO. (paper)

  6. Quantification of DNA in Neonatal Dried Blood Spots by Adenine Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durie, Danielle; Yeh, Ed; McIntosh, Nathan; Fisher, Lawrence; Bulman, Dennis E; Birnboim, H Chaim; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y

    2018-01-02

    Newborn screening programs have expanded to include molecular-based assays as first-tier tests and the success of these assays depends on the quality and yield of DNA extracted from neonatal dried blood spots (DBS). To meet high throughput and rapid turnaround time requirements, newborn screening laboratories adopted rapid DNA extraction methods that produce crude extracts. Quantification of DNA in neonatal DBS is not routinely performed due to technical challenges; however, this may enhance the performance of assays that are sensitive to amounts of input DNA. In this study, we developed a novel high throughput method to quantify total DNA in DBS. It is based on specific acid-catalyzed depurination of DNA followed by mass spectrometric quantification of adenine. The amount of adenine was used to calculate DNA quantity per 3.2 mm DBS. Reference intervals were established using archived, neonatal DBS (n = 501) and a median of 130.6 ng of DNA per DBS was obtained, which is in agreement with literature values. The intra- and interday variations were quantification were 12.5 and 37.8 nmol/L adenine, respectively. We demonstrated that DNA from neonatal DBS can be successfully quantified in high throughput settings using instruments currently deployed in NBS laboratories.

  7. Biomarker-Based Analysis for Contaminants in Sediments/Soil: Review of Cell-Based Assays and cDNA Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inouye, Laura

    2000-01-01

    This technical note reviews the existing technology for cell-based biomarker assays and cDNA arrays and explores their potential as rapid, sensitive, and low-cost tools for sediment/soil toxicity screening...

  8. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  9. The SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS): Technical description: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Socioeconomic impacts must be assessed both for the near term and for the future. One means of addressing the need for the assessment of such impacts has been through the development of the computerized socioeconomic assessment model called the SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS) model. The SEARS model was developed for the Battelle Project Management Division. It was refined and adapted from state-of-the-art computerized projection models and thoroughly validated and is now available for use in projecting the likely socioeconomic impacts of a repository facility. This Technical Description is one of six major products that describe the SEARS modeling system. 61 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  10. Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolami, Davide [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-17

    The report describes hypotheses, aims, methods and results of the project 20170675PRD2, “Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations”, which has been run from July 31, 2017 to January 7, 2018. The technical work has been performed by Director’s Fellow Davide Girolami of the T-4 Division, Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, under the supervision of Wojciech Zurek (T-4), Lukasz Cincio (T-4), and Marcus Daniels (CCS-7). The project ended as Davide Girolami has been converted to J. R. Oppenheimer Fellow to work on the project 20180702PRD1, “Optimal Control of Quantum Machines”, started on January 8, 2018.

  11. Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Newhouse, Norman L. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Led by PPG and partnered with Hexagon Lincoln and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the team recently carried out a project “Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass”. The project was funded by DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, starting on September 1, 2014 as a two-year project to assess technical and commercial feasibilities of manufacturing low-cost, high-strength glass fibers to replace T700 carbon fibers with a goal of reducing the composite total cost by 50% of the existing, commercial 700 bar hydrogen storage tanks used in personal vehicles.

  12. Technical procedures for land use, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This volume contains Technical Procedures pursuant to the Land Use Site Study Plan including land use data acquisition, land use/land cover map compilation, verification of land use/land cover map accuracy, and land use/land cover data analysis. 22 refs., 5 figs

  13. [Studies on the repair of damaged DNA in bacteriophage, bacterial and mammalian systems]: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, E.C.

    1987-08-01

    This study sought to exploit the use of uv radiation as a source of genomic damage. We explored the molecular mechanism of the repair of DNA damage at a number of different levels of biological organization, by investigating bacteriophage, bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. Not only have observations obtained in one biological system suggested specific experimental approaches in others, but we have also learned that some biochemical pathways for DNA repair are unique to specific organisms. Our studies are summarized in terms of 4 major areas of research activity that span the past 16 years. 86 refs

  14. Effects of humic acid on DNA quantification with Quantifiler® Human DNA Quantification kit and short tandem repeat amplification efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung Bum; Lee, Hye Young; Zhang, Ai Hua; Kim, Hye Yeon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Soong Deok

    2012-11-01

    Correct DNA quantification is an essential part to obtain reliable STR typing results. Forensic DNA analysts often use commercial kits for DNA quantification; among them, real-time-based DNA quantification kits are most frequently used. Incorrect DNA quantification due to the presence of PCR inhibitors may affect experiment results. In this study, we examined the alteration degree of DNA quantification results estimated in DNA samples containing a PCR inhibitor by using a Quantifiler® Human DNA Quantification kit. For experiments, we prepared approximately 0.25 ng/μl DNA samples containing various concentrations of humic acid (HA). The quantification results were 0.194-0.303 ng/μl at 0-1.6 ng/μl HA (final concentration in the Quantifiler reaction) and 0.003-0.168 ng/μl at 2.4-4.0 ng/μl HA. Most DNA quantity was undetermined when HA concentration was higher than 4.8 ng/μl HA. The C (T) values of an internal PCR control (IPC) were 28.0-31.0, 36.5-37.1, and undetermined at 0-1.6, 2.4, and 3.2 ng/μl HA. These results indicate that underestimated DNA quantification results may be obtained in the DNA sample with high C (T) values of IPC. Thus, researchers should carefully interpret the DNA quantification results. We additionally examined the effects of HA on the STR amplification by using an Identifiler® kit and a MiniFiler™ kit. Based on the results of this study, it is thought that a better understanding of various effects of HA would help researchers recognize and manipulate samples containing HA.

  15. Sixth ITER technical meeting on safety and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, G.; Baker, D.

    1997-01-01

    The article summarizes the topics of the Sixth Technical Meeting on Safety and Environment which was held to review the first draft of the Non-Site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2) and the draft of the ITER Final Design Report Safety Assessment (FDR-Safety) during October 27 - November 4, 1997 at the ITER San Diego Joint Work Site

  16. Revision of the European Ecolabel Criteria for Personal, Notebook and Tablet Computers TECHNICAL REPORT Summary of the final criteria proposals

    OpenAIRE

    DODD NICHOLAS; VIDAL ABARCA GARRIDO CANDELA; WOLF Oliver; GRAULICH Kathrin; BUNKE Dirk; GROSS Rita; LIU Ran; MANHART Andreas; PRAKASH Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    This technical report provide the background information for the revision of the EU Ecolabel criteria for Personal and Notebook Computers. The study has been carried out by the Joint Research Centre with technical support from the Oeko-Institut. The work has been developed for the European Commission's Directorate General for the Environment. The main purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the technical background and rationale for each criterion proposal. This document is compl...

  17. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelpuk, B.; Joy, P.; Crouthamel, M.

    1977-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of various thermal energy storage alternatives is determined by comparing the system performance and annualized cost which result from each storage alternative operating with the same solar collector model, the same building load model, and the same heating system and controls model. Performance and cost calculations are made on the basis of an hour-by-hour time step using actual weather bureau data for Albuquerque, N. M., and New York City for a single six-month heating season. The primary approach to comparing various storage alternatives is to allow the collector area and storage mass to vary until a minimum cost combination is achieved. In the Albuquerque location collector area of 325 ft/sup 2/, water storage mass of 12.5 lb/ft/sup 2/ of collector area, and phase change mass of 6.25 lb/ft/sup 2/ of collector area results in minimum cost systems, each of which delivers about 50% of the total building demand. The primary conclusion is that, using current costs for materials and containers, water is the cheapest storage alternative for heating applications in both Albuquerque and New York City. The cost of containing or encapsulating phase change materials, coupled with their small system performance advantage, is the main reason for this conclusion. The use of desiccant materials for thermal storage is considered to be impractical due to irreversibilities in thermal cycling.

  18. Strategies for reactor safety: Preventing loss of coolant accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydell, B.O.Y.

    1997-12-01

    This final report on the NKS/RAK-1.2 summarizes the main features of the PIFRAP PC-program and its intended implementation. Regardless of the preferred technical approach to LOCA frequency estimation, the analysis approach must include recognition of the following technical issues: a) Degradation and failure mechanisms potentially affecting piping systems within the reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) and the potential consequences; b) In-service inspection practices and how they influence piping reliability; and c) The service experience with piping systems. The report consists of six sections and one appendix. A Nordic perspective on LOCA and nuclear safety is given. It includes summaries of results from research in material sciences and current regulatory philosophies regarding piping reliability. A summary of the LOCA concept is applied in Nordic PSA studies. It includes a discussion on deterministic and probabilistic views on LOCA. The R and D on piping reliability by SKI and the PIFRAP model is summarized. Next, Section 6 presents conclusion and recommendations. Finally, Appendix A contains a list of abbreviations and acronyms, together with a glossary of technical terms. (EG)

  19. Geant4-DNA coupling and validation in the GATE Monte Carlo platform for DNA molecules irradiation in a calculation grid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Quang Trung

    2014-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation methods are successfully being used in various areas of medical physics but also at different scales, for example, from the radiation therapy treatment planning systems to the prediction of the effects of radiation in cancer cells. The Monte Carlo simulation platform GATE based on the Geant4 tool-kit offers features dedicated to simulations in medical physics (nuclear medicine and radiotherapy). For radiobiology applications, the Geant4-DNA physical models are implemented to track particles till very low energy (eV) and are adapted for estimation of micro-dosimetric quantities. In order to implement a multi-scale Monte Carlo platform, we first validated the physical models of Geant4-DNA, and integrated them into GATE. Finally, we validated this implementation in the context of radiation therapy and proton therapy. In order to validate the Geant4-DNA physical models, dose point kernels for monoenergetic electrons (10 keV to 100 keV) were simulated using the physical models of Geant4-DNA and were compared to those simulated with Geant4 Standard physical models and another Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The range and the stopping powers of electrons (7.4 eV to 1 MeV) and protons (1 keV to 100 MeV) calculated with GATE/Geant4-DNA were then compared with literature. We proposed to simulate with the GATE platform the impact of clinical and preclinical beams on cellular DNA. We modeled a clinical proton beam of 193.1 MeV, 6 MeV clinical electron beam and a X-ray irradiator beam. The beams models were validated by comparing absorbed dose computed and measured in liquid water. Then, the beams were used to calculate the frequency of energy deposits in DNA represented by different geometries. First, the DNA molecule was represented by small cylinders: 2 nm x 2 nm (∼10 bp), 5 nm x 10 nm (nucleosome) and 25 nm x 25 nm (chromatin fiber). All these cylinders were placed randomly in a sphere of liquid water (500 nm radius). Then we reconstructed the DNA

  20. DNA gel electrophoresis: the reptation model(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gary W

    2009-06-01

    DNA gel electrophoresis has been the most important experimental tool to separate DNA fragments for several decades. The introduction of PFGE in the 1980s and capillary gel electrophoresis in the 1990s made it possible to study, map and sequence entire genomes. Explaining how very large DNA molecules move in a gel and why PFGE is needed to separate them has been an active field of research ever since the launch of the journal Electrophoresis. This article presents a personal and historical overview of the development of the theory of gel electrophoresis, focusing on the reptation model, the band broadening mechanisms, and finally the factors that limit the read length and the resolution of electrophoresis-based sequencing systems. I conclude with a short discussion of some of the questions that remain unanswered.

  1. Final Technical Report - DE-EE0003542

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, James D

    2013-03-31

    Wind has provided energy for thousands of years: some of the earliest windmill engineering designs date back to ancient Babylonia and India where wind would be used as a source of irrigation. Today, wind is the quickest growing resource in Americas expanding energy infrastructure. However, to continue to positively diversify Americas energy portfolio and further reduce the countrys reliance of foreign oil, the industry must grow substantially over the next two decades in both turbine installations and skilled industrial manpower to support. The wind sector is still an emergent industry requiring maturation and development of its labor force: dedicated training is needed to provide the hard and soft skills to support the increasingly complex wind turbine generators as the technology evolves. Furthermore, the American workforce is facing a steep decline in available labor resources as the baby boomer generation enters retirement age. It is therefore vital that a process is quickly created for supporting the next generation of wind technicians. However, the manpower growth must incorporate three key components. First, the safety and technical training curriculum must be standardized across the industry - current wind educational programs are disparate and dedicated standardization programs must be further refined and implemented. Second, it is essential that the wind sector avoid disrupting other energy production industries by cannibalizing workers, which would indirectly affect the rest of Americas energy portfolio. The future wind workforce must be created organically utilizing either young people entering the workforce or train personnel emerging from careers outside of energy production. Third, the training must be quick and efficient as large amounts of wind turbines are being erected each year and this growth is expected to continue until at least 2035. One source that matches these three requirements is personnel transitioning from military service to the

  2. Epigenetic Patterns of PTSD: DNA Methylation In Serum of OIF/OEF Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    also have no data on other relevant exposures which are known to affect DNA methylation , such as dietary factors ( folate , vitamin B12 intake), (54, 55...ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-08-2-0053 31 MAR 2008 - 31 DEC 2010Final01-01-2011 Epigenetic Patterns of PTSD: DNA Methylation in Serum of OIF/OEF...distribution unlimited PTSD, epigenetics, DNA methylation , cytokines, serum, pre-deployment, post-deployment Abstract on next page. 38 jrusiecki@usuhs.mil

  3. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  4. Advanced Beta Dosimetry Techniques.Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David M. Hamby, PhD

    2006-01-01

    Final report describing NEER research on Advanced Beta Dosimetry Techniques. The research funded by this NEER grant establishes the framework for a detailed understanding of the challenges in beta dosimetry, especially in the presence of a mixed radiation field. The work also stimulated the thinking of the research group which will lead to new concepts in digital signal processing to allow collection of detection signals and real-time analysis such that simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy can take place. The work described herein (with detail in the many publications that came out of this research) was conducted in a manner that provided dissertation and thesis topics for three students, one of which was completely funded by this grant. The overall benefit of the work came in the form of a dramatic shift in signal processing that is normally conducted in pulse shape analysis. Analog signal processing was shown not to be feasible for this type of work and that digital signal processing was a must. This, in turn, led the research team to a new understanding of pulse analysis, one in which expands the state-of-the-art in simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy with a single detector

  5. Sustainability Logistics Basing - Science and Technology Objective - Demonstration; Industry Assessment and Demonstration Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    TECHNICAL REPORT AD ________________ NATICK/TR-17/019 SUSTAINABILITY ...LOGISTICS BASING – SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY OBJECTIVE – DEMONSTRATION; INDUSTRY ASSESSMENT AND DEMONSTRATION FINAL REPORT by Elizabeth D. Swisher and...Benjamin J. Campbell August 2017 Final Report December 2014 – February 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is

  6. Technical note: Vetiver can grow on coal fly ash without DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Anita

    2011-02-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to open lands or ash ponds located near power plants and this has lain to waste thousands of hectares all over the world. Wind and leaching are often the causes of off-site contamination from fly ash dumpsites. Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides) grown on fly ash for three months showed massive, mesh-like growth of roots which could have a phytostabilizing effect. The plant achieved this without any damage to its nuclear DNA as shown by comet assay done on the root nuclei, which implies the long-term survival of the plant on the remediation site. Also, when Vetiver is used for phytoremediation of coal fly ash, its shoots can be safely grazed by animals as very little of heavy metals in fly ash were found to be translocated to the shoots. These features make planting of Vetiver a practical and environmentally compatible method for restoration of fly ash dumpsites. Lack of DNA damage in Vetiver has been compared to that in a sensitive plant i.e. Allium cepa. Our results suggested that apart from traditional end-points viz. growth parameters like root length, shoot length and dry weight, comet assay could also be included in a battery of tests for initial, rapid and effective selection of plants for restoration and phytoremediation of polluted sites.

  7. Profiling soil microbial communities with next-generation sequencing: the influence of DNA kit selection and technician technical expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Soliman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Structure and diversity of microbial communities are an important research topic in biology, since microbes play essential roles in the ecology of various environments. Different DNA isolation protocols can lead to data bias and can affect results of next-generation sequencing. To evaluate the impact of protocols for DNA isolation from soil samples and also the influence of individual handling of samples, we compared results obtained by two researchers (R and T using two different DNA extraction kits: (1 MO BIO PowerSoil® DNA Isolation kit (MO_R and MO_T and (2 NucleoSpin® Soil kit (MN_R and MN_T. Samples were collected from six different sites on Okinawa Island, Japan. For all sites, differences in the results of microbial composition analyses (bacteria, archaea, fungi, and other eukaryotes, obtained by the two researchers using the two kits, were analyzed. For both researchers, the MN kit gave significantly higher yields of genomic DNA at all sites compared to the MO kit (ANOVA; P < 0.006. In addition, operational taxonomic units for some phyla and classes were missed in some cases: Micrarchaea were detected only in the MN_T and MO_R analyses; the bacterial phylum Armatimonadetes was detected only in MO_R and MO_T; and WIM5 of the phylum Amoebozoa of eukaryotes was found only in the MO_T analysis. Our results suggest the possibility of handling bias; therefore, it is crucial that replicated DNA extraction be performed by at least two technicians for thorough microbial analyses and to obtain accurate estimates of microbial diversity.

  8. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Mark E [General Motors, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop technologies that would enable the production of cast crankshafts that can replace high performance forged steel crankshafts. To achieve this, the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the new material needs to be 850 MPa with a desired minimum Yield Strength (YS; 0.2% offset) of 615 MPa and at least 10% elongation. Perhaps more challenging, the cast material needs to be able to achieve sufficient local fatigue properties to satisfy the durability requirements in today’s high performance gasoline and diesel engine applications. The project team focused on the development of cast steel alloys for application in crankshafts to take advantage of the higher stiffness over other potential material choices. The material and process developed should be able to produce high-performance crankshafts at no more than 110% of the cost of current production cast units, perhaps the most difficult objective to achieve. To minimize costs, the primary alloy design strategy was to design compositions that can achieve the required properties with minimal alloying and post-casting heat treatments. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) based approach was utilized, rather than relying only on traditional trial-and-error methods, which has been proven to accelerate alloy development time. Prototype melt chemistries designed using ICME were cast as test specimens and characterized iteratively to develop an alloy design within a stage-gate process. Standard characterization and material testing was done to validate the alloy performance against design targets and provide feedback to material design and manufacturing process models. Finally, the project called for Caterpillar and General Motors (GM) to develop optimized crankshaft designs using the final material and manufacturing processing path developed. A multi-disciplinary effort was to integrate finite element analyses by engine designers and geometry-specific casting

  9. Evaluation of the feasibility, economic impact, and effectiveness of underground nuclear power plants. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Information on underground nuclear power plants is presented concerning underground nuclear power plant concepts; public health impacts; technical feasibility of underground concepts; economic impacts of underground construction; and evaluation of related issues

  10. Detecting single DNA copy number variations in complex genomes using one nanogram of starting DNA and BAC-array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Valent, Alexander; Soularue, Pascal; Perot, Christine; Inda, Maria Mar; Receveur, Aline; Smaïli, Sadek; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Bénard, Jean; Bernheim, Alain; Gidrol, Xavier; Danglot, Gisèle

    2004-07-29

    Comparative genomic hybridization to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-arrays (array-CGH) is a highly efficient technique, allowing the simultaneous measurement of genomic DNA copy number at hundreds or thousands of loci, and the reliable detection of local one-copy-level variations. We report a genome-wide amplification method allowing the same measurement sensitivity, using 1 ng of starting genomic DNA, instead of the classical 1 microg usually necessary. Using a discrete series of DNA fragments, we defined the parameters adapted to the most faithful ligation-mediated PCR amplification and the limits of the technique. The optimized protocol allows a 3000-fold DNA amplification, retaining the quantitative characteristics of the initial genome. Validation of the amplification procedure, using DNA from 10 tumour cell lines hybridized to BAC-arrays of 1500 spots, showed almost perfectly superimposed ratios for the non-amplified and amplified DNAs. Correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.99 were observed for regions of low-copy-level variations and all regions, respectively (including in vivo amplified oncogenes). Finally, labelling DNA using two nucleotides bearing the same fluorophore led to a significant increase in reproducibility and to the correct detection of one-copy gain or loss in >90% of the analysed data, even for pseudotriploid tumour genomes.

  11. Adsorption and combing of DNA on HOPG surfaces of bulk crystals and nanosheets: application to the bridging of DNA between HOPG/Si heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, F; Martin, P; Fujita, H; Kawakatsu, H

    2006-01-01

    Controlled and reproducible combing of λ-phage DNA molecules can be realized in predetermined orientations on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) surfaces. Observations by atomic force microscopy (AFM) show that DNA adsorption onto HOPG surfaces leads to different hierarchical organizations such as balls, networks, films, and fractal structures. HOPG nanosheets (3.5-100 nm thick) were created by simply rubbing a HOPG crystal onto a silicon oxide surface, and then patterned with a focused ion beam (FIB) to fabricate HOPG/Si heterostructures (arrays of silicon micropillars and microtracks decorated on their top surface with HOPG nanosheets). The surface reactivity of HOPG nanosheets toward DNA is found to be the same as of HOPG bulk crystals. Finally, combing is used to attach and suspend bundles of approximately 20-50 DNA molecules between HOPG/Si heterostructures

  12. Programmed self-assembly of DNA/RNA for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei

    Three self-assembly strategies were utilized for assembly of novel functional DNA/RNA nanostructures. RNA-DNA hybrid origami method was developed to fabricate nano-objects (ribbon, rectangle, and triangle) with precisely controlled geometry. Unlike conventional DNA origami which use long DNA single strand as scaffold, a long RNA single strand was used instead, which was folded by short DNA single strands (staples) into prescribed objects through sequence specific hybridization between RNA and DNA. Single stranded tiles (SST) and RNA-DNA hybrid origami were utilized to fabricate a variety of barcode-like nanostructures with unique patterns by expanding a plain rectangle via introducing spacers (10-bp dsDNA segment) between parallel duplexes. Finally, complex 2D array and 3D polyhedrons with multiple patterns within one structure were assembled from simple DNA motifs. Two demonstrations of biomedical applications of DNA nanotechnology were presented. Firstly, lambda-DNA was used as template to direct the fabrication of multi-component magnetic nanoparticle chains. Nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) characterization showed superb magnetic relaxativity of the nanoparticle chains which have large potential to be utilized as MRI contrast agents. Secondly, DNA nanotechnology was introduced into the conformational study of a routinely used catalytic DNAzyme, the RNA-cleaving 10-23 DNAzyme. The relative angle between two flanking duplexes of the catalytic core was determined (94.8°), which shall be able to provide a clue to further understanding of the cleaving mechanism of this DNAzyme from a conformational perspective.

  13. Electroacoustic miniaturized DNA-biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamby, Jean; Lazerges, Mathieu; Pernelle, Christine; Perrot, Hubert; Girault, Hubert H; Tribollet, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    A micrometer-sized electroacoustic DNA-biosensor was developed. The device included a thin semi-crystalline polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dielectric layer with two Ag microband electrodes on one side and a DNA thiol-labeled monolayer adsorbed on a gold surface on the other. A resonance wave was observed at 29 MHz with a network analyzer, upon AC voltage application between the two Ag electrodes, corresponding to electromechanical coupling induced by molecular dipoles of the PET polymer chain in the dielectric layer. It was found that the device size and geometry were well adapted to detect DNA hybridization, by measuring the capacity of the resonance response evolution: hybridization induced polarization of the dielectric material that affected the electromechanical coupling established in the dielectric layer. The 0.2 mm(2) sensor sensitive area allows detection in small volumes and still has higher detection levels for bioanalytical applications, the non-contact configuration adopted avoids electric faradic reactions that may damage biosensor sensitive layers, and finally, PET is a costless raw material, easy to process and well adapted for large scale production. The well-balanced technological and economic advantages of this kind of device make it a good candidate for biochip integration.

  14. 75 FR 61619 - Safety Zone; IJSBA World Finals, Lower Colorado River, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Sports Boating Association (IJSBA) World Finals. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for... International Jet Sports Boating Association (IJSBA) is sponsoring the IJSBA World Finals. The event will... 13211. Technical Standards The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA) (15 U.S.C. 272...

  15. Patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures using a GFP nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommese, R F; Hariadi, R F; Kim, K; Liu, M; Tyska, M J; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2016-11-01

    DNA nanostructures have become an important and powerful tool for studying protein function over the last 5 years. One of the challenges, though, has been the development of universal methods for patterning protein complexes on DNA nanostructures. Herein, we present a new approach for labeling DNA nanostructures by functionalizing them with a GFP nanobody. We demonstrate the ability to precisely control protein attachment via our nanobody linker using two enzymatic model systems, namely adenylyl cyclase activity and myosin motility. Finally, we test the power of this attachment method by patterning unpurified, endogenously expressed Arp2/3 protein complex from cell lysate. By bridging DNA nanostructures with a fluorescent protein ubiquitous throughout cell and developmental biology and protein biochemistry, this approach significantly streamlines the application of DNA nanostructures as a programmable scaffold in biological studies. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  16. How to read and write mechanical information in DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessel, Helmut

    In this talk I will show that DNA molecules contain another layer of information on top of the classical genetic information. This different type of information is of mechanical nature and guides the folding of DNA molecules inside cells. With the help of a new Monte Carlo technique, the Mutation Monte Carlo method, we demonstrate that the two layers of information can be multiplexed (as one can have two phone conversations on the same wire). For instance, we can guide on top of genes with single base-pair precision the packaging of DNA into nucleosomes. Finally, we study the mechanical properties of DNA molecules belonging to organisms all across the tree of life. From this we learn that in multicellular organisms the stiffness of DNA around transcription start sites differs dramatically from that of unicellular life. The reason for this difference is surprising.

  17. Cells immobilized on patterns printed in DNA by an inkjet printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kengo; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-05-01

    The ability to two-dimensionally align various kinds of cells freely onto substrate would be a useful tool for analysis of cell-cell interactions. In this study, we aimed to establish a method for attaching cells to the substrate, in which the pattern is drawn by an inkjet printer. Poly-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was immobilized onto the cell surface by use of DNA-conjugated poly(ethylene) glycol-phospholipid (DNA-PEG-lipid), which is the amphiphilic conjugate of PEG-lipid and single-stranded DNA. The surface of the substrate was then modified with the complementary DNA using an inkjet printer. Finally, DNA-immobilized cells were attached onto the substrate through DNA hybridization. The use of the inkjet printer enabled us to draw the DNA pattern accurately on the substrate with a resolution of a few hundred micrometers. DNA-immobilized cells could be attached precisely along the DNA pattern on the substrate. In addition, various kinds of cells could be attached simultaneously by using various sequences of DNA. Our technique is promising for analysis of cell-cell interactions and differentiation induction in stem cell research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 76 FR 16531 - Technical Correction for Neurological Listing Cross-Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... 1-800-325-0778, or visit our Internet site, Social Security Online, at http://www.socialsecurity.gov... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Part 404 [Docket No. SSA-2011-0019] RIN 0960-AH33 Technical Correction for Neurological Listing Cross-Reference AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final...

  19. Technical diagnosis of cuban school swimmers backstroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Leyva González Leyva González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The teaching-learning process of swimming, in the conditions of Cuba, comprises several stages; the first initiation, with a duration of three to four years. Once the ten years have passed, the perfection stage begins, and finally, to the high performance of sports in adolescence. Although their improvement process favors the formation of specific motor skills in the Back stroke technique of junior swimmers, they do not show similarity in their underwater strokes with the theoretical model of technical efficiency. The following work intends from a field study and, using the empirical observation, to diagnose the mechanics of swimming of the movement of arms of the school back stroke swimmers in order to point out the technical patterns used and to identify, the main potentialities and errors of these.

  20. Preventing the transmission of mitochondrial DNA disorders using prenatal or preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Hubert J M; Sallevelt, Suzanne C E H; Dreesen, Jos C F M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; de Coo, Irenaeus F M

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are among the most common inborn errors of metabolism; at least 15% are caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, which occur de novo or are maternally inherited. For familial heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations, the mitochondrial bottleneck defines the mtDNA mutation load in offspring, with an often high or unpredictable recurrence risk. Oocyte donation is a safe option to prevent the transmission of mtDNA disease, but the offspring resulting from oocyte donation are genetically related only to the father. Prenatal diagnosis (PND) is technically possible but usually not applicable because of limitations in predicting the phenotype. For de novo mtDNA point mutations, recurrence risks are low and PND can be offered to provide reassurance regarding fetal health. PND is also the best option for female carriers with low-level mutations demonstrating skewing to 0% or 100%. A fairly new option for preventing the transmission of mtDNA diseases is preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), in which embryos with a mutant load below a mutation-specific or general expression threshold of 18% can be transferred. PGD is currently the best reproductive option for familial heteroplasmic mtDNA point mutations. Nuclear genome transfer and genome editing techniques are currently being investigated and might offer additional reproductive options for specific mtDNA disease cases. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Final Technical Report 09 LW 112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhoff, R J

    2010-11-28

    Since the development of new antibiotics is out-paced by the emergence of bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics, it is crucial to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying resistance existing antibiotics. At the center of this mystery is a poorly understood phenomenon, heteroresistance: the coexistence of multiple subpopulations with varying degrees of antibiotic resistance. A better understanding of the fundamental basis of heteroresistance could result in sorely needed breakthroughs in treatment options. This project proposed to leverage a novel microfluidic (microchemostat) technology to probe the heteroresistance phenomenon in bacteria, with the aim of restoring the efficacy of existing {beta}-lactam antibiotics. The clinically important bacteria Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was used as the test case of bacteria that exhibits antibiotic heteroresistance. MRSA is difficult to treat because it is resistant to all {beta}-lactam antibiotics, as well as other classes of antimicrobials. Whereas {beta}-lactams such as methicillin and oxacillin are the preferred antibiotics to treat S. aureus infections due to their efficacy and low side effects, accurate determination and use of oxacillin/methicillin dosage is hampered by heteroresistance. In fact, invasive MRSA infections now account for about 95,000 deaths per year, a number that exceeds the deaths due to either influenza or HIV (12). In some MRSA strains, two subpopulations of cells may coexist: both populations carry the mecA gene that confers resistance, but mecA is differentially expressed so that only a small number of cells are observed during in vitro testing. Why this occurs is not understood. Prior experiments have sought to explain this phenomenon with conflicting results, with technology being the primary barrier to test the system sufficiently. This is the final report on work accomplished under the Lab-wide LDRD project 09-LW-112. This project was awarded to Frederick Balagadde who

  2. 78 FR 17871 - Changes To Implement the Technical Corrections to the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act as to Inter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... Business Method Patents--Definition of Technological Invention, 77 FR 48734 (Aug. 14, 2012) (final rule... Inter Partes Review AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office, Commerce. ACTION: Final rule..., United States Code (``AIA Technical Corrections Act''). Consistent with the statutory changes, this final...

  3. A Phenotype-Driven Approach to Generate Mouse Models with Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations Causing Mitochondrial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna H.K. Kauppila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of mtDNA are an important cause of human disease, but few animal models exist. Because mammalian mitochondria cannot be transfected, the development of mice with pathogenic mtDNA mutations has been challenging, and the main strategy has therefore been to introduce mutations found in cell lines into mouse embryos. Here, we describe a phenotype-driven strategy that is based on detecting clonal expansion of pathogenic mtDNA mutations in colonic crypts of founder mice derived from heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice. As proof of concept, we report the generation of a mouse line transmitting a heteroplasmic pathogenic mutation in the alanine tRNA gene of mtDNA displaying typical characteristics of classic mitochondrial disease. In summary, we describe a straightforward and technically simple strategy based on mouse breeding and histology to generate animal models of mtDNA-mutation disease, which will be of great importance for studies of disease pathophysiology and preclinical treatment trials.

  4. Next-generation DNA sequencing of HEXA: a step in the right direction for carrier screening

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Jodi D; Greger, Valerie; Strovel, Erin T; Blitzer, Miriam G; Umbarger, Mark A; Kennedy, Caleb; Bishop, Brian; Saunders, Patrick; Porreca, Gregory J; Schienda, Jaclyn; Davie, Jocelyn; Hallam, Stephanie; Towne, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is the prototype for ethnic-based carrier screening, with a carrier rate of ∼1/27 in Ashkenazi Jews and French Canadians. HexA enzyme analysis is the current gold standard for TSD carrier screening (detection rate ∼98%), but has technical limitations. We compared DNA analysis by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) plus an assay for the 7.6 kb deletion to enzyme analysis for TSD carrier screening using 74 samples collected from participants at a TSD family conference. ...

  5. Modern problems of perfection of elite light athletic sportsmen’s technical skillfulness perfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kolot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: perfection of elite sportsmen’s technical skillfulness in competition kinds of light athletic. Material: the data of more than 60 literature sources were systemized. Expert questioning of 36 coaches, having experience of work with elite sportsmen, was carried out; documents of training process planning were analyzed as well as sportsmen’s diaries (n=244. Results: we have presented main principles of sportsmen’s technical skillfulness perfection and elucidated characteristics of technical training methodic. We have determined main priorities of technical training building for light athletes at every stage of many years’ perfection. Dynamic of competition practice volume has been found as well as main requirements to selection of training means of technical orientation. The data of bio-mechanical criteria of sportsmen’s technical skillfulness assessment have been supplemented. Conclusions: effectiveness of sportsmen’s training methodic is determined by realization of previous stages’ technical potential in final competition results. It can be achieved by determination of means of and methods of different orientation rational correlation.

  6. Modern problems of perfection of elite light athletic sportsmen’s technical skillfulness perfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolot A.V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: perfection of elite sportsmen’s technical skillfulness in competition kinds of light athletic. Material: the data of more than 60 literature sources were systemized. Expert questioning of 36 coaches, having experience of work with elite sportsmen, was carried out; documents of training process planning were analyzed as well as sportsmen’s diaries (n=244. Results: we have presented main principles of sportsmen’s technical skillfulness perfection and elucidated characteristics of technical training methodic. We have determined main priorities of technical training building for light athletes at every stage of many years’ perfection. Dynamic of competition practice volume has been found as well as main requirements to selection of training means of technical orientation. The data of bio-mechanical criteria of sportsmen’s technical skillfulness assessment have been supplemented. Conclusions: effectiveness of sportsmen’s training methodic is determined by realization of previous stages’ technical potential in final competition results. It can be achieved by determination of means of and methods of different orientation rational correlation.

  7. NASA Space Environments Technical Discipline Team Space Weather Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, J. I.; Nicholas, A. C.; Parker, L. N.; Xapsos, M.; Walker, P. W.; Stauffer, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Space Environment Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is a technical organization led by NASA's Technical Fellow for Space Environments that supports NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer through the NASA Engineering and Safety Center. The Space Environments TDT conducts independent technical assessments related to the space environment and space weather impacts on spacecraft for NASA programs and provides technical expertise to NASA management and programs where required. This presentation will highlight the status of applied space weather activities within the Space Environment TDT that support development of operational space weather applications and a better understanding of the impacts of space weather on space systems. We will first discuss a tool that has been developed for evaluating space weather launch constraints that are used to protect launch vehicles from hazardous space weather. We then describe an effort to better characterize three-dimensional radiation transport for CubeSat spacecraft and processing of micro-dosimeter data from the International Space Station which the team plans to make available to the space science community. Finally, we will conclude with a quick description of an effort to maintain access to the real-time solar wind data provided by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite at the Sun-Earth L1 point.

  8. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox Plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock ampersand Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  9. A final step towards the European wind loading code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staalduinen, P.C. van; Geurts, C.P.W.

    1999-01-01

    The process of the transition of national wind loading codes into a European Prestandard ENV 1991-2-4 for wind loading is being discussed. Backgrounds of this undertaking are being explained and specific technical issues to be resolved when drafting the final version of a European Standard for Wind

  10. Integrated Technical Information for the Air Logistics Center: Enhancing Maintenance Technician Task Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitta, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    This technical paper documents the final results of an analysis of the task environment under which depot maintenance technicians perform their jobs--specifically, programmed depot maintenance (PDM) for F-15 aircraft...

  11. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafini Eduardo P

    2009-06-01

    transmission of HPV-DNA and the immunodepression of maternal variables (HIV, p = 0.007. Finally, the study suggests that perinatal transmission of HPV-DNA occurred in 24.5% (n = 12/49 of the cases studied.

  12. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. C. Griffith

    2007-01-01

    In this project we provide an example of how to develop multi-tiered models to go across levels of biological organization to provide a framework for relating results of studies of low doses of ionizing radiation. This framework allows us to better understand how to extrapolate laboratory results to policy decisions, and to identify future studies that will increase confidence in policy decisions. In our application of the conceptual Model we were able to move across multiple levels of biological assessment for rodents going from molecular to organism level for in vitro and in vivo endpoints and to relate these to human in vivo organism level effects. We used the rich literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing brain in our models. The focus of this report is on disrupted neuronal migration due to radiation exposure and the structural and functional implications of these early biological effects. The cellular mechanisms resulting in pathogenesis are most likely due to a combination of the three mechanisms mentioned. For the purposes of a computational model, quantitative studies of low dose radiation effects on migration of neuronal progenitor cells in the cerebral mantle of experimental animals were used. In this project we were able to show now results from studies of low doses of radiation can be used in a multidimensional framework to construct linked models of neurodevelopment using molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ level studies conducted both in vitro and in vivo in rodents. These models could also be linked to behavioral endpoints in rodents which can be compared to available results in humans. The available data supported modeling to 10 cGy with limited data available at 5 cGy. We observed gradual but non-linear changes as the doses decreased. For neurodevelopment it appears that the slope of the dose response decreases from 25 cGy to 10 cGy. Future studies of neurodevelopment should be able to better define the dose response in this range.

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquelyn Yanch

    2006-05-22

    This project involved the development of a method for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the investigation of Boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee. The overall objective of this work was a robust approach for rapid screening of new {sup 10}B-labelled compounds to determine their suitability for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis via Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). For BNCS it is essential to obtain a compound showing high uptake levels in the synovium and long residence time in the joints. Previously the in vivo uptake behavior of potential compounds was evaluated in the arthritic knee joints of rabbits via extensive dissection studies. These studies are very labor-intensive and involve sacrificing large numbers of animals. An in vivo {sup 10}B screening approach was developed to provide initial evaluation of potential compounds. Only those compounds showing positive uptake and retention characteristics will be evaluated further via dissection studies. No further studies will be performed with compounds showing rapid clearance and/or low synovial uptake. Two approaches to in vivo screening were investigated using both simulation methods and experimentation. Both make use of neutron beams generated at the MIT Research Reactor. The first, Transmission Computed Tomography (TCT) was developed and tested but was eventually rejected due to very limited spatial resolution using existing reactor beams. The second, in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGNAA) was much more promising. IVPGNAA was developed using computer simulation and physical measurement coupled with image reconstruction techniques. The method was tested in arthritic New Zealand rabbits previously injected intra-articularly with three boron labeled compounds and shown to be effective in providing information regarding uptake level and residence time of {sup 10}B in the joint.

  14. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Ives; Eric Montgomery; Zhigang Pan; Blake Riddick; Donald Feldman; Lou Falce

    2012-09-25

    This program applied reservoir cathode technology to increase the lifetime of cesiated tungsten photocathodes. Cesiated tungsten photocathodes provide a quantum efficiency of approximately 0.08% when cesium is initially applied to the surface. During operation, however, the cesium evaporates from the surface, resulting in a gradual decrease in quantum efficiency. After 4-6 hours of operation, the efficiency drop to below useful levels, requiring recoating on the emission surface. This program developed a cathode geometry where cesium could be continuously diffused to the surface at a rate matching the evaporation rate. This results in constant current emission until the cesium in the reservoir is depleted. Measurements of the evaporation rate indicated that the reservoir should provide cesium for more than 30,000 hours of continuous operation. This is orders of magnitude longer operation then previously available. Experiments also demonstrated that the photocathode could be rejuvenated following contamination from a vacuum leak. Recoating of the emission surface demonstrated that the initial quantum efficiency could be recovered.

  15. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diedhiou, Papa Madiallacke

    2010-01-01

    The established training programme, covering three months is structured over 2 main components: 1. Induced mutagenesis for the genetic improvement of Jatropha; 2. Genotyping using molecular markers in order to link phenotypic diversity to genotype.

  16. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judy D. Wall

    2009-02-27

    Bioremediation of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface necessitate an understanding of the metabolic capacities and interactions of the anaerobic microorganisms that are found there, including members of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Genetic investigation into the pathway of reductant flow to U(VI) in the SRB belonging to the genus Desulfovibrio has been the focus of this project. In Dv. desulfuricans strain G20, we confirmed the importance of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 by disruption of the gene encoding that cytochrome, cycA, and demonstrated a decrease in the ability of the mutant (I2) to reduce U(VI). We found that the cytochrome c3 was necessary for electrons from pyruvate to reach sulfate or fumarate as terminal electron acceptors. It was not needed for electrons from lactate to reach sulfate, from which we infer that a different pathway is used for the electrons from these two substrates. Cyrstal structure of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 was obtained and site-directed mutations of the protein indicated a binding site for metals at heme 4 of the structure. Kinetic studies for oxidation of reduced cytochrome c3 with U(VI) or molybdate revealed a preference for U(VI) as a substrate. Evidence for a role for sodium gradients in the energetic scheme for this soil organism was obtained.

  17. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasure, John, et. al.

    2008-03-07

    Through past DOE funding, the MIND Research network has funded a national consortium effort that used multi-modal neuroimaging, genetics, and clinical assessment of subjects to study schizophrenia in both first episode and persistently ill patients. Although active recruitment of research participants is complete, this consortium remains active and productive in terms of analysis of this unique multi-modal data collected on over 320 subjects.

  18. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering; Lobban, Lance [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Crossley, Steven [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Khanna, Vikas [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maravelias, Christos [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Petkovic, Lucia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Duong, Nhung [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2018-01-24

    The goal was to develop a biomass conversion process that optimizes fractionation and conversion to maximize Carbon efficiency and Hydrogen consumption to obtain drop-in fuels. Selective fractionation of raw biomass was obtained via multi-stage thermal fractionation to produce different streams that are enriched in a particular chemical family (acids, furanics or phenolics). These streams were later catalytically upgraded in both liquid and vapor phase to perform C-C bond formation and hydrodeoxygenation. Among various upgrading strategies investigated we have identified an effective path in which cyclopentanone is a crucial intermediate that can be derived from furfural and other furanics obtained in high concentrations from this thermal staged process. Cyclopentanone is a very versatile molecule, which can couple with itself to product high quality jet-fuel, or couple with phenolic or furanics to create long chain molecules. These (mono-oxygenated) compounds in the correct molecular weight fuel range can be hydrotreated to direct drop-in fuels. Interestingly, we have found that the conversion of furfural to cyclopentanone is not affected by the presence of acetic acid, and, more interestingly, it is enhanced by the presence of water. These are very significant findings, since water and acetic acid are always present in all streams from the primary conversion stage. These results have allowed to complete detailed life-cycle assessment and techno-economic analysis that have been back-fed to the experimentalists to refine the catalyst selection and process operations with the objective of maximizing C efficiency at minimum H utilization. These combined investigations have opened the possibility of an economically and technologically effective process that could result in commercial fuels produced from renewable sources at a cost that might be competitive with fossil fuels.

  19. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Our BES supported program integrates molecular beam epitaxy growth with in situ atomic scale imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Aided by density functional theory calculations, we explore enhanced functionalities emerging from the interplay of strain, proximity, and spin-orbit interactions in heterostructures of wide band gap semiconductors, graphene, and Dirac materials, focusing on three thrusts: 1) doping wide bandgap semiconductors and graphene; 2) graphene nanoribbons and graphene-semiconductor heterostructures; and 3) Dirac materials. Our findings and discoveries have led to the publication of one book chapter and twenty-three refereed journal articles, including several in high impact journals such as Nature Communications, Physical Review Letters, and Nano Letters. Highlights of each thrust are provided in the report.

  20. Final Technical Report

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tommy Ngai

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... framework, based on the Kirkpatrick model (Kirkpatrick, D.L. ..... organizations provide education and training services in water and sanitation. .... Although this resulted in slightly more complicated administrative processes, the new structure ..... water and sanitation supplies in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Technical Report: Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Wang, Cheng-Yu

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this work was to develop catalyzed nanoporous materials that have superior hydrogen uptake between 300K and 400K and moderate pressures. Platinum nanoparticles were introduced to both activated carbons (ACs) and microporous metal organic frameworks (MMOFs) in order to dissociate molecular hydrogen into an active hydrogen species that diffuses from the catalyst to weakly chemisorbs to the AC/MMOF support; this combined sequence is referred to as the hydrogen spillover mechanism. For all materials studied, maximum excess hydrogen uptake was 1-1.4 wt% (excess) at 300K, falling short of DOE storage goals (5.5 wt% by 2015). Select Pt/AC materials (after in situ catalyst activation) had high uptake (up to 1.4 wt%) at low pressure which significantly exceeded that expected for physisorption. The uptake was not correlated to size of Pt catalyst, but appeared to be associated with high surface activity of the AC support and the methodology of catalyst doping. Multiple techniques were explored to introduce Pt nanoparticles into MMOFs, but most led to significant structural degradation. Ultimately, a ‘pre-bridge’ (PB) technique was used to introduce Pt/AC catalysts into MMOFs, as the PB technique led to virtually non-detectable changes in structure. At high pressure, hydrogen spillover of ~1 wt% (excess) to a PB-MMOF was very slow (i.e. >80 hours at 70-80 bar), which can be attributed to high diffusion barriers in a complex three-surface domain material (Pt, AC, MMOF) as well as unexpected evidence for mechanical instability of the undoped MMOF precursor. In a low-pressure comparison study of three PB-MMOFs, we found evidence that the doping technique may introduce defects which may contribute to enhanced adsorption at 300K. However, we could not rule out the effect of active Pt sites, as common predictors of adsorption generally favored the materials without Pt. Furthermore, spectroscopic evidence provided definitive evidence of weak hydrogen chemisorption to two MMOFs and AC, and was found only for materials containing Pt catalyst. Overall, high uptake via hydrogen spillover requires high catalytic activity and an energy neutral surface landscape for ready diffusion, with little to no correlation to the size of the Pt nanoparticle or textural properties (i.e. surface area or porosity) of the AC or MMOF support.

  2. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chii-Dong

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop new novel methods for studying correlated motion of atomic systems. This involves new formulations of the theoretical approaches, the performance of numerical calculations, and the detailed comparison with available experiment. Different theoretical methods have been developed for different classes of problems. The basis of our theoretical method is the hyperspherical approach. We have studied in general three-body systems and restricted four-body systems, and examined the qualitative properties such as the visualization of the wavefunctions which then allows us to do classifications, and then develop accurate theoretical methods for performing calculations to predict results that can be compared to experiments

  3. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargione, Joseph

    2012-02-24

    The United States has abundant wind resources, such that only about 3% of the resource would need to be developed to achieve the goal of producing 20% of electricity in the United States by 2030. Inappropriately sited wind development may result in conflicts with wildlife that can delay or derail development projects, increase projects costs, and may degrade important conservation values. The most cost-effective approach to reducing such conflicts is through landscape-scale siting early in project development. To support landscape scale siting that avoids sensitive areas for wildlife, we compiled a database on species distributions, wind resource, disturbed areas, and land ownership. This database can be viewed and obtained via http://wind.tnc.org/awwi. Wind project developers can use this web tool to identify potentially sensitive areas and areas that are already disturbed and are therefore likely to be less sensitive to additional impacts from wind development. The United States goal of producing 20% of its electricity from wind energy by the year 2030 would require 241 GW of terrestrial nameplate capacity. We analyzed whether this goal could be met by using lands that are already disturbed, which would minimize impacts to wildlife. Our research shows that over 14 times the DOE goal could be produced on lands that are already disturbed (primarily cropland and oil and gas fields), after taking into account wind resource availability and areas that would be precluded from wind development because of existing urban development or because of development restrictions. This work was published in the peer reviewed science journal PLoS ONE (a free online journal) and can be viewed here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0017566. Even projects that are sited appropriately may have some impacts on wildlife habitat that can be offset with offsite compensatory mitigation. We demonstrate one approach to mapping and quantifying mitigation costs, using the state of Kansas as a case study. Our approach considers a range of conservation targets (species and habitat) and calculates mitigation costs based on actual costs of the conservation actions (protection and restoration) that would be needed to fully offset impacts. This work was published in the peer reviewed science journal PLoS ONE (a free online journal) and can be viewed here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0026698.

  4. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Douglas C.; Restani, Marco, Ph.D

    2009-12-28

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management award was used to establish the organization and initiate investigations of hazardous waste issues along the U.S.-Mexico border. Scientific investigations conducted during the execution of this grant contributed significant data and established new sampling protocols to the dimension, frequency and severity of hazardous materials (e.g., heavy metals) along the U.S.-Mexico border. Additionally, new protocols and assessments with distinct Homeland Security implications were embedded thus establishing a baseline that will be significant for related investigations in the future.

  5. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis L.; Eggleston

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to experimentally investigate asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral (Penning-Malmberg) plasma trap. These traps provide an excellent platform for transport studies since the plasmas are generally well confined. One can then study transport in a controlled manner: the plasma is perturbed and the resulting transport measured. The focus of this research is the transport produced by applied asymmetric electric fields. The main results of our research concern (1) the theory of asymmetry-induced transport, (2) an absolute comparison of theory predictions with experimental results, (3) the amplitude scaling of the transport, (4) the frequency dependence of the transport, (5) the development of techniques to determine the relative contribution of mobility and diffusion to the transport, and (6) measuring the effect of small axial magnetic variations on the transport

  6. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Timothy S. [Idaho State University

    2013-09-10

    The biochemistry of bacterial proteins involved in redox transformations of metals and minerals is, without dispute, an important area of research. Nevertheless, most studies on bacterial metal transformation have focused not on biochemistry but on genetics and genomics. The objective of this research is to better understand the role of conformation change in electron transfer from cytochromes to minerals, a process that underpins respiratory metal reduction by bacteria in nature and in bioremediation strategies, including reductive immobilization of radioactive contaminants. Our DOE-funded work is specifically focused on answering long-standing questions about the biochemical behavior of these very interesting proteins, and our findings thus far have already made impacts in the fields of environmental microbiology and biogeochemistry. Among the key findings from the project are 1) Successful large-scale production of biomass for protein isolation; 2) Purification of several c-type cytochromes for biochemical study; 3) Characterization of these proteins using spectrophotometric and electrochemical techniques; 4) Examination of protein conformational change and redox activity towards metal oxides using a small mass cytochrome c from Acidiphilium cryptum; 5) Proteomic characterization of A. cryptum biofilms; 6) Training of 2 undergraduate research assistants; 7) Publications and several meeting presentations.

  7. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2014-04-13

    DOE has funded our work in three areas: (1) reactions of sea salt aerosols to form photochemically labile halogen gases that help to drive tropospheric chemistry; (2) oxidation of organics at interfaces and formation of SOA driven by oxides of nitrogen photochemistry; and (3) nucleation and growth of new particles in the troposphere from reactions of methanesulfonic acid with amines.

  8. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng-Po [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Andarawis, Emad [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Shaddock, David [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Yin, Liang [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Ghandi, Reza [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Srikrishnan, Kashyap [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Saia, Richard [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Patil, Amita [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Fang, Kun [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Shen, Zhenzhen [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2013-09-09

    The development and demonstration in this digital telemetry project has brought SiC-based high temperature electronics to a new level of complexity and integration with the active electronic devices and the packaging materials operating at 300°C for greater than 2000 hours. Our highest level of integration is a 6x6mm die with 474 transistors with the most complex functionality to date. Advances were made in the area of device modeling and fabrication, circuit simulation and design, device testing, and packaging. The technologies developed here would help enable sensor systems in enhanced geothermal systems, as well as other applications with high temperature requirements.

  9. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Davis

    2005-03-31

    The forest products industry consumes large amounts of energy. Understanding how genetic variation in trees actually controls the characteristics of wood, the major raw material utilized by the industry, is an opportunity for energy savings. For companies that are vertically integrated (i.e., have both tree production and processing operations), energy savings can accrue for both production and processing. Tree production demands nitrogen fertilizers, the manufacture of which is highly energy intensive. Wood processing for paper product manufacturing requires digestion and bleaching, both of which are more efficient when the lignin content of wood is reduced. This project identified genes involved in utilization of nitrogen from fertilizer, and the coupling of nitrogen demand to lignin content, establishing a framework for reducing tree nitrogen demand per unit carbon gained. This creates opportunities for genetic manipulation of trees for greater energy efficiency.

  10. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

    2007-06-06

    The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following; Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre; Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties; Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare; Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years; Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland; The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass; Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land); Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion; Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests; Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre; Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate); Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles; There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal; Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel; Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants; Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive; Although we were able to create available glucose from the AHG fraction in the bio-oil it proved recalcitrant to fermentation by yeast. Although fermentation results were much more positive with wood based bio-oil sugars, ethanol does not appear to be a likely product from grass based bio-oil; and A package of policy recommendations has been developed with roughly 75 key stakeholders from throughout the region that would support the transition to greater development of advanced biofuels and products in the region, as well as a strong role for native grass agriculture to support those industries.

  11. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Szoeke, Simon P. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2018-03-02

    The investigator and DOE-supported student [1] retrieved vertical air velocity and microphysical fall velocity retrieval for VOCALS and CAP-MBL homogeneous clouds. [2] Calculated in-cloud and cloud top dissipation calculation and diurnal cycle computed for VOCALS. [3] Compared CAP-MBL Doppler cloud radar scenes with (Remillard et al. 2012) automated classification.

  12. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loren F. Goodrich

    2011-05-31

    NIST has played a key role in many of the one-on-one, domestic, and international interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors. The history of interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors tells us that careful measurement methods are needed to obtain consistent results. Inconsistent results can lead to many problems including: a mistrust of the results of others, unfair advantages in commerce, and erroneous feedback in the optimization of conductor performance. NIST has experience in many interlaboratory comparisons; a long-term commitment to measurement accuracy; and independent, third-party laboratory status. The principal investigator's direct involvement in the measurements and daily supervision of sample mounting is the unique situation that has allowed important discoveries and evolution of our capabilities over the last 30 years. The principal investigator's research and metrology has helped to improve the accuracy of critical-current (I{sub c}) measurements in laboratories throughout the world. As conductors continue to improve and design limits are tested, the continuation of the long-term commitment to measurement accuracy could be vitally important to the success of new conductor development programs. It is extremely important to the U.S. wire manufacturers to get accurate (high certainty) I{sub c} measurements in order to optimize conductor performance. The optimization requires the adjustment of several fabrication parameters (such as reaction time, reaction temperature, conductor design, doping, diffusion barrier, Cu to non-Cu ratio, and twist pitch) based on the I{sub c} measurement of the conductor. If the I{sub c} measurements are made with high variability, it may be unclear whether or not the parameters are being adjusted in the optimal direction or whether or not the conductor meets the target specification. Our metrology is vital to the U.S. wire manufacturers in the highly competitive international arena and to meet the aggressive performance goals. The latest high-performance Nb{sub 3}Sn wires are being designed with higher current densities, larger effective filament diameter, less Cu stabilizer, and, in some cases, larger wire diameters than ever before. In addition, some of the conductor designs and heat treatments cause the residual resistivity ratio (RRR, ratio of room temperature resistivity to the resistivity at 20 K) of the stabilizer to be less than 20. These parameters are pushing the conductors towards less intrinsic stability, into a region we call marginally stable. These parameters also create a whole series of challenges for routine I{sub c} testing on short-samples, even when tested with the sample immersed in liquid helium. High-current, variable-temperature I{sub c} measurements are even more difficult than those made in liquid helium because the sample is only cooled by flowing helium gas. Providing accurate I{sub c} results under these conditions requires a complex system that provide adequate cooling as well as uniform sample temperature. We have been make variable-temperature measurements for about 15 years, but we started to design the first high-current (at least 500 A), variable-temperature, variable-strain apparatus in late 2006. Our first critical-current measurements as a function of strain, temperature, and magnetic field, I{sub c}(B,T,{var_epsilon}), in a new single, unified apparatus (full matrix characterization) were made in the summer of 2008. This is the only such facility in the U.S. and it has some unique components that are not duplicated anywhere in the world. The compounding of all three variables (H, T, {var_epsilon}) makes an already labor and time intensive characterization very formidable; however, the results cannot be generated any other way and are needed to answer key questions about strain and temperature safety margins and about the reliability of using scaling laws based on small data sets to predict performance. In the future, this new apparatus will allow NIST to create a database on strands that would benefit U.S. superconductor wire manufacturers, national research laboratories, and programs using superconductor strands such as HEP and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, Jerry; Giese, Scott R; Beckermann, Christoph; Combi, Joan; Yavorsky, James; Cannon, Fred

    2009-09-30

    The Center for Advanced Biobased was created with funding supplied by the Department of Energy to study biobased alternatives to petroleum based materials used in the manufacture of foundry sand binders. The project was successful in developing two new biobased polymers that are based on renewable agricultural materials or abundant naturally occurring organic materials. The technology has the potential of replacing large amounts of chemicals produced from oil with environmentally friendly alternatives.

  14. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, Walter David [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2016-08-27

    This report describes the research carried out under this grant for the period from 1997 to 2014. This work has been previously described in annual progress reports and renewal applications. As a result of this project, ~100 papers were published in open refereed journals and 107 invited talks were given by the PI. The research subjects covered by this project included the synthesis and characterization of super-heavy nuclei, the critical study of the reaction mechanisms used in these synthesis reactions, the mechanism(s) of intermediate energy and relativistic nuclear collisions, the study of reactions induced by radioactive nuclear beams, and general properties of the heaviest elements.

  15. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivey, James J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-02-02

    The research summarized here has the goal of developing a fundamental understanding of how catalysts work. These materials are demonstrably essential to our daily life, from the cars we drive to the clothes we wear. Our Center advances the science behind how we prepare, analyze, and describe catalysts. This has been identified by one of the documents guiding Federal research objectives (Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination): “Major challenges in heterogeneous catalysis are to more clearly define the nature of the active sites, to engineer at the molecular level catalysis with designed properties in three dimensions, and to create new catalysts for new transformations.” This directly addresses this objective.

  16. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.; Long, S.; Li, Binsheng; Lamke, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The overall goal of the contract is to provide general support and advice to the DOE, Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/EF) on the opportunities for coal and Clean Coal Technology trade in the Asia-Pacific region. The report which follows is divided into six subsections, each pertaining to separate subtasks the U.S. Department of Energy requested. Subtask A includes two reports, one which outlines important coal and clean coal technology news events which occurred during the second half of 1993, and another which outlines the potential for Clean Coal Technology in the Asia-Pacific Region. Subtask B and the first paper in Subtask C contain advisories and briefing papers that present and explain the coal, electricity and Clean Coal Technology situation in China. The second paper in Subtask C is an overview of the coal supply, demand and trade situation in the Asian region with coal projections to the year 2010. Subtask D is an overview of meetings with Asian energy and policy representatives which were carried out to (1) gather key information relevant to this contract, and (2) examine areas for closer cooperation on important coal/CCT-related energy issues. The tasks listed in the contract proposal as Subtasks E and F are summarized in respective sections of this report. Subtask E specifies the activities carried out under the APEC Experts` Group on Clean Coal Technologies, and Subtask F explains the work done by the Coal Project in building contacts and working relationships with key energy and technology planners in China (including The State Science and Technology Commission, the Ministry of Electric Power and Tsinghua University, and the State Planning Commission). The Subtask E section also includes activities to develop and strengthen the role of the APEC Experts Group on Clean Coal Activities.

  17. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Brenizer

    2011-05-16

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investiments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  18. Technical procedures for ecology: Environmental field program, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This volume contains Technical Procedures pursuant to the Land Use Site Study Plan including walkover surveys for threatened, endangered, or candidate species; vegetation classification and mapping; reclamation planning; wetland and floodplain determination and characterization of playas; wildlife habitat mapping methods; mammal sampling; bird survey methods; reptile and amphibian survey methods; preexisting environmental; stress and disturbance studies methods; voucher specimens for plants; and voucher specimens to wildlife. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Endogenous induced technical change and the costs of Kyoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Paolo; Carraro, Carlo; Galeotti, M.

    2001-09-01

    Many predictions and conclusions in the climate change literature have been made and drawn on the basis of theoretical analyses and quantitative models that are either static or that allow for simple forms of changes in technology, often along exogenously given time paths. It is therefore not clear a priori whether those conclusions and policy recipes still hold in the more realistic case of endogenously evolving technologies. In this paper, a quantitative tool with the features of an endogenous growth model is presented, which also accounts for the possibility that technical change can be induced by environmental policy measures. Both the output production technology and the emission-output ratio depend upon the stock of knowledge, which accumulates through R and D activities. R and D is thus an additional policy variable that comes into play along with pollution abatement and capital investment. Two versions of this climate model are studied, one with endogenous technical change but exogenous environmental technical change (i.e. no induced technical change) and the other with both endogenous and induced technical change. Hence, in both models technical change evolves endogenously as far as the production technology is concerned, but endogenous environmental (or induced) technical change is only accounted for in the second version. Finally, a third version of the model also captures technological spillover effects. As an application, the three versions of the model are simulated allowing for trade of pollution permits as specified in the Kyoto Protocol and assessing the implications in terms of cost efficiency, economic growth and R and D efforts of the three different specifications of technical change

  20. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  1. A novel quantitative assay of mitophagy: Combining high content fluorescence microscopy and mitochondrial DNA load to quantify mitophagy and identify novel pharmacological tools against pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, Alan; Hinks-Roberts, Alex; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Dombi, Eszter; Morten, Karl; Brady, Stefen; Fratter, Carl; Carver, Janet; Muir, Rebecca; Davis, Ryan; Green, Charlotte J; Johnston, Iain; Hilton-Jones, David; Sue, Carolyn; Mortiboys, Heather; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular mechanism for the recycling of mitochondrial fragments. This process is able to improve mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quality in heteroplasmic mtDNA disease, in which mutant mtDNA co-exists with normal mtDNA. In disorders where the load of mutant mtDNA determines disease severity it is likely to be an important determinant of disease progression. Measuring mitophagy is technically demanding. We used pharmacological modulators of autophagy to validate two techniques for quantifying mitophagy. First we used the IN Cell 1000 analyzer to quantify mitochondrial co-localisation with LC3-II positive autophagosomes. Unlike conventional fluorescence and electron microscopy, this high-throughput system is sufficiently sensitive to detect transient low frequency autophagosomes. Secondly, because mitophagy preferentially removes pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutants, we developed a heteroplasmy assay based on loss of m.3243A>G mtDNA, during culture conditions requiring oxidative metabolism ("energetic stress"). The effects of the pharmacological modulators on these two measures were consistent, confirming that the high throughput imaging output (autophagosomes co-localising with mitochondria) reflects mitochondrial quality control. To further validate these methods, we performed a more detailed study using metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug that is still sometimes used in Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness (MIDD). This confirmed our initial findings and revealed that metformin inhibits mitophagy at clinically relevant concentrations, suggesting that it may have novel therapeutic uses. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Oberg, Aaron A.

    2009-05-11

    This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.

  3. Final radioactive waste disposal: A European comparison of organization and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drasdo, P.

    2000-01-01

    The investigation is aimed to the comparison of organization structures of operators (plants) and governmental institutions concerned with the final disposal of radioactive waste. The study is covering Germany, France, United Kingdom and Sweden. The capital amount of total final disposal costs are the highest in Germany, the lowest in Sweden. This is also true for the final disposal costs that have to be financed by electricity production from nuclear power plants. The reasons for the differences with respect to economic efficiencies, political decisions and technical concepts are discussed

  4. Final technical report for: Insertional Mutagenesis of Brachypodium distachyon DE-AI02-07ER64452

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Vogel P. [DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2015-10-29

    Several bioenergy grasses are poised to become a major source of energy in the United States. Despite their increasing importance, we know little about the basic biology underlying the traits that control the utility of grasses as energy crops. Better knowledge of grass biology (e.g. identification of the genes that control cell wall composition, plant architecture, cell size, cell division, reproduction, nutrient uptake, carbon flux, etc.) could be used to design rational strategies for crop improvement and shorten the time required to domesticate these species. The use of an appropriate model system is an efficient way to gain this knowledge. Brachypodium distachyon is a small annual grass with all the attributes needed to be a modern model organism including simple growth requirements, fast generation time, small stature, small genome size and self-fertility. These attributes led to the recommendation in the DOE’s “Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda” report to propose developing and using B. distachyon as a model for energy crops to accelerate their domestication. Strategic investments (e.g. genome sequencing) in B. distachyon by the DOE are now bearing fruit and B. distachyon is being used as a model grass by hundreds of laboratories worldwide. Sequence indexed insertional mutants are an extremely powerful tool for both forward and reverse genetics. They allow researchers to order mutants in any gene tagged in the collection by simply emailing a request. The goal of this project was to create a collection of sequence indexed insertional mutants (T-DNA lines) for the model grass Brachypodium distachyon in order to facilitate research by the scientific community. During the course of this grant we created a collection of 23,649 B. distachyon T-DNA lines and identified 26,112 unique insertion sites. The collection can be queried through the project website (http://jgi.doe.gov/our-science/science-programs/plant-genomics/brachypodium/brachypodium-t-dna

  5. DNA Database of the Nicaraguan Population: Allele Frecuencies of Importance in Forensic Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Vargas-Díaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific-technical development in the field of natural science, specifically the discovery of human DNA polymorphism, has allowed us to identify people by their genetic fingerprint, i.e. their DNA, unique to every individual on earth.Its use in criminal investigations and forensic medicine has brought about the creation of DNA databases for discrete groups, populations and entire nations.In Nicaragua, the Molecular Biology Center of the Universidad Centroamericana has been a pioneer in this area of research, providing support for criminal investigations and resolving innumerable cases of paternity disputes. In this report we present the achievements of ten years of research, highlighting thetechnical aspects and, in particular, the application of the AmpFlSTR Identifiler system, as well as future prospects for scientific investigation in this area.

  6. Direct non transcriptional role of NF-Y in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Belluti, Silvia; Miotto, Benoit; Neusiedler, Julia; Dolfini, Diletta; Drac, Marjorie; Basile, Valentina; Schwob, Etienne; Mantovani, Roberto; Blow, J Julian; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-04-01

    NF-Y is a heterotrimeric transcription factor, which plays a pioneer role in the transcriptional control of promoters containing the CCAAT-box, among which genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and DNA damage response. The knock-down of the sequence-specific subunit NF-YA triggers defects in S-phase progression, which lead to apoptotic cell death. Here, we report that NF-Y has a critical function in DNA replication progression, independent from its transcriptional activity. NF-YA colocalizes with early DNA replication factories, its depletion affects the loading of replisome proteins to DNA, among which Cdc45, and delays the passage from early to middle-late S phase. Molecular combing experiments are consistent with a role for NF-Y in the control of fork progression. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrate a direct non-transcriptional role of NF-Y in the overall efficiency of DNA replication, specifically in the DNA elongation process, using a Xenopus cell-free system. Our findings broaden the activity of NF-Y on a DNA metabolism other than transcription, supporting the existence of specific TFs required for proper and efficient DNA replication. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. INDOT Technical Training Plan : [Technical Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of job classifications, increasing technical : performance expectations, licensing and certification requirements, : budget restrictions and frequent department : reorganization has made technical training of employees : more difficult, ...

  8. A NEW TEACHING METHOD OF TECHNICAL DRAWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMA Ana-Maria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents a project of applied research, on how to teach more effectively the subject of technical drawing, using Student - centred education methods. The authors applied a new method of interaction with the students and teaching during a semester and the conclusions were drawn comparing the final results of the classes on which this project was applied with the ones where the classical method of teaching was applied.

  9. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ

  10. IPEN Scientific and technical publications 1956-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN (Energy Research Institute) from Sao Paulo, Brazil, was founded in 1956. Since its foundation, the main objectives of IPEN has been to undertake research and development into the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to train scientific personnel to post-graduate level. The IPEN Scientific and Technical Publication - IPEN/SP, is a system developed at IPEN. Its purpose has been to generate a data base identifying the technical and scientific literature produced by IPEN staff members, published either in the Institute's series or in others brazilian and foreign publications. Documents cited in this jubilee edition include those in which IPEN staff members were authors or co-authors; document published by foreign research visitors while working at IPEN facilities; theses prepared by IPEN staff and reports in which IPEN is a corporate author. The IPEN technical publications reflect the main fields of research persuaded by the Institute, namely nuclear physics radiochemistry, chemical engineering, nuclear metallurgy and engineering and finally medical and industrial applications of radioisotopes. This present volume, published under the new title of IPEN - Scientific and Technical Publications, is a cumulative edition, to celebrate the 25th. anniversary of IPEN. In this jubilee edition, 1345 document published by IPEN staff are cited, following the main subject heading of INIS Subject Categories. (author)

  11. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Are mini DNA-barcodes sufficiently informative to resolve species ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... between mini-barcode and the full- length DNA barcode was carried out in Microsoft Excel. (http://www.office.microsoft.com). ..... Received 15 June 2013, in final revised form 5 April 2014; accepted 3 June 2014. Unedited version published ...

  13. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  14. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  15. Polyamine structural effects on the induction and stabilization of liquid crystalline DNA: potential applications to DNA packaging, gene therapy and polyamine therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, M; Thomas, Thresia; Shirahata, Akira; Pillai, C K S; Thomas, T J

    2002-09-01

    DNA undergoes condensation, conformational transitions, aggregation and resolubilization in the presence of polyamines, positively charged organic molecules present in all cells. Under carefully controlled environmental conditions, DNA can also transform to a liquid crystalline state in vitro. We undertook the present work to examine the ability of spermidine, N4-methylspermidine, spermine, N1-acetylspermine and a group of tetramine, pentamine and hexamine analogs of spermine to induce and stabilize liquid crystalline DNA. Liquid crystalline textures were identified under a polarizing microscope. In the absence of polyamines, calf thymus DNA assumed a diffused, planar cholesteric phase with entrapped bubbles when incubated on a glass slide at 37 degrees C. In the presence of spermidine and spermine, the characteristic fingerprint textures of the cholesteric phase, adopting a hexagonal order, were obtained. The helical pitch was 2.5 micro m. The final structures were dendrimeric and crystalline when DNA was treated with spermine homologs and bis(ethyl) derivatives. A cholesteric structure was observed when DNA was treated with a hexamine at 37 degrees C. This structure changed to a hexagonal dendrimer with fluidity on prolonged incubation. These data show a structural specificity effect of polyamines on liquid crystalline phase transitions of DNA and suggest a possible physiological function of natural polyamines.

  16. Final technical report on studies of plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.; Malmberg, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    This document gives an overview of the scientific results obtained under the DOE grant, and references the journal articles which give more complete descriptions of the various topics. Recently, the research has been focused on 2-dimensional vortices and turbulence: experiments using a new camera-diagnosed electron plasma apparatus have given surprising results which both clarify and challenge theories. Here, the crossfield E x B flow of the electron plasma is directly analogous to the 2-d flow of an ideal fluid such as water, and may also give insight into more complicated poloidal flows exhibited in toroidal plasmas. The shear-flow instabilities, turbulence, and vortices can be accurately observed, and the free relaxation of this turbulence has been characterized. The physical processes underlying the complicated turbulent evolution can also be studied in more controlled near-linear regimes. The original experimental focus of this program was on radial particle transport from applied external field asymmetries. Here, this research program clearly identified the importance of the collective response of the plasma, giving smaller fields from shielding, or enhanced fields from resonant modes. Experiments and theory work have also elucidated the flow of a plasma along the magnetic field. Finally, some theory was pursued for direct application to fusion plasmas, and to gravitating gas clouds in astrophysics. This program was highly successful in clarifying basic plasma transport processes

  17. Final Technical Report Steam Cycle Washer for Unbleached Pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkey, Yvonne; Salminen, Reijo; Karlsnes, Andy

    2008-09-22

    Project Abstract for “Steam Cycle Washer for Unbleached Pulp” When completed, the patented SC Washer will provide an innovative, energy efficient demonstration project to wash unbleached pulp using a pressure vessel charged with steam. The Port Townsend Paper Corporation’s pulp mill in Port Townsend, WA was initially selected as the host site for conducting the demonstration of the SCW. Due to 2006 and 2007 delays in the project caused by issues with 21st Century Pulp & Paper, the developer of the SCW, and the 2007 bankruptcy proceedings and subsequent restructuring at Port Townsend Paper, the mill can no longer serve as a host site. An alternate host site is now being sought to complete the commercial demonstration of the Steam Cycle Washer for Unbleached Pulp. Additionally, estimated costs to complete the project have more than doubled since the initial estimates for the project were completed in 2002. Additional grant funding from DOE was sought and in July, 2008 the additional DOE funds were procured under a new DOE award, DE-PS36-08GO98014 issued to INL. Once the new host site is secured the completion of the project will begin under the management of INL. Future progress reports and milestone tracking will be completed under requirements of new DOE Award Number DE-PS36-08GO98014. The following are excerpts from the project Peer Review completed in 2006. They describe the project in some detail. Additional information can be found by reviewing DOE Award Number: DE-PS36-08GO98014. 5. Statement of Problem and Technical Barriers: The chemical pulping industry is one of the major users of fresh water in the United States. On average the industry uses over 80 tons of water to produce one ton of pulp, some states use up to 50% more (Washington 120 and Wisconsin 140). In order to process one ton of pulp using 80 tons of process water, a large amount of: • energy is used in process heat and • power is required for pumping the large volume of pulp slurries

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: technical approach document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, PL95-604, grants the Secretary of Energy authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards from inactive uranium mill sites. These cleanup actions are to be performed in compliance with the EPA standards (40 CFR Part 192) which became final on March 7, 1983. This document describes the general technical approaches and design criteria that are adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) and final designs that comply with EPA standards

  19. Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) implementation: Zion Generating Station Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, W.; Akers, D.W.; Duce, S.W.; Mandler, J.W.; Simpson, F.B.; Young, T.E.

    1985-06-01

    A review of the Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) of the Zion Generating Station Units 1 and 2 was performed. The principal review guidelines used were NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants,'' and Draft 7 of NUREG-0472, Revision 3, ''Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Pressurized Water Reactors.'' Draft submittals were discussed with the Licensee by both EG and G and the NRC staff until all items requiring changes to the Technical Specifications were resolved. The Licensee then submitted final proposed RETS to the NRC which were evaluated and found to be in compliance with the NRC review guidelines. The proposed Offsite Dose Calculation Manual was reviewed and generally found to be consistent with the NRC review guidelines. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. DNA replication and cancer: From dysfunctional replication origin activities to therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-06-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svolik, S.

    2004-01-01

    Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes which are produced by 1 st and 2 nd bloc of the Mochovce NPP, prepares the NPP in its natural range. The purpose of the equipment is liquidation of wastes, which are formed at production. Wastes are warehoused in the building of active auxiliary plants in the present time, where are reservoirs in which they are deposited. Because they are already feeling and in 2006 year they should be filled definitely, it is necessary to treat them in that manner, so as they may be liquidated. Therefore the Board of directors of the Slovenske elektrarne has disposed about construction of final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes in the Mochovce NPP. Because of transport the wastes have to be treated in the locality of power plant. Technically, the final treatment of the wastes will be interconnected with building of active operation by bridges. These bridges will transport the wastes for treatment into processing centre

  2. Origins of anti-DNA autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The direction of research in autoimmunity was strongly influenced by three notable discoveries made more than 25 year ago: anti-DNA anti-bodies in lupus serum, the immunofluorescent antinuclar antibody test and the NZB mouse. Now another turning point has been reached for three new reasons: the discovery of the hybridoma technic, advances in cellular immunology and the use of molecular biology to solve immunological problems. These developments have motivated fresh approaches to questions about the origins and pathogenic mechanisms of autoantibodies. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a conspicuous position in the field of autoimmunity for several reasons. Its diverse manifestations have attracted a correspondingly diverse group of investigators whose interests range from molecular biology to therapeutic trials; superb models of the disease occur spontaneously in animals; and the extensive variety of autoantibodies in SLE provides an abundance of investigative reagents. An explanation of the origins of these autoantibodies is one of the major goals of research in the disease. The autoantibodies that bind to DNA are of central interest. They occur in almost all patients with active SLE, they often fluctuate with its clinical activity, and they participate in forming its lesions

  3. Doxorubicin hinders DNA condensation promoted by the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, C H M; de Paula, H M C; da Silva, L H M; Rocha, M S

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the interaction between the anticancer drug doxorubicin (doxo) and condensed DNA, using optical tweezers. To perform this task, we use the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the working buffer to mimic two key conditions present in the real intracellular environment: the condensed state of the DNA and the abundant presence of charged macromolecules in the surrounding medium. In particular, we have found that, when doxo is previously intercalated in disperse DNA, the drug hinders the DNA condensation process upon the addition of BSA in the buffer. On the other hand, when bare DNA is firstly condensed by BSA, doxo is capable to intercalate and to unfold the DNA condensates at relatively high concentrations. In addition, a specific interaction between BSA and doxo was verified, which significantly changes the chemical equilibrium of the DNA-doxo interaction. Finally, the presence of BSA in the buffer stabilizes the double-helix structure of the DNA-doxo complexes, preventing partial DNA denaturation induced by the stretching forces. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. cDNA library construction of two human Demodexspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, DongLing; Wang, RuiLing; Zhao, YaE; Yang, Rui; Hu, Li; Lei, YuYang; Dan, WeiChao

    2017-06-01

    The research of Demodex, a type of pathogen causing various dermatoses in animals and human beings, is lacking at RNA level. This study aims at extracting RNA and constructing cDNA library for Demodex. First, P. cuniculiand D. farinaewere mixed to establish homogenization method for RNA extraction. Second, D. folliculorumand D. breviswere collected and preserved in Trizol, which were mixed with D. farinaerespectively to extract RNA. Finally, cDNA library was constructed and its quality was assessed. The results indicated that for D. folliculorum& D. farinae, the recombination rate of cDNA library was 90.67% and the library titer was 7.50 × 104 pfu/ml. 17 of the 59 positive clones were predicted to be of D. folliculorum; For D. brevis& D. farinae, the recombination rate was 90.96% and the library titer was 7.85 x104 pfu/ml. 40 of the 59 positive clones were predicted to be of D. brevis. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that mtDNA cox1, cox3and ATP6 detected from cDNA libraries had 96.52%-99.73% identities with the corresponding sequences in GenBank. In conclusion, the cDNA libraries constructed for Demodexmixed with D. farinaewere successful and could satisfy the requirements for functional genes detection.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2012-11-26

    In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer) domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  6. Solar Living House Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Bradley [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-09

    permanent site constructions. This project suggest that high-performance buildings can be realized for more modest budgets. Public Benefits: Work on the Solar Living House and Solar Decathlon 2015 offered our student team unparalleled learning opportunities. Because of the duration of the project, a number of students participated at different points in their education, from first year undergraduates all the way through to advanced graduate students. The opportunity for collaboration with students and faculty from the National University of Singapore was also extraordinary, allowing for a sharing of technical knowledge and cultural exchange. The wider public has benefited from this work as its findings have been shared through public presentations and publications. It serves as a useful stepping stone along the path towards affordable, high-performance buildings.

  7. IPEN scientific and technical publications 1984-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN (Energy Research Institute) from Sao Paulo, Brazil, was founded in 1956. Since its foundation, the main objectives of IPEN has been to undertake research and development into the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to train scientific personnel to post-graduate level. The IPEN Scientific and Technical Publication - IPEN/STP, is a system developed at IPEN. Its purpose has been to generate a data base identifying the technical and scientific literature produced by IPEN staff members, published either in the Institute's series or in others brazilian and foreign publications. Documents cited in this 1984-1986 supplement include those in which IPEN staff members were authors or co-authors; document published by foreign research visitors while working at IPEN facilities; theses prepared by IPEN staff and reports in which IPEN is a corporate author. The IPEN technical publications reflect the main fields of research persuaded by the Institute, namely nuclear physics radiochemistry, chemical engineering, nuclear metallurgy and engineering and finally medical and industrial applications of radioisotopes. In this 1984-1986 supplement 458 document published by IPEN staff are cited, following the main subject heading of INIS Subject Categories. (author)

  8. IPEN Scientific and technical publications 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN (Energy Research Institute) from Sao Paulo, Brazil, was founded in 1956. Since its foundation, the main objectives of IPEN has been to undertake research and development into the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to train scientific personnel to post-graduate level. The IPEN Scientific and Technical Publication - IPEN/STP, is a system developed at IPEN. Its purpose has been to generate a data base identifying the technical and scientific literature produced by IPEN staff members, published either in the Institute's series or in others brazilian and foreign publications. Documents cited in this 1982-1983 supplement include those in which IPEN staff members were authors or co-authors; document published by foreign research visitors while working at IPEN facilities; theses prepared by IPEN staff and reports in which IPEN is a corporate author. The IPEN technical publications reflect the main fields of research persuaded by the Institute, namely nuclear physics radiochemistry, chemical engineering, nuclear metallurgy and engineering and finally medical and industrial applications of radioisotopes. In this 1982-1983 supplement 131 document published by IPEN staff are cited, following the main subject heading of INIS Subject Categories. (author)

  9. Technical concept for a Greater Confinement Disposal test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    For the past two years, Ford, Bacon and Davis has been performing technical services for the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site in specific development of defense low-level waste management concepts for greater confinement disposal concept with particular application to arid sites. The investigations have included the development of Criteria for Greater Confinement Disposal, NVO-234, which was published in May of 1981 and the draft of the technical concept for Greater Confinement Disposal, with the latest draft published in November 1981. The final draft of the technical concept and design specifications are expected to be published imminently. The document is prerequisite to the actual construction and implementation of the demonstration facility this fiscal year. The GCD Criteria Document, NVO-234 is considered to contain information complimentary and compatible with that being developed for the reserved section 10 CFR 61.51b of the NRCs proposed licensing rule for low level waste disposal facilities

  10. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA based on Zn²⁺ assistant DNA recycling followed with hybridization chain reaction dual amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yong; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Fenglei

    2015-01-15

    A new strategy to combine Zn(2+) assistant DNA recycling followed with hybridization chain reaction dual amplification was designed for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA. A gold electrode was used to immobilize molecular beacon (MB) as the recognition probe and perform the amplification procedure. In the presence of the target DNA, the hairpin probe 1 was opened, and the DNAzyme was liberated from the caged structure. The activated DNAzyme hybridized with the MB and catalyzed its cleavage in the presence of Zn(2+) cofactor and resulting in a free DNAzyme strand. Finally, each target-induced activated DNAzyme underwent many cycles triggering the cleavage of MB, thus forming numerous MB fragments. The MB fragments triggered the HCR and formed a long double-helix DNA structure. Because both H1 and H2 were labeled by biotin, a lot of SA-ALP was captured on the electrode surface, thus catalyzing a silver deposition process for electrochemical stripping analysis. This novel cascade signal amplification strategy can detect target DNA down to the attomolar level with a dynamic range spanning 6 orders of magnitude. This highly sensitive and specific assay has a great potential to become a promising DNA quantification method in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. 75 FR 2860 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell... Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee... change; updates will be posted on http://hydrogen.energy.gov and copies of the final agenda will...

  12. Final Technical Report_Clean Energy Program_SLC-SELF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Glenn; Coward, Doug

    2014-01-22

    This is the Final Technical Report for DOE's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, Award No. DE-EE0003813, submitted by St. Lucie County, FL (prime recipient) and the Solar and Energy Loan Fund (SELF), the program's third-party administrator. SELF is a 501(c)(3) and a certified Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI). SELF is a community-based lending organization that operates the Clean Energy Loan Program, which focuses on improving the overall quality of life of underserved populations in Florida with an emphasis on home energy improvements and cost-effective renewable energy alternatives. SELF was launched in 2010 through the creation of the non-profit organization and with a $2.9 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block (EECBG) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). SELF has its main office and headquarters in St. Lucie County, in the region known as the Treasure Coast in East-Central Florida. St. Lucie County received funding to create SELF as an independent non-profit institution, outside the control of local government. This was important for SELF to create its identity as an integral part of the business community and to help in its quest to become a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI). This goal was accomplished in 2013, allowing SELF to focus on its mission to increase energy savings while serving markets that have struggled to find affordable financial assistance. These homeowners are most impacted by high energy costs. Energy costs are a disproportionate percentage of household expenses for low to moderate income (LMI) households. Electricity costs have been steadily rising in Florida by nearly 5% per year. Housing in LMI neighborhoods often includes older inefficient structures that further exacerbate the problem. Despite the many available clean energy solutions, most LMI property owners do not have the disposable income or equity in their homes necessary to afford the high upfront cost

  13. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  14. Base sequence effects on DNA replication influenced by bulky adducts. Final report, March 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.

    1997-05-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are environmental pollutants that are present in air, food, and water. While PAH compounds are chemically inert and are sparingly soluble in aqueous solutions, in living cells they are metabolized to a variety of oxygenated derivatives, including the high mutagenic and tumorigenic diol epoxide derivatives. The diol epoxides of the sterically hindered fjord region compound benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]PhDE) are among the most powerful tumorigenic compounds in animal model test systems. In this project, site-specifically modified oligonucleotides containing single B[c]PhDE-N{sup 6}-dA lesions derived from the reactions of the 1S,2R,3R,4S and 1R,2S,3S,4R diol epoxides of B[c]PhDE with dA residues were synthesized. The replication of DNA catalyzed by a prokaryotic DNA polymerase (the exonuclease-free Klenow fragment E. Coli Po1 I) in the vicinity of the lesion at base-specific sites on B[c]PhDE-modified template strands was investigated in detail. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for the insertion of single deoxynucleotide triphosphates into growing DNA (primer) strands using the modified dA* and the bases just before and after the dA* residue as templates, depend markedly on the stereochemistry of the B[c]PhDE-modified dA residues. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which bulky PAH-DNA adducts affect normal DNA replication.

  15. Decay kinetics of nicotine/NNK-DNA adducts in vivo studied by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, H.F.; He, L.; Liu, Y.F.; Liu, K.X.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Ma, H.J.; Li, K.

    2000-01-01

    The decay kinetics of nicotine-DNA adducts and NNK-DNA adducts in mice liver after single dosing was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The decay is characterized by a two-stage process. The half-lives of nicotine-DNA adducts are 1.3 d (4-24 h) and 7.0 d (1-21 d), while for NNK-DNA adducts are 0.7 d (4-24 h) and 18.0 d (1-21 d). The relatively faster decay of nicotine-DNA adducts suggests that the genotoxicity of nicotine is weaker than that of NNK. The in vitro study shows that the metabolization of nicotine is necessary for the final formation of nicotine-DNA adducts, and nicotine Δ1'(5') iminium ion is a probable metabolite species that binds to DNA molecule covalently

  16. Coincident In Vitro Analysis of DNA-PK-Dependent and -Independent Nonhomologous End Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hendrickson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are primarily repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ. The current model suggests that the Ku 70/80 heterodimer binds to DSB ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form the active DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK. Subsequently, XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, XLF and most likely, other unidentified components participate in the final DSB ligation step. Therefore, DNA-PK plays a key role in NHEJ due to its structural and regulatory functions that mediate DSB end joining. However, recent studies show that additional DNA-PK-independent NHEJ pathways also exist. Unfortunately, the presence of DNA-PKcs appears to inhibit DNA-PK-independent NHEJ, and in vitro analysis of DNA-PK-independent NHEJ in the presence of the DNA-PKcs protein remains problematic. We have developed an in vitro assay that is preferentially active for DNA-PK-independent DSB repair based solely on its reaction conditions, facilitating coincident differential biochemical analysis of the two pathways. The results indicate the biochemically distinct nature of the end-joining mechanisms represented by the DNA-PK-dependent and -independent NHEJ assays as well as functional differences between the two pathways.

  17. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. High-speed DNA-based rolling motors powered by RNase H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehl, Kevin; Mugler, Andrew; Vivek, Skanda; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Fan, Mengzhen; Weeks, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based machines that walk by converting chemical energy into controlled motion could be of use in applications such as next generation sensors, drug delivery platforms, and biological computing. Despite their exquisite programmability, DNA-based walkers are, however, challenging to work with due to their low fidelity and slow rates (~1 nm/min). Here, we report DNA-based machines that roll rather than walk, and consequently have a maximum speed and processivity that is three-orders of magnitude greater than conventional DNA motors. The motors are made from DNA-coated spherical particles that hybridise to a surface modified with complementary RNA; motion is achieved through the addition of RNase H, which selectively hydrolyses hybridised RNA. Spherical motors move in a self-avoiding manner, whereas anisotropic particles, such as dimerised particles or rod-shaped particles travel linearly without a track or external force. Finally, we demonstrate detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by measuring particle displacement using a smartphone camera. PMID:26619152

  19. Power system technical performance issues related to the application of long HVAC cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechowski, on behalf of Cigre WG C4.502, W.; Sluis, L. V. der; Ohno, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the progress of work of Cigre Working Group C4.502 “Power system technical performance issues related to the application of long HVAC cables”. The primary goal of the WG C4.502 is to write a technical brochure that will serve as practical guide for performing studies necessary...... for assessing the technical performance of HV/EHV systems with large share of AC cable lines. This paper besides providing a background for formulation of WG C4.502 and its overall aim, describes the tasks that were accomplished before the interim report was submitted to Study Committee C4 System Technical...... Performance in August 2010. The work in the WG is ongoing and final report will be ready according to the time schedule in 2012. The focus of this paper is in particular to show all issues related to system technical performance with assigned weights in terms of their importance and/or uniqueness for cable...

  20. Flow in porous media, phase behavior and ultralow interfacial tensions: mechanisms of enhanced petroleum recovery. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    A major program of university research, longer-ranged and more fundamental in approach than industrial research, into basic mechanisms of enhancing petroleum recovery and into underlying physics, chemistry, geology, applied mathematics, computation, and engineering science has been built at Minnesota. The 1982 outputs of the interdisciplinary team of investigators were again ideas, instruments, techniques, data, understanding and skilled people: forty-one scientific and engineering papers in leading journals; four pioneering Ph.D. theses; numerous presentations to scientific and technical meetings, and to industrial, governmental and university laboratories; vigorous program of research visits to and from Minnesota; and two outstanding Ph.D.'s to research positions in the petroleum industry, one to a university faculty position, one to research leadership in a governmental institute. This report summarizes the 1982 papers and theses and features sixteen major accomplishments of the program during that year. Abstracts of all forty-five publications in the permanent literature are appended. Further details of information transfer and personnel exchange with industrial, governmental and university laboratories appear in 1982 Quarterly Reports available from the Department of Energy and are not reproduced here. The Minnesota program continues in 1983, notwithstanding earlier uncertainty about the DOE funding which finally materialized and is the bulk of support. Supplemental grants-in-aid from nine companies in the petroleum industry are important, as are the limited University and departmental contributions. 839 references, 172 figures, 29 tables.

  1. Final Scientific/Technical Report – BISfuel EFRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, Devens

    2015-07-13

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Arizona State University and integrated them into a cohesive, highly collaborative unit to attack the solar fuel problem. The investigators came from many disciplines, and worked together to apply their expertise in new areas in order to pursue Center goals. The primary goal, construction of a complete functional system for producing hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight, was realized, although much more work would be necessary to develop a practical device for doing so. The Center investigators discovered a great deal of important new chemistry, as is reported in 100 research publications and several patents and invention disclosures. A spin-off company was established based on some of the Center discoveries. Fundamental discoveries were made in the areas of molecular biotechnology, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, catalysis, materials science, physical chemistry and chemical physics. New instrumental techniques were developed, including femtosecond X-ray crystallography, which is an exciting approach to determination of the structures of both biological and synthetic molecules. The fundamental discoveries made by the Center will contribute to the development of not only solar fuel technologies, but also biomedical applications; technological uses of DNA; new materials for (opto)electronic, electrochemical, computational and display applications; fuel cells; industrial catalytic processes and related areas. In addition, Center studies of synthetic systems are leading to a better understanding of important natural biological systems, including natural photosynthesis.

  2. Technical structure of the global nanoscience and nanotechnology literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostoff, Ronald N., E-mail: kostofr@onr.navy.mil; Koytcheff, Raymond G. [Office of Naval Research (United States); Lau, Clifford G. Y. [Institute for Defense Analyses (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Text mining was used to extract technical intelligence from the open source global nanotechnology and nanoscience research literature. An extensive nanotechnology/nanoscience-focused query was applied to the Science Citation Index/Social Science Citation Index (SCI/SSCI) databases. The nanotechnology/nanoscience research literature technical structure (taxonomy) was obtained using computational linguistics/document clustering and factor analysis. The infrastructure (prolific authors, key journals/institutions/countries, most cited authors/journals/documents) for each of the clusters generated by the document clustering algorithm was obtained using bibliometrics. Another novel addition was the use of phrase auto-correlation maps to show technical thrust areas based on phrase co-occurrence in Abstracts, and the use of phrase-phrase cross-correlation maps to show technical thrust areas based on phrase relations due to the sharing of common co-occurring phrases. The {approx}400 most cited nanotechnology papers since 1991 were grouped, and their characteristics generated. Whereas the main analysis provided technical thrusts of all nanotechnology papers retrieved, analysis of the most cited papers allowed their characteristics to be displayed. Finally, most cited papers from selected time periods were extracted, along with all publications from those time periods, and the institutions and countries were compared based on their representation in the most cited documents list relative to their representation in the most publications list.

  3. Technical structure of the global nanoscience and nanotechnology literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostoff, Ronald N.; Koytcheff, Raymond G.; Lau, Clifford G. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Text mining was used to extract technical intelligence from the open source global nanotechnology and nanoscience research literature. An extensive nanotechnology/nanoscience-focused query was applied to the Science Citation Index/Social Science Citation Index (SCI/SSCI) databases. The nanotechnology/nanoscience research literature technical structure (taxonomy) was obtained using computational linguistics/document clustering and factor analysis. The infrastructure (prolific authors, key journals/institutions/countries, most cited authors/journals/documents) for each of the clusters generated by the document clustering algorithm was obtained using bibliometrics. Another novel addition was the use of phrase auto-correlation maps to show technical thrust areas based on phrase co-occurrence in Abstracts, and the use of phrase-phrase cross-correlation maps to show technical thrust areas based on phrase relations due to the sharing of common co-occurring phrases. The ∼400 most cited nanotechnology papers since 1991 were grouped, and their characteristics generated. Whereas the main analysis provided technical thrusts of all nanotechnology papers retrieved, analysis of the most cited papers allowed their characteristics to be displayed. Finally, most cited papers from selected time periods were extracted, along with all publications from those time periods, and the institutions and countries were compared based on their representation in the most cited documents list relative to their representation in the most publications list

  4. Cascade DNA nanomachine and exponential amplification biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianguo; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Weiyu; Xu, Huo; Li, Hongling; Jia, Lee

    2015-11-15

    DNA is a versatile scaffold for the assembly of multifunctional nanostructures, and potential applications of various DNA nanodevices have been recently demonstrated for disease diagnosis and treatment. In the current study, a powerful cascade DNA nanomachine was developed that can execute the exponential amplification of p53 tumor suppressor gene. During the operation of the newly-proposed DNA nanomachine, dual-cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (dual-CNDP) was ingeniously introduced, where the target trigger is repeatedly used as the fuel molecule and the nicked fragments are dramatically accumulated. Moreover, each displaced nicked fragment is able to activate the another type of cyclical strand-displacement amplification, increasing exponentially the value of fluorescence intensity. Essentially, one target binding event can induce considerable number of subsequent reactions, and the nanodevice was called cascade DNA nanomachine. It can implement several functions, including recognition element, signaling probe, polymerization primer and template. Using the developed autonomous operation of DNA nanomachine, the p53 gene can be quantified in the wide concentration range from 0.05 to 150 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM. If taking into account the final volume of mixture, the detection limit is calculated as lower as 6.2 pM, achieving an desirable assay ability. More strikingly, the mutant gene can be easily distinguished from the wild-type one. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein is expected to promote the development and application of DNA nanomachine, showing great potential value in basic biology and medical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Final Technical Report - In-line Uranium Immunosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Diane A.

    2006-01-01

    In this project, personnel at Tulane University and Sapidyne Instruments Inc. developed an in-line uranium immunosensor that could be used to determine the efficacy of specific in situ biostimulation approaches. This sensor was designed to operate autonomously over relatively long periods of time (2-10 days) and was able to provide near real-time data about uranium immobilization in the absence of personnel at the site of the biostimulation experiments. An alpha prototype of the in-line immmunosensor was delivered from Sapidyne Instruments to Tulane University in December of 2002 and a beta prototype was delivered in November of 2003. The beta prototype of this instrument (now available commercially from Sapidyne Instruments) was programmed to autonomously dilute standard uranium to final concentrations of 2.5 to 100 nM (0.6 to 24 ppb) in buffer containing a fluorescently labeled anti-uranium antibody and the uranium chelator, 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10-phenanthroline. The assay limit of detection for hexavalent uranium was 5.8 nM or 1.38 ppb. This limit of detection is well below the drinking water standard of 30 ppb recently promulgated by the EPA. The assay showed excellent precision; the coefficients of variation (CV's) in the linear range of the assay were less than 5% and CV?s never rose above 14%. Analytical recovery in the immunosensors-based assay was assessed by adding variable known quantities of uranium to purified water samples. A quantitative recovery (93.75% - 108.17%) was obtained for sample with concentrations from 7.5 to 20 nM (2-4.75 ppb). In August of 2005 the sensor was transported to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for testing of water samples at the Criddle test site (see Wu et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 40:3978-3985 2006 for a description of this site). In this first on-site test, the in-line sensor was able to accurately detect changes in the concentrations of uranium in effluent samples from this site. Although the absolute values for the uranium

  6. LET-effects in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.

    1995-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiobiological experiments provides a fundamental tool to study the influence of different ionization densities and to prove the physical basis of models and theories. The knowledge of the interaction of high LET radiation (LET: linear energy transfer [keV/microm]) with biological matter is of great importance for the application of neutrons, protons and heavier ions in radiotherapy. It is also essential in radioprotection to estimate the risk in case of exposure to high LET radiation. In this contribution, an introductory view on the physical properties of ions is given and the cellular response to high LET radiation is summarized. Then the measurements of strand break induction of DNA in solution and in intracellular DNA are reported and compared to cell survival. The possibility of changes in the quality of the lesions is discussed and finally the present status of model calculations in comparison to the experiments is given

  7. Ionizing-radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks: A direct and indirect lighting up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignard, Julien; Mirey, Gladys; Salles, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation has been extensively studied by biochemical or cell imaging techniques. Cell imaging development relies on technical advances as well as our knowledge of the cell DNA damage response (DDR) process. The DDR involves a complex network of proteins that initiate and coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair activities. As some DDR proteins assemble at DSBs in an established spatio-temporal pattern, visible nuclear foci are produced. In addition, post-translational modifications are important for the signaling and the recruitment of specific partners at damaged chromatin foci. We briefly review here the most widely used methods to study DSBs. We also discuss the development of indirect methods, using reporter expression or intra-nuclear antibodies, to follow the production of DSBs in real time and in living cells

  8. Single Molecule Study of DNA Organization and Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Botao

    We have studied five projects related to DNA organization and recombination using mainly single molecule force-spectroscopy and statistical tools. First, HU is one of the most abundant DNA-organizing proteins in bacterial chromosomes and participates in gene regulation. We report experiments that study the dependence of DNA condensation by HU on force, salt and HU concentration. A first important result is that at physiological salt levels, HU only bends DNA, resolving a previous paradox of why a chromosome-compacting protein should have a DNA-stiffening function. A second major result is quantitative demonstration of strong dependencies of HU-DNA dissociation on both salt concentration and force. Second, we have used a thermodynamic Maxwell relation to count proteins driven off large DNAs by tension, an effect important to understanding DNA organization. Our results compare well with estimates of numbers of proteins HU and Fis in previous studies. We have also shown that a semi-flexible polymer model describes our HU experimental data well. The force-dependent binding suggests mechano-chemical mechanisms for gene regulation. Third, the elusive role of protein H1 in chromatin has been clarified with purified H1 and Xenopus extracts. We find that H1 compacts DNA by both bending and looping. Addition of H1 enhances chromatin formation and maintains the plasticity of the chromatin. Fourth, the topology and mechanics of DNA twisting are critical to DNA organization and recombination. We have systematically measured DNA extension as a function of linking number density from 0.08 to -2 with holding forces from 0.2 to 2.4 pN. Unlike previous proposals, the DNA extension decreases with negative linking number. Finally, DNA recombination is a dynamic process starting from enzyme-DNA binding. We report that the Int-DBD domain of lambda integrase binds to DNA without compaction at low Int-DBD concentration. High concentration of Int-DBD loops DNA below a threshold force

  9. 76 FR 19267 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    .... No. 61-127] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical... for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. This document reinstates two... entitled, ``Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Final Rule'' (74 FR 42500). That...

  10. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and

  11. Design and technical status of the EU contribution to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, Maurizio; Federici, Gianfranco; Casci, Federico Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Europe is involved in the procurement of most of the high-technology items for the ITER device (e.g. parts of the superconducting Toroidal (TF) and Poloidal Field (PF) coils, the vacuum vessel (VV), the in-vessel components, the remote handling, the additional heating systems, the tritium plant and cryoplant and finally parts of the diagnostics). In many cases the technologies required to manufacture these components are well established, in others there is still ongoing design and R and D work to select and optimise the final design solutions and to consolidate the underlying technologies as, for example, in the areas of heating and current drive, plasma diagnostics, shield blanket and first wall, remote handling, etc. A design review has recently been conducted by the ITER Organisation, with the support of the Domestic Agencies (DAs) established by the countries participating to ITER, to address the remaining outstanding technical issues and understand the associated implications for design, machine performance, schedule and cost. This paper provides an update of the design and technical status of EU contributions to ITER.

  12. Technical Efficiency and Organ Transplant Performance: A Mixed-Method Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Pablos-Heredero, Carmen; Fernández-Renedo, Carlos; Medina-Merodio, Jose-Amelio

    2015-01-01

    Mixed methods research is interesting to understand complex processes. Organ transplants are complex processes in need of improved final performance in times of budgetary restrictions. As the main objective a mixed method approach is used in this article to quantify the technical efficiency and the excellence achieved in organ transplant systems and to prove the influence of organizational structures and internal processes in the observed technical efficiency. The results show that it is possible to implement mechanisms for the measurement of the different components by making use of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The analysis show a positive relationship between the levels related to the Baldrige indicators and the observed technical efficiency in the donation and transplant units of the 11 analyzed hospitals. Therefore it is possible to conclude that high levels in the Baldrige indexes are a necessary condition to reach an increased level of the service offered. PMID:25950653

  13. Buccal DNA collection: comparison of buccal swabs with FTA cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Elizabeth; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Robertson, Laila; Brisbane, Joanna M; Ashton, Lesley J; Scott, Rodney J; Armstrong, Bruce K

    2006-04-01

    Collection and analysis of DNA, most commonly from blood or buccal cells, is becoming more common in epidemiologic studies. Buccal samples, which are painless to take and relatively easily collected, are often the preferred source. There are several buccal cell collection methods: swabs, brushes, mouthwash, and treated cards, such as FTA or IsoCode cards. Few studies have systematically compared methods of buccal cell collection with respect to DNA yield and amplification success under similar conditions. We compared buccal DNA collection and amplification using buccal swabs and FTA cards in 122 control subjects from our Australian case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Buccal DNA was quantified using a real-time PCR for beta-actin and genotyped at the loci of three polymorphisms (MTHFR 677C>T, ACE I/D, and XPD 1012G>A). PCR was successful with DNA from buccal swabs for 62% to 89% of subjects and from FTA cards for 83% to 100% of subjects, depending on the locus. The matched pair odds ratios (95% confidence interval) comparing success of FTA cards with buccal swabs are as follows: MTHFR 677C>T using PCR-RFLP, 12.5 (11.6-13.5) and using real-time PCR, 130.0 (113.1-152.8); ACE I/D using PCR-amplified fragment length polymorphism, 3.36 (3.2-3.5); XPD 1012G>A using real-time PCR, 150.0 (132.7-172.3). FTA cards are a robust DNA collection method and generally produce DNA suitable for PCR more reliably than buccal swabs. There are, however, technical challenges in handling discs punched from FTA cards that intending users should be aware of.

  14. Autonomous Dynamically Self-Organizing and Self-Healing Distributed Hardware Architecture - the eDNA Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, Michael Reibel; Madsen, Jan; Keymeulen, Didier

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the current state of the autonomous dynamically self-organizing and self-healing electronic DNA (eDNA) hardware architecture (patent pending). In its current prototype state, the eDNA architecture is capable of responding to multiple injected faults by autonomously reconfiguring itself to accommodate the fault and keep the application running. This paper will also disclose advanced features currently available in the simulation model only. These features are future work and will soon be implemented in hardware. Finally we will describe step-by-step how an application is implemented on the eDNA architecture.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  16. Predictors of employer satisfaction: technical and non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Jared A; Wu, Tsui-Feng; Fales-Williams, Amanda J; Kirk, Ryan A; Preast, Vanessa A

    2012-01-01

    Employers of 2007-2009 graduates from Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine were asked to respond to a survey regarding their overall satisfaction with their new employees as well as their new employees' preparation in several technical and non-technical skill areas. Seventy-five responses contained complete data and were used in the analysis. Four technical skill areas (data collection, data interpretation, planning, and taking action) and five non-technical skill areas (interpersonal skills, ability to deal with legal issues, business skills, making referrals, and problem solving) were identified. All of the skill area subscales listed above had appropriate reliability (Cronbach's alpha>0.70) and were positively and significantly correlated with overall employer satisfaction. Results of two simultaneous regression analyses indicated that of the four technical skill areas, taking action is the most salient predictor of employer satisfaction. Of the five non-technical skill areas, interpersonal skills, business skills, making referrals, and problem solving were the most important skills in predicting employer satisfaction. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that all technical skills explained 25% of the variation in employer satisfaction; non-technical skills explained an additional 42% of the variation in employer satisfaction.

  17. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  18. Herpes virus and viral DNA synthesis in ultraviolet light-irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie

    1976-07-01

    The rate of virus DNA synthesis and the production of infectious virus are impaired in stationary monkey kidney CV-I cells irradiated with u.v. before infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). The inhibition of HSV multiplication is due to u.v.-induced damage in cell DNA. CV-I cells recover their capacity to support HSV growth during the 40 to 48 h after irradiation, and the final virus yield is enhanced by factor of 10. The time course of the recovery is similar to that of the excision repair process occurring in u.v.-irradiated mammalian cells. Caffeine, hydroxyurea and cycloheximide inhibit the recovery. Fluorodeoxyuridine is without effect. A small but significant amount of labelled dThd coming from irradiated cell DNA is incorporated into virus DNA. HSV specified thymidine kinase seems to be more effective for virus DNA synthesis in irradiated than in control cells.

  19. Analysis of pyrimidine dimer content of isolated DNA by nuclease digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farland, W.H.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Isolated DNA is highly susceptible to degradation by exogenous nucleases. Complete digestion is possible with a number of well-characterized enzymes from a variety of sources. Treatment of DNA with a battery of enzymes including both phosphodiesterase and phosphatase activities yields a mixture of nucleosides and inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) as a final product. Unlike native DNA, ultraviolet-irradiated DNA is resistant to complete digestion. Setlow et al. demonstrated that the structural changes in the DNA responsible for the nuclease resistance were the formation of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, the major photoproduct in UV-irradiated DNA. Using venom phosphodiesterase, they demonstrated that UV irradiation of DNA affected both the rate and extent of enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition, it was demonstrated that the major nuclease-resistant product of this hydrolysis was an oligonucleotide containing dimerized pyrimidines. Treatment of the DNA to split the dimers, either photochemically or photoenzymatically, rendered the polymer more susceptible to hydrolysis by the phosphodiesterase. The specificity of photoreactivating enzyme for pyrimidine dimers lends support to the role of these structures in conferring nuclease resistance to UV-irradiated DNA. The nuclease resistance of DNA containing dimers has been the basis of several assays for the measurement of these photoproducts. Sutherland and Chamberlin reported the development of a rapid and sensitive assay for dimers in 32 P-labeled DNA

  20. SMC1-Mediated Intra-S-Phase Arrest Facilitates Bocavirus DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Deng, Xuefeng; Cheng, Fang; Li, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Activation of a host DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for DNA replication of minute virus of canines (MVC), a member of the genus Bocavirus of the Parvoviridae family; however, the mechanism by which DDR contributes to viral DNA replication is unknown. In the current study, we demonstrate that MVC infection triggers the intra-S-phase arrest to slow down host cellular DNA replication and to recruit cellular DNA replication factors for viral DNA replication. The intra-S-phase arrest is regulated by ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase) signaling in a p53-independent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that SMC1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1) is the key regulator of the intra-S-phase arrest induced during infection. Either knockdown of SMC1 or complementation with a dominant negative SMC1 mutant blocks both the intra-S-phase arrest and viral DNA replication. Finally, we show that the intra-S-phase arrest induced during MVC infection was caused neither by damaged host cellular DNA nor by viral proteins but by replicating viral genomes physically associated with the DNA damage sensor, the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex. In conclusion, the feedback loop between MVC DNA replication and the intra-S-phase arrest is mediated by ATM-SMC1 signaling and plays a critical role in MVC DNA replication. Thus, our findings unravel the mechanism underlying DDR signaling-facilitated MVC DNA replication and demonstrate a novel strategy of DNA virus-host interaction. PMID:23365434