WorldWideScience

Sample records for dna content based

  1. Analysis of Cellular DNA Content by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Huang, Xuan; Zhao, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Cellular DNA content can be measured by flow cytometry with the aim of : (1) revealing cell distribution within the major phases of the cell cycle, (2) estimating frequency of apoptotic cells with fractional DNA content, and/or (3) disclosing DNA ploidy of the measured cell population. In this unit, simple and universally applicable methods for staining fixed cells are presented, as are methods that utilize detergents and/or proteolytic treatment to permeabilize cells and make DNA accessible to fluorochrome. Additionally, supravital cell staining with Hoechst 33342, which is primarily used for sorting live cells based on DNA-content differences for their subsequent culturing, is described. Also presented are methods for staining cell nuclei isolated from paraffin-embedded tissues. Available algorithms are listed for deconvolution of DNA-content-frequency histograms to estimate percentage of cells in major phases of the cell cycle and frequency of apoptotic cells with fractional DNA content. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

  2. DNA content in radiation-associated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorowski, R.A.; Deaconson, T.F.; Vetsch, R.; Cerletty, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    DNA content has been reported to be of prognostic significance in differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since malignant tumors with irradiation as an initiator often contain DNA aberrations, the DNA content of well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma in patients with a prior history of low-dose head and neck irradiation was determined and compared with similar nonradiation-associated lesions. The DNA content of thyroid cancers from 53 patients was determined with use of flow cytometry. Sixteen radiation-associated thyroid carcinomas (11 papillary, 3 follicular, and 2 medullary) all were diploid. In a group of 37 nonradiation-associated tumors, 10 were aneuploid (10 of 29 papillary carcinomas and 0 of 2 follicular or 6 medullary carcinomas). This difference in DNA content is significant (p less than 0.02, Fisher's exact test). These findings were unexpected and suggest that if the initiating irradiation causes a DNA aberration, this aberration is not reflected in DNA content as measured by means of flow cytometry

  3. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for radiation molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repin Mikhail V

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this work is to obtain the correct relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for the use at FISH analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Results The relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the male and female human diploid genomes have been calculated from the publicly available international Human Genome Project data. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of human chromosomes were compared with the data recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001. The differences in the values of the relative DNA contents of chromosomes obtained by using different approaches for 15 human chromosomes, mainly for large chromosomes, were below 2%. For the chromosomes 13, 17, 20 and 22 the differences were above 5%. Conclusion New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes were obtained. This approach, based on the genome sequence, can be recommended for the use in radiation molecular cytogenetics.

  4. Nuclear DNA content and base composition in 28 taxa of Musa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaté, K; Brown, S; Durand, P; Bureau, J M; De Nay, D; Trinh, T H

    2001-08-01

    The nuclear DNA content of 28 taxa of Musa was assessed by flow cytometry, using line PxPC6 of Petunia hybrida as an internal standard. The 2C DNA value of Musa balbisiana (BB genome) was 1.16 pg, whereas Musa acuminata (AA genome) had an average 2C DNA value of 1.27 pg, with a difference of 11% between its subspecies. The two haploid (IC) genomes, A and B, comprising most of the edible bananas, are therefore of similar size, 0.63 pg (610 million bp) and 0.58 pg (560 million bp), respectively. The genome of diploid Musa is thus threefold that of Arabidopsis thaliana. The genome sizes in a set of triploid Musa cultivars or clones were quite different, with 2C DNA values ranging from 1.61 to 2.23 pg. Likewise, the genome sizes of tetraploid cultivars ranged from 1.94 to 2.37 pg (2C). Apparently, tetraploids (for instance, accession I.C.2) can have a genome size that falls within the range of triploid genome sizes, and vice versa (as in the case of accession Simili Radjah). The 2C values estimated for organs such as leaf, leaf sheath, rhizome, and flower were consistent, whereas root material gave atypical results, owing to browning. The genomic base composition of these Musa taxa had a median value of 40.8% GC (SD = 0.43%).

  5. TRX-LOGOS - a graphical tool to demonstrate DNA information content dependent upon backbone dynamics in addition to base sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Connor H; Schulze, Katharina V; Babbitt, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    It is now widely-accepted that DNA sequences defining DNA-protein interactions functionally depend upon local biophysical features of DNA backbone that are important in defining sites of binding interaction in the genome (e.g. DNA shape, charge and intrinsic dynamics). However, these physical features of DNA polymer are not directly apparent when analyzing and viewing Shannon information content calculated at single nucleobases in a traditional sequence logo plot. Thus, sequence logos plots are severely limited in that they convey no explicit information regarding the structural dynamics of DNA backbone, a feature often critical to binding specificity. We present TRX-LOGOS, an R software package and Perl wrapper code that interfaces the JASPAR database for computational regulatory genomics. TRX-LOGOS extends the traditional sequence logo plot to include Shannon information content calculated with regard to the dinucleotide-based BI-BII conformation shifts in phosphate linkages on the DNA backbone, thereby adding a visual measure of intrinsic DNA flexibility that can be critical for many DNA-protein interactions. TRX-LOGOS is available as an R graphics module offered at both SourceForge and as a download supplement at this journal. To demonstrate the general utility of TRX logo plots, we first calculated the information content for 416 Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor binding sites functionally confirmed in the Yeastract database and matched to previously published yeast genomic alignments. We discovered that flanking regions contain significantly elevated information content at phosphate linkages than can be observed at nucleobases. We also examined broader transcription factor classifications defined by the JASPAR database, and discovered that many general signatures of transcription factor binding are locally more information rich at the level of DNA backbone dynamics than nucleobase sequence. We used TRX-logos in combination with MEGA 6.0 software

  6. Rapid DNA analysis for automated processing and interpretation of low DNA content samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turingan, Rosemary S; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Hogan, Catherine; Jiang, Hua; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of casework samples with low DNA content include those resulting from the transfer of epithelial cells from the skin to an object (e.g., cells on a water bottle, or brim of a cap), blood spatter stains, and small bone and tissue fragments. Low DNA content (LDC) samples are important in a wide range of settings, including disaster response teams to assist in victim identification and family reunification, military operations to identify friend or foe, criminal forensics to identify suspects and exonerate the innocent, and medical examiner and coroner offices to identify missing persons. Processing LDC samples requires experienced laboratory personnel, isolated workstations, and sophisticated equipment, requires transport time, and involves complex procedures. We present a rapid DNA analysis system designed specifically to generate STR profiles from LDC samples in field-forward settings by non-technical operators. By performing STR in the field, close to the site of collection, rapid DNA analysis has the potential to increase throughput and to provide actionable information in real time. A Low DNA Content BioChipSet (LDC BCS) was developed and manufactured by injection molding. It was designed to function in the fully integrated Accelerated Nuclear DNA Equipment (ANDE) instrument previously designed for analysis of buccal swab and other high DNA content samples (Investigative Genet. 4(1):1-15, 2013). The LDC BCS performs efficient DNA purification followed by microfluidic ultrafiltration of the purified DNA, maximizing the quantity of DNA available for subsequent amplification and electrophoretic separation and detection of amplified fragments. The system demonstrates accuracy, precision, resolution, signal strength, and peak height ratios appropriate for casework analysis. The LDC rapid DNA analysis system is effective for the generation of STR profiles from a wide range of sample types. The technology broadens the range of sample

  7. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bonomi

    Full Text Available Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH, and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF and 42 poor responders (PR to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001 in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  8. Nuclear DNA contents of Echinchloa crus-galli and its Gaussian relationships with environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan-Dan; Lu, Yong-Liang; Guo, Shui-Liang; Yin, Li-Ping; Zhou, Ping; Lou, Yu-Xia

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies on plant nuclear DNA content variation and its relationships with environmental gradients produced conflicting results. We speculated that the relationships between nuclear DNA content of a widely-distributed species and its environmental gradients might be non-linear if it was sampled in a large geographical gradient. Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P. Beauv. is a worldwide species, but without documents on its intraspecific variation of nuclear DNA content. Our objectives are: 1) to detect intraspecific variation scope of E. crus-galli in its nuclear DNA content, and 2) to testify whether nuclear DNA content of the species changes with environmental gradients following Gaussian models if its populations were sampled in a large geographical gradient. We collected seeds of 36 Chinese populations of E. crus-galli across a wide geographical gradient, and sowed them in a homogeneous field to get their offspring to determine their nuclear DNA content. We analyzed the relationships of nuclear DNA content of these populations with latitude, longitude, and nineteen bioclimatic variables by using Gaussian and linear models. (1) Nuclear DNA content varied from 2.113 to 2.410 pg among 36 Chinese populations of E. crus-galli, with a mean value of 2.256 pg. (2) Gaussian correlations of nuclear DNA content (y) with geographical gradients were detected, with latitude (x) following y = 2.2923*e -(x - 24.9360)2/2*63.79452 (r = 0.546, P correlations of its Nuclear DNA content with geographical and most bioclimatic gradients.

  9. A method for the determination of bacterial spore DNA content based on isotopic labelling, spore germination and diphenylamine assay; ploidy of spores of several Bacillus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, P.M.; Karamata, D.

    1992-01-01

    A reliable method for measuring the spore DNA content, based on radioactive DNA labelling, spore germination in absence of DNA replication and diphenylamine assay, was developed. The accuracy of the method, within 10 - 15%, is adequate for determining the number of chromosomes per spore, provided that the genome size is known. B subtilis spores were shown to be invariably monogenomic, while those of larger bacilli Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, often, if not invariably, contain two genomes. Attempts to modify the spore DNA content of B subtilis by altering the richness of the sporulation medium, the sporulation conditions (liquid or solid medium), or by mutation, were apparently unsuccessful. An increase of spore size with medium richness, not accompanied by an increase in DNA content, was observed. The implication of the apparently species-specific spore ploidy and the influence of the sporulation conditions on spore size and shape are discussed

  10. Cytofluorophotometrical study of the DNA content of the uterine cervical carcinoma and the vaginal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumoto, Yoshiaki

    1987-01-01

    The Feulgen DNA content in cells of uterine cervical carcinoma and that of its adjacent vaginal epithelium were measured by microfluorophotometry. The Feulgen DNA content in cells of uterine cervical carcinoma was increased and showed a greater variation of its DNA values compared with diploid cells. The Feulgen DNA content in cells of normal vaginal epithelium adjacent to cervical carcinoma was also increased compared with diploid cells in 6 out of 8 cases. The relativity between the cellular DNA content of cervical carcinoma and that of its adjacent normal vaginal epithelium was found. In 10 out of 14 cases of uterine cervical carcinoma, the mean value of cellular DNA content was increased after by therapuetic irradiation with 10 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA content of vaginal epithelial cells were similar to those on the DNA content of carcinoma cells. (author)

  11. Charge transport through DNA based electronic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil R.; Chawda, Vivek; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Sinha, Niraj

    2018-05-01

    We report charge transport in electronic 'barriers' constructed by sequence engineering in DNA. Considering the ionization potentials of Thymine-Adenine (AT) and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) base pairs, we treat AT as 'barriers'. The effect of DNA conformation (A and B form) on charge transport is also investigated. Particularly, the effect of width of 'barriers' on hole transport is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on energy minimized DNA structures to obtain the electronic Hamiltonian. The quantum transport calculations are performed using the Landauer-Buttiker framework. Our main findings are contrary to previous studies. We find that a longer A-DNA with more AT base pairs can conduct better than shorter A-DNA with a smaller number of AT base pairs. We also find that some sequences of A-DNA can conduct better than a corresponding B-DNA with the same sequence. The counterions mediated charge transport and long range interactions are speculated to be responsible for counter-intuitive length and AT content dependence of conductance of A-DNA.

  12. Reduced mitochondrial DNA content associates with poor prognosis of prostate cancer in African American men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Koochekpour

    Full Text Available Reduction or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has been associated with cancer progression. Although imbalanced mtDNA content is known to occur in prostate cancer, differences in mtDNA content between African American (AA and Caucasian American (CA men are not defined. We provide the first evidence that tumors in AA men possess reduced level of mtDNA compared to CA men. The median tumor mtDNA content was reduced in AA men. mtDNA content was also reduced in normal prostate tissues of AA men compared to CA men, suggesting a possible predisposition to cancer in AA men. mtDNA content was also reduced in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissue from AA men. Tumor and BPH tissues from patients ≥ 60 years of age possess reduced mtDNA content compared to patients 7 compared to ≤ 7, whereas reduced mtDNA content was observed in tumors of Gleason grade >7 compared to ≤ 7. Together, our data suggest that AA men possess lower mtDNA levels in normal and tumor tissues compared to CA men, which could contribute to higher risk and more aggressive prostate cancer in AA men.

  13. Reduced mitochondrial DNA content associates with poor prognosis of prostate cancer in African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochekpour, Shahriar; Marlowe, Timothy; Singh, Keshav K; Attwood, Kristopher; Chandra, Dhyan

    2013-01-01

    Reduction or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been associated with cancer progression. Although imbalanced mtDNA content is known to occur in prostate cancer, differences in mtDNA content between African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) men are not defined. We provide the first evidence that tumors in AA men possess reduced level of mtDNA compared to CA men. The median tumor mtDNA content was reduced in AA men. mtDNA content was also reduced in normal prostate tissues of AA men compared to CA men, suggesting a possible predisposition to cancer in AA men. mtDNA content was also reduced in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue from AA men. Tumor and BPH tissues from patients ≥ 60 years of age possess reduced mtDNA content compared to patients 7 compared to ≤ 7, whereas reduced mtDNA content was observed in tumors of Gleason grade >7 compared to ≤ 7. Together, our data suggest that AA men possess lower mtDNA levels in normal and tumor tissues compared to CA men, which could contribute to higher risk and more aggressive prostate cancer in AA men.

  14. Diet Assessment Based on Rumen Contents: A Comparison between DNA Metabarcoding and Macroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth V Nichols

    Full Text Available Dietary choices are central to our understanding of ecology and evolution. Still, many aspects of food choice have been hampered by time consuming procedures and methodological problems. Faster and cheaper methods, such as DNA metabarcoding, have therefore been widely adopted. However, there is still very little empirical support that this new method is better and more accurate compared to the classic methods. Here, we compare DNA metabarcoding to macroscopic identifications of rumen contents in two species of wild free-ranging ungulates: roe deer and fallow deer. We found that the methods were comparable, but they did not completely overlap. Sometimes the DNA method failed to identify food items that were found macroscopically, and the opposite was also true. However, the total number of taxa identified increased using DNA compared to the macroscopic analysis. Moreover, the taxonomic precision of metabarcoding was substantially higher, with on average 90% of DNA-sequences being identified to genus or species level compared to 75% of plant fragments using macroscopy. In niche overlap analyses, presence/absence data showed that both methods came to very similar conclusions. When using the sequence count data and macroscopic weight, niche overlap was lower than when using presence-absence data yet tended to increase when using DNA compared to macroscopy. Nevertheless, the significant positive correlation between macroscopic quantity and number of DNA sequences counted from the same plant group give support for the use of metabarcoding to quantify plants in the rumen. This study thus shows that there is much to be gained by using metabarcoding to quantitatively assess diet composition compared to macroscopic analysis, including higher taxonomic precision, sensitivity and cost efficiency.

  15. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, André

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. ► Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. ► Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. ► Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze–thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA (λ nDNA ) and mtDNA (λ mtDNA ) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in degraded samples in the future. To our knowledge this is the first time different degradation impact of the two

  16. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Christopher B., E-mail: Christopher.jackson@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Gallati, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.gallati@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Schaller, Andre, E-mail: andre.schaller@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  17. DNA content variation and its significance in the evolution of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales, Streptophyta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloisie Poulíčková

    Full Text Available It is now clear that whole genome duplications have occurred in all eukaryotic evolutionary lineages, and that the vast majority of flowering plants have experienced polyploidisation in their evolutionary history. However, study of genome size variation in microalgae lags behind that of higher plants and seaweeds. In this study, we have addressed the question whether microalgal phylogeny is associated with DNA content variation in order to evaluate the evolutionary significance of polyploidy in the model genus Micrasterias. We applied flow-cytometric techniques of DNA quantification to microalgae and mapped the estimated DNA content along the phylogenetic tree. Correlations between DNA content and cell morphometric parameters were also tested using geometric morphometrics. In total, DNA content was successfully determined for 34 strains of the genus Micrasterias. The estimated absolute 2C nuclear DNA amount ranged from 2.1 to 64.7 pg; intraspecific variation being 17.4-30.7 pg in M. truncata and 32.0-64.7 pg in M. rotata. There were significant differences between DNA contents of related species. We found strong correlation between the absolute nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers and significant positive correlation between the DNA content and both cell size and number of terminal lobes. Moreover, the results showed the importance of cell/life cycle studies for interpretation of DNA content measurements in microalgae.

  18. DNA content analysis allows discrimination between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucila Langoni; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; da Silva, Raíssa Bernardes; De Vito, Fernanda Bernadelli; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a human protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Currently the species is divided into six taxonomic groups. The genome of the CL Brener clone has been estimated to be 106.4-110.7 Mb, and DNA content analyses revealed that it is a diploid hybrid clone. Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate that has the same reservoirs and vectors as T. cruzi; however, it is non-pathogenic to vertebrate hosts. The haploid genome of T. rangeli was previously estimated to be 24 Mb. The parasitic strains of T. rangeli are divided into KP1(+) and KP1(-). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the DNA content in different strains of T. cruzi and T. rangeli by flow cytometry. All T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains yielded cell cycle profiles with clearly identifiable G1-0 (2n) and G2-M (4n) peaks. T. cruzi and T. rangeli genome sizes were estimated using the clone CL Brener and the Leishmania major CC1 as reference cell lines because their genome sequences have been previously determined. The DNA content of T. cruzi strains ranged from 87,41 to 108,16 Mb, and the DNA content of T. rangeli strains ranged from 63,25 Mb to 68,66 Mb. No differences in DNA content were observed between KP1(+) and KP1(-) T. rangeli strains. Cultures containing mixtures of the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains resulted in cell cycle profiles with distinct G1 peaks for strains of each species. These results demonstrate that DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is a reliable technique for discrimination between T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolated from different hosts.

  19. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in blood samples of patients with stage I breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Peng; An, Han-Xiang; Dang, Cheng-Xue; Radpour, Ramin; Kohler, Corina; Fokas, Emmanouil; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Zhong, Xiao Yan

    2009-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in carcinogenesis. We developed an accurate multiplex quantitative real-time PCR for synchronized determination of mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA). We sought to investigate whether mtDNA content in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients is associated with clinical and pathological parameters. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with breast cancer and 51 age-matched healthy individuals as control. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood for the quantification of mtDNA and nDNA, using a one-step multiplex real-time PCR. A FAM labeled MGB probe and primers were used to amplify the mtDNA sequence of the ATP 8 gene, and a VIC labeled MGB probe and primers were employed to amplify the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase gene. mtDNA content was correlated with tumor stage, menstruation status, and age of patients as well as lymph node status and the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her-2/neu protein. The content of mtDNA in stage I breast cancer patients was significantly lower than in other stages (overall P = 0.023). Reduced mtDNA was found often in post menopausal cancer group (P = 0.024). No difference in mtDNA content, in regards to age (p = 0.564), lymph node involvement (p = 0.673), ER (p = 0.877), PR (p = 0.763), and Her-2/neu expression (p = 0.335), was observed. Early detection of breast cancer has proved difficult and current detection methods are inadequate. In the present study, decreased mtDNA content in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer was strongly associated with stage I. The use of mtDNA may have diagnostic value and further studies are required to validate it as a potential biomarker for early detection of breast cancer

  20. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeneva, Inna B., E-mail: inna.korzeneva@molgen.vniief.ru [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190 Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Kostuyk, Svetlana V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); Ershova, Elizaveta S. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow, 107031 (Russian Federation); Skorodumova, Elena N.; Zhuravleva, Veronika F.; Pankratova, Galina V.; Volkova, Irina V.; Stepanova, Elena V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190 Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Porokhovnik, Lev N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow, 107031 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat is resistant to double-strand breaks in the environment of a raised endonuclease activity. • Hybridization-based techniques are preferable for the analysis of damaged and/or oxidized genomic fragments, rather than the qRT-PCR method. • A chronic exposure to the low-dose IR induces an elevation of the rDNA content in the human circulating cfDNA as compared to cellular DNA. • An exposure to IR entails a decrease of the level of the human circulating satellite III (1q12) as compared to cellular DNA (RsatIII index). • The RrDNA/RsatIII ratio is a potential marker of a chronic IR individual exposure. - Abstract: A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N = 88) and tritium β-radiation (N = 88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the

  1. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzeneva, Inna B.; Kostuyk, Svetlana V.; Ershova, Elizaveta S.; Skorodumova, Elena N.; Zhuravleva, Veronika F.; Pankratova, Galina V.; Volkova, Irina V.; Stepanova, Elena V.; Porokhovnik, Lev N.; Veiko, Natalia N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat is resistant to double-strand breaks in the environment of a raised endonuclease activity. • Hybridization-based techniques are preferable for the analysis of damaged and/or oxidized genomic fragments, rather than the qRT-PCR method. • A chronic exposure to the low-dose IR induces an elevation of the rDNA content in the human circulating cfDNA as compared to cellular DNA. • An exposure to IR entails a decrease of the level of the human circulating satellite III (1q12) as compared to cellular DNA (RsatIII index). • The RrDNA/RsatIII ratio is a potential marker of a chronic IR individual exposure. - Abstract: A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N = 88) and tritium β-radiation (N = 88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the

  2. Deficit in DNA content relative to histones in X-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.; Mendez, F.; Neubort, S.

    1976-01-01

    The DNA and histone content of HeLa S-3 cell cultures was measured by direct mass assays 21 hours after 1000 rad of X-irradiation, when the cells were arrested in G2 phase. The nuclear DNA content of such cultures was found to be deficient (73 per cent of control values). In contrast, the synthesis of nuclear histones persisted, and the total histone content was close to 100 per cent of control values. When synchronously-growing cultures were irradiated in mid-S phase and examined 3.5 hours later in G2 phase, both DNA and histone content were equal to control values. (author)

  3. Nuclear DNA content of the hybrid plant pathogen Phytophthora andina determined by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Presser, Jackson W; Goss, Erica M

    2016-09-01

    Phytophthora andina is a heterothallic plant pathogen of Andean solanaceous hosts and is an interspecific hybrid of P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. The objective of this study was to estimate the nuclear DNA content of isolates in three clonal lineages of P. andina relative to P. infestans Twelve isolates of P. andina and six isolates of P. infestans were measured for nuclear DNA content by propidium iodide-stained flow cytometry. We found that the DNA content of P. andina was similar but slightly smaller, on average, than that of our sample of P. infestans isolates. This is consistent with P. andina being a homoploid hybrid rather than allopolyploid hybrid. Nuclear DNA content was more variable among a smaller sample of P. infestans isolates, including a putative triploid isolate from Mexico, but small differences in nuclear DNA content were also observed among P. andina isolates. Both species appear to be able to tolerate significant variation in genome size. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  4. Nuclear DNA content variation in life history phases of the Bonnemasoniaceae (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Soler, Noemi; Gómez Garreta, Amelia; Ribera Siguan, Ma Antonia; Kapraun, Donald F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content in gametophytes and sporophytes or the prostrate phases of the following species of Bonnemaisoniaceae (Asparagopsis armata, Asparagopsis taxiformis, Bonnemaisonia asparagoides, Bonnemaisonia clavata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera) were estimated by image analysis and static microspectrophotometry using the DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dilactate) and the chicken erythrocytes standard. These estimates expand on the Kew database of DNA nuclear content. DNA content values for 1C nuclei in the gametophytes (spermatia and vegetative cells) range from 0.5 pg to 0.8 pg, and for 2C nuclei in the sporophytes or the prostrate phases range from 1.15-1.7 pg. Although only the 2C and 4C values were observed in the sporophyte or the prostrate phase, in the vegetative cells of the gametophyte the values oscillated from 1C to 4C, showing the possible start of endopolyploidy. The results confirm the alternation of nuclear phases in these Bonnemaisoniaceae species, in those that have tetrasporogenesis, as well as those that have somatic meiosis. The availability of a consensus phylogenetic tree for Bonnemaisoniaceae has opened the way to determine evolutionary trends in DNA contents. Both the estimated genome sizes and the published chromosome numbers for Bonnemaisoniaceae suggest a narrow range of values consistent with the conservation of an ancestral genome.

  5. Nuclear DNA Content Variation in Life History Phases of the Bonnemasoniaceae (Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Soler, Noemi; Gómez Garreta, Amelia; Ribera Siguan, Mª Antonia; Kapraun, Donald F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content in gametophytes and sporophytes or the prostrate phases of the following species of Bonnemaisoniaceae (Asparagopsis armata, Asparagopsis taxiformis, Bonnemaisonia asparagoides, Bonnemaisonia clavata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera) were estimated by image analysis and static microspectrophotometry using the DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dilactate) and the chicken erythrocytes standard. These estimates expand on the Kew database of DNA nuclear content. DNA content values for 1C nuclei in the gametophytes (spermatia and vegetative cells) range from 0.5 pg to 0.8 pg, and for 2C nuclei in the sporophytes or the prostrate phases range from 1.15–1.7 pg. Although only the 2C and 4C values were observed in the sporophyte or the prostrate phase, in the vegetative cells of the gametophyte the values oscillated from 1C to 4C, showing the possible start of endopolyploidy. The results confirm the alternation of nuclear phases in these Bonnemaisoniaceae species, in those that have tetrasporogenesis, as well as those that have somatic meiosis. The availability of a consensus phylogenetic tree for Bonnemaisoniaceae has opened the way to determine evolutionary trends in DNA contents. Both the estimated genome sizes and the published chromosome numbers for Bonnemaisoniaceae suggest a narrow range of values consistent with the conservation of an ancestral genome. PMID:24465835

  6. Nuclear DNA content in 20 species of Siluriformes (Teleostei: Ostariophysi from the Neotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Fenerich

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, 20 species of Siluriformes fish were analyzed in order to determine their nuclear DNA content and compare these data with their diploid number. In addition, the extension and importance of the changes that occurred during the process of diversification in the group of Neotropical freshwater catfish were investigated. The only species studied of the family Doradidae, Rhinodoras d'orbignyi (2n = 58, presented 3.46 ± 0.13 pg of DNA. Among the species of the family Heptapteridae, the values of nuclear DNA content and the diploid numbers ranged from 1.13 ± 0.09 pg of DNA in Pimelodella sp. (2n = 46 to 2.38 ± 0.07 pg of DNA in Imparfinis mirini (2n = 58. The family Loricariidae showed the widest variation in diploid number and nuclear DNA content values, ranging from 2n = 52 and 3.96 ± 0.22 pg of DNA in Liposarcus anisitsi to 2n = 76 and 4.90 ± 0.12 pg of DNA in Hypostomus sp. 4. In this group, two local samples of Pimelodus maculatus (Pimelodidae were analyzed, and both exhibited 2n = 56, but different nuclear DNA content values (2.68 ± 0.22 pg and 2.82 ± 0.20 pg, respectively. Among the Pseudopimelodidae species analyzed, Pseudopimelodus mangurus (2n = 54 showed 2.23 ± 0.15 pg and Microglanis cottoides (2n = 54 exhibited 2.50 ± 0.18 pg of DNA. Two species of Trichomycterus (Trichomycteridae also presented the same diploid number, 2n = 54 chromosomes, but, while the species from the Quinta stream presented a DNA content of 2.62 ± 0.19 pg, in the sample from the Capivara river this value was 2.30 ± 0.23 pg. In the analyzed species, the results showed that the changes in DNA content were frequently not followed by changes in the diploid number. This fact permits to suggest that, in addition to structural chromosome rearrangements, other mechanisms, including deletions, duplications and polyploidy, could be involved in the process of species differentiation in the representatives of the fish order Siluriformes.

  7. Prognostic significance of DNA content in stage I adenocarcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Heidi L.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela; El-Naggar, Adel K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Up to 30% of lung cancers (Stage I) with the most favorable outcome recur within 5 years after surgery. This study reviews the pattern of failure after surgical resection in early lung cancers and determines whether flow cytometric DNA variables were prognostic indicators for survival, disease-free survival (DFS), or distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Methods and Materials: Pathologic specimens from 45 patients at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center who underwent surgical resection and mediastinal nodal dissection for stage I (AJCC) adenocarcinomas of the lung were analyzed by flow cytometry for DNA content. Survival was calculated by the method of Desu and Lee. Chi-square and cross tabulation were used in the analysis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 62 years, and 52.3% were male. All patients were clinical Stage I (T1-2 N0), Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and had a weight loss <10 lbs. Median overall survival (OS) and DFS were 50 months and 33 months, respectively. OS, DFS, and DMFS at 1, 3 and 5 years were 73%, 57%, and 35%; 63%, 53%, and 45%; and 67%, 56%, and 48%, respectively. Analysis of all 45 patients revealed 86% of patients developing brain metastasis had an abnormal DNA content ≥ 30%, whereas 4% of patients with brain metastasis had abnormal DNA content < 30% (p = 0.01). This correlation maintained significance when only pT1/2 lesions were analyzed. There was a significant statistical correlation between abnormal DNA and 5-year OS, with 74% OS for those with abnormal DNA < 30% vs. 42% for ≥ 30% (p = 0.036). The 5-year DFS for pT1/2 patients was significantly correlated with abnormal DNA content: 53% for patients with abnormal DNA < 30% vs. 17% for patients with abnormal DNA ≥ 30%, respectively (p = 0.03). Of those with %S fraction (%S) < 2, 13% failed locally compared to 41% of those with %S ≥ 2. There was a highly significant correlation between DNA index (DNAI) and aneuploid %S: 68% of patients

  8. Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth regulators, DNA content and anatomy in vitro -cultivated Curcuma longa ... Shoots were inoculated in MS culture medium with the addition of 30 g/L of sucrose ... flow cytometry, utilizing two reference standards, green pea, and tomato.

  9. Decreased Mitochondrial DNA Content in Association with Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in House Dust during Wintertime: From a Population Enquiry to Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Nicky; Koppen, Gudrun; Smeets, Karen; Napierska, Dorota; Plusquin, Michelle; De Prins, Sofie; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Nelen, Vera; Cox, Bianca; Cuypers, Ann; Hoet, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number) was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 µM) of benzo(a)pyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (±SD) 0.95±0.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25th–75th percentile: 390.7–767.3) and 1385ng/g dust (25th–75th percentile: 1000–1980) in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: −15.16 to −4.2; p = 0.002) for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was −7.3% (95% CI: −13.71 to −0.42; p = 0.04). Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(a)pyrene (range 0 µM to 500 µM) to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans

  10. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in association with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust during wintertime: from a population enquiry to cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky Pieters

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 µM of benzo(apyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (± SD 0.95 ± 0.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25(th-75(th percentile: 390.7-767.3 and 1385 ng/g dust (25(th-75(th percentile: 1000-1980 in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: -15.16 to -4.2; p = 0.002 for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was -7.3% (95% CI: -13.71 to -0.42; p = 0.04. Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(apyrene (range 0 µM to 500 µM to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans.

  11. Nuclear DNA content variation among central European Koeleria taxa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečinka, A.; Suchánková, Pavla; Lysák, Martin; Trávníček, B.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 98, - (2006), s. 117-122 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosome number * nuclear DNA content * flow cytometry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.448, year: 2006

  12. Genetic stock assessment of spawning arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) populations by flow cytometric determination of DNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, S F; Bickham, J W

    1991-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in cellular DNA content was measured in five Coregonus autumnalis spawning populations from the Mackenzie River drainage, Canada, using flow cytometry. The rivers assayed were the Peel, Arctic Red, Mountain, Carcajou, and Liard rivers. DNA content was determined from whole blood preparations of fish from all rivers except the Carcajou, for which kidney tissue was used. DNA content measurements of kidney and blood preparations of the same fish from the Mountain River revealed statistically indistinguishable results. Mosaicism was found in blood preparations from the Peel, Arctic Red, Mountain, and Liard rivers, but was not observed in kidney tissue preparations from the Mountain or Carcajou rivers. The Liard River sample had significantly elevated mean DNA content relative to the other four samples; all other samples were statistically indistinguishable. Significant differences in mean DNA content among spawning stocks of a single species reinforces the need for adequate sample sizes of both individuals and populations when reporting "C" values for a particular species.

  13. Significance of somatic mutations and content alteration of mitochondrial DNA in esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu-Fen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of mitochondria in energy metabolism, the generation of ROS, aging, and the initiation of apoptosis have implicated their importance in tumorigenesis. In this study we aim to establish the mutation spectrum and to understand the role of somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancer. Methods The entire mitochondrial genome was screened for somatic mutations in 20 pairs (18 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, one adenosquamous carcinoma and one adenocarcinoma of tumor/surrounding normal tissue of esophageal cancers, using temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, followed by direct DNA sequencing to identify the mutations. Results Fourteen somatic mtDNA mutations were identified in 55% (11/20 of tumors analyzed, including 2 novel missense mutations and a frameshift mutation in ND4L, ATP6 subunit, and ND4 genes respectively. Nine mutations (64% were in the D-loop region. Numerous germline variations were found, at least 10 of them were novel and five were missense mutations, some of them occurred in evolutionarily conserved domains. Using real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the mtDNA content was found to increase in some tumors and decrease in others. Analysis of molecular and other clinicopathological findings does not reveal significant correlation between somatic mtDNA mutations and mtDNA content, or between mtDNA content and metastatic status. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancers are frequent. Some missense and frameshift mutations may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of esophageal carcinoma. More extensive biochemical and molecular studies will be necessary to determine the pathological significance of these somatic mutations.

  14. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Elizaveta S; Skorodumova, Elena N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Volkova, Irina V; Stepanova, Elena V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N=88) and tritium β-radiation (N=88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the circulating cfDNA as compared with the cfDNA of non-exposed people (N=109). Such index that simultaneously displays both the increase of rDNA content and decrease of satellite III content in the cfDNA (RrDNA/RsatIII) can be recommended as a marker of chronic processes in the body that involve the elevated cell death rate and/or increased blood plasma endonuclease activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. rDNA mapping, heterochromatin characterization and AT/GC content of Agapanthus africanus (L. Hoffmanns (Agapanthaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARYANE C. REIS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Agapanthus (Agapanthaceae has 10 species described. However, most taxonomists differ respect to this number because the great phenotypic plasticity of the species. The cytogenetic has been an important tool to aid the plant taxon identification, and to date, all taxa of Agapanthus L'Héritier studied cytologically, presented 2n = 30. Although the species possess large chromosomes, the group is karyologically little explored. This work aimed to increase the cytogenetic knowledge of Agapanthus africanus (L. Hoffmanns by utilization of chromosome banding techniques with DAPI / CMA3 and Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH. In addition, flow cytometry was used for determination of DNA content and the percentage of AT / GC nitrogenous bases. Plants studied showed 2n = 30 chromosomes, ranging from 4.34 - 8.55 µm, with the karyotype formulae (KF = 10m + 5sm. Through FISH, one 45S rDNA signal was observed proximally to centromere of the chromosome 7, while for 5S rDNA sites we observed one signal proximally to centromere of chromosome 9. The 2C DNA content estimated for the species was 2C = 24.4 with 59% of AT and 41% of GC. Our data allowed important upgrade for biology and cytotaxonomy of Agapanthus africanus (L. Hoffmanns.

  16. Karyotype analysis, DNA content and molecular screening in Lippia alba (Verbenaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M.O. Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analyses, of pollen viability, nuclear DNA content and RAPD markers were employed to study three chemotypes of Lippia alba (Mill. (Verbenaceae in order to understand the genetic variation among them. Different ploidy levels and mixoploid individuals were observed. This work comprises the first report of different chromosome numbers (cytotypes in L. alba. The chromosome numbers of La2-carvone and La3-linalool chemotypes suggested that they are polyploids. Flow cytometric analysis showed an increase of nuclear DNA content that was not directly proportional to ploidy level variation. A cluster analysis based on RAPD markers revealed that La3-linalool shares genetic markers with La1-citral and La2-carvone. The analysis showed that the majority of genetic variation of La3-linalool could be a consequence of ixoploidy. ur data indicates that sexual reproduction aong those three chemotypes is unlikely and suggests the beginning of reproductive isolation. The results demonstrated that chromosome analysis, nuclear DNA content estimation and RAPD markers constitute excellent tools for detecting genetic variation among L. alba chemotypes.Análises citogenéticas, de viabilidade do pólen, do conteúdo de DNA nuclear e marcadores RAPD foram empregadas no estudo de três quimiotipos de Lippia alba (Mill. (Verbenaceae visando contribuir para o entendimento da variação genética entre os mesmos. Diferentes níveis de ploidia e indivíduos mixoploides foram observados. Este trabalho compreende o primeiro relato de diferentes números cromossômicos (citótipos em L. alba. Os números cromossômicos dos quimiotipos La2-carvona e La3-linalol sugere que eles seja poliploides. A análise da citometria de fluxo mostrou um aumento do conteúdo de DNA nuclear que não foi diretamente proporcional à variação no nível de ploidia. A análise de agrupamento baseada nos marcadores RAPD demonstrou que La3-linalol compartilha marcadores genéticos com La1

  17. Micromechanics of base pair unzipping in the DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Sergey N; Paramonova, Ekaterina V; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Solov’yov, Andrey V

    2012-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA duplex unzipping in a water environment were performed. The investigated DNA double helix consists of a Drew-Dickerson dodecamer sequence and a hairpin (AAG) attached to the end of the double-helix chain. The considered system is used to examine the process of DNA strand separation under the action of an external force. This process occurs in vivo and now is being intensively investigated in experiments with single molecules. The DNA dodecamer duplex is consequently unzipped pair by pair by means of the steered MD. The unzipping trajectories turn out to be similar for the duplex parts with G⋅C content and rather distinct for the parts with A⋅T content. It is shown that during the unzipping each pair experiences two types of motion: relatively quick rotation together with all the duplex and slower motion in the frame of the unzipping fork. In the course of opening, the complementary pair passes through several distinct states: (i) the closed state in the double helix, (ii) the metastable preopened state in the unzipping fork and (iii) the unbound state. The performed simulations show that water molecules participate in the stabilization of the metastable states of the preopened base pairs in the DNA unzipping fork. (paper)

  18. Karyotype and nuclear DNA content of Trichomycterus areolatus (Siluriformes, Trichomycteridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Colihueque

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis of Trichomycterus areolatus, collected from the Tijeral and Huilma Rivers in southern Chile has shown a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 54, a fundamental number of FN = 106, and a karyotypic formula of 44m + 8sm + 2st. Intra-individual polymorphism of chromosome number (2n = 54, 55 and 56 in specimens from the Huilma River has also been documented, providing further evidence of the occurrence of this phenomenon in Trichomycterus. The karyotype exhibited large chromosome pairs: metacentric pairs 1 (relative length 7.54%, 2 (5.75% and 3 (5.09%, submetacentric pair 23 (5.25%, and subtelocentic pair 27 (5.28%. Nuclear DNA content analysis showed an average value of 5.04 ± 1.09 pg/nucleus. This DNA content is higher than the mean value described for other species in this genus.

  19. Cytological study of DNA content and nuclear morphometric analysis for aid in the diagnosis of high-grade dysplasia within oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Xiao, Xuan; Wu, Wenyan; Shen, Xuemin; Zhou, Zengtong; Liu, Wei; Shi, Linjun

    2017-09-01

    To quantitatively examine the DNA content and nuclear morphometric status of oral leukoplakia (OL) and investigate its association with the degree of dysplasia in a cytologic study. Oral cytobrush biopsy was carried out to obtain exfoliative epithelial cells from lesions before scalpel biopsy at the same location in a blinded series of 70 patients with OL. Analysis of nuclear morphometry and DNA content status using image cytometry was performed with oral smears stained with the Feulgen-thionin method. Nuclear morphometric analysis revealed significant differences in DNA content amount, DNA index, nuclear area, nuclear radius, nuclear intensity, sphericity, entropy, and fractal dimension (all P content analysis identified 34 patients with OL (48.6%) with DNA content abnormality. Nonhomogeneous lesion (P = .018) and high-grade dysplasia (P = .008) were significantly associated with abnormal DNA content. Importantly, the positive correlation between the degree of oral dysplasia and DNA content status was significant (P = .004, correlation coefficient = 0.342). Cytology analysis of DNA content and nuclear morphometric status using image cytometry may support their use as a screening and monitoring tool for OL progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  1. Chromosome numbers and DNA content in some species of Mecardonia (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, María M.; Angulo, María B.; Greppi, Julián A.; Bugallo, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic characterization and determination of DNA content by flow cytometry of five species of Mecardonia Ruiz et Pavon, 1798 (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae) was performed. This is the first study of nuclear DNA content carried out in the genus. Mitotic analysis revealed a base chromosome number x = 11 for all entities and different ploidy levels, ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 22) to hexaploid (2n = 6x = 66). The results include the first report of the chromosome numbers for Mecardonia flagellaris (Chamisso & Schlechtendal, 1827) (2n = 22), Mecardonia grandiflora (Bentham) Pennell, 1946 (2n = 22), Mecardonia kamogawae Greppi & Hagiwara, 2011 (2n = 66), and Mecardonia sp. (2n = 44). The three ploidy levels here reported suggest that polyploidy is common in Mecardonia and appear to be an important factor in the evolution of this genus. The 2C- and 1Cx-values were also estimated in all the species. The 2C-values ranged from 1.91 to 5.29 pg. The 1Cx-values ranged from 0.88 to 1.03 pg. The general tendency indicated a decrease in the 1Cx-value with increasing ploidy level. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to taxonomy of the genus. PMID:28123693

  2. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of DNA quality of frozen beef based on DNA yield, gel electrophoresis and PCR amplification and their correlations to beef quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Xingyu; Zhang, Lan; Ku, Ting; Quek, Siew Young

    2018-09-15

    Freezing is a practical method for meat preservation but the quality of frozen meat can deteriorate with storage time. This research investigated the effect of frozen storage time (up to 66 months) on changes in DNA yield, purity and integrity in beef, and further analyzed the correlation between beef quality (moisture content, protein content, TVB-N value and pH value) and DNA quality in an attempt to establish a reliable, high-throughput method for meat quality control. Results showed that frozen storage time influenced the yield and integrity of DNA significantly (p quality degraded dramatically with the increased storage time based on gel electrophoresis results. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) were observed in all frozen beef samples. Using real-time PCR for quantitative assessment of DNA and meat quality revealed that correlations could be established successfully with mathematical models to evaluate frozen beef quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnekow Angelika

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms.

  4. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-05-29

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms.

  5. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  6. Differentiation of the guinea pig eye: nuclear ultrastructure, template activity and DNA content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalenberger, B.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclei of various cell types in the eye of embryonal and adult Guinea pigs were studied by means of electron microscopy, cytophotometry and autoradiography. Striking differences in condensation and arrangement of chromatin were found between the different tissues and cells. Several nuclear types were analyzed quantitatively with regard to their content of condensed and decondensed chromatin by means of electron microscopic morphometry. Structural differences in chromatin organization coincided with different nuclear DNA contents in various cell types of the retina, such as bipolar cells, Mueller cells, rods and cones, and the pigmented epithelium. The differences between DNA-Feulgen means obtained by cytophotometric analysis were highly significant. Template activity as shown by 3 H-uridine incorporation made evident than the rate of RNA synthesis is positively correlated with the quantity of decondensed chromatin. It is speculated that differentiation of the Guinea pig eye involves differential DNA synthesis, and that the extra-DNA could have some ''trigger'' function for the pattern of chromatin condensation and thus the pattern of gene expression. (author)

  7. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  8. Nuclear DNA content of the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum Sw. with the analysis of flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upatham Meesawat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear DNA content for the adult plants grown in a greenhouse and in vitro young plantlets of the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum Sw. was analyzed using flow cytometry. The resulting 2C DNA values ranged from 2.30±0.14 pgto 2.43±0.06 pg. However, nuclear DNA ploidy levels of long-term in vitro plantlets were found to be triploid and tetraploid.These ploidy levels were confirmed by chromosome counting. Tetraploid individuals (2n = 4x = 76 had approximately two times DNA content than diploid (2n = 2x = 38 individuals. This variation may be due to prolonged cultivation and thepresence of exogenous plant growth regulators.

  9. Alterations of DNA content in human endometrial stromal cells transfected with a temperature-sensitive SV40: tetraploidization and physiological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, C A; Mayben, J P; Butler, T D; Haskill, J S; Kaufman, D G

    1992-01-01

    The normal genomic stability of human cells is reversed during neoplastic transformation. The SV40 large T antigen alters the DNA content in human endometrial stromal cells in a manner that relates to neoplastic progression. Human endometrial stromal cells were transfected with a plasmid containing the A209 temperature-sensitive mutant of SV40 (tsSV40), which is also defective in the viral origin of replication. Ninety-seven clonal transfectants from seven different primary cell strains were isolated. Initial analysis revealed that 20% of the clonal populations (19/97) had an apparent diploid DNA content, 35% (34/97) had an apparent tetraploid DNA content, and the remainder were mixed populations of diploid and tetraploid cells. No aneuploid populations were observed. Diploid tsSV40 transformed cells always give rise to a population of cells with a tetraploid DNA content when continuously cultured at the permissive temperature. The doubling of DNA content can be vastly accelerated by the sudden reintroduction of large T antigen activity following a shift from non-permissive to permissive temperature. Tetraploid tsSV40 transfected cells have a lower capacity for anchorage-independent growth and earlier entry into 'crisis' than diploid cells. These results indicate that during the pre-crisis, extended lifespan phase of growth, the SV40 large T antigen causes a doubling of DNA content. This apparent doubling of DNA content does not confer growth advantage during the extended lifespan that precedes 'crisis'.

  10. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, O A; Pyshnyi, D V

    2012-01-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  11. Content of DNA in cancerous tumours of the breast before and after large-fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiukashvili, N N

    1976-07-01

    The article presents the results of microspectrophotometric investigation of DNA in different cancerous tumors of the breast gland before and after large-fractionated irradiation. The study of quantitative content of DNA in the non-irradiated tumors of the breast of different histological structure showed that parenchymatous cells are characterized by a definite variety in the DNA content with a different level of their polyploidy. This points to the fact that different histological forms of the breast cancer are distinguished by the character of the components differentiation. The comparative assessment of the ploidity of the cancerous cells of irradiated and non-irradiated tumors revealed that under the changed conditions of co-existence in all histological forms of cancer new modal classes of the cells develop and general quantity of the DNA content decreases. This testifies to the fact that the histological forms of the breast cancer are not equal sensitive tumors. A microspectrophotometric study of the breast tumors makes it possible to reveal the injury of the malignant tumor cells in the initial period of irradiation, when it is difficult to discover clear-cut dystrophical changes during histological investigation.

  12. 99Tcm-MIBI imaging in diagnosing benign/malign pulmonary disease and analysis of lung cancer DNA content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yanlin; Tan Jiaju; Yang Jie; Zhu Zheng; Yu Fengwen; He Xiaohong; Huang Kemin; Yuan Baihong; Su Shaodi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) lung imaging in diagnosing benign/malign pulmonary disease and the relation of 99 Tc m -MIBI uptake ratio (UR) with lung cancer DNA content. Methods: Early and delay imaging were performed on 27 cases of benign lung disease and 46 cases of malign lung disease. Visual analysis of the images and T/N uptake ratio measurement were performed on every case. Cancer cell DNA content and DNA index (DI) were measured in 24 cases of malign pulmonary disease. Results: The delay phase UR was 1.13 ± 0.19 in benign disease group, and the delay phase UR was 1.45 ± 0.21 in malign disease group (t6.51, P 99 Tc m -MIBI is not an ideal imaging agent for differentiating pulmonary benign/malign disease. Lung cancer DNA content may be reflected by delay phase UR

  13. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Tyler J; Patel, Rooshil M; McClintock, Timothy S; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A; McCarthy, John J

    2016-03-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (transcriptional activity. Finally, transcription was primarily responsible for changes in the expression of genes known to regulate myofiber size. These findings show that resident myonuclei possess a significant reserve capacity to up-regulate transcription during hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy. © 2016 Kirby et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Investigations on the influence of radiation with variable linear energy transfer (LET) on the DNA-content and DNA-repair-mechanisms in Vicia faba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckl, P.

    1981-01-01

    This study was initiated to investigate, whether there are any radiation-induced changes in DNA-content and if these changes can be repaired. Seeds of Vicia faba L. were grown in glass culture vessels. After 10 to 20 days the seedings were irradiated using a 1 C1 60 Co gammasource (90mrad/h and 33 rad/h) and a 5 mCi 252 Cf neutronsource (90 mrad/h). Both, neutron and gamma irradiation cause a reduction in nuclear DNA-content even after low doses (1 to 10 rad). The extent of depression is only depending on linear energy transfer. Parallel to the induced minimum in DNA-content, but shifted to higher doses, also the mitotic activity reaches a minimum. Whereas neutron irradiation results in a total stop after doses of 8 rad, gamma-irradiation only induces a depression of 80 %. Whith higher doses the mitotic activity increases again. The neutron-induced changes in DNA-content seem to be restored within 90 minutes after irradiation. No continuous increase could be found after low gamma-doses. Gamma-irradiation with higher dose rates ( 60 Co, 33 rad/h) causes a general decrease over the dose-range studied (100 to 1600 rad). Following doses of 100 rad the mitotic activity increases significantly. With higher doses the decrease is exponential. A dose-dependent mitotic delay could also be observed. As described by many authors, unscheduled DNA-synthesis (UDS) could not be detected in nuclei of Vicia faba. This indicates that an other system, perhaps acting in situ - at the damaged place - is responsible for the repair of radiation-induced thymine-damages. (Author)

  15. Localization-based super-resolution imaging meets high-content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghin, Anne; Kechkar, Adel; Butler, Corey; Levet, Florian; Cabillic, Marine; Rossier, Olivier; Giannone, Gregory; Galland, Rémi; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-12-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy techniques have proven to be essential tools for quantitatively monitoring biological processes at unprecedented spatial resolution. However, these techniques are very low throughput and are not yet compatible with fully automated, multiparametric cellular assays. This shortcoming is primarily due to the huge amount of data generated during imaging and the lack of software for automation and dedicated data mining. We describe an automated quantitative single-molecule-based super-resolution methodology that operates in standard multiwell plates and uses analysis based on high-content screening and data-mining software. The workflow is compatible with fixed- and live-cell imaging and allows extraction of quantitative data like fluorophore photophysics, protein clustering or dynamic behavior of biomolecules. We demonstrate that the method is compatible with high-content screening using 3D dSTORM and DNA-PAINT based super-resolution microscopy as well as single-particle tracking.

  16. Histogram score contributes for reliability of DNA content estimatives in Brachiaria spp Notas do histograma contribuem para a confiabilidade das estimativas do conteúdo de DNA de Brachiaria spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Oliveira Timbó

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry allows to estimate the DNA content of a large number of plants quickly. However, inadequate protocols can compromise the reliability of these estimates leading to variations in the values of DNA content the same species. The objective of this study was to propose an efficient protocol to estimate the DNA content of Brachiaria spp. genotypes with different ploidy levels using flow cytometry. We evaluated four genotypes (B. ruziziensis diploid and artificially tetraploidized; a tetraploid B. brizantha and a natural triploid hybrid, three buffer solutions (MgSO4, Galbraith and Tris-HCl and three species as internal reference standards (Raphanus sativus, Solanum lycopersicum e Pisum sativum. The variables measured were: histogram score (1-5, coefficient of variation and estimation of DNA content. The best combination for the analysis of Brachiaria spp. DNA content was the use of MgSO4 buffer with R. sativus as a internal reference standard. Genome sizes expressed in picograms of DNA are presented for all genotypes and the importance of the histogram score on the results reliability of DNA content analyses were discussed.A citometria de fluxo permite estimar o conteúdo de DNA de um grande número de plantas rapidamente. No entanto, protocolos inadequados podem comprometer a confiabilidade dessas estimativas, levando a variações nos valores de conteúdo de DNA para uma mesma espécie. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se propor um protocolo eficiente para a estimativa do conteúdo de DNA de genótipos de Brachiaria spp. com diferentes níveis de ploidia, utilizando a citometria de fluxo. Foram avaliados quatro genótipos (B. ruziziensis, diploide e tetraploidizada artificialmente; B. brizantha tetraploide e um híbrido natural triploide, 3 soluções tampões (MgSO4, Galbraith e Tris-HCl e três espécies como padrões de referência interno (Raphanus sativus, Solanum lycopersicum e Pisum sativum. As variáveis mensuradas foram: nota do

  17. The photoreaction between furocoumarins and various DNA with different base compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'Acqua, F.; Vedaldi, D.; Recher, M.

    1978-01-01

    The photoreactivity of psoralen and 8-methylpsoralen towards various samples of DNA having different base-pair compositions has been studied. The total photobinding capacity shown by the two furocoumarins increases by increasing the content of A-T, confirming the data previously obtained using synthetic polynucleotides. The amount of monofunctional fluorescent 4',5'-cycloadducts and of the cross-linkages formed during the photoreaction is not parallel to the content of A-T, but is highest when the A-T content is between 50 and 60%, while it decreases as the content of A-T is lowered or increased. The possible binding site for the formation of 4',5'-monofunctional cycloadducts as well as of cross-linkages is discussed. (author)

  18. An association analysis between mitochondrial DNA content, G10398A polymorphism, HPV infection, and the prognosis of cervical cancer in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dali; Xu, Hui; Li, Xin; Wei, Yuehua; Jiang, Huangang; Xu, Hong; Luo, Aihua; Zhou, Fuxiang

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to analyze quantitative (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content) and qualitative (G10398A polymorphism) mtDNA alterations as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in cervical cancer prognosis. One hundred and twenty-two cases of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical carcinoma specimens were collected from the Yichang Tumor Hospital and Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University in the recent 10 years together with medical records. A quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to determine the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA and HPV expression levels. G10398A polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP assay. The overall survival of patients with higher mtDNA content was significantly reduced compared with lower mtDNA content patients (P = 0.029). But there was no difference of prognosis between the mtDNA 10398 A allele and G allele. However, the Kaplan-Meier survival curve illustrated a significantly reduced overall survival in the patients with 10398A plus high mtDNA copy number compared with the other groups (P content compared with 10398G (P content were positively related in the younger subgroup (≤45 years) (correlation coefficient = 0.456, P = 0.022). This study indicated that mtDNA content and HPV infection status are associated with cervical cancer prognosis. High mitochondrial DNA content plus 10398 A may be a marker of poor prognosis in cervical cancer. And mtDNA variation may potentially influence the predisposition to HPV infection and cervical carcinogenesis.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA content in embryo culture medium is significantly associated with human embryo fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliani, S; Anserini, P; Venturini, P L; Scaruffi, P

    2013-10-01

    Is the amount of cell-free DNA released by human embryos into culture medium correlated with embryo morphological features? The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content of culture medium is significantly associated with the fragmentation rate on Days 2 and 3 of embryo development, whether the oocyte came from women ≤ 35 or >35 years old. Cellular fragmentation is often utilized as one of the morphological parameters for embryo quality assessment. The amount of cellular fragments is considered to be an important morphological parameter for embryo implantation potential. It has been hypothesized that fragments are apoptotic bodies or anuclear cytoplasmatic pieces of blastomeres, although no definitive conclusion has been drawn about their pathogenesis. Human fertilized oocytes were individually cultured from Day 1 to Days 2 and 3. A total of 800 samples (166 spent media from Day 2 and 634 from Day 3) were enrolled into the present study. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified in 800 spent embryo culture media by Pico Green dye fluorescence assay. After DNA purification, genomic DNA (gDNA) and mtDNA were profiled by specific quantitative PCR. Statistical analyses defined correlations among DNA contents, embryo morphology and maternal age. Different independent tests confirmed the presence of DNA into embryo culture medium and, for the first time, we demonstrate that both gDNA and mtDNA are detectable in the secretome. The amount of DNA is larger in embryos with bad quality cleavage compared with high-grade embryos, suggesting that the DNA profile of culture medium is an objective marker for embryo quality assessment. In particular, DNA profiles are significantly associated with fragmentation feature (total dsDNA: P = 0.0010; mtDNA; P = 0.0247) and advanced maternal age. It is necessary to establish whether DNA profiling of spent embryo culture medium is a robust onsite test that can improve the prediction of blastulation, implantation and/or pregnancy rate. The

  20. Mitochondrial DNA and STR analyses for human DNA from maggots crop contents: a forensic entomology case from central-southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Cai, J F; Guo, Y D; Xiong, F; Zhang, L; Feng, H; Meng, F M; Fu, Y; Li, J B; Chen, Y Q

    2011-08-01

    Insect larvae and adult insects found on human corpses can provide important forensic evidence however it is useful to be able to prove evidence of association. Without this, it could be claimed that the insect evidence was a contaminant or had been planted on the body. This paper describes how mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and STR analysis of the crop contents of larvae of the blowfly Aldrichina grahami collected from separated body parts was used to provide evidence of association.

  1. Prenatal Ambient Air Pollution, Placental Mitochondrial DNA Content, and Birth Weight in the INMA (Spain) and ENVIRONAGE (Belgium) Birth Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Diana B.P.; Casas, Maribel; Vilahur, Nadia; Begiristain, Haizea; Bustamante, Mariona; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Fernández, Mariana F.; Fierens, Frans; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Iñiguez, Carmen; Janssen, Bram G.; Lefebvre, Wouter; Llop, Sabrina; Olea, Nicolás; Pedersen, Marie; Pieters, Nicky; Santa Marina, Loreto; Souto, Ana; Tardón, Adonina; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Vrijheid, Martine; Sunyer, Jordi; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondria are sensitive to environmental toxicants due to their lack of repair capacity. Changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content may represent a biologically relevant intermediate outcome in mechanisms linking air pollution and fetal growth restriction. Objective: We investigated whether placental mtDNA content is a possible mediator of the association between prenatal nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure and birth weight. Methods: We used data from two independent European cohorts: INMA (n = 376; Spain) and ENVIRONAGE (n = 550; Belgium). Relative placental mtDNA content was determined as the ratio of two mitochondrial genes (MT-ND1 and MTF3212/R3319) to two control genes (RPLP0 and ACTB). Effect estimates for individual cohorts and the pooled data set were calculated using multiple linear regression and mixed models. We also performed a mediation analysis. Results: Pooled estimates indicated that a 10-μg/m3 increment in average NO2 exposure during pregnancy was associated with a 4.9% decrease in placental mtDNA content (95% CI: –9.3, –0.3%) and a 48-g decrease (95% CI: –87, –9 g) in birth weight. However, the association with birth weight was significant for INMA (–66 g; 95% CI: –111, –23 g) but not for ENVIRONAGE (–20 g; 95% CI: –101, 62 g). Placental mtDNA content was associated with significantly higher mean birth weight (pooled analysis, interquartile range increase: 140 g; 95% CI: 43, 237 g). Mediation analysis estimates, which were derived for the INMA cohort only, suggested that 10% (95% CI: 6.6, 13.0 g) of the association between prenatal NO2 and birth weight was mediated by changes in placental mtDNA content. Conclusion: Our results suggest that mtDNA content can be one of the potential mediators of the association between prenatal air pollution exposure and birth weight. Citation: Clemente DB, Casas M, Vilahur N, Begiristain H, Bustamante M, Carsin AE, Fernández MF, Fierens F, Gyselaers W, Iñiguez C, Janssen BG

  2. DNA-Based Applications in Nanobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Abu-Salah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological molecules such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA have shown great potential in fabrication and construction of nanostructures and devices. The very properties that make DNA so effective as genetic material also make it a very suitable molecule for programmed self-assembly. The use of DNA to assemble metals or semiconducting particles has been extended to construct metallic nanowires and functionalized nanotubes. This paper highlights some important aspects of conjugating the unique physical properties of dots or wires with the remarkable recognition capabilities of DNA which could lead to miniaturizing biological electronics and optical devices, including biosensors and probes. Attempts to use DNA-based nanocarriers for gene delivery are discussed. In addition, the ecological advantages and risks of nanotechnology including DNA-based nanobiotechnology are evaluated.

  3. Cytometric analysis of mammalian sperm for induced morphologic and DNA content errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkel, D.

    1983-01-01

    Some flow-cytometric and image analysis procedures under development for quantitative analysis of sperm morphology are reviewed. The results of flow-cytometric DNA-content measurements on sperm from radiation exposed mice are also summarized, the results related to the available cytological information, and their potential dosimetric sensitivity discussed

  4. Genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEMEN SURAHMAN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas B, Renwarin Y, Bintoro MH, Sudarsono, Surahman M, Ehara H (2010 Genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers. Biodiversitas 11: 112-117. Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu Rottb. was believed capable to accumulate high carbohydrate content in its trunk. The capability of sago palm producing high carbohydrate should be an appropriate criterion for defining alternative crops in anticipating food crisis. The objective of this research was to study genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on cpDNA markers. Total genome extraction was done following the Qiagen DNA isolation protocols 2003. Single Nucleotide Fragments (SNF analyses were performed by using ABI Prism GeneScanR 3.7. SNF analyses detected polymorphism revealing eleven alleles and ten haplotypes from total 97 individual samples of sago palm. Specific haplotypes were found in the population from Papua, Sulawesi, and Kalimantan. Therefore, the three islands will be considered as origin of sago palm diversities in Indonesia. The highest haplotype numbers and the highest specific haplotypes were found in the population from Papua suggesting this islands as the centre and the origin of sago palm diversities in Indonesia. The research had however no sufficient data yet to conclude the Papua origin of sago palm. Genetic hierarchies and differentiations of sago palm samples were observed significantly different within populations (P=0.04574, among populations (P=0.04772, and among populations within the island (P=0.03366, but among islands no significant differentiations were observed (P= 0.63069.

  5. Raman study of CaDNA films as a function of water content and excess CaCl2 concentration: Stability of the B conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenker, Megan; Marlowe, Robert; Lee, Scott; Rupprecht, Allan

    2006-03-01

    Highly oriented, wet-spun films of CaDNA expand in the direction perpendicular to the helical axis as the hydration of the film is increased. CaDNA films with a high CaCl2 content show an unexpected shrinkage at a relative humidity of about 93%. We have performed Raman experiments on CaDNA films as a function of both water content and excess CaCl2 concentration in order to determine if this unexpected shrinkage might be related to a conformational transition of the DNA molecules. We find that the DNA molecules remain in the B conformation for all salt contents down to a relative humidity of 59%.

  6. [A study on the relationship between postmortem interval and the changes of DNA content in the kidney cellule of rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Peng, D B; Liu, Y; Deng, W N; Liu, Y L; Li, J J

    2001-05-01

    To study changes of DNA content in the kidney cellule of rats and relationship with the postmortem interval. This experiment chose seven parameter of cell nuclear, including the area and integral optical density, determined the changes of DNA content in the kidney cellule of 15 rats at different intervals between 0 and 48 h postmortem with auto-TV-image system. The degradation rate of DNA in nuclear has a certainty relationship to early PMI(in 48 h) of rat, and get binomial regress equation. Determining the quantity of DNA in nuclear should be an objective and exact way to estimate the PMI.

  7. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  8. Content-based intermedia synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Young; Sampath-Kumar, Srihari; Rangan, P. Venkat

    1995-03-01

    Inter-media synchronization methods developed until now have been based on syntactic timestamping of video frames and audio samples. These methods are not fully appropriate for the synchronization of multimedia objects which may have to be accessed individually by their contents, e.g. content-base data retrieval. We propose a content-based multimedia synchronization scheme in which a media stream is viewed as hierarchial composition of smaller objects which are logically structured based on the contents, and the synchronization is achieved by deriving temporal relations among logical units of media object. content-based synchronization offers several advantages such as, elimination of the need for time stamping, freedom from limitations of jitter, synchronization of independently captured media objects in video editing, and compensation for inherent asynchronies in capture times of video and audio.

  9. Hide and seek: How do DNA glycosylases locate oxidatively damaged DNA bases amidst a sea of undamaged bases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrea J; Wallace, Susan S

    2017-06-01

    The first step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway responsible for removing oxidative DNA damage utilizes DNA glycosylases to find and remove the damaged DNA base. How glycosylases find the damaged base amidst a sea of undamaged bases has long been a question in the BER field. Single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM TIRFM) experiments have allowed for an exciting look into this search mechanism and have found that DNA glycosylases scan along the DNA backbone in a bidirectional and random fashion. By comparing the search behavior of bacterial glycosylases from different structural families and with varying substrate specificities, it was found that glycosylases search for damage by periodically inserting a wedge residue into the DNA stack as they redundantly search tracks of DNA that are 450-600bp in length. These studies open up a wealth of possibilities for further study in real time of the interactions of DNA glycosylases and other BER enzymes with various DNA substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Standards-based Content Resources: A Prerequisite for Content Integration and Content Interoperability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Galinski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to show how standards-based approaches for content standardization, content management, content related services and tools as well as the respective certification systems not only guarantee reliable content integration and content interoperability, but also are of particular benefit to people with special needs in eAccessibility/eInclusion. Method: document MoU/MG/05 N0221 ''Semantic Interoperability and the need for a coherent policy for a framework of distributed, possibly federated repositories for all kinds of content items on a world-wide scale''2, which was adopted in 2005, was a first step towards the formulation of global interoperability requirements for structured content. These requirements -based on advanced terminological principles- were taken up in EU-projects such as IN-SAFETY (INfrastructure and SAFETY and OASIS (Open architecture for Accessible Services Integration and Standardization. Results: Content integration and content interoperability are key concepts in connection with the emergence of state-of-the-art distributed and federated databases/repositories of structured content. Given the fact that linguistic content items are increasingly combined with or embedded in non-linguistic content items (and vice versa, a systemic and generic approach to data modelling and content management has become the order of the day. Fulfilling the requirements of capability for multilinguality and multimodality, based on open standards makes software and database design fit for eAccessibility/eInclusion from the outset. It also makes structured content capable for global content integration and content interoperability, because it enhances its potential for being re-used and re-purposed in totally different eApplications. Such content as well as the methods, tools and services applied can be subject to new kinds of certification schemes which also should be based on standards. Conclusions: Content must be totally reliable in some

  11. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    Free radicals produced during the radiolysis of water gives rise to a plethora of DNA damages including single strand breaks, sites of base loss and a wide variety of purine and pyrimidine base lesions. All these damages are processed in cells by base excision repair. The oxidative DNA glycosylases which catalyze the first step in the removal of a base damage during base excision repair evolved primarily to protect the cells from the deleterious mutagenic effects of single free radical-induced DNA lesions arising during oxidative metabolism. This is evidenced by the high spontaneous mutation rate in bacterial mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases. However, when a low LET photon transverses the DNA molecule, a burst of free radicals is produced during the radiolysis of water that leads to the formation of clustered damages in the DNA molecule, that are recognized by the oxidative DNA glycosylases. When substrates containing two closely opposed sugar damages or base and sugar damages are incubated with the oxidative DNA glycosylases in vitro, one strand is readily incised by the lyase activity of the DNA glycosylase. Whether or not the second strand is incised depends on the distance between the strand break resulting from the incised first strand and the remaining DNA lesion on the other strand. If the lesions are more than two or three base pairs apart, the second strand is readily cleaved by the DNA glycosylase, giving rise to a double strand break. Even if the entire base excision repair system is reconstituted in vitro, whether or not a double strand break ensues depends solely upon the ability of the DNA glycosylase to cleave the second strand. These data predicted that cells deficient in the oxidative DNA glycosylases would be radioresistant while those that overproduce an oxidative DNA glycosylase would be radiosensitive. This prediction was indeed borne in Escherichia coli that is, mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radioresistant

  12. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids. PMID:24751596

  13. [Single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication based on DNA origami].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Youjie; Li, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) as the template of DNA replication was attached to DNA origami by a hybridization reaction based on the complementary base-pairing principle. DNA replication catalyzed by E.coli DNA polymerase I Klenow Fragment (KF) was detected using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The height variations between the ssDNA and the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the distribution of KF during DNA replication and biotin-streptavidin (BA) complexes on the DNA strand after replication were detected. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to analyze the changes in the DNA after replication. The designed ssDNA could be anchored on the target positions of over 50% of the DNA origami. The KF was capable of binding to the ssDNA fixed on DNA origami and performing its catalytic activities, and was finally dissociated from the DNA after replication. The height of DNA strand increased by about 0.7 nm after replication. The addition of streptavidin also resulted in an DNA height increase to about 4.9 nm due to the formation of BA complexes on the biotinylated dsDNA. The resulting dsDNA and BA complex were subsequently confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of AFM and DNA origami allows detection and characterization of DNA replication at the single molecule level, and this approach provides better insights into the mechanism of DNA polymerase and the factors affecting DNA replication.

  14. NSAIDs modulate CDKN2A, TP53, and DNA content risk for progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C Galipeau

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Somatic genetic CDKN2A, TP53, and DNA content abnormalities are common in many human cancers and their precursors, including esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA and Barrett's esophagus (BE, conditions for which aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been proposed as possible chemopreventive agents; however, little is known about the ability of a biomarker panel to predict progression to cancer nor how NSAID use may modulate progression. We aimed to evaluate somatic genetic abnormalities with NSAIDs as predictors of EA in a prospective cohort study of patients with BE.Esophageal biopsies from 243 patients with BE were evaluated at baseline for TP53 and CDKN2A (p16 alterations, tetraploidy, and aneuploidy using sequencing; loss of heterozygosity (LOH; methylation-specific PCR; and flow cytometry. At 10 y, all abnormalities, except CDKN2A mutation and methylation, contributed to EA risk significantly by univariate analysis, ranging from 17p LOH (relative risk [RR] = 10.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.2-21.3, p < 0.001 to 9p LOH (RR = 2.6; 95% CI 1.1-6.0, p = 0.03. A panel of abnormalities including 17p LOH, DNA content tetraploidy and aneuploidy, and 9p LOH was the best predictor of EA (RR = 38.7; 95% CI 10.8-138.5, p < 0.001. Patients with no baseline abnormality had a 12% 10-y cumulative EA incidence, whereas patients with 17p LOH, DNA content abnormalities, and 9p LOH had at least a 79.1% 10-y EA incidence. In patients with zero, one, two, or three baseline panel abnormalities, there was a significant trend toward EA risk reduction among NSAID users compared to nonusers (p = 0.01. The strongest protective effect was seen in participants with multiple genetic abnormalities, with NSAID nonusers having an observed 10-y EA risk of 79%, compared to 30% for NSAID users (p < 0.001.A combination of 17p LOH, 9p LOH, and DNA content abnormalities provided better EA risk prediction than any single TP53, CDKN2A, or DNA content

  15. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A novel automatic quantification method for high-content screening analysis of DNA double strand-break response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingwen; Lin, Jie; Zhang, Pengquan; Yang, Songnan; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2017-08-29

    High-content screening is commonly used in studies of the DNA damage response. The double-strand break (DSB) is one of the most harmful types of DNA damage lesions. The conventional method used to quantify DSBs is γH2AX foci counting, which requires manual adjustment and preset parameters and is usually regarded as imprecise, time-consuming, poorly reproducible, and inaccurate. Therefore, a robust automatic alternative method is highly desired. In this manuscript, we present a new method for quantifying DSBs which involves automatic image cropping, automatic foci-segmentation and fluorescent intensity measurement. Furthermore, an additional function was added for standardizing the measurement of DSB response inhibition based on co-localization analysis. We tested the method with a well-known inhibitor of DSB response. The new method requires only one preset parameter, which effectively minimizes operator-dependent variations. Compared with conventional methods, the new method detected a higher percentage difference of foci formation between different cells, which can improve measurement accuracy. The effects of the inhibitor on DSB response were successfully quantified with the new method (p = 0.000). The advantages of this method in terms of reliability, automation and simplicity show its potential in quantitative fluorescence imaging studies and high-content screening for compounds and factors involved in DSB response.

  17. Determination of Ploidy Level and Nuclear DNA Content in the Droseraceae by Flow Cytometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoshi, Y.; Azumatani, M.; Suyama, T.; Adamec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2017), s. 321-327 ISSN 0011-4545 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : nuclear DNA content * genome size * Droseraceae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2016

  18. Synthesis of furan-based DNA binders and their interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voege, Andrea; Hoffmann, Sascha; Gabel, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many substances, based on naturally occurring DNA-binding molecules have been developed for the use in cancer therapy and as virostatica. Most of these substances are binding specifically to A-T rich sequences in the DNA minor groove. Neutral and positively charged DNA-binders are known. BNCT is most effective, which the boron is directly located in the cellular nucleus, so that the intercation with thermal neutrons can directly damage the DNA. To reach this aim, we have connected ammonioundecahydrododecaborate(1-) to DNA-binding structures such as 2,5-bis(4-formylphenyl)furan via a Schiff-Base reaction followed by a reduction of the imine to a secondary amine. In a following step the amine can be alkylated to insert positive charges to prevent repulsion between the compounds and the negatively charged sugar-phosphate-backbone of the DNA. (author)

  19. Quantification of total phosphorothioate in bacterial DNA by a bromoimane-based fluorescent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Xiang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of phosphorothioate (PT) modifications in bacterial DNA has challenged our understanding of conserved phosphodiester backbone structure of cellular DNA. This exclusive DNA modification in bacteria is not found in animal cells yet, and its biological function in bacteria is still poorly understood. Quantitative information about the bacterial PT modifications is thus important for the investigation of their possible biological functions. In this study, we have developed a simple fluorescence method for selective quantification of total PTs in bacterial DNA, based on fluorescent labeling of PTs and subsequent release of the labeled fluorophores for absolute quantification. The method was highly selective to PTs and not interfered by the presence of reactive small molecules or proteins. The quantification of PTs in an E. coli DNA sample was successfully achieved using our method and gave a result of about 455 PTs per million DNA nucleotides, while almost no detectable PTs were found in a mammalian calf thymus DNA. With this new method, the content of phosphorothioate in bacterial DNA could be successfully quantified, serving as a simple method suitable for routine use in biological phosphorothioate related studies. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Arginine-rich cross-linking peptides with different SV40 nuclear localization signal content as vectors for intranuclear DNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, Mariia; Egorova, Anna; Slita, Anna; Maretina, Marianna; Baranov, Vladislav; Kiselev, Anton

    2017-11-01

    The major barriers for intracellular DNA transportation by cationic polymers are their toxicity, poor endosomal escape and inefficient nuclear uptake. Therefore, we designed novel modular peptide-based carriers modified with SV40 nuclear localization signal (NLS). Core peptide consists of arginine, histidine and cysteine residues for DNA condensation, endosomal escape promotion and interpeptide cross-linking, respectively. We investigated three polyplexes with different NLS content (10 mol%, 50 mol% and 90 mol% of SV40 NLS) as vectors for intranuclear DNA delivery. All carriers tested were able to condense DNA, to protect it from DNAase I and were not toxic to the cells. We observed that cell cycle arrest by hydroxyurea did not affect transfection efficacy of NLS-modified carriers which we confirmed using quantitative confocal microscopy analysis. Overall, peptide carrier modified with 90 mol% of SV40 NLS provided efficient transfection and nuclear uptake in non-dividing cells. Thus, incorporation of NLS into arginine-rich cross-linking peptides is an adequate approach to the development of efficient intranuclear gene delivery vehicles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dihydropyridines decrease X-ray-induced DNA base damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojewodzka, M., E-mail: marylaw@ichtj.waw.pl [Center of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland); Gradzka, I.; Buraczewska, I.; Brzoska, K.; Sochanowicz, B. [Center of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland); Goncharova, R.; Kuzhir, T. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Belarussian National Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus); Szumiel, I. [Center of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland)

    2009-12-01

    Compounds with the structural motif of 1,4-dihydropyridine display a broad spectrum of biological activities, often defined as bioprotective. Among them are L-type calcium channel blockers, however, also derivatives which do not block calcium channels exert various effects at the cellular and organismal levels. We examined the effect of sodium 3,5-bis-ethoxycarbonyl-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-4-carboxylate (denoted here as DHP and previously also as AV-153) on X-ray-induced DNA damage and mutation frequency at the HGPRT (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in Chinese hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells. Using formamido-pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) comet assay, we found that 1-h DHP (10 nM) treatment before X-irradiation considerably reduced the initial level of FPG-recognized DNA base damage, which was consistent with decreased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine content and mutation frequency lowered by about 40%. No effect on single strand break rejoining or on cell survival was observed. Similar base damage-protective effect was observed for two calcium channel blockers: nifedipine (structurally similar to DHP) or verapamil (structurally unrelated). So far, the specificity of the DHP-caused reduction in DNA damage - practically limited to base damage - has no satisfactory explanation.

  2. Correlation of DNA content and nucleomorphometric features with World Health Organization grading of meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, J P; Röhl, F W; Kirches, E; Dietzmann, K

    1998-02-01

    Many studies dealing with extracranial cancer showed a strong correlation of DNA ploidy to a poor clinical outcome, recurrence, or malignancy. In brain tumors, analysis of DNA content did not always provided significant diagnostic information. In this study, DNA density and karyometric parameters of 50 meningiomas (26 Grade I, 10 Grade II, 14 Grade III) were quantitatively evaluated by digital cell image analyses of Feulgen-stained nuclei. In particular, the densitometric parameter SEXT, which describes nuclear DNA content, as well as the morphometric values LENG (a computer-assisted measurement of nuclear circumference), AREA (a computer-assisted measurement of nuclear area), FCON (a parameter that describes nuclear roundness), and CONC (a describing nuclear contour), evaluated with the software IMAGE C, were correlated to World Health Organization (WHO) grading using univariate and multivariate methods. AREA and LENG values showed significant differences between tumors of Grades I and III. FCON values were unable to distinguish WHO Grade III from Grade I/II but were useful in clearly separating Grade II from Grade I tumors. CONC values detected differences between WHO Grades II and I/III tumors but not between the latter. SEXT values clearly distinguished Grade III from Grade I/II tumors. The 1c, 2c, 2.5c, and 5c exceeding rates showed no predictive values. Only the 6c exceeding rate showed a significant difference between Grades I and III. These results outline the characteristic features of the atypical (Grade II) meningiomas, which make them a recognizable tumor entity distinct from benign and anaplastic meningiomas. The combination of DNA densitometric and morphometric findings seems to be a powerful addition to the histopathologic classification of meningiomas, as suggested by the WHO.

  3. DNA interaction with platinum-based cytostatics revealed by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerkova, Kristyna; Vaculovic, Tomas; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Kynicky, Jindrich; Brtnicky, Martin; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-12-15

    The main mechanism of action of platinum-based cytostatic drugs - cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin - is the formation of DNA cross-links, which restricts the transcription due to the disability of DNA to enter the active site of the polymerase. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed as a simplified model of the amplification process in the cell nucleus. PCR with fluorescently labelled dideoxynucleotides commonly employed for DNA sequencing was used to monitor the effect of platinum-based cytostatics on DNA in terms of decrease in labeling efficiency dependent on a presence of the DNA-drug cross-link. It was found that significantly different amounts of the drugs - cisplatin (0.21 μg/mL), oxaliplatin (5.23 μg/mL), and carboplatin (71.11 μg/mL) - were required to cause the same quenching effect (50%) on the fluorescent labelling of 50 μg/mL of DNA. Moreover, it was found that even though the amounts of the drugs was applied to the reaction mixture differing by several orders of magnitude, the amount of incorporated platinum, quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, was in all cases at the level of tenths of μg per 5 μg of DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A mutant Pfu DNA polymerase designed for advanced uracil-excision DNA engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørholm, Morten H H

    2010-03-16

    The combined use of restriction enzymes with PCR has revolutionized molecular cloning, but is inherently restricted by the content of the manipulated DNA sequences. Uracil-excision based cloning is ligase and sequence independent and allows seamless fusion of multiple DNA sequences in simple one-tube reactions, with higher accuracy than overlapping PCR. Here, the addition of a highly efficient DNA polymerase and a low-background-, large-insertion- compatible site-directed mutagenesis protocol is described, largely expanding the versatility of uracil-excision DNA engineering. The different uracil-excision based molecular tools that have been developed in an open-source fashion, constitute a comprehensive, yet simple and inexpensive toolkit for any need in molecular cloning.

  5. Use of capillary GC-MS for identification of radiation-induced DNA base damage: Implications for base-excision repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Application of GC-MS to characterization of radiation-induced base products of DNA and DNa base-amino acid crosslinks is presented. Samples of γ-irradiated DNa were hydrolyzed with formic acid, trimethylsilylated and subjected to GC-MS analysis using a fused silica capillary column. Hydrolysis conditions suitable for the simultaneous analysis of the radiation-induced products of all four DNA bases in a single run were determined. The trimethylsilyl derivatives of these products had excellent GC-properties and easily interpretable mass spectra. The complementary use of t-butyldimetylsilyl derivatives was also demonstrated. Moreover, the usefulness of this method for identification of radiation-induced DNA base-amino acid crosslinks was shown using γ-irradiated mixtures of thymine and tyrosine or phenylalanine. Because of the excellent resolving power of capillary GC and the instant and highly sensitive identification by MS, GC-MS is suggested as a suitable technique for identification of altered bases removed from DNA by base-excision repair enzymes

  6. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  7. DNA based radiological dosimetry technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Quijada, Gerardo A.; Roy, Emmanuel; Veres, Teodor; Dumoulin, Michel M.; Vachon, Caroline; Blagoeva, Rosita; Pierre, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this project is to develop a personal and wearable dosimeter using a highly-innovative approach based on the specific recognition of DNA damage with a polymer hybrid. Our biosensor will be sensitive to breaks in nucleic acid macromolecules and relevant to mixed-field radiation. The dosimeter proposed will be small, field deployable and will sense damages for all radiation types at the DNA level. The generalized concept for the novel-based radiological dosimeter: 1) Single or double stranded oligonucleotide is immobilized on surface; 2) Single stranded has higher cross-section for fragmentation; 3) Double stranded is more biological relevant; 4) Radiation induces fragmentation; 5) Ultra-sensitive detection of fragments provides radiation dose. Successful efforts have been made towards a proof-of-concept personal wearable DNA-based dosimeter that is appropriate for mixed-field radiation. The covalent immobilization of oligonucleotides on large areas of plastic surfaces has been demonstrated and corroborated spectroscopically. The surface concentration of DNA was determined to be 8 x 1010 molecules/cm 2 from a Ce(IV) catalyzed hydrolysis study of a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide. Current efforts are being directed at studying radiation induced fragmentation of DNA followed by its ultra-sensitive detection via a novel method. In addition, proof-of-concept wearable personal devices and a detection platform are presently being fabricated. (author)

  8. G+C content dominates intrinsic nucleosome occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Timothy R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative preference of nucleosomes to form on individual DNA sequences plays a major role in genome packaging. A wide variety of DNA sequence features are believed to influence nucleosome formation, including periodic dinucleotide signals, poly-A stretches and other short motifs, and sequence properties that influence DNA structure, including base content. It was recently shown by Kaplan et al. that a probabilistic model using composition of all 5-mers within a nucleosome-sized tiling window accurately predicts intrinsic nucleosome occupancy across an entire genome in vitro. However, the model is complicated, and it is not clear which specific DNA sequence properties are most important for intrinsic nucleosome-forming preferences. Results We find that a simple linear combination of only 14 simple DNA sequence attributes (G+C content, two transformations of dinucleotide composition, and the frequency of eleven 4-bp sequences explains nucleosome occupancy in vitro and in vivo in a manner comparable to the Kaplan model. G+C content and frequency of AAAA are the most important features. G+C content is dominant, alone explaining ~50% of the variation in nucleosome occupancy in vitro. Conclusions Our findings provide a dramatically simplified means to predict and understand intrinsic nucleosome occupancy. G+C content may dominate because it both reduces frequency of poly-A-like stretches and correlates with many other DNA structural characteristics. Since G+C content is enriched or depleted at many types of features in diverse eukaryotic genomes, our results suggest that variation in nucleotide composition may have a widespread and direct influence on chromatin structure.

  9. Effect of gamma rays on nucleic acids content (RNA and DNA) of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera Littoralis (BOISD). Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, H.A.; El-Shall, S.A.; Sobeiha, A.K.; El-Bamby, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Full grown pupae of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera Littoralis (Boisd) were exposed to exposed to sub sterilizing doses of 100, 200 and 300 Gy gamma radiation. The changes in nucleic acids content (RNA and DNA) of irradiated pupae, after 24 hours from irradiation, and also in 3 days old adults resulting from irradiated pupae were investigated. The total nucleic acids content in either pupae or adults was progressively reduced as the dose was increased. The reduction of both RNA and DNA in females was greater than in males. DNA was more radiosensitive than RNA. The destructive action of irradiation on nucleic acids was more pronounced in adult stage. Irradiation increased the RNA/DNA ratio than control at all treatments for female pupae at 200 Gy. 2 tabs

  10. Effect of gamma rays on nucleic acids content (RNA and DNA) of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera Littoralis (BOISD). Vol. 4.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallam, H A; El-Shall, S A [Biological Applications Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Sobeiha, A K; El-Bamby, M A [Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Full grown pupae of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera Littoralis (Boisd) were exposed to exposed to sub sterilizing doses of 100, 200 and 300 Gy gamma radiation. The changes in nucleic acids content (RNA and DNA) of irradiated pupae, after 24 hours from irradiation, and also in 3 days old adults resulting from irradiated pupae were investigated. The total nucleic acids content in either pupae or adults was progressively reduced as the dose was increased. The reduction of both RNA and DNA in females was greater than in males. DNA was more radiosensitive than RNA. The destructive action of irradiation on nucleic acids was more pronounced in adult stage. Irradiation increased the RNA/DNA ratio than control at all treatments for female pupae at 200 Gy. 2 tabs.

  11. Phosphorescent quantum dots/doxorubicin nanohybrids based on photoinduced electron transfer for detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yanming; Zhang, Zhifeng; Gong, Yan; Yan, Guiqin

    2014-09-15

    MPA-capped Mn-doped ZnS QDs/DXR nanohybrids (MPA: 3-mercaptopropionic acid; QDs: quantum dots; DXR: cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide) were constructed via photoinduced electron transfer (PIET) and then used as a room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) probe for detection of DNA. DXR as a quencher will quench the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs via PIET, thereby forming Mn-doped ZnS QDs/DXR nanohybrids and storing RTP. With the addition of DNA, it will be inserted into DXR and thus DXR will be competitively desorbed from the surface of Mn-doped ZnS QDs, thereby releasing the RTP of Mn-doped ZnS QDs. Based on this, a new method for DNA detection was built. The sensor for DNA has a detection limit of 0.039 mg L(-1) and a linear range from 0.1 to 14 mg L(-1). The present QDs-based RTP method does not need deoxidants or other inducers as required by conventional RTP detection methods, and avoids interference from autofluorescence and the scattering light of the matrix that are encountered in spectrofluorometry. Therefore, this method can be used to detect the DNA content in body fluid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening for Methylated Poly(⌊-histidine with Various Dimethylimidazolium/Methylimidazole/Imidazole Contents as DNA Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Asayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Methylated poly(l-histidine (PLH-Me, our original polypeptide, has controlled the contents of dimethylimidazolium, τ/π-methylimidazole and imidazole groups for efficient gene delivery. The screening for the PLH-Me as DNA carrier has been carried out by use of the PLH with 25 mol% (τ-methyl, 16 mol%; π-methyl, 17 mol%; deprotonated imidazole, 41 mol%, 68 mol% (τ-methyl, 16 mol%; π-methyl, 8 mol%; deprotonated imidazole, 8 mol% and 87 mol% (τ-methyl, 7 mol%; π-methyl, 4 mol%; deprotonated imidazole, 2 mol% dimethylimidazolium groups, that is, PLH-Me(25, PLH-Me(68 and PLH-Me(87, respectively. The screening of the chemical structure of PLH-Me has been carried out for DNA carrier properties, which are the stability of its DNA polyion complexes and gene expression. The DNA complexes with the 25 mol% and 68 mol% dimethylated PLH-Me possessed almost same ability to retain DNA, as compared with the 87 mol% dimethylated PLH-Me, which was examined by competitive exchange with dextran sulfate. From the gene transfection experiment against HepG2 cells, human hepatoma cell line, the PLH-Me(25/DNA complex was revealed to mediate highest gene expression. These results suggest that the dimethyl-imidazolium/methylimidazole/imidazole balance of the PLH-Me is important for DNA carrier design.

  13. Tyramine Hydrochloride Based Label-Free System for Operating Various DNA Logic Gates and a DNA Caliper for Base Number Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2017-07-05

    DNA is believed to be a promising candidate for molecular logic computation, and the fluorogenic/colorimetric substrates of G-quadruplex DNAzyme (G4zyme) are broadly used as label-free output reporters of DNA logic circuits. Herein, for the first time, tyramine-HCl (a fluorogenic substrate of G4zyme) is applied to DNA logic computation and a series of label-free DNA-input logic gates, including elementary AND, OR, and INHIBIT logic gates, as well as a two to one encoder, are constructed. Furthermore, a DNA caliper that can measure the base number of target DNA as low as three bases is also fabricated. This DNA caliper can also perform concatenated AND-AND logic computation to fulfil the requirements of sophisticated logic computing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of two silica-based extraction methods for DNA isolation from bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2016-09-01

    One of the most demanding DNA extractions is from bones and teeth due to the robustness of the material and the relatively low DNA content. The greatest challenge is due to the manifold nature of the material, which is defined by various factors, including age, storage, environmental conditions, and contamination with inhibitors. However, most published protocols do not distinguish between different types or qualities of bone material, but are described as being generally applicable. Our laboratory works with two different extraction methods based on silica membranes or the use of silica beads. We compared the amplification success of the two methods from bone samples with different qualities and in the presence of inhibitors. We found that the DNA extraction using the silica membrane method results an in higher DNA yield but also in a higher risk of co-extracting impurities, which can act as inhibitors. In contrast the silica beads method shows decreased co-extraction of inhibitors but also less DNA yield. Related to our own experiences it has to be considered that each bone material should be reviewed independently regarding the analysis and extraction method. Therefore, the most ambitious task is determining the quality of the bone material, which requires substantial experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stability in chromosome number and DNA content in synthetic tetraploids of Lolium multiflorum after two generations of selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselaine Cristina Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chromosome doubling of Italian ryegrass genotypes ( Lolium multiflorum Lam. adapted to the brazilian edaphoclimatic conditions is an important strategy used by breeders and aims to obtain more vigorous genotypes with better forage quality and disease resistance. The effectiveness of chromosome doubling can be measured by genetic stability and fertility rates of plants over generations. However, a common problem in the polyploidization process is the regeneration of mixoploid plants that have impaired fertility and genetic stability. The objective of this study was to verify if progenies of recently tetraploidized plants remain stable regarding DNA content and chromosome number, over two generations. Progenies of L. multiflorum plants artificially tetraploidized with colchicine treatment were evaluated. Chromosome counting and estimates of the DNA content were used to evaluate the genetic stability. The percentage of tetraploid plants (4X increased over generations (18%, 34% and 91% in cycle 0, 1 and 2, respectively. All progenies identified as tetraploid by flow citometry showed variation in chromosome number (mixoploidy, but produced viable seeds. Results showed that stabilization in chromosome number and DNA content in tetraploidized plant progenies requires time and that the success of this procedure depends on a continuous and accurate screening and selection.

  17. Karyotype and nucleic acid content in Zantedeschia aethiopica Spr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-07-03

    Jul 3, 2012 ... Analysis of karyotype, nucleic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide ... base pairs) for Z. aethiopica and 1144.26 ± 0.05 picograms (equivalent to 1144.26 mega base pairs) for Z. elliottiana. ... ml ice-cold nuclei-isolation buffer A of the Partec high resolution. DNA kit ...

  18. A universal DNA-based protein detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thua N N; Cui, Jinhui; Hartman, Mark R; Peng, Songming; Funabashi, Hisakage; Duan, Faping; Yang, Dayong; March, John C; Lis, John T; Cui, Haixin; Luo, Dan

    2013-09-25

    Protein immune detection requires secondary antibodies which must be carefully selected in order to avoid interspecies cross-reactivity, and is therefore restricted by the limited availability of primary/secondary antibody pairs. Here we present a versatile DNA-based protein detection system using a universal adapter to interface between IgG antibodies and DNA-modified reporter molecules. As a demonstration of this capability, we successfully used DNA nano-barcodes, quantum dots, and horseradish peroxidase enzyme to detect multiple proteins using our DNA-based labeling system. Our system not only eliminates secondary antibodies but also serves as a novel method platform for protein detection with modularity, high capacity, and multiplexed capability.

  19. DNAzyme-Based Logic Gate-Mediated DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-13

    Controlling DNA self-assembly processes using rationally designed logic gates is a major goal of DNA-based nanotechnology and programming. Such controls could facilitate the hierarchical engineering of complex nanopatterns responding to various molecular triggers or inputs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a series of DNAzyme-based logic gates to control DNA tile self-assembly onto a prescribed DNA origami frame. Logic systems such as "YES," "OR," "AND," and "logic switch" are implemented based on DNAzyme-mediated tile recognition with the DNA origami frame. DNAzyme is designed to play two roles: (1) as an intermediate messenger to motivate downstream reactions and (2) as a final trigger to report fluorescent signals, enabling information relay between the DNA origami-framed tile assembly and fluorescent signaling. The results of this study demonstrate the plausibility of DNAzyme-mediated hierarchical self-assembly and provide new tools for generating dynamic and responsive self-assembly systems.

  20. Network clustering coefficient approach to DNA sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, Guenther J.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul-Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350/sala 2040/90035-003 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica e Quimica da Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Rua Francisco Getulio Vargas 1130, 95001-970 Caxias do Sul (Brazil); Lemke, Ney [Programa Interdisciplinar em Computacao Aplicada, Unisinos, Av. Unisinos, 950, 93022-000 Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Corso, Gilberto [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, 59072 970 Natal, RN (Brazil)]. E-mail: corso@dfte.ufrn.br

    2006-05-15

    In this work we propose an alternative DNA sequence analysis tool based on graph theoretical concepts. The methodology investigates the path topology of an organism genome through a triplet network. In this network, triplets in DNA sequence are vertices and two vertices are connected if they occur juxtaposed on the genome. We characterize this network topology by measuring the clustering coefficient. We test our methodology against two main bias: the guanine-cytosine (GC) content and 3-bp (base pairs) periodicity of DNA sequence. We perform the test constructing random networks with variable GC content and imposed 3-bp periodicity. A test group of some organisms is constructed and we investigate the methodology in the light of the constructed random networks. We conclude that the clustering coefficient is a valuable tool since it gives information that is not trivially contained in 3-bp periodicity neither in the variable GC content.

  1. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  2. Evaluation of cell number and DNA content in mouse embryos cultivated with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundt, Mirian S.; Cabrini, Romulo L.

    2000-01-01

    The evaluation of the degree of development, the number of cells and the DNA content, were used to evaluate the embryotoxicity of uranium. Embryos at a one cell stage were cultured with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UN) at a final concentration of uranium (U) of 26, 52 and 104 μgU/ml. At 24 hs of culture, the embryos at the 2 cell stage, were put in new wells with the same concentrations of U as the previous day, until the end of the period of incubation at 72 hs. At 72 hs of culture, 87% of the original one cell embryos were at morula stage, and in those cultivated with uranium, the percentage decreased significantly to 77; 63.24 and 40.79% respectively for the different U concentrations. Those embryos that exhibited a normal morphology, were selected and fixed on slides. The number of cells per embryo was evaluated in Giemsa stained preparations. The DNA content was evaluated cytophotometrically in Feulgen stained nuclei. The number of cells decreased significantly from 20,3 ± 5.6 in the control to 19 ± 6; 14 ± 3 and 13.9 ± 5.6 for the different concentrations. All the embryos evaluated showed one easy recognizable polar body, which was used a haploid indicator (n). The content of DNA was measured in a total of 20 control embryos and 16 embryos cultivated with UN. In control embryos, 92,7% of the nuclei presented a normal ploidy from 2n to 4n, 2,9% nuclei were hypoploid and 4,4% were hyperploid. The percentage of hypoploid nuclei rose in a dose-dependent fashion to 3.45; 44.45 and 50.34% respectively for the embryos cultured at the different U concentrations. The results indicate that U is embryotoxic, that its effects are dose dependent at the concentrations used in this study and that even those embryos that show a normal morphology, can be genetically affected. We show that the model employed is extremely sensitive. It is possible to use the preimplantation embryos, as a model to test the effect of possibly mutagenic agents of the nuclear industry. (author)

  3. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-10

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm.

  4. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm

  5. Application of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantitatively Determine Relative Content of Puccnia striiformis f. sp. tritici DNA in Wheat Leaves in Incubation Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqiong Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst is a devastating wheat disease worldwide. Potential application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS in detection of pathogen amounts in latently Pst-infected wheat leaves was investigated for disease prediction and control. A total of 300 near-infrared spectra were acquired from the Pst-infected leaf samples in an incubation period, and relative contents of Pst DNA in the samples were obtained using duplex TaqMan real-time PCR arrays. Determination models of the relative contents of Pst DNA in the samples were built using quantitative partial least squares (QPLS, support vector regression (SVR, and a method integrated with QPLS and SVR. The results showed that the kQPLS-SVR model built with a ratio of training set to testing set equal to 3 : 1 based on the original spectra, when the number of the randomly selected wavelength points was 700, the number of principal components was 8, and the number of the built QPLS models was 5, was the best. The results indicated that quantitative detection of Pst DNA in leaves in the incubation period could be implemented using NIRS. A novel method for determination of latent infection levels of Pst and early detection of stripe rust was provided.

  6. Selective base excision repair of DNA damage by the non-base-flipping DNA glycosylase AlkC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rongxin; Mullins, Elwood A.; Shen, Xing; #8208; Xing; Lay, Kori T.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Rokas, Antonis; Eichman, Brandt F. (UCD); (Vanderbilt)

    2017-10-20

    DNA glycosylases preserve genome integrity and define the specificity of the base excision repair pathway for discreet, detrimental modifications, and thus, the mechanisms by which glycosylases locate DNA damage are of particular interest. Bacterial AlkC and AlkD are specific for cationic alkylated nucleobases and have a distinctive HEAT-like repeat (HLR) fold. AlkD uses a unique non-base-flipping mechanism that enables excision of bulky lesions more commonly associated with nucleotide excision repair. In contrast, AlkC has a much narrower specificity for small lesions, principally N3-methyladenine (3mA). Here, we describe how AlkC selects for and excises 3mA using a non-base-flipping strategy distinct from that of AlkD. A crystal structure resembling a catalytic intermediate complex shows how AlkC uses unique HLR and immunoglobulin-like domains to induce a sharp kink in the DNA, exposing the damaged nucleobase to active site residues that project into the DNA. This active site can accommodate and excise N3-methylcytosine (3mC) and N1-methyladenine (1mA), which are also repaired by AlkB-catalyzed oxidative demethylation, providing a potential alternative mechanism for repair of these lesions in bacteria.

  7. Compensatory lung growth: protein, DNA and RNA lung contents in undernourished trilobectomized rats Crescimento pulmonar compensatório: conteúdos pulmonares de proteína, DNA e RNA em ratos subnutridos trilobectomizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Lopes Ruiz Júnior

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate compensatory lung growth (CLG by lung contents of proteins, DNA, and RNA in undernourished young adult rats, submitted to pulmonary trilobectomy. METHODS: We used 137 male Wistar rats, randomly distributed into 9 groups; they were submitted to three treatments (control, thoracotomy, and trilobectomy, and sacrificed at three different times (7, 30, and 90 days. In trilobectomy we removed the right median, accessory, and caudal lobes. We studied lung proteins, DNA, and RNA contents. RESULTS: In the cranial lobe and left lung, protein content was higher in trilobectomized rats however there was insufficient CLG to make up for the loss. The increase of DNA in the cranial lobe and left lung of trilobectomized rats was sufficient to compensate for this loss, resulting in a similar content to controls. RNA content in trilobectomized rats, was higher in the cranial lobe and left lung, more efficient in the cranial lobe, but less than in the other groups. CONCLUSION: CLG occurred in trilobectomized rats, probably with cell hyperplasia and little hypertrophy, due to the large DNA compensation and small RNA compensation. This was markedly different to well-nourished animals, who had pronounced hypertrophy.OBJETIVO: demonstrar se ocorre crescimento pulmonar compensatório (CPC representado pelos conteúdos de proteínas, DNA e RNA no rato adulto jovem, subnutrido, submetido à trilobectomia pulmonar. MÉTODOS: Utilizamos 137 ratos "Wistar", machos, distribuídos por sorteio, em 9 grupos, submetidos a três tratamentos (controle, toracotomia, trilobectomia, sacrificados em três momentos (7, 30 e 90 dias. Na trilobectomia foram extirpados os lobos médio, acessório e caudal direitos. Variáveis estudadas: conteúdos pulmonares de proteínas, DNA e RNA. RESULTADOS: No lobo cranial e pulmão esquerdo o conteúdo protéico foi maior nos trilobectomizados. Ocorreu CPC insuficiente para suprir a perda desta variável, sendo menor nos pulm

  8. DNA-content in isolated nuclei of postembryonic stages of progeny from normal and irradiated males of Tetranychus urticae (Acari Tetranychidoe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempelaar, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The lC DNA-content of isolated nuclei of postembryonic stages of Tetranychus urticae stained with the classic and a modified Schiff's reagent was cytophotometrically estimated as 0.1 pg, a low value in animals. For many tissues of this arrhenotokus species the ploidy ratio between males and females is 1:2, indicating the absence of sex-related differences in ploidy. In addition, DNA measurements were performed to evaluate irradiation-experiments, starting with X-irradiation of mature sperm in males with doses known from previous work to induce chromosomal fragments that are subject to loss and missegregation in the embryonic mitotic stages of the female progeny despite the presumed holokinetic nature of the chromosomes. The DNA-content of the nuclei of the surviving postembryonic preadult stages did not indicate the occurrence of nuclei with in-between male/female values, ruling out loss and missegregation of fragments as important factors in postembryonic lethality. Abnormally low DNA-values in some adult females could be attributed to development of embryos before oviposition caused by radiation-induced effects. (orig.) [de

  9. Increase of mitochondrial DNA content and transcripts in early bovine embryogenesis associated with upregulation of mtTFA and NRF1 transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyman Yvan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has shown that mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial functions are critical determinants of embryonic development. However, the expression of the factors controlling mitochondrial biogenesis in early embryogenesis has received little attention so far. Methods We used real-time quantitative PCR to quantify mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in bovine oocytes and in various stages of in vitro produced embryos. To investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the replication and the transcriptional activation of mtDNA, we quantified the mRNA corresponding to the mtDNA-encoded cytochrome oxidase 1 (COX1, and two nuclear-encoded factors, i.e. the Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 (NRF1, and the nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A (mtTFA. Results Unlike findings reported in mouse embryos, the mtDNA content was not constant during early bovine embryogenesis. We found a sharp, 60% decrease in mtDNA content between the 2-cell and the 4/8-cell stages. COX1 mRNA was constant until the morula stage after which it increased dramatically. mtTFA mRNA was undetectable in oocytes and remained so until the 8/16-cell stage; it began to appear only at the morula stage, suggesting de novo synthesis. In contrast, NRF1 mRNA was detectable in oocytes and the quantity remained constant until the morula stage. Conclusion Our results revealed a reduction of mtDNA content in early bovine embryos suggesting an active process of mitochondrial DNA degradation. In addition, de novo mtTFA expression associated with mitochondrial biogenesis activation and high levels of NRF1 mRNA from the oocyte stage onwards argue for the essential function of these factors during the first steps of bovine embryogenesis.

  10. Heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores with increased core water content and with or without major DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popham, D.L.; Sengupta, S.; Setlow, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spores of a Bacillus subtilis strain with an insertion mutation in the dacB gene, which codes for an enzyme involved in spore cortex biosynthesis, have a higher core water content than wild-type spores. Spores lacking the two major α/β-type small, acid-soluble proteins (SASP) (termed a α - β - spores) have the same core water content as do wild-type spores, but α - β - dacB spores had more core water than did dacB spores. The resistance of α - β - , α - β - dacB, dacB, and wild-type spores to dry and moist heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV radiation has been determined, as has the role of DNA damage in spore killing by moist heat and hydrogen peroxide. These data (1) suggest that core water content has little if any role in spore UV resistance and are consistent with binding of α/β-type SASP to DNA being the major mechanism providing protection to spores from UV radiation; (2) suggest that binding of αβ-type SASP to DNA is the major mechanism unique to spores providing protection from dry heat; (3) suggest that spore resistance to moist heat and hydrogen peroxide is affected to a large degree by the core water content, as increased core water resulted in large decreases in spore resistance to these agents; and (4) indicate that since this decreased resistance (i.e., in dacB spores) is not associated with increased spore killing by DNA damage, spore DNA must normally be extremely well protected against such damage, presumably by the saturation of spore DNA by α/β-type SASP. 19 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Orthogonally Based Digital Content Management Applicable to Projects-bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel MILODIN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is defined the concept of digital content. The requirements of an efficient management of the digital content are established. There are listed the quality characteristics of digital content. Orthogonality indicators of digital content are built up. They are meant to measure the image, the sound as well as the text orthogonality as well. Projects-base concept is introduced. There is presented the model of structuring the content in order to maximize orthogonality via a convergent iterative process. The model is instantiated for the digital content of a projects-base. It is introduced the application used to test the model. The paper ends with conclusions.

  12. Content-Based Image Retrial Based on Hadoop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DongSheng Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, time complexity of algorithms for content-based image retrial is extremely high. In order to retrieve images on large-scale databases efficiently, a new way for retrieving based on Hadoop distributed framework is proposed. Firstly, a database of images features is built by using Speeded Up Robust Features algorithm and Locality-Sensitive Hashing and then perform the search on Hadoop platform in a parallel way specially designed. Considerable experimental results show that it is able to retrieve images based on content on large-scale cluster and image sets effectively.

  13. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@sci.uut.ac.ir; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-05

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I–V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive. - Highlights: • Modeling a DNA based molecular transistor and studying its transport properties. • Choosing the appropriate DNA sequence using the quantum chaos tools. • Choosing the functional interval for voltages via the inverse participation ratio tool. • Detecting the rectifier and negative differential resistance behavior of DNA.

  14. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  15. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veikko Linko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications.

  16. Comparison of Six DNA Extraction Procedures and the Application of Plastid DNA Enrichment Methods in Selected Non-photosynthetic Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Yi Shyu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA was isolated using three DNA extraction commercial kits and three CTAB-based methods for two non-photosynthetic plants, Balanophora japonica and Mitrastemon kanehirai. The quality of the isolated DNA was evaluated and subjected to following restriction enzyme digestions. All six procedures yielded DNA of sufficient quality for PCR, and the method described by Barnwell et al. (1998 performed well in isolating DNA from both species for restriction enzyme digestion. In addition, we succeeded to enrich plastid DNA content by using the methods depending on a high salt buffer to deplete nuclear material. The ‘high salt’ methods based on protocol presented by Milligan (1989 were able to increase plastid DNA effectively and significantly reduce nuclear DNA from M. kanehirai. The plastid DNA enrichment protocols are inexpensive and not time-consuming, and may be applicable to other non-photosynthetic plants.

  17. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  18. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbubur Rahman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymers (CPs are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective.

  19. Recent progress on DNA based walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing; Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Chen, Haorong; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-08-01

    DNA based synthetic molecular walkers are reminiscent of biological protein motors. They are powered by hybridization with fuel strands, environment induced conformational transitions, and covalent chemistry of oligonucleotides. Recent developments in experimental techniques enable direct observation of individual walkers with high temporal and spatial resolution. The functionalities of state-of-the-art DNA walker systems can thus be analyzed for various applications. Herein we review recent progress on DNA walker principles and characterization methods, and evaluate various aspects of their functions for future applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2017-11-25

    DNA as a novel biomaterial can be used to fabricate different kinds of DNA nanostructures based on its principle of GC/AT complementary base pairing. Studies have shown that DNA nanostructure is a nice drug carrier to overcome big obstacles existing in cancer therapy such as systemic toxicity and unsatisfied drug efficacy. Thus, different types of DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems have been designed in cancer therapy. To improve treating efficacy, they are also developed into more functional drug delivery nanosystems. In recent years, some important progresses have been made. The objective of this review is to make a retrospect and summary about these different kinds of DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems and their latest progresses: (1) active targeting; (2) mutidrug co-delivery; (3) construction of stimuli-responsive/intelligent nanosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF METHODS OF DNA EXTRACTION FROM PLANT ORIGIN OBJECTS AND FOODS BASED ON THEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Dyshlyuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last decades modern and highly efficient methods of determining the quality and safety of food products, based on the application of the latest scientific achievements were developed in the world. A special place is given to the methods based on achievements of molecular biology and genetics. At the present stage of development in the field of assessing the quality of raw materials and processed food products much attention is given to highly accurate, sensitive and specific research methods, the method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR occupying a leading place among them. PCR is a sophisticated method that simulates the natural DNA replication and allows to detect a single specific DNA molecule in the presence of millions of other molecules. The key point in the preparation of material for PCR is the extraction of nucleic acids. The low content of DNA in plant material and the high concentration of secondary metabolites complicate the process of extraction. The key solution to this problem is highly effective method of extraction, which allows to obtain the DNA of adequate quality and purity. Comparative analysis of methods for the extraction of nucleic acids from fruit raw materials and products based on them was carried out in the study. General analysis of the experimental data allowed us to determine the most efficient method for DNA extracting. In the comparative analysis it was found out that to extract DNA from plant raw materials and food products prepared on their basis it is the most suitable to use "Sorb-GMO-A" reactants kit (set. The approach described gives us a brilliant opportunity to obtain deoxyribonucleic acid proper quality and purity.

  2. DNA fragments assembly based on nicking enzyme system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3'-end or 5'-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB.

  3. Evaluation of Genetic Variations in Maize Seedlings Exposed to Electric Field Based on Protein and DNA Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma A. AL-Huqail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study analyzed proteins and nuclear DNA of electric fields (ELF exposed and nonexposed maize seedlings for different exposure periods using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, isozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, and comet assay, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed total of 46 polypeptides bands with different molecular weights ranging from 186.20 to 36.00 KDa. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 84.62%. Leucine-aminopeptidase, peroxidase, and catalase isozymes showed the highest values of polymorphism (100% based on zymograms number, relative front (Rf, and optical intensity while esterase isozyme generated polymorphism value of 83.33%. Amino acids were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, which revealed the presence of 17 amino acids of variable contents ranging from 22.65% to 28.09%. RAPD revealed that 78 amplified DNA products had highly polymorphism value (95.08% based on band numbers, with variable sizes ranging from 120 to 992 base pairs and band intensity. Comet assay recorded the highest extent of nuclear DNA damage as percentage of tailed DNA (2.38% and tail moment unit (5.36 at ELF exposure of maize nuclei for 5 days. The current study concluded that the longer ELF exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of maize cells and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of economic plants to ELF stressors.

  4. DNA-based random number generation in security circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearheart, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2010-06-01

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. This research focuses on further developing DNA-based methodologies to mimic digital data manipulation. While exhibiting fundamental principles, this work was done in conjunction with the vision that DNA-based circuitry, when the technology matures, will form the basis for a tamper-proof security module, revolutionizing the meaning and concept of tamper-proofing and possibly preventing it altogether based on accurate scientific observations. A paramount part of such a solution would be self-generation of random numbers. A novel prototype schema employs solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences; temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors. A discussion of how to evaluate sequence randomness is included, as well as how these techniques are applied to a simulation of the random number generation circuitry. Simulation results show generated sequences successfully pass three selected NIST random number generation tests specified for security applications.

  5. The Effects of Low LET Radiation and Aging on DNA Content in Rats Hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that the polyploidization levels in rat's hepatocytes increased with aging. The high LET ionizing radiation also induce cell polyploidization by two different means: cells and nuclei fusion, and mitosis restriction after DNA replication. The purpose of the present study was to determine the kinetic of rat's hepatocytes polyploidization with aging, and the late effects of low doses of gamma irradiation on polyploidization. Two groups of rats were used. Each group composed of 150 four weeks old animals. The first group was served as a control, and the second was irradiated with 4 Gy of gamma irradiation at the age of one month. Of each group, 7-8 animals were monthly scarified (for two years), and their liver tissues were used to obtain cell suspensions which were further fixed in gradual series concentrations of ethanol. After staining with Propidum Iodide PI (10 6 cells per ml of PI used at 10 - 5 M final concentration), the cells were analyzed on a FACS Vantage Flow Cytometer (Becton Dickinson). With the control group, the results showed: 1) A decrease of cell fraction that contained normal diploid until steady level. 2) Biphasic changes of fraction tetraploidy cells (increase until age of 4 month followed by decrease). 3) The fraction of octaploidy cells appeared at age of 3-4 month and increased continuously by the aging. In regard to life-span reductions of irradiated animals, the DNA contents were similar to those in control groups in addition to some variation due to a programmed cell death (Apoptosis) induced by irradiation and regenerations. These variations persisted till the age of 7 month. It was concluded that the level of DNA content might be used to determine the rat's age, and the low LET radiation had no effect on the phenomenon of polyploidization. (author)

  6. Mapping Base Modifications in DNA by Transverse-Current Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jose R.; Skachkov, Dmitry; Massey, Steven E.; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian P.

    2018-02-01

    Sequencing DNA modifications and lesions, such as methylation of cytosine and oxidation of guanine, is even more important and challenging than sequencing the genome itself. The traditional methods for detecting DNA modifications are either insensitive to these modifications or require additional processing steps to identify a particular type of modification. Transverse-current sequencing in nanopores can potentially identify the canonical bases and base modifications in the same run. In this work, we demonstrate that the most common DNA epigenetic modifications and lesions can be detected with any predefined accuracy based on their tunneling current signature. Our results are based on simulations of the nanopore tunneling current through DNA molecules, calculated using nonequilibrium electron-transport methodology within an effective multiorbital model derived from first-principles calculations, followed by a base-calling algorithm accounting for neighbor current-current correlations. This methodology can be integrated with existing experimental techniques to improve base-calling fidelity.

  7. DNA biosynthesis content and intensiveness in mice thymus at early periods following fast neutron irradiation with different energy rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indyk, V.M.; Antonenko, G.I.; Parnovskaya, N.V.

    1988-01-01

    Biosynthesis of dna of the thymic glands of animals irradiated by fast neutrons with different energy values in the early post-irradiation period is investigated. It is shown that the rate of mass recovery in organs, their cellular nature, dna content and indices of their specific activity have the dose and time dependences, as well as they considerably differ at different neutron energies and different quality radiation. With the increase of neutron energy value their biological effectiveness decreases

  8. Effect of serotonin on the expression of antigens and DNA levels in Yersinia pestis cells with different plasmid content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueva, Svetlana N.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Schukovskaya, Tatyana N.; Kravtsov, Alexander L.

    2004-08-01

    Using flow cytometry (FCM) the influence of exogenous serotonin on culture growth, DNA content and fluorescence intensity of cells binding FITC-labelled plague polyclonal immunoglobulins was studied in Yersinia pestis EV (pFra+, pCad+, pPst+), Yersinia pestis KM218 (pFra-, pCad-, pPst-), Yersinia pestis KM 216 (pFra-, pCad-, pPst+). The results have been obtained by FCM showed serotonin accelerated Yersinia pestis EV (pFra+, pCad+, pPst+), Yersinia pestis KM218 (pFra-, pCad-, pPst-) culture growth during cultivation in Hottinger broth pH 7.2 at 28°C at concentration of 10-5 M. The presence of 10-5 M serotonin in nutrient broth could modulate DNA content in 37°C growing population of plague microbe independently of their plasmid content. Serotonin have been an impact on the distribution pattern of the cells according to their phenotypical characteristics, which was reflected in the levels of population heterogeneity in the intensity of specific immunofluorescence determined by FMC.

  9. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  10. Analytical Devices Based on Direct Synthesis of DNA on Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavan, Ana C; Niu, Jia; Chen, Zhen; Güder, Firat; Cheng, Chao-Min; Liu, David; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-05

    This paper addresses a growing need in clinical diagnostics for parallel, multiplex analysis of biomarkers from small biological samples. It describes a new procedure for assembling arrays of ssDNA and proteins on paper. This method starts with the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to paper and proceeds to assemble microzones of DNA-conjugated paper into arrays capable of simultaneously capturing DNA, DNA-conjugated protein antigens, and DNA-conjugated antibodies. The synthesis of ssDNA oligonucleotides on paper is convenient and effective with 32% of the oligonucleotides cleaved and eluted from the paper substrate being full-length by HPLC for a 32-mer. These ssDNA arrays can be used to detect fluorophore-linked DNA oligonucleotides in solution, and as the basis for DNA-directed assembly of arrays of DNA-conjugated capture antibodies on paper, detect protein antigens by sandwich ELISAs. Paper-anchored ssDNA arrays with different sequences can be used to assemble paper-based devices capable of detecting DNA and antibodies in the same device and enable simple microfluidic paper-based devices.

  11. Oxidative DNA base modifications as factors in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinski, R.; Jaruga, P.; Zastawny, T.H.

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species can cause extensive DNA modifications including modified bases. Some of the DNA base damage has been found to possess premutagenic properties. Therefore, if not repaired, it can contribute to carcinogenesis. We have found elevated amounts of modified bases in cancerous and precancerous tissues as compared with normal tissues. Most of the agents used in anticancer therapy are paradoxically responsible for induction of secondary malignancies and some of them may generate free radicals. The results of our experiments provide evidence that exposure of cancer patients to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs cause base modifications in genomic DNA of lymphocytes. Some of these base damages could lead to mutagenesis in critical genes and ultimately to secondary cancers such as leukemias. This may point to an important role of oxidative base damage in cancer initiation. Alternatively, the increased level of the modified base products may contribute to genetic instability and metastatic potential of tumor cells. (author)

  12. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  13. Enhanced base excision repair capacity in carotid atherosclerosis may protect nuclear DNA but not mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; B. Dahl, Tuva; Skjelland, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Lesional and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, potentially leading to accumulation of DNA base lesions within atherosclerotic plaques. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway counteracting oxidative DNA damage, our knowledge on BER...

  14. Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-Rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S.; Pham, M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses. Experimental Mycology 17, 309-322. Isolates of Colletotrichum were grouped into 10 separate species based on arbitrarily primed PCR (ap-PCR), A + T-rich DNA (AT-DNA) and nuclear DNA banding patterns. In general, the grouping of Colletotrichum isolates by these molecular approaches corresponded to that done by classical taxonomic identification, however, some exceptions were observed. PCR amplification of genomic DNA using four different primers allowed for reliable differentiation between isolates of the 10 species. HaeIII digestion patterns of AT-DNA also distinguished between species of Colletotrichum by generating species-specific band patterns. In addition, hybridization of the repetitive DNA element (GcpR1) to genomic DNA identified a unique set of Pst 1-digested nuclear DNA fragments in each of the 10 species of Colletotrichum tested. Multiple isolates of C. acutatum, C. coccodes, C. fragariae, C. lindemuthianum, C. magna, C. orbiculare, C. graminicola from maize, and C. graminicola from sorghum showed 86-100% intraspecies similarity based on ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses. Interspecies similarity determined by ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses varied between 0 and 33%. Three distinct banding patterns were detected in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry. Similarly, three different banding patterns were observed among isolates of C. musae from diseased banana.

  15. A nuclear DNA-based species determination and DNA quantification assay for common poultry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S

    2014-12-01

    DNA testing for food authentication and quality control requires sensitive species-specific quantification of nuclear DNA from complex and unknown biological sources. We have developed a multiplex assay based on TaqMan® real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for species-specific detection and quantification of chicken (Gallus gallus), duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) nuclear DNA. The multiplex assay is able to accurately detect very low quantities of species-specific DNA from single or multispecies sample mixtures; its minimum effective quantification range is 5 to 50 pg of starting DNA material. In addition to its use in food fraudulence cases, we have validated the assay using simulated forensic sample conditions to demonstrate its utility in forensic investigations. Despite treatment with potent inhibitors such as hematin and humic acid, and degradation of template DNA by DNase, the assay was still able to robustly detect and quantify DNA from each of the three poultry species in mixed samples. The efficient species determination and accurate DNA quantification will help reduce fraudulent food labeling and facilitate downstream DNA analysis for genetic identification and traceability.

  16. Cell type-specific characterization of nuclear DNA contents within complex tissues and organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Georgina M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic organisms are defined by the presence of a nucleus, which encloses the chromosomal DNA, and is characterized by its DNA content (C-value. Complex eukaryotic organisms contain organs and tissues that comprise interspersions of different cell types, within which polysomaty, endoreduplication, and cell cycle arrest is frequently observed. Little is known about the distribution of C-values across different cell types within these organs and tissues. Results We have developed, and describe here, a method to precisely define the C-value status within any specific cell type within complex organs and tissues of plants. We illustrate the application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana, specifically focusing on the different cell types found within the root. Conclusion The method accurately and conveniently charts C-value within specific cell types, and provides novel insight into developmental processes. The method is, in principle, applicable to any transformable organism, including mammals, within which cell type specificity of regulation of endoreduplication, of polysomaty, and of cell cycle arrest is suspected.

  17. Ultraviolet enhancement of DNA base release by bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakinuma, J.; Tanabe, M.; Orii, H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on base-releasing activity of bleomycin was studied on bleomycin A 2 -DNA reaction mixture in the presence of Fe(II) and 2-mercaptoethanol. This effect was measured by the release of free bases from calf thymus DNA with high-performance liquid chromatography. UV irradiation enhanced DNA base-releasing activity of bleomycin and simultaneously caused disappearance of fluorescence emission maximum at 355 nm assigned to bithiazole rings and increase in the intensity of a peak at 400 nm. UV irradiation at 295 nm, the UV absorption maximum of bleomycin, is the most effective in releasing free bases and in changing fluorescence emission patterns. From these results, we suggest that some alterations in the bithiazole group of bleomycin molecule were initiated by UV irradiation and contributed to increased base-releasing activity of bleomycin through a yet unexplained mechanism, presumably through bleomycin dimer formation. (orig.)

  18. Silver(I)-Mediated Base Pairs in DNA Sequences Containing 7-Deazaguanine/Cytosine: towards DNA with Entirely Metallated Watson-Crick Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Arriaga, José M; Maldonado, Carmen R; Dobado, José A; Galindo, Miguel A

    2018-03-26

    DNA sequences comprising noncanonical 7-deazaguanine ( 7C G) and canonical cytosine (C) are capable of forming Watson-Crick base pairs via hydrogen bonds as well as silver(I)-mediated base pairs by coordination to central silver(I) ions. Duplexes I and II containing 7C G and C have been synthesized and characterized. The incorporation of silver(I) ions into these duplexes has been studied by means of temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and DFT calculations. The results suggest the formation of DNA molecules comprising contiguous metallated 7C G-Ag I -C Watson-Crick base pairs that preserve the original B-type conformation. Furthermore, additional studies performed on duplex III indicated that, in the presence of Ag I ions, 7C G-C and 7C A-T Watson-Crick base pairs ( 7C A, 7-deazadenine; T, thymine) can be converted to metallated 7C G-Ag I -C and 7C A-Ag I -T base pairs inside the same DNA molecule whilst maintaining its initial double helix conformation. These findings are very important for the development of customized silver-DNA nanostructures based on a Watson-Crick complementarity pattern. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    using deoxyribonucleic acid complex as an electron blocking layer App. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 171109. 23. F.H.C. Crick , J.D. Watson . The complementary...9550-09-1-0647 final 01-09-2009 ; 30-11-2011 DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells FA 9550-09-1-0647 Pawlicka, Agnieszka, J. Instituto de...Available. DNA is an abundant natural product with very good biodegradation properties and can be used to obtain gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) with high

  20. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-18

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  1. Content Based Searching for INIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Jain, R.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Whatever a user wants is available on the internet, but to retrieve the information efficiently, a multilingual and most-relevant document search engine is a must. Most current search engines are word based or pattern based. They do not consider the meaning of the query posed to them; purely based on the keywords of the query; no support of multilingual query and and dismissal of nonrelevant results. Current information-retrieval techniques either rely on an encoding process, using a certain perspective or classification scheme, to describe a given item, or perform a full-text analysis, searching for user-specified words. Neither case guarantees content matching because an encoded description might reflect only part of the content and the mere occurrence of a word does not necessarily reflect the document’s content. For general documents, there doesn’t yet seem to be a much better option than lazy full-text analysis, by manually going through those endless results pages. In contrast to this, new search engine should extract the meaning of the query and then perform the search based on this extracted meaning. New search engine should also employ Interlingua based machine translation technology to present information in the language of choice of the user. (author

  2. How stable are the mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovarets’ O. O.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the lifetime of the mutagenic tautomers of DNA base pairs through the investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms of their intramolecular proton transfer. Methods. Non-empirical quantum chemistry, the analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. Physicochemical character of the transition state of the intramolecular tautomerisation of DNA bases was investigated, the lifetime of mutagenic tautomers was calculated. Conclusions. The lifetime of the DNA bases mutagenic tautomers by 3–10 orders exceeds typical time of DNA replication in the cell (~103 s. This fact confirms that the postulate, on which the Watson-Crick tautomeric hypothesis of spontaneous transitions grounds, is adequate. The absence of intramolecular H-bonds in the canonical and mutagenic tautomeric forms determine their high stability

  3. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E., E-mail: ekkumar@tifr.res.in

    2016-04-28

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  4. Altered mitochondrial genome content signals worse pathology and prognosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Anton M F; Chan, Eva K F; Grogan, Judith; Petersen, Desiree C; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gupta, Ruta; Lyons, Ruth J; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Horvath, Lisa G; Kench, James G; Stricker, Phillip D; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) content is depleted in many cancers. In prostate cancer, there is intra-glandular as well as inter-patient mtDNA copy number variation. In this study, we determine if mtDNA content can be used as a predictor for prostate cancer staging and outcomes. Fresh prostate cancer biopsies from 115 patients were obtained at time of surgery. All cores underwent pathological review, followed by isolation of cancer and normal tissue. DNA was extracted and qPCR performed to quantify the total amount of mtDNA as a ratio to genomic DNA. Differences in mtDNA content were compared for prostate cancer pathology features and disease outcomes. We showed a significantly reduced mtDNA content in prostate cancer compared with normal adjacent prostate tissue (mean difference 1.73-fold, P-value Prostate cancer with increased mtDNA content showed unfavorable pathologic characteristics including, higher disease stage (PT2 vs PT3 P-value = 0.018), extracapsular extension (P-value = 0.02) and a trend toward an increased Gleason score (P-value = 0.064). No significant association was observed between changes in mtDNA content and biochemical recurrence (median follow up of 107 months). Contrary to other cancer types, prostate cancer tissue shows no universally depleted mtDNA content. Rather, the change in mtDNA content is highly variable, mirroring known prostate cancer genome heterogeneity. Patients with high mtDNA content have an unfavorable pathology, while a high mtDNA content in normal adjacent prostate tissue is associated with worse prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. PCR-based cDNA library construction: general cDNA libraries at the level of a few cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Belyavsky, A; Vinogradova, T; Rajewsky, K

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for the construction of general cDNA libraries is described which is based on the amplification of total cDNA in vitro. The first cDNA strand is synthesized from total RNA using an oligo(dT)-containing primer. After oligo(dG) tailing the total cDNA is amplified by PCR using two primers complementary to oligo(dA) and oligo(dG) ends of the cDNA. For insertion of the cDNA into a vector a controlled trimming of the 3' ends of the cDNA by Klenow enzyme was used. Starting from 10 J558L ...

  6. Genome Sizes in Hepatica Mill: (Ranunculaceae Show a Loss of DNA, Not a Gain, in Polyploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. M. Zonneveld

    2010-01-01

    , and a possible pentaploid. The somatic nuclear DNA contents (2C-value, as measured by flow cytometry with propidium iodide, were shown to range from 33 to 80 pg. The Asiatic and American species, often considered subspecies of H. nobilis, could be clearly distinguished from European H. nobilis. DNA content confirmed the close relationships in the Asiatic species, and these are here considered as subspecies of H. asiatica. Parents for the allotetraploid species could be suggested based on their nuclear DNA content. Contrary to the increase in genome size suggested earlier for Hepatica, a significant (6%–14% loss of nuclear DNA in the natural allopolyploids was found.

  7. PCR-based detection of a rare linear DNA in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveliev Sergei V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The described method allows for detection of rare linear DNA fragments generated during genomic deletions. The predicted limit of the detection is one DNA molecule per 107 or more cells. The method is based on anchor PCR and involves gel separation of the linear DNA fragment and chromosomal DNA before amplification. The detailed chemical structure of the ends of the linear DNA can be defined with the use of additional PCR-based protocols. The method was applied to study the short-lived linear DNA generated during programmed genomic deletions in a ciliate. It can be useful in studies of spontaneous DNA deletions in cell culture or for tracking intracellular modifications at the ends of transfected DNA during gene therapy trials.

  8. PCR-based detection of a rare linear DNA in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Sergei V.

    2002-11-11

    The described method allows for detection of rare linear DNA fragments generated during genomic deletions. The predicted limit of the detection is one DNA molecule per 10(7) or more cells. The method is based on anchor PCR and involves gel separation of the linear DNA fragment and chromosomal DNA before amplification. The detailed chemical structure of the ends of the linear DNA can be defined with the use of additional PCR-based protocols. The method was applied to study the short-lived linear DNA generated during programmed genomic deletions in a ciliate. It can be useful in studies of spontaneous DNA deletions in cell culture or for tracking intracellular modifications at the ends of transfected DNA during gene therapy trials.

  9. Radiation-induced energy migration within solid DNA: The role of misonidazole as an electron trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kazwini, A.T.; O'Neill, P.; Adams, G.E.; Fielden, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    The in-pulse luminescence emission from solid DNA produced upon irradiation with electron pulses of energy below 260 keV has been investigated in vacuo at 293 K to gain an insight into the existence of radiation-induced charge/energy migration within DNA. The DNA samples contained misonidazole in the range 3 to 330 base pairs per misonidazole molecule. Under these conditions greater than 90% of the total energy is deposited in the DNA. The in-pulse radiation-induced luminescence spectrum of DNA was found to be critically dependent upon the misonidazole content of DNA. The luminescence intensity from the mixtures decreases with increasing content of misonidazole, and at the highest concentration, the intensity at 550 nm is reduced to 50% of that from DNA only. In the presence of 1 atm of oxygen, the observed emission intensity from DNA in the wavelength region 350-575 was reduced by 35-40% compared to that from DNA in vacuo. It is concluded that electron migration can occur in solid mixtures of DNA over a distance of up to about 100 base pairs

  10. Flow cytometric and microscopic analysis of the effect of tannic acid on plant nuclei and estimation of DNA content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loureiro, J.; Rodriguez, E.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Santos, C.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 98, - (2006), s. 515-527 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : genome size * flow cytometry * nuclear DNA content Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.448, year: 2006

  11. Improved chaos-based video steganography using DNA alphabets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Kar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA based steganography plays a vital role in the field of privacy and secure communication. Here, we propose a DNA properties-based mechanism to send data hidden inside a video file. Initially, the video file is converted into image frames. Random frames are then selected and data is hidden in these at random locations by using the Least Significant Bit substitution method. We analyze the proposed architecture in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio as well as mean squared error measured between the original and steganographic files averaged over all video frames. The results show minimal degradation of the steganographic video file. Keywords: Chaotic map, DNA, Linear congruential generator, Video steganography, Least significant bit

  12. The demise of chloroplast DNA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Beth A; Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2004-09-01

    Although it might be expected that chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) would be stably maintained in mature leaves, we report the surprising observation that cpDNA levels decline during plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col.) until most of the leaves contain little or no DNA long before the onset of senescence. We measured the cpDNA content in developing cotyledons, rosette leaves, and cauline leaves. The amount of cpDNA per chloroplast decreases as the chloroplasts develop, reaching undetectable levels in mature leaves. In young cauline leaves, most individual molecules of cpDNA are found in complex, branched forms. In expanded cauline leaves, cpDNA is present in smaller branched forms only at the base of the leaf and is virtually absent in the distal part of the leaf. We conclude that photosynthetic activity may persist long after the demise of the cpDNA. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

  13. Content-Based Personalization Services Integrating Folksonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Cataldo; Narducci, Fedelucio; Lops, Pasquale; de Gemmis, Marco; Semeraro, Giovanni

    Basic content-based personalization consists in matching up the attributes of a user profile, in which preferences and interests are stored, with the attributes of a content object. The Web 2.0 (r)evolution has changed the game for personalization, from ‘elitary’ Web 1.0, written by few and read by many, to web content generated by everyone (user-generated content - UGC), since the role of people has evolved from passive consumers of information to that of active contributors.

  14. An Estimate of the Total DNA in the Biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landenmark, Hanna K E; Forgan, Duncan H; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-06-01

    Modern whole-organism genome analysis, in combination with biomass estimates, allows us to estimate a lower bound on the total information content in the biosphere: 5.3 × 1031 (±3.6 × 1031) megabases (Mb) of DNA. Given conservative estimates regarding DNA transcription rates, this information content suggests biosphere processing speeds exceeding yottaNOPS values (1024 Nucleotide Operations Per Second). Although prokaryotes evolved at least 3 billion years before plants and animals, we find that the information content of prokaryotes is similar to plants and animals at the present day. This information-based approach offers a new way to quantify anthropogenic and natural processes in the biosphere and its information diversity over time.

  15. Cell cycle phase of nondividing cells in aging human cell cultures determined by DNA content and chromosomal constitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanishevsky, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Human diploid cell cultures, strain WI-38, have a finite proliferative capacity and have been proposed as a model of biological aging. To identify the cell cycle phase of the nondividing cells, cultures of various ages were exposed to 3 Hdt for 48 hours to label dividing cells, then the cycle phase was identified for individual cells by one of two methods, and finally, the proliferative status of the same cells was scored by autoradiographic evidence of 3 HdT uptake. The methods to identify the cycle phase were: determination of DNA strain content by Feulgen scanning cytophotometry, and determination of chromosome constitution by the technique of premature chromosome condensation (PCC). Preliminary experiments showed the effect of continuous exposure to various levels of 3 HdT on cell growth. High levels of 3 HdT inhibited cell cycle traverse: the cell number and labeling index curves reached a plateau; the cell volume increased; the cells accumulated with 4C DNA contents and it appeared that they blocked in G 2 phase. This pattern is consistent with a radiation effect. (U.S.)

  16. DNA hybridization sensor based on pentacene thin film transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Min; Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Chand, Rohit; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2011-01-15

    A DNA hybridization sensor using pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs) is an excellent candidate for disposable sensor applications due to their low-cost fabrication process and fast detection. We fabricated pentacene TFTs on glass substrate for the sensing of DNA hybridization. The ss-DNA (polyA/polyT) or ds-DNA (polyA/polyT hybrid) were immobilized directly on the surface of the pentacene, producing a dramatic change in the electrical properties of the devices. The electrical characteristics of devices were studied as a function of DNA immobilization, single-stranded vs. double-stranded DNA, DNA length and concentration. The TFT device was further tested for detection of λ-phage genomic DNA using probe hybridization. Based on these results, we propose that a "label-free" detection technique for DNA hybridization is possible through direct measurement of electrical properties of DNA-immobilized pentacene TFTs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Triple-helix molecular switch-based aptasensors and DNA sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Elnaz; Abnous, Khalil; Alibolandi, Mona; Ramezani, Mohammad; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2018-07-15

    Utilization of traditional analytical techniques is limited because they are generally time-consuming and require high consumption of reagents, complicated sample preparation and expensive equipment. Therefore, it is of great interest to achieve sensitive, rapid and simple detection methods. It is believed that nucleic acids assays, especially aptamers, are very important in modern life sciences for target detection and biological analysis. Aptamers and DNA-based sensors have been widely used for the design of various sensors owing to their unique features. In recent years, triple-helix molecular switch (THMS)-based aptasensors and DNA sensors have been broadly utilized for the detection and analysis of different targets. The THMS relies on the formation of DNA triplex via Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairings under optimal conditions. This review focuses on recent progresses in the development and applications of electrochemical, colorimetric, fluorescence and SERS aptasensors and DNA sensors, which are based on THMS. Also, the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Cobra: A content-based video retrieval system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkovic, M.; Jonker, W.; Jensen, C.S.; Jeffery, K.G.; Pokorny, J.; Saltenis, S.; Bertino, E.; Böhm, K.; Jarke, M.

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of large publicly available video libraries results in a demand for techniques that can manipulate the video data based on content. In this paper, we present a content-based video retrieval system called Cobra. The system supports automatic extraction and retrieval of high-level

  20. DGGE and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis of bacterial communities in colon content and feces of pigs fed whole crop rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Feng; Zhu, Wei-Yun; Yao, Wen; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2007-01-01

    The effect of feeding whole crop rice (WCR) to growing-finishing pigs at three levels 0 (Control), 10% and 20% on bacterial communities in colon content and feces was analyzed using 16S rDNA-based techniques. Amplicons of the V6-V8 variable regions of bacterial 16S rDNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), cloning and sequencing. The total number of DGGE bands and Shannon index of diversity for feces samples were higher in the pigs fed WCR-containing diets compared with the control, while a decrease trend was observed in these two parameters for colon content samples with the inclusion of WCR in the diets, although statistical differences were not significant. In general, the intestinal bacterial communities were prone to form the cluster for pig fed the same diet. Feeding of WCR induced the presence of special DGGE band with the sequence showing 99% similarity to that of Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 20016T). The sequences of seven amplicons in total nine clones showed less than 97% similarity with those of previously identified or unidentified bacteria, suggesting that most bacteria in gastrointestinal tracts have not been cultured or identified. The results suggest that the diet containing WCR did not affect the major groups of bacteria, but stimulated the growth of L. reuteri-like species.

  1. High-speed DNA-based rolling motors powered by RNase H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehl, Kevin; Mugler, Andrew; Vivek, Skanda; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Fan, Mengzhen; Weeks, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based machines that walk by converting chemical energy into controlled motion could be of use in applications such as next generation sensors, drug delivery platforms, and biological computing. Despite their exquisite programmability, DNA-based walkers are, however, challenging to work with due to their low fidelity and slow rates (~1 nm/min). Here, we report DNA-based machines that roll rather than walk, and consequently have a maximum speed and processivity that is three-orders of magnitude greater than conventional DNA motors. The motors are made from DNA-coated spherical particles that hybridise to a surface modified with complementary RNA; motion is achieved through the addition of RNase H, which selectively hydrolyses hybridised RNA. Spherical motors move in a self-avoiding manner, whereas anisotropic particles, such as dimerised particles or rod-shaped particles travel linearly without a track or external force. Finally, we demonstrate detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by measuring particle displacement using a smartphone camera. PMID:26619152

  2. Privacy-Preserving Content-Based Recommender System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Zekeriya; Erkin, Z.; Beye, M.; Veugen, T.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    By offering personalized content to users, recommender systems have become a vital tool in e-commerce and online media applications. Content-based algorithms recommend items or products to users, that are most similar to those previously purchased or consumed. Unfortunately, collecting and storing

  3. Validity evidence based on test content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, Stephen; Faulkner-Bond, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Validity evidence based on test content is one of the five forms of validity evidence stipulated in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing developed by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and National Council on Measurement in Education. In this paper, we describe the logic and theory underlying such evidence and describe traditional and modern methods for gathering and analyzing content validity data. A comprehensive review of the literature and of the aforementioned Standards is presented. For educational tests and other assessments targeting knowledge and skill possessed by examinees, validity evidence based on test content is necessary for building a validity argument to support the use of a test for a particular purpose. By following the methods described in this article, practitioners have a wide arsenal of tools available for determining how well the content of an assessment is congruent with and appropriate for the specific testing purposes.

  4. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA

  5. Gastric lymphomas in Turkey. Analysis of prognostic factors with special emphasis on flow cytometric DNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Z D; Barista, I; Canpinar, H; Sungur, A; Tekuzman, G

    2000-07-01

    In contrast to DNA ploidy, to the authors' knowledge the prognostic significance of S-phase fraction (SPF) in gastric lymphomas has not been determined. In the current study, the prognostic significance of various parameters including SPF and DNA aneuploidy were analyzed and some distinct epidemiologic and biologic features of gastric lymphomas in Turkey were found. A series of 78 gastric lymphoma patients followed at Hacettepe University is reported. DNA flow cytometry was performed for 34 patients. The influence of various parameters on survival was investigated with the log rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to identify independent prognostic factors. The median age of the patients was 50 years. There was no correlation between patient age and tumor grade. DNA content analysis revealed 4 of the 34 cases to be aneuploid with DNA index values < 1.0. The mean SPF was 33.5%. In the univariate analysis, surgical resection of the tumor, modified Ann Arbor stage, performance status, response to first-line chemotherapy, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, and SPF were important prognostic factors for disease free survival (DFS). The same parameters, excluding LDH level, were important for determining overall survival (OS). In the multivariate analysis, surgical resection of the tumor, disease stage, performance status, and age were found to be important prognostic factors for OS. To the authors' knowledge the current study is the first to demonstrate the prognostic significance of SPF in gastric lymphomas. The distinguishing features of Turkish gastric lymphoma patients are 1) DNA indices of aneuploid cases that all are < 1.0, which is a unique feature; 2) a lower percentage of aneuploid cases; 3) a higher SPF; 4) a younger age distribution; and 5) lack of an age-grade correlation. The authors conclude that gastric lymphomas in Turkey have distinct biologic and epidemiologic characteristics. Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.

  6. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  7. Induced Polarization Influences the Fundamental Forces in DNA Base Flipping

    OpenAIRE

    Lemkul, Justin A.; Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Base flipping in DNA is an important process involved in genomic repair and epigenetic control of gene expression. The driving forces for these processes are not fully understood, especially in the context of the underlying dynamics of the DNA and solvent effects. We studied double-stranded DNA oligomers that have been previously characterized by imino proton exchange NMR using both additive and polarizable force fields. Our results highlight the importance of induced polarization on the base...

  8. Analysis of pyrimidine dimer content of isolated DNA by nuclease digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farland, W.H.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Isolated DNA is highly susceptible to degradation by exogenous nucleases. Complete digestion is possible with a number of well-characterized enzymes from a variety of sources. Treatment of DNA with a battery of enzymes including both phosphodiesterase and phosphatase activities yields a mixture of nucleosides and inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) as a final product. Unlike native DNA, ultraviolet-irradiated DNA is resistant to complete digestion. Setlow et al. demonstrated that the structural changes in the DNA responsible for the nuclease resistance were the formation of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, the major photoproduct in UV-irradiated DNA. Using venom phosphodiesterase, they demonstrated that UV irradiation of DNA affected both the rate and extent of enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition, it was demonstrated that the major nuclease-resistant product of this hydrolysis was an oligonucleotide containing dimerized pyrimidines. Treatment of the DNA to split the dimers, either photochemically or photoenzymatically, rendered the polymer more susceptible to hydrolysis by the phosphodiesterase. The specificity of photoreactivating enzyme for pyrimidine dimers lends support to the role of these structures in conferring nuclease resistance to UV-irradiated DNA. The nuclease resistance of DNA containing dimers has been the basis of several assays for the measurement of these photoproducts. Sutherland and Chamberlin reported the development of a rapid and sensitive assay for dimers in 32 P-labeled DNA

  9. Influence of serum HBV-DNA content on the expression of TGF-β1 and TNF-α in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yujie; Nan Chunhong; Yan Lijuan; Yue Zhijun; Yang Zhicai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the serum HBV-DNA content and levels of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as the degree of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: Serum HBV-DNA content quantification was determined with PCR-real time fluorescence method; TGF-β1 and TNF-α with ELISA and the hepatic fibrosis indicators HA, LN, IV-C, P-III with RIA. Altogether 89 patients with clinical chronic hepatitis B of various degrees (mild 25, moderate 35, advanced 29) were tested. Results: With the progress of hepatic injury, the serum contents of HBV-DNA, TGF-β1, TNF-α were correspondingly increased with significant differences among the patients groups (p<0.01). The TGF-β1, TNF-α, HA, IV-C, PC III, levels were positively correlated to the degree of hepatic injury with r=0.9561, 0.8123, 0.8561, 0.7723, 0.7150 respectively and p<0.01; for LN it was r=0.542 and p<0.05. Conclusion: In patients with chronic hepatitis B, hepatic fibrosis is the fundamental process in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. High concentration of HBV is the crucial factor for development of hepatic fibrosis, which works synergically with many cytokines especially TGF-β1 and TNF-α

  10. Optimizing cationic and neutral lipids for efficient gene delivery at high serum content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chia-Ling; Ewert, Kai K; Majzoub, Ramsey N; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Liang, Keng S; Leal, Cecília; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposome (CL)-DNA complexes are promising gene delivery vectors with potential application in gene therapy. A key challenge in creating CL-DNA complexes for application is that their transfection efficiency (TE) is adversely affected by serum. In particular, little is known about the effects of a high serum content on TE, even though this may provide design guidelines for application in vivo. We prepared CL-DNA complexes in which we varied the neutral lipid [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine, glycerol-monooleate (GMO), cholesterol], the headgroup charge and chemical structure of the cationic lipid, and the ratio of neutral to cationic lipid; we then measured the TE of these complexes as a function of serum content and assessed their cytotoxicity. We tested selected formulations in two human cancer cell lines (M21/melanoma and PC-3/prostate cancer). In the absence of serum, all CL-DNA complexes of custom-synthesized multivalent lipids show high TE. Certain combinations of multivalent lipids and neutral lipids, such as MVL5(5+)/GMO-DNA complexes or complexes based on the dendritic-headgroup lipid TMVLG3(8+) exhibited high TE both in the absence and presence of serum. Although their TE still dropped to a small extent in the presence of serum, it reached or surpassed that of benchmark commercial transfection reagents, particularly at a high serum content. Two-component vectors (one multivalent cationic lipid and one neutral lipid) can rival or surpass benchmark reagents at low and high serum contents (up to 50%, v/v). We propose guidelines for optimizing the serum resistance of CL-DNA complexes based on a given cationic lipid. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. DNA cross-linking by dehydromonocrotaline lacks apparent base sequence preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieben, W Kurt; Coulombe, Roger A

    2004-12-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are ubiquitous plant toxins, many of which, upon oxidation by hepatic mixed-function oxidases, become reactive bifunctional pyrrolic electrophiles that form DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links. The anti-mitotic, toxic, and carcinogenic action of PAs is thought to be caused, at least in part, by these cross-links. We wished to determine whether the activated PA pyrrole dehydromonocrotaline (DHMO) exhibits base sequence preferences when cross-linked to a set of model duplex poly A-T 14-mer oligonucleotides with varying internal and/or end 5'-d(CG), 5'-d(GC), 5'-d(TA), 5'-d(CGCG), or 5'-d(GCGC) sequences. DHMO-DNA cross-links were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) of 32P endlabeled oligonucleotides and by HPLC analysis of cross-linked DNAs enzymatically digested to their constituent deoxynucleosides. The degree of DNA cross-links depended upon the concentration of the pyrrole, but not on the base sequence of the oligonucleotide target. Likewise, HPLC chromatograms of cross-linked and digested DNAs showed no discernible sequence preference for any nucleotide. Added glutathione, tyrosine, cysteine, and aspartic acid, but not phenylalanine, threonine, serine, lysine, or methionine competed with DNA as alternate nucleophiles for cross-linking by DHMO. From these data it appears that DHMO exhibits no strong base preference when forming cross-links with DNA, and that some cellular nucleophiles can inhibit DNA cross-link formation.

  12. A Bayesian deconvolution strategy for immunoprecipitation-based DNA methylome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Thomas A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Turner, Daniel J.; Flicek, Paul; Li, Heng; Kulesha, Eugene; Gräf, Stefan; Johnson, Nathan; Herrero, Javier; Tomazou, Eleni M.; Thorne, Natalie P.; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Herberth, Marlis; Howe, Kevin L.; Jackson, David K.; Miretti, Marcos M.; Marioni, John C.; Birney, Ewan; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Durbin, Richard; Tavaré, Simon; Beck, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    DNA methylation is an indispensible epigenetic modification of mammalian genomes. Consequently there is great interest in strategies for genome-wide/whole-genome DNA methylation analysis, and immunoprecipitation-based methods have proven to be a powerful option. Such methods are rapidly shifting the bottleneck from data generation to data analysis, necessitating the development of better analytical tools. Until now, a major analytical difficulty associated with immunoprecipitation-based DNA methylation profiling has been the inability to estimate absolute methylation levels. Here we report the development of a novel cross-platform algorithm – Bayesian Tool for Methylation Analysis (Batman) – for analyzing Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) profiles generated using arrays (MeDIP-chip) or next-generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq). The latter is an approach we have developed to elucidate the first high-resolution whole-genome DNA methylation profile (DNA methylome) of any mammalian genome. MeDIP-seq/MeDIP-chip combined with Batman represent robust, quantitative, and cost-effective functional genomic strategies for elucidating the function of DNA methylation. PMID:18612301

  13. High-resolution NMR studies of chimeric DNA-RNA-DNA duplexes, heteronomous base pairing, and continuous base stacking at junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Shanho; Flynn, P.; Wang, A.; Reid, B.

    1991-01-01

    Two symmetrical DNA-RNA-DNA duplex chimeras, d(CGCG)r(AAUU)d(CGCG) (designated rAAUU) and d(CGCG)r(UAUA)d(CGCG) (designated rUAUA), and a nonsymmetrical chimeric duplex, d(CGTT)r(AUAA)d(TGCG)/d(CGCA)r(UUAU)d(AACG) (designated rAUAA), as well as their pure DNA analogues, containing dU instead of T, have been synthesized by solid-phase phosphoramidite methods and studied by high-resolution NMR techniques. The 1D imino proton NOE spectra of these d-r-d chimeras indicate normal Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding and base stacking at the junction region. Preliminary qualitative NOESY, COSY, and chemical shift data suggest that the internal RNA segment contains C3'-endo (A-type) sugar conformations except for the first RNA residues (position 5 and 17) following the 3' end of the DNA block, which, unlike the other six ribonucleotides, exhibit detectable H1'-H2' J coupling. The nucleosides of the two flanking DNA segments appear to adopt a fairly normal C2'-endo B-DNA conformation except at the junction with the RNA blocks (residues 4 and 16), where the last DNA residue appears to adopt an intermediate sugar conformation. The data indicate that A-type and B-type conformations can coexist in a single short continuous nucleic acid duplex, but these results differ somewhat from previous theoretical model studies

  14. A study of real-time content marketing : formulating real-time content marketing based on content, search and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Duyen

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to understand profoundly the new concept of content marketing – real-time content marketing on the aspect of the digital marketing experts. Particularly, the research will focus on the real-time content marketing theories and how to build real-time content marketing strategy based on content, search and social media. It also finds out how marketers measure and keep track of conversion rates of their real-time content marketing plan. Practically, th...

  15. Recognition of base J in duplex DNA by J-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabatini, Robert; Meeuwenoord, Nico; van Boom, Jacques H.; Borst, Piet

    2002-01-01

    beta-d-Glucosylhydroxymethyluracil, also called base J, is an unusual modified DNA base conserved among Kinetoplastida. Base J is found predominantly in repetitive DNA and correlates with epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes. We have previously found a J-binding

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering based nonfluorescent probe for multiplex DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lan; Yu, Chenxu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    To provide rapid and accurate detection of DNA markers in a straightforward, inexpensive, and multiplex format, an alternative surface-enhanced Raman scattering based probe was designed and fabricated to covalently attach both DNA probing sequence and nonfluorescent Raman tags to the surface of gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuP-RTag). The intensity of Raman signal of the probes could be controlled through the surface coverage of the nonfluorescent Raman tags (RTags). Detection sensitivity of these probes could be optimized by fine-tuning the amount of DNA molecules and RTags on the probes. Long-term stability of the DNA-AuP-RTag probes was found to be good (over 3 months). Excellent multiplexing capability of the DNA-AuP-RTag scheme was demonstrated by simultaneous identification of up to eight probes in a mixture. Detection of hybridization of single-stranded DNA to its complementary targets was successfully accomplished with a long-term goal to use nonfluorescent RTags in a Raman-based DNA microarray platform.

  17. Prenatal Care: A Content-Based ESL Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Elissa Anne

    A content-based curriculum in English as a Second Language (ESL) focusing on prenatal self-care is presented. The course was designed as a solution to the problem of inadequate prenatal care for limited-English-proficient Mexican immigrant women. The first three sections offer background information on and discussion of (1) content-based ESL…

  18. A Novel Fast and Secure Approach for Voice Encryption Based on DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaei Kate, Hamidreza; Razmara, Jafar; Isazadeh, Ayaz

    2018-06-01

    Today, in the world of information communication, voice information has a particular importance. One way to preserve voice data from attacks is voice encryption. The encryption algorithms use various techniques such as hashing, chaotic, mixing, and many others. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed for voice encryption based on three different schemes to increase flexibility and strength of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm uses an innovative encoding scheme, the DNA encryption technique and a permutation function to provide a secure and fast solution for voice encryption. The algorithm is evaluated based on various measures including signal to noise ratio, peak signal to noise ratio, correlation coefficient, signal similarity and signal frequency content. The results demonstrate applicability of the proposed method in secure and fast encryption of voice files

  19. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I–V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed. PMID:29342091

  20. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun

    2018-01-17

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I-V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed.

  1. Enhanced Stability of DNA Nanostructures by Incorporation of Unnatural Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Guocheng; Wang, Ting; Fu, Jing; Li, Rujiao; Song, Linlin; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan; Chen, Fei

    2017-11-03

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures hold great promise in the fields of nanofabrication, biosensing and nanomedicine. However, the inherent low stability of the DNA double helices, formed by weak interactions, largely hinders the assembly and functions of DNA nanostructures. In this study, we redesigned and constructed a six-arm DNA junction by incorporation of the unnatural base pairs 5-Me-isoC/isoG and A/2-thioT into the double helices. They not only retained the structural integrity of the DNA nanostructure, but also showed enhanced thermal stability and resistance to T7 Exonuclease digestion. This research may expand the applications of DNA nanostructures in nanofabrication and biomedical fields, and furthermore, the genetic alphabet expansion with unnatural base pairs may enable us to construct more complicated and diversified self-assembled DNA nanostructures. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. DNA methylation based biomarkers: Practical considerations and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How Kit, Alexandre; Tost, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    of biochemical molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA or lipids, whereby protein biomarkers have been the most extensively studied and used, notably in blood-based protein quantification tests or immunohistochemistry. The rise of interest in epigenetic mechanisms has allowed the identification of a new type...... of biomarker, DNA methylation, which is of great potential for many applications. This stable and heritable covalent modification mostly affects cytosines in the context of a CpG dinucleotide in humans. It can be detected and quantified by a number of technologies including genome-wide screening methods...... as well as locus- or gene-specific high-resolution analysis in different types of samples such as frozen tissues and FFPE samples, but also in body fluids such as urine, plasma, and serum obtained through non-invasive procedures. In some cases, DNA methylation based biomarkers have proven to be more...

  3. Modulation of DNA base excision repair during neuronal differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Ferrarelli, Leslie K

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage susceptibility and base excision DNA repair (BER) capacity in undifferentiated and differentiated human neural cells. The results show that undifferentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells are less sensitive to oxidative damage than their differentiated counterparts, in part because...

  4. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerman, Kagan

    2001-01-01

    The utility and advantages of an indicator free and MB based sequence specific DNA hybridization biosensor based on guanine and adenine oxidation signals and MB reduction signals have been demonstrated...

  5. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  6. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on grafting-to mode of terminal deoxynucleoside transferase-mediated extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyuan; Liu, Zhoujie; Peng, Huaping; Zheng, Yanjie; Lin, Zhen; Liu, Ailin; Chen, Wei; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-12-15

    Previously reported electrochemical DNA biosensors based on in-situ polymerization approach reveal that terminal deoxynucleoside transferase (TdTase) has good amplifying performance and promising application in the design of electrochemical DNA biosensor. However, this method, in which the background is significantly affected by the amount of TdTase, suffers from being easy to produce false positive result and poor stability. Herein, we firstly present a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on grafting-to mode of TdTase-mediated extension, in which DNA targets are polymerized in homogeneous solution and then hybridized with DNA probes on BSA-based DNA carrier platform. It is surprising to find that the background in the grafting-to mode of TdTase-based electrochemical DNA biosensor have little interference from the employed TdTase. Most importantly, the proposed electrochemical DNA biosensor shows greatly improved detection performance over the in-situ polymerization approach-based electrochemical DNA biosensor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Slow elimination of injured liver DNA bases of γ-irradiated old mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Malakhov, L.V.; Fomenko, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the elimination of injured bases from the liver DNA of old and young mice after their exposure to γ rays. The presented data show that if DNA from the liver of irradiated mice is treated with incision enzymes, its priming activity is increased. In the case of enzymatic treatment of DNA isolated 5 h after irradiation we find a great difference between the priming activity of the liver DNA of old and young mice. The reason for this difference is that the liver DNA of 20-month old mice 5 h after irradiation still has many unrepaired injured bases. These data indicated that the rate of incision of γ-injured DNA bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of young mice. In the liver of mice of different age the rate of restitution of DNA, single-strand breaks induced by γ rays in doses up to 100 Gy is the same. At the same time, the level of induced reparative synthesis of DNA in cells of an old organism is lower than in cells of a young organism. The obtained data suggest that reduction of the rate of elimination of modified bases from the cell DNA of 20-month old mice is due to reduction of the activity of the DNA repair enzymes or to restrictions in the chromatin in the access of these enzymes to the injured regions of DNA in the cells of old animals

  8. Raman spectroscopy for DNA quantification in cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okotrub, K A; Surovtsev, N V; Semeshin, V F; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel approach to quantify DNA in cell nuclei. This approach is based on spectroscopy analysis of Raman light scattering, and avoids the problem of nonstoichiometric binding of dyes to DNA, as it directly measures the signal from DNA. Quantitative analysis of nuclear DNA contribution to Raman spectrum could be reliably performed using intensity of a phosphate mode at 1096 cm(-1) . When compared to the known DNA standards from cells of different animals, our results matched those values at error of 10%. We therefore suggest that this approach will be useful to expand the list of DNA standards, to properly adjust the duration of hydrolysis in Feulgen staining, to assay the applicability of fuchsines for DNA quantification, as well as to measure DNA content in cells with complex hydrolysis patterns, when Feulgen densitometry is inappropriate. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  9. DNA/RNA-based formulations for treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaolu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2017-12-01

    To develop a successful formulation for the gene therapy of breast cancer, an effective therapeutic nucleic acid and a proper delivery system are essential. Increased understanding of breast cancer, and developments in biotechnology, material science and nanotechnology have provided a major impetus in the development of effective formulations for the gene therapy of breast cancer. Areas covered: We discuss DNA/RNA-based formulations that can inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and control the progress of breast cancer. Targets for the gene therapy of breast cancer, DNA/RNA-based therapeutics and delivery systems are summarized. And examples of successful DNA/RNA-based formulations for breast cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Expert opinion: Several challenges remain in developing effective DNA/RNA-based formulations for treatment of breast cancer. Firstly, most of the currently utilized targets are not effective enough as monotherapy for breast cancer. Secondly, the requirements for co-delivery system make the preparation of formulation more complicated. Thirdly, nanoparticles with the modification of tumor-targeting ligands could be more unstable in circulation and normal tissues. Lastly, immune responses against the viral vectors are unfavorable for the gene therapy of breast cancer because of the damage to the host and the impaired therapeutic ability.

  10. Size and Base Composition of RNA in Supercoiled Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter H.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Helinski, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    The average size and base composition of the covalently integrated RNA segment in supercoiled ColE1 DNA synthesized in Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol (CM-ColE1 DNA) have been determined by two independent methods. The two approaches yielded similar results, indicating that the RNA segment in CM-ColE1 DNA contains GMP at the 5′ end and comprises on the average 25 to 26 ribonucleotides with a base composition of 10-11 G, 3 A, 5-6 C, and 6-7 U. PMID:4359488

  11. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Fuyi; Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang; Gao, Fenglei; Wang, Po

    2017-01-01

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH 4 oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10 −15 to 10 −11  g mL −1 and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10 −15  g mL −1 . Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 . And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  12. DNA-based asymmetric catalysis : Sequence-dependent rate acceleration and enantioselectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Klijn, Jaap E.; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    This study shows that the role of DNA in the DNA-based enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of azachalcone with cyclopentadiene is not limited to that of a chiral scaffold. DNA in combination with the copper complex of 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Cu-L1) gives rise to a rate acceleration of up to

  13. Highly sensitive DNA sensors based on cerium oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyet, Nguyen Thi; Hai Yen, Le Thi; Van Thu, Vu; lan, Hoang; Trung, Tran; Vuong, Pham Hung; Tam, Phuong Dinh

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a CeO2 nanorod (NR)-based electrochemical DNA sensor was developed to identify Salmonella that causes food-borne infections. CeO2 NRs were synthesized without templates via a simple and unexpensive hydrothermal approach at 170 °C for 12 h by using CeO(NO3)3·6H2O as a Ce source. The DNA probe was immobilized onto the CeO2 NR-modified electrode through covalent attachment. The characteristics of the hybridized DNA were analyzed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- as a redox probe. Experimental results showed that electron transfer resistance (Ret) increased after the DNA probe was attached to the electrode surface and increased further after the DNA probe hybridized with its complementary sequence. A linear response of Ret to the target DNA concentration was found from 0.01 μM to 2 μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the DNA sensor were 0.01 μM and 3362.1 Ω μM-1 cm-2, respectively. Various parameters, such as pH value, ionic strength, DNA probe concentration, and hybridization time, influencing DNA sensor responses were also investigated.

  14. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z.

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals

  15. Web-Based Media Contents Editor for UCC Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoksoo

    The purpose of this research is to "design web-based media contents editor for establishing UCC(User Created Contents)-based websites." The web-based editor features user-oriented interfaces and increased convenience, significantly different from previous off-line editors. It allows users to edit media contents online and can be effectively used for online promotion activities of enterprises and organizations. In addition to development of the editor, the research aims to support the entry of enterprises and public agencies to the online market by combining the technology with various UCC items.

  16. Biosensor for label-free DNA quantification based on functionalized LPGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helena M R; Moreira, Luis; Pereira, Leonor; Jorge, Pedro; Gouveia, Carlos; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Fernandes, José R A

    2016-10-15

    A label-free fiber optic biosensor based on a long period grating (LPG) and a basic optical interrogation scheme using off the shelf components is used for the detection of in-situ DNA hybridization. A new methodology is proposed for the determination of the spectral position of the LPG mode resonance. The experimental limit of detection obtained for the DNA was 62±2nM and the limit of quantification was 209±7nM. The sample specificity was experimentally demonstrated using DNA targets with different base mismatches relatively to the probe and was found that the system has a single base mismatch selectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissociation between insulin secretion and DNA synthesis in cultured pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1985-01-01

    -Tdr incorporation. However, long-term exposure to IBMX did not result in increased DNA content of the islets. Inhibition of the DNA synthesis by 5 mM hydroxyurea resulted in a marked reduction in DNA content of the islets but no decrease in either insulin release or insulin content when expressed per ng DNA...

  18. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA quantification of various forensic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréasson, H; Nilsson, M; Budowle, B; Lundberg, H; Allen, M

    2006-12-01

    Due to the different types and quality of forensic evidence materials, their DNA content can vary substantially, and particularly low quantities can impact the results in an identification analysis. In this study, the quantity of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA was determined in a variety of materials using a previously described real-time PCR method. DNA quantification in the roots and distal sections of plucked and shed head hairs revealed large variations in DNA content particularly between the root and the shaft of plucked hairs. Also large intra- and inter-individual variations were found among hairs. In addition, DNA content was estimated in samples collected from fingerprints and accessories. The quantification of DNA on various items also displayed large variations, with some materials containing large amounts of nuclear DNA while no detectable nuclear DNA and only limited amounts of mitochondrial DNA were seen in others. Using this sensitive real-time PCR quantification assay, a better understanding was obtained regarding DNA content and variation in commonly analysed forensic evidence materials and this may guide the forensic scientist as to the best molecular biology approach for analysing various forensic evidence materials.

  19. DNA preservation in silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawen; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Gong, He; Liu, Meng; Guo, Shaozhe; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2017-06-27

    The structure of DNA is susceptible to alterations at high temperature and on changing pH, irradiation and exposure to DNase. Options to protect and preserve DNA during storage are important for applications in genetic diagnosis, identity authentication, drug development and bioresearch. In the present study, the stability of total DNA purified from human dermal fibroblast cells, as well as that of plasmid DNA, was studied in silk protein materials. The DNA/silk mixtures were stabilized on filter paper (silk/DNA + filter) or filter paper pre-coated with silk and treated with methanol (silk/DNA + PT-filter) as a route to practical utility. After air-drying and water extraction, 50-70% of the DNA and silk could be retrieved and showed a single band on electrophoretic gels. 6% silk/DNA + PT-filter samples provided improved stability in comparison with 3% silk/DNA + filter samples and DNA + filter samples for DNA preservation, with ∼40% of the band intensity remaining at 37 °C after 40 days and ∼10% after exposure to UV light for 10 hours. Quantitative analysis using the PicoGreen assay confirmed the results. The use of Tris/borate/EDTA (TBE) buffer enhanced the preservation and/or extraction of the DNA. The DNA extracted after storage maintained integrity and function based on serving as a functional template for PCR amplification of the gene for zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750) and for transgene expression of red fluorescence protein (dsRed) in HEK293 cells. The high molecular weight and high content of a crystalline beta-sheet structure formed on the coated surfaces likely accounted for the preservation effects observed for the silk/DNA + PT-filter samples. Although similar preservation effects were also obtained for lyophilized silk/DNA samples, the rapid and simple processing available with the silk-DNA-filter membrane system makes it appealing for future applications.

  20. DNA Array-Based Gene Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Provenzano, Maurizio; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Pilati, Pierluigi; Nitti, Donato; Lise, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease in most respects, including its cellularity, different genetic alterations, and diverse clinical behaviors. Traditional molecular analyses are reductionist, assessing only 1 or a few genes at a time, thus working with a biologic model too specific and limited to confront a process whose clinical outcome is likely to be governed by the combined influence of many genes. The potential of functional genomics is enormous, because for each experiment, thousands of relevant observations can be made simultaneously. Accordingly, DNA array, like other high-throughput technologies, might catalyze and ultimately accelerate the development of knowledge in tumor cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of DNA array technology in cancer research has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to carcinogenesis, tumor aggressiveness, and sensitivity to antiblastic agents. Given the revolutionary implications that the use of this technology might have in the clinical management of patients with cancer, principles of DNA array-based tumor gene profiling need to be clearly understood for the data to be correctly interpreted and appreciated. In the present work, we discuss the technical features characterizing this powerful laboratory tool and review the applications so far described in the field of oncology. PMID:15621987

  1. Research on Image Encryption Based on DNA Sequence and Chaos Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian Zhang, Tian; Yan, Shan Jun; Gu, Cheng Yan; Ren, Ran; Liao, Kai Xin

    2018-04-01

    Nowadays encryption is a common technique to protect image data from unauthorized access. In recent years, many scientists have proposed various encryption algorithms based on DNA sequence to provide a new idea for the design of image encryption algorithm. Therefore, a new method of image encryption based on DNA computing technology is proposed in this paper, whose original image is encrypted by DNA coding and 1-D logistic chaotic mapping. First, the algorithm uses two modules as the encryption key. The first module uses the real DNA sequence, and the second module is made by one-dimensional logistic chaos mapping. Secondly, the algorithm uses DNA complementary rules to encode original image, and uses the key and DNA computing technology to compute each pixel value of the original image, so as to realize the encryption of the whole image. Simulation results show that the algorithm has good encryption effect and security.

  2. Characterization of polymer, DNA-based, and silk thin film resistivities and of DNA-based films prepared for enhanced electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaney, Perry P.; Ouchen, Fahima; Grote, James G.

    2009-08-01

    DC resistivity studies were carried out on biopolymer films of DNA-CTMA and silk fibroin, and on selected traditional polymer films, including PMMA and APC. Films of DNA-CTMA versus molecular weight and with conductive dopants PCBM, BAYTRON P and ammonium tetrachloroplatinate are reported. The films were spin coated on glass slides configured for measurements of volume dc resistance. The measurements used the alternating polarity method to record the applied voltage-dependent current independent of charging and background currents. The Arrhenius equation plus a constant was fitted to the conductivity versus temperature data of the polymers and the non-doped DNA-based biopolymers with activation energies ranging from 0.8 to 1.4 eV.

  3. RDNAnalyzer: A tool for DNA secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Shehzadi, Abida; Nadeem, Shahid; Husnain, Tayyab

    2012-01-01

    RDNAnalyzer is an innovative computer based tool designed for DNA secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. It can randomly generate the DNA sequence or user can upload the sequences of their own interest in RAW format. It uses and extends the Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm and has various application for the sequence analysis. It predicts the DNA secondary structure and base pairings. It also provides the tools for routinely performed sequence analysis by the biological scientists such as DNA replication, reverse compliment generation, transcription, translation, sequence specific information as total number of nucleotide bases, ATGC base contents along with their respective percentages and sequence cleaner. RDNAnalyzer is a unique tool developed in Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 using Microsoft Visual C# and Windows Presentation Foundation and provides user friendly environment for sequence analysis. It is freely available. http://www.cemb.edu.pk/sw.html RDNAnalyzer - Random DNA Analyser, GUI - Graphical user interface, XAML - Extensible Application Markup Language.

  4. DNA content of cells with generalized chromosome shattering induced by ultraviolet light plus caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Gray, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Asynchronously growing Chinese hamster cells (M3-1) were UV-irradiated (lambda = 254 nm) and then incubated with/without caffeine (2 mM) for 20 h. Microscopic evaluation of metaphase spreads revealed that after UV-irradiation alone (5.0 J/m 2 ) and caffeine treatment alone, the percentage of cells with condensed chromatin appearing fragmented and/or pulverized ('GCS-like' cells; GCS, Generalized Chromosome Shattering) was very low while it was high following the combined treatment. Cytogenetic and flow cytometric analysis of cells obtained by mechanical shaking cultures treated with UV and caffeine indicated that 'GCS-like' cells have the same DNA content as untreated cells in G2 phase and mitosis. (orig.)

  5. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  6. One-Dimensional Multichromophor Arrays Based on DNA: From Self-Assembly to Light-Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslen, Philipp; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-10-20

    Light-harvesting complexes collect light energy and deliver it by a cascade of energy and electron transfer processes to the reaction center where charge separation leads to storage as chemical energy. The design of artificial light-harvesting assemblies faces enormous challenges because several antenna chromophores need to be kept in close proximity but self-quenching needs to be avoided. Double stranded DNA as a supramolecular scaffold plays a promising role due to its characteristic structural properties. Automated DNA synthesis allows incorporation of artificial chromophore-modified building blocks, and sequence design allows precise control of the distances and orientations between the chromophores. The helical twist between the chromophores, which is induced by the DNA framework, controls energy and electron transfer and thereby reduces the self-quenching that is typically observed in chromophore aggregates. This Account summarizes covalently multichromophore-modified DNA and describes how such multichromophore arrays were achieved by Watson-Crick-specific and DNA-templated self-assembly. The covalent DNA systems were prepared by incorporation of chromophores as DNA base substitutions (either as C-nucleosides or with acyclic linkers as substitutes for the 2'-deoxyribofuranoside) and as DNA base modifications. Studies with DNA base substitutions revealed that distances but more importantly relative orientations of the chromophores govern the energy transfer efficiencies and thereby the light-harvesting properties. With DNA base substitutions, duplex stabilization was faced and could be overcome, for instance, by zipper-like placement of the chromophores in both strands. For both principal structural approaches, DNA-based light-harvesting antenna could be realized. The major disadvantages, however, for covalent multichromophore DNA conjugates are the poor yields of synthesis and the solubility issues for oligonucleotides with more than 5-10 chromophore

  7. DNA-based construction at the nanoscale: emerging trends and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourdu Xavier, P.; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    2018-02-01

    The field of structural DNA nanotechnology has evolved remarkably—from the creation of artificial immobile junctions to the recent DNA-protein hybrid nanoscale shapes—in a span of about 35 years. It is now possible to create complex DNA-based nanoscale shapes and large hierarchical assemblies with greater stability and predictability, thanks to the development of computational tools and advances in experimental techniques. Although it started with the original goal of DNA-assisted structure determination of difficult-to-crystallize molecules, DNA nanotechnology has found its applications in a myriad of fields. In this review, we cover some of the basic and emerging assembly principles: hybridization, base stacking/shape complementarity, and protein-mediated formation of nanoscale structures. We also review various applications of DNA nanostructures, with special emphasis on some of the biophysical applications that have been reported in recent years. In the outlook, we discuss further improvements in the assembly of such structures, and explore possible future applications involving super-resolved fluorescence, single-particle cryo-electron (cryo-EM) and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) nanoscopic imaging techniques, and in creating new synergistic designer materials.

  8. Oxidatively-induced DNA damage and base excision repair in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Deniz; Tuna, Gamze; Kirkali, Güldal; Tunca, Zeliha; Can, Güneş; Arat, Hidayet Ece; Kant, Melis; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Özerdem, Ayşegül

    2018-05-01

    Oxidatively-induced DNA damage has previously been associated with bipolar disorder. More recently, impairments in DNA repair mechanisms have also been reported. We aimed to investigate oxidatively-induced DNA lesions and expression of DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy individuals. DNA base lesions including both base and nucleoside modifications were measured using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with isotope-dilution in DNA samples isolated from leukocytes of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (n = 32) and healthy individuals (n = 51). The expression of DNA repair enzymes OGG1 and NEIL1 were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of malondialdehyde were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Seven DNA base lesions in DNA of leukocytes of patients and healthy individuals were identified and quantified. Three of them had significantly elevated levels in bipolar patients when compared to healthy individuals. No elevation of lipid peroxidation marker malondialdehyde was observed. The level of OGG1 expression was significantly reduced in bipolar patients compared to healthy individuals, whereas the two groups exhibited similar levels of NEIL1 expression. Our results suggest that oxidatively-induced DNA damage occurs and base excision repair capacity may be decreased in bipolar patients when compared to healthy individuals. Measurement of oxidatively-induced DNA base lesions and the expression of DNA repair enzymes may be of great importance for large scale basic research and clinical studies of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescence Microscopy of Nanochannel-Confined DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Fredrik; Persson, Fredrik; Fritzsche, Joachim; Beech, Jason P; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O

    2018-01-01

    Stretching of DNA in nanoscale confinement allows for several important studies. The genetic contents of the DNA can be visualized on the single DNA molecule level and both the polymer physics of confined DNA and also DNA/protein and other DNA/DNA-binding molecule interactions can be explored. This chapter describes the basic steps to fabricate the nanostructures, perform the experiments and analyze the data.

  10. Envisaging quantum transport phenomenon in a muddled base pair of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Rajan; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh

    2018-05-01

    The effect of muddled base pair on electron transfer through a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule connected to the gold electrodes has been elucidated using tight binding model. The effect of hydrogen and nitrogen bonds on the resistance of the base pair has been minutely observed. Using the semiempirical extended Huckel approach within NEGF regime, we have determined the current and conductance vs. bias voltage for disordered base pairs of DNA made of thymine (T) and adenine (A). The asymmetrical behaviour amid five times depreciation in the current characteristics has been observed for deviated Au-AT base pair-Au devices. An interesting revelation is that the conductance of the intrinsic AT base pair configuration attains dramatically high values with the symmetrical zig-zag pattern of current, which clearly indicates the transformation of the bond length within the strands of base pair when compared with other samples. A thorough investigation of the transmission coefficients T( E) and HOMO-LUMO gap reveals the misalignment of the strands in base pairs of DNA. The observed results present an insight to extend this work to build biosensing devices to predict the abnormality with the DNA.

  11. DNA barcode-based molecular identification system for fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Koo, Hyeyoung; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Won

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we applied DNA barcoding to identify species using short DNA sequence analysis. We examined the utility of DNA barcoding by identifying 53 Korean freshwater fish species, 233 other freshwater fish species, and 1339 saltwater fish species. We successfully developed a web-based molecular identification system for fish (MISF) using a profile hidden Markov model. MISF facilitates efficient and reliable species identification, overcoming the limitations of conventional taxonomic approaches. MISF is freely accessible at http://bioinfosys.snu.ac.kr:8080/MISF/misf.jsp .

  12. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  13. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  14. Opto-electronic DNA chip-based integrated card for clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Gilles; Broyer, Patrick; Lanet, Véronique; Delattre, Cyril; Foucault, Frédéric; Menou, Lionel; Calvas, Bernard; Roller, Denis; Ginot, Frédéric; Campagnolo, Raymond; Mallard, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    Clinical diagnostics is one of the most promising applications for microfluidic lab-on-a-chip or lab-on-card systems. DNA chips, which provide multiparametric data, are privileged tools for genomic analysis. However, automation of molecular biology protocol and use of these DNA chips in fully integrated systems remains a great challenge. Simplicity of chip and/or card/instrument interfaces is amongst the most critical issues to be addressed. Indeed, current detection systems for DNA chip reading are often complex, expensive, bulky and even limited in terms of sensitivity or accuracy. Furthermore, for liquid handling in the lab-on-cards, many devices use complex and bulky systems, either to directly manipulate fluids, or to ensure pneumatic or mechanical control of integrated valves. All these drawbacks prevent or limit the use of DNA-chip-based integrated systems, for point-of-care testing or as a routine diagnostics tool. We present here a DNA-chip-based protocol integration on a plastic card for clinical diagnostics applications including: (1) an opto-electronic DNA-chip, (2) fluid handling using electrically activated embedded pyrotechnic microvalves with closing/opening functions. We demonstrate both fluidic and electric packaging of the optoelectronic DNA chip without major alteration of its electronical and biological functionalities, and fluid control using novel electrically activable pyrotechnic microvalves. Finally, we suggest a complete design of a card dedicated to automation of a complex biological protocol with a fully electrical fluid handling and DNA chip reading.

  15. High-resolution DNA content analysis of microbiopsy samples in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentenero, M; Monticone, M; Marino, R; Aiello, C; Marchitto, G; Malacarne, D; Giaretti, W; Gandolfo, S; Castagnola, P

    2017-04-01

    DNA aneuploidy has been reported to be a predictor of poor prognosis in both premalignant and malignant lesions. In oral lichen planus (OLP), this hypothesis remains to be proved. This study aimed to determine the rate of occurrence of DNA aneuploidy in patients with OLP by high-resolution DNA flow cytometry. Patients with OLP were consecutively enrolled. Tissue samples were subdivided for formalin fixation and routine histological assessment and for immediate storage at -20°C for later DNA ploidy analysis, which was performed by DAPI staining of the extracted nuclei and excitation with a UV lamp. The DNA aneuploid sublines were characterized by the DNA Index. A DNA aneuploid status was observed in two of 77 patients with OLP (2.6%). When considering the clinical aspect of the OLP lesions, both DNA aneuploid cases had a reticular clinical aspect. DNA aneuploidy is an uncommon event in OLP and less frequent compared to other non-dysplastic and non-OLP oral potentially malignant disorders. The extremely low rate of DNA aneuploidy could represent an occasional finding or reflect the low rate of malignant transformation observed in patients with OLP even if the real prognostic value of DNA ploidy analysis in patients with OLP remains to be confirmed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. UV-Visible Spectroscopy-Based Quantification of Unlabeled DNA Bound to Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Brandi L; Hutchison, James E

    2016-12-20

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles have been increasingly applied as sensitive and selective analytical probes and biosensors. The DNA ligands bound to a nanoparticle dictate its reactivity, making it essential to know the type and number of DNA strands bound to the nanoparticle surface. Existing methods used to determine the number of DNA strands per gold nanoparticle (AuNP) require that the sequences be fluorophore-labeled, which may affect the DNA surface coverage and reactivity of the nanoparticle and/or require specialized equipment and other fluorophore-containing reagents. We report a UV-visible-based method to conveniently and inexpensively determine the number of DNA strands attached to AuNPs of different core sizes. When this method is used in tandem with a fluorescence dye assay, it is possible to determine the ratio of two unlabeled sequences of different lengths bound to AuNPs. Two sizes of citrate-stabilized AuNPs (5 and 12 nm) were functionalized with mixtures of short (5 base) and long (32 base) disulfide-terminated DNA sequences, and the ratios of sequences bound to the AuNPs were determined using the new method. The long DNA sequence was present as a lower proportion of the ligand shell than in the ligand exchange mixture, suggesting it had a lower propensity to bind the AuNPs than the short DNA sequence. The ratio of DNA sequences bound to the AuNPs was not the same for the large and small AuNPs, which suggests that the radius of curvature had a significant influence on the assembly of DNA strands onto the AuNPs.

  17. Trial watch: Naked and vectored DNA-based anticancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    One type of anticancer vaccine relies on the administration of DNA constructs encoding one or multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The ultimate objective of these preparations, which can be naked or vectored by non-pathogenic viruses, bacteria or yeast cells, is to drive the synthesis of TAAs in the context of an immunostimulatory milieu, resulting in the (re-)elicitation of a tumor-targeting immune response. In spite of encouraging preclinical results, the clinical efficacy of DNA-based vaccines employed as standalone immunotherapeutic interventions in cancer patients appears to be limited. Thus, efforts are currently being devoted to the development of combinatorial regimens that allow DNA-based anticancer vaccines to elicit clinically relevant immune responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of this therapeutic paradigm.

  18. Watson-Crick base pairing controls excited-state decay in natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Dominik B; Schlueter, Alexander; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-10-13

    Excited-state dynamics are essential to understanding the formation of DNA lesions induced by UV light. By using femtosecond IR spectroscopy, it was possible to determine the lifetimes of the excited states of all four bases in the double-stranded environment of natural DNA. After UV excitation of the DNA duplex, we detected a concerted decay of base pairs connected by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. A comparison of single- and double-stranded DNA showed that the reactive charge-transfer states formed in the single strands are suppressed by base pairing in the duplex. The strong influence of the Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds indicates that proton transfer opens an efficient decay path in the duplex that prohibits the formation or reduces the lifetime of reactive charge-transfer states. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. [Under what conditions does G.C Watson-Crick DNA base pair acquire all four configurations characteristic for A.T Watson-Crick DNA base pair?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', O O

    2013-01-01

    At the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory it was established for the first time, that the Löwdin's G*.C* DNA base pair formed by the mutagenic tautomers can acquire, as the A-T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, four biologically important configurations, namely: Watson-Crick, reverse Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen. This fact demonstrates rather unexpected role of the tautomerisation of the one of the Watson-Crick DNA base pairs, in particular, via double proton transfer: exactly the G.C-->G*.C* tautomerisation allows to overcome steric hindrances for the implementation of the above mentioned configurations. Geometric, electron-topological and energetic properties of the H-bonds that stabilise the studied pairs, as well as the energetic characteristics of the latters are presented.

  20. Label-free detection of kanamycin based on a G-quadruplex DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yun-Peng; Liu, Chun; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Han-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This work was the first to report that the kanamycin-binding DNA aptamer (5'-TGG GGG TTG AGG CTA AGC CGA-3') can form stable parallel G-quadruplex DNA (G4-DNA) structures by themselves and that this phenomenon can be verified by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on these findings, we developed a novel label-free strategy for kanamycin detection based on the G4-DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay with thiazole orange (TO) as the fluorescence probe. In the proposed strategy, TO became strongly fluorescent upon binding to kanamycin-binding G4-DNA. However, the addition of kanamycin caused the displacement of TO from the G4-DNA-TO conjugate, thereby resulting in decreased fluorescent signal, which was inversely related to the kanamycin concentration. The detection limit of the proposed assay decreased to 59 nM with a linear working range of 0.1 μM to 20 μM for kanamycin. The cross-reactivity against six other antibiotics was negligible compared with the response to kanamycin. A satisfactory recovery of kanamycin in milk samples ranged from 80.1% to 98.0%, confirming the potential of this bioassay in the measurement of kanamycin in various applications. Our results also served as a good reference for developing similar fluorescent G4-DNA-based bioassays in the future.

  1. Technical reproducibility of single-nucleotide and size-based DNA biomarker assessment using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenli; Tan, Iain B; Sapari, Nur S; Grabsch, Heike I; Okines, Alicia; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Aoyama, Toru; Hewitt, Lindsay C; Inam, Imran; Bottomley, Dan; Nankivell, Matthew; Stenning, Sally P; Cunningham, David; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Soong, Richie; Tan, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues has been used in the past to analyze genetic polymorphisms. We evaluated the technical reproducibility of different types of assays for gene polymorphisms using DNA extracted from FFPE material. By using the MassARRAY iPLEX system, we investigated polymorphisms in DPYD (rs1801159 and rs3918290), UMPS (rs1801019), ERCC1 (rs11615), ERCC1 (rs3212986), and ERCC2 (rs13181) in 56 FFPE DNA samples. By using PCR, followed by size-based gel electrophoresis, we also examined TYMS 5' untranslated region 2R/3R repeats and GSTT1 deletions in 50 FFPE DNA samples and 34 DNAs extracted from fresh-frozen tissues and cell lines. Each polymorphism was analyzed by two independent runs. We found that iPLEX biomarker assays measuring single-nucleotide polymorphisms provided consistent concordant results. However, by using FFPE DNA, size-based PCR biomarkers (GSTT1 and TYMS 5' untranslated region) were discrepant in 32.7% (16/49, with exact 95% CI, 19.9%-47.5%; exact binomial confidence limit test) and 4.2% (2/48, with exact 95% CI, 0.5%-14.3%) of cases, respectively, whereas no discrepancies were observed using intact genomic DNA. Our findings suggest that DNA from FFPE material can be used to reliably test single-nucleotide polymorphisms. However, results based on size-based PCR biomarkers, and particularly GSTT1 deletions, using FFPE DNA need to be interpreted with caution. Independent repeated assays should be performed on all cases to assess potential discrepancies. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Augmentation of French grunt diet description using combined visual and DNA-based analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, John S.; Parkyn, Daryl C.; Murie, Debra J.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Austin, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Trophic linkages within a coral-reef ecosystem may be difficult to discern in fish species that reside on, but do not forage on, coral reefs. Furthermore, dietary analysis of fish can be difficult in situations where prey is thoroughly macerated, resulting in many visually unrecognisable food items. The present study examined whether the inclusion of a DNA-based method could improve the identification of prey consumed by French grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum, a reef fish that possesses pharyngeal teeth and forages on soft-bodied prey items. Visual analysis indicated that crustaceans were most abundant numerically (38.9%), followed by sipunculans (31.0%) and polychaete worms (5.2%), with a substantial number of unidentified prey (12.7%). For the subset of prey with both visual and molecular data, there was a marked reduction in the number of unidentified sipunculans (visual – 31.1%, combined &ndash 4.4%), unidentified crustaceans (visual &ndash 15.6%, combined &ndash 6.7%), and unidentified taxa (visual &ndash 11.1%, combined &ndash 0.0%). Utilising results from both methodologies resulted in an increased number of prey placed at the family level (visual &ndash 6, combined &ndash 33) and species level (visual &ndash 0, combined &ndash 4). Although more costly than visual analysis alone, our study demonstrated the feasibility of DNA-based identification of visually unidentifiable prey in the stomach contents of fish.

  3. Sequencing of megabase plus DNA by hybridization: Method development ENT. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-01-31

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is the only sequencing method based on the experimental determination of the content of oligonucleotide sequences. The data acquisition relies on the natural process of base pairing. It is possible to determine the content of complementary oligosequences in the target DNA by the process of hybridization with oligonucleotide probes of known sequences.

  4. Content-based analysis improves audiovisual archive retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, B.; Snoek, C.G.M.; de Rijke, M.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Content-based video retrieval is maturing to the point where it can be used in real-world retrieval practices. One such practice is the audiovisual archive, whose users increasingly require fine-grained access to broadcast television content. In this paper, we take into account the information needs

  5. Hoogsteen base pairs proximal and distal to echinomycin binding sites on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, D.; Dervan, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Forms of the DNA double helix containing non-Watson-Crick base-pairing have been discovered recently based on x-ray diffraction analysis of quionoxaline antibiotic-oligonucleotide complexes. In an effort to find evidence for Hoogsteen base-pairing at quinoxaline-binding sites in solution, chemical footprinting (differential cleavage reactivity) of echinomycin bound to DNA restriction fragments was examined. The authors report that purines (A>G) in the first and/or fourth base-pair positions of occupied echinomycin-binding sites are hyperreactive to diethyl pyrocarbonate. The correspondence of the solid-state data and the sites of diethyl pyrocarbonate hyperreactivity suggests that diethyl pyrocarbonate may be a sensitive reagent for the detection of Hoogsteen base-pairing in solution. Moreover, a 12-base-pair segment of alternating A-T DNA, which is 6 base pairs away from the nearest strong echinomycin-binding site, is also hyperreactive to diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence of echinomycin. This hyperreactive segment may be an altered form of right-handed DNA that is entirely Hoogsteen base-paired

  6. A DNA-based semantic fusion model for remote sensing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Sun

    Full Text Available Semantic technology plays a key role in various domains, from conversation understanding to algorithm analysis. As the most efficient semantic tool, ontology can represent, process and manage the widespread knowledge. Nowadays, many researchers use ontology to collect and organize data's semantic information in order to maximize research productivity. In this paper, we firstly describe our work on the development of a remote sensing data ontology, with a primary focus on semantic fusion-driven research for big data. Our ontology is made up of 1,264 concepts and 2,030 semantic relationships. However, the growth of big data is straining the capacities of current semantic fusion and reasoning practices. Considering the massive parallelism of DNA strands, we propose a novel DNA-based semantic fusion model. In this model, a parallel strategy is developed to encode the semantic information in DNA for a large volume of remote sensing data. The semantic information is read in a parallel and bit-wise manner and an individual bit is converted to a base. By doing so, a considerable amount of conversion time can be saved, i.e., the cluster-based multi-processes program can reduce the conversion time from 81,536 seconds to 4,937 seconds for 4.34 GB source data files. Moreover, the size of result file recording DNA sequences is 54.51 GB for parallel C program compared with 57.89 GB for sequential Perl. This shows that our parallel method can also reduce the DNA synthesis cost. In addition, data types are encoded in our model, which is a basis for building type system in our future DNA computer. Finally, we describe theoretically an algorithm for DNA-based semantic fusion. This algorithm enables the process of integration of the knowledge from disparate remote sensing data sources into a consistent, accurate, and complete representation. This process depends solely on ligation reaction and screening operations instead of the ontology.

  7. A DNA-based semantic fusion model for remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Heng; Weng, Jian; Yu, Guangchuang; Massawe, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Semantic technology plays a key role in various domains, from conversation understanding to algorithm analysis. As the most efficient semantic tool, ontology can represent, process and manage the widespread knowledge. Nowadays, many researchers use ontology to collect and organize data's semantic information in order to maximize research productivity. In this paper, we firstly describe our work on the development of a remote sensing data ontology, with a primary focus on semantic fusion-driven research for big data. Our ontology is made up of 1,264 concepts and 2,030 semantic relationships. However, the growth of big data is straining the capacities of current semantic fusion and reasoning practices. Considering the massive parallelism of DNA strands, we propose a novel DNA-based semantic fusion model. In this model, a parallel strategy is developed to encode the semantic information in DNA for a large volume of remote sensing data. The semantic information is read in a parallel and bit-wise manner and an individual bit is converted to a base. By doing so, a considerable amount of conversion time can be saved, i.e., the cluster-based multi-processes program can reduce the conversion time from 81,536 seconds to 4,937 seconds for 4.34 GB source data files. Moreover, the size of result file recording DNA sequences is 54.51 GB for parallel C program compared with 57.89 GB for sequential Perl. This shows that our parallel method can also reduce the DNA synthesis cost. In addition, data types are encoded in our model, which is a basis for building type system in our future DNA computer. Finally, we describe theoretically an algorithm for DNA-based semantic fusion. This algorithm enables the process of integration of the knowledge from disparate remote sensing data sources into a consistent, accurate, and complete representation. This process depends solely on ligation reaction and screening operations instead of the ontology.

  8. Radiation chemistry of the base components of DNA and related substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teoule, R.

    1979-01-01

    The loss of UV absorption may be considered as a useful index to evaluate the extent of base destruction. The variations observed reflect the sum of different phenomena: the modification of base stacking, hydrogen bond rupture between DNA bases and the saturation of conjugated double bonds of heterocycles. Another way to measure the base degradation is by formic acid hydrolysis. Radiation products are very sensitive to the formic acid hydrolysis performed at 180 deg C. In aerated solutions, an important event responsible for the degradation of pyrimidine bases is the formation of hydroperoxide. This review consists of the following subheadings: identification of the DNA base damages; thymine fragment in aerated solutions and in deaerated solutions; adenine fragment; and cytosine fragment. The review concludes with the remarks: one has to be very cautious in the extrapolation of the results obtained by the gamma irradiation of free bases in solution to DNA. Free bases are liberated but no nucleoside during irradiation. (Yamashita, S.)

  9. DNA & Protein detection based on microbead agglutination

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-06-06

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microparticles in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Agglutination-based tests are most often used to explore the antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for mode protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin two-component system, as well as a hybridization based two-component assay; however, as our work shows, two-component systems are prone to self-termination of the linking analyte and thus have a lower sensitivity. Three component systems have also been used with DNA hybridization, as in our work; however, their assay requires 48 hours for incubation, while our assay is performed in 5 minutes making it a real candidate for POC testing. We demonstrate three assays: a two-component biotin/streptavidin assay, a three-component hybridization assay using single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules and a stepped three-component hybridization assay. The comparison of these three assays shows our simple stepped three-component agglutination assay to be rapid at room temperature and more sensitive than the two-component version by an order of magnitude. An agglutination assay was also performed in a PDMS microfluidic chip where agglutinated beads were trapped by filter columns for easy observation. We developed a rapid (5 minute) room temperature assay, which is based on microbead agglutination. Our three-component assay solves the linker self-termination issue allowing an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over two–component assays. Our stepped version of the three-component assay solves the issue with probe site saturation thus enabling a wider range of detection. Detection of the agglutinated beads with the naked eye by trapping in microfluidic channels has been shown.

  10. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bread Water Content Measurement Based on Hyperspectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhi; Møller, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Water content is one of the most important properties of the bread for tasting assesment or store monitoring. Traditional bread water content measurement methods mostly are processed manually, which is destructive and time consuming. This paper proposes an automated water content measurement...... for bread quality based on near-infrared hyperspectral imaging against the conventional manual loss-in-weight method. For this purpose, the hyperspectral components unmixing technology is used for measuring the water content quantitatively. And the definition on bread water content index is presented...

  12. Speech Transduction Based on Linguistic Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Henrichsen, Peter; Christiansen, Thomas Ulrich

    Digital hearing aids use a variety of advanced digital signal processing methods in order to improve speech intelligibility. These methods are based on knowledge about the acoustics outside the ear as well as psychoacoustics. This paper investigates the recent observation that speech elements...... with a high degree of information can be robustly identified based on basic acoustic properties, i.e., function words have greater spectral tilt than content words for each of the 18 Danish talkers investigated. In this paper we examine these spectral tilt differences as a function of time based on a speech...... material six times the duration of previous investigations. Our results show that the correlation of spectral tilt with information content is relatively constant across time, even if averaged across talkers. This indicates that it is possible to devise a robust method for estimating information density...

  13. The use of gold nanoparticle aggregation for DNA computing and logic-based biomolecular detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In-Hee; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Park, Ji-Yoon; Chai, Young Gyu; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The use of DNA molecules as a physical computational material has attracted much interest, especially in the area of DNA computing. DNAs are also useful for logical control and analysis of biological systems if efficient visualization methods are available. Here we present a quick and simple visualization technique that displays the results of the DNA computing process based on a colorimetric change induced by gold nanoparticle aggregation, and we apply it to the logic-based detection of biomolecules. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness in both DNA-based logical computation and logic-based biomolecular detection

  14. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  15. Ab initio Calculations of Electronic Fingerprints of DNA bases on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Rehr, John J.; Kilina, Svetlana; Das, Tanmoy; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2012-02-01

    We have carried out first principles DFT calculations of the electronic local density of states (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) adsorbed on graphene using LDA with ultra-soft pseudo-potentials. We have also calculated the longitudinal transmission currents T(E) through graphene nano-pores as an individual DNA base passes through it, using a non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. We observe several dominant base-dependent features in the LDOS and T(E) in an energy range within a few eV of the Fermi level. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases from dI/dV measurements in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and nano-pore experiments. Thus these electronic signatures can provide an alternative approach to DNA sequencing.

  16. Optimization of DNA Sensor Model Based Nanostructured Graphene Using Particle Swarm Optimization Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediyeh Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been predicted that the nanomaterials of graphene will be among the candidate materials for postsilicon electronics due to their astonishing properties such as high carrier mobility, thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Graphene is a semimetal zero gap nanomaterial with demonstrated ability to be employed as an excellent candidate for DNA sensing. Graphene-based DNA sensors have been used to detect the DNA adsorption to examine a DNA concentration in an analyte solution. In particular, there is an essential need for developing the cost-effective DNA sensors holding the fact that it is suitable for the diagnosis of genetic or pathogenic diseases. In this paper, particle swarm optimization technique is employed to optimize the analytical model of a graphene-based DNA sensor which is used for electrical detection of DNA molecules. The results are reported for 5 different concentrations, covering a range from 0.01 nM to 500 nM. The comparison of the optimized model with the experimental data shows an accuracy of more than 95% which verifies that the optimized model is reliable for being used in any application of the graphene-based DNA sensor.

  17. DNA-based asymmetric organometallic catalysis in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oelerich, Jens; Roelfes, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Here, the first examples of DNA-based organometallic catalysis in water that give rise to high enantioselectivities are described. Copper complexes of strongly intercalating ligands were found to enable the asymmetric intramolecular cyclopropanation of alpha-diazo-beta-keto sulfones in water. Up to

  18. A DNA methylation-based definition of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Olafur A; Moran, Sebastian; Gomez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Arribas-Jorba, Carlos; Sandoval, Juan; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Olafsdottir, Elinborg; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Jonasson, Jon G; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Esteller, Manel

    2015-03-01

    In cancer, epigenetic states are deregulated and thought to be of significance in cancer development and progression. We explored DNA methylation-based signatures in association with breast cancer subtypes to assess their impact on clinical presentation and patient prognosis. DNA methylation was analyzed using Infinium 450K arrays in 40 tumors and 17 normal breast samples, together with DNA copy number changes and subtype-specific markers by tissue microarrays. The identified methylation signatures were validated against a cohort of 212 tumors annotated for breast cancer subtypes by the PAM50 method (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Selected markers were pyrosequenced in an independent validation cohort of 310 tumors and analyzed with respect to survival, clinical stage and grade. The results demonstrate that DNA methylation patterns linked to the luminal-B subtype are characterized by CpG island promoter methylation events. In contrast, a large fraction of basal-like tumors are characterized by hypomethylation events occurring within the gene body. Based on these hallmark signatures, we defined two DNA methylation-based subtypes, Epi-LumB and Epi-Basal, and show that they are associated with unfavorable clinical parameters and reduced survival. Our data show that distinct mechanisms leading to changes in CpG methylation states are operative in different breast cancer subtypes. Importantly, we show that a few selected proxy markers can be used to detect the distinct DNA methylation-based subtypes thereby providing valuable information on disease prognosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Content-Based Image Retrieval Based on Electromagnetism-Like Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid A. Jalab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many researchers in the field of automatic content-based image retrieval have devoted a remarkable amount of research looking for methods to retrieve the best relevant images to the query image. This paper presents a novel algorithm for increasing the precision in content-based image retrieval based on electromagnetism optimization technique. The electromagnetism optimization is a nature-inspired technique that follows the collective attraction-repulsion mechanism by considering each image as an electrical charge. The algorithm is composed of two phases: fitness function measurement and electromagnetism optimization technique. It is implemented on a database with 8,000 images spread across 80 classes with 100 images in each class. Eight thousand queries are fired on the database, and the overall average precision is computed. Experimental results of the proposed approach have shown significant improvement in the retrieval performance in regard to precision.

  20. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function of p...... energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease....

  1. The essential component in DNA-based information storage system: robust error-tolerating module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin Kay-Yuen eYim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The size of digital data is ever increasing and is expected to grow to 40,000EB by 2020, yet the estimated global information storage capacity in 2011 is less than 300EB, indicating that most of the data are transient. DNA, as a very stable nano-molecule, is an ideal massive storage device for long-term data archive. The two most notable illustrations are from Church et al. and Goldman et al., whose approaches are well-optimized for most sequencing platforms – short synthesized DNA fragments without homopolymer. Here we suggested improvements on error handling methodology that could enable the integration of DNA-based computational process, e.g. algorithms based on self-assembly of DNA. As a proof of concept, a picture of size 438 bytes was encoded to DNA with Low-Density Parity-Check error-correction code. We salvaged a significant portion of sequencing reads with mutations generated during DNA synthesis and sequencing and successfully reconstructed the entire picture. A modular-based programming framework - DNAcodec with a XML-based data format was also introduced. Our experiments demonstrated the practicability of long DNA message recovery with high error-tolerance, which opens the field to biocomputing and synthetic biology.

  2. Sex determination based on amelogenin DNA by modified electrode with gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad; Rajabzadeh, Nooshin; Benvidi, Ali; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a simple and renewable electrochemical biosensor based on carbon paste electrode (CPE) for the detection of DNA synthesis and hybridization. CPE was modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which are helpful for immobilization of thiolated bioreceptors. AuNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolated single-stranded DNA (SH-ssDNA) of the amelogenin gene was formed on CPE. The immobilization of the probe and its hybridization with the target DNA was optimized using different experimental conditions. The modified electrode was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrochemical response of ssDNA hybridization and DNA synthesis was measured using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with methylene blue (MB) as an electroactive indicator. The new biosensor can distinguish between complementary and non-complementary strands of amelogenin ssDNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood and was detected based on changes in the MB reduction signal. These results demonstrated that the new biosensor could be used for sex determination. The proposed biosensor in this study could be used for detection and discrimination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of amelogenin DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA isolation by galactoacrylate-based nano-poly(HEMA-co-Gal-OPA) nanopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkcan Kayhan, Ceren; Zeynep Ural, Fulden; Koruyucu, Meryem; Gül Salman, Yeşim; Uygun, Murat; Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-10-01

    Isolation of DNA is one of the important processes for biotechnological applications such as investigation of DNA structures and functions, recombinant DNA preparations, identification of genetic factors and diagnosis and treatment of genetic disorders. The aim of this study was to synthesis and characterizes the galactoacrylate based nanopolymers with high surface area and to investigate the usability of these synthesized nanopolymers for DNA isolation studies. Nanopolymers were synthesized by the surfactant free emulsion polymerization technique by using the monomers of 2-hydroxyl ethylmethacrylate and 6-O-(2 ' -hydroxy-3 ' -acryloyloxypropyl)-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-galactopyranose. Galactoacrylate origin of these newly synthesized nanopolymers increased the interaction between DNA and nanopolymers. Prepared nanopolymers were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and ZETA sizer analysis. Synthesized nanopolymers were spherical, and their average particle size was about 246.8 nm. Adsorption of DNA onto galactoacrylate based nanopolymers was investigated by using different pHs, temperatures, ionic strength, DNA concentrations and desorption studies and maximum DNA adsorption was found to be as 567.12 mg/g polymer at 25 °C, in pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Reusability was investigated for 5 successive reuse and DNA adsorption capacity decreased only about 10% at the end of the 5th reuse.

  4. Blood extracellular DNA after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.G.; Tishchenko, L.I.; Surkova, E.A.; Vasil'eva, I.N.

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that blood extracellular DNA of irradiated rats largely consists of the low-molecular DNA and its oligomers. Molecular masses of oligomers are multiple to molecular mass of monomer fragment with nucleosome size. The low-molecular DNA has linear form. The average content of GC-pairs in low-molecular DNA is higher than in total rat's DNA (48.5% against 41.5%). The low-molecular DNA is a part of complex containing RNA, acidic proteins and lipids. It is assumed that the formation of low-molecular DNA is a result of Ca/Mg - dependent nuclear endonuclease action

  5. Fluorescence quantitative PCR in detection of HBV DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zheng; Li Ming; Shen Xia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the serum content of HBV-DNA and expression of serological markers with HBV infection patients. Methods: Serum samples from 375 hepatitis B patients with different clinical status and 70 normal persons were quantitated for HBV-DNA by FQ-PCR. Results: The average of HBV-DNA contents in the patient in the groups of HBsAg (+) and of HBeAg(+) were significantly higher than those in the group of HBsAg(-) and of HBeAg(-). Even in the group of HBeAg negative, high HBV-DNA contents might still be present in both the HBeAg(+) and HBeAg(-) groups. Conclusion: FQ-PCR can be used to monitor the real state of HBV infection, replication and the course of disease

  6. A biological inspired fuzzy adaptive window median filter (FAWMF) for enhancing DNA signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muneer; Jung, Low Tan; Bhuiyan, Al-Amin

    2017-10-01

    Digital signal processing techniques commonly employ fixed length window filters to process the signal contents. DNA signals differ in characteristics from common digital signals since they carry nucleotides as contents. The nucleotides own genetic code context and fuzzy behaviors due to their special structure and order in DNA strand. Employing conventional fixed length window filters for DNA signal processing produce spectral leakage and hence results in signal noise. A biological context aware adaptive window filter is required to process the DNA signals. This paper introduces a biological inspired fuzzy adaptive window median filter (FAWMF) which computes the fuzzy membership strength of nucleotides in each slide of window and filters nucleotides based on median filtering with a combination of s-shaped and z-shaped filters. Since coding regions cause 3-base periodicity by an unbalanced nucleotides' distribution producing a relatively high bias for nucleotides' usage, such fundamental characteristic of nucleotides has been exploited in FAWMF to suppress the signal noise. Along with adaptive response of FAWMF, a strong correlation between median nucleotides and the Π shaped filter was observed which produced enhanced discrimination between coding and non-coding regions contrary to fixed length conventional window filters. The proposed FAWMF attains a significant enhancement in coding regions identification i.e. 40% to 125% as compared to other conventional window filters tested over more than 250 benchmarked and randomly taken DNA datasets of different organisms. This study proves that conventional fixed length window filters applied to DNA signals do not achieve significant results since the nucleotides carry genetic code context. The proposed FAWMF algorithm is adaptive and outperforms significantly to process DNA signal contents. The algorithm applied to variety of DNA datasets produced noteworthy discrimination between coding and non-coding regions contrary

  7. Droplet-based microscale colorimetric biosensor for multiplexed DNA analysis via a graphene nanoprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Xia; Luo Ming; Shi Liyang; Ji Xinghu; He Zhike

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: With a microvalve manipulate technique combined with droplet platform, a microscale fluorescence-based colorimetric sensor for multiplexed DNA analysis is developed via a graphene nanoprobe. Highlights: ► A quantitative detection for multiplexed DNA is first realized on droplet platform. ► The DNA detection is relied on a simple fluorescence-based colorimetric method. ► GO is served as a quencher for two different DNA fluorescent probes. ► This present work provides a rapid, sensitive, visual and convenient detection tool for droplet biosensor. - Abstract: The development of simple and inexpensive DNA detection strategy is very significant for droplet-based microfluidic system. Here, a droplet-based biosensor for multiplexed DNA analysis is developed with a common imaging device by using fluorescence-based colorimetric method and a graphene nanoprobe. With the aid of droplet manipulation technique, droplet size adjustment, droplet fusion and droplet trap are realized accurately and precisely. Due to the high quenching efficiency of graphene oxide (GO), in the absence of target DNAs, the droplet containing two single-stranded DNA probes and GO shows dark color, in which the DNA probes are labeled carboxy fluorescein (FAM) and 6-carboxy-X-rhodamine (ROX), respectively. The droplet changes from dark to bright color when the DNA probes form double helix with the specific target DNAs leading to the dyes far away from GO. This colorimetric droplet biosensor exhibits a quantitative capability for simultaneous detection of two different target DNAs with the detection limits of 9.46 and 9.67 × 10 −8 M, respectively. It is also demonstrated that this biosensor platform can become a promising detection tool in high throughput applications with low consumption of reagents. Moreover, the incorporation of graphene nanoprobe and droplet technique can drive the biosensor field one more step to some extent.

  8. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahal, Tamar; Gilat, Noa; Michaeli, Yael; Redy-Keisar, Orit; Shabat, Doron; Ebenstein, Yuval

    2014-08-19

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a modified form of the DNA base cytosine, is an important epigenetic mark linked to regulation of gene expression in development, and tumorigenesis. We have developed a spectroscopic method for a global quantification of 5hmC in genomic DNA. The assay is performed within a multiwell plate, which allows simultaneous recording of up to 350 samples. Our quantification procedure of 5hmC is direct, simple, and rapid. It relies on a two-step protocol that consists of enzymatic glucosylation of 5hmC with an azide-modified glucose, followed by a "click reaction" with an alkyne-fluorescent tag. The fluorescence intensity recorded from the DNA sample is proportional to its 5hmC content and can be quantified by a simple plate reader measurement. This labeling technique is specific and highly sensitive, allowing detection of 5hmC down to 0.002% of the total nucleotides. Our results reveal significant variations in the 5hmC content obtained from different mouse tissues, in agreement with previously reported data.

  9. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization of four important species of Bamboo, found in Raigad district, Maharashtra State, India. ... Bambusoideae are differentiated from other members of the family by the presence of petiolate blades with parallel venation and stamens are three, four, six or more, ...

  10. Biomarkers of mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle of healthy young human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Nielsen, Joachim; Hansen, Christina Neigaard

    2012-01-01

    Key points  Several biochemical measures of mitochondrial components are used as biomarkers of mitochondrial content and muscle oxidative capacity. However, no studies have validated these surrogates against a morphological measure of mitochondrial content in human subjects.  The most commonly used...... markers (citrate synthase activity, cardiolipin content, mitochondrial DNA content (mtDNA), complex I-V protein, and complex I-IV activity) were correlated with a measure of mitochondrial content (transmission electron microscopy) and muscle oxidative capacity (respiration in permeabilized fibres......).  Cardiolipin content followed by citrate synthase activity and complex I activity were the biomarkers showing the strongest association with mitochondrial content.  mtDNA was found to be a poor biomarker of mitochondrial content.  Complex IV activity was closely associated with mitochondrial oxidative...

  11. DNA interactions with a Methylene Blue redox indicator depend on the DNA length and are sequence specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2010-06-01

    A DNA molecular beacon approach was used for the analysis of interactions between DNA and Methylene Blue (MB) as a redox indicator of a hybridization event. DNA hairpin structures of different length and guanine (G) content were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 5'-end. Binding of MB to the folded hairpin DNA was electrochemically studied and compared with binding to the duplex structure formed by hybridization of the hairpin DNA to a complementary DNA strand. Variation of the electrochemical signal from the DNA-MB complex was shown to depend primarily on the DNA length and sequence used: the G-C base pairs were the preferential sites of MB binding in the duplex. For short 20 nts long DNA sequences, the increased electrochemical response from MB bound to the duplex structure was consistent with the increased amount of bound and electrochemically readable MB molecules (i.e. MB molecules that are available for the electron transfer (ET) reaction with the electrode). With longer DNA sequences, the balance between the amounts of the electrochemically readable MB molecules bound to the hairpin DNA and to the hybrid was opposite: a part of the MB molecules bound to the long-sequence DNA duplex seem to be electrochemically mute due to long ET distance. The increasing electrochemical response from MB bound to the short-length DNA hybrid contrasts with the decreasing signal from MB bound to the long-length DNA hybrid and allows an "off"-"on" genosensor development.

  12. Quantification of meat proportions by measuring DNA contents in raw and boiled sausages using matrix-adapted calibrators and multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppel, René; Eugster, Albert; Ruf, Jürg; Rentsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of meat proportions in raw and boiled sausage according to the recipe was evaluated using three different calibrators. To measure the DNA contents from beef, pork, sheep (mutton), and horse, a tetraplex real-time PCR method was applied. Nineteen laboratories analyzed four meat products each made of different proportions of beef, pork, sheep, and horse meat. Three kinds of calibrators were used: raw and boiled sausages of known proportions ranging from 1 to 55% of meat, and a dilution series of DNA from muscle tissue. In general, results generated using calibration sausages were more accurate than those resulting from the use of DNA from muscle tissue, and exhibited smaller measurement uncertainties. Although differences between uses of raw and boiled calibration sausages were small, the most precise and accurate results were obtained by calibration with fine-textured boiled reference sausages.

  13. Widespread Transient Hoogsteen Base-Pairs in Canonical Duplex DNA with Variable Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvey, Heidi S.; Gottardo, Federico L.; Nikolova, Evgenia N.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2015-01-01

    Hoogsteen base-pairing involves a 180 degree rotation of the purine base relative to Watson-Crick base-pairing within DNA duplexes, creating alternative DNA conformations that can play roles in recognition, damage induction, and replication. Here, using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion, we show that transient Hoogsteen base-pairs occur across more diverse sequence and positional contexts than previously anticipated. We observe sequence-specific variations in Hoogsteen base-pair energetic stabilities that are comparable to variations in Watson-Crick base-pair stability, with Hoogsteen base-pairs being more abundant for energetically less favorable Watson-Crick base-pairs. Our results suggest that the variations in Hoogsteen stabilities and rates of formation are dominated by variations in Watson-Crick base pair stability, suggesting a late transition state for the Watson-Crick to Hoogsteen conformational switch. The occurrence of sequence and position-dependent Hoogsteen base-pairs provide a new potential mechanism for achieving sequence-dependent DNA transactions. PMID:25185517

  14. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  15. Application of flow cytometry for exploring the evolution of Geosmithia fungi living in association with bark beetles: the role of conidial DNA content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselská, Tereza; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 83-92 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/11/2302 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ambrosia fungi * Bark beetles * Conidial DNA content Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2015

  16. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based prediction of genotypes in chronic HBV patients from Western India. Yashwant G. Chavan, Sharad R. Pawar, Minal Wani, Amol D. Raut, Rabindra N. Misra ...

  17. Transforming bases to bytes: Molecular computing with DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Despite the popular image of silicon-based computers for computation, an embryonic field of mole- cular computation is emerging, where molecules in solution perform computational ..... [4] Mao C, Sun W, Shen Z and Seeman N C 1999. A nanomechanical device based on the B-Z transition of DNA; Nature 397 144–146.

  18. A Constant Rate of Spontaneous Mutation in DNA-Based Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, John W.

    1991-08-01

    In terms of evolution and fitness, the most significant spontaneous mutation rate is likely to be that for the entire genome (or its nonfrivolous fraction). Information is now available to calculate this rate for several DNA-based haploid microbes, including bacteriophages with single- or double-stranded DNA, a bacterium, a yeast, and a filamentous fungus. Their genome sizes vary by ≈6500-fold. Their average mutation rates per base pair vary by ≈16,000-fold, whereas their mutation rates per genome vary by only ≈2.5-fold, apparently randomly, around a mean value of 0.0033 per DNA replication. The average mutation rate per base pair is inversely proportional to genome size. Therefore, a nearly invariant microbial mutation rate appears to have evolved. Because this rate is uniform in such diverse organisms, it is likely to be determined by deep general forces, perhaps by a balance between the usually deleterious effects of mutation and the physiological costs of further reducing mutation rates.

  19. Effect of UV-irradiation on DNA-membrane complex of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefranova, O.A.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    The UV radiation effect on DNA membrane complex of Bacillus subtilis has been studied. Increase of DNA content in the DNA membrane complex in two strains of 168 and recA - and its decrease in the polA - strain are shown. The above effect in the first two stamms is suppressed with caffeine and correlates with the change in protein content in the DNA membrane complex, determined by a radioactive label, but not lipids in other words, fixation of DNA and membrane goes through proteins. Capability of DNA content increase in the DNA membrane complex after UV irradiation and subsequent bacteria incubation in a total medium correlates with the relative sensitivity of stamm UV sensitivity. It is suggested, that the reparation synthesis goes in cells on the membrane and that binding of DNA and the membrane is necessary for the normal DNA reparation process

  20. A Novel Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Encoding and Spatiotemporal Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Song

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA computing based image encryption is a new, promising field. In this paper, we propose a novel image encryption scheme based on DNA encoding and spatiotemporal chaos. In particular, after the plain image is primarily diffused with the bitwise Exclusive-OR operation, the DNA mapping rule is introduced to encode the diffused image. In order to enhance the encryption, the spatiotemporal chaotic system is used to confuse the rows and columns of the DNA encoded image. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed encryption algorithm is of high key sensitivity and large key space, and it can resist brute-force attack, entropy attack, differential attack, chosen-plaintext attack, known-plaintext attack and statistical attack.

  1. Design and specificity of long ssDNA donors for CRISPR-based knock-in

    OpenAIRE

    Leonetti, Manuel; Li, Han; Beckman, Kyle; Pessino, Veronica; Huang, Bo; Weissman, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas technologies have transformed our ability to manipulate genomes for research and gene-based therapy. In particular, homology-directed repair after genomic cleavage allows for precise modification of genes using exogenous donor sequences as templates. While both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) forms of donors have been used as repair templates, a systematic comparison of the performance and specificity of repair using ssDNA versus dsDNA donors is still la...

  2. Image cytometry: nuclear and chromosomal DNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos Roberto; Clarindo, Wellington Ronildo; Abreu, Isabella Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Image cytometry (ICM) associates microscopy, digital image and software technologies, and has been particularly useful in spatial and densitometric cytological analyses, such as DNA ploidy and DNA content measurements. Basically, ICM integrates methodologies of optical microscopy calibration, standard density filters, digital CCD camera, and image analysis softwares for quantitative applications. Apart from all system calibration and setup, cytological protocols must provide good slide preparations for efficient and reliable ICM analysis. In this chapter, procedures for ICM applications employed in our laboratory are described. Protocols shown here for human DNA ploidy determination and quantification of nuclear and chromosomal DNA content in plants could be used as described, or adapted for other studies.

  3. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references

  4. DNA nanosensor based on biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhao Sheng; Shan, Xiao Yue; Chai, Lu Jing; Ma, Juan Juan; Chen, Jian Rong; Feng, Hui

    2014-10-15

    An ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes for DNA detection was reported. We take advantage of good biocompatibility and strong fluorescence of graphene quantum dots, base pairing specificity of DNA and unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes to achieve the analysis of low concentrations of DNA. Graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield up to 0.20 were prepared and served as the fluorophore of DNA probe. FRET process between graphene quantum dots-labeled probe and oxidized carbon nanotubes is easily achieved due to their efficient self-assembly through specific π-π interaction. This nanosensor can distinguish complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection method based on this nanosensor possesses a broad linear span of up to 133.0 nM and ultralow detection limit of 0.4 nM. The constructed nanosensor is expected to be highly biocompatible because of all its components with excellent biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of cell number and DNA content in mouse embryos cultivated with uranium; Evaluacion del numero de celulas y el contenido de DNA en embriones murinos cultivados con uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundt, Mirian S; Cabrini, Romulo L [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Radiobiologia

    2000-07-01

    The evaluation of the degree of development, the number of cells and the DNA content, were used to evaluate the embryotoxicity of uranium. Embryos at a one cell stage were cultured with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UN) at a final concentration of uranium (U) of 26, 52 and 104 {mu}gU/ml. At 24 hs of culture, the embryos at the 2 cell stage, were put in new wells with the same concentrations of U as the previous day, until the end of the period of incubation at 72 hs. At 72 hs of culture, 87% of the original one cell embryos were at morula stage, and in those cultivated with uranium, the percentage decreased significantly to 77; 63.24 and 40.79% respectively for the different U concentrations. Those embryos that exhibited a normal morphology, were selected and fixed on slides. The number of cells per embryo was evaluated in Giemsa stained preparations. The DNA content was evaluated cytophotometrically in Feulgen stained nuclei. The number of cells decreased significantly from 20,3 {+-} 5.6 in the control to 19 {+-} 6; 14 {+-} 3 and 13.9 {+-} 5.6 for the different concentrations. All the embryos evaluated showed one easy recognizable polar body, which was used a haploid indicator (n). The content of DNA was measured in a total of 20 control embryos and 16 embryos cultivated with UN. In control embryos, 92,7% of the nuclei presented a normal ploidy from 2n to 4n, 2,9% nuclei were hypoploid and 4,4% were hyperploid. The percentage of hypoploid nuclei rose in a dose-dependent fashion to 3.45; 44.45 and 50.34% respectively for the embryos cultured at the different U concentrations. The results indicate that U is embryotoxic, that its effects are dose dependent at the concentrations used in this study and that even those embryos that show a normal morphology, can be genetically affected. We show that the model employed is extremely sensitive. It is possible to use the preimplantation embryos, as a model to test the effect of possibly mutagenic agents of the nuclear industry

  6. [The development of pollen grains and formation of pollen tubes in higher plants : I. Quantitative measurements of the DNA-content of generative and vegetative nuclei in the pollen grain and pollen tube of Petunia hybrida mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesemann, C U

    1971-01-01

    The DNA-content of generative and vegetative nuclei in mature pollen grains of four Petunia hybrida mutants was determined by cytophotometry. In addition the DNA-content of generative and vegetative nuclei in the pollen tube of two of these four mutants (virescens-2 n and ustulata-2 n) was cytophotometrically measured.The DNA-values found in the generative nuclei indicate that the DNA-replication continues in the mature pollen grain and comes to an end only after the migration of the nuclei into the pollen tube. These data are in disagreement with the results of DNA-measurements described for a limited number of other species which all show completion of DNA-synthesis during the maturation stage of the pollen grains.The vegetative nuclei of the four Petunia mutants studied show significant differences in the onset of the degenerative phase. Extreme variation is manifested in the ustulata-2 n mutant in which the degeneration of nuclei may reach the final stage in the maturing pollen grain. However in this mutant vegetative nuclei with an unaltered DNA-content may also be demonstrated in the pollen tube. Some of the vegetative nuclei in the pollen tube of ustulata-2 n exhibit an increased amount of DNA which could be the result of differential DNA-replication in the vegetative nuclei. The decrease of the DNA-content in a certain fraction of the vegetative nuclei in the maturing pollen grain does not agree with observations made in other species by several authors who report DNA constancy until the pollen grain is fully mature.The data obtained from the analysis of the four Petunia hybrida mutants point to an important role of the vegetative nucleus in the development of the pollen tube. The Petunia hybrida mutants may be regarded as especially favourable material for investigations concerning the function of the vegetative cell in the development of the pollen grain and pollen tube.

  7. Characterizing the DNA Damage Response by Cell Tracking Algorithms and Cell Features Classification Using High-Content Time-Lapse Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Georgescu

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when

  8. Enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and adenosine triphosphate by dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Lin, Ying; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Chuanbin; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2014-06-15

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) strategy has been well developed for the fabrication of various biosensing platforms for signal amplification. Herein, a novel enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensing platform for the detection of target DNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was firstly proposed, in which three auxiliary DNA probes were ingeniously designed to construct the dendritic DNA concatamer via HCR strategy and used as hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) carrier for signal amplification. With the developed dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification strategy, the DNA biosensor could achieve an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and ATP with a superior detection limit as low as 5 aM and 20 fM, respectively, and also demonstrate a high selectivity for DNA and ATP detection. The currently proposed dendritic DNA concatamer opens a promising direction to construct ultrasensitive DNA biosensing platform for biomolecular detection in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine, which offers the distinct advantages of simplicity and cost efficiency owing to no need of any kind of enzyme, chemical modification or labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Roles of the Amino Group of Purine Bases in the Thermodynamic Stability of DNA Base Pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The energetic aspects of hydrogen-bonded base-pair interactions are important for the design of functional nucleotide analogs and for practical applications of oligonucleotides. The present study investigated the contribution of the 2-amino group of DNA purine bases to the thermodynamic stability of oligonucleotide duplexes under different salt and solvent conditions, using 2'-deoxyriboinosine (I and 2'-deoxyribo-2,6-diaminopurine (D as non-canonical nucleotides. The stability of DNA duplexes was changed by substitution of a single base pair in the following order: G•C > D•T ≈ I•C > A•T > G•T > I•T. The apparent stabilization energy due to the presence of the 2-amino group of G and D varied depending on the salt concentration, and decreased in the water-ethanol mixed solvent. The effects of salt concentration on the thermodynamics of DNA duplexes were found to be partially sequence-dependent, and the 2-amino group of the purine bases might have an influence on the binding of ions to DNA through the formation of a stable base-paired structure. Our results also showed that physiological salt conditions were energetically favorable for complementary base recognition, and conversely, low salt concentration media and ethanol-containing solvents were effective for low stringency oligonucleotide hybridization, in the context of conditions employed in this study.

  10. PEDAGOGICAL STRATEGIES AND CONTENT KNOWLEDGE IN 92 ENGLISH FOR MATHS LECTURE IN CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Fitrianingsih

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was intended to find the pedagogical strategies applied by the teacher in the teaching learning process and to know teacher‘s content knowledge, how teacher need to understand the subject matter taught. This study was carried out in English for Math lecture of Mathematics education study program IKIP PGRI Bojonegoro which involved the teacher and the students as the respondent. This study is under qualitative case study. In collecting the data, questionnaire, observation and interview were conducted to get detail information of the issues. The result reveals: 1 the teacher combines some methods such as cooperative learning, problem-based learning and task-based learning to get the students enthusiasm; 2 based on teacher‘s educational background, although the teacher graduated from Bachelor Degree of Mathematics Education but she was able to combine English teaching through mathematics content very well. It can be concluded that Teacher‘s pedagogical strategy and content knowledge is very important in the application of content-based instruction teaching and learning.

  11. All-Atom Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting QM data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude force field yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100 ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduces (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII sub-states of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive force field, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  12. Privacy-Preserving Content-Based Recommendations through Homomorphic Encryption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Erkin, Zekeriya; Beye, M.; Veugen, T.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    By offering personalized content to users, recommender systems have become a vital tool in ecommerce and online media applications. Content-based algorithms recommend items or products to users, that are most similar to those previously purchased or consumed. Unfortunately, collecting and storing

  13. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  14. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF TEACHERS’ PEDAGOGICAL SKILLS AND CONTENT KNOWLEDGE IN A CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Nor Rizan Tengku Mohamad Maasum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Advocates of the content-based approach believed that a language can be learnt effectively when it is the medium of instruction rather than just a subject.  Integrating English and content as part of instruction has become one of the cornerstones of second language pedagogy. Researchers claimed that there are many benefits of integrating English and content instruction.  Among the benefits are the increase in students’ interest with content themes, meaningful input and understanding. In 2003, the Malaysian Ministry of Education introduced the teaching and learning of science and mathematics in English for Year One, Form One and Lower Six Form in all government public schools. This paper describes the challenges faced by teachers when they are required to teach content subjects such as science and mathematics in English.  The focus of the paper is on the teachers’ pedagogical skills  and content knowldge which comprises subject matter content, pedagogical approach, classroom management, use of resources, assessment, preparation of teaching materials, managing students, teachers’ compensatory communication strategies, use of first language and teachers’ perspectives of teaching content subjects in English. Data were obtained from a self-report questionnaire administered to 495 secondary school teachers in West Malaysia. Results from the study provide implications for school administrators in making decisions in assignment of  capable teachers to teach the various levels of classes. Suggestions for teacher self-development and life-long learning efforts are also provided.   Key words: Content-based instruction, ESL instruction, second language, first language and second language pedagogy

  16. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  17. Content-Based Multimedia Retrieval in the Presence of Unknown User Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beecks, Christian; Assent, Ira; Seidl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Content-based multimedia retrieval requires an appropriate similarity model which reflects user preferences. When these preferences are unknown or when the structure of the data collection is unclear, retrieving the most preferable objects the user has in mind is challenging, as the notion...... address the problem of content-based multimedia retrieval in the presence of unknown user preferences. Our idea consists in performing content-based retrieval by considering all possibilities in a family of similarity models simultaneously. To this end, we propose a novel content-based retrieval approach...

  18. Structuring polymers for delivery of DNA-based therapeutics: updated insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madhu; Tiwari, Shailja; Vyas, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers greater opportunities for treating numerous incurable diseases from genetic disorders, infections, and cancer. However, development of appropriate delivery systems could be one of the most important factors to overcome numerous biological barriers for delivery of various therapeutic molecules. A number of nonviral polymer-mediated vectors have been developed for DNA delivery and offer the potential to surmount the associated problems of their viral counterpart. To address the concerns associated with safety issues, a wide range of polymeric vectors are available and have been utilized successfully to deliver their therapeutics in vivo. Today's research is mainly focused on the various natural or synthetic polymer-based delivery carriers that protect the DNA molecule from degradation, which offer specific targeting to the desired cells after systemic administration, have transfection efficiencies equivalent to virus-mediated gene delivery, and have long-term gene expression through sustained-release mechanisms. This review explores an updated overview of different nonviral polymeric delivery system for delivery of DNA-based therapeutics. These polymeric carriers have been evaluated in vitro and in vivo and are being utilized in various stages of clinical evaluation. Continued research and understanding of the principles of polymer-based gene delivery systems will enable us to develop new and efficient delivery systems for the delivery of DNA-based therapeutics to achieve the goal of efficacious and specific gene therapy for a vast array of clinical disorders as the therapeutic solutions of tomorrow.

  19. Cytophotometric and biochemical analyses of DNA in pentaploid and diploid Agave species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, A; Natali, L; Cionini, G; Castorena-Sanchez, I

    1996-04-01

    Nuclear DNA content, chromatin structure, and DNA composition were investigated in four Agave species: two diploid, Agave tequilana Weber and Agave angustifolia Haworth var. marginata Hort., and two pentaploid, Agave fourcroydes Lemaire and Agave sisalana Perrine. It was determined that the genome size of pentaploid species is nearly 2.5 times that of diploid ones. Cytophotometric analyses of chromatin structure were performed following Feulgen or DAPI staining to determine optical density profiles of interphase nuclei. Pentaploid species showed higher frequencies of condensed chromatin (heterochromatin) than diploid species. On the other hand, a lower frequency of A-T rich (DAPI stained) heterochromatin was found in pentaploid species than in diploid ones, indicating that heterochromatin in pentaploid species is made up of sequences with base compositions different from those of diploid species. Since thermal denaturation profiles of extracted DNA showed minor variations in the base composition of the genomes of the four species, it is supposed that, in pentaploid species, the large heterochromatin content is not due to an overrepresentation of G-C repetitive sequences but rather to the condensation of nonrepetitive sequences, such as, for example, redundant gene copies switched off in the polyploid complement. It is suggested that speciation in the genus Agave occurs through point mutations and minor DNA rearrangements, as is also indicated by the relative stability of the karyotype of this genus. Key words : Agave, DNA cytophotometry, DNA melting profiles, chromatin structure, genome size.

  20. cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project cDNA sequence quality data Data detail Data name cDNA sequence quality... data DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00838-003 Description of data contents Phred's quality score. P...tion Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us cDNA sequence quality

  1. Influence of DNA isolation on Q-PCR-based quantification of methanogenic Archaea in biogas fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, I; Mundt, K; Sontag, M; Baumstark, I; Nettmann, E; Klocke, M

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) is commonly applied for the detection of certain microorganisms in environmental samples. However, some environments, like biomass-degrading biogas fermenters, are enriched with PCR-interfering substances. To study the impact of the DNA extraction protocol on the results of Q-PCR-based analysis of the methane-producing archaeal community in biogas fermenters, nine different protocols with varying cell disruption and DNA purification approaches were tested. Differences in the quantities of the isolated DNA and the purity parameters were found, with the best cell lysis efficiencies being obtained by a combined lysozyme/SDS-based lysis. When DNA was purified by sephacryl columns, the amount of DNA decreased by one log cycle but PCR inhibitors were eliminated sufficiently. In the case of detection of methanogenic Archaea, the chosen DNA isolation protocol strongly influenced the Q-PCR-based determination of 16S rDNA copy numbers. For example, with protocols including mechanical cell disruption, the 16S rDNA of Methanobacteriales were predominantly amplified (81-90% of the total 16S rDNA copy numbers), followed by the 16S rDNA of Methanomicrobiales (9-18%). In contrast, when a lysozyme/SDS-based cell lysis was applied, the 16S rDNA copy numbers determined for these two orders were the opposite (Methanomicrobiales 82-95%, Methanobacteriales 4-18%). In extreme cases, the DNA isolation method led to discrimination of some groups of methanogens (e.g. members of the Methanosaetaceae). In conclusion, for extraction of high amounts of microbial DNA with high purity from samples of biogas plants, a combined lysozyme/SDS-based cell lysis followed by a purification step with sephacryl columns is recommended. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of dopamine in dopaminergic cell using nanoparticles-based barcode DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jeung Hee; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based bio-barcode-amplification analysis may be an innovative approach to dopamine detection. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of this bio-barcode DNA method in detecting dopamine from dopaminergic cells. Herein, a combination DNA barcode and bead-based immunoassay for neurotransmitter detection with PCR-like sensitivity is described. This method relies on magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies and nanoparticles that are encoded with DNA, and antibodies that can sandwich the target protein captured by the nanoparticle-bound antibodies. The aggregate sandwich structures are magnetically separated from solution, and treated in order to remove the conjugated barcode DNA. The DNA barcodes were then identified via PCR analysis. The dopamine concentration in dopaminergic cells can be readily and rapidly detected via the bio-barcode assay method. The bio-barcode assay method is, therefore, a rapid and high-throughput screening tool for the detection of neurotransmitters such as dopamine.

  3. Changes in distribution of cell cycle phases and DNA content in HeLa S3 cell after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shunbao

    1992-01-01

    The effects of irradiation and hyperthermia on the distribution in various phases and DNA content of HeLa S 3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and an image analysis instrument. A marked increase in DNA content from 6.718 to 9.614(AU) in HeLa S 3 cells after 6 Gy irradiation was seen to correspond with the changes in the distribution of various phases in G 2 + M, from 22% to 52%. Meanwhile, the surviving fraction of HeLa S 3 cells after 6 Gy irradiation was less than 1%. However, after heating at 44 deg C for 10 min, the amount of cells in G 2 + M increased from 22.5% to 52.5% and the surviving fraction after hyperthermia was less than 2.65%. The changes in distribution of various phases after Ir-192 irradiation were similar to those seen after X-ray irradiation. The delay of G 2 + M phase after treatment with 8 Gy plus heating at 44 deg C for 7 min in HeLa S 3 cells was similar to that seen in the case of treatment with 8 Gy alone. As the surviving fraction accompanying the G 2 + M delay after irradiation plus heat treatment was very low, we suggest that the changes of distribution in various phases of HeLa S 3 cells after treatment might be used as a rapid indicator of serious injury

  4. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  5. DNA-based approaches to identify forest fungi in Pacific Islands: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna E. Case; Sara M. Ashiglar; Phil G. Cannon; Ernesto P. Militante; Edwin R. Tadiosa; Mutya Quintos-Manalo; Nelson M. Pampolina; John W. Hanna; Fred E. Brooks; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based diagnostics have been successfully used to characterize diverse forest fungi (e.g., Hoff et al. 2004, Kim et al. 2006, Glaeser & Lindner 2011). DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (LSU) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) has proved especially useful (Sonnenberg et al. 2007, Seifert 2009, Schoch et al. 2012) for...

  6. Use of Moringa oleifera Flower Pod Extract as Natural Preservative and Development of SCAR Marker for Its DNA Based Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Iram; Javed, Attia; Aslam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Mushtaq, Roohi; Athar, Muhammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    The use of Moringa oleifera as natural food preservative has been evaluated in the present study. In addition, for quality assurance, the study has also been focused on the shelf life of product to authenticate the identification of plant by development of DNA based marker. Among the different extracts prepared from flower pods of Moringa oleifera, methanol and aqueous extract exhibited high antibacterial and antioxidant activity, respectively. The high phenolic contents (53.5 ± 0.169 mg GAE/g) and flavonoid contents (10.9 ± 0.094 mg QE/g) were also recorded in methanol and aqueous extract, respectively. Due to instability of bioactive compounds in aqueous extract, methanol extract is considered as potent natural preservative. The shelf life of methanol extract was observed for two months at 4°C under dark conditions. The developed SCAR primers (MOF217/317/MOR317) specifically amplified a fragment of 317 bp from DNA of Moringa oleifera samples collected from different regions of Punjab province of Pakistan. The methanol extract of Moringa oleifera flower pods has great potential to be used as natural preservative and nutraceutical in food industry.

  7. Unstable Hoogsteen base pairs adjacent to echinomycin binding sites within a DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.E.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Feigon, J.

    1989-01-01

    The bisintercalation complex present between the DNA octamer [d(ACGTACGT)] 2 and the cyclic octadepsipeptide antibiotic echinomycin has been studied by one- and two-dimensional proton NMR, and the results obtained have been compared with the crystal structures of related DNA-echinomycin complexes. Two echinomycins are found to bind cooperatively to each DNA duplex at the CpG steps, with the two quinoxaline rings of each echinomycin bisintercalating between the C·G and A·T base pairs. At low temperatures, the A·T base pairs on either side of the intercalation site adopt the Hoogsteen conformation, as observed in the crystal structures. However, as the temperature is raised, the Hoogsteen base pairs in the interior of the duplex are destabilized and are observed to be exchanging between the Hoogsteen base pair and either an open or a Watson-Crick base-paired state. The terminal A·T base pairs, which are not as constrained by the helix as the internal base pairs, remain stably Hoogsteen base-paired up to at least 45 degree C. The implications of these results for the biological role of Hoogsteen base pairs in echinomycin-DNA complexes in vivo are discussed

  8. Isothermal amplification of environmental DNA (eDNA for direct field-based monitoring and laboratory confirmation of Dreissena sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie R Williams

    Full Text Available Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP of aquatic invasive species environmental DNA (AIS eDNA was used for rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of Dreissena sp. relevant to the Great Lakes (USA basin. The method was validated for two uses including i direct amplification of eDNA using a hand filtration system and ii confirmation of the results after DNA extraction using a conventional thermal cycler run at isothermal temperatures. Direct amplification eliminated the need for DNA extraction and purification and allowed detection of target invasive species in grab or concentrated surface water samples, containing both free DNA as well as larger cells and particulates, such as veligers, eggs, or seeds. The direct amplification method validation was conducted using Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis and uses up to 1 L grab water samples for high target abundance (e.g., greater than 10 veligers (larval mussels per L for Dreissena sp. or 20 L samples concentrated through 35 μm nylon screens for low target abundance, at less than 10 veligers per liter water. Surface water concentrate samples were collected over a period of three years, mostly from inland lakes in Michigan with the help of a network of volunteers. Field samples collected from 318 surface water locations included i filtered concentrate for direct amplification validation and ii 1 L grab water sample for eDNA extraction and confirmation. Though the extraction-based protocol was more sensitive (resulting in more positive detections than direct amplification, direct amplification could be used for rapid screening, allowing for quicker action times. For samples collected between May and August, results of eDNA direct amplification were consistent with known presence/absence of selected invasive species. A cross-platform smartphone application was also developed to disseminate the analyzed results to volunteers. Field tests of the direct amplification protocol using a

  9. Effect of cellular glutathione content on the induction of DNA double strand breaks by 25 MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenberg, D.; Kistler, M.; Eckhardt-Schupp, F.

    1987-08-01

    The effect of endogenous glutathione (GSH) on the induction of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) by 25 MeV electrons was investigated using stationary haploid yeast cells defective in ..gamma..-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (gsh 1) containing less than 5 per cent of the normal GSH content. In gsh 1 cells the induction of dsb is increased by a factor of 1.5 under oxic and 1.8 under anoxic irradiation conditions whereas the oxygen enhancement ratio was only slightly decreased (1.9) compared to wild-type cells (2.4).

  10. Effect of cellular glutathione content on the induction of DNA double strand breaks by 25 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, D.; Kistler, M.; Eckhardt-Schupp, F.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of endogenous glutathione (GSH) on the induction of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) by 25 MeV electrons was investigated using stationary haploid yeast cells defective in γ-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (gsh 1) containing less than 5 per cent of the normal GSH content. In gsh 1 cells the induction of dsb is increased by a factor of 1.5 under oxic and 1.8 under anoxic irradiation conditions whereas the oxygen enhancement ratio was only slightly decreased (1.9) compared to wild-type cells (2.4). (author)

  11. Semantic content-based recommendations using semantic graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weisen; Kraines, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems (RSs) can be useful for suggesting items that might be of interest to specific users. Most existing content-based recommendation (CBR) systems are designed to recommend items based on text content, and the items in these systems are usually described with keywords. However, similarity evaluations based on keywords suffer from the ambiguity of natural languages. We present a semantic CBR method that uses Semantic Web technologies to recommend items that are more similar semantically with the items that the user prefers. We use semantic graphs to represent the items and we calculate the similarity scores for each pair of semantic graphs using an inverse graph frequency algorithm. The items having higher similarity scores to the items that are known to be preferred by the user are recommended.

  12. Updating the maize karyotype by chromosome DNA sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The karyotype is a basic concept regarding the genome, fundamentally described by the number and morphological features of all chromosomes. Chromosome class, centromeric index, intra- and interchromosomal asymmetry index, and constriction localization are important in clinical, systematic and evolutionary approaches. In spite of the advances in karyotype characterization made over the last years, new data about the chromosomes can be generated from quantitative methods, such as image cytometry. Therefore, using Zea mays L., this study aimed to update the species’ karyotype by supplementing information on chromosome DNA sizing. After adjustment of the procedures, chromosome morphometry and class as well as knob localization enabled describing the Z. mays karyotype. In addition, applying image cytometry, DNA sizing was unprecedentedly measured for the arms and satellite of all chromosomes. This way, unambiguous identification of the chromosome pairs, and hence the assembly of 51 karyograms, were only possible after the DNA sizing of each chromosome, their arms and satellite portions. These accurate, quantitative and reproducible data also enabled determining the distribution and variation of DNA content in each chromosome. From this, a correlation between DNA amount and total chromosome length evidenced that the mean DNA content of chromosome 9 was higher than that of chromosome 8. The chromosomal DNA sizing updated the Z. mays karyotype, providing insights into its dynamic genome with regards to the organization of the ten chromosomes and their respective portions. Considering the results and the relevance of cytogenetics in the current scenario of comparative sequencing and genomics, chromosomal DNA sizing should be incorporated as an additional parameter for karyotype definition. Based on this study, it can be affirmed that cytogenetic approaches go beyond the simple morphological description of chromosomes. PMID:29293613

  13. Content-based analysis and indexing of sports video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Bai, Xuesheng; Xu, Guang-you

    2001-12-01

    An explosion of on-line image and video data in digital form is already well underway. With the exponential rise in interactive information exploration and dissemination through the World-Wide Web, the major inhibitors of rapid access to on-line video data are the management of capture and storage, and content-based intelligent search and indexing techniques. This paper proposes an approach for content-based analysis and event-based indexing of sports video. It includes a novel method to organize shots - classifying shots as close shots and far shots, an original idea of blur extent-based event detection, and an innovative local mutation-based algorithm for caption detection and retrieval. Results on extensive real TV programs demonstrate the applicability of our approach.

  14. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HLA class I sequence-based typing using DNA recovered from frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura A; Abdur Rahman, Manal; Ng, Carmond; Le, Anh Q; Milloy, M-J; Mo, Theresa; Brumme, Zabrina L

    2012-08-31

    We describe a rapid, reliable and cost-effective method for intermediate-to-high-resolution sequence-based HLA class I typing using frozen plasma as a source of genomic DNA. The plasma samples investigated had a median age of 8.5 years. Total nucleic acids were isolated from matched frozen PBMC (~2.5 million) and plasma (500 μl) samples from a panel of 25 individuals using commercial silica-based kits. Extractions yielded median [IQR] nucleic acid concentrations of 85.7 [47.0-130.0]ng/μl and 2.2 [1.7-2.6]ng/μl from PBMC and plasma, respectively. Following extraction, ~1000 base pair regions spanning exons 2 and 3 of HLA-A, -B and -C were amplified independently via nested PCR using universal, locus-specific primers and sequenced directly. Chromatogram analysis was performed using commercial DNA sequence analysis software and allele interpretation was performed using a free web-based tool. HLA-A, -B and -C amplification rates were 100% and chromatograms were of uniformly high quality with clearly distinguishable mixed bases regardless of DNA source. Concordance between PBMC and plasma-derived HLA types was 100% at the allele and protein levels. At the nucleotide level, a single partially discordant base (resulting from a failure to call both peaks in a mixed base) was observed out of >46,975 bases sequenced (>99.9% concordance). This protocol has previously been used to perform HLA class I typing from a variety of genomic DNA sources including PBMC, whole blood, granulocyte pellets and serum, from specimens up to 30 years old. This method provides comparable specificity to conventional sequence-based approaches and could be applied in situations where cell samples are unavailable or DNA quantities are limiting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Absolute quantification of DNA methylation using microfluidic chip-based digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Bai, Yanan; Cheng, Zule; Liu, Fangming; Wang, Ping; Yang, Dawei; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Mao, Hongju; Zhao, Jianlong

    2017-10-15

    Hypermethylation of CpG islands in the promoter region of many tumor suppressor genes downregulates their expression and in a result promotes tumorigenesis. Therefore, detection of DNA methylation status is a convenient diagnostic tool for cancer detection. Here, we reported a novel method for the integrative detection of methylation by the microfluidic chip-based digital PCR. This method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme HpaII, which cleaves the unmethylated DNA strands while keeping the methylated ones intact. After HpaII treatment, the DNA methylation level is determined quantitatively by the microfluidic chip-based digital PCR with the lower limit of detection equal to 0.52%. To validate the applicability of this method, promoter methylation of two tumor suppressor genes (PCDHGB6 and HOXA9) was tested in 10 samples of early stage lung adenocarcinoma and their adjacent non-tumorous tissues. The consistency was observed in the analysis of these samples using our method and a conventional bisulfite pyrosequencing. Combining high sensitivity and low cost, the microfluidic chip-based digital PCR method might provide a promising alternative for the detection of DNA methylation and early diagnosis of epigenetics-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure on Histology and DNA Content of the Brain Cortex and Hypothalamus of Young and Adult Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.I.; Othman, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the potential adverse effects of exposure to electromagnetic radiation (EMR) arising from mobile phone. The present study investigates the effect of the daily exposure of adult and young rats to EMR for 1 hour (at a frequency of 900 MHz, a power density of 0.02 mW/cm 2 and an average specific absorption rate of 1.165 W/kg) on the DNA content and tissue architecture of the cortex and hypothalamus of the rat brain. Both young and adult rats were sacrificed at two intervals, after 4 months of daily EMR exposure and after 1 month of stopping the exposure. The present results showed a significant increase in the DNA intensity of young and adult rats in both areas after 4 months of daily EMR exposure. However, decreased DNA content around the normal level was observed after one month of stopping the exposure. Light microscopic examination of irradiated rats revealed edema, vacuolation, necrosis and proliferated glial cells. Stopping EMR exposure showed mild amelioration in the structural damage of the cerebral cortex of young animals, however, most drastic changes still persisted in the other animals. In conclusion, these data may confirm the neurotoxic risks arising from the extensive use of mobile phones that may alter the brain histology and impair its function

  19. Statistical length of DNA based on AFM image measured by a computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinqing; Qiu Xijun; Zhang Yi; Hu Jun; Wu Shiying; Huang Yibo; Ai Xiaobai; Li Minqian

    2001-01-01

    Taking advantage of image processing technology, the contour length of DNA molecule was measured automatically by a computer. Based on the AFM image of DNA, the topography of DNA was simulated into a curve. Then the DNA length was measured automatically by inserting mode. It was shown that the experimental length of a naturally deposited DNA (180.4 +- 16.4 nm) was well consistent with the theoretical length (185.0 nm). Comparing to other methods, the present approach had advantages of precision and automatism. The stretched DNA was also measured. It present approach had advantages of precision and automatism. The stretched DNA was also measured. It was shown that the experimental length (343.6 +- 20.7 nm) was much longer than the theoretical length (307.0 nm). This result indicated that the stretching process had a distinct effect on the DNA length. However, the method provided here avoided the DNA-stretching effect

  20. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Leigh, Mary Beth; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based molecular techniques permit the comprehensive determination of microbial diversity but generally do not reveal the relationship between the identity and the function of microorganisms. The first direct molecular technique to enable the linkage of phylogeny with function is DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Applying this method first helped describe the utilization of simple compounds, such as methane, methanol or glucose and has since been used to detect microbial communities active in the utilization of a wide variety of compounds, including various xenobiotics. The principle of the method lies in providing 13C-labeled substrate to a microbial community and subsequent analyses of the 13C-DNA isolated from the community. Isopycnic centrifugation permits separating 13C-labeled DNA of organisms that utilized the substrate from 12C-DNA of the inactive majority. As the whole metagenome of active populations is isolated, its follow-up analysis provides successful taxonomic identification as well as the potential for functional gene analyses. Because of its power, DNA-SIP has become one of the leading techniques of microbial ecology research. But from other point of view, it is a labor-intensive method that requires careful attention to detail during each experimental step in order to avoid misinterpretation of results.

  1. Designing thermal diode and heat pump based on DNA nanowire: Multifractal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@iaurmia.ac.ir; Panahinia, R.

    2017-07-12

    The management of heat flow in DNA nano wire was considered. Thermal diode effect in DNA and the domain of its appearance dependent to system parameters have been detected. The appearance of directed thermal flow in thermodynamic sizes proposes the possibility of designing the macroscopic thermal rectifier. By applying driven force, pumping effect has been also observed. The resonance frequency of DNA and threshold amplitudes of driving force for attaining permanent pumping effect have been detected. Forasmuch as detecting negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR) phenomenon, DNA can act as a thermal transistor. By using an analytical parallel investigation based on Rényi spectrum analysis, threshold values to transition to NDTR and pumping regimes have been detected. - Highlights: • The control and management of heat current in DNA have been investigated. • Directed thermal flow and NDTR in DNA have been identified. • By increasing the system size, the reversed thermal rectification appeared. So, it is proposed the possibility of designing the macroscopic thermal rectifier. • Pumping effect accompanied with detection of resonance frequency of DNA has been observed. • To verify the results, we did a parallel analysis based on multifractal concept to detect threshold values for transition to pumping state and NDTR regime.

  2. Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2011-07-10

    From ligand-receptor binding to DNA hybridization, molecular recognition plays a central role in biology. Over the past several decades, chemists have successfully reproduced the exquisite specificity of biomolecular interactions. However, engineering multiple specific interactions in synthetic systems remains difficult. DNA retains its position as the best medium with which to create orthogonal, isoenergetic interactions, based on the complementarity of Watson-Crick binding. Here we show that DNA can be used to create diverse bonds using an entirely different principle: the geometric arrangement of blunt-end stacking interactions. We show that both binary codes and shape complementarity can serve as a basis for such stacking bonds, and explore their specificity, thermodynamics and binding rules. Orthogonal stacking bonds were used to connect five distinct DNA origami. This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures.

  3. Gold-based optical biosensor for single-mismatched DNA detection using salt-induced hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Ma, Xingyi; Cao, Cuong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a gold nanoparticle (Au-NP)-based detection method for sensitive and specific DNA-based diagnostic applications is described. A sandwich format consisting of Au-NPs/DNA/PMP (Streptavidin-coated MagnetSphere Para-Magnetic Particles) was fabricated. PMPs captured and separated target...

  4. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  6. Plant DNA Detection from Grasshopper Guts: A Step-by-Step Protocol, from Tissue Preparation to Obtaining Plant DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Avanesyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions.

  7. Swi5-Sfr1 protein stimulates Rad51-mediated DNA strand exchange reaction through organization of DNA bases in the presynaptic filament.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H

    2013-12-03

    The Swi5-Sfr1 heterodimer protein stimulates the Rad51-promoted DNA strand exchange reaction, a crucial step in homologous recombination. To clarify how this accessory protein acts on the strand exchange reaction, we have analyzed how the structure of the primary reaction intermediate, the Rad51/single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) complex filament formed in the presence of ATP, is affected by Swi5-Sfr1. Using flow linear dichroism spectroscopy, we observe that the nucleobases of the ssDNA are more perpendicularly aligned to the filament axis in the presence of Swi5-Sfr1, whereas the bases are more randomly oriented in the absence of Swi5-Sfr1. When using a modified version of the natural protein where the N-terminal part of Sfr1 is deleted, which has no affinity for DNA but maintained ability to stimulate the strand exchange reaction, we still observe the improved perpendicular DNA base orientation. This indicates that Swi5-Sfr1 exerts its activating effect through interaction with the Rad51 filament mainly and not with the DNA. We propose that the role of a coplanar alignment of nucleobases induced by Swi5-Sfr1 in the presynaptic Rad51/ssDNA complex is to facilitate the critical matching with an invading double-stranded DNA, hence stimulating the strand exchange reaction.

  8. Content-based image retrieval: Color-selection exploited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, E.L. van den; Vuurpijl, L.G.; Kisters, P. M. F.; Schmid, J.C.M. von; Moens, M.F.; Busser, R. de; Hiemstra, D.; Kraaij, W.

    2002-01-01

    This research presents a new color selection interface that facilitates query-by-color in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR). Existing CBIR color selection interfaces, are being judged as non-intuitive and difficult to use. Our interface copes with these problems of usability. It is based on 11

  9. Content-Based Image Retrieval: Color-selection exploited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, Marie-Francine; van den Broek, Egon; Vuurpijl, L.G.; de Brusser, Rik; Kisters, P.M.F.; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Kraaij, Wessel; von Schmid, J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    This research presents a new color selection interface that facilitates query-by-color in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR). Existing CBIR color selection interfaces, are being judged as non-intuitive and difficult to use. Our interface copes with these problems of usability. It is based on 11

  10. Implementation options for DNA-based identification into ecological status assessment under the European Water Framework Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Daniel; Borja, Angel; Jones, J Iwan; Pont, Didier; Boets, Pieter; Bouchez, Agnes; Bruce, Kat; Drakare, Stina; Hänfling, Bernd; Kahlert, Maria; Leese, Florian; Meissner, Kristian; Mergen, Patricia; Reyjol, Yorick; Segurado, Pedro; Vogler, Alfried; Kelly, Martyn

    2018-07-01

    Assessment of ecological status for the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is based on "Biological Quality Elements" (BQEs), namely phytoplankton, benthic flora, benthic invertebrates and fish. Morphological identification of these organisms is a time-consuming and expensive procedure. Here, we assess the options for complementing and, perhaps, replacing morphological identification with procedures using eDNA, metabarcoding or similar approaches. We rate the applicability of DNA-based identification for the individual BQEs and water categories (rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal waters) against eleven criteria, summarised under the headlines representativeness (for example suitability of current sampling methods for DNA-based identification, errors from DNA-based species detection), sensitivity (for example capability to detect sensitive taxa, unassigned reads), precision of DNA-based identification (knowledge about uncertainty), comparability with conventional approaches (for example sensitivity of metrics to differences in DNA-based identification), cost effectiveness and environmental impact. Overall, suitability of DNA-based identification is particularly high for fish, as eDNA is a well-suited sampling approach which can replace expensive and potentially harmful methods such as gill-netting, trawling or electrofishing. Furthermore, there are attempts to replace absolute by relative abundance in metric calculations. For invertebrates and phytobenthos, the main challenges include the modification of indices and completing barcode libraries. For phytoplankton, the barcode libraries are even more problematic, due to the high taxonomic diversity in plankton samples. If current assessment concepts are kept, DNA-based identification is least appropriate for macrophytes (rivers, lakes) and angiosperms/macroalgae (transitional and coastal waters), which are surveyed rather than sampled. We discuss general implications of implementing DNA-based identification

  11. DENA: A Configurable Microarchitecture and Design Flow for Biomedical DNA-Based Logic Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiki, Zohre; Jahanian, Ali

    2017-10-01

    DNA is known as the building block for storing the life codes and transferring the genetic features through the generations. However, it is found that DNA strands can be used for a new type of computation that opens fascinating horizons in computational medicine. Significant contributions are addressed on design of DNA-based logic gates for medical and computational applications but there are serious challenges for designing the medium and large-scale DNA circuits. In this paper, a new microarchitecture and corresponding design flow is proposed to facilitate the design of multistage large-scale DNA logic systems. Feasibility and efficiency of the proposed microarchitecture are evaluated by implementing a full adder and, then, its cascadability is determined by implementing a multistage 8-bit adder. Simulation results show the highlight features of the proposed design style and microarchitecture in terms of the scalability, implementation cost, and signal integrity of the DNA-based logic system compared to the traditional approaches.

  12. Improving Griffith's protocol for co-extraction of microbial DNA and RNA in adsorptive soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulin, Mélanie Marie; Nicolaisen, Mette Haubjerg; Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of microbial gene expression is increasingly being used to study key functions in soil microbial communities, yet major limitations still exist for efficient extraction of nucleic acids, especially RNA for transcript analysis, from this complex matrix. We present an improved......-time PCR on both the RNA (after conversion to cDNA) and the DNA fraction of the extracts. Non-adsorptive soils were characterized by low clay content and/or high phosphate content, whereas adsorptive soils had clay contents above 20% and/or a strong presence of divalent Ca in combination with high p......H. Modifications to the co-extraction protocol improved nucleic acid extraction efficiency from all adsorptive soils and were successfully validated by DGGE analysis of the indigenous community based on 16S rRNA gene and transcripts in soils representing low biomass and/or high clay content. This new approach...

  13. An ultrasensitive hollow-silica-based biosensor for pathogenic Escherichia coli DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Eda Yuhana; Lee, Yook Heng; Futra, Dedi; Tan, Ling Ling; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Ibrahim, Nik Nuraznida Nik; Ahmad, Asmat

    2018-03-01

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor for ultrasensitive and selective quantitation of Escherichia coli DNA based on aminated hollow silica spheres (HSiSs) has been successfully developed. The HSiSs were synthesized with facile sonication and heating techniques. The HSiSs have an inner and an outer surface for DNA immobilization sites after they have been functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. From field emission scanning electron microscopy images, the presence of pores was confirmed in the functionalized HSiSs. Furthermore, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis indicated that the HSiSs have four times more surface area than silica spheres that have no pores. These aminated HSiSs were deposited onto a screen-printed carbon paste electrode containing a layer of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a AuNP/HSiS hybrid sensor membrane matrix. Aminated DNA probes were grafted onto the AuNP/HSiS-modified screen-printed electrode via imine covalent bonds with use of glutaraldehyde cross-linker. The DNA hybridization reaction was studied by differential pulse voltammetry using an anthraquinone redox intercalator as the electroactive DNA hybridization label. The DNA biosensor demonstrated a linear response over a wide target sequence concentration range of 1.0×10 -12 -1.0×10 -2 μM, with a low detection limit of 8.17×10 -14 μM (R 2 = 0.99). The improved performance of the DNA biosensor appeared to be due to the hollow structure and rough surface morphology of the hollow silica particles, which greatly increased the total binding surface area for high DNA loading capacity. The HSiSs also facilitated molecule diffusion through the silica hollow structure, and substantially improved the overall DNA hybridization assay. Graphical abstract Step-by-step DNA biosensor fabrication based on aminated hollow silica spheres.

  14. Investigating the dynamics of surface-immobilized DNA nanomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Katherine E.; Trefzer, Martin A.; Johnson, Steven; Tyrrell, Andy M.

    2016-07-01

    Surface-immobilization of molecules can have a profound influence on their structure, function and dynamics. Toehold-mediated strand displacement is often used in solution to drive synthetic nanomachines made from DNA, but the effects of surface-immobilization on the mechanism and kinetics of this reaction have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we show that the kinetics of strand displacement in surface-immobilized nanomachines are significantly different to those of the solution phase reaction, and we attribute this to the effects of intermolecular interactions within the DNA layer. We demonstrate that the dynamics of strand displacement can be manipulated by changing strand length, concentration and G/C content. By inserting mismatched bases it is also possible to tune the rates of the constituent displacement processes (toehold-binding and branch migration) independently, and information can be encoded in the time-dependence of the overall reaction. Our findings will facilitate the rational design of surface-immobilized dynamic DNA nanomachines, including computing devices and track-based motors.

  15. On the way to identify microorganisms in drinking water distribution networks via DNA analysis of the gut content of freshwater isopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Michael; Keller, Adrian; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Warnecke, Hans-Joachim

    2015-05-10

    Pure drinking water is the basis for a healthy society. In Germany the drinking water regulations demand for analysis of water via detection of certain microbiological parameters by cultivation only. However, not all prokaryotes can be detected by these standard methods. How to gain more and better information about the bacteria present in drinking water and its distribution systems? The biofilms in drinking water distribution systems are built by bacteria and therefore represent a valuable source of information about the species present. Unfortunately, these biofilms are badly accessible. We thus exploited the circumstance that a lot of metazoans graze the biofilms, so that the content of their guts partly reflects the respective biofilm biocenosis. Therefore, we collected omnivorous isopods, prepared their guts and examined and characterized their contents based on 16S und 18S rDNA analysis. These molecularbiological investigations provide a profound basis for the characterization of the biocenosis and thereby biologically assess the drinking water ecosystems. Combined with a thorough identification of the species and the knowledge of their habitats, this approach can provide useful indications for the assessment of drinking-water quality and the early detection of problems in the distribution system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA base-calling from a nanopore using a Viterbi algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timp, Winston; Comer, Jeffrey; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-05-16

    Nanopore-based DNA sequencing is the most promising third-generation sequencing method. It has superior read length, speed, and sample requirements compared with state-of-the-art second-generation methods. However, base-calling still presents substantial difficulty because the resolution of the technique is limited compared with the measured signal/noise ratio. Here we demonstrate a method to decode 3-bp-resolution nanopore electrical measurements into a DNA sequence using a Hidden Markov model. This method shows tremendous potential for accuracy (~98%), even with a poor signal/noise ratio. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Slow elimination of DNA damaged bases in the liver of old gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A I; Malakhova, L V; Fomenko, L A [AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki

    1981-01-01

    Elimination of the DNA damaged bases in the liver of old and young mice after their gamma-irradiation is studied. It is established that the incision rate of DNA gamma-damaged bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of the young ones. It is supposed to be connected with the decrease of the activity of DNA reparation ferments or with the presence of limitations in chromatin for the access of these ferments to the damaged parts of DNA in the cells of old animals.

  18. Folic acid functionalized surface highlights 5-methylcytosine-genomic content within circulating tumor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Malara, Natalia; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Limongi, Tania; Asande, Monica; Trunzo, Valentina; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Raso, Cinzia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Perozziello, Gerardo; Raimondo, Raffaella; De Vitis, Stefania; Roveda, Laura; Renne, Maria; Prati, Ubaldo; Mollace, Vincenzo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2014-01-01

    Although the detection of methylated cell free DNA represents one of the most promising approaches for relapse risk assessment in cancer patients, the low concentration of cell-free circulating DNA constitutes the biggest obstacle in the development of DNA methylation-based biomarkers from blood. This paper describes a method for the measurement of genomic methylation content directly on circulating tumor cells (CTC), which could be used to deceive the aforementioned problem. Since CTC are disease related blood-based biomarkers, they result essential to monitor tumor's stadiation, therapy, and early relapsing lesions. Within surface's bio-functionalization and cell's isolation procedure standardization, the presented approach reveals a singular ability to detect high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content in the whole CTC compound, by choosing folic acid (FA) as transducer molecule. Sensitivity and specificity, calculated for FA functionalized surface (FA-surface), result respectively on about 83% and 60%. FA-surface, allowing the detection and characterization of early metastatic dissemination, provides a unique advance in the comprehension of tumors progression and dissemination confirming the presence of CTC and its association with high risk of relapse. This functionalized surface identifying and quantifying high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content into the patient's blood lead significant progress in cancer risk assessment, also providing a novel therapeutic strategy.© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Folic acid functionalized surface highlights 5-methylcytosine-genomic content within circulating tumor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Malara, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Although the detection of methylated cell free DNA represents one of the most promising approaches for relapse risk assessment in cancer patients, the low concentration of cell-free circulating DNA constitutes the biggest obstacle in the development of DNA methylation-based biomarkers from blood. This paper describes a method for the measurement of genomic methylation content directly on circulating tumor cells (CTC), which could be used to deceive the aforementioned problem. Since CTC are disease related blood-based biomarkers, they result essential to monitor tumor\\'s stadiation, therapy, and early relapsing lesions. Within surface\\'s bio-functionalization and cell\\'s isolation procedure standardization, the presented approach reveals a singular ability to detect high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content in the whole CTC compound, by choosing folic acid (FA) as transducer molecule. Sensitivity and specificity, calculated for FA functionalized surface (FA-surface), result respectively on about 83% and 60%. FA-surface, allowing the detection and characterization of early metastatic dissemination, provides a unique advance in the comprehension of tumors progression and dissemination confirming the presence of CTC and its association with high risk of relapse. This functionalized surface identifying and quantifying high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content into the patient\\'s blood lead significant progress in cancer risk assessment, also providing a novel therapeutic strategy.© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. High Interlaboratory Reprocucibility of DNA Sequence-based Typing of Bacteria in a Multicenter Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, MA de; Boye, Kit; Lencastre, H de

    2006-01-01

    Current DNA amplification-based typing methods for bacterial pathogens often lack interlaboratory reproducibility. In this international study, DNA sequence-based typing of the Staphylococcus aureus protein A gene (spa, 110 to 422 bp) showed 100% intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility without...... extensive harmonization of protocols for 30 blind-coded S. aureus DNA samples sent to 10 laboratories. Specialized software for automated sequence analysis ensured a common typing nomenclature....

  1. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-05-12

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  2. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-01-01

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee ampersand Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of ''naked DNA'' for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  3. Fundamental study of the radiation monitoring system based on evaluation of DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, K.; Matuo, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Ikeda, T.

    2011-01-01

    The biological dosemeter that measures biological responses to ionising radiation is useful for radiation protection. This paper presents the development and characterisation of a gamma ray irradiation dosimetry system based on real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) methodology. Real-time PCR is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. If there are no limitations due to limiting substrates or reagents, at each extension step, the amount of DNA target is doubled, leading to exponential (geometric) amplification of the specific DNA fragment. The essential point of this assay is that DNA lesions caused by ionising radiation block DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase, resulting in a decrease in the amplification of a damaged DNA template compared with that of non-damaged DNA templates. (authors)

  4. Sequential addition of short DNA oligos in DNA-polymerase-based synthesis reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Shea N; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P; Christian, Allen T; Young, Jennifer A; Clague, David S

    2013-06-25

    A method of preselecting a multiplicity of DNA sequence segments that will comprise the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence, separating the DNA sequence segments temporally, and combining the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments with at least one polymerase enzyme wherein the multiplicity of DNA sequence segments join to produce the DNA molecule of user-defined sequence. Sequence segments may be of length n, where n is an odd integer. In one embodiment the length of desired hybridizing overlap is specified by the user and the sequences and the protocol for combining them are guided by computational (bioinformatics) predictions. In one embodiment sequence segments are combined from multiple reading frames to span the same region of a sequence, so that multiple desired hybridizations may occur with different overlap lengths.

  5. A k-mer-based barcode DNA classification methodology based on spectral representation and a neural gas network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiannaca, Antonino; La Rosa, Massimo; Rizzo, Riccardo; Urso, Alfonso

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, an alignment-free method for DNA barcode classification that is based on both a spectral representation and a neural gas network for unsupervised clustering is proposed. In the proposed methodology, distinctive words are identified from a spectral representation of DNA sequences. A taxonomic classification of the DNA sequence is then performed using the sequence signature, i.e., the smallest set of k-mers that can assign a DNA sequence to its proper taxonomic category. Experiments were then performed to compare our method with other supervised machine learning classification algorithms, such as support vector machine, random forest, ripper, naïve Bayes, ridor, and classification tree, which also consider short DNA sequence fragments of 200 and 300 base pairs (bp). The experimental tests were conducted over 10 real barcode datasets belonging to different animal species, which were provided by the on-line resource "Barcode of Life Database". The experimental results showed that our k-mer-based approach is directly comparable, in terms of accuracy, recall and precision metrics, with the other classifiers when considering full-length sequences. In addition, we demonstrate the robustness of our method when a classification is performed task with a set of short DNA sequences that were randomly extracted from the original data. For example, the proposed method can reach the accuracy of 64.8% at the species level with 200-bp fragments. Under the same conditions, the best other classifier (random forest) reaches the accuracy of 20.9%. Our results indicate that we obtained a clear improvement over the other classifiers for the study of short DNA barcode sequence fragments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules using a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Sarah J; Han, Min Su; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2007-09-15

    We have developed a novel competition assay that uses a gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based, high-throughput colorimetric approach to screen the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules. This assay hinges on the observation that the melting behavior of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates is sensitive to the concentration of the DNA-binding molecule in solution. When short, oligomeric hairpin DNA sequences were added to a reaction solution consisting of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates and DNA-binding molecules, these molecules may either bind to the Au NP aggregate interconnects or the hairpin stems based on their relative affinity for each. This relative affinity can be measured as a change in the melting temperature (Tm) of the DNA-modified Au NP aggregates in solution. As a proof of concept, we evaluated the selectivity of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindone (an AT-specific binder), ethidium bromide (a nonspecific binder), and chromomycin A (a GC-specific binder) for six sequences of hairpin DNA having different numbers of AT pairs in a five-base pair variable stem region. Our assay accurately and easily confirmed the known trends in selectivity for the DNA binders in question without the use of complicated instrumentation. This novel assay will be useful in assessing large libraries of potential drug candidates that work by binding DNA to form a drug/DNA complex.

  7. CBRecSys 2016. New Trends on Content-Based Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2016 workshop provides a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  8. Theory and Application of DNA Histogram Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Charles Bruce

    The underlying principles and assumptions associated with DNA histograms are discussed along with the characteristics of fluorescent probes. Information theory was described and used to calculate the information content of a DNA histogram. Two major types of DNA histogram analyses are proposed: parametric and nonparametric analysis. Three levels…

  9. DNA-based identification of spices: DNA isolation, whole genome amplification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Felix; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-26

    Usually spices are identified morphologically using simple methods like magnifying glasses or microscopic instruments. On the other hand, molecular biological methods like the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enable an accurate and specific detection also in complex matrices. Generally, the origins of spices are plants with diverse genetic backgrounds and relationships. The processing methods used for the production of spices are complex and individual. Consequently, the development of a reliable DNA-based method for spice analysis is a challenging intention. However, once established, this method will be easily adapted to less difficult food matrices. In the current study, several alternative methods for the isolation of DNA from spices have been developed and evaluated in detail with regard to (i) its purity (photometric), (ii) yield (fluorimetric methods), and (iii) its amplifiability (PCR). Whole genome amplification methods were used to preamplify isolates to improve the ratio between amplifiable DNA and inhibiting substances. Specific primer sets were designed, and the PCR conditions were optimized to detect 18 spices selectively. Assays of self-made spice mixtures were performed to proof the applicability of the developed methods.

  10. DNA-Based Nanobiosensors as an Emerging Platform for Detection of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Abu-Salah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection of disease at an early stage is one of the biggest challenges in medicine. Different disciplines of science are working together in this regard. The goal of nanodiagnostics is to provide more accurate tools for earlier diagnosis, to reduce cost and to simplify healthcare delivery of effective and personalized medicine, especially with regard to chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes and cardiovascular diseases that have high healthcare costs. Up-to-date results suggest that DNA-based nanobiosensors could be used effectively to provide simple, fast, cost-effective, sensitive and specific detection of some genetic, cancer, and infectious diseases. In addition, they could potentially be used as a platform to detect immunodeficiency, and neurological and other diseases. This review examines different types of DNA-based nanobiosensors, the basic principles upon which they are based and their advantages and potential in diagnosis of acute and chronic diseases. We discuss recent trends and applications of new strategies for DNA-based nanobiosensors, and emphasize the challenges in translating basic research to the clinical laboratory.

  11. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Subsequence Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation. Different from the traditional DNA encryption methods, our algorithm does not use complex biological operation but just uses the idea of DNA subsequence operations (such as elongation operation, truncation operation, deletion operation, etc. combining with the logistic chaotic map to scramble the location and the value of pixel points from the image. The experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed algorithm is easy to be implemented, can get good encryption effect, has a wide secret key's space, strong sensitivity to secret key, and has the abilities of resisting exhaustive attack and statistic attack.

  13. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL −1 and 50 μg mL −1 of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities

  14. Excited state dynamics of DNA bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kleinermanns, K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; de Vries, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 308-342 ISSN 0144-235X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0911564; NASA (US) NNX12AG77G; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 663; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) KI 531-29 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA bases * nucleobases * excited state * dynamics * computations * gas phase * conical intersections Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.920, year: 2013

  15. Feasibility study of molecular memory device based on DNA using methylation to store information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Liming; Al-Dirini, Feras [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Center for Neural Engineering (CfNE), The University of Melbourne, Carlton 3053 (Australia); National ICT Australia, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios, E-mail: sskaf@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Center for Neural Engineering (CfNE), The University of Melbourne, Carlton 3053 (Australia); Hossain, Faruque M. [Center for Neural Engineering (CfNE), The University of Melbourne, Carlton 3053 (Australia); Evans, Robin [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2016-07-14

    DNA, because of its robustness and dense information storage capability, has been proposed as a potential candidate for next-generation storage media. However, encoding information into the DNA sequence requires molecular synthesis technology, which to date is costly and prone to synthesis errors. Reading the DNA strand information is also complex. Ideally, DNA storage will provide methods for modifying stored information. Here, we conduct a feasibility study investigating the use of the DNA 5-methylcytosine (5mC) methylation state as a molecular memory to store information. We propose a new 1-bit memory device and study, based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method, the feasibility of electrically reading the information. Our results show that changes to methylation states lead to changes in the peak of negative differential resistance which can be used to interrogate memory state. Our work demonstrates a new memory concept based on methylation state which can be beneficial in the design of next generation DNA based molecular electronic memory devices.

  16. Feasibility study of molecular memory device based on DNA using methylation to store information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Liming; Al-Dirini, Feras; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios; Hossain, Faruque M.; Evans, Robin

    2016-01-01

    DNA, because of its robustness and dense information storage capability, has been proposed as a potential candidate for next-generation storage media. However, encoding information into the DNA sequence requires molecular synthesis technology, which to date is costly and prone to synthesis errors. Reading the DNA strand information is also complex. Ideally, DNA storage will provide methods for modifying stored information. Here, we conduct a feasibility study investigating the use of the DNA 5-methylcytosine (5mC) methylation state as a molecular memory to store information. We propose a new 1-bit memory device and study, based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method, the feasibility of electrically reading the information. Our results show that changes to methylation states lead to changes in the peak of negative differential resistance which can be used to interrogate memory state. Our work demonstrates a new memory concept based on methylation state which can be beneficial in the design of next generation DNA based molecular electronic memory devices.

  17. DNA Microarray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content DNA Microarray Technology Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  18. DNA Source Selection for Downstream Applications Based on DNA Quality Indicators Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Aguilar, Gema; Sánchez-López, Ana María; Barberán-Aceituno, Cristina; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    High-quality human DNA samples and associated information of individuals are necessary for biomedical research. Biobanks act as a support infrastructure for the scientific community by providing a large number of high-quality biological samples for specific downstream applications. For this purpose, biobank methods for sample preparation must ensure the usefulness and long-term functionality of the products obtained. Quality indicators are the tool to measure these parameters, the purity and integrity determination being those specifically used for DNA. This study analyzes the quality indicators in DNA samples derived from 118 frozen human tissues in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) reactive, 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 119 frozen blood samples, and 26 saliva samples. The results obtained for DNA quality are discussed in association with the usefulness for downstream applications and availability of the DNA source in the target study. In brief, if any material is valid, blood is the most approachable option of prospective collection of samples providing high-quality DNA. However, if diseased tissue is a requisite or samples are available, the recommended source of DNA would be frozen tissue. These conclusions will determine the best source of DNA, according to the planned downstream application. Furthermore our results support the conclusion that a complete procedure of DNA quantification and qualification is necessary to guarantee the appropriate management of the samples, avoiding low confidence results, high costs, and a waste of samples. PMID:27158753

  19. DNA electronic circular dichroism on the inter-base pair scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Meo, Florent; Nørby, Morten Steen; Rubio-Magnieto, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    A successful elucidation of the near-ultraviolet electronic circular dichroism spectrum of a short double-stranded DNA is reported. Time-dependent density functional theory methods are shown to accurately predict spectra and assign bands on the microscopic base-pair scale, a finding that opens...... the field for using circular dichroism spectroscopy as a sensitive nanoscale probe of DNA to reveal its complex interactions with the environment. (Chemical Equation Presented)....

  20. A new model for ancient DNA decay based on paleogenomic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Logan; Ware, Roselyn; Smith, Oliver; Collins, Matthew; Allaby, Robin G

    2017-06-20

    The persistence of DNA over archaeological and paleontological timescales in diverse environments has led to a revolutionary body of paleogenomic research, yet the dynamics of DNA degradation are still poorly understood. We analyzed 185 paleogenomic datasets and compared DNA survival with environmental variables and sample ages. We find cytosine deamination follows a conventional thermal age model, but we find no correlation between DNA fragmentation and sample age over the timespans analyzed, even when controlling for environmental variables. We propose a model for ancient DNA decay wherein fragmentation rapidly reaches a threshold, then subsequently slows. The observed loss of DNA over time may be due to a bulk diffusion process in many cases, highlighting the importance of tissues and environments creating effectively closed systems for DNA preservation. This model of DNA degradation is largely based on mammal bone samples due to published genomic dataset availability. Continued refinement to the model to reflect diverse biological systems and tissue types will further improve our understanding of ancient DNA breakdown dynamics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-02-16

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation.

  2. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Surjit B; Mezei, Mihaly; Beveridge, David L

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute-solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interact more strongly with water molecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning's counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 A from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general, the

  3. Excretion of purine base derivatives after intake of bacterial protein meal in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Skrede, A.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial protein meal has a high content ofprotein but also of RNA and DNA. Sixteen barrows were allocated to four diets containing increasing levels of bacterial protein meal (BPM), from weaning to 80 kg live weight, to evaluate whether the RNA and DNA contents of BPM influenced the retention...... of nitrogen. It was hypothesised that an increased intake of RNA and DNA would lead to an increased urinary excretion of purine base derivatives and increased plasma concentrations. Retention of nitrogen was unaffected by dietary content of BPM (P=0.08) and the urinary excretion of purine base derivatives...

  4. Electroporation-based DNA delivery technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    DNA delivery to for example skin and muscle can easily be performed with electroporation. The method is efficient, feasible, and inexpensive and the future possibilities are numerous. Here we present our protocol for gene transfection to mouse skin using naked plasmid DNA and electric pulses....

  5. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. • Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. • Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions. PMID:25202604

  6. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange

  7. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  8. Detection of plant-based adulterants in turmeric powder using DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvathy, V A; Swetha, V P; Sheeja, T E; Sasikumar, B

    2015-01-01

    In its powdered form, turmeric [Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae)], a spice of medical importance, is often adulterated lowering its quality. The study sought to detect plant-based adulterants in traded turmeric powder using DNA barcoding. Accessions of Curcuma longa L., Curcuma zedoaria Rosc. (Zingiberaceae), and cassava starch served as reference samples. Three barcoding loci, namely ITS, rbcL, and matK, were used for PCR amplification of the reference samples and commercial samples representing 10 different companies. PCR success rate, sequencing efficiency, occurrence of SNPs, and BLAST analysis were used to assess the potential of the barcoding loci in authenticating the traded samples of turmeric. The PCR and sequencing success of the loci rbcL and ITS were found to be 100%, whereas matK showed no amplification. ITS proved to be the ideal locus because it showed greater variability than rbcL in discriminating the Curcuma species. The presence of C. zedoaria could be detected in one of the samples whereas cassava starch, wheat, barley, and rye in other two samples although the label claimed nothing other than turmeric powder in the samples. Unlabeled materials in turmeric powder are considered as adulterants or fillers, added to increase the bulk weight and starch content of the commodity for economic gains. These adulterants pose potential health hazards to consumers who are allergic to these plants, lowering the product's medicinal value and belying the claim that the product is gluten free. The study proved DNA barcoding as an efficient tool for testing the integrity and the authenticity of commercial products of turmeric.

  9. The Religious Facebook Experience: Uses and Gratifications of Faith-Based Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Jo Brubaker

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores why Christians ( N  = 335 use Facebook for religious purposes and the needs engaging with religious content on Facebook gratifies. Individuals who access faith-based content on Facebook were recruited to participate in an online survey through a series of Facebook advertisements. An exploratory factor analysis revealed four primary motivations for accessing religious Facebook content: ministering, spiritual enlightenment, religious information, and entertainment. Along with identifying the uses and gratifications received from engaging with faith-based Facebook content, this research reveals how the frequency of Facebook use, the intensity of Facebook use for religious purposes, and also religiosity predict motivations for accessing this social networking site for faith-based purposes. The data revealed those who frequently use Facebook for posting, liking, commenting, and sharing faith-based content and who are more religious are more likely to minister to others. Frequent use also predicted seeking religious information. The affiliation with like-minded individuals afforded by this medium provides faith-based users with supportive content and communities that motivate the use of Facebook for obtaining spiritual guidance, for accessing religious resources, and for relaxing and being entertained.

  10. CBRecSys 2015. New Trends on Content-Based Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2015 workshop aims to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  11. Web content adaptation for mobile device: A fuzzy-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C.C. Wu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available While HTML will continue to be used to develop Web content, how to effectively and efficiently transform HTML-based content automatically into formats suitable for mobile devices remains a challenge. In this paper, we introduce a concept of coherence set and propose an algorithm to automatically identify and detect coherence sets based on quantified similarity between adjacent presentation groups. Experimental results demonstrate that our method enhances Web content analysis and adaptation on the mobile Internet.

  12. Computational modeling of a carbon nanotube-based DNA nanosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantari-Nejad, R; Bahrami, M [Mechanical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rungger, I; Sanvito, S, E-mail: mbahrami@aut.ac.ir [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-11-05

    During the last decade the design of biosensors, based on quantum transport in one-dimensional nanostructures, has developed as an active area of research. Here we investigate the sensing capabilities of a DNA nanosensor, designed as a semiconductor single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) connected to two gold electrodes and functionalized with a DNA strand acting as a bio-receptor probe. In particular, we have considered both covalent and non-covalent bonding between the DNA probe and the SWCNT. The optimized atomic structure of the sensor is computed both before and after the receptor attaches itself to the target, which consists of another DNA strand. The sensor's electrical conductance and transmission coefficients are calculated at the equilibrium geometries via the non-equilibrium Green's function scheme combined with the density functional theory in the linear response limit. We demonstrate a sensing efficiency of 70% for the covalently bonded bio-receptor probe, which drops to about 19% for the non-covalently bonded one. These results suggest that a SWCNT may be a promising candidate for a bio-molecular FET sensor.

  13. Computational modeling of a carbon nanotube-based DNA nanosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantari-Nejad, R; Bahrami, M; Rafii-Tabar, H; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade the design of biosensors, based on quantum transport in one-dimensional nanostructures, has developed as an active area of research. Here we investigate the sensing capabilities of a DNA nanosensor, designed as a semiconductor single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) connected to two gold electrodes and functionalized with a DNA strand acting as a bio-receptor probe. In particular, we have considered both covalent and non-covalent bonding between the DNA probe and the SWCNT. The optimized atomic structure of the sensor is computed both before and after the receptor attaches itself to the target, which consists of another DNA strand. The sensor's electrical conductance and transmission coefficients are calculated at the equilibrium geometries via the non-equilibrium Green's function scheme combined with the density functional theory in the linear response limit. We demonstrate a sensing efficiency of 70% for the covalently bonded bio-receptor probe, which drops to about 19% for the non-covalently bonded one. These results suggest that a SWCNT may be a promising candidate for a bio-molecular FET sensor.

  14. Tracking fungal community responses to maize plants by DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko E Kuramae

    Full Text Available We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA templates. We detected no significant differences in soil fungal diversity and community structure associated with different plant cultivars. However, DNA-based analyses yielded lower fungal OTU richness as compared to RNA-based analyses. Clear differences in fungal community structure were also observed in relation to sampling time and the nucleic acid pool targeted (DNA versus RNA. The most abundant soil fungi, as recovered by DNA-based methods, did not necessary represent the most "active" fungi (as recovered via RNA. Interestingly, RNA-derived community compositions at t1 were highly similar to DNA-derived communities at t2, based on presence/absence measures of OTUs. We recovered large proportions of fungal sequences belonging to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Basidiomycota, especially at the RNA level, suggesting that these important and potentially beneficial fungi are not affected by the plant cultivars nor by GM traits (Bt toxin production. Our results suggest that even though DNA- and RNA-derived soil fungal communities can be very different at a given time, RNA composition may have a predictive power of fungal community development through time.

  15. DNA-based nanobiostructured devices: The role of quasiperiodicity and correlation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@gmail.com [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal-RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Lyra, M.L.; Moura, F.A.B.F. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970, Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the main physical properties of DNA-based nanobiostructured devices, stressing the role played by their quasi-periodicity arrangement and correlation effects. Although the DNA-like molecule is usually described as a short-ranged correlated random ladder, artificial segments can be grown following quasiperiodic sequences as, for instance, the Fibonacci and Rudin–Shapiro ones. They have interesting properties like a complex fractal spectra of energy, which can be considered as their indelible mark, and collective properties that are not shared by their constituents. These collective properties are due to the presence of long-range correlations, which are expected to be reflected somehow in their various spectra (electronic transmission, density of states, etc.) defining another description of disorder. Although long-range correlations are responsible for the effective electronic transport at specific resonant energies of finite DNA segments, much of the anomalous spread of an initially localized electron wave-packet can be accounted by short-range pair correlations, suggesting that an approach based on the inclusion of further short-range correlations on the nucleotide distribution leads to an adequate description of the electronic properties of DNA segments. The introduction of defects may generate states within the gap, and substantially improves the conductance, specially of finite branches. They usually become exponentially localized for any amount of disorder, and have the property to tailor the electronic transport properties of DNA-based nanoelectronic devices. In particular, symmetric and antisymmetric correlations have quite distinct influence on the nature of the electronic states, and a diluted distribution of defects lead to an anomalous diffusion of the electronic wave-packet. Nonlinear contributions, arising from the coupling between electrons and the molecular

  16. EGNAS: an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kick Alfred

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular recognition based on the complementary base pairing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the fundamental principle in the fields of genetics, DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing. We present an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm that allows to generate sets containing a maximum number of sequences with defined properties. EGNAS (Exhaustive Generation of Nucleic Acid Sequences offers the possibility of controlling both interstrand and intrastrand properties. The guanine-cytosine content can be adjusted. Sequences can be forced to start and end with guanine or cytosine. This option reduces the risk of “fraying” of DNA strands. It is possible to limit cross hybridizations of a defined length, and to adjust the uniqueness of sequences. Self-complementarity and hairpin structures of certain length can be avoided. Sequences and subsequences can optionally be forbidden. Furthermore, sequences can be designed to have minimum interactions with predefined strands and neighboring sequences. Results The algorithm is realized in a C++ program. TAG sequences can be generated and combined with primers for single-base extension reactions, which were described for multiplexed genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thereby, possible foldback through intrastrand interaction of TAG-primer pairs can be limited. The design of sequences for specific attachment of molecular constructs to DNA origami is presented. Conclusions We developed a new software tool called EGNAS for the design of unique nucleic acid sequences. The presented exhaustive algorithm allows to generate greater sets of sequences than with previous software and equal constraints. EGNAS is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/pc6/EGNAS.

  17. DNA based random key generation and management for OTP encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Manhui

    2017-09-01

    One-time pad (OTP) is a principle of key generation applied to the stream ciphering method which offers total privacy. The OTP encryption scheme has proved to be unbreakable in theory, but difficult to realize in practical applications. Because OTP encryption specially requires the absolute randomness of the key, its development has suffered from dense constraints. DNA cryptography is a new and promising technology in the field of information security. DNA chromosomes storing capabilities can be used as one-time pad structures with pseudo-random number generation and indexing in order to encrypt the plaintext messages. In this paper, we present a feasible solution to the OTP symmetric key generation and transmission problem with DNA at the molecular level. Through recombinant DNA technology, by using only sender-receiver known restriction enzymes to combine the secure key represented by DNA sequence and the T vector, we generate the DNA bio-hiding secure key and then place the recombinant plasmid in implanted bacteria for secure key transmission. The designed bio experiments and simulation results show that the security of the transmission of the key is further improved and the environmental requirements of key transmission are reduced. Analysis has demonstrated that the proposed DNA-based random key generation and management solutions are marked by high security and usability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A quantum theoretical study of reactions of methyldiazonium ion with DNA base pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Ganapathy, Vinay; Mishra, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Reactions of methyldiazonium ion at the different sites of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs were investigated employing density functional and second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Display Omitted Highlights: → Methylation of the DNA bases is important as it can cause mutation and cancer. → Methylation reactions of the GC and AT base pairs with CH 3 N 2 + were not studied earlier theoretically. → Experimental observations have been explained using theoretical methods. - Abstract: Methylation of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs by the methyldiazonium ion was investigated employing density functional and second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Methylation at the N3, N7 and O6 sites of guanine, N1, N3 and N7 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine and the O2 and O4 sites of thymine were considered. The computed reactivities for methylation follow the order N7(guanine) > N3(adenine) > O6(guanine) which is in agreement with experiment. The base pairing in DNA is found to play a significant role with regard to reactivities of the different sites.

  19. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  20. Chiral halogenated Schiff base compounds: green synthesis, anticancer activity and DNA-binding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyaeifar, Mahnaz; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Sahihi, Mehdi; Kazemi, Zahra; Kajani, Abolghasem Abbasi; Zali-Boeini, Hassan; Kordestani, Nazanin; Bruno, Giuseppe; Gharaghani, Sajjad

    2018-06-01

    Eight enantiomerically pure halogenated Schiff base compounds were synthesized by reaction of halogenated salicylaldehydes with 3-Amino-1,2-propanediol (R or S) in water as green solvent at ambient temperature. All compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, NMR (1H and 13C), circular dichroism (CD) and FT-IR spectroscopy. FS-DNA binding studies of these compounds carried out by fluorescence quenching and UV-vis spectroscopy. The obtained results revealed that the ligands bind to DNA as: (Rsbnd ClBr) > (Rsbnd Cl2) > (Rsbnd Br2) > (Rsbnd I2) and (Ssbnd ClBr) > (Ssbnd Cl2) > (Ssbnd Br2) > (Ssbnd I2), indicating the effect of halogen on binding constant. In addition, DNA-binding constant of the Ssbnd and R-enantiomers are different from each other. The ligands can form halogen bonds with DNA that were confirmed by molecular docking. This method was also measured the bond distances and bond angles. The study of obtained data can have concluded that binding affinity of the ligands to DNA depends on strength of halogen bonds. The potential anticancer activity of ligands were also evaluated on MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines by using MTT assay. The results showed that the anticancer activity and FS-DNA interaction is significantly dependent on the stereoisomers of Schiff base compounds as R-enantiomers displayed significantly higher activity than S-enantiomers. The molecular docking was also used to illustrate the specific DNA-binding of synthesized compounds and groove binding mode of DNA interaction was proposed for them. In addition, molecular docking results indicated that there are three types of bonds (Hsbnd and X-bond and hX-bond) between synthesized compounds and base pairs of DNA.

  1. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian, E-mail: tajbakhshj@cshs.org [Chromatin Biology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Stefanovski, Darko [Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19348 (United States); Tang, George [Chromatin Biology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Wawrowsky, Kolja [Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H. [Department of Surgery and UF Health Comprehensive Transplant Center, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32608 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup −}, 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +}, and 5hmC{sup −}/5mC{sup +} cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +} cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably

  2. Sulfhydryl group content of chicken progesterone receptor: effect of oxidation on DNA binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleg, S.; Schrader, W.T.; O'Malley, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    DNA binding activity of chicken progesterone receptor B form (PRB) and A form (PRA) has been examined. This activity is strongly dependent upon the presence of thiols in the buffer. Stability studies showed that PRB was more sensitive to oxidation that was PRA. Receptor preparations were fractionated by DNA-cellulose chromatography to DNA-positive and DNA-negative subpopulations, and sulfhydryl groups were quantified on immunopurified receptor by labeling with [ 3 H]-N-ethylmaleimide. Labeling of DNA-negative receptors with [ 3 H]-N-ethylmaleimide showed 21-23 sulfhydryl groups on either PRA or PRB form when the proteins were reduced and denatured. A similar number was seen without reduction if denatured DNA-positive receptor species were tested. In contrast, the DNA-negative PRB had only 10-12 sulfhydryl groups detectable without reduction. A similar number (12-13 sulfhydryl groups) was found for PRA species that lost DNA binding activity after exposure to a nonreducing environment in vitro. The authors conclude that the naturally occurring receptor forms unable to bind to DNA, as well as receptor forms that have lost DNA binding activity due to exposure to nonreducing environment in vitro, contain 10-12 oxidized cysteine residues, likely present as disulfide bonds. Since they were unable to reduce the disulfide bonds when the native DNA-negative receptor proteins were treated with dithiothreitol (DTT), they speculate that irreversible loss of DNA binding activity of receptor in vitro is due to oxidation of cysteine residues that are not accessible to DTT in the native state

  3. Design and Realization of Music Retrieval System Based on Feature Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As computer technology develops rapidly, retrieval systems have also undergone great changes. People are no longer contented with singular retrieval means, but are trying many other ways to retrieve feature content. When it comes to music, however, the complexity of sound is still preventing its retrieval from moving further forward. To solve this problem, systematic analysis and study is carried out on music retrieval system based on feature content. A music retrieval system model based on feature content consisting of technical approaches for processing and retrieving of extraction symbols of music feature content is built and realized. An SML model is proposed and tested on two different types of song sets. The result shows good performance of the system. Besides, the shortfalls of the model are also noted and the future prospects of the music retrieval system based on feature content are outlined.

  4. Traceability of Plant Diet Contents in Raw Cow Milk Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Elena; Mastromauro, Francesco; Gianì, Silvia; Breviario, Diego

    2009-01-01

    The use of molecular marker in the dairy sector is gaining large acceptance as a reliable diagnostic approach for food authenticity and traceability. Using a PCR approach, the rbcL marker, a chloroplast-based gene, was selected to amplify plant DNA fragments in raw cow milk samples collected from stock farms or bought on the Italian market. rbcL-specific DNA fragments could be found in total milk, as well as in the skimmed and the cream fractions. When the PCR amplified fragments were sent to sequence, the nucleotide composition of the chromatogram reflected the multiple contents of the polyphytic diet. PMID:22253982

  5. Ultrafast dynamics of solvation and charge transfer in a DNA-based biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Batabyal, Subrata; Mondol, Tanumoy; Sao, Dilip; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules is a key factor for DNA-based devices in optoelectronics and biotechnology. The association of a significant amount of water molecules in DNA-based materials for the intactness of the DNA structure and their dynamic role in the charge-transfer (CT) dynamics is less documented in contemporary literature. In the present study, we have used a genomic DNA-cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTMA) complex, a technological important biomaterial, and Hoechest 33258 (H258), a well-known DNA minor groove binder, as fluorogenic probe for the dynamic solvation studies. The CT dynamics of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs; 5.2 nm) embedded in the as-prepared and swollen biomaterial have also been studied and correlated with that of the timescale of solvation. We have extended our studies on the temperature-dependent CT dynamics of QDs in a nanoenvironment of an anionic, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelle (AOT RMs), whereby the number of water molecules and their dynamics can be tuned in a controlled manner. A direct correlation of the dynamics of solvation and that of the CT in the nanoenvironments clearly suggests that the hydration barrier within the Arrhenius framework essentially dictates the charge-transfer dynamics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D'Elia, D.; Montalvo, A.; Pinto, B.; de Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces

  7. DNA Damage and Base Excision Repair in Mitochondria and Their Role in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gredilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, our knowledge about the processes involved in the aging process has exponentially increased. However, further investigation will be still required to globally understand the complexity of aging. Aging is a multifactorial phenomenon characterized by increased susceptibility to cellular loss and functional decline, where mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial DNA damage response are thought to play important roles. Due to the proximity of mitochondrial DNA to the main sites of mitochondrial-free radical generation, oxidative stress is a major source of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Mitochondrial DNA repair mechanisms, in particular the base excision repair pathway, constitute an important mechanism for maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity. The results reviewed here support that mitochondrial DNA damage plays an important role in aging.

  8. Formation of (DNA)2-LNA triplet with recombinant base recognition: A quantum mechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Vijaya Shri; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar

    2018-05-01

    The formation of DNA triple helix offers the verity of new possibilities in molecular biology. However its applications are limited to purine and pyrimidine rich sequences recognized by forming Hoogsteen/Reverse Hoogsteen triplets in major groove sites of DNA duplex. To overcome this drawback modification in bases backbone and glucose of nucleotide unit of DNA have been proposed so that the third strand base recognized by both the bases of DNA duplex by forming Recombinant type(R-type) of bonding in mixed sequences. Here we performed Quanrum Mechanical (Hartree-Fock and DFT) methodology on natural DNA and Locked Nucleic Acids(LNA) triplets using 6-31G and some other new advance basis sets. Study suggests energetically stable conformation has been observed for recombinant triplets in order of G-C*G > A-T*A > G-C*C > T-A*T for both type of triplets. Interestingly LNA leads to more stable conformation in all set of triplets, clearly suggests an important biological tool to overcome above mentioned drawbacks.

  9. The Integration of Language and Content: Form-Focused Instruction in a Content-Based Language Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Valeo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This comparative, classroom-based study investigated the effect and effectiveness of introducing a focus on form approach to a content-based, occupation-specific language program for adults. Thirty-six adults in two classes participated in a 10-week study. One group of 16 adults received content-based instruction that included a focus on form component while the other group of 20 adults received the same content-based instruction with a focus on meaning only. Pre-tests/post-tests/delayed post-tests measured learning of two grammatical forms, the present conditional and the simple past tense, as well as occupational content knowledge. Results indicated significant gains on most of the language measures for both learner groups but significant advantages for the form-focused group on the content knowledge tests. The results are discussed in relation to the impact of specific strategies designed to focus on form and the relationship between attention to form and comprehension of content in the context of content-based language programs. Résumé Cette étude comparative menée en salle de classe a examiné l'effet et l'efficacité d’un enseignement mettant l’accent sur ​​la forme dans un programme de langues professionnelles pour adultes. Trente-six apprenants de deux classes intactes ont participé à cette recherche pendant 10 semaines. Un groupe de 16 personnes a reçu les instructions qui se concentraient sur la forme, tandis que l'autre groupe de 20 personnes a reçu les mêmes instructions qui portaient sur ​​le sens seulement. Des pré-tests, des post-tests ainsi que des post-tests retardés ont mesuré l'apprentissage de la langue et du contenu de deux traits grammaticaux; premièrement, la connaissance du conditionnel et du passé et, deuxièmement, la connaissance du contenu professionnel. Les résultats ont indiqué une amélioration sensible de la plupart des compétences linguistiques pour les deux groupes d

  10. Magnetophoresis of flexible DNA-based dumbbell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2008-02-01

    Controlled movement and manipulation of magnetic micro- and nanostructures using magnetic forces can give rise to important applications in biomedecine, diagnostics, and immunology. We report controlled magnetophoresis and stretching, in aqueous solution, of a DNA-based dumbbell structure containing magnetic and diamagnetic microspheres. The velocity and stretching of the dumbbell were experimentally measured and correlated with a theoretical model based on the forces acting on individual magnetic beads or the entire dumbbell structures. The results show that precise and predictable manipulation of dumbbell structures is achievable and can potentially be applied to immunomagnetic cell separators.

  11. Efficient Sleeping Beauty DNA Transposition From DNA Minicircles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nynne Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA transposon-based vectors have emerged as new potential delivery tools in therapeutic gene transfer. Such vectors are now showing promise in hematopoietic stem cells and primary human T cells, and clinical trials with transposon-engineered cells are on the way. However, the use of plasmid DNA as a carrier of the vector raises safety concerns due to the undesirable administration of bacterial sequences. To optimize vectors based on the Sleeping Beauty (SB DNA transposon for clinical use, we examine here SB transposition from DNA minicircles (MCs devoid of the bacterial plasmid backbone. Potent DNA transposition, directed by the hyperactive SB100X transposase, is demonstrated from MC donors, and the stable transfection rate is significantly enhanced by expressing the SB100X transposase from MCs. The stable transfection rate is inversely related to the size of circular donor, suggesting that a MC-based SB transposition system benefits primarily from an increased cellular uptake and/or enhanced expression which can be observed with DNA MCs. DNA transposon and transposase MCs are easily produced, are favorable in size, do not carry irrelevant DNA, and are robust substrates for DNA transposition. In accordance, DNA MCs should become a standard source of DNA transposons not only in therapeutic settings but also in the daily use of the SB system.

  12. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  13. Self-Assembling Molecular Logic Gates Based on DNA Crossover Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eleanor A; Peterson, Evan; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2017-07-05

    DNA-based computational hardware has attracted ever-growing attention due to its potential to be useful in the analysis of complex mixtures of biological markers. Here we report the design of self-assembling logic gates that recognize DNA inputs and assemble into crossover tiles when the output signal is high; the crossover structures disassemble to form separate DNA stands when the output is low. The output signal can be conveniently detected by fluorescence using a molecular beacon probe as a reporter. AND, NOT, and OR logic gates were designed. We demonstrate that the gates can connect to each other to produce other logic functions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A force-based, parallel assay for the quantification of protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Katja; Pippig, Diana A; Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Gaub, Hermann E

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA), parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction.

  15. A force-based, parallel assay for the quantification of protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Limmer

    Full Text Available Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA, parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction.

  16. Solution-based targeted genomic enrichment for precious DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearer Aiden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solution-based targeted genomic enrichment (TGE protocols permit selective sequencing of genomic regions of interest on a massively parallel scale. These protocols could be improved by: 1 modifying or eliminating time consuming steps; 2 increasing yield to reduce input DNA and excessive PCR cycling; and 3 enhancing reproducible. Results We developed a solution-based TGE method for downstream Illumina sequencing in a non-automated workflow, adding standard Illumina barcode indexes during the post-hybridization amplification to allow for sample pooling prior to sequencing. The method utilizes Agilent SureSelect baits, primers and hybridization reagents for the capture, off-the-shelf reagents for the library preparation steps, and adaptor oligonucleotides for Illumina paired-end sequencing purchased directly from an oligonucleotide manufacturing company. Conclusions This solution-based TGE method for Illumina sequencing is optimized for small- or medium-sized laboratories and addresses the weaknesses of standard protocols by reducing the amount of input DNA required, increasing capture yield, optimizing efficiency, and improving reproducibility.

  17. (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 2. Phylogeny and biogeography of Alyssum (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences. Yan Li Yan Kong Zhe Zhang Yanqiang Yin Bin Liu Guanghui Lv Xiyong Wang. Research Article Volume 93 Issue 2 August 2014 pp 313-323 ...

  18. Identification of Species in Tripterygium (Celastraceae) Based on DNA Barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Na; Yao, Yuanyuan; Liang, Xuming; Qu, Xianyou; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Yingjie; Yang, Dajian; Sun, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Species of genus Tripterygium (Celastraceae) have attracted much attention owing to their excellent effect on treating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, due to high market demand causing overexploitation, natural populations of genus Tripterygium have rapidly declined. Tripterygium medicinal materials are mainly collected from the wild, making the quality of medicinal materials unstable. Additionally, identification of herbal materials from Tripterygium species and their adulterants is difficult based on morphological characters. Therefore, an accurate, convenient, and stability method is urgently needed. In this wok, we developed a DNA barcoding technique to distinguish T. wilfordii HOOK. f., T. hypoglaucum (LÉVL.) HUTCH, and T. regelii SPRAGUE et TAKEDA and their adulterants based on four uniform and standard DNA regions (internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), matK, rbcL, and psbA-trnH). DNA was extracted from 26 locations of fresh leaves. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Neighbor-Joining (NJ) method, while barcoding gap was analyzed to assess identification efficiency. Compared with the other DNA barcodes applied individually or in combination, ITS2+psbA-trnH was demonstrated as the optimal barcode. T. hypoglaucum and T. wilfordii can be considered as conspecific, while T. regelii was recognized as a separate species. Furthermore, identification of commercial Tripterygium samples was conducted using BLAST against GenBank and Species Identification System for Traditional Chinese Medicine. Our results indicated that DNA barcoding is a convenient, effective, and stability method to identify and distinguish Tripterygium and its adulterants, and could be applied as the quality control for Tripterygium medicinal preparations and monitoring of the medicinal herb trade in markets.

  19. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization ...

  20. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on DNA-Hb modified gold electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafi, A.K.M.; Fan Yin; Shin, Hoon-Kyu; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2006-01-01

    A hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) biosensor based on DNA-hemoglobin (Hb) modified electrode is described in this paper. The sensor was designed by DNA and hemoglobin dropletting onto gold electrode surface layer by layer. The sensor based on the direct electron transfer of iron of hemoglobin showed a well electrocatalytic response to the reduction of the H 2 O 2 . This sensor offered an excellent electrochemical response for H 2 O 2 concentration below micromole level with high sensitivity and selectivity and short response time. Experimental conditions influencing the biosensor performance such as, pH, potential were optimized and assessed. The levels of the RSD's ( 2 O 2 was observed from 10 to 120 μM with the detection limit of 0.4 μM (based on the S/N = 3)

  1. Pros and cons of methylation-based enrichment methods for ancient DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Gamba, Cristina; Sarkissian, Clio Der; Ermini, Luca; Louvel, Guillaume; Boulygina, Eugenia; Sokolov, Alexey; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Lopez, Patricio; McDonald, H. Gregory; Scott, Eric; Tikhonov, Alexei; Stafford,, Thomas W.; Alfarhan, Ahmed H.; Alquraishi, Saleh A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Shapiro, Beth; Willerslev, Eske; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that DNA methylation survives in fossil material provides an opportunity for novel molecular approaches in palaeogenomics. Here, we apply to ancient DNA extracts the probe-independent Methylated Binding Domains (MBD)-based enrichment method, which targets DNA molecules containing methylated CpGs. Using remains of a Palaeo-Eskimo Saqqaq individual, woolly mammoths, polar bears and two equine species, we confirm that DNA methylation survives in a variety of tissues, environmental contexts and over a large temporal range (4,000 to over 45,000 years before present). MBD enrichment, however, appears principally biased towards the recovery of CpG-rich and long DNA templates and is limited by the fast post-mortem cytosine deamination rates of methylated epialleles. This method, thus, appears only appropriate for the analysis of ancient methylomes from very well preserved samples, where both DNA fragmentation and deamination have been limited. This work represents an essential step toward the characterization of ancient methylation signatures, which will help understanding the role of epigenetic changes in past environmental and cultural transitions. PMID:26134828

  2. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-01-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP. - Highlights: • We apply magnetoresistive sensors to study solid-surface hybridization kinetics of DNA. • We measure DNA melting profiles for perfectly matching DNA duplexes and for a single base mismatch. • We present a procedure to correct for temperature dependencies of the sensor output. • We reliably extract melting temperatures for the DNA hybrids. • We demonstrate direct measurement of differential binding signal for two probes on a single sensor

  3. Influence of amino acids Shiff bases on irradiated DNA stability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, N H; Malakyan, M H; Bajinyan, S A; Torosyan, A L; Grigoryan, I E; Haroutiunian, S G

    2013-01-01

    To reveal protective role of the new Mn(II) complexes with Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate and Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate Schiff Bases against ionizing radiation. The DNA of the rats liver was isolated on 7, 14, and 30 days after X-ray irradiation. The differences between the DNA of irradiated rats and rats pre-treated with Mn(II) complexes were studied using the melting, microcalorimetry, and electrophoresis methods. The melting parameters and the melting enthalpy of rats livers DNA were changed after the X-ray irradiation: melting temperature and melting enthalpy were decreased and melting interval was increased. These results can be explained by destruction of DNA molecules. It was shown that pre-treatment of rats with Mn(II) complexes approximates the melting parameters to norm. Agarose gel electrophoresis data confirmed the results of melting studies. The separate DNA fragments were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. The DNA isolated from animals pre-treated with the Mn(II) chelates had better electrophoretic characteristics, which correspond to healthy DNA. Pre-treatment of the irradiated rats with Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tyrosinate) and Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tryptophanate)2 improves the DNA characteristics.

  4. A novel quantitative assay of mitophagy: Combining high content fluorescence microscopy and mitochondrial DNA load to quantify mitophagy and identify novel pharmacological tools against pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, Alan; Hinks-Roberts, Alex; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Dombi, Eszter; Morten, Karl; Brady, Stefen; Fratter, Carl; Carver, Janet; Muir, Rebecca; Davis, Ryan; Green, Charlotte J; Johnston, Iain; Hilton-Jones, David; Sue, Carolyn; Mortiboys, Heather; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular mechanism for the recycling of mitochondrial fragments. This process is able to improve mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quality in heteroplasmic mtDNA disease, in which mutant mtDNA co-exists with normal mtDNA. In disorders where the load of mutant mtDNA determines disease severity it is likely to be an important determinant of disease progression. Measuring mitophagy is technically demanding. We used pharmacological modulators of autophagy to validate two techniques for quantifying mitophagy. First we used the IN Cell 1000 analyzer to quantify mitochondrial co-localisation with LC3-II positive autophagosomes. Unlike conventional fluorescence and electron microscopy, this high-throughput system is sufficiently sensitive to detect transient low frequency autophagosomes. Secondly, because mitophagy preferentially removes pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutants, we developed a heteroplasmy assay based on loss of m.3243A>G mtDNA, during culture conditions requiring oxidative metabolism ("energetic stress"). The effects of the pharmacological modulators on these two measures were consistent, confirming that the high throughput imaging output (autophagosomes co-localising with mitochondria) reflects mitochondrial quality control. To further validate these methods, we performed a more detailed study using metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug that is still sometimes used in Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness (MIDD). This confirmed our initial findings and revealed that metformin inhibits mitophagy at clinically relevant concentrations, suggesting that it may have novel therapeutic uses. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Diagnostic markers of urothelial cancer based on DNA methylation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chihara, Yoshitomo; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Kanai, Yae; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugano, Kokichi; Kawashima, Kiyotaka; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Early detection and risk assessment are crucial for treating urothelial cancer (UC), which is characterized by a high recurrence rate, and necessitates frequent and invasive monitoring. We aimed to establish diagnostic markers for UC based on DNA methylation. In this multi-center study, three independent sample sets were prepared. First, DNA methylation levels at CpG loci were measured in the training sets (tumor samples from 91 UC patients, corresponding normal-appearing tissue from these patients, and 12 normal tissues from age-matched bladder cancer-free patients) using the Illumina Golden Gate methylation assay to identify differentially methylated loci. Next, these methylated loci were validated by quantitative DNA methylation by pyrosequencing, using another cohort of tissue samples (Tissue validation set). Lastly, methylation of these markers was analyzed in the independent urine samples (Urine validation set). ROC analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these 12 selected markers. Of the 1303 CpG sites, 158 were hyper ethylated and 356 were hypo ethylated in tumor tissues compared to normal tissues. In the panel analysis, 12 loci showed remarkable alterations between tumor and normal samples, with 94.3% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity. Similarly, corresponding normal tissue could be distinguished from normal tissues with 76.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, the diagnostic accuracy for UC of these markers determined in urine samples was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Based on these preliminary findings, diagnostic markers based on differential DNA methylation at specific loci can be useful for non-invasive and reliable detection of UC and epigenetic field defect

  6. "Off-on" electrochemical hairpin-DNA-based genosensor for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2011-03-01

    A simple and robust "off-on" signaling genosensor platform with improved selectivity for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection based on the electronic DNA hairpin molecular beacons has been developed. The DNA beacons were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 3'-end, while the 5'-end was labeled with a methylene blue (MB) redox probe. A typical "on-off" change of the electrochemical signal was observed upon hybridization of the 27-33 nucleotide (nt) long hairpin DNA to the target DNA, in agreement with all the hitherto published data. Truncation of the DNA hairpin beacons down to 20 nts provided improved genosensor selectivity for SNP and allowed switching of the electrochemical genosensor response from the on-off to the off-on mode. Switching was consistent with the variation in the mechanism of the electron transfer reaction between the electrode and the MB redox label, for the folded beacon being characteristic of the electrochemistry of adsorbed species, while for the "open" duplex structure being formally controlled by the diffusion of the redox label within the adsorbate layer. The relative current intensities of both processes were governed by the length of the formed DNA duplex, potential scan rate, and apparent diffusion coefficient of the redox species. The off-on genosensor design used for detection of a cancer biomarker TP53 gene sequence favored discrimination between the healthy and SNP-containing DNA sequences, which was particularly pronounced at short hybridization times.

  7. Physically transient photonics: random versus distributed feedback lasing based on nanoimprinted DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Persano, Luana; Cyprych, Konrad; Szukalski, Adam; Sznitko, Lech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-28

    Room-temperature nanoimprinted, DNA-based distributed feedback (DFB) laser operation at 605 nm is reported. The laser is made of a pure DNA host matrix doped with gain dyes. At high excitation densities, the emission of the untextured dye-doped DNA films is characterized by a broad emission peak with an overall line width of 12 nm and superimposed narrow peaks, characteristic of random lasing. Moreover, direct patterning of the DNA films is demonstrated with a resolution down to 100 nm, enabling the realization of both surface-emitting and edge-emitting DFB lasers with a typical line width of <0.3 nm. The resulting emission is polarized, with a ratio between the TE- and TM-polarized intensities exceeding 30. In addition, the nanopatterned devices dissolve in water within less than 2 min. These results demonstrate the possibility of realizing various physically transient nanophotonics and laser architectures, including random lasing and nanoimprinted devices, based on natural biopolymers.

  8. The radiation chemistry of the purine bases within DNA and related model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, J.; Berger, M.; Shaw, A.

    1986-01-01

    Both the direct and indirect effects of ionizing radiations are believed to contribute to the chemical changes induced in cellular DNA. Relevant information on the possible degradation pathways has been provided by studies using DNA model compounds, the major proportion of which have focused on pyrimidine components and sugar derivatives. With the development of powerful analytical tools such as high performance liquid chromatography and soft ionization mass spectrometry techniques, progress has recently been made in the elucidation of the nature of the radiation-induced chemical modifications of purine bases in DNA and related nucleosides and nucleotides. This short review details recent aspects of the radiation-induced degradation of adenine and guanine bases in DNA and its model compounds as the result of both direct and indirect effects. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Application of MPEG-7 descriptors for content-based indexing of sports videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeynck, Michael; Auweiler, Thorsten; Ohm, Jens-Rainer

    2003-06-01

    The amount of multimedia data available worldwide is increasing every day. There is a vital need to annotate multimedia data in order to allow universal content access and to provide content-based search-and-retrieval functionalities. Since supervised video annotation can be time consuming, an automatic solution is appreciated. We review recent approaches to content-based indexing and annotation of videos for different kind of sports, and present our application for the automatic annotation of equestrian sports videos. Thereby, we especially concentrate on MPEG-7 based feature extraction and content description. We apply different visual descriptors for cut detection. Further, we extract the temporal positions of single obstacles on the course by analyzing MPEG-7 edge information and taking specific domain knowledge into account. Having determined single shot positions as well as the visual highlights, the information is jointly stored together with additional textual information in an MPEG-7 description scheme. Using this information, we generate content summaries which can be utilized in a user front-end in order to provide content-based access to the video stream, but further content-based queries and navigation on a video-on-demand streaming server.

  10. Content Based Retrieval System for Magnetic Resonance Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojachanets, Katarina

    2010-01-01

    The amount of medical images is continuously increasing as a consequence of the constant growth and development of techniques for digital image acquisition. Manual annotation and description of each image is impractical, expensive and time consuming approach. Moreover, it is an imprecise and insufficient way for describing all information stored in medical images. This induces the necessity for developing efficient image storage, annotation and retrieval systems. Content based image retrieval (CBIR) emerges as an efficient approach for digital image retrieval from large databases. It includes two phases. In the first phase, the visual content of the image is analyzed and the feature extraction process is performed. An appropriate descriptor, namely, feature vector is then associated with each image. These descriptors are used in the second phase, i.e. the retrieval process. With the aim to improve the efficiency and precision of the content based image retrieval systems, feature extraction and automatic image annotation techniques are subject of continuous researches and development. Including the classification techniques in the retrieval process enables automatic image annotation in an existing CBIR system. It contributes to more efficient and easier image organization in the system.Applying content based retrieval in the field of magnetic resonance is a big challenge. Magnetic resonance imaging is an image based diagnostic technique which is widely used in medical environment. According to this, the number of magnetic resonance images is enormously growing. Magnetic resonance images provide plentiful medical information, high resolution and specific nature. Thus, the capability of CBIR systems for image retrieval from large database is of great importance for efficient analysis of this kind of images. The aim of this thesis is to propose content based retrieval system architecture for magnetic resonance images. To provide the system efficiency, feature

  11. Accumulation of premutagenic DNA lesions in mice defective in removal of oxidative base damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klungland, Arne; Rosewell, Ian; Hollenbach, Stephan; Larsen, Elisabeth; Daly, Graham; Epe, Bernd; Seeberg, Erling; Lindahl, Tomas; Barnes, Deborah E.

    1999-01-01

    DNA damage generated by oxidant byproducts of cellular metabolism has been proposed as a key factor in cancer and aging. Oxygen free radicals cause predominantly base damage in DNA, and the most frequent mutagenic base lesion is 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). This altered base can pair with A as well as C residues, leading to a greatly increased frequency of spontaneous G·C→T·A transversion mutations in repair-deficient bacterial and yeast cells. Eukaryotic cells use a specific DNA glycosylase, the product of the OGG1 gene, to excise 8-oxoG from DNA. To assess the role of the mammalian enzyme in repair of DNA damage and prevention of carcinogenesis, we have generated homozygous ogg1−/− null mice. These animals are viable but accumulate abnormal levels of 8-oxoG in their genomes. Despite this increase in potentially miscoding DNA lesions, OGG1-deficient mice exhibit only a moderately, but significantly, elevated spontaneous mutation rate in nonproliferative tissues, do not develop malignancies, and show no marked pathological changes. Extracts of ogg1 null mouse tissues cannot excise the damaged base, but there is significant slow removal in vivo from proliferating cells. These findings suggest that in the absence of the DNA glycosylase, and in apparent contrast to bacterial and yeast cells, an alternative repair pathway functions to minimize the effects of an increased load of 8-oxoG in the genome and maintain a low endogenous mutation frequency. PMID:10557315

  12. Intercalation of a Zn(II) complex containing ciprofloxacin drug between DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Asadian, Ali Ashraf; Mahdavi, Mryam

    2017-11-02

    In this study, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of a Zn(II) complex containing an antibiotic drug, ciprofloxacin, with calf thymus DNA using spectroscopic methods. It was found that Zn(II) complex could bind with DNA via intercalation mode as evidenced by: hyperchromism in UV-Vis spectrum; these spectral characteristics suggest that the Zn(II) complex interacts with DNA most likely through a mode that involves a stacking interaction between the aromatic chromophore and the base pairs of DNA. DNA binding constant (K b = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1 ) from spectrophotometric studies of the interaction of Zn(II) complex with DNA is comparable to those of some DNA intercalative polypyridyl Ru(II) complexes 1.0 -4.8 × 10 4 M -1 . CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of DNA in the presence of Zn(II) complex as observed for the classical intercalator methylene blue. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH DNA-MB, indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with MB for the intercalation.

  13. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  14. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier, E-mail: didier.gasparutto@cea.fr

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL{sup −1} and 50 μg mL{sup −1} of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair

  15. The Five Immune Forces Impacting DNA-Based Cancer Immunotherapeutic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneetha Amara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based vaccine strategy is increasingly realized as a viable cancer treatment approach. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity utilizing tumor associated antigens have been investigated in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. The promising outcomes of these studies have suggested that DNA-based vaccines induce potent T-cell effector responses and at the same time cause only minimal side-effects to cancer patients. However, the immune evasive tumor microenvironment is still an important hindrance to a long-term vaccine success. Several options are currently under various stages of study to overcome immune inhibitory effect in tumor microenvironment. Some of these approaches include, but are not limited to, identification of neoantigens, mutanome studies, designing fusion plasmids, vaccine adjuvant modifications, and co-treatment with immune-checkpoint inhibitors. In this review, we follow a Porter’s analysis analogy, otherwise commonly used in business models, to analyze various immune-forces that determine the potential success and sustainable positive outcomes following DNA vaccination using non-viral tumor associated antigens in treatment against cancer.

  16. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochol, R D; Lin, L; Casavant, B P; Dueck, M E; Lee, L P

    2011-01-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm 2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening

  17. Smart DNA vectors based on cyclodextrin polymers: compaction and endosomal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintgens, Véronique; Leborgne, Christian; Baconnais, Sonia; Burckbuchler, Virginie; Le Cam, Eric; Scherman, Daniel; Kichler, Antoine; Amiel, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    Neutral β-cyclodextrin polymers (polyβCD) associated with cationic adamantyl derivatives (Ada) can be used to deliver plasmid DNA into cells. In absence of an endosomolytic agent, transfection efficiency remains low because most complexes are trapped in the endosomal compartment. We asked whether addition of an imidazole-modified Ada can increase efficiency of polyβCD/cationic Ada-based delivery system. We synthesized two adamantyl derivatives: Ada5, which has a spacer arm between the Ada moiety and a bi-cationic polar head group, and Ada6, which presents an imidazole group. Strength of association between polyβCD and Ada derivatives was evaluated by fluorimetric titration. Gel mobility shift assay, zeta potential, and dark field transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated the system allowed for efficient DNA compaction. In vitro transfection experiments performed on HepG2 and HEK293 cells revealed the quaternary system polyβCD/Ada5/Ada6/DNA has efficiency comparable to cationic lipid DOTAP. We successfully designed fine-tuned DNA vectors based on cyclodextrin polymers combined with two new adamantyl derivatives, leading to significant transfection associated with low toxicity.

  18. The effect of DNA extraction methods on observed microbial communities from fibrous and liquid rumen fractions of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaidya, Jueeli D.; Bogert, van den Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Saccenti, Edoardo; Plugge, Caroline M.; Smidt, Hauke

    2018-01-01

    DNA based methods have been widely used to study the complexity of the rumen microbiota, and it is well known that the method of DNA extraction is a critical step in enabling accurate assessment of this complexity. Rumen fluid (RF) and fibrous content (FC) fractions differ substantially in terms of

  19. One-electron oxidation reactions of purine and pyrimidine bases in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this survey is to critically review the available information on one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases in cellular DNA with emphasis on damage induced through the transient generation of purine and pyrimidine radical cations. Since the indirect effect of ionizing radiation mediated by hydroxyl radical is predominant in cells, efforts have been made to selectively ionize bases using suitable one-electron oxidants that consist among others of high intensity UVC laser pulses. Thus, the main oxidation product in cellular DNA was found to be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine as a result of direct bi-photonic ionization of guanine bases and indirect formation of guanine radical cations through hole transfer reactions from other base radical cations. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and other purine and pyrimidine degradation products was rationalized in terms of the initial generation of related radical cations followed by either hydration or deprotonation reactions in agreement with mechanistic pathways inferred from detailed mechanistic studies. The guanine radical cation has been shown to be implicated in three other nucleophilic additions that give rise to DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-links in model systems. Evidence was recently provided for the occurrence of these three reactions in cellular DNA. There is growing evidence that one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases whose mechanisms have been characterized in model studies involving aqueous solutions take place in a similar way in cells. It may also be pointed out that the above cross-linked lesions are only produced from the guanine radical cation and may be considered as diagnostic products of the direct effect of ionizing radiation.

  20. Measurement and theory of hydrogen bonding contribution to isosteric DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N; Kool, Eric T

    2012-02-15

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions between F and natural bases in nucleic acid duplexes and in a DNA polymerase active site. Since F is widely used to measure electrostatic contributions to pairing and replication, it is important to quantify the impact of this isostere on DNA stability. Here, we studied the pairing stability and selectivity of this compound and a closely related variant, dichlorotoluene deoxyriboside (L), in DNA, using both experimental and computational approaches. We measured the thermodynamics of duplex formation in three sequence contexts and with all possible pairing partners by thermal melting studies using the van't Hoff approach, and for selected cases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Experimental results showed that internal F-A pairing in DNA is destabilizing by 3.8 kcal/mol (van't Hoff, 37 °C) as compared with T-A pairing. At the end of a duplex, base-base interactions are considerably smaller; however, the net F-A interaction remains repulsive while T-A pairing is attractive. As for selectivity, F is found to be slightly selective for adenine over C, G, T by 0.5 kcal mol, as compared with thymine's selectivity of 2.4 kcal/mol. Interestingly, dichlorotoluene in DNA is slightly less destabilizing and slightly more selective than F, despite the lack of strongly electronegative fluorine atoms. Experimental data were complemented by computational results, evaluated at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. These computations suggest that the pairing energy of F to A

  1. Satellite DNA-based artificial chromosomes for use in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlaczky, G

    2001-04-01

    Satellite DNA-based artificial chromosomes (SATACs) can be made by induced de novo chromosome formation in cells of different mammalian species. These artificially generated accessory chromosomes are composed of predictable DNA sequences and they contain defined genetic information. Prototype human SATACs have been successfully constructed in different cell types from 'neutral' endogenous DNA sequences from the short arm of the human chromosome 15. SATACs have already passed a number of hurdles crucial to their further development as gene therapy vectors, including: large-scale purification; transfer of purified artificial chromosomes into different cells and embryos; generation of transgenic animals and germline transmission with purified SATACs; and the tissue-specific expression of a therapeutic gene from an artificial chromosome in the milk of transgenic animals.

  2. HMMBinder: DNA-Binding Protein Prediction Using HMM Profile Based Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rianon; Chowdhury, Shahana Yasmin; Rashid, Mahmood A; Sharma, Alok; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Shatabda, Swakkhar

    2017-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins often play important role in various processes within the cell. Over the last decade, a wide range of classification algorithms and feature extraction techniques have been used to solve this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel DNA-binding protein prediction method called HMMBinder. HMMBinder uses monogram and bigram features extracted from the HMM profiles of the protein sequences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of HMM profile based features for the DNA-binding protein prediction problem. We applied Support Vector Machines (SVM) as a classification technique in HMMBinder. Our method was tested on standard benchmark datasets. We experimentally show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods found in the literature.

  3. HMMBinder: DNA-Binding Protein Prediction Using HMM Profile Based Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rianon Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins often play important role in various processes within the cell. Over the last decade, a wide range of classification algorithms and feature extraction techniques have been used to solve this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel DNA-binding protein prediction method called HMMBinder. HMMBinder uses monogram and bigram features extracted from the HMM profiles of the protein sequences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of HMM profile based features for the DNA-binding protein prediction problem. We applied Support Vector Machines (SVM as a classification technique in HMMBinder. Our method was tested on standard benchmark datasets. We experimentally show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods found in the literature.

  4. Nutrient content and acceptability of soybean based complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrient content and acceptability of soybean based complementary food. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... A study was carried out in Morogoro region, Tanzania, to determine composition and acceptability of soy-based formulations with banana and cowpeas as traditional staples.

  5. Highly Sensitive DNA Sensor Based on Upconversion Nanoparticles and Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Cristobal, P; Vilela, P; El-Sagheer, A; Lopez-Cabarcos, E; Brown, T; Muskens, O L; Rubio-Retama, J; Kanaras, A G

    2015-06-17

    In this work we demonstrate a DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles and graphene oxide (GO). Monodisperse NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 29.1 ± 2.2 nm were synthesized and coated with a SiO2 shell of 11 nm, which allowed the attachment of single strands of DNA. When these DNA-functionalized NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 nanoparticles were in the proximity of the GO surface, the π-π stacking interaction between the nucleobases of the DNA and the sp(2) carbons of the GO induced a FRET fluorescence quenching due to the overlap of the fluorescence emission of the NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 and the absorption spectrum of GO. By contrast, in the presence of the complementary DNA strands, the hybridization leads to double-stranded DNA that does not interact with the GO surface, and thus the NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 nanoparticles remain unquenched and fluorescent. The high sensitivity and specificity of this sensor introduces a new method for the detection of DNA with a detection limit of 5 pM.

  6. Research Report Non-invasive DNA-based species and sex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shrushti modi

    Non-invasive DNA-based species and sex identification of Asiatic wild dog (Cuon alpinus) .... We did not find any cross-gender amplification with any of the reference or field-collected samples. Success rate for sex discrimination for all field-.

  7. Developing a biological dosimeter based on mitochondrial DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S; Carlisle, S M; Unrau, P; Deugau, K V [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Direct measurement of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage from ionizing radiation may be advantageous in determining radiation radiation exposures and assessing their effects on atomic radiation workers. The mitochondrial DNA molecule is one potential cellular DNA target which is: fully defined and sequenced; present in many copies per cell; not vital to cellular survival; and less subject to DNA repair than nuclear DNA. A method is described to isolate and analyse normal mitochondrial DNA. We describe the developments needed to determine DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA. The target is to make a biological dosimeter. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Developing a biological dosimeter based on mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Carlisle, S.M.; Unrau, P.; Deugau, K.V.

    1995-01-01

    Direct measurement of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage from ionizing radiation may be advantageous in determining radiation radiation exposures and assessing their effects on atomic radiation workers. The mitochondrial DNA molecule is one potential cellular DNA target which is: fully defined and sequenced; present in many copies per cell; not vital to cellular survival; and less subject to DNA repair than nuclear DNA. A method is described to isolate and analyse normal mitochondrial DNA. We describe the developments needed to determine DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA. The target is to make a biological dosimeter. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  9. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-04

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication.

  10. Content-based multimedia retrieval: indexing and diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuken, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    The demand for efficient systems that facilitate searching in multimedia databases and collections is vastly increasing. Application domains include criminology, musicology, trademark registration, medicine and image or video retrieval on the web. This thesis discusses content-based retrieval

  11. Application of content-based image compression to telepathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Margaret J.; Ducksbury, Paul G.; Callagy, Grace

    2002-05-01

    Telepathology is a means of practicing pathology at a distance, viewing images on a computer display rather than directly through a microscope. Without compression, images take too long to transmit to a remote location and are very expensive to store for future examination. However, to date the use of compressed images in pathology remains controversial. This is because commercial image compression algorithms such as JPEG achieve data compression without knowledge of the diagnostic content. Often images are lossily compressed at the expense of corrupting informative content. None of the currently available lossy compression techniques are concerned with what information has been preserved and what data has been discarded. Their sole objective is to compress and transmit the images as fast as possible. By contrast, this paper presents a novel image compression technique, which exploits knowledge of the slide diagnostic content. This 'content based' approach combines visually lossless and lossy compression techniques, judiciously applying each in the appropriate context across an image so as to maintain 'diagnostic' information while still maximising the possible compression. Standard compression algorithms, e.g. wavelets, can still be used, but their use in a context sensitive manner can offer high compression ratios and preservation of diagnostically important information. When compared with lossless compression the novel content-based approach can potentially provide the same degree of information with a smaller amount of data. When compared with lossy compression it can provide more information for a given amount of compression. The precise gain in the compression performance depends on the application (e.g. database archive or second opinion consultation) and the diagnostic content of the images.

  12. Cell-based DNA demethylation detection system for screening of epigenetic drugs in 2D, 3D, and xenograft models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agrawal, K.; Das, V.; Otmar, Miroslav; Krečmerová, Marcela; Džubák, P.; Hajdúch, M.

    91A, č. 2 (2017), s. 133-143 ISSN 1552-4922 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-31984A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA methylation * DNA methylation inhibitors * demethylation detection system * epigenetic drugs * high content screening Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 3.222, year: 2016

  13. Solvent effects on hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick, mismatched, and modified DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poater, Jordi; Swart, Marcel; Guerra, Celia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed a complete series of Watson–Crick and mismatched DNA base pairs, both in gas phase and in solution. Solvation causes a weakening and lengthening of the hydrogen bonds between the DNA bases because of the stabilization of the lone pairs involved in these bonds. We have

  14. A DNA microarray-based methylation-sensitive (MS)-AFLP hybridization method for genetic and epigenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, F; Yamamoto, M

    2004-07-01

    We previously developed a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting technique named the Methylation Sensitive (MS)-AFLP method, which permits comparative genome-wide scanning of methylation status with a manageable number of fingerprinting experiments. The technique uses the methylation sensitive restriction enzyme NotI in the context of the existing Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) method. Here we report the successful conversion of this gel electrophoresis-based DNA fingerprinting technique into a DNA microarray hybridization technique (DNA Microarray MS-AFLP). By performing a total of 30 (15 x 2 reciprocal labeling) DNA Microarray MS-AFLP hybridization experiments on genomic DNA from two breast and three prostate cancer cell lines in all pairwise combinations, and Southern hybridization experiments using more than 100 different probes, we have demonstrated that the DNA Microarray MS-AFLP is a reliable method for genetic and epigenetic analyses. No statistically significant differences were observed in the number of differences between the breast-prostate hybridization experiments and the breast-breast or prostate-prostate comparisons.

  15. A Database Approach to Content-based XML retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a rst prototype system for content-based retrieval from XML data. The system's design supports both XPath queries and complex information retrieval queries based on a language modelling approach to information retrieval. Evaluation using the INEX benchmark shows that it is

  16. Charge transfer in DNA: role of base pairing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Bunček, M.; Schneider, Bohdan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, Suppl. (2009), S123-S123 ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /7./. Genoa, 11.07.2009-15.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : DNA * charge transport * base pairing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2009

  17. Evolution-based Virtual Content Insertion with Visually Virtual Interactions in Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hu; Wu, Ja-Ling

    With the development of content-based multimedia analysis, virtual content insertion has been widely used and studied for video enrichment and multimedia advertising. However, how to automatically insert a user-selected virtual content into personal videos in a less-intrusive manner, with an attractive representation, is a challenging problem. In this chapter, we present an evolution-based virtual content insertion system which can insert virtual contents into videos with evolved animations according to predefined behaviors emulating the characteristics of evolutionary biology. The videos are considered not only as carriers of message conveyed by the virtual content but also as the environment in which the lifelike virtual contents live. Thus, the inserted virtual content will be affected by the videos to trigger a series of artificial evolutions and evolve its appearances and behaviors while interacting with video contents. By inserting virtual contents into videos through the system, users can easily create entertaining storylines and turn their personal videos into visually appealing ones. In addition, it would bring a new opportunity to increase the advertising revenue for video assets of the media industry and online video-sharing websites.

  18. Molecular-based rapid inventories of sympatric diversity: a comparison of DNA barcode clustering methods applied to geography-based vs clade-based sampling of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Andrea; Crawford, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Molecular markers offer a universal source of data for quantifying biodiversity. DNA barcoding uses a standardized genetic marker and a curated reference database to identify known species and to reveal cryptic diversity within wellsampled clades. Rapid biological inventories, e.g. rapid assessment programs (RAPs), unlike most barcoding campaigns, are focused on particular geographic localities rather than on clades. Because of the potentially sparse phylogenetic sampling, the addition of DNA barcoding to RAPs may present a greater challenge for the identification of named species or for revealing cryptic diversity. In this article we evaluate the use of DNA barcoding for quantifying lineage diversity within a single sampling site as compared to clade-based sampling, and present examples from amphibians. We compared algorithms for identifying DNA barcode clusters (e.g. species, cryptic species or Evolutionary Significant Units) using previously published DNA barcode data obtained from geography-based sampling at a site in Central Panama, and from clade-based sampling in Madagascar. We found that clustering algorithms based on genetic distance performed similarly on sympatric as well as clade-based barcode data, while a promising coalescent-based method performed poorly on sympatric data. The various clustering algorithms were also compared in terms of speed and software implementation. Although each method has its shortcomings in certain contexts, we recommend the use of the ABGD method, which not only performs fairly well under either sampling method, but does so in a few seconds and with a user-friendly Web interface.

  19. Rock and Roll English Teaching: Content-Based Cultural Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a content-based English as a Second/Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) workshop that strengthens language acquisition, increases intrinsic motivation, and bridges cultural divides. He uses a rock and roll workshop to introduce an organizational approach with a primary emphasis on cultural awareness content and a…

  20. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Knowledge-based approach to video content classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wong, Edward K.

    2001-01-01

    A framework for video content classification using a knowledge-based approach is herein proposed. This approach is motivated by the fact that videos are rich in semantic contents, which can best be interpreted and analyzed by human experts. We demonstrate the concept by implementing a prototype video classification system using the rule-based programming language CLIPS 6.05. Knowledge for video classification is encoded as a set of rules in the rule base. The left-hand-sides of rules contain high level and low level features, while the right-hand-sides of rules contain intermediate results or conclusions. Our current implementation includes features computed from motion, color, and text extracted from video frames. Our current rule set allows us to classify input video into one of five classes: news, weather, reporting, commercial, basketball and football. We use MYCIN's inexact reasoning method for combining evidences, and to handle the uncertainties in the features and in the classification results. We obtained good results in a preliminary experiment, and it demonstrated the validity of the proposed approach.

  2. Electrical signatures of single-stranded DNA with single base mutations in a nanopore capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracheva, Maria E; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the magnitude of the electrical signals produced by DNA translocation through a 1 nm diameter nanopore in a capacitor membrane with a numerical multi-scale approach, and assess the possibility of resolving individual nucleotides as well as their types in the absence of conformational disorder. We show that the maximum recorded voltage caused by the DNA translocation is about 35 mV, while the maximum voltage signal due to the DNA backbone is about 30 mV, and the maximum voltage of a DNA base is about 8 mV. Signals from individual nucleotides can be identified in the recorded voltage traces, suggesting a 1 nm diameter pore in a capacitor can be used to accurately count the number of nucleotides in a DNA strand. Furthermore, we study the effect of a single base substitution on the voltage trace, and calculate the differences among the voltage traces due to a single base mutation for the sequences C 3 AC 7 , C 3 CC 7 , C 3 GC 7 and C 3 TC 7 . The calculated voltage differences are in the 5-10 mV range. The calculated maximum voltage caused by the translocation of individual bases varies from 2 to 9 mV, which is experimentally detectable

  3. DNA polymerases beta and lambda mediate overlapping and independent roles in base excision repair in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena K Braithwaite

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Base excision repair (BER is a DNA repair pathway designed to correct small base lesions in genomic DNA. While DNA polymerase beta (pol beta is known to be the main polymerase in the BER pathway, various studies have implicated other DNA polymerases in back-up roles. One such polymerase, DNA polymerase lambda (pol lambda, was shown to be important in BER of oxidative DNA damage. To further explore roles of the X-family DNA polymerases lambda and beta in BER, we prepared a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line with deletions in the genes for both pol beta and pol lambda. Neutral red viability assays demonstrated that pol lambda and pol beta double null cells were hypersensitive to alkylating and oxidizing DNA damaging agents. In vitro BER assays revealed a modest contribution of pol lambda to single-nucleotide BER of base lesions. Additionally, using co-immunoprecipitation experiments with purified enzymes and whole cell extracts, we found that both pol lambda and pol beta interact with the upstream DNA glycosylases for repair of alkylated and oxidized DNA bases. Such interactions could be important in coordinating roles of these polymerases during BER.

  4. Demographic-Based Content Analysis of Web-Based Health-Related Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadah, Shouq A; Shahbazi, Moloud; Wiley, Matthew T; Hristidis, Vagelis

    2016-06-13

    An increasing number of patients from diverse demographic groups share and search for health-related information on Web-based social media. However, little is known about the content of the posted information with respect to the users' demographics. The aims of this study were to analyze the content of Web-based health-related social media based on users' demographics to identify which health topics are discussed in which social media by which demographic groups and to help guide educational and research activities. We analyze 3 different types of health-related social media: (1) general Web-based social networks Twitter and Google+; (2) drug review websites; and (3) health Web forums, with a total of about 6 million users and 20 million posts. We analyzed the content of these posts based on the demographic group of their authors, in terms of sentiment and emotion, top distinctive terms, and top medical concepts. The results of this study are: (1) Pregnancy is the dominant topic for female users in drug review websites and health Web forums, whereas for male users, it is cardiac problems, HIV, and back pain, but this is not the case for Twitter; (2) younger users (0-17 years) mainly talk about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression-related drugs, users aged 35-44 years discuss about multiple sclerosis (MS) drugs, and middle-aged users (45-64 years) talk about alcohol and smoking; (3) users from the Northeast United States talk about physical disorders, whereas users from the West United States talk about mental disorders and addictive behaviors; (4) Users with higher writing level express less anger in their posts. We studied the popular topics and the sentiment based on users' demographics in Web-based health-related social media. Our results provide valuable information, which can help create targeted and effective educational campaigns and guide experts to reach the right users on Web-based social chatter.

  5. ABI Base Recall: Automatic Correction and Ends Trimming of DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyazghi, Zakaria; Yazouli, Loubna El; Sadki, Khalid; Radouani, Fouzia

    2017-12-01

    Automated DNA sequencers produce chromatogram files in ABI format. When viewing chromatograms, some ambiguities are shown at various sites along the DNA sequences, because the program implemented in the sequencing machine and used to call bases cannot always precisely determine the right nucleotide, especially when it is represented by either a broad peak or a set of overlaying peaks. In such cases, a letter other than A, C, G, or T is recorded, most commonly N. Thus, DNA sequencing chromatograms need manual examination: checking for mis-calls and truncating the sequence when errors become too frequent. The purpose of this paper is to develop a program allowing the automatic correction of these ambiguities. This application is a Web-based program powered by Shiny and runs under R platform for an easy exploitation. As a part of the interface, we added the automatic ends clipping option, alignment against reference sequences, and BLAST. To develop and test our tool, we collected several bacterial DNA sequences from different laboratories within Institut Pasteur du Maroc and performed both manual and automatic correction. The comparison between the two methods was carried out. As a result, we note that our program, ABI base recall, accomplishes good correction with a high accuracy. Indeed, it increases the rate of identity and coverage and minimizes the number of mismatches and gaps, hence it provides solution to sequencing ambiguities and saves biologists' time and labor.

  6. Ionically conducting Er3+-doped DNA-based biomembranes for electrochromic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leones, R.; Fernandes, M.; Sentanin, F.; Cesarino, I.; Lima, J.F.; Zea Bermudez, V. de; Pawlicka, A.; Magon, C.J.; Donoso, J.P.; Silva, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymer-based membranes have particular interest due to their biocompatibility, Biodegradability, easy extraction from natural resources and low cost. The incorporation of Er 3+ ions into natural macromolecule hosts with the purpose of producing highly efficient emitting phosphors is of widespread interest in materials science, due to their important roles in display devices. Thus, biomembranes may be viewed as innovative materials for the area of optics. This paper describes studies of luminescent material DNA-based membranes doped with erbium triflate and demonstrates that their potential technological applications may be expanded to electrochromic devices. The sample that exhibits the highest ionic conductivity is DNA 10 Er, (1.17 × 10 −5 and 7.76 × 10 −4 S.cm −1 at 30 and 100 °C, respectively). DSC, XRD and POM showed that the inclusion of the guest salt into DNA does not change significantly its amorphous nature. The overall redox stability was ca. 2.0 V indicating that these materials have an acceptable stability window for applications in solid state electrochemical devices. The EPR analysis suggested that the Er 3+ ions are distributed in various environments. A small ECD comprising a Er 3+ -doped DNA-based membrane was assembled and tested by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. These electrochemical analyses revealed a pale blue color to transparent color change and a decrease of the charge density from -4.0 to -1.2 mC.cm −2 during 4000 color/bleaching cycles

  7. Mitochondrial DNA assessment in adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy according to a validated case definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casula, M.; van der Valk, M.; Wit, F. W.; Nievaard, M. A.; Reiss, P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have compared mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in tissue from HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy with and without evidence of lipodystrophy, the diagnosis of which was based on subjective clinical assessment. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study

  8. Application of Bayesian Classification to Content-Based Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Berrick, S.; Gopalan, A.; Hua, X.; Shen, S.; Smith, P.; Yang, K-Y.; Wheeler, K.; Curry, C.

    2004-01-01

    The high volume of Earth Observing System data has proven to be challenging to manage for data centers and users alike. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC), about 1 TB of new data are archived each day. Distribution to users is also about 1 TB/day. A substantial portion of this distribution is MODIS calibrated radiance data, which has a wide variety of uses. However, much of the data is not useful for a particular user's needs: for example, ocean color users typically need oceanic pixels that are free of cloud and sun-glint. The GES DAAC is using a simple Bayesian classification scheme to rapidly classify each pixel in the scene in order to support several experimental content-based data services for near-real-time MODIS calibrated radiance products (from Direct Readout stations). Content-based subsetting would allow distribution of, say, only clear pixels to the user if desired. Content-based subscriptions would distribute data to users only when they fit the user's usability criteria in their area of interest within the scene. Content-based cache management would retain more useful data on disk for easy online access. The classification may even be exploited in an automated quality assessment of the geolocation product. Though initially to be demonstrated at the GES DAAC, these techniques have applicability in other resource-limited environments, such as spaceborne data systems.

  9. Towards DNA-Based Programmable Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    thiolated   ssDNA  was  first  immobilized  onto  the  gold...surface.  The  surface  was  then  passivated  with   mercaptohexanol.  Subsequently,  another  complementary   thiolated ...right).       Approach  3:  DNA-­‐mediated  interaction  between   polymer -­‐coated  surfaces   We  also  tried

  10. New scoring schema for finding motifs in DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowzari-Dalini Abbas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pattern discovery in DNA sequences is one of the most fundamental problems in molecular biology with important applications in finding regulatory signals and transcription factor binding sites. An important task in this problem is to search (or predict known binding sites in a new DNA sequence. For this reason, all subsequences of the given DNA sequence are scored based on an scoring function and the prediction is done by selecting the best score. By assuming no dependency between binding site base positions, most of the available tools for known binding site prediction are designed. Recently Tomovic and Oakeley investigated the statistical basis for either a claim of dependence or independence, to determine whether such a claim is generally true, and they presented a scoring function for binding site prediction based on the dependency between binding site base positions. Our primary objective is to investigate the scoring functions which can be used in known binding site prediction based on the assumption of dependency or independency in binding site base positions. Results We propose a new scoring function based on the dependency between all positions in biding site base positions. This scoring function uses joint information content and mutual information as a measure of dependency between positions in transcription factor binding site. Our method for modeling dependencies is simply an extension of position independency methods. We evaluate our new scoring function on the real data sets extracted from JASPAR and TRANSFAC data bases, and compare the obtained results with two other well known scoring functions. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the new approach improves known binding site discovery and show that the joint information content and mutual information provide a better and more general criterion to investigate the relationships between positions in the TFBS. Our scoring function is formulated by simple

  11. DNA based methods used for characterization and detection of food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of food borne pathogen is of outmost importance in the food industries and related agencies. For the last few decades conventional methods were used to detect food borne pathogens based on phenotypic characters. At the advent of complementary base pairing and amplification of DNA, the diagnosis of food ...

  12. Security of Heterogeneous Content in Cloud Based Library Information Systems Using an Ontology Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai DOINEA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As in any domain that involves the use of software, the library information systems take advantages of cloud computing. The paper highlights the main aspect of cloud based systems, describing some public solutions provided by the most important players on the market. Topics related to content security in cloud based services are tackled in order to emphasize the requirements that must be met by these types of systems. A cloud based implementation of an Information Library System is presented and some adjacent tools that are used together with it to provide digital content and metadata links are described. In a cloud based Information Library System security is approached by means of ontologies. Aspects such as content security in terms of digital rights are presented and a methodology for security optimization is proposed.

  13. Criminal Genomic Pragmatism: Prisoners' Representations of DNA Technology and Biosecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Background. Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners' perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. Aim. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. Methods. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. Results. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. Conclusions. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity. PMID:22791960

  14. Criminal Genomic Pragmatism: Prisoners' Representations of DNA Technology and Biosecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners’ perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. Aim. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners’ representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. Methods. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. Results. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. Conclusions. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity.

  15. Criminal genomic pragmatism: prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners' perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity.

  16. Understanding the Elementary Steps in DNA Tile-Based Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Hong, Fan; Hu, Huiyu; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2017-09-26

    Although many models have been developed to guide the design and implementation of DNA tile-based self-assembly systems with increasing complexity, the fundamental assumptions of the models have not been thoroughly tested. To expand the quantitative understanding of DNA tile-based self-assembly and to test the fundamental assumptions of self-assembly models, we investigated DNA tile attachment to preformed "multi-tile" arrays in real time and obtained the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of single tile attachment in various sticky end association scenarios. With more sticky ends, tile attachment becomes more thermostable with an approximately linear decrease in the free energy change (more negative). The total binding free energy of sticky ends is partially compromised by a sequence-independent energy penalty when tile attachment forms a constrained configuration: "loop". The minimal loop is a 2 × 2 tetramer (Loop4). The energy penalty of loops of 4, 6, and 8 tiles was analyzed with the independent loop model assuming no interloop tension, which is generalizable to arbitrary tile configurations. More sticky ends also contribute to a faster on-rate under isothermal conditions when nucleation is the rate-limiting step. Incorrect sticky end contributes to neither the thermostability nor the kinetics. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of DNA tile attachment elucidated here will contribute to the future improvement and optimization of tile assembly modeling, precise control of experimental conditions, and structural design for error-free self-assembly.

  17. DNA-based catalytic enantioselective intermolecular oxa-Michael addition reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Using the DNA-based catalysis concept, a novel Cu(II) catalyzed enantioselective oxa-Michael addition of alcohols to enones is reported. Enantioselectivities of up to 86% were obtained. The presence of water is important for the reactivity, possibly by reverting unwanted side reactions such as

  18. Content Sharing Based on Personal Information in Virtually Secured Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Hosik; Ro, Yong Man; Plataniotis, Kostantinos N.

    User generated contents (UGC) are shared in an open space like social media where users can upload and consume contents freely. Since the access of contents is not restricted, the contents could be delivered to unwanted users or misused sometimes. In this paper, we propose a method for sharing UGCs securely based on the personal information of users. With the proposed method, virtual secure space is created for contents delivery. The virtual secure space allows UGC creator to deliver contents to users who have similar personal information and they can consume the contents without any leakage of personal information. In order to verify the usefulness of the proposed method, the experiment was performed where the content was encrypted with personal information of creator, and users with similar personal information have decrypted and consumed the contents. The results showed that UGCs were securely shared among users who have similar personal information.

  19. PCR-Free Enrichment of Mitochondrial DNA from Human Blood and Cell Lines for High Quality Next-Generation DNA Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meetha P Gould

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sequencing technology allow for accurate detection of mitochondrial sequence variants, even those in low abundance at heteroplasmic sites. Considerable sequencing cost savings can be achieved by enriching samples for mitochondrial (relative to nuclear DNA. Reduction in nuclear DNA (nDNA content can also help to avoid false positive variants resulting from nuclear mitochondrial sequences (numts. We isolate intact mitochondrial organelles from both human cell lines and blood components using two separate methods: a magnetic bead binding protocol and differential centrifugation. DNA is extracted and further enriched for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA by an enzyme digest. Only 1 ng of the purified DNA is necessary for library preparation and next generation sequence (NGS analysis. Enrichment methods are assessed and compared using mtDNA (versus nDNA content as a metric, measured by using real-time quantitative PCR and NGS read analysis. Among the various strategies examined, the optimal is differential centrifugation isolation followed by exonuclease digest. This strategy yields >35% mtDNA reads in blood and cell lines, which corresponds to hundreds-fold enrichment over baseline. The strategy also avoids false variant calls that, as we show, can be induced by the long-range PCR approaches that are the current standard in enrichment procedures. This optimization procedure allows mtDNA enrichment for efficient and accurate massively parallel sequencing, enabling NGS from samples with small amounts of starting material. This will decrease costs by increasing the number of samples that may be multiplexed, ultimately facilitating efforts to better understand mitochondria-related diseases.

  20. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Clostridium perfringens DNA Based Morphology-Dependent DNA Adsorption Properties of CeO2 Nanorods in Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingcan Qian

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogens such as Clostridium perfringens can cause diverse illnesses and seriously threaten to human health, yet far less attention has been given to detecting these pathogenic bacteria. Herein, two morphologies of nanoceria were synthesized via adjusting the concentration of NaOH, and CeO2 nanorod has been utilized as sensing material to achieve sensitive and selective detection of C. perfringens DNA sequence due to its strong adsorption ability towards DNA compared to nanoparticle. The DNA probe was tightly immobilized on CeO2/chitosan modified electrode surface via metal coordination, and the DNA surface density was 2.51 × 10−10 mol/cm2. Under optimal experimental conditions, the electrochemical impedance biosensor displays favorable selectivity toward target DNA in comparison with base-mismatched and non-complementary DNA. The dynamic linear range of the proposed biosensor for detecting oligonucleotide sequence of Clostridium perfringens was from 1.0 × 10−14 to 1.0 × 10−7 mol/L. The detection limit was 7.06 × 10−15 mol/L. In comparison, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV method quantified the target DNA with a detection limit of 1.95 × 10−15 mol/L. Moreover, the DNA biosensor could detect C. perfringens extracted DNA in dairy products and provided a potential application in food quality control.

  1. The structure of metallo-DNA with consecutive thymine-Hg-II-thymine base pairs explains positive entropy for the metallo base pair formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamaguchi, H.; Šebera, Jakub; Kondo, J.; Oda, S.; Komuro, T.; Kawamura, T.; Dairaku, T.; Kondo, Y.; Okamoto, I.; Ono, A.; Burda, J. V.; Kojima, C.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Tanaka, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2014), s. 4094-4099 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR structures * mercury * metalation * metal- DNA binding * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014 http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/42/6/4094.full

  2. Content-based Image Hiding Method for Secure Network Biometric Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjiu Che

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For secure biometric verification, most existing methods embed biometric information directly into the cover image, but content correlation analysis between the biometric image and the cover image is often ignored. In this paper, we propose a novel biometric image hiding approach based on the content correlation analysis to protect the network-based transmitted image. By using principal component analysis (PCA, the content correlation between the biometric image and the cover image is firstly analyzed. Then based on particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm, some regions of the cover image are selected to represent the biometric image, in which the cover image can carry partial content of the biometric image. As a result of the correlation analysis, the unrepresented part of the biometric image is embedded into the cover image by using the discrete wavelet transform (DWT. Combined with human visual system (HVS model, this approach makes the hiding result perceptually invisible. The extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed hiding approach is robust against some common frequency and geometric attacks; it also provides an effective protection for the secure biometric verification.

  3. PISMA: A Visual Representation of Motif Distribution in DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio Alcántara-Silva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because the graphical presentation and analysis of motif distribution can provide insights for experimental hypothesis, PISMA aims at identifying motifs on DNA sequences, counting and showing them graphically. The motif length ranges from 2 to 10 bases, and the DNA sequences range up to 10 kb. The motif distribution is shown as a bar-code–like, as a gene-map–like, and as a transcript scheme. Results: We obtained graphical schemes of the CpG site distribution from 91 human papillomavirus genomes. Also, we present 2 analyses: one of DNA motifs associated with either methylation-resistant or methylation-sensitive CpG islands and another analysis of motifs associated with exosome RNA secretion. Availability and Implementation: PISMA is developed in Java; it is executable in any type of hardware and in diverse operating systems. PISMA is freely available to noncommercial users. The English version and the User Manual are provided in Supplementary Files 1 and 2, and a Spanish version is available at www.biomedicas.unam.mx/wp-content/software/pisma.zip and www.biomedicas.unam.mx/wp-content/pdf/manual/pisma.pdf .

  4. Feasibility of using DNA-immobilized nanocellulose-based immunoadsorbent for systemic lupus erythematosus plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changgang; Carlsson, Daniel O; Mihranyan, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this project was to study the feasibility of using a DNA-immobilized nanocellulose-based immunoadsorbent for possible application in medical apheresis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. Calf thymus DNA was bound to high surface area nanocellulose membrane at varying concentrations using UV-irradiation. The DNA-immobilized samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and phosphorus elemental analysis. The anti-ds-DNA IgG binding was tested in vitro using ELISA. The produced sample showed high affinity in vitro to bind anti-ds-DNA-antibodies from mice, as much as 80% of added IgG was bound by the membrane. Furthermore, the binding efficiency was quantitatively dependent on the amount of immobilized DNA onto nanocellulose membrane. The described nanocellulose membranes are interesting immunoadsorbents for continued clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. RFLP of analyses of an intergenic spacer region of chloroplast DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-11-16

    Nov 16, 2006 ... amplified with PCR and digested with 6 restriction endonucleases (Hpa II, Alu I, Hinc II, Ava III, Nde I and. Hae III). According to results ... the environment, but DNA based techniques represent reliable tools and do not have many of ... existence of some variations in gene content (Downie and Palmer, 1992).

  6. Validation of a DNA IQ-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Fourney, Ron M

    2010-10-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead/DNA complex washes and DNA elution. Validation studies determined the reliability and limitations of this shaker-based process. Reproducibility with regards to DNA yields for the tested robotic workstations proved to be excellent and not significantly different than that offered by the manual phenol/chloroform extraction. DNA extraction of animal:human blood mixtures contaminated with soil demonstrated that a human profile was detectable even in the presence of abundant animal blood. For exhibits containing small amounts of biological material, concordance studies confirmed that DNA yields for this shaker-based extraction process are equivalent or greater to those observed with phenol/chloroform extraction as well as our original validated automated magnetic bead percolation-based extraction process. Our data further supports the increasing use of robotics for the processing of casework samples. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Archaeal DNA Polymerase-B as a DNA Template Guardian: Links between Polymerases and Base/Alternative Excision Repair Enzymes in Handling the Deaminated Bases Uracil and Hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abellón-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Archaea repair of uracil and hypoxanthine, which arise by deamination of cytosine and adenine, respectively, is initiated by three enzymes: Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (UDG, which recognises uracil; Endonuclease V (EndoV, which recognises hypoxanthine; and Endonuclease Q (EndoQ, (which recognises both uracil and hypoxanthine. Two archaeal DNA polymerases, Pol-B and Pol-D, are inhibited by deaminated bases in template strands, a feature unique to this domain. Thus the three repair enzymes and the two polymerases show overlapping specificity for uracil and hypoxanthine. Here it is demonstrated that binding of Pol-D to primer-templates containing deaminated bases inhibits the activity of UDG, EndoV, and EndoQ. Similarly Pol-B almost completely turns off EndoQ, extending earlier work that demonstrated that Pol-B reduces catalysis by UDG and EndoV. Pol-B was observed to be a more potent inhibitor of the enzymes compared to Pol-D. Although Pol-D is directly inhibited by template strand uracil, the presence of Pol-B further suppresses any residual activity of Pol-D, to near-zero levels. The results are compatible with Pol-D acting as the replicative polymerase and Pol-B functioning primarily as a guardian preventing deaminated base-induced DNA mutations.

  8. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogona...

  9. AN INVESTIGATION OF TEACHERS’ PEDAGOGICAL SKILLS AND CONTENT KNOWLEDGE IN A CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Nor Rizan Tengku Mohamad Maasum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advocates of the content-based approach believed that a language can be learnt effectively when it is the medium of instruction rather than just a subject. Integrating English and content as part of instruction has become one of the cornerstones of second language pedagogy. Researchers claimed that there are many benefits of integrating English and content instruction. Among the benefits are the increase in students’ interest with content themes, meaningful input and understanding. In 2003, the Malaysian Ministry of Education introduced the teaching and learning of science and mathematics in English for Year One, Form One and Lower Six Form in all government public schools. This paper describes the challenges faced by teachers when they are required to teach content subjects such as science and mathematics in English. The focus of the paper is on the teachers’ pedagogical skills and content knowldge which comprises subject matter content, pedagogical approach, classroom management, use of resources, assessment, preparation of teaching materials, managing students, teachers’ compensatory communication strategies, use of first language and teachers’ perspectives of teaching content subjects in English. Data were obtained from a self-report questionnaire administered to 495 secondary school teachers in West Malaysia. Results from the study provide implications for school administrators in making decisions in assignment of capable teachers to teach the various levels of classes. Suggestions for teacher self-development and life-long learning efforts are also provided.

  10. High-Throughput Array Instrument for DNA-Based Breast Cancer Diagnostics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swerdlow, Harold

    2000-01-01

    ...) for breast-cancer diagnostics. These methods are based upon large numbers of discrete DNA spots placed on glass microscope slides typically, and hybridized to a probe derived from a tIssue or blood sample...

  11. Development and assessment of microarray-based DNA fingerprinting in Eucalyptus grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezar, Sabine; Myburg, A A; Berger, D K; Wingfield, M J; Wingfield, B D

    2004-11-01

    Development of improved Eucalyptus genotypes involves the routine identification of breeding stock and superior clones. Currently, microsatellites and random amplified polymorphic DNA markers are the most widely used DNA-based techniques for fingerprinting of these trees. While these techniques have provided rapid and powerful fingerprinting assays, they are constrained by their reliance on gel or capillary electrophoresis, and therefore, relatively low throughput of fragment analysis. In contrast, recently developed microarray technology holds the promise of parallel analysis of thousands of markers in plant genomes. The aim of this study was to develop a DNA fingerprinting chip for Eucalyptus grandis and to investigate its usefulness for fingerprinting of eucalypt trees. A prototype chip was prepared using a partial genomic library from total genomic DNA of 23 E. grandis trees, of which 22 were full siblings. A total of 384 cloned genomic fragments were individually amplified and arrayed onto glass slides. DNA fingerprints were obtained for 17 individuals by hybridizing labeled genome representations of the individual trees to the 384-element chip. Polymorphic DNA fragments were identified by evaluating the binary distribution of their background-corrected signal intensities across full-sib individuals. Among 384 DNA fragments on the chip, 104 (27%) were found to be polymorphic. Hybridization of these polymorphic fragments was highly repeatable (R2>0.91) within the E. grandis individuals, and they allowed us to identify all 17 full-sib individuals. Our results suggest that DNA microarrays can be used to effectively fingerprint large numbers of closely related Eucalyptus trees.

  12. Content-Based Information Retrieval from Forensic Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geradts, Z.J.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    In forensic science, the number of image databases is growing rapidly. For this reason, it is necessary to have a proper procedure for searching in these images databases based on content. The use of image databases results in more solved crimes; furthermore, statistical information can be obtained

  13. Gold nanoparticle-based probes for the colorimetric detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganareal, Thenor Aristotile Charles S; Balbin, Michelle M; Monserate, Juvy J; Salazar, Joel R; Mingala, Claro N

    2018-02-12

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) is considered to be the most stable metal nanoparticle having the ability to be functionalized with biomolecules. Recently, AuNP-based DNA detection methods captured the interest of researchers worldwide. Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease, a chronic gastroenteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), was found to have negative effect in the livestock industry. In this study, AuNP-based probes were evaluated for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. AuNP-based probe was produced by functionalization of AuNPs with thiol-modified oligonucleotide and was confirmed by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize AuNPs. DNA detection was done by hybridization of 10 μL of DNA with 5 μL of probe at 63 °C for 10 min and addition of 3 μL salt solution. The method was specific to MAP with detection limit of 103 ng. UV-Vis and SEM showed dispersion and aggregation of the AuNPs for the positive and negative results, respectively, with no observed particle growth. This study therefore reports an AuNP-based probes which can be used for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular evidence for the predation of Critically Endangered endemic Aphanius transgrediens from the stomach contents of world wide invasive Gambusia affinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Predation and competition among native and invasive species are difficult to study in aquatic environments. Identification of preys from semi-digested body parts sampled from stomach contents of the predator is very challenging. Recent studies were mainly based on use of DNA extracted from stomach content to identify the prey species. This study presents the molecular evidence that reveals the predation of critically endangered Aphanius transgrediens by world-wide invasive Gambusia affinis for a better understanding of the link between the invasion and the extinction of native species in freshwater ecosystems. DNA samples were extracted from semi-digested stomach contents of the invader and short fragments of mitochondrial NADH1 gene were amplified using species-specific primers designed in this study to make identification at species level. Existence of both the prey and the predator species were also confirmed using environmental DNA extracted from water samples.

  15. Biogas slurry pricing method based on nutrient content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-ai; Guo, Honghai; Yang, Zhengtao; Xin, Shurong

    2017-11-01

    In order to promote biogas-slurry commercialization, A method was put forward to valuate biogas slurry based on its nutrient contents. Firstly, element contents of biogas slurry was measured; Secondly, each element was valuated based on its market price, and then traffic cost, using cost and market effect were taken into account, the pricing method of biogas slurry were obtained lastly. This method could be useful in practical production. Taking cattle manure raw meterial biogas slurry and con stalk raw material biogas slurry for example, their price were 38.50 yuan RMB per ton and 28.80 yuan RMB per ton. This paper will be useful for recognizing the value of biogas projects, ensuring biogas project running, and instructing the cyclic utilization of biomass resources in China.

  16. Optoelectronic studies on heterocyclic bases of deoxyribonucleic acid for DNA photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy

    2015-10-01

    The optoelectronics study of large molecules, particularly π-stacking molecules, such as DNA is really an extremely difficult task. We perform first electronic structure calculations on the heterocyclic bases of 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid based on Lorentz-Fresnel dispersion theory. In the UV-VIS range of spectrum, many of the optoelectronic parameters for DNA four bases namely adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine are calculated and discussed. The results demonstrate that adenine has the highest hyperpolarizability, whereas thymine has the lowest hyperpolarizability. Cytosine has the lower average oscillator energy and the higher lattice energy. Thymine infers the most stable nucleic base with the lower phonon energy. Thymine also has the highest average oscillator energy and the lower lattice energy. Moreover, the four nucleic acid bases have large band gap energies less than 5 eV with a semiconducting behavior. Guanine shows the smallest band gap and the highest Fermi level energy, whereas adenine elucidates the highest band gap energy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Content and user-based music visual analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaochun; Tang, Lei

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, people's ability to collect music got enhanced greatly. Many people who prefer listening music offline even stored thousands of music on their local storage or portable device. However, their ability to deal with music information has not been improved accordingly, which results in two problems. One is how to find out the favourite songs from large music dataset and satisfy different individuals. The other one is how to compose a play list quickly. To solve these problems, the authors proposed a content and user-based music visual analysis approach. We first developed a new recommendation algorithm based on the content of music and user's behaviour, which satisfy individual's preference. Then, we make use of visualization and interaction tools to illustrate the relationship between songs and help people compose a suitable play list. At the end of this paper, a survey is mentioned to show that our system is available and effective.

  18. ITS1: a DNA barcode better than ITS2 in eukaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Cun; Liu, Chang; Huang, Liang; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Chen, Haimei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Cai, Dayong; Li, Jian-Qin

    2015-05-01

    A DNA barcode is a short piece of DNA sequence used for species determination and discovery. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS/ITS2) region has been proposed as the standard DNA barcode for fungi and seed plants and has been widely used in DNA barcoding analyses for other biological groups, for example algae, protists and animals. The ITS region consists of both ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Here, a large-scale meta-analysis was carried out to compare ITS1 and ITS2 from three aspects: PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and species discrimination, in terms of the presence of DNA barcoding gaps, species discrimination efficiency, sequence length distribution, GC content distribution and primer universality. In total, 85 345 sequence pairs in 10 major groups of eukaryotes, including ascomycetes, basidiomycetes, liverworts, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, monocotyledons, eudicotyledons, insects and fishes, covering 611 families, 3694 genera, and 19 060 species, were analysed. Using similarity-based methods, we calculated species discrimination efficiencies for ITS1 and ITS2 in all major groups, families and genera. Using Fisher's exact test, we found that ITS1 has significantly higher efficiencies than ITS2 in 17 of the 47 families and 20 of the 49 genera, which are sample-rich. By in silico PCR amplification evaluation, primer universality of the extensively applied ITS1 primers was found superior to that of ITS2 primers. Additionally, shorter length of amplification product and lower GC content was discovered to be two other advantages of ITS1 for sequencing. In summary, ITS1 represents a better DNA barcode than ITS2 for eukaryotic species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. K-mer Content, Correlation, and Position Analysis of Genome DNA Sequences for the Identification of Function and Evolutionary Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sievers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In genome analysis, k-mer-based comparison methods have become standard tools. However, even though they are able to deliver reliable results, other algorithms seem to work better in some cases. To improve k-mer-based DNA sequence analysis and comparison, we successfully checked whether adding positional resolution is beneficial for finding and/or comparing interesting organizational structures. A simple but efficient algorithm for extracting and saving local k-mer spectra (frequency distribution of k-mers was developed and used. The results were analyzed by including positional information based on visualizations as genomic maps and by applying basic vector correlation methods. This analysis was concentrated on small word lengths (1 ≤ k ≤ 4 on relatively small viral genomes of Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae, while also checking its usability for larger sequences, namely human chromosome 2 and the homologous chromosomes (2A, 2B of a chimpanzee. Using this alignment-free analysis, several regions with specific characteristics in Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae formerly identified by independent, mostly alignment-based methods, were confirmed. Correlations between the k-mer content and several genes in these genomes have been found, showing similarities between classified and unclassified viruses, which may be potentially useful for further taxonomic research. Furthermore, unknown k-mer correlations in the genomes of Human Herpesviruses (HHVs, which are probably of major biological function, are found and described. Using the chromosomes of a chimpanzee and human that are currently known, identities between the species on every analyzed chromosome were reproduced. This demonstrates the feasibility of our approach for large data sets of complex genomes. Based on these results, we suggest k-mer analysis with positional resolution as a method for closing a gap between the effectiveness of alignment-based methods (like NCBI BLAST and the

  20. Twin target self-amplification-based DNA machine for highly sensitive detection of cancer-related gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huo; Jiang, Yifan; Liu, Dengyou; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Yafeng; Yu, Suhong; Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zai-Sheng

    2018-06-29

    The sensitive detection of cancer-related genes is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of human cancers, and previous isothermal amplification sensing systems were often based on the reuse of target DNA, the amplification of enzymatic products and the accumulation of reporting probes. However, no reporting probes are able to be transformed into target species and in turn initiate the signal of other probes. Herein we reported a simple, isothermal and highly sensitive homogeneous assay system for tumor suppressor p53 gene detection based on a new autonomous DNA machine, where the signaling probe, molecular beacon (MB), was able to execute the function similar to target DNA besides providing the common signal. In the presence of target p53 gene, the operation of DNA machine can be initiated, and cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (CNDP) and nicking/polymerization cyclical amplification (NPCA) occur, during which the MB was opened by target species and cleaved by restriction endonuclease. In turn, the cleaved fragments could activate the next signaling process as target DNA did. According to the functional similarity, the cleaved fragment was called twin target, and the corresponding fashion to amplify the signal was named twin target self-amplification. Utilizing this newly-proposed DNA machine, the target DNA could be detected down to 0.1 pM with a wide dynamic range (6 orders of magnitude) and single-base mismatched targets were discriminated, indicating a very high assay sensitivity and good specificity. In addition, the DNA machine was not only used to screen the p53 gene in complex biological matrix but also was capable of practically detecting genomic DNA p53 extracted from A549 cell line. This indicates that the proposed DNA machine holds the potential application in biomedical research and early clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis of schiff bases of pyridine-4-carbaldehyde and their antioxidant and DNA binding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, S.; Murtaza, S.; Nazar, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Schiff bases of pyridine-4-carbaldehyde with 3-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, 1,3-phenylenediamine, 1,2-phenylenediamine, 2-aminothiophenol, 4-aminoantipyrene, 2-aminophenol and naphthalene-1-amine was synthesized and compounds were characterized by FTIR, NMR and mass spectrometry. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA binding interaction studies. DPPH scavenging method was used to evaluate the antioxidant activities of synthesized Schiff bases at six gradually increasing concentrations of 0.5-5mg/ml. 2-((pyridin-4-ylmethylidene)amino)phenol came out to be the most efficient antioxidant at a concentration of 4mg/ml with 74% inhibition of free radicals generated by DPPH. The DNA binding interaction of the synthesized Schiff bases was determined using UV-Vis absorption titration method. Both the hypochromic and hyperchromic effects were observed along the series. The values for the binding constant (K) and free energy change (G) were calculated and most of the Schiff bases have high positive K values which indicate the efficient binding of Schiff bases with DNA. Molecular docking studies as carried out using PatchDock molecular algorithm software also indicated the high values for geometrical shape complementarity score suggesting the stabilities of Schiff bases/DNA complex. Docking studies also suggested the minor groove binding of the Schiff bases with DNA. Drug-likeness of the synthesized compounds was also tested in silico and the results are accordingly discussed. (author)

  2. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  4. Multimedia Based E-learning : Design and Integration of Multimedia Content in E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Omar Alsadhan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The advancement in multimedia and information technologies also have impacted the way of imparting education. This advancement has led to rapid use of e learning systems and has enabled greater integration of multimedia content into e learning systems. This paper present a model for development of e learning systems based on multimedia content. The model is called “Multimedia based e learning” and is loosely based on waterfall software development model. This model consists of three distinct phases; Multimedia Content Modelling, Multimedia content Development, Multimedia content Integration. These three phases are further sub divided into 7 different activities which are analysis, design, technical requirements, content development, content production & integration, implementation and evaluation. This model defines a general framework that can be applied for the development of e learning systems across all disciplines and subjects.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of some non-hydrogen-bonding base pair DNA strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Ojha, Rajendra P.; Tiwari, Gargi; Pandey, Vishnudatt; Mall, Vijaysree

    2018-05-01

    In order to elucidate the structural activity of hydrophobic modified DNA, the DMMO2-D5SICS, base pair is introduced as a constituent in different set of 12-mer and 14-mer DNA sequences for the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit water solvent. AMBER 14 force field was employed for each set of duplex during the 200ns production-dynamics simulation in orthogonal-box-water solvent by the Particle-Mesh-Ewald (PME) method in infinite periodic boundary conditions (PBC) to determine conformational parameters of the complex. The force-field parameters of modified base-pair were calculated by Gaussian-code using Hartree-Fock /ab-initio methodology. RMSD Results reveal that the conformation of the duplex is sequence dependent and the binding energy of the complex depends on the position of the modified base-pair in the nucleic acid strand. We found that non-bonding energy had a significant contribution to stabilising such type of duplex in comparison to electrostatic energy. The distortion produced within strands by such type of base-pair was local and destabilised the duplex integrity near to substitution, moreover the binding energy of duplex depends on the position of substitution of hydrophobic base-pair and the DNA sequence and strongly supports the corresponding experimental study.

  6. Fat Content and Nitrite-Curing Influence the Formation of Oxidation Products and NOC-Specific DNA Adducts during In Vitro Digestion of Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes), protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds) and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine) during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%), resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat). A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat. PMID:24978825

  7. Fat content and nitrite-curing influence the formation of oxidation products and NOC-specific DNA adducts during in vitro digestion of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes), protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds) and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine) during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%), resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat). A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat.

  8. Fat content and nitrite-curing influence the formation of oxidation products and NOC-specific DNA adducts during in vitro digestion of meat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Van Hecke

    Full Text Available The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes, protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%, resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat. A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat.

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparisons with Other Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T.Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site (Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains), Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  11. Replication of DNA during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.

    1992-01-01

    The incorporation of [6-H-3]-thymidine into DNA of developing barley end sperm was examined by autoradiography of cross sections of seeds and DNA analysis. The majority of nuclear divisions took place in the very young endosperm, but as late as 25 days after anthesis there was evidence for DNA...... replication. The DNA content of the endosperm increases during development and in response to nitrogen application in parallel to the storage protein synthesis profile. The hordein genes were hypersensitive to DNase I treatment throughout development....

  12. DNA quantification of basidiomycetous fungi during storage of logging residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Børja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for bioenergy caused an increased use of logging residues, branches and treetops that were previously left on the ground after harvesting. Residues are stored outdoors in piles and it is unclear to what extent fungi transform this material. Our objective was to quantify the amount of wood degrading fungi during storage using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR to detect basidiomycetous DNA in logging residues, a novel approach in this field. We found that the qPCR method was accurate in quantifying the fungal DNA during storage. As the moisture content of the piled logging residues decreased during the storage period, the fungal DNA content also decreased. Scots pine residues contained more fungal DNA than residues from Norway spruce. Loose piles had generally more fungal DNA than bundled ones.

  13. Cloud-based adaptive exon prediction for DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putluri, Srinivasareddy; Zia Ur Rahman, Md; Fathima, Shaik Yasmeen

    2018-02-01

    Cloud computing offers significant research and economic benefits to healthcare organisations. Cloud services provide a safe place for storing and managing large amounts of such sensitive data. Under conventional flow of gene information, gene sequence laboratories send out raw and inferred information via Internet to several sequence libraries. DNA sequencing storage costs will be minimised by use of cloud service. In this study, the authors put forward a novel genomic informatics system using Amazon Cloud Services, where genomic sequence information is stored and accessed for processing. True identification of exon regions in a DNA sequence is a key task in bioinformatics, which helps in disease identification and design drugs. Three base periodicity property of exons forms the basis of all exon identification techniques. Adaptive signal processing techniques found to be promising in comparison with several other methods. Several adaptive exon predictors (AEPs) are developed using variable normalised least mean square and its maximum normalised variants to reduce computational complexity. Finally, performance evaluation of various AEPs is done based on measures such as sensitivity, specificity and precision using various standard genomic datasets taken from National Center for Biotechnology Information genomic sequence database.

  14. Determination for Enterobacter cloacae based on a europium ternary complex labeled DNA probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Ruan, Min; Qin, Pin-Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    The fast detection and accurate diagnosis of the prevalent pathogenic bacteria is very important for the treatment of disease. Nowadays, fluorescence techniques are important tools for diagnosis. A two-probe tandem DNA hybridization assay was designed for the detection of Enterobacter cloacae based on time-resolved fluorescence. In this work, the authors synthesized a novel europium ternary complex Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) with intense luminescence, high fluorescence quantum yield and long lifetime before. We developed a method based on this europium complex for the specific detection of original extracted DNA from E. cloacae. In the hybridization assay format, the reporter probe was labeled with Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) on the 5'-terminus, and the capture probe capture probe was covalent immobilized on the surface of the glutaraldehyde treated glass slides. The original extracted DNA of samples was directly used without any DNA purification and amplification. The detection was conducted by monitoring the fluorescence intensity from the glass surface after DNA hybridization. The detection limit of the DNA was 5 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The results of the present work proved that this new approach was easy to operate with high sensitivity and specificity. It could be conducted as a powerful tool for the detection of pathogen microorganisms in the environment.

  15. Genomic Mapping of Human DNA provides Evidence of Difference in Stretch between AT and GC rich regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenberger, Jeffrey; Dorfman, Kevin; Cao, Han

    Human DNA is a not a polymer consisting of a uniform distribution of all 4 nucleic acids, but rather contains regions of high AT and high GC content. When confined, these regions could have different stretch due to the extra hydrogen bond present in the GC basepair. To measure this potential difference, human genomic DNA was nicked with NtBspQI, labeled with a cy3 like fluorophore at the nick site, stained with YOYO, loaded into a device containing an array of nanochannels, and imaged. Over 473,000 individual molecules of DNA, corresponding to roughly 30x coverage of a human genome, were collected and aligned to the human reference. Based on the known AT/GC content between aligned pairs of labels, the stretch was measured for regions of similar size but different AT/GC content. We found that regions of high GC content were consistently more stretched than regions of high AT content between pairs of labels varying in size between 2.5 kbp and 500 kbp. We measured that for every 1% increase in GC content there was roughly a 0.06% increase in stretch. While this effect is small, it is important to take into account differences in stretch between AT and GC rich regions to improve the sensitivity of detection of structural variations from genomic variations. NIH Grant: R01-HG006851.

  16. Detection of anthrax lef with DNA-based photonic crystal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bailin; Dallo, Shatha; Peterson, Ralph; Hussain, Syed; Weitao, Tao; Ye, Jing Yong

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis has posed a threat of becoming biological weapons of mass destruction due to its virulence factors encoded by the plasmid-borne genes, such as lef for lethal factor. We report the development of a fast and sensitive anthrax DNA biosensor based on a photonic crystal structure used in a total-internal-reflection configuration. For the detection of the lef gene, a single-stranded DNA lef probe was biotinylated and immobilized onto the sensor via biotin-streptavidin interactions. A positive control, lef-com, was the complementary strand of the probe, while a negative control was an unrelated single-stranded DNA fragment from the 16S rRNA gene of Acinetobacter baumannii. After addition of the biotinylated lef probe onto the sensor, significant changes in the resonance wavelength of the sensor were observed, resulting from binding of the probe to streptavidin on the sensor. The addition of lef-com led to another significant increase as a result of hybridization between the two DNA strands. The detection sensitivity for the target DNA reached as low as 0.1 nM. In contrast, adding the unrelated DNAs did not cause an obvious shift in the resonant wavelength. These results demonstrate that detection of the anthrax lef by the photonic crystal structure in a total-internal-reflection sensor is highly specific and sensitive.

  17. Tritium content in some organs and the DNA of rat liver cells following short term administration of tritiated food, tritiated protein or tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochalska, M.; Szot, Z.

    1979-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were given equivalent doses of various tritium compounds, namely tritiated food (TF), tritiated protein (TP) or tritiated water (TW) for 5 days. On the 6th day of the experiment tritium radioactivity of dry tissues and the DNA of liver cells was determined. DNA of liver cells of animals given TP contained 13-23 times more tritium than that of rats receiving TW. Incorporation of tritium from TF into the examined tissues was found to be higher than that from TP or TW, with the exception of the brain which revealed the highest tritium content after TP. Tritium concentration in lungs, small intestine, muscle, skin and femur of animals given TF or TP did not differ significantly. (author)

  18. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wenjun; Qian Qinfang; Hou Xiaolin; Feng Weiyue; Chai Zhifang

    2000-01-01

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  19. Mitochondrial DNA differentiates Alzheimer's disease from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesniy, Petar; Llorens, Franc; Golanska, Ewa; Sikorska, Beata; Liberski, Pawel; Zerr, Inga; Trullas, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    Low content of cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a biomarker of early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), but whether mtDNA is altered in a rapid neurodegenerative dementia such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is unknown. CSF mtDNA was measured using digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) in two independent cohorts comprising a total of 112 patients diagnosed with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), probable AD, or non-Alzheimer's type dementia. Patients with AD exhibit low mtDNA content in CSF compared with patients diagnosed with sCJD or with non-Alzheimer's type dementias. The CSF concentration of mtDNA does not correlate with Aβ, t-tau, p-tau, and 14-3-3 protein levels in CSF. Low-CSF mtDNA is not a consequence of brain damage and allows the differential diagnosis of AD from sCJD and other dementias. These results support the hypothesis that mtDNA in CSF is a pathophysiological biomarker of AD. Copyright © 2015 Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intermolecular G-quadruplex structure-based fluorescent DNA detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-03-15

    Adopting multi-donors to pair with one acceptor could improve the performance of fluorogenic detection probes. However, common dyes (e.g., fluorescein) in close proximity to each other would self-quench the fluorescence, and the fluorescence is difficult to restore. In this contribution, we constructed a novel "multi-donors-to-one acceptor" fluorescent DNA detection system by means of the intermolecular G-quadruplex (IGQ) structure-based fluorescence signal enhancement combined with the hairpin oligonucleotide. The novel IGQ-hairpin system was characterized using the p53 gene as the model target DNA. The proposed system showed an improved assay performance due to the introduction of IGQ-structure into fluorescent signaling probes, which could inhibit the background fluorescence and increase fluorescence restoration amplitude of fluoresceins upon target DNA hybridization. The proof-of-concept scheme is expected to provide new insight into the potential of G-quadruplex structure and promote the application of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes in fundamental research, diagnosis, and treatment of genetic diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrating DNA-based data into bioassessments improves our understanding of species distributions and species habitat relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    The integration of DNA-based identification methods into bioassessments could result in more accurate representations of species distributions and species-habitat relationships. DNA-based approaches may be particularly informative for tracking the distributions of rare and/or inv...

  2. Comparative DNA isolation behaviours of silica and polymer based sorbents in batch fashion: monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore size distribution as a new sorbent for DNA isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günal, Gülçin; Kip, Çiğdem; Eda Öğüt, S; İlhan, Hasan; Kibar, Güneş; Tuncel, Ali

    2018-02-01

    Monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore-size distribution were proposed as a high performance sorbent for DNA isolation in batch fashion under equilibrium conditions. The proposed sorbent including both macroporous and mesoporous compartments was synthesized 5.1 μm in-size, by a "staged shape templated hydrolysis and condensation method". Hydrophilic polymer based sorbents were also obtained in the form of monodisperse-macroporous microspheres ca 5.5 μm in size, with different functionalities, by a developed "multi-stage microsuspension copolymerization" technique. The batch DNA isolation performance of proposed material was comparatively investigated using polymer based sorbents with similar morphologies. Among all sorbents tried, the best DNA isolation performance was achieved with the monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore size distribution. The collocation of interconnected mesoporous and macroporous compartments within the monodisperse silica microspheres provided a high surface area and reduced the intraparticular mass transfer resistance and made easier both the adsorption and desorption of DNA. Among the polymer based sorbents, higher DNA isolation yields were achieved with the monodisperse-macroporous polymer microspheres carrying trimethoxysilyl and quaternary ammonium functionalities. However, batch DNA isolation performances of polymer based sorbents were significantly lower with respect to the silica microspheres.

  3. GC-Rich Extracellular DNA Induces Oxidat