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Sample records for dna base sequence

  1. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES ... sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences . 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16...coding bound on the rate of DNA codes is proved. To obtain the bound, we use some ensembles of DNA sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci

  2. DNA Sequence Optimization Based on Continuous Particle Swarm Optimization for Reliable DNA Computing and DNA Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In DNA based computation and DNA nanotechnology, the design of good DNA sequences has turned out to be an essential problem and one of the most practical and important research topics. Basically, the DNA sequence design problem is a multi-objective problem and it can be evaluated using four objective functions, namely, Hmeasure, similarity, continuity and hairpin. Approach: There are several ways to solve multi-objective problem, however, in order to evaluate the correctness of PSO algorithm in DNA sequence design, this problem is converted into single objective problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is proposed to minimize the objective in the problem, subjected to two constraints: melting temperature and GCcontent. A model is developed to present the DNA sequence design based on PSO computation. Results: Based on experiments and researches done, 20 particles are used in the implementation of the optimization process, where the average values and the standard deviation for 100 runs are shown along with comparison to other existing methods. Conclusion: The results achieve verified that PSO can suitably solves the DNA sequence design problem using the proposed method and model, comparatively better than other approaches.

  3. ProteDNA: a sequence-based predictor of sequence-specific DNA-binding residues in transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor named ProteDNA for identifying the sequence-specific binding residues in a transcription factor (TF). Concerning protein–DNA interactions, there are two types of binding mechanisms involved, namely sequence-specific binding and nonspecific binding. Sequence-specific bindings occur between protein sidechains and nucleotide bases and correspond to sequence-specific recognition of genes. Therefore, sequence-specific bindings are esse...

  4. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  5. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  6. An Optimal Seed Based Compression Algorithm for DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Vinitha Eric

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a seed based lossless compression algorithm to compress a DNA sequence which uses a substitution method that is similar to the LempelZiv compression scheme. The proposed method exploits the repetition structures that are inherent in DNA sequences by creating an offline dictionary which contains all such repeats along with the details of mismatches. By ensuring that only promising mismatches are allowed, the method achieves a compression ratio that is at par or better than the existing lossless DNA sequence compression algorithms.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation on the telomeric DNA base sequence repeat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres are protein-DNA complexes at the terminals of linear chromosomes, which protect chromosomal integrity and maintain cellular replicative capacity.From single-cell organisms to advanced animals and plants,structures and functions of telomeres are both very conservative. In cells of human and vertebral animals, telomeric DNA base sequences all are (TTAGGG)n. In the present work, we have obtained absorption and fluorescence spectra measured from seven synthesized oligonucleotides to simulate the telomeric DNA system and calculated their relative fluorescence quantum yields on which not only telomeric DNA characteristics are predicted but also possibly the shortened telomeric sequences during cell division are imrelative fluorescence quantum yield and remarkable excitation energy innerconversion, which tallies with the telomeric sequence of (TTAGGG)n. This result shows that telomeric DNA has a strong non-radiative or innerconvertible capability.``

  8. Nanopore-based Fourth-generation DNA Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanxiao Feng; Yuechuan Zhang; Cuifeng Ying; Deqiang Wang; Chunlei Du

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than$100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  9. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  10. ProteDNA: a sequence-based predictor of sequence-specific DNA-binding residues in transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Yi; Huang, Yu-Feng; Huang, Chun-Chin; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Kang; Oyang, Yen-Jen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor named ProteDNA for identifying the sequence-specific binding residues in a transcription factor (TF). Concerning protein-DNA interactions, there are two types of binding mechanisms involved, namely sequence-specific binding and nonspecific binding. Sequence-specific bindings occur between protein sidechains and nucleotide bases and correspond to sequence-specific recognition of genes. Therefore, sequence-specific bindings are essential for correct gene regulation. In this respect, ProteDNA is distinctive since it has been designed to identify sequence-specific binding residues. In order to accommodate users with different application needs, ProteDNA has been designed to operate under two modes, namely, the high-precision mode and the balanced mode. According to the experiments reported in this article, under the high-precision mode, ProteDNA has been able to deliver precision of 82.3%, specificity of 99.3%, sensitivity of 49.8% and accuracy of 96.5%. Meanwhile, under the balanced mode, ProteDNA has been able to deliver precision of 60.8%, specificity of 97.6%, sensitivity of 60.7% and accuracy of 95.4%. ProteDNA is available at the following websites: http://protedna.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, http://protedna.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://bio222.esoe.ntu.edu.tw/ProteDNA/.

  11. Rapid sequencing of DNA based on single-molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Steven A.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Fairfield, Frederick R.; Hammond, Mark L.; Harger, Carol A.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.; Nutter, Harvey L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1991-07-01

    Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. The authors have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-laser excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed, as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, the authors have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. Individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead have been observed and manipulated with an epifluorescence microscope.

  12. Protein sequence for clustering DNA based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal. F. Elhadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms and some viruses. Clustering is a process that groups a set of objects into clusters so that the similarity among objects in the same cluster is high, while that among the objects in different clusters is low. In this paper, we proposed an approach for clustering DNA sequences using Self-Organizing Map (SOM algorithm and Protein Sequence. The main objective is to analyze biological data and to bunch DNA to many clusters more easily and efficiently. We use the proposed approach to analyze both large and small amount of input DNA sequences. The results show that the similarity of the sequences does not depend on the amount of input sequences. Our approach depends on evaluating the degree of the DNA sequences similarity using the hierarchal representation Dendrogram. Representing large amount of data using hierarchal tree gives the ability to compare large sequences efficiently

  13. Mixed Sequence Reader: A Program for Analyzing DNA Sequences with Heterozygous Base Calling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Tien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tang, Chuan Yi; Chen, Chun-Houh; Lian, Jang-Hau; Hu, Chi-Yu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chao, Angel; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Yun-Shien

    2012-01-01

    The direct sequencing of PCR products generates heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatograms that are useful for identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletions (indels), short tandem repeats (STRs), and paralogous genes. Indels and STRs can be easily detected using the currently available Indelligent or ShiftDetector programs, which do not search reference sequences. However, the detection of other genomic variants remains a challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools for heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data analysis. In this study, we developed a free web-based program, Mixed Sequence Reader (MSR), which can directly analyze heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data in .abi file format using comparisons with reference sequences. The heterozygous sequences are identified as two distinct sequences and aligned with reference sequences. Our results showed that MSR may be used to (i) physically locate indel and STR sequences and determine STR copy number by searching NCBI reference sequences; (ii) predict combinations of microsatellite patterns using the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (CODIS); (iii) determine human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes by searching current viral databases in cases of double infections; (iv) estimate the copy number of paralogous genes, such as β-defensin 4 (DEFB4) and its paralog HSPDP3. PMID:22778697

  14. Mixed Sequence Reader: A Program for Analyzing DNA Sequences with Heterozygous Base Calling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Tien Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct sequencing of PCR products generates heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatograms that are useful for identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, insertion-deletions (indels, short tandem repeats (STRs, and paralogous genes. Indels and STRs can be easily detected using the currently available Indelligent or ShiftDetector programs, which do not search reference sequences. However, the detection of other genomic variants remains a challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools for heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data analysis. In this study, we developed a free web-based program, Mixed Sequence Reader (MSR, which can directly analyze heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data in .abi file format using comparisons with reference sequences. The heterozygous sequences are identified as two distinct sequences and aligned with reference sequences. Our results showed that MSR may be used to (i physically locate indel and STR sequences and determine STR copy number by searching NCBI reference sequences; (ii predict combinations of microsatellite patterns using the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (CODIS; (iii determine human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes by searching current viral databases in cases of double infections; (iv estimate the copy number of paralogous genes, such as β-defensin 4 (DEFB4 and its paralog HSPDP3.

  15. Mixed sequence reader: a program for analyzing DNA sequences with heterozygous base calling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Tien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tang, Chuan Yi; Chen, Chun-Houh; Lian, Jang-Hau; Hu, Chi-Yu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chao, Angel; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Yun-Shien

    2012-01-01

    The direct sequencing of PCR products generates heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatograms that are useful for identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletions (indels), short tandem repeats (STRs), and paralogous genes. Indels and STRs can be easily detected using the currently available Indelligent or ShiftDetector programs, which do not search reference sequences. However, the detection of other genomic variants remains a challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools for heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data analysis. In this study, we developed a free web-based program, Mixed Sequence Reader (MSR), which can directly analyze heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data in .abi file format using comparisons with reference sequences. The heterozygous sequences are identified as two distinct sequences and aligned with reference sequences. Our results showed that MSR may be used to (i) physically locate indel and STR sequences and determine STR copy number by searching NCBI reference sequences; (ii) predict combinations of microsatellite patterns using the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (CODIS); (iii) determine human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes by searching current viral databases in cases of double infections; (iv) estimate the copy number of paralogous genes, such as β-defensin 4 (DEFB4) and its paralog HSPDP3.

  16. A CLIQUE algorithm using DNA computing techniques based on closed-circle DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Xiyu

    2011-07-01

    DNA computing has been applied in broad fields such as graph theory, finite state problems, and combinatorial problem. DNA computing approaches are more suitable used to solve many combinatorial problems because of the vast parallelism and high-density storage. The CLIQUE algorithm is one of the gird-based clustering techniques for spatial data. It is the combinatorial problem of the density cells. Therefore we utilize DNA computing using the closed-circle DNA sequences to execute the CLIQUE algorithm for the two-dimensional data. In our study, the process of clustering becomes a parallel bio-chemical reaction and the DNA sequences representing the marked cells can be combined to form a closed-circle DNA sequences. This strategy is a new application of DNA computing. Although the strategy is only for the two-dimensional data, it provides a new idea to consider the grids to be vertexes in a graph and transform the search problem into a combinatorial problem.

  17. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  18. Phylogeny of Pelargonium (Geraniaceae) based on DNA sequences from three genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F.T.; Culham, A.; Hettiarachi, P.; Touloumendidou, T.; Gibby, M.

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic hypotheses for the largely South African genus Pelargonium L'Hér. (Geraniaceae) were derived based on DNA sequence data from nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial encoded regions. The datasets were unequally represented and comprised cpDNA trnL-F sequences for 152 taxa, nrDNA ITS seque

  19. Recognizing a Single Base in an Individual DNA Strand: A Step Toward Nanopore DNA Sequencing**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenasy, N.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; Ghadiri, M. R.; Bayley, H.

    2007-01-01

    Functional supramolecular chemistry at the single-molecule level. Single strands of DNA can be captured inside α-hemolysin transmembrane pore protein to form single-species α-HL·DNA pseudorotaxanes. This process can be used to identify a single adenine nucleotide at a specific location on a strand of DNA by the characteristic reductions in the α-HL ion conductance. This study suggests that α-HL-mediated single-molecule DNA sequencing might be fundamentally feasible. PMID:15666419

  20. High Interlaboratory Reprocucibility of DNA Sequence-based Typing of Bacteria in a Multicenter Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, MA de; Boye, Kit; Lencastre, H de

    2006-01-01

    Current DNA amplification-based typing methods for bacterial pathogens often lack interlaboratory reproducibility. In this international study, DNA sequence-based typing of the Staphylococcus aureus protein A gene (spa, 110 to 422 bp) showed 100% intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility without...... extensive harmonization of protocols for 30 blind-coded S. aureus DNA samples sent to 10 laboratories. Specialized software for automated sequence analysis ensured a common typing nomenclature....

  1. Transgenerational inheritance: Models and mechanisms of non-DNA sequence-based inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miska, Eric A; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2016-10-07

    Heritability has traditionally been thought to be a characteristic feature of the genetic material of an organism-notably, its DNA. However, it is now clear that inheritance not based on DNA sequence exists in multiple organisms, with examples found in microbes, plants, and invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In mammals, the molecular mechanisms have been challenging to elucidate, in part due to difficulties in designing robust models and approaches. Here we review some of the evidence, concepts, and potential mechanisms of non-DNA sequence-based transgenerational inheritance. We highlight model systems and discuss whether phenotypes are replicated or reconstructed over successive generations, as well as whether mechanisms operate at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we explore the short- and long-term implications of non-DNA sequence-based inheritance. Understanding the effects of non-DNA sequence-based mechanisms is key to a full appreciation of heritability in health and disease.

  2. DNA sequencing by CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L; Guttman, András

    2009-06-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA-sequencing methods have evolved from the labor-intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multiCE systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the "next-generation" technologies of cyclic-array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes were only possible with the advent of modern sequencing technologies that were a result of step-by-step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next-generation sequencing is moving ahead at breakneck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of CE in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal.

  3. High Interlaboratory Reprocucibility of DNA Sequence-based Typing of Bacteria in a Multicenter Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, MA de; Boye, Kit; Lencastre, H de;

    2006-01-01

    Current DNA amplification-based typing methods for bacterial pathogens often lack interlaboratory reproducibility. In this international study, DNA sequence-based typing of the Staphylococcus aureus protein A gene (spa, 110 to 422 bp) showed 100% intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility without...

  4. Roche genome sequencer FLX based high-throughput sequencing of ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alquezar-Planas, David E; Fordyce, Sarah Louise

    2012-01-01

    Since the development of so-called "next generation" high-throughput sequencing in 2005, this technology has been applied to a variety of fields. Such applications include disease studies, evolutionary investigations, and ancient DNA. Each application requires a specialized protocol to ensure tha...

  5. Information Theory of DNA Sequencing

    CERN Document Server

    Motahari, Abolfazl; Tse, David

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing is the basic workhorse of modern day biology and medicine. Shotgun sequencing is the dominant technique used: many randomly located short fragments called reads are extracted from the DNA sequence, and these reads are assembled to reconstruct the original sequence. By drawing an analogy between the DNA sequencing problem and the classic communication problem, we define an information theoretic notion of sequencing capacity. This is the maximum number of DNA base pairs that can be resolved reliably per read, and provides a fundamental limit to the performance that can be achieved by any assembly algorithm. We compute the sequencing capacity explicitly for a simple statistical model of the DNA sequence and the read process. Using this framework, we also study the impact of noise in the read process on the sequencing capacity.

  6. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs.

  7. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  8. Generating Multiple Base-Resolution DNA Methylomes Using Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Rodger, Euan J; Stockwell, Peter A; Le Mée, Gwenn; Morison, Ian M

    2017-01-01

    Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) is an effective technique for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in eukaryotes. RRBS couples size selection, bisulfite conversion, and second-generation sequencing to enrich for CpG-dense regions of the genome. The progressive improvement of second-generation sequencing technologies and reduction in cost provided an opportunity to examine the DNA methylation patterns of multiple genomes. Here, we describe a protocol for sequencing multiple RRBS libraries in a single sequencing reaction to generate base-resolution methylomes. Furthermore, we provide a brief guideline for base-calling and data analysis of multiplexed RRBS libraries. These strategies will be useful to perform large-scale, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis.

  9. Sequence-specific DNA interactions with calixarene-based langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullaud, Vanessa; Moridi, Negar; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2014-07-29

    The interactions of an amphiphilic calixarene, namely p-guanidino-dodecyloxy-calix[4]arene, 1, self-assembled as Langmuir monolayers, with short double stranded DNA, were investigated by surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, surface ellipsometry and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). Three DNA 30mers were used as models, poly(AT), poly(GC) and a random DNA sequence with 50% of G:C base pairs. The interactions of these model DNA duplexes with 1-based Langmuir monolayers were studied by measuring compression isotherms using increasing DNA concentrations (10(-6), 10(-5), 10(-4), and 5 × 10(-4) g L(-1)) in the aqueous subphase. The isotherms of 1 showed an expansion of the monolayer with, interestingly, significant differences depending on the duplex DNA sequence studied. Indeed, the interactions of 1-based monolayers with poly(AT) led to an expansion of the monolayer that was significantly more pronounced that for monolayers on subphases of poly(GC) and the random DNA sequence. The structure and thickness of 1-based Langmuir monolayers were investigated by BAM and surface ellipsometry that showed differences in thickness and structure between a monolayer formed on pure water or on a DNA subphase, with here again relevant dissimilarities depending on the DNA composition.

  10. Base J glucosyltransferase does not regulate the sequence specificity of J synthesis in trypanosomatid telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Whitney; Cliffe, Laura; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Yinsheng; Sabatini, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Telomeric DNA of trypanosomatids possesses a modified thymine base, called base J, that is synthesized in a two-step process; the base is hydroxylated by a thymidine hydroxylase forming hydroxymethyluracil (hmU) and a glucose moiety is then attached by the J-associated glucosyltransferase (JGT). To examine the importance of JGT in modifiying specific thymine in DNA, we used a Leishmania episome system to demonstrate that the telomeric repeat (GGGTTA) stimulates J synthesis in vivo while mutant telomeric sequences (GGGTTT, GGGATT, and GGGAAA) do not. Utilizing an in vitro GT assay we find that JGT can glycosylate hmU within any sequence with no significant change in Km or kcat, even mutant telomeric sequences that are unable to be J-modified in vivo. The data suggests that JGT possesses no DNA sequence specificity in vitro, lending support to the hypothesis that the specificity of base J synthesis is not at the level of the JGT reaction.

  11. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  12. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bertolini

    Full Text Available The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43% in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97 and lower for avian species (0.70. PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  13. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  14. Neural network predicts sequence of TP53 gene based on DNA chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, J.S.; Wikman, F.; Lu, M.L.;

    2002-01-01

    We have trained an artificial neural network to predict the sequence of the human TP53 tumor suppressor gene based on a p53 GeneChip. The trained neural network uses as input the fluorescence intensities of DNA hybridized to oligonucleotides on the surface of the chip and makes between zero...... and four errors in the predicted 1300 bp sequence when tested on wild-type TP53 sequence....

  15. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  16. Sequence dependency of canonical base pair opening in the DNA double helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Viveca; Villa, Alessandra; Hess, Berk

    2017-04-01

    The flipping-out of a DNA base from the double helical structure is a key step of many cellular processes, such as DNA replication, modification and repair. Base pair opening is the first step of base flipping and the exact mechanism is still not well understood. We investigate sequence effects on base pair opening using extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations targeting the opening of 11 different canonical base pairs in two DNA sequences. Two popular biomolecular force fields are applied. To enhance sampling and calculate free energies, we bias the simulation along a simple distance coordinate using a newly developed adaptive sampling algorithm. The simulation is guided back and forth along the coordinate, allowing for multiple opening pathways. We compare the calculated free energies with those from an NMR study and check assumptions of the model used for interpreting the NMR data. Our results further show that the neighboring sequence is an important factor for the opening free energy, but also indicates that other sequence effects may play a role. All base pairs are observed to have a propensity for opening toward the major groove. The preferred opening base is cytosine for GC base pairs, while for AT there is sequence dependent competition between the two bases. For AT opening, we identify two non-canonical base pair interactions contributing to a local minimum in the free energy profile. For both AT and CG we observe long-lived interactions with water and with sodium ions at specific sites on the open base pair.

  17. A Real-Time de novo DNA Sequencing Assembly Platform Based on an FPGA Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanqi; Georgiou, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an FPGA based DNA comparison platform which can be run concurrently with the sensing phase of DNA sequencing and shortens the overall time needed for de novo DNA assembly. A hybrid overlap searching algorithm is applied which is scalable and can deal with incremental detection of new bases. To handle the incomplete data set which gradually increases during sequencing time, all-against-all comparisons are broken down into successive window-against-window comparison phases and executed using a novel dynamic suffix comparison algorithm combined with a partitioned dynamic programming method. The complete system has been designed to facilitate parallel processing in hardware, which allows real-time comparison and full scalability as well as a decrease in the number of computations required. A base pair comparison rate of 51.2 G/s is achieved when implemented on an FPGA with successful DNA comparison when using data sets from real genomes.

  18. A DNA sequence obtained by replacement of the dopamine RNA aptamer bases is not an aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2017-08-05

    A unique specificity of the aptamer-ligand biorecognition and binding facilitates bioanalysis and biosensor development, contributing to discrimination of structurally related molecules, such as dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. The aptamer sequence capable of specific binding of dopamine is a 57 nucleotides long RNA sequence reported in 1997 (Biochemistry, 1997, 36, 9726). Later, it was suggested that the DNA homologue of the RNA aptamer retains the specificity of dopamine binding (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2009, 388, 732). Here, we show that the DNA sequence obtained by the replacement of the RNA aptamer bases for their DNA analogues is not able of specific biorecognition of dopamine, in contrast to the original RNA aptamer sequence. This DNA sequence binds dopamine and structurally related catecholamine neurotransmitters non-specifically, as any DNA sequence, and, thus, is not an aptamer and cannot be used neither for in vivo nor in situ analysis of dopamine in the presence of structurally related neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA sequence-based analysis of the Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulet, Magdalena; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2010-06-01

    Partial sequences of four core 'housekeeping' genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of the type strains of 107 Pseudomonas species were analysed in order to obtain a comprehensive view regarding the phylogenetic relationships within the Pseudomonas genus. Gene trees allowed the discrimination of two lineages or intrageneric groups (IG), called IG P. aeruginosa and IG P. fluorescens. The first IG P. aeruginosa, was divided into three main groups, represented by the species P. aeruginosa, P. stutzeri and P. oleovorans. The second IG was divided into six groups, represented by the species P. fluorescens, P. syringae, P. lutea, P. putida, P. anguilliseptica and P. straminea. The P. fluorescens group was the most complex and included nine subgroups, represented by the species P. fluorescens, P. gessardi, P. fragi, P. mandelii, P. jesseni, P. koreensis, P. corrugata, P. chlororaphis and P. asplenii. Pseudomonas rhizospherae was affiliated with the P. fluorescens IG in the phylogenetic analysis but was independent of any group. Some species were located on phylogenetic branches that were distant from defined clusters, such as those represented by the P. oryzihabitans group and the type strains P. pachastrellae, P. pertucinogena and P. luteola. Additionally, 17 strains of P. aeruginosa, 'P. entomophila', P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae and P. stutzeri, for which genome sequences have been determined, have been included to compare the results obtained in the analysis of four housekeeping genes with those obtained from whole genome analyses.

  20. Cryptanalysis of an Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Sequence Operation and Hyper-chaotic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming

    2017-06-01

    Recently, chaotic image cipher using DNA sequence operation has been studied extensively. However, corresponding cryptanalysis is lacking, which impedes its further development. This paper cryptanalyzes a newly proposed chaotic image cipher based on DNA sequence operation. In this paper, we firstly analyze the security defects of the proposal. Then by applying chosen-plaintext attack, we show that all the secret parameters can be revealed. The effectiveness of the proposed chosen-plaintext attack is supported both by rigorous theoretical analysis and experimental results.

  1. Similarity Estimation Between DNA Sequences Based on Local Pattern Histograms of Binary Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusei Kobori; Satoshi Mizuta

    2016-01-01

    Graphical representation of DNA sequences is one of the most popular techniques for alignment-free sequence comparison. Here, we propose a new method for the feature extraction of DNA sequences represented by binary images, by estimating the similarity between DNA sequences using the frequency histograms of local bitmap patterns of images. Our method shows linear time complexity for the length of DNA sequences, which is practical even when long sequences, such as whole genome sequences, are compared. We tested five distance measures for the estimation of sequence similarities, and found that the histogram intersection and Manhattan distance are the most appropriate ones for phylogenetic analyses.

  2. Evolution of DNA sequencing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-01-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted...

  3. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  4. An algorithm for the study of DNA sequence evolution based on the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakoulis, G Ch; Karafyllidis, I; Sandaltzopoulos, R; Tsalides, Ph; Thanailakis, A

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies of the quantum-mechanical processes in the DNA molecule have seriously challenged the principle that mutations occur randomly. The proton tunneling mechanism causes tautomeric transitions in base pairs resulting in mutations during DNA replication. The meticulous study of the quantum-mechanical phenomena in DNA may reveal that the process of mutagenesis is not completely random. We are still far away from a complete quantum-mechanical model of DNA sequence mutagenesis because of the complexity of the processes and the complex three-dimensional structure of the molecule. In this paper we have developed a quantum-mechanical description of DNA evolution and, following its outline, we have constructed a classical model for DNA evolution assuming that some aspects of the quantum-mechanical processes have influenced the determination of the genetic code. Conversely, our model assumes that the genetic code provides information about the quantum-mechanical mechanisms of mutagenesis, as the current code is the product of an evolutionary process that tries to minimize the spurious consequences of mutagenesis. Based on this model we develop an algorithm that can be used to study the accumulation of mutations in a DNA sequence. The algorithm has a user-friendly interface and the user can change key parameters in order to study relevant hypotheses.

  5. A New Revised DNA Cramp Tool Based Approach of Chopping DNA Repetitive and Non-Repetitive Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Hari Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In vogue tremendous amount of data generated day by day by the living organism of genetic sequences and its accumulation in database, their size is growing in an exponential manner. Due to excessive storage of DNA sequences in public databases like NCBI, EMBL and DDBJ archival maintenance is tedious task. Transmission of information from one place to another place in network management systems is also a critical task. So To improve the efficiency and to reduce the overhead of the database need of compression arises in database optimization. In this connection different techniques were bloomed, but achieved results are not bountiful. Many classical algorithms are fails to compress genetic sequences due to the specificity of text encoded in dna and few of the existing techniques achieved positive results. DNA is repetitive and non repetitive in nature. Our proposed technique DNACRAMP is applicable on repetitive and non repetitive sequences of dna and it yields better compression ratio in terms of bits per bases. This is compared with existing techniques and observed that our one is the optimum technique and compression results are on par with existing techniques.

  6. Mapping Protein-DNA Interactions Using ChIP-exo and Illumina-Based Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfeld, Stefan J; Mills, Ian G

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) provides a means of enriching DNA associated with transcription factors, histone modifications, and indeed any other proteins for which suitably characterized antibodies are available. Over the years, sequence detection has progressed from quantitative real-time PCR and Southern blotting to microarrays (ChIP-chip) and now high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). This progression has vastly increased the sequence coverage and data volumes generated. This in turn has enabled informaticians to predict the identity of multi-protein complexes on DNA based on the overrepresentation of sequence motifs in DNA enriched by ChIP with a single antibody against a single protein. In the course of the development of high-throughput sequencing, little has changed in the ChIP methodology until recently. In the last three years, a number of modifications have been made to the ChIP protocol with the goal of enhancing the sensitivity of the method and further reducing the levels of nonspecific background sequences in ChIPped samples. In this chapter, we provide a brief commentary on these methodological changes and describe a detailed ChIP-exo method able to generate narrower peaks and greater peak coverage from ChIPped material.

  7. Sequence dependency of canonical base pair opening in the DNA double helix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveca Lindahl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The flipping-out of a DNA base from the double helical structure is a key step of many cellular processes, such as DNA replication, modification and repair. Base pair opening is the first step of base flipping and the exact mechanism is still not well understood. We investigate sequence effects on base pair opening using extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations targeting the opening of 11 different canonical base pairs in two DNA sequences. Two popular biomolecular force fields are applied. To enhance sampling and calculate free energies, we bias the simulation along a simple distance coordinate using a newly developed adaptive sampling algorithm. The simulation is guided back and forth along the coordinate, allowing for multiple opening pathways. We compare the calculated free energies with those from an NMR study and check assumptions of the model used for interpreting the NMR data. Our results further show that the neighboring sequence is an important factor for the opening free energy, but also indicates that other sequence effects may play a role. All base pairs are observed to have a propensity for opening toward the major groove. The preferred opening base is cytosine for GC base pairs, while for AT there is sequence dependent competition between the two bases. For AT opening, we identify two non-canonical base pair interactions contributing to a local minimum in the free energy profile. For both AT and CG we observe long-lived interactions with water and with sodium ions at specific sites on the open base pair.

  8. A novel chaos-based image encryption algorithm using DNA sequence operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiuli; Chen, Yiran; Broyde, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    An image encryption algorithm based on chaotic system and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence operations is proposed in this paper. First, the plain image is encoded into a DNA matrix, and then a new wave-based permutation scheme is performed on it. The chaotic sequences produced by 2D Logistic chaotic map are employed for row circular permutation (RCP) and column circular permutation (CCP). Initial values and parameters of the chaotic system are calculated by the SHA 256 hash of the plain image and the given values. Then, a row-by-row image diffusion method at DNA level is applied. A key matrix generated from the chaotic map is used to fuse the confused DNA matrix; also the initial values and system parameters of the chaotic system are renewed by the hamming distance of the plain image. Finally, after decoding the diffused DNA matrix, we obtain the cipher image. The DNA encoding/decoding rules of the plain image and the key matrix are determined by the plain image. Experimental results and security analyses both confirm that the proposed algorithm has not only an excellent encryption result but also resists various typical attacks.

  9. SAM: String-based sequence search algorithm for mitochondrial DNA database queries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Alexander; Irwin, Jodi; Dür, Arne; Parsons, Thomas; Parson, Walther

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the haploid mitochondrial (mt) genome has numerous applications in forensic and population genetics, as well as in disease studies. Although mtDNA haplotypes are usually determined by sequencing, they are rarely reported as a nucleotide string. Traditionally they are presented in a difference-coded position-based format relative to the corrected version of the first sequenced mtDNA. This convention requires recommendations for standardized sequence alignment that is known to vary between scientific disciplines, even between laboratories. As a consequence, database searches that are vital for the interpretation of mtDNA data can suffer from biased results when query and database haplotypes are annotated differently. In the forensic context that would usually lead to underestimation of the absolute and relative frequencies. To address this issue we introduce SAM, a string-based search algorithm that converts query and database sequences to position-free nucleotide strings and thus eliminates the possibility that identical sequences will be missed in a database query. The mere application of a BLAST algorithm would not be a sufficient remedy as it uses a heuristic approach and does not address properties specific to mtDNA, such as phylogenetically stable but also rapidly evolving insertion and deletion events. The software presented here provides additional flexibility to incorporate phylogenetic data, site-specific mutation rates, and other biologically relevant information that would refine the interpretation of mitochondrial DNA data. The manuscript is accompanied by freeware and example data sets that can be used to evaluate the new software (http://stringvalidation.org). PMID:21056022

  10. A pedigree-based study of mitochondrial D-loop DNA sequence variation among Arabian horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, A T; Del Valle, A; Bowling, M

    2000-02-01

    Through DNA sequence comparisons of a mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable region, we investigated matrilineal diversity for Arabian horses in the United States. Sixty-two horses were tested. From published pedigrees they traced in the maternal line to 34 mares acquired primarily in the mid to late 19th century from nomadic Bedouin tribes. Compared with the reference sequence (GenBank X79547), these samples showed 27 haplotypes with altogether 31 base substitution sites within 397 bp of sequence. Based on examination of pedigrees from a random sampling of 200 horses in current studbooks of the Arabian Horse Registry of America, we estimated that this study defined the expected mtDNA haplotypes for at least 89% of Arabian horses registered in the US. The reliability of the studbook recorded maternal lineages of Arabian pedigrees was demonstrated by haplotype concordance among multiple samplings in 14 lines. Single base differences observed within two maternal lines were interpreted as representing alternative fixations of past heteroplasmy. The study also demonstrated the utility of mtDNA sequence studies to resolve historical maternity questions without access to biological material from the horses whose relationship was in question, provided that representatives of the relevant female lines were available for comparison. The data call into question the traditional assumption that Arabian horses of the same strain necessarily share a common maternal ancestry.

  11. Quality evaluation of methyl binding domain based kits for enrichment DNA-methylation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim De Meyer

    Full Text Available DNA-methylation is an important epigenetic feature in health and disease. Methylated sequence capturing by Methyl Binding Domain (MBD based enrichment followed by second-generation sequencing provides the best combination of sensitivity and cost-efficiency for genome-wide DNA-methylation profiling. However, existing implementations are numerous, and quality control and optimization require expensive external validation. Therefore, this study has two aims: 1 to identify a best performing kit for MBD-based enrichment using independent validation data, and 2 to evaluate whether quality evaluation can also be performed solely based on the characteristics of the generated sequences. Five commercially available kits for MBD enrichment were combined with Illumina GAIIx sequencing for three cell lines (HCT15, DU145, PC3. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data (all three cell lines and publicly available Illumina Infinium BeadChip data (DU145 and PC3 were used for benchmarking. Consistent large-scale differences in yield, sensitivity and specificity between the different kits could be identified, with Diagenode's MethylCap kit as overall best performing kit under the tested conditions. This kit could also be identified with the Fragment CpG-plot, which summarizes the CpG content of the captured fragments, implying that the latter can be used as a tool to monitor data quality. In conclusion, there are major quality differences between kits for MBD-based capturing of methylated DNA, with the MethylCap kit performing best under the used settings. The Fragment CpG-plot is able to monitor data quality based on inherent sequence data characteristics, and is therefore a cost-efficient tool for experimental optimization, but also to monitor quality throughout routine applications.

  12. Sequencing for complete rDNA sequences (18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2, and 28S rDNA) of Demodex and phylogenetic analysis of Acari based on 18S and 28S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping; Hu, Li; Xu, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Hang; Liu, Wen-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Due to the difficulty of DNA extraction for Demodex, few studies dealt with the identification and the phyletic evolution of Demodex at molecular level. In this study, we amplified, sequenced, and analyzed a complete (Demodex folliculorum) and an almost complete (D12 missing) (Demodex brevis) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence and also analyzed the primary sequences of divergent domains in small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of 51 species and in large-subunit rRNA of 43 species from four superfamilies in Acari (Cheyletoidea, Tetranychoidea, Analgoidea, and Ixodoidea). The results revealed that 18S rDNA sequence was relatively conserved in rDNA-coding regions and was not evolving as rapidly as 28S rDNA sequence. The evolutionary rates of transcribed spacer regions were much higher than those of the coding regions. The maximum parsimony trees of 18S and 28S rDNA appeared to be almost identical, consistent with their morphological classification. Based on the fact that the resolution capability of sequence length and the divergence of the 13 segments (D1-D6, D7a, D7b, and D8-D12) of 28S rDNA were stronger than that of the nine variable regions (V1-V9) of 18S rDNA, we were able to identify Demodex (Cheyletoidea) by the indels occurring in D2, D6, and D8.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Demodex caprae based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Demodex caprae infests the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of goats worldwide, which not only seriously impairs goat farming, but also causes a big economic loss. However, there are few reports on the DNA level of D. caprae. To reveal the taxonomic position of D. caprae within the genus Demodex, the present study conducted phylogenetic analysis of D. caprae based on mt16S rDNA sequence data. D. caprae adults and eggs were obtained from a skin nodule of the goat suffering demodicidosis. The mt16S rDNA sequences of individual mite were amplified using specific primers, and then cloned, sequenced, and aligned. The sequence divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversion rate were computed, and the phylogenetic trees in Demodex were reconstructed. Results revealed the 339-bp partial sequences of six D. caprae isolates were obtained, and the sequence identity was 100% among isolates. The pairwise divergences between D. caprae and Demodex canis or Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis were 22.2-24.0%, 24.0-24.9%, and 22.9-23.2%, respectively. The corresponding average genetic distances were 2.840, 2.926, and 2.665, and the average transition/transversion rates were 0.70, 0.55, and 0.54, respectively. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates of D. caprae versus the other three species all reached interspecies level. The five phylogenetic trees all presented that D. caprae clustered with D. brevis first, and then with D. canis, D. folliculorum, and Demodex injai in sequence. In conclusion, D. caprae is an independent species, and it is closer to D. brevis than to D. canis, D. folliculorum, or D. injai.

  14. Molecular phylogeny and evolution of Scomber (Teleostei: Scombridae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jiao; GAO Tianxiang; MIAO Zhenqing; YANAGIMOTO Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Scomber was conducted based on mitochondrial (COI, Cyt b and control region) and nuclear (5S rDNA) DNA sequence data in multigene perspective. A variety of phylogenetic analytic methods were used to clarify the current taxonomic classification and to assess phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of this genus. The present study produced a well-resolved phylogeny that strongly supported the monophyly of Scomber. We confirmed that S. japonicus and S. colias were genetically distinct. Although morphologically and ecologically similar to S. colias, the molecular data showed that S. japonicus has a greater molecular affinity with S. australasicus, which conflicts with the traditional taxonomy. This phyiogenetic pattern was corroborated by the mtDNA data, but incompletely by the nuclear DNA data. Phylogenetic concordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA regions for the basal nodes supports an Atlantic origin for Scomber. The present-day geographic ranges of the species were compared with the resultant molecular phylogeny derived from partition Bayesian analyses of the combined data sets to evaluate possible dispersal routes of the genus. The present-day geographic distribution of Scomber species might be best ascribed to multiple dispersal events. In addition, our results suggest that phylogenies derived from multiple genes and long sequences exhibited improved phylogenetic resolution, from which we conclude that the phylogenetic reconstruction is a reliable representation of the evolutionary history of Scomber.

  15. Effect of base sequence on the DNA cross-linking properties of pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Khondaker M; James, Colin H; Thurston, David E

    2011-07-01

    Pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) dimers are synthetic sequence-selective DNA minor-groove cross-linking agents that possess two electrophilic imine moieties (or their equivalent) capable of forming covalent aminal linkages with guanine C2-NH(2) functionalities. The PBD dimer SJG-136, which has a C8-O-(CH(2))(3)-O-C8'' central linker joining the two PBD moieties, is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials and current research is focused on developing analogues of SJG-136 with different linker lengths and substitution patterns. Using a reversed-phase ion pair HPLC/MS method to evaluate interaction with oligonucleotides of varying length and sequence, we recently reported (JACS, 2009, 131, 13 756) that SJG-136 can form three different types of adducts: inter- and intrastrand cross-linked adducts, and mono-alkylated adducts. These studies have now been extended to include PBD dimers with a longer central linker (C8-O-(CH(2))(5)-O-C8'), demonstrating that the type and distribution of adducts appear to depend on (i) the length of the C8/C8'-linker connecting the two PBD units, (ii) the positioning of the two reactive guanine bases on the same or opposite strands, and (iii) their separation (i.e. the number of base pairs, usually ATs, between them). Based on these data, a set of rules are emerging that can be used to predict the DNA-interaction behaviour of a PBD dimer of particular C8-C8' linker length towards a given DNA sequence. These observations suggest that it may be possible to design PBD dimers to target specific DNA sequences.

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of the Gomphales based on nuc-25S-rDNA, mit-12S-rDNA, and mit-atp6-DNA combined sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admir J. Giachini; Kentaro Hosaka; Eduardo Nouhra; Joseph Spatafora; James M. Trappe

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Geastrales, Gomphales, Hysterangiales, and Phallales were estimated via combined sequences: nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (nuc-25S-rDNA), mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal DNA (mit-12S-rDNA), and mitochondrial atp6 DNA (mit-atp6-DNA). Eighty-one taxa comprising 19 genera and 58 species...

  17. Quality Control of the Traditional Patent Medicine Yimu Wan Based on SMRT Sequencing and DNA Barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jing; Xu, Zhichao; Xin, Tianyi; Shi, Linchun; Song, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Substandard traditional patent medicines may lead to global safety-related issues. Protecting consumers from the health risks associated with the integrity and authenticity of herbal preparations is of great concern. Of particular concern is quality control for traditional patent medicines. Here, we establish an effective approach for verifying the biological composition of traditional patent medicines based on single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and DNA barcoding. Yimu Wan (YMW), a classical herbal prescription recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, was chosen to test the method. Two reference YMW samples were used to establish a standard method for analysis, which was then applied to three different batches of commercial YMW samples. A total of 3703 and 4810 circular-consensus sequencing (CCS) reads from two reference and three commercial YMW samples were mapped to the ITS2 and psbA-trnH regions, respectively. Moreover, comparison of intraspecific genetic distances based on SMRT sequencing data with reference data from Sanger sequencing revealed an ITS2 and psbA-trnH intergenic spacer that exhibited high intraspecific divergence, with the sites of variation showing significant differences within species. Using the CCS strategy for SMRT sequencing analysis was adequate to guarantee the accuracy of identification. This study demonstrates the application of SMRT sequencing to detect the biological ingredients of herbal preparations. SMRT sequencing provides an affordable way to monitor the legality and safety of traditional patent medicines.

  18. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results.

  19. Recognizing a Single Base in an Individual DNA Strand: A Step Toward Nanopore DNA Sequencing**

    OpenAIRE

    Ashkenasy, N.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; Ghadiri, M. R.; Bayley, H

    2005-01-01

    Functional supramolecular chemistry at the single-molecule level. Single strands of DNA can be captured inside α-hemolysin transmembrane pore protein to form single-species α-HL·DNA pseudorotaxanes. This process can be used to identify a single adenine nucleotide at a specific location on a strand of DNA by the characteristic reductions in the α-HL ion conductance. This study sug...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence-based phylogenetic relationship among flesh flies of the genus Sarcophaga (Sarcophagidae: Diptera)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neelam Bajpai; Raghav Ram Tewari

    2010-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among flesh flies of the family Sarcophagidae has been based mainly on the morphology of male genitalia. However, the male genitalic character-based relationships are far from satisfactory. Therefore, in the present study mitochondrial DNA has been used as marker to unravel genetic relatedness and to construct phylogeny among five sympatric species of the genus Sarcophaga. Two mitochondrial genes viz., cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and NAD dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) were sequenced and genetic distance values were calculated on the basis of sequence differences in both the mitochondrial genes. The data revealed very few genetic difference among the five species for the COI and ND5 gene sequences.

  1. An adaptive, object oriented strategy for base calling in DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, M C; Brumley, R L; Haker, M; Smith, L M

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the determination of nucleotide sequence from data produced in fluorescence-based automated DNA sequencing instruments employing the four-color strategy. This algorithm takes advantage of object oriented programming techniques for modularity and extensibility. The algorithm is adaptive in that data sets from a wide variety of instruments and sequencing conditions can be used with good results. Confidence values are provided on the base calls as an estimate of accuracy. The algorithm iteratively employs confidence determinations from several different modules, each of which examines a different feature of the data for accurate peak identification. Modules within this system can be added or removed for increased performance or for application to a different task. In comparisons with commercial software, the algorithm performed well. Images PMID:8233787

  2. A novel DNA sequence similarity calculation based on simplified pulse-coupled neural network and Huffman coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Nie, Rencan; Zhou, Dongming; Yao, Shaowen; Chen, Yanyan; Yu, Jiefu; Wang, Quan

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for the calculation of DNA sequence similarity is proposed based on simplified pulse-coupled neural network (S-PCNN) and Huffman coding. In this study, we propose a coding method based on Huffman coding, where the triplet code was used as a code bit to transform DNA sequence into numerical sequence. The proposed method uses the firing characters of S-PCNN neurons in DNA sequence to extract features. Besides, the proposed method can deal with different lengths of DNA sequences. First, according to the characteristics of S-PCNN and the DNA primary sequence, the latter is encoded using Huffman coding method, and then using the former, the oscillation time sequence (OTS) of the encoded DNA sequence is extracted. Simultaneously, relevant features are obtained, and finally the similarities or dissimilarities of the DNA sequences are determined by Euclidean distance. In order to verify the accuracy of this method, different data sets were used for testing. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective.

  3. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Garrido-Cardenas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years.

  4. MSA-PAD: DNA multiple sequence alignment framework based on PFAM accessed domain information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balech, Bachir; Vicario, Saverio; Donvito, Giacinto; Monaco, Alfonso; Notarangelo, Pasquale; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-08-01

    Here we present the MSA-PAD application, a DNA multiple sequence alignment framework that uses PFAM protein domain information to align DNA sequences encoding either single or multiple protein domains. MSA-PAD has two alignment options: gene and genome mode.

  5. CanScript, an 18-Base pair DNA sequence, boosts tumor cell-specific promoter activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Richards, Nathan G; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Yeo, Charles J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Brody, Jonathan R

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy protocols for the treatment of cancer often employ gene promoter sequences that are known to be overexpressed in specific tumor cell types relative to normal cells. These promoters, while specific, are often weakly active. It would be desirable to increase the activity of such promoters, while at the same time retain specificity, so that the therapeutic gene is more robustly expressed. Using a luciferase reporter DNA construct in both in vitro cell transfection assays and in vivo mouse tumor models, we have determined that in the absence of any other DNA sequence, a previously identified 18-base pair enhancer sequence called CanScript, lying upstream of the MSLN gene, has ∼25% of the promoter activity of CAG, a very strong non-specific promoter/enhancer, in tumor cells in which MSLN is highly expressed. Furthermore, tandem repeat copies of CanScript enhance transcription in a dose-dependent manner and, when coupled with promoter sequences that are active in tumor cells, increase promoter activity. These findings suggest that the incorporation of CanScript into gene constructs may have application in enhancing activity of promoters used in cancer-targeting gene therapy strategies, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20798601

  6. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated.

  7. Theory of phase segregation in DNA assemblies containing two different base-pair sequence types

    Science.gov (United States)

    (O’ Lee, Dominic J.; Wynveen, Aaron; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous pairing of homologous DNA sequences—a challenging subject in molecular biophysics, often referred to as ‘homology recognition’—has been observed in vitro for several DNA systems. One of these experiments involved liquid crystalline quasi-columnar phases formed by a mixture of two kinds of double stranded DNA oligomer. Both oligomer types were of the same length and identical stoichiometric base-pair composition, but the base-pairs followed a different order. Phase segregation of the two DNA types was observed in the experiments, with the formation of boundaries between domains rich in molecules of one type (order) of base pair sequence. We formulate here a modified ‘X–Y model’ for phase segregation in such assemblies, obtain approximate solutions of the model, compare analytical results to Monte Carlo simulations, and rationalise past experimental observations. This study, furthermore, reveals the factors that affect the degree of segregation. Such information could be used in planning new versions of similar segregation experiments, needed for deepening our understanding of forces that might be involved, e.g., in gene–gene recognition.

  8. Identification of forensic samples by using an infrared-based automatic DNA sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Ugo; Sani, Ilaria; Klintschar, Michael; Cerri, Nicoletta; De Ferrari, Francesco; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa

    2003-06-01

    We have recently introduced a new protocol for analyzing all core loci of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) with an infrared (IR) automatic DNA sequencer (LI-COR 4200). The amplicons were labeled with forward oligonucleotide primers, covalently linked to a new infrared fluorescent molecule (IRDye 800). The alleles were displayed as familiar autoradiogram-like images with real-time detection. This protocol was employed for paternity testing, population studies, and identification of degraded forensic samples. We extensively analyzed some simulated forensic samples and mixed stains (blood, semen, saliva, bones, and fixed archival embedded tissues), comparing the results with donor samples. Sensitivity studies were also performed for the four multiplex systems. Our results show the efficiency, reliability, and accuracy of the IR system for the analysis of forensic samples. We also compared the efficiency of the multiplex protocol with ultraviolet (UV) technology. Paternity tests, undegraded DNA samples, and real forensic samples were analyzed with this approach based on IR technology and with UV-based automatic sequencers in combination with commercially-available kits. The comparability of the results with the widespread UV methods suggests that it is possible to exchange data between laboratories using the same core group of markers but different primer sets and detection methods.

  9. Quantitative sequencing of 5-formylcytosine in DNA at single-base resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Michael J.; Marsico, Giovanni; Bachman, Martin; Beraldi, Dario; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the cytosine modifications 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and 5-formylcytosine (5fC) were found to exist in the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of a wide range of mammalian cell types. It is now important to understand their role in normal biological function and disease. Here we introduce reduced bisulfite sequencing (redBS-Seq), a quantitative method to decode 5fC in DNA at single-base resolution, based on a selective chemical reduction of 5fC to 5hmC followed by bisulfite treatment. After extensive validation on synthetic and genomic DNA, we combined redBS-Seq and oxidative bisulfite sequencing (oxBS-Seq) to generate the first combined genomic map of 5-methylcytosine, 5hmC and 5fC in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our experiments revealed that in certain genomic locations 5fC is present at comparable levels to 5hmC and 5mC. The combination of these chemical methods can quantify and precisely map these three cytosine derivatives in the genome and will help provide insights into their function.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Indonesian Indigenous Chickens based on Mitochondrial DNA Displacement (D-loop Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI SULANDARI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA displacement (D-loop sequences were used to study the genetic diversity and relationship of Indonesian indigenous chickens. A total of 483 individuals belonging to 15 population breeds and 43 individuals belonging to 6 populations of jungle fowl (2 populations of Gallus gallus and 4 populations of Gallus varius were sampled. The hypervariable I (HVI segment of the D-loop was PCR amplified and subsequently sequenced. The sequences of the first 397 nucleotides were used for analysis. Sixty nine haplotypes were identified from 54 polymorphic sites with polymorphism between nucleotides 167 and 397 contributing to 94.5% of the sequence variation. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Indonesian indigenous chickens can be grouped into five distinct clades (clade I, II, IIIc, IIId, and IV of the previously identified seven clades (clade I, II, IIIa, IIIb, IIIc, IIId, and IV in Asian indigenous chickens. Fifty haplotypes belong to clade II, seven haplotypes are in clade IV, six are in clade IIId, three are in clade I and one haploype is in clade IIIc. There was no breed-specific clade. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA based on partial D-loop sequences of Indonesian chicken indicates that 67.85% of the total sequence variation between haplotypes was present within the population and 32.15% between populations. One of the haplotypes (represented by PLC4 was shared by all populations, suggesting that these populations may share the same maternal ancestor. These results show a high mitochondrial D-loop diversity and indicate multiple maternal origins for Indonesian indigenous chickens.

  11. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surjit B Dixit; Mihaly Mezei; David L Beveridge

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute–solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interactmore strongly with watermolecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning’s counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 Å from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general

  12. Sequence-dependent elasticity and electrostatics of single-stranded DNA: signatures of base-stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Dustin B; Duggan, Gina; Gouil, Quentin; Saleh, Omar A

    2014-02-04

    Base-stacking is a key factor in the energetics that determines nucleic acid structure. We measure the tensile response of single-stranded DNA as a function of sequence and monovalent salt concentration to examine the effects of base-stacking on the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of single-stranded DNA. By comparing the elastic response of highly stacked poly(dA) and that of a polypyrimidine sequence with minimal stacking, we find that base-stacking in poly(dA) significantly enhances the polymer's rigidity. The unstacking transition of poly(dA) at high force reveals that the intrinsic electrostatic tension on the molecule varies significantly more weakly on salt concentration than mean-field predictions. Further, we provide a model-independent estimate of the free energy difference between stacked poly(dA) and unstacked polypyrimidine, finding it to be ∼-0.25 kBT/base and nearly constant over three orders of magnitude in salt concentration.

  13. Differentiation of European freshwater bucephalids (Digenea: Bucephalidae) based on karyotypes and DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkevičiūtė, Romualda; Stunžėnas, Virmantas; Stanevičiūtė, Gražina

    2014-02-01

    Three species of bucephalid digeneans are known in European freshwater habitats. In this study parthenitae of Rhipidocotyle campanula (Dujardin, 1845) and R. fennica Gibson, Taskinen & Valtonen, 1992, infecting unionid bivalves, and adult Bucephalus polymorphus von Baer, 1827 from perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) were investigated using karyological analysis and DNA sequencing. Our previously published data on genetic characteristics of parthenitae of B. polymorphus from Dreissena polymorpha Pallas were used for comparative analysis. Ribosomal DNA sequences (ITS2 and 28S rDNA) were used to estimate the phylogenetic relationships of the three bucephalid species. Very close phylogenetic affinity between investigated species was revealed; the sequence difference between the two species of Rhipidocotyle Diesing, 1858 (3.78% based on 28S) was comparable with intergeneric differences observed in comparisons of B. polymorphus with R. campanula and R. fennica (3.43% and 4.49% based on 28S, respectively). A high degree of similarity was noted in karyotype structure of the two species of Rhipidocotyle. The diploid chromosome sets consist of 14 bi-armed chromosomes with the first pair of metacentric elements markedly larger than the remaining chromosomes. This chromosome set structure is also specific to B. polymorphus. One specimen of Anodonta anatina L. was infected with tetraploid R. fennica (4n = 28). On the basis of karyotype characters and molecular data, species of the genus Rhipidocotyle cannot be recognised as more closely related to each other than to B. polymorphus. Our findings of Lithuanian and Ukrainian populations of unionid mussels infected with R. fennica provide evidence that this species occurs not only in Finland but also in Central and Eastern Europe. Previous reports of B. polymorphus in unionids in these regions are equivocal because of possible confusion with R. fennica.

  14. Systematic position of Myrtama Ovcz. & Kinz. based on morphological and nrDNA ITS sequence evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Daoyuan; ZHANG Yuan; GASKIN J. F.; CHEN Zhiduan

    2006-01-01

    Myrtama is a genus named from Myricaria elegans Royle in the 1970's in terms of its morphological peculiarities. The establishment of this genus and its systematic position have been disputed since its inception. ITS sequences from 10 species of Tamaricaceae are reported, and analyzed by PAUP 4.0b8 and Bayesian Inference to reconstruct the phylogenies. A single ITS tree is generated from maximum parsimony and MrBayes analyses, respectively. The molecular data set shows strong support for Tamarix and Myricaria as monophyletic genera,and Myrtama as a sister group to the genus Myricaria.Based on morphological differences, a single morphological tree is also generated, in which two major lineages existed but Myrtama is a sister group to Tamarix, rather than Myricaria. The evidence from DNA sequences and morphological characters supports that Myicaria elegans should be put into neither Myricaria nor Tamarix, but kept in its own monotypic genus.

  15. Monoclonal antibody-based, selective isolation of DNA fragments containing an alkylated base to be quantified in defined gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochleitner, K; Thomale, J; Nikitin AYu; Rajewsky, M F

    1991-08-25

    We have established a sensitive, monoclonal antibody (Mab)-based procedure permitting the selective enrichment of sequences containing the miscoding alkylation product O6-ethylguanine (O6-EtGua) from mammalian DNA. H5 rat hepatoma cells were reacted with the N-nitroso carcinogen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in vitro, to give overall levels of greater than or equal to 25 O6-EtGua residues per diploid genome (corresponding to O6-EtGua/guanine molar ratios of greater than or equal to 10(-8). For analysis, enzymatically restricted DNA from these cells is incubated with an antibody specific for O6-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine, the resulting Mab-DNA complexes are separated from (O6-EtGua)-free fragments by filtration through a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane, and the DNA is recovered from the filter-bound complexes quantitatively. The efficiency of Mab binding to DNA fragments containing O6-EtGua is constant over a range of O6-EtGua/guanine molar ratios between 10(-5) and 10(-8). (O6-EtGua)-containing restriction fragments encompassing known gene sequences (e.g., the immunoglobulin E heavy chain gene of H5 rat hepatoma cells used as a model in this study) are subsequently amplified by PCR and quantified by slot-blot hybridisation. The content and distribution of a specific carcinogen-DNA adduct in defined sequences of genomic DNA can thus be analyzed as well as the kinetics of intragenomic (toposelective) repair of any DNA lesion for which a suitable Mab is available.

  16. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  17. Molecular phylogenetic relationship of Eplnephelus based on sequences of mtDNA Cty b

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The mtDNA Cyt b gene was sequenced partially for Variola louti of Serranidae,Epinephelinae and seven endemic species of groupers-Epinephelus awoara,E.brunneus,E.coioides,E.longispinis,E.sexfasciatus,E.spilotoceps and E.tauvina in China.The seven endemic species and other seven foreign species of groupers--E,aeneus,E.caninus,E.drummondhayi,E,haifensis,E.labriformis,E.marginatus and E.multinotatus from the GenBank were combined and analysed as ingroup,while Variola louti was used as outgroup.We compared the 420 bp sequences of Cyt b among the 15 species and constructed two types of molecular phylogenetic trees with maximum parsimony method (MP)and neighbor-joining method (NJ) respectively.The results were as follows:(1) As to the base composition of mtDNA Cyt b sequence (402 bp) of 14 species of Epinepkelus,the content of (A + T) was 53.6%,higher than that of (G + C) (46.4%).The transition/transversion ratio was 4.78 with no mutation saturation.(2) The duster relationships between E.awoara and E.sexfasciatus,E.coioides and E.tauvina,E.longispinis and E.spilotoceps were consistent with phenotypes in taxonomy.(3) In the phylogenetic tree,the species in the Atlantic Ocean were associated closely with those in the Pacific Ocean,which suggested that the Cyt b sequences of Epinephelus were highly conserved.This may be attributed to the coordinate evolution.(4) In well-bred mating or heredity management,mating Epinephelus of the same branch should be avoided.It is likely to be an effective way to mate the species of the Atlantic Ocean with those of the Pacific Ocean to improve the inheritance species.

  18. Mink serum amyloid A protein. Expression and primary structure based on cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhaug, G; Husby, G; Dowton, S B

    1990-06-15

    The nucleotide sequences of two mink serum amyloid A (SAA) cDNA clones have been analyzed, one (SAA1) 776 base pairs long and the other (SAA2) 552 base pairs long. Significant differences were discovered when derived amino acid sequences were compared with data for apoSAA isolated from high density lipoprotein. Previous studies of mink protein SAA and amyloid protein A (AA) suggest that only one SAA isotype is amyloidogenic. The cDNA clone for SAA2 defines the "amyloid prone" isotype while SAA1 is found only in serum. Mink SAA1 has alanine in position 10, isoleucine in positions 24, 67, and 71, lysine in position 27, and proline in position 105. Residue 10 in mink SAA2 is valine while arginine and asparagine are at positions 24 and 27, respectively, all characteristics of protein AA isolated from mink amyloid fibrils. Mink SAA2 also has valine in position 67, phenylalanine in position 71, and amino acid 105 is serine. It remains unknown why these six amino acid substitutions render SAA2 more amyloidogenic than SAA1. Eighteen hours after lipopolysaccharide stimulation, mink SAA mRNA is abundant in liver with relatively minor accumulations in brain and lung. Genes encoding both SAA isotypes are expressed in all three organs while no SAA mRNA was detectable in amyloid prone organs, including spleen and intestine, indicating that deposition of AA from locally synthesized SAA is unlikely. A third mRNA species (2.2 kilobases) was identified and hybridizes with cDNA probes for mink SAA1 and SAA2. In addition to a major primary translation product (molecular mass 14,400 Da) an additional product with molecular mass 28,000 Da was immunoprecipitable.

  19. Multilocus sequence analysis supports the taxonomic position of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts based on DNA-DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnat, Sebastian; Małek, Wanda; Oleńska, Ewa; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Kalita, Michał; Rogalski, Jerzy; Wójcik, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the phylogenetic relationship and taxonomic status of six strains, representing different phenons and genomic groups of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts, originating from Poland, were established by comparative analysis of five concatenated housekeeping gene sequences (atpD, dnaK, glnA, recA and rpoB), DNA-DNA hybridization and total DNA G+C content. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of combined atpD, dnaK, glnA, recA and rpoB sequence data placed the studied bacteria into the clade comprising the genus Mesorhizobium. In the core gene phylograms, four A. glycyphyllos nodule isolates (AG1, AG7, AG15 and AG27) formed a cluster common with Mesorhizobium ciceri, whereas the two other A. glycyphyllos symbionts (AG17 and AG22) were grouped together with Mesorhizobium amorphae and M. septentrionale. The species position of the studied bacteria was clarified by DNA-DNA hybridization. The DNA-DNA relatedness between isolates AG1, AG7, AG15 and AG27 and reference strain M. ciceri USDA 3383T was 76.4-84.2%, and all these A. glycyphyllos nodulators were defined as members of the genomospecies M. ciceri. DNA-DNA relatedness for isolates AG17 and AG22 and the reference strain M. amorphae ICMP 15022T was 77.5 and 80.1%, respectively. We propose that the nodule isolates AG17 and AG22 belong to the genomic species M. amorphae. Additionally, it was found that the total DNA G+C content of the six test A. glycyphyllos symbionts was 59.4-62.1 mol%, within the range for species of the genus Mesorhizobium.

  20. Endonuclease-based Method for Detecting the Sequence Specific DNA Binding Protein on Double-stranded DNA Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Fei BAI; Qin Yu GE; Tong Xiang LI; Jin Ke WANG; Quan Jun LIU; Zu Hong LU

    2005-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe contains two different protein binding sites.One is for DNA- binding proteins to be detected and the other is for a DNA restriction enzyme.The two sites were arranged together with no base interval. The working principle of the capturing dsDNA probe is described as follows: the capturing probe can be cut with the DNA restriction enzyme (such as EcoR I) to cause a sticky terminal, if the probe is not bound with a target protein, and the sticky terminal can be extended and labeled with Cy3-dUTP by DNA polymerase. When the probe is bound with a target protein, the probe is not capable to be cut by the restriction enzyme because of space obstruction. The amount of the target DNA binding proteins can be measured according to the variations of fluorescent signals of the corresponding probes.

  1. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yonghua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  2. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonghua Zhang

    2002-05-27

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  3. Fluorescence of size-expanded DNA bases: reporting on DNA sequence and structure with an unnatural genetic set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Andrew T; Kool, Eric T

    2008-03-26

    We recently described the synthesis and helix assembly properties of expanded DNA (xDNA), which contains base pairs 2.4 A larger than natural DNA pairs. This designed genetic set is under study with the goals of mimicking the functions of the natural DNA-based genetic system and of developing useful research tools. Here, we study the fluorescence properties of the four expanded bases of xDNA (xA, xC, xG, xT) and evaluate how their emission varies with changes in oligomer length, composition, and hybridization. Experiments were carried out with short oligomers of xDNA nucleosides conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide, and we investigated the effects of hybridizing these fluorescent oligomers to short complementary DNAs with varied bases opposite the xDNA bases. As monomer nucleosides, the xDNA bases absorb light in two bands: one at approximately 260 nm (similar to DNA) and one at longer wavelength ( approximately 330 nm). All are efficient violet-blue fluorophores with emission maxima at approximately 380-410 nm and quantum yields (Phifl) of 0.30-0.52. Short homo-oligomers of the xDNA bases (length 1-4 monomers) showed moderate self-quenching except xC, which showed enhancement of Phifl with increasing length. Interestingly, multimers of xA emitted at longer wavelengths (520 nm) as an apparent excimer. Hybridization of an oligonucleotide to the DNA adjacent to the xDNA bases (with the xDNA portion overhanging) resulted in no change in fluorescence. However, addition of one, two, or more DNA bases in these duplexes opposite the xDNA portion resulted in a number of significant fluorescence responses, including wavelength shifts, enhancements, or quenching. The strongest responses were the enhancement of (xG)n emission by hybridization of one or more adenines opposite them, and the quenching of (xT)n and (xC)n emission by guanines opposite. The data suggest multiple ways in which the xDNA bases, both alone and in oligomers, may be useful as tools in biophysical analysis

  4. The phylogenetic status of Paxillosida (Asteroidea) based on complete mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Mioko; Komatsu, Miéko; Araki, Takeyoshi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Wada, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    One of the most important issues in asteroid phylogeny is the phylogenetic status of Paxillosida. This group lacks an anus and suckers on the tube feet in adults and does not develop the brachiolaria stage in early development. Two controversial hypotheses have been proposed for the phylogenetic status of Paxillosida, i.e., Paxillosida is primitive or rather specialized in asteroids. In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA nucleotide sequences from two paxillosidans (Astropecten polyacanthus and Luidia quinaria) and one forcipulatidan (Asterias amurensis). The mitochondrial genomes of the three asteroids were identical with respect to gene order and transcription direction, and were identical to the previously reported mitochondrial genomes of Asterina pectinifera (Valvatida) and Pisaster ochraceus (Forcipulatida) in this respect. Therefore, the comparison of genome structures was uninformative for the purposes of asteroid phylogeny. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses based on the amino acid sequences and the nucleotide sequences from the five asteroids supported the monophyly of the clade that included the two paxillosidans and Asterina. This suggests that the paxillosidan characters are secondarily derived ones.

  5. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia.

  6. Molecular simulations of polycation-DNA binding exploring the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence in nuclear localization sequence based polycations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-10-10

    Gene therapy relies on the delivery of DNA into cells, and polycations are one class of vectors enabling efficient DNA delivery. Nuclear localization sequences (NLS), cationic oligopeptides that target molecules for nuclear entry, can be incorporated into polycations to improve their gene delivery efficiency. We use simulations to study the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence on the DNA-binding behavior of NLS-grafted polycations by systematically mutating the residues in the grafts, which are based on the SV40 NLS (peptide sequence PKKKRKV). Replacing arginine (R) with lysine (K) reduces binding strength by eliminating arginine-DNA interactions, but placing R in a less hindered location (e.g., farther from the grafting point to the polycation backbone) has surprisingly little effect on polycation-DNA binding strength. Changing the positions of the hydrophobic proline (P) and valine (V) residues relative to the polycation backbone changes hydrophobic aggregation within the polycation and, consequently, changes the conformational entropy loss that occurs upon polycation-DNA binding. Since conformational entropy loss affects the free energy of binding, the positions of P and V in the grafts affect DNA binding affinity. The insight from this work guides synthesis of polycations with tailored DNA binding affinity and, in turn, efficient DNA delivery.

  7. The contrasting structures of mismatched DNA sequences containing looped-out bases (bulges) and multiple mismatches (bubbles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A; Lilley, D M

    1989-09-12

    We have studied the structure and reactivities of two kinds of mismatched DNA sequences--unopposed bases, or bulges, and multiple mismatched pairs of bases. These were generated in a constant sequence environment, in relatively long DNA fragments, using a technique based on heteroduplex formation between sequences cloned into single-stranded M13 phage. The mismatched sequences were studied from two points of view, viz 1. The mobility of the fragments on gel electrophoresis in polyacrylamide was studied in order to examine possible bending of the DNA due to the presence of the mismatch defect. Such bending would constitute a global effect on the conformation of the molecule. 2. Sequences in and around the mismatches were studied using enzyme and chemical probes of DNA structure. This would reveal more local structural effects of the mismatched sequences. We observed that the structures of the bulges and the multiple mismatches appear to be fundamentally different. The bulged sequences exhibited a large gel retardation, consistent with a significant bending of the DNA at the bulge, and whose magnitude depends on the number of mismatched bases. The larger bulges were sensitive to cleavage by single-strand specific nucleases, and modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate (adenines) or osmium tetroxide (thymines) in a non-uniform way, suggesting that the bulges have a precise structure that leads to exposure of some, but not all, of the bases. In contrast the multiple mismatches ('bubbles') cause very much less bending of the DNA fragment in which they occur, and uniform patterns of chemical reactivity along the length of the mismatched sequences, suggesting a less well defined, and possibly flexible, structure. The precise structure of the bulges suggests that such features may be especially significant for recognition by proteins.

  8. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  9. Fluorescence bio-barcode DNA assay based on gold and magnetic nanoparticles for detection of Exotoxin A gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Bahram; Kamali, Mehdi; Salouti, Mojtaba; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh

    2017-06-15

    Bio-barcode DNA based on gold nanoparticle (bDNA-GNPs) as a new generation of biosensor based detection tools, holds promise for biological science studies. They are of enormous importance in the emergence of rapid and sensitive procedures for detecting toxins of microorganisms. Exotoxin A (ETA) is the most toxic virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ETA has ADP-ribosylation activity and decisively affects the protein synthesis of the host cells. In the present study, we developed a fluorescence bio-barcode technology to trace P. aeruginosa ETA. The GNPs were coated with the first target-specific DNA probe 1 (1pDNA) and bio-barcode DNA, which acted as a signal reporter. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with the second target-specific DNA probe 2 (2pDNA) that was able to recognize the other end of the target DNA. After binding the nanoparticles with the target DNA, the following sandwich structure was formed: MNP 2pDNA/tDNA/1pDNA-GNP-bDNA. After isolating the sandwiches by a magnetic field, the DNAs of the probes which have been hybridized to their complementary DNA, GNPs and MNPs, via the hydrogen, electrostatic and covalently bonds, were released from the sandwiches after dissolving in dithiothreitol solution (DTT 0.8M). This bio-barcode DNA with known DNA sequence was then detected by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The findings showed that the new method has the advantages of fast, high sensitivity (the detection limit was 1.2ng/ml), good selectivity, and wide linear range of 5-200ng/ml. The regression analysis also showed that there was a good linear relationship (∆F=0.57 [target DNA]+21.31, R(2)=0.9984) between the fluorescent intensity and the target DNA concentration in the samples.

  10. Phylogenetic relationship of Podocopida (Ostracoda: Podocopa) based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Na; ZHAO Meiying; CHEN Liqiao; YANG Pin

    2006-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from 18S rDNA of 11 ostracodes, which represent four suborders and six superfamilies ofpodocopidan, were determined. The phylogenetic relationships were analyzed based on three kinds of methods (maximum-likelihood, maximum-parsimony,and neighbor-joining), and the three topologies gained were basically similar. The results have showed that (1) a monophyletic Podocopida was supported strongly; (2) the phylogenetic relationships of four suborders were (Darwinulocopina plus (Bairdiocopina plus (Cytherocopina plus Cypridocopina))), which indicated that a close relationship between Cytherocopina and Cypridocopina, and Darwinulocopina had separated early from the main podocopinan; (3) Cypridocopinan formed a monophyletic group, among which the phylogenetic relationship of three superfamilies was (Cypridoidea plus (Macrocypridoidea plus Pontocypridoidea)).

  11. Changes in DNA base sequence induced by gamma-ray mutagenesis of lambda phage and prophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindall, K.R.; Stein, J.; Hutchinson, F.

    1988-04-01

    Mutations in the cI (repressor) gene were induced by gamma-ray irradiation of lambda phage and of prophage, and 121 mutations were sequenced. Two-thirds of the mutations in irradiated phage assayed in recA host cells (no induction of the SOS response) were G:C to A:T transitions; it is hypothesized that these may arise during DNA replication from adenine mispairing with a cytosine product deaminated by irradiation. For irradiated phage assayed in host cells in which the SOS response had been induced, 85% of the mutations were base substitutions, and in 40 of the 41 base changes, a preexisting base pair had been replaced by an A:T pair; these might come from damaged bases acting as AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites. The remaining mutations were 1 and 2 base deletions. In irradiated prophage, base change mutations involved the substitution of both A:T and of G:C pairs for the preexisting pairs; the substitution of G:C pairs shows that some base substitution mechanism acts on the cell genome but not on the phage. In the irradiated prophage, frameshifts and a significant number of gross rearrangements were also found.

  12. A 502-Base Free-Solution Electrophoretic DNA Sequencing Method Using End-Attached Wormlike Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istivan, Stephen B; Bishop, Daniel K; Jones, Angela L; Grosser, Shane T; Schneider, James W

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate that the use of wormlike nonionic micelles as drag-tags in end-labeled free-solution electrophoresis ("micelle-ELFSE") provides single-base resolution of Sanger sequencing products up to 502 bases in length, a nearly 2-fold improvement over reported ELFSE separations. "CiEj" running buffers containing 48 mM C12E5, 6 mM C10E5, and 3 M urea (32.5 °C) form wormlike micelles that provide a drag equivalent to an uncharged DNA fragment with a length (α) of 509 bases (effective Rh = 27 nm). Runtime in a 40 cm capillary (30 kV) was 35 min for elution of all products down to the 26-base primer. We also show that smaller Triton X-100 micelles give a read length of 103 bases in a 4 min run, so that a combined analysis of the Sanger products using the two buffers in separate capillaries could be completed in 14 min for the full range of lengths. A van Deemter analysis shows that resolution is limited by diffusion-based peak broadening and wall adsorption. Effects of drag-tag polydispersity are not observed, despite the inherent polydispersity of the wormlike micelles. We ascribe this to a stochastic size-sampling process that occurs as micelle size fluctuates rapidly during the runtime. A theoretical model of the process suggests that fluctuations occur with a time scale less than 10 ms, consistent with the monomer exchange process in nonionic micelles. The CiEj buffer has a low viscosity (2.7 cP) and appears to be semidilute in micelle concentration. The large drag-tag size of the CiEj buffers leads to steric segregation of the DNA and tag for short fragments and attendant mobility shifts.

  13. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  14. A likelihood ratio test for species membership based on DNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Mikhail V.; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    DNA barcoding as an approach for species identification is rapidly increasing in popularity. However, it remains unclear which statistical procedures should accompany the technique to provide a measure of uncertainty. Here we describe a likelihood ratio test which can be used to test if a sampled...... sequence is a member of an a priori specified species. We investigate the performance of the test using coalescence simulations, as well as using the real data from butterflies and frogs representing two kinds of challenge for DNA barcoding: extremely low and extremely high levels of sequence variability....

  15. Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus (Digenea): Species Differentiation Based on mtDNA (Barcode) and Partial LSUrDNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmame, L.; Huffman, J.; Cole, R.; Dayanandan, S.; Tkach, V.; McLaughlin, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Flukes belonging to Sphaeridiotrema are important parasites of waterfowl, and 2 morphologically similar species Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus, have been implicated in waterfowl mortality in North America. Cytochrome oxidase I (barcode region) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences from specimens of S. globulus and S. pseudoglobulus, obtained from naturally and experimentally infected hosts from New Jersey and Quebec, respectively, confirmed that these species were distinct. Barcode sequences of the 2 species differed at 92 of 590 nucleotide positions (15.6%) and the translated sequences differed by 13 amino acid residues. Partial LSU-rDNA sequences differed at 29 of 1,208 nucleotide positions (2.4%). Additional barcode sequences from specimens collected from waterfowl in Wisconsin and Minnesota and morphometric data obtained from specimens acquired along the north shore of Lake Superior revealed the presence of S. pseudoglobulus in these areas. Although morphometric data suggested the presence of S. globulus in the Lake Superior sample, it was not found among the specimens sequenced from Wisconsin or Minnesota. ?? 2011 American Society of Parasitologists.

  16. [DNA sequencing technology and automatization of it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraev, A S

    1991-01-01

    Precise manipulations with genetic material, typical for modern experiments in molecular biology and in new biotechnology, require a capability to determine DNA base sequence. This capability enables today to exploit specific genetic knowledge for the dissection of complex cell processes and for modulation of cell metabolism in transgenic organisms. The review focuses on such DNA sequencing technologies that are widespread in general laboratory practice. They can safely be called, with the availability of commercial reagents, industrial techniques. Modern DNA sequencing requires recurrent breakdown of large genomic DNA into smaller pieces, that are then amplified, sequenced and the initial long stretch reconstructed via overlap of small pieces. The DNA sequencing process has several steps: a DNA fragment is obtained in sufficient quantity and purity, it is converted to a form suitable for a particular sequencing method, a sequencing reaction is performed and its products fractionated; and finally the resultant data are interpreted (i.e. an autoradiograph is read into a computer memory) and a long sequence in reconstructed via overlap of short stretches. These steps are considered in separate parts; an accent is made on sequencing strategies with respect to their biological task. In the last part, possibilities for automation of sequencing experiment are considered, followed by a discussion of domestic problems in DNA sequencing.

  17. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  18. [DNA molecular identification of Herba Dendrobii and its adulterant species based on ITS sequence analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; He, Tao; Chun, Ze

    2009-11-01

    To identify Herba Dendrobii and its adulterant species on molecular level, the rDNA ITS sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii were studied. Genomic DNA of Dendrobium was extracted using the modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method. The PCR products of the rDNA ITS sequences of Dendrobium (32 materials) were purified and then sequenced. The characteristic of the sequences and the genetic distance were compared between Bulbophyllum odoratissimum and Dendrobium, Dendrobium interspecies and different populations. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the UPGMA method by the biology softwares including BioEdit, MEGA4.0 etc. The PCR products were purified and then sequenced. It was built up that the database of rDNA ITS sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii (32 materials). The ITS1 was 228-234 bp, the GC content accounting for 45.7%-53.0%. Its variable sites were 167, accounting for 67.34%. The Parsim-Informative positions were 106, accounting for 42.74%. The ITS2 was 241-247 bp, the GC accounting for 44.8% - 55.7%. The variable sites were 165, accounting for 66.27%. The Parsim-Informative positions were 115, accounting for 46.18%. The genetic distance between B. odoratissimum and Dendrobium was 0.295. The average genetic distance was 0.142 between Dendrobium species, and there were 2-156 variable nucleotides. The average genetic distance between different populations was 0.002, and there were 2-156 variable nucleotides. The genetic distance between B. odoratissimum and Dendrobium was greater than that of Denrobium interspecies. Meanwhile, the genetic distance between Denrobium species was also greater than that of different populations (varieties). The molecular phylogeny tree was constructed on the database of rDNA ITS the sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii using the biology softwares. Then 10 materials on molecular level were authenticated. It is concluded that using of the whole sequences database of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii

  19. Phylogeny and systematics of 18 Colletotrichum species based on ribosomal DNA spacer sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasaprasad, S; Mills, P R; Meehan, B M; Brown, A E

    1996-06-01

    The potential use of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences in understanding the phylogeny and systematics of Colletotrichum species has been evaluated. Sequence data from a limited number of isolates revealed that in Colletotrichum species the ITS 1 region (50.3% variable sites) shows a greater degree of intra- and inter-specific divergence than ITS 2 (12.4% variable sites). Nucleotide sequences of the ITS 1 region from 93 isolates representing 18 Colletotrichum species were determined. Data for 71 of these isolates where molecular and morphological identities concurred were used for phylogenetic analysis. The size of the ITS 1 region varied from 159 to 185 base pairs. Maximum intraspecific divergence was recorded with C. acutatum (5.8%), and C. capsici showed the greatest level of interspecific divergence (8.9-23.3%). Parsimony and distance analyses gave similar tree topologies. The bootstrapped consensus parsimony tree divided the 18 Colletotrichum species into six phylogenetic groups, designated 1-6. These groups, however, are not congruent with species clusterings based on spore shape. For example, the straight cylindrical spored species were represented both in groups 1 and 6; group 6 also included the falcate fusiform spored species C. capsici. The molecular evidence suggests refinement of the species concepts of some of the taxa examined. In group 6, divergence between C. gloeosporioides and C. fuscum (0.6-3.0%) or C. kahawae (0.6-3.0%) or C. fragariae (0.6-4.2%) overlap the divergence (3.6%) within C. gloeosporioides. It is suggested that C. fuscum as well as C. kahawae and C. fragariae fall within the group species C. gloeosporioides. ITS 1 data enabled clear distinction (7.1%) of Colletotrichum isolates from maize and sorghum into C. graminicola and C. sublineolum, respectively (group 2). Species such as C. acutatum, C. coccodes, C. dematium, and C. trichellum can be clearly distinguished based on ITS 1 sequence divergence, but C

  20. Genetic diversity of Lombok chickens based on D-loop mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Syamsul Arifin Zein

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA displacement (D-loop sequences were used to study the genetic diversity and relationship of Lombok chickens. A total of 45 individuals were sampled. The D-loop segment was PCR amplified and subsequently sequenced. The sequences of the 785 nucleotides were used for analysis. Twelve haplotypes were identified from 25 polymorphic sites with polymorphism between nucleotides 200 and 400 contributing to 80% of the variation. Fu’s Fs value was - 8.768 (all samples, P = 0, indicating high genetic diversity and population expansion, a conclusion supported by a neighbor– joining analysis of the haplotypes. Nucleotides diversity of the Lombok chicken were 0.00221 and haplotype diversity were 0.654 + 0.08. The dominant haplotype found among the Lombok chickens was haplotype B (62% and genetic distances value ranged from 0.001 to 0.017.

  1. Phylogenetic position of the family Orientocreadiidae within the superfamily Plagiorchioidea (Trematoda) based on partial 28S rDNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, S G; Shchenkov, S V

    2017-08-22

    Trematodes of the family Orientocreadiidae are mostly parasites of freshwater fishes. Here, the phylogenetic position of this family is inferred based on the partial 28S rDNA sequence from a representative of the genus Orientocreadium s. str.-О. pseudobagri Yamaguti, 1934. Sequences were analysed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference algorithms. Both approaches placed the Orientocreadiidae within a clade corresponding to the superfamily Plagiorchioidea and supported the family Leptophallidae as a sister taxon.

  2. HAlign: Fast multiple similar DNA/RNA sequence alignment based on the centre star strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Quan; Hu, Qinghua; Guo, Maozu; Wang, Guohua

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is important work, but bottlenecks arise in the massive MSA of homologous DNA or genome sequences. Most of the available state-of-the-art software tools cannot address large-scale datasets, or they run rather slowly. The similarity of homologous DNA sequences is often ignored. Lack of parallelization is still a challenge for MSA research. We developed two software tools to address the DNA MSA problem. The first employed trie trees to accelerate the centre star MSA strategy. The expected time complexity was decreased to linear time from square time. To address large-scale data, parallelism was applied using the hadoop platform. Experiments demonstrated the performance of our proposed methods, including their running time, sum-of-pairs scores and scalability. Moreover, we supplied two massive DNA/RNA MSA datasets for further testing and research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Rapid in vitro splicing of coding sequences from genomic DNA by isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxuan Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloning of coding sequence (CDS is an important step for gene function research. Here, we reported a simple and efficient strategy for assembling multiple-exon into an intron-free CDS from genomic DNA (gDNA by an isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR (IRR-PCR method. As an example, a 2067-bp full-length CDS of the anther-specific expression gene OsABCG15, which is composed of seven exons and six introns, was generated by IRR-PCR using genomic DNA of rice leaf as the template. Actually, this approach can be wildly applied to any DNA sequences assembly to achieve CDS cloning, gene fusion and multiple site-directed mutagenesis in functional genomics studies in vitro.

  4. Measurement of word frequencies in genomic DNA sequences based on partial alignment and fuzzy set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Fumiya; Mizuta, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    Accompanied with the rapid increase of the amount of data registered in the databases of biological sequences, the need for a fast method of sequence comparison applicable to sequences of large size is also increasing. In general, alignment is used for sequence comparison. However, the alignment may not be appropriate for comparison of sequences of large size such as whole genome sequences due to its large time complexity. In this article, we propose a semi alignment-free method of sequence comparison based on word frequency distributions, in which we partially use the alignment to measure word frequencies along with the idea of fuzzy set theory. Experiments with ten bacterial genome sequences demonstrated that the fuzzy measurements has the effect that facilitates discrimination between close relatives and distant relatives.

  5. Information Analysis of DNA Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, Riyazuddin

    2010-01-01

    The problem of differentiating the informational content of coding (exons) and non-coding (introns) regions of a DNA sequence is one of the central problems of genomics. The introns are estimated to be nearly 95% of the DNA and since they do not seem to participate in the process of transcription of amino-acids, they have been termed "junk DNA." Although it is believed that the non-coding regions in genomes have no role in cell growth and evolution, demonstration that these regions carry useful information would tend to falsify this belief. In this paper, we consider entropy as a measure of information by modifying the entropy expression to take into account the varying length of these sequences. Exons are usually much shorter in length than introns; therefore the comparison of the entropy values needs to be normalized. A length correction strategy was employed using randomly generated nucleonic base strings built out of the alphabet of the same size as the exons under question. Our analysis shows that intron...

  6. Phylogeny and evolutionary histories of Pyrus L. revealed by phylogenetic trees and networks based on data from multiple DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reconstructing the phylogeny of Pyrus has been difficult due to the wide distribution of the genus and lack of informative data. In this study, we collected 110 accessions representing 25 Pyrus species and constructed both phylogenetic trees and phylogenetic networks based on multiple DNA sequence d...

  7. Changes in DNA base sequences in the mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana induced by low-energy N+ implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常凤启; 刘选明; 李银心; 贾庚祥; 马晶晶; 刘公社; 朱至清

    2003-01-01

    To reveal the mutation effect of low-energy ion implantation on Arabidopsis thaliana in vivo, T80II, a stable dwarf mutant, derived from the seeds irradiated by 30 keV N+ with the dose of 80×1015 ions/cm2 was used for Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and base sequence analysis. The results indicated that among total 397 RAPD bands observed, 52 bands in T80II were different from those of wild type showing a variation frequency 13.1%. In comparison with the sequences of A. thaliana in GenBank, the RAPD fragments in T80II were changed greatly in base sequences with an average rate of one base change per 16.8 bases. The types of base changes included base transition, transversion, deletion and insertion. Among the 275 base changes detected, single base substitutions (97.09%) occurred more frequently than base deletions and insertions (2.91%). And the frequency of base transitions (66.55%) was higher than that of base transversions (30.55%). Adenine, thymine, guanine or cytosine could be replaced by any of other three bases in cloned DNA fragments in T80II. It seems that thymine was more sensitive to the irradiation than other bases. The flanking sequences of the base changes in RAPD fragments in T80II were analyzed and the mutational "hotspot" induced by low-energy ion implantation was discussed.

  8. Comparison of base composition analysis and Sanger sequencing of mitochondrial DNA for four U.S. population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesler, Kevin M; Coble, Michael D; Hall, Thomas A; Vallone, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    A set of 711 samples from four U.S. population groups was analyzed using a novel mass spectrometry based method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) base composition profiling. Comparison of the mass spectrometry results with Sanger sequencing derived data yielded a concordance rate of 99.97%. Length heteroplasmy was identified in 46% of samples and point heteroplasmy was observed in 6.6% of samples in the combined mass spectral and Sanger data set. Using discrimination capacity as a metric, Sanger sequencing of the full control region had the highest discriminatory power, followed by the mass spectrometry base composition method, which was more discriminating than Sanger sequencing of just the hypervariable regions. This trend is in agreement with the number of nucleotides covered by each of the three assays. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Next-generation sequencing-based 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends for alternative promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Bambarendage P U; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian genomes contain many unknown alternative first exons and promoters. Thus, we have modified the existing 5'RACE (5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach into a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based new protocol that can identify these alternative promoters. This protocol has incorporated two main ideas: (i) 5'RACE starting from the known second exons of genes and (ii) NGS-based sequencing of the subsequent cDNA products. This protocol also provides a bioinformatics strategy that processes the sequence reads from NGS runs. This protocol has successfully identified several alternative promoters for an imprinted gene, PEG3. Overall, this NGS-based 5'RACE protocol is a sensitive and reliable method for detecting low-abundant transcripts and promoters.

  10. The phylogenetic placement of Siniperca obscura base on complete mitochondrial DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dun-Xue; Li, Yulong; Bin, Shi-Yu; Wang, Kaizhuo; Chu, Wu-Ying; Zhang, Jian-She

    2014-06-01

    Abstract The extant freshwater sinipercids represent a group of 12 species and they are endemic to East Asia. In this study, we cloned and sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Siniperca obscura from the Lijiang River. The size of the complete mitochondrial genome is 16,492 bp. The organization of the mitochondrial contained 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA and 22 transfer RNAs) and a major non-coding control region as well as those reported sinipercid fishes. Among the 13 protein-coding genes, three reading-frame overlaps were found: ATP8 and ATP6 overlap by 10 nucleotides and ND4 and ND4L overlap by 7 nucleotides and ND5 and ND6 overlap by 5 nucleotides. Phylogenetic analyses using N-J and maximum parsimony (MP) computational algorithms showed that S. chuatsi and S. kneri are sister species, next joined by S. Obscura, based on combined 12 protein-coding genes (excluding DN6).

  11. A Preliminarily Phylogeny Study of the Eriobotrya Based on the nrDNA Adh Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XINAGHUI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationships of the genus Eriobotrya Lindl. were examined based on the nrDNA Adh sequences. A phylogenetic tree of 14 loquat accessions (species, varieties and forma was generated by using Photinieae serrulaia L. as an outgroup and Rhaphiolepis indica (L. Lindl. as an ingroup, which represent the two closest genera of Eriobotyra. The results showed that these loquat accessions were divided into two main clades in the consensus tree. Clade I included E. seguinii Card and group A formed by E. henryi Nakai, E.bengalensis Hook.f., and forma angustifolia Vidal. Clade II is composed of the other taxas which included three groups. E. cavaleriei Rehd and E. fragrans Champ formed group B; group C consisted of E. prinoides Rehd. & Wils. var. dadunensis H.Z.Zhang, and E. japonica Lindl.; and group D included E. deflexa Nakai and E. deflexa Nakai Var.buisanensis NaKai. Since E. deflexa Nakai, E. deflexa Nakai Var.buisanensis NaKai and E. kwangsiensis Chun, were closer in the phylogenetic tree; while E. prinoides Rehd. & Wils. var. dadunensis H.Z.Zhang, E. japonica Lindl, E. prinoides Rehd & Wils and E.elliptica Lindl. were close with each other, they may be locataed at a similar place of the phylogenetic stage. However, E. malipoensis Kuan need further studies on its phylogenetis relationship for it was separated from the others. Results further support the theory that E. cavaleriei Rehd could be a variety of E. fragrans Champ.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of living and recently extinct bandicoots based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, M; Kear, B P; Aplin, K; Meredith, R W; Emerling, C; Springer, M S

    2012-01-01

    Bandicoots (Peramelemorphia) are a major order of australidelphian marsupials, which despite a fossil record spanning at least the past 25 million years and a pandemic Australasian range, remain poorly understood in terms of their evolutionary relationships. Many living peramelemorphians are critically endangered, making this group an important focus for biological and conservation research. To establish a phylogenetic framework for the group, we compiled a concatenated alignment of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences, comprising representatives of most living and recently extinct species. Our analysis confirmed the currently recognised deep split between Macrotis (Thylacomyidae), Chaeropus (Chaeropodidae) and all other living bandicoots (Peramelidae). The mainly New Guinean rainforest peramelids were returned as the sister clade of Australian dry-country species. The wholly New Guinean Peroryctinae was sister to Echymiperinae. The poorly known and perhaps recently extinct Seram Bandicoot (Rhynchomeles) is sister to Echymipera. Estimates of divergence times from relaxed-clock Bayesian methods suggest that living bandicoots originated in the late Oligocene or early Miocene, much earlier than currently thought based on fossils. Subsequent radiations within Peramelemorphia probably took place on the Australian mainland during the Miocene, with diversification of rainforest taxa on the newly emergent New Guinean landmasses through the middle-late Miocene and complete establishment of modern lineages by the early Pliocene.

  13. DNA Lossless Differential Compression Algorithm based on Similarity of Genomic Sequence Database

    CERN Document Server

    Afify, Heba; Wahed, Manal Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Modern biological science produces vast amounts of genomic sequence data. This is fuelling the need for efficient algorithms for sequence compression and analysis. Data compression and the associated techniques coming from information theory are often perceived as being of interest for data communication and storage. In recent years, a substantial effort has been made for the application of textual data compression techniques to various computational biology tasks, ranging from storage and indexing of large datasets to comparison of genomic databases. This paper presents a differential compression algorithm that is based on production of difference sequences according to op-code table in order to optimize the compression of homologous sequences in dataset. Therefore, the stored data are composed of reference sequence, the set of differences, and differences locations, instead of storing each sequence individually. This algorithm does not require a priori knowledge about the statistics of the sequence set. The...

  14. DNA display I. Sequence-encoded routing of DNA populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Halpin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported technologies for DNA-directed organic synthesis and for DNA computing rely on routing DNA populations through complex networks. The reduction of these ideas to practice has been limited by a lack of practical experimental tools. Here we describe a modular design for DNA routing genes, and routing machinery made from oligonucleotides and commercially available chromatography resins. The routing machinery partitions nanomole quantities of DNA into physically distinct subpools based on sequence. Partitioning steps can be iterated indefinitely, with worst-case yields of 85% per step. These techniques facilitate DNA-programmed chemical synthesis, and thus enable a materials biology that could revolutionize drug discovery.

  15. Phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-09-01

    To confirm phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences, mtDNA 16S partial sequences of ten isolates of three Demodex species from China were amplified, recombined, and sequenced and then analyzed with two Demodex folliculorum isolates from Spain. Lastly, genetic distance was computed, and phylogenetic tree was reconstructed. MEGA 4.0 analysis showed high sequence identity among 16S rDNA partial sequences of three Demodex species, which were 95.85 % in D. folliculorum, 98.53 % in Demodex canis, and 99.71 % in Demodex brevis. The divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversions of the three Demodex species reached interspecies level, whereas there was no significant difference of the divergence (1.1 %), genetic distance (0.011), and transition/transversions (3/1) of the two geographic D. folliculorum isolates (Spain and China). Phylogenetic trees reveal that the three Demodex species formed three separate branches of one clade, where D. folliculorum and D. canis gathered first, and then gathered with D. brevis. The two Spain and five China D. folliculorum isolates did not form sister clades. In conclusion, 16S mtDNA are suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis in low taxa (genus or species), but not for intraspecies determination of Demodex. The differentiation among the three Demodex species has reached interspecies level.

  16. Dynamics and Control of DNA Sequence Amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan

    2014-01-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence \\emph{in vitro} through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal tempe...

  17. Metal-organic frameworks-based biosensor for sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifen; Zheng, Hanye; Zhu, Xi; Lin, Zhenyu; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan; Chen, Zhong-Ning

    2013-06-21

    A simple, cost-efficient, sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor is developed for sequence-specific recognition of duplex DNA (ds-DNA) in vitro using metal-organic framework (MOF) as the sensing platform. N,N-Bis(2-hydroxy-ethyl)dithiooxamidatocopper(II) (H(2)dtoaCu) was chosen as the example MOF, because it strongly chemisorbs the dye-labeled probe TFO (triplex-forming oligonucleotide), and quenches fluorescence from the dye. In the presence of target ds-DNA (the PPT of HIV RNA, a 16-bp ds-DNA sequence), the TFO could interact with the major groove in ds-DNA (via Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding) to form a rigid triplex structure, resulting in fluorescence recovery. The enhanced fluorescence signal has a relationship with the ds-DNA concentration, the detection limit is as low as 1.3 nmol L(-1) (S/N = 3) with good selectivity, which is lower than that based on a graphene oxide platform and electrochemical-DNA sensor.

  18. Molecular phylogenetics of North American phoxinins (Actinopterygii: Cypriniformes: Leuciscidae) based on RAG1 and S7 nuclear DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalino, Angelo P; Mayden, Richard L

    2010-04-01

    Most molecular phylogenetic hypotheses for North American (NA) phoxinins are based on mitochondrial DNA sequences (mtDNA) and the resulting hypotheses are rather variable, though there is general support for three major lineages of NA phoxinins: western, creek chub-plagopterin (CC-P), and open posterior myodome (OPM) clades. Support for a monophyletic NA phoxinin group has varied among studies. This study utilizes nuclear DNA (nDNA) sequences from the RAG1 (exon 3) and S7 (intron 1) gene regions to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships and monophyly of NA phoxinins. Results from the nDNA analyses provide overall support for the western, CC-P, and OPM clades. The CC-P clade had the best overall resolution and support in the individual and combined analyses of the nDNA data. Resolution of the western clade was fairly good, with most analyses recovering a monophyletic Gila clade. The OPM clade demonstrated the highest degree of topological variability among the analyses. The RAG1 analyses failed to recover a monophyletic NA phoxinin group by resolving the European leuciscins, inclusive Notemigonus crysoleucas, within the NA phoxinin topology. Most analyses recovered a strongly supported shiner clade though, similar to several mtDNA studies; there was a high degree of topological variability among the results.

  19. The first determination of DNA sequence of a specific gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Masayori

    2016-05-10

    How and when the first DNA sequence of a gene was determined? In 1977, F. Sanger came up with an innovative technology to sequence DNA by using chain terminators, and determined the entire DNA sequence of the 5375-base genome of bacteriophage φX 174 (Sanger et al., 1977). While this Sanger's achievement has been recognized as the first DNA sequencing of genes, we had determined DNA sequence of a gene, albeit a partial sequence, 11 years before the Sanger's DNA sequence (Okada et al., 1966).

  20. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  1. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  2. EGNAS: an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kick Alfred

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular recognition based on the complementary base pairing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the fundamental principle in the fields of genetics, DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing. We present an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm that allows to generate sets containing a maximum number of sequences with defined properties. EGNAS (Exhaustive Generation of Nucleic Acid Sequences offers the possibility of controlling both interstrand and intrastrand properties. The guanine-cytosine content can be adjusted. Sequences can be forced to start and end with guanine or cytosine. This option reduces the risk of “fraying” of DNA strands. It is possible to limit cross hybridizations of a defined length, and to adjust the uniqueness of sequences. Self-complementarity and hairpin structures of certain length can be avoided. Sequences and subsequences can optionally be forbidden. Furthermore, sequences can be designed to have minimum interactions with predefined strands and neighboring sequences. Results The algorithm is realized in a C++ program. TAG sequences can be generated and combined with primers for single-base extension reactions, which were described for multiplexed genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thereby, possible foldback through intrastrand interaction of TAG-primer pairs can be limited. The design of sequences for specific attachment of molecular constructs to DNA origami is presented. Conclusions We developed a new software tool called EGNAS for the design of unique nucleic acid sequences. The presented exhaustive algorithm allows to generate greater sets of sequences than with previous software and equal constraints. EGNAS is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/pc6/EGNAS.

  3. Molecular phylogenetics of Meliaceae (Sapindales) based on nuclear and plastid DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellner, Alexandra N; Samuel, Rosabelle; Johnson, Sheila A; Cheek, Martin; Pennington, Terence D; Chase, Mark W

    2003-03-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of Meliaceae, including representatives of all four currently recognized subfamilies and all but two tribes (32 genera and 35 species, respectively), were carried out using DNA sequence data from three regions: plastid genes rbcL, matK (partial), and nuclear 26S rDNA (partial). Individual and combined phylogenetic analyses were performed for the rbcL, matK, and 26S rDNA data sets. Although the percentage of informative characters is highest in the segment of matK sequenced, rbcL provides the greatest number of informative characters of the three regions, resulting in the best resolved trees. Results of parsimony analyses support the recognition of only two subfamilies (Melioideae and Swietenioideae), which are sister groups. Melieae are the only tribe recognized previously that are strongly supported as monophyletic. The members of the two small monogeneric subfamilies, Quivisianthe and Capuronianthus, fall within Melioideae and Swietenioideae, respectively, supporting their taxonomic inclusion in these groups. Furthermore, the data indicate a close relationship between Aglaieae and Guareeae and a possible monophyletic origin of Cedreleae of Swietenioideae. For Trichilieae (Melioideae) and Swietenieae (Swietenioideae) lack of monophyly is indicated.

  4. Identification of staphylococcal species based on variations in protein sequences (mass spectrometry) and DNA sequence (sodA microarray).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooken, Jennifer; Fox, Karen; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim; Wunschel, David; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martínez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-02-01

    This report is among the first using sequence variation in newly discovered protein markers for staphylococcal (or indeed any other bacterial) speciation. Variation, at the DNA sequence level, in the sodA gene (commonly used for staphylococcal speciation) provided excellent correlation. Relatedness among strains was also assessed using protein profiling using microcapillary electrophoresis and pulsed field electrophoresis. A total of 64 strains were analyzed including reference strains representing the 11 staphylococcal species most commonly isolated from man (Staphylococcus aureus and 10 coagulase negative species [CoNS]). Matrix assisted time of flight ionization/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI MS/MS) were used for peptide analysis of proteins isolated from gel bands. Comparison of experimental spectra of unknowns versus spectra of peptides derived from reference strains allowed bacterial identification after MALDI TOF MS analysis. After LC-MS/MS analysis of gel bands bacterial speciation was performed by comparing experimental spectra versus virtual spectra using the software X!Tandem. Finally LC-MS/MS was performed on whole proteomes and data analysis also employing X!tandem. Aconitate hydratase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase served as marker proteins on focused analysis after gel separation. Alternatively on full proteomics analysis elongation factor Tu generally provided the highest confidence in staphylococcal speciation.

  5. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  6. Authentication of Curcuma species (Zingiberaceae) based on nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid trnK sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Sasaki, Yohei; Fushimi, Hirotoshi; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2010-07-01

    Curcuma drugs have been used discriminatingly for invigorating blood circulation, promoting digestion, and as a cholagogic in China. However, there is confusion about the drug's botanical origins and clinical uses because of morphological similarity of Curcuma plants and drugs. Comparative sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and trnK gene in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was carried out in order to examine interspecies phylogeny and to identify ultimately Curcuma species. A total of a hundred of accessions of eighteen species were analyzed. This resulted in an aligned matrix of 1810 bp for 18S rDNA and 2 800 bp for trnK. 18S rDNA sequence divergence within the ingroup ranged from 0-0.05%, trnK ranged from 0-0.19%. One base transversion-substituted site (from cytosine to thymine) was observed from the upstream of 18S rDNA at nucleotide position 234 in C. kwangsiensis and Japanese population of C. zedoaria which have separated genetic distance to other Curcuma taxa. Two noncoding regions embedded in trnK intron showed higher variability, including nucleotide substitutions, repeat insertion and deletions. Based on consensus of relationship, eighteen major lineages within Curcuma are recognized at the species level. The results suggest that Curcuma is monophyletic with 100% bootstrap support and sister to the genera Hedychium and Zingiber. The trnK sequences showed considerable variations between Curcuma species and thus were revealed as a promising candidate for barcoding of Curcuma species, which provide valuable characters for inferring relationship within species but are insufficient to resolve relationships among closely related taxa.

  7. Whole genome semiconductor based sequencing of farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Mediterranean genetic stocks using a DNA pooling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Geraci, Claudia; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Sardina, Maria Teresa; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is an important marine species for commercial and sport fisheries and aquaculture production. Recently, the European sea bass genome has been sequenced and assembled. This resource can open new opportunities to evaluate and monitor variability and identify variants that could contribute to the adaptation to farming conditions. In this work, two DNA pools constructed from cultivated European sea bass were sequenced using a next generation semiconductor sequencing approach based on Ion Proton sequencer. Using the first draft version of the D. labrax genome as reference, sequenced reads obtained a total of about 1.6 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), spread all over the chromosomes. Transition/transversion (Ti/Tv) was equal to 1.28, comparable to what was already reported in Salmon species. A pilot homozygosity analysis across the D. labrax genome using DNA pool sequence datasets indicated that this approach can identify chromosome regions with putative signatures of selection, including genes involved in ion transport and chloride channel functions, amino acid metabolism and circadian clock and related neurological systems. This is the first study that reported genome wide polymorphisms in a fish species obtained with the Ion Proton sequencer. Moreover, this study provided a methodological approach for selective sweep analysis in this species.

  8. Genbit Compress Tool(GBC): A Java-Based Tool to Compress DNA Sequences and Compute Compression Ratio(bits/base) of Genomes

    CERN Document Server

    Rajeswari, P Raja; Kumar, V K; 10.5121/ijcsit.2010.2313

    2010-01-01

    We present a Compression Tool, "GenBit Compress", for genetic sequences based on our new proposed "GenBit Compress Algorithm". Our Tool achieves the best compression ratios for Entire Genome (DNA sequences) . Significantly better compression results show that GenBit compress algorithm is the best among the remaining Genome compression algorithms for non-repetitive DNA sequences in Genomes. The standard Compression algorithms such as gzip or compress cannot compress DNA sequences but only expand them in size. In this paper we consider the problem of DNA compression. It is well known that one of the main features of DNA Sequences is that they contain substrings which are duplicated except for a few random Mutations. For this reason most DNA compressors work by searching and encoding approximate repeats. We depart from this strategy by searching and encoding only exact repeats. our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. As long as 8 lakh characters can be give...

  9. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  10. Genetic distances and phylogenetic trees of different Awassi sheep populations based on DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Atiyat, R M; Aljumaah, R S

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate evolutionary distances and to reconstruct phylogeny trees between different Awassi sheep populations. Thirty-two sheep individuals from three different geographical areas of Jordan and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) were randomly sampled. DNA was extracted from the tissue samples and sequenced using the T7 promoter universal primer. Different phylogenetic trees were reconstructed from 0.64-kb DNA sequences using the MEGA software with the best general time reverse distance model. Three methods of distance estimation were then used. The maximum composite likelihood test was considered for reconstructing maximum likelihood, neighbor-joining and UPGMA trees. The maximum likelihood tree indicated three major clusters separated by cytosine (C) and thymine (T). The greatest distance was shown between the South sheep and North sheep. On the other hand, the KSA sheep as an outgroup showed shorter evolutionary distance to the North sheep population than to the others. The neighbor-joining and UPGMA trees showed quite reliable clusters of evolutionary differentiation of Jordan sheep populations from the Saudi population. The overall results support geographical information and ecological types of the sheep populations studied. Summing up, the resulting phylogeny trees may contribute to the limited information about the genetic relatedness and phylogeny of Awassi sheep in nearby Arab countries.

  11. DNA methylation-based forensic age prediction using artificial neural networks and next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaki, Athina; Ballard, David; Aliferi, Anastasia; Miller, Thomas H; Barron, Leon P; Syndercombe Court, Denise

    2017-02-28

    generation sequencing (NGS)-based method able to quantify the methylation status of the selected 16 CpG sites was developed using the Illumina MiSeq(®) platform. The method was validated using DNA standards of known methylation levels and the age prediction accuracy has been initially assessed in a set of 46 whole blood samples. Although the resulted prediction accuracy using the NGS data was lower compared to the original model (MAE=7.5years), it is expected that future optimization of our strategy to account for technical variation as well as increasing the sample size will improve both the prediction accuracy and reproducibility.

  12. Identification of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) and its adulterants by a DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Lan; Zha, Sheng-Hua; Zhao, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is an herbaceous plant that grows in high plateaus and has been used as both food and folk medicine for centuries because of its benefits to human health. In the present study, ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences of forty-three maca samples, collected from different regions or vendors, were amplified and analyzed. The ITS sequences of nineteen potential adulterants of maca were also collected and analyzed. The results indicated that the ITS sequence of maca was consistent in all samples and unique when compared with its adulterants. Therefore, this DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence can be used for the molecular identification of maca and its adulterants.

  13. DNA Data Visualization (DDV): Software for Generating Web-Based Interfaces Supporting Navigation and Analysis of DNA Sequence Data of Entire Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Tomasz; Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Data visualization methods are necessary during the exploration and analysis activities of an increasingly data-intensive scientific process. There are few existing visualization methods for raw nucleotide sequences of a whole genome or chromosome. Software for data visualization should allow the researchers to create accessible data visualization interfaces that can be exported and shared with others on the web. Herein, novel software developed for generating DNA data visualization interfaces is described. The software converts DNA data sets into images that are further processed as multi-scale images to be accessed through a web-based interface that supports zooming, panning and sequence fragment selection. Nucleotide composition frequencies and GC skew of a selected sequence segment can be obtained through the interface. The software was used to generate DNA data visualization of human and bacterial chromosomes. Examples of visually detectable features such as short and long direct repeats, long terminal repeats, mobile genetic elements, heterochromatic segments in microbial and human chromosomes, are presented. The software and its source code are available for download and further development. The visualization interfaces generated with the software allow for the immediate identification and observation of several types of sequence patterns in genomes of various sizes and origins. The visualization interfaces generated with the software are readily accessible through a web browser. This software is a useful research and teaching tool for genetics and structural genomics.

  14. Molecular systematics of the Phyllachorales (ascomycota, fungi based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderlei-Silva Denise

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the monophyly of the Phyllachorales from a molecular standpoint and elucidate its phylogenetic relationships with other orders, a segment of the 18S rRNA gene from several representatives of the Phyllachorales, including species of Glomerella, Phyllachora, Coccodiella (=Coccostroma, Sphaerodothis, Ophiodothella, as well as Magnaporthe was sequenced. Maximum Parsimony analysis revealed that the Phyllachorales was a polyphyletic assemblage of taxa. None of the other members of the Phyllachorales, which produced either a clypeus or stroma, clustered with Glomerella. Of the taxa examined, was Coccodiella the closest relative of Phyllachora. Magnaporthe was closely related to the Diaporthales. Our 18S rDNA data highly supported Glomerella being accommodated in a separate family.

  15. Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbacher, J.P.; Pratt, T.K.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The avian family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars) comprises nine extant species and one extinct species, all of which are currently classified in a single genus, Aegotheles. Owlet-nightjars are secretive nocturnal birds of the South Pacific. They are relatively poorly studied and some species are known from only a few specimens. Furthermore, their confusing morphological variation has made it difficult to cluster existing specimens unambiguously into hierarchical taxonomic units. Here we sample all extant owlet-nightjar species and all but three currently recognized subspecies. We use DNA extracted primarily from museum specimens to obtain mitochondrial gene sequences and construct a molecular phylogeny. Our phylogeny suggests that most species are reciprocally monophyletic, however A. albertisi appears paraphyletic. Our data also suggest splitting A. bennettii into two species and splitting A. insignis and A. tatei as suggested in another recent paper. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Bambusa (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Xia, Nianhe; Lin, Rushun

    2005-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of Bambusa species were performed using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The 21 species sampled included members of Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Dendrocalamus, Guadua, Leleba, and Lingnania. Arundinaria gigantea was used as an outgroup. Using the maximum parsimony method with PAUP*, gaps were treated as missing states or new states. Parsimonious analysis revealed that Dendrocalamus latiflorus was closely related to the members of Dendrocalamopsis. Dendrocalamus membranaceus was a sister species to Dendrocalamus strictus. Three Dendrocalamus species were closely related to and nested in a polyphyletic Bambusa. Bambusa subaequalis was a sister species to B. multiplex, B. emeiensis to B. chungii, B. contracta to B. hainanensis, and B. flexuosa was a sister species to B. sinospinosa, B. tuldoides, B. surrecta, B. intermedia, and B. valida group, which raised doubts about the monophyly of the subgenera Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Leleba, and Lingnania under the genus Bambusa.

  17. Phylogeny and evolution of the auks (subfamily Alcinae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moum, Truls; Johansen, Steinar; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Piatt, John F.

    1994-01-01

    The genetic divergence and phylogeny of the auks was assessed by mitochondrial DNA sequence comparisons in a study using 19 of the 22 auk species and two outgroup representatives. We compared more than 500 nucleotides from each of two mitochondrial genes encoding 12S rRNA and the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6. Divergence times were estimated from transversional substitutions. The dovekie (Alle alle) is related to the razorbill (Alca torda) and the murres (Uria spp). Furthermore, the Xantus's murrelet (Synthliboramphus hypoleucus) and the ancient (Synthliboramphus antiquus) and Japanese murrelets (Synthliboramphus wumizusume) are genetically distinct members of the same main lineage, whereas brachyramphine and synthliboramphine murrelets are not closely related. An early adaptive radiation of six main species groups of auks seems to trace back to Middle Miocene. Later speciation probably involved ecological differentiations and geographical isolations.

  18. Modified Genetic Algorithm for DNA Sequence Assembly by Shotgun and Hybridization Sequencing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof.Narayan Kumar Sahu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of rapid DNA sequencing methods in 1976, scientists have had the problem of inferring DNA sequences from sequenced fragments. Shotgun sequencing is a well-established biological and computational method used in practice. Many conventional algorithms for shotgun sequencing are based on the notion of pair wise fragment overlap. While shotgun sequencing infers a DNA sequence given the sequences of overlapping fragments, a recent and complementary method, called sequencing by hybridization (SBH, infers a DNA sequence given the set of oligomers that represents all sub words of some fixed length, k. In this paper, we propose a new computer algorithm for DNA sequence assembly that combines in a novel way the techniques of both shotgun and SBH methods. Based on our preliminary investigations, the algorithm promises- to be very fast and practical for DNA sequence assembly [1].

  19. Fractals in DNA sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zu-Guo(喻祖国); Vo Anh; Gong Zhi-Min(龚志民); Long Shun-Chao(龙顺潮)

    2002-01-01

    Fractal methods have been successfully used to study many problems in physics, mathematics, engineering, finance,and even in biology. There has been an increasing interest in unravelling the mysteries of DNA; for example, how can we distinguish coding and noncoding sequences, and the problems of classification and evolution relationship of organisms are key problems in bioinformatics. Although much research has been carried out by taking into consideration the long-range correlations in DNA sequences, and the global fractal dimension has been used in these works by other people, the models and methods are somewhat rough and the results are not satisfactory. In recent years, our group has introduced a time series model (statistical point of view) and a visual representation (geometrical point of view)to DNA sequence analysis. We have also used fractal dimension, correlation dimension, the Hurst exponent and the dimension spectrum (multifractal analysis) to discuss problems in this field. In this paper, we introduce these fractal models and methods and the results of DNA sequence analysis.

  20. Phylogeny of minute carabid beetles and their relatives based upon DNA sequence data (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechitae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, David R.; Ober, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The phylogeny of ground beetles of supertribe Trechitae is inferred using DNA sequences of genes that code for 28S ribosomal RNA, 18S ribosomal RNA, and wingless. Within the outgroups, austral psydrines are inferred to be monophyletic, and separate from the three genera of true Psydrina (Psydrus, Nomius, Laccocenus); the austral psydrines are formally removed from Psydrini and are treated herein as their own tribe, Moriomorphini Sloane. All three genes place Gehringia with Psydrina. Trechitae is inferred to be monophyletic, and sister to Patrobini. Within trechites, evidence is presented that Tasmanitachoides is not a tachyine, but is instead a member of Trechini. Perileptus is a member of subtribe Trechodina. Against Erwin’s hypothesis of anillines as a polyphyletic lineage derived from the tachyine genus Paratachys, the anillines sampled are monophyletic, and not related to Paratachys. Zolini, Pogonini, Tachyina, and Xystosomina are all monophyletic, with the latter two being sister groups. The relationships of the subtribe Bembidiina were studied in greater detail. Phrypeus is only distantly related to Bembidion, and there is no evidence from sequence data that it belongs within Bembidiina. Three groups that have been recently considered to be outside of the large genus Bembidion are shown to be derived members of Bembidion, related to subgroups: Cillenus is related to the Ocydromus complex of Bembidion, Zecillenus is related to the New Zealand subgenus Zeplataphus, and Hydrium is close to subgenus Metallina. The relationships among major lineages of Trechitae are not, however, resolved with these data. PMID:22379388

  1. Phylogeny of minute carabid beetles and their relatives based upon DNA sequence data (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechitae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maddison

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The phylogeny of ground beetles of supertribe Trechitae is inferred using DNA sequences of genes that code for 28S ribosomal RNA, 18S ribosomal RNA, and wingless. Within the outgroups, austral psydrines are inferred to be monophyletic, and separate from the three genera of true Psydrina (Psydrus, Nomius, Laccocenus; the austral psydrines are formally removed from Psydrini and are treated herein as their own tribe, Moriomorphini Sloane. All three genes place Gehringia with Psydrina. Trechitae is inferred to be monophyletic, and sister to Patrobini.Within trechites, evidence is presented that Tasmanitachoides is not a tachyine, but is instead a member of Trechini. Perileptus is a member of subtribe Trechodina. Against Erwin’s hypothesis of anillines as a polyphyletic lineage derived from the tachyine genus Paratachys, the anillines sampled are monophyletic, and not related to Paratachys. Zolini, Pogonini, Tachyina, and Xystosomina are all monophyletic, with the latter two being sister groups. The relationships of the subtribe Bembidiina were studied in greater detail. Phrypeus is only distantly related to Bembidion, and there is no evidence from sequence data that it belongs within Bembidiina. Three groups that have been recently considered to be outside of the large genus Bembidion are shown to be derived members of Bembidion, related to subgroups: Cillenus is related to the Ocydromus complex of Bembidion, Zecillenus is related to the New Zealand subgenus Zeplataphus, and Hydrium is close to subgenus Metallina. The relationships among major lineages of Trechitae are not, however, resolved with these data.

  2. Female-specific DNA sequences in geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M C; Lin, W C; Horng, Y M; Rouvier, R; Huang, C W

    2003-07-01

    1. The OPAE random primers (Operon Technologies, Inc., CA) were used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting in Chinese, White Roman and Landaise geese. One of these primers, OPAE-06, produced a 938-bp sex-specific fragment in all females and in no males of Chinese geese only. 2. A novel female-specific DNA sequence in Chinese goose was cloned and sequenced. Two primers, CGSex-F and CGSex-R, were designed in order to amplify a 912-bp sex-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment on genomic DNA from female geese. 3. It was shown that a simple and effective PCR-based sexing technique could be used in the three goose breeds studied. 4. Nucleotide sequencing of the sex-specific fragments in White Roman and Landaise geese was performed and sequence differences were observed among these three breeds.

  3. Phylogeographical studies of Ascaris spp. based on ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Cavallero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The taxonomic distinctiveness of Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum, two of the world's most significant nematodes, still represents a much-debated scientific issue. Previous studies have described two different scenarios in transmission patterns, explained by two hypotheses: (1 separated host-specific transmission cycles in highly endemic regions, (2 a single pool of infection shared by humans and pigs in non-endemic regions. Recently, A. suum has been suggested as an important cause of human ascariasis in endemic areas such as China, where cross-infections and hybridization have also been reported. The main aims of the present study were to investigate the molecular epidemiology of human and pig Ascaris from non-endemic regions and, with reference to existing data, to infer the phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationships among the samples. METHODOLOGY: 151 Ascaris worms from pigs and humans were characterized using PCR-RFLP on nuclear ITS rDNA. Representative geographical sub-samples were also analysed by sequencing a portion of the mitochondrial cox1 gene, to infer the extent of variability at population level. Sequence data were compared to GenBank sequences from endemic and non-endemic regions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: No fixed differences between human and pig Ascaris were evident, with the exception of the Slovak population, which displays significant genetic differentiation. The RFLP analysis confirmed pig as a source of human infection in non-endemic regions and as a corridor for the promulgation of hybrid genotypes. Epidemiology and host-affiliation seem not to be relevant in shaping molecular variance. Phylogenetic and phylogeographical analyses described a complex scenario, involving multiple hosts, sporadic contact between forms and an ancestral taxon referable to A. suum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest the existence of homogenizing gene flow between the two taxa, which appear to be variants of a single

  4. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS, noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF, that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods—the standard Z-score (STDZ method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ method—together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ. Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping.

  5. Sequence-based prediction of protein-binding sites in DNA: comparative study of two SVM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Im, Jinyong; Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Han, Kyungsook

    2014-11-01

    As many structures of protein-DNA complexes have been known in the past years, several computational methods have been developed to predict DNA-binding sites in proteins. However, its inverse problem (i.e., predicting protein-binding sites in DNA) has received much less attention. One of the reasons is that the differences between the interaction propensities of nucleotides are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that DNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding DNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting DNA-binding amino acids. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets with amino acids using an extensive dataset of protein-DNA complexes, and developed two support vector machine (SVM) models that predict protein-binding nucleotides from sequence data alone. One SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using DNA sequence data alone, and the other SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using both DNA and protein sequences. In a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences, the SVM model that uses DNA sequence data only predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 67.0%, an F-measure of 67.1%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.340. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs that were not used in training, it achieved an accuracy of 66.2%, an F-measure 66.3% and a MCC of 0.324. Another SVM model that uses both DNA and protein sequences achieved an accuracy of 69.6%, an F-measure of 69.6%, and a MCC of 0.383 in a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences and 859 protein sequences. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs and 143 proteins, it showed an accuracy of 67.3%, an F-measure of 66.5% and a MCC of 0.329. Both in cross-validation and independent testing, the second SVM model that used both DNA and protein sequence data showed better performance than the first model that used DNA sequence data. To the best of

  6. Transverse Electronic Signature of DNA for Electronic Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Endres, Robert G.; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    In recent years, the proliferation of large-scale DNA sequencing projects for applications in clinical medicine and health care has driven the search for new methods that could reduce the time and cost. The commonly used Sanger sequencing method relies on the chemistry to read the bases in DNA and is far too slow and expensive for reading personal genetic codes. There were earlier attempts to sequence DNA by directly visualizing the nucleotide composition of the DNA molecules by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However, sequencing DNA based on directly imaging DNA's atomic structure has not yet been successful. In Chap. 9, Xu, Endres, and Arakawa report a potential physical alternative by detecting unique transverse electronic signatures of DNA bases using ultrahigh vacuum STM. Supported by the principles, calculations and statistical analyses, these authors argue that it would be possible to directly sequence DNA by the STM-based technology without any modification of the DNA.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of South China Sea snappers (genus Lutjanus; family Lutjanidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yusong; Wang, Zhongduo; Liu, Chuwu; Liu, Li; Liu, Yun

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of intra- and interspecies were elucidated based on complete cytochrome b (cyt b) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene sequences from 12 recognized species of genus Lutjanus Bloch in the South China Sea (SCS). Using the combined data set of consensus cyt b and COII gene sequences, interspecific relationships for all 12 recognized species in SCS were consistent with Allen's morphology-based identifications, with strong correlation between the molecular and morphological characteristics. Monophyly of eight species (L. malabaricus, L. russellii, L. stellatus, L. bohar, L. johnii, L. sebae, L. fulvus, and L. fulviflamma) was strongly supported; however, the pairs L. vitta/L. ophuysenii and L. erythropterus/L. argentimaculatus were more similar than expected We inferred that L. malabaricus exists in SCS, and the introgression caused by hybridization is the reason for the unexpectedly high homogeneity.

  8. Molecular Taxonomy ofConogethes punctiferalis andConogethes pinicolalis (Lepidoptera:Crambidae) Based on Mitochondrial DNA Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Tian-tao; WANG Zhen-ying; HE Kang-lai; LIU Yong; LI Jing

    2014-01-01

    Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) was originally considered as one species with fruit-feeding type (FFT) and pinaceae-feeding type (PFT), but it has subsequently been divided into two different species ofConogethes punctiferalis andConogethes pinicolalis. The relationship between the two species was investigated by phylogenetic reconstruction using maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimations. The phylogenetic tree and network were constructed based upon sequence data from concatenation of three genes of mitochondrial cytochromec oxidase subunits I, II and cytochromeb which were derived from 118 samples ofC. punctiferalisand 24 samples ofC. pinicolalis. The phylogenetic tree and network showed that conspeciifc sequences were clustering together despite intraspeciifc variability. Here we report the results of a combined analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences from three genes and morphological data representing powerful evidence thatC. pinicolalis andC. punctiferalis are signiifcantly different.

  9. Molecular phylogeny of Sri Lankan Dipterocarpaceae in relation to other Asian Dipterocarpaceae based on chloroplast DNA sequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GAMAGE, Dayananda Thawalama; SILVA, Morley de; YOSHIDA, Akira; SZMIDT, Alfred E; YAMAZAKI, Tsuneyuki

    2003-01-01

    .... We studied this relationship using chloroplast DNA nucleotide sequences. DNA sequences of trnL-trnF spacer and trnL intron regions from 27 Sri Lankan species, and 62 other species belonging to 14 genera were included in the study...

  10. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Advanced Process Decision-Making, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, Raj, E-mail: raj@pmc-group.com, E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Advanced Process Decision-Making, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Division of Fundamental Research, PMC Advanced Technology, Mount Laurel, New Jersey 08054 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  11. Promoter prediction and annotation of microbial genomes based on DNA sequence and structural responses to superhelical stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benham Craig J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous studies, we found that the sites in prokaryotic genomes which are most susceptible to duplex destabilization under the negative superhelical stresses that occur in vivo are statistically highly significantly associated with intergenic regions that are known or inferred to contain promoters. In this report we investigate how this structural property, either alone or together with other structural and sequence attributes, may be used to search prokaryotic genomes for promoters. Results We show that the propensity for stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization (SIDD is closely associated with specific promoter regions. The extent of destabilization in promoter-containing regions is found to be bimodally distributed. When compared with DNA curvature, deformability, thermostability or sequence motif scores within the -10 region, SIDD is found to be the most informative DNA property regarding promoter locations in the E. coli K12 genome. SIDD properties alone perform better at detecting promoter regions than other programs trained on this genome. Because this approach has a very low false positive rate, it can be used to predict with high confidence the subset of promoters that are strongly destabilized. When SIDD properties are combined with -10 motif scores in a linear classification function, they predict promoter regions with better than 80% accuracy. When these methods were tested with promoter and non-promoter sequences from Bacillus subtilis, they achieved similar or higher accuracies. We also present a strictly SIDD-based predictor for annotating promoter sequences in complete microbial genomes. Conclusion In this report we show that the propensity to undergo stress-induced duplex destabilization (SIDD is a distinctive structural attribute of many prokaryotic promoter sequences. We have developed methods to identify promoter sequences in prokaryotic genomes that use SIDD either as a sole predictor or in

  12. Non-B DNA-forming sequences and WRN deficiency independently increase the frequency of base substitution in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacolla, Albino; Wang, Guliang; Jain, Aklank

    2011-01-01

    determined non-B DNA-induced mutation frequencies and spectra in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells and assessed the role of WRN in isogenic knockdown (WRN-KD) cells using a supF gene mutation reporter system flanked by triplex- or Z-DNA-forming sequences. Although both non-B DNA and WRN-KD served to increase...

  13. An image encryption scheme based on the MLNCML system using DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Qian; Wang, Xing-Yuan; Liu, Jia; Chi, Ze-Lin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new image scheme based on the spatiotemporal chaos of the Mixed Linear-Nonlinear Coupled Map Lattices (MLNCML). This spatiotemporal chaotic system has more cryptographic features in dynamics than the system of Coupled Map Lattices (CML). In the proposed scheme, we employ the strategy of DNA computing and one time pad encryption policy, which can enhance the sensitivity to the plaintext and resist differential attack, brute-force attack, statistical attack and plaintext attack. Simulation results and theoretical analysis indicate that the proposed scheme has superior high security.

  14. Effective inhibition of human cytomegalovirus gene expression by DNA-based external guide sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Zeng; Hongjian Li; Yueqing Li; Yanwei Cui; Qi Zhou; Yi Zou; Guang Yang; Tianhong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether a 12 nucleotide DNA-based miniEGSs can silence the expression of human cytomegalovirus(HCMV)UL49 gene efficiently,A HeLa cell line stably expressing UL49 gene was constructed and the putative miniEGSs(UL49-miniEGSs)were assayed in the stable cell line.Quantitative RT-PCR and western blot resuits showed a reduction of 67%in UL49expression level in HeLa cells that were transfected with UL49-miniEGSs.It was significantly different from that of mock and control miniEGSs(TK-miniEGSs)which were 1 and 7%,respectively.To further confirm the gene silence directed by UL49-miniEGSs with human RNase P,a mutant of UL49-miniEGSs was constructedand a modified 5'RACE was carried out.Data showed that the inhibition of UL49 gene expression directed by UL49-miniEGSs was RNase P-dependent and the clea vage of UL49 mRNA by RNase P was site specific.As a result,the length of DNA-based miniEGSs that could silence gene expression efficiently was only 12 nt.That is significantly less than any other Oligonucleotide-based method of gene inactivation known SO far.MiniEGSs may represent novel gene-targeting agents for the inhibition of viral genes and other human disease reiated gene expression.

  15. Genotyping of Chlamydophila psittaci using a new DNA microarray assay based on sequence analysis of ompA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Evelyn

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The currently used genotyping system for the avian zoonotic pathogen Chlamydophila (C. psittaci has evolved from serology and is based on ompA sequence variations. It includes seven avian and two non-avian genotypes. Restriction enzyme cleavage of the amplified ompA gene and, less frequently, ompA sequencing are being used for examination, but, beside methodological limitations, an increasing number of recently tested strains could not be assigned to any established genotype. Results Comprehensive analysis of all available ompA gene sequences has revealed a remarkable genetic diversity within the species C. psittaci, which is only partially covered by the present genotyping scheme. We suggest adjustments and extensions to the present scheme, which include the introduction of subgroups to the more heterogeneous genotypes A, E/B and D, as well as six provisional genotypes representing so far untypable strains. The findings of sequence analysis have been incorporated in the design of a new DNA microarray. The ArrayTube™ microarray-based ompA genotyping assay has been shown to discriminate among established genotypes and identify so far untyped strains. Its high specificity, which allows detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, is due to the parallel approach consisting in the use of 35 hybridization probes derived from variable domains 2 and 4 of the ompA gene. Conclusion The traditional genotyping system does not adequately reflect the extent of intra-species heterogeneity in ompA sequences of C. psittaci. The newly developed DNA microarray-based assay represents a promising diagnostic tool for tracing epidemiological chains, exploring the dissemination of genotypes and identifying non-typical representatives of C. psittaci.

  16. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Michael D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work.

  17. Motif finding in DNA sequences based on skipping nonconserved positions in background Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Sze, Sing-Hoi

    2011-05-01

    One strategy to identify transcription factor binding sites is through motif finding in upstream DNA sequences of potentially co-regulated genes. Despite extensive efforts, none of the existing algorithms perform very well. We consider a string representation that allows arbitrary ignored positions within the nonconserved portion of single motifs, and use O(2(l)) Markov chains to model the background distributions of motifs of length l while skipping these positions within each Markov chain. By focusing initially on positions that have fixed nucleotides to define core occurrences, we develop an algorithm to identify motifs of moderate lengths. We compare the performance of our algorithm to other motif finding algorithms on a few benchmark data sets, and show that significant improvement in accuracy can be obtained when the sites are sufficiently conserved within a given sample, while comparable performance is obtained when the site conservation rate is low. A software program (PosMotif ) and detailed results are available online at http://faculty.cse.tamu.edu/shsze/posmotif.

  18. Phylogeny and biogeography of Alyssum (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Li; Yan Kong; Zhe Zhang; Yanqiang Yin; Bin Liu; Guanghui Lv; Xiyong Wang

    2014-08-01

    The genus Alyssum consists of about 195 species native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa. All species were assigned to six sections. Previous molecular phylogeny studies indicate that Alyssum is polyphyletic. However, the divergence time and dispersal of the genus are not well studied. In this study, the phylogenetic relationships within the genus Alyssum were studied with nrDNA ITS sequences obtained from five sections. The divergence time was estimated by fossil calibration and the biogeography was examined by spread analysis. The phylogeny indicated two main lineages: lineage 1 includes the section of Alyssum, Gamosepalum and Psilonema; lineage 2 includes the section of Odontarrhena, Meniocus and Clypeola. The phylogenetic relationship was not congruent with the previous sectional classifications. The age of Alyssum was dated to the upper Miocene. Molecular data suggested the diversification of Alyssum in Mediterranean areas and wide-ranging distribution such as North Africa, eastward into Central Asia and immigration into North America. Climatic aridification and arid/semiarid areas established in the Pliocene/Pleistocene could have provided favourable conditions for the migration and diversification of Alyssum.

  19. Glycome mapping on DNA sequencing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroy, Wouter; Contreras, Roland; Callewaert, Nico

    2006-01-01

    Here we provide a detailed protocol for the analysis of protein-linked glycans on DNA sequencing equipment. This protocol satisfies the glyco-analytical needs of many projects and can form the basis of 'glycomics' studies, in which robustness, high throughput, high sensitivity and reliable quantification are of paramount importance. The protocol routinely resolves isobaric glycan stereoisomers, which is much more difficult by mass spectrometry (MS). Earlier methods made use of polyacrylamide gel-based sequencers, but we have now adapted the technique to multicapillary DNA sequencers, which represent the state of the art today. In addition, we have integrated an option for HPLC-based fractionation of highly anionic 8-amino-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans before rapid capillary electrophoretic profiling. This option facilitates either two-dimensional profiling of complex glycan mixtures and exoglycosidase sequencing, or MS analysis of particular compounds of interest rather than of the total pool of glycans in a sample.

  20. The DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin cleavage in a systematically altered DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Shweta D; Chen, Jon K; Murray, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    Bleomycin is an anti-tumour agent that is clinically used to treat several types of cancers. Bleomycin cleaves DNA at specific DNA sequences and recent genome-wide DNA sequencing specificity data indicated that the sequence 5'-RTGT*AY (where T* is the site of bleomycin cleavage, R is G/A and Y is T/C) is preferentially cleaved by bleomycin in human cells. Based on this DNA sequence, we constructed a plasmid clone to explore this bleomycin cleavage preference. By systematic variation of single nucleotides in the 5'-RTGT*AY sequence, we were able to investigate the effect of nucleotide changes on bleomycin cleavage efficiency. We observed that the preferred consensus DNA sequence for bleomycin cleavage in the plasmid clone was 5'-YYGT*AW (where W is A/T). The most highly cleaved sequence was 5'-TCGT*AT and, in fact, the seven most highly cleaved sequences conformed to the consensus sequence 5'-YYGT*AW. A comparison with genome-wide results was also performed and while the core sequence was similar in both environments, the surrounding nucleotides were different.

  1. DNA sequencing by synthesis with degenerate primers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The degenerate primer-based sequencing Was developed by a synthesis method(DP-SBS)for high-throughput DNA sequencing,in which a set of degenerate primers are hybridized on the arrayed DNA templates and extended by DNA polymerase on microarrays.In this method,adifferent set of degenerate primers containing a give nnumber(n)of degenerate nucleotides at the 3'-ends were annealed to the sequenced templates that were immobilized on the solid surface.The nucleotides(n+1)on the template sequences were determined by detecting the incorporation of fluorescent labeled nucleotides.The fluorescent labeled nucleotide was incorporated into the primer in a base-specific manner after the enzymatic primer extension reactions and nine-base length were read out accurately.The main advanmge of the DP-SBS is that the method only uses very conventional biochemical reagents and avoids the complicated special chemical reagents for removing the labeled nucleotides and reactivating the primer for further extension.From the present study,it is found that the DP-SBS method is reliable,simple,and cost-effective for laboratory-sequencing a large amount of short DNA fragments.

  2. MitoBamAnnotator: A web-based tool for detecting and annotating heteroplasmy in human mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Ilia; Nagar, Tal; Mishmar, Dan; Rubin, Eitan

    2011-11-01

    The use of Next-Generation Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA is becoming widespread in biological and clinical research. This, in turn, creates a need for a convenient tool that detects and analyzes heteroplasmy. Here we present MitoBamAnnotator, a user friendly web-based tool that allows maximum flexibility and control in heteroplasmy research. MitoBamAnnotator provides the user with a comprehensively annotated overview of mitochondrial genetic variation, allowing for an in-depth analysis with no prior knowledge in programming.

  3. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Zhu, Y.F.; Chung, C.N.; Allman, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, the authors recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Snager`s enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. The preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possibly be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, the authors applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  4. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in the acanthocephalan Prosthenorchis elegans in Colombia based on cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, Ana Carolina; Brieva, Claudia; Bloor, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Prosthenorchis elegans is a member of the Phylum Acanthocephala and is an important parasite affecting New World Primates in the wild in South America and in captivity around the world. It is of significant management concern due to its pathogenicity and mode of transmission through intermediate hosts. Current diagnosis of P. elegans is based on the detection of eggs by coprological examination. However, this technique lacks both specificity and sensitivity, since eggs of most members of the genus are morphologically indistinguishable and shed intermittently, making differential diagnosis difficult, and coprological examinations are often negative in animals severely infected at death. We examined sequence variation in 633 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) sequence in 37 isolates of P. elegans from New World monkeys (Saguinus leucopus and Cebus albifrons) in Colombia held in rescue centers and from the wild. Intraspecific divergence ranged from 0.0 to 1.6% and was comparable with corresponding values within other species of acanthocephalans. Furthermore, comparisons of patterns of sequence divergence within the Acanthocephala suggest that Prosthenorchis represents a separate genus within the Oligacanthorhynchida. Six distinct haplotypes were identified within P. elegans which grouped into one of two well-supported mtDNA haplogroups. No association between haplogroup/haplotype, holding facility and species was found. This information will help pave the way to the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools for the detection of P. elegans as well as furthering research into the life cycle, intermediate hosts and epidemiological aspects of the species.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in the acanthocephalan Prosthenorchis elegans in Colombia based on cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Falla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthenorchis elegans is a member of the Phylum Acanthocephala and is an important parasite affecting New World Primates in the wild in South America and in captivity around the world. It is of significant management concern due to its pathogenicity and mode of transmission through intermediate hosts. Current diagnosis of P. elegans is based on the detection of eggs by coprological examination. However, this technique lacks both specificity and sensitivity, since eggs of most members of the genus are morphologically indistinguishable and shed intermittently, making differential diagnosis difficult, and coprological examinations are often negative in animals severely infected at death. We examined sequence variation in 633 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase I (COI sequence in 37 isolates of P. elegans from New World monkeys (Saguinus leucopus and Cebus albifrons in Colombia held in rescue centers and from the wild. Intraspecific divergence ranged from 0.0 to 1.6% and was comparable with corresponding values within other species of acanthocephalans. Furthermore, comparisons of patterns of sequence divergence within the Acanthocephala suggest that Prosthenorchis represents a separate genus within the Oligacanthorhynchida. Six distinct haplotypes were identified within P. elegans which grouped into one of two well-supported mtDNA haplogroups. No association between haplogroup/haplotype, holding facility and species was found. This information will help pave the way to the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools for the detection of P. elegans as well as furthering research into the life cycle, intermediate hosts and epidemiological aspects of the species.

  7. DNA sequence functionalized with heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassembly for novel energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-15

    This work reports the use of compositionally heterogeneous asymmetric Ag@Au core-satellite nanoassembly functionalized with DNA sequence as unique signaling nanoprobes for the realization of new energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay of prostate- specific antigen (PSA). Specifically, the Ag@Au asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies (Ag@Au ACS) were fabricated on a two-dimensional glass substrate by a modified controlled assembly technique, and then functionalized with DNA sequences containing PSA aptamers as signaling nanoprobes. Then, the sandwich complexing between the PSA, its antibodies, and the signaling nanoprobes was performed on a CdS QDs modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The single stranded DNA can server as a facile mediator that place the Ag@Au ACS in proximity of CdS QDs, stimulating the interparticle exciton-plasmon interactions between Ag@Au ACS and CdS QDs and thus quenching the excitonic states in the latter. Since the damping effect is closely related to the target concentration, a novel energy-transfer-based PEC bioanalysis could be achieved for the sensitive and specific PSA assay. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0×10(-11)gmL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)gmL(-1) and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3×10(-13)gmL(-1). This strategy used the Ag@Au ACS-DNA signaling nanoprobes and overcame the deficiency of short operating distance of the energy transfer process for feasible PEC immunoassay. More significantly, it provided a way to couple the plasmonic properties of the Ag NPs and Au NPs in a single PEC bioanalytical system. We expected this work could inspire more interests and further investigations on the advanced engineering of the core-satellite or other judiciously designed nanostructures for new PEC bioanalytical uses with novel properties.

  8. A phylogenetic study on galactose-containing Candida species based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sugita, Takashi; Nakase, Takashi

    1999-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of 33 Candida species containing galactose in the cells were investigated by using 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Galactose-containing Candida species and galactose-containing species from nine ascomycetous genera were a heterogeneous assemblage. They were divided into three clusters (II, III, and IV) which were phylogenetically distant from cluster I, comprising 9 galactose-lacking Candida species, C. glabrata, C. holmii, C. krusei, C. tropicalis (the type species of Candida), C. albicans, C. viswanathii, C. maltosa, C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae, and 17 related ascomycetous yeasts. These three clusters were also phylogenetically distant from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which contains galactomannan in its cell wall. Cluster II comprised C. magnoliae, C. vaccinii, C. apis, C. gropengiesseri, C. etchellsii, C. floricola, C. lactiscondensi, Wickerhamiella domercqiae, C. versatilis, C. azyma, C. vanderwaltii, C. pararugosa, C. sorbophila, C. spandovensis, C. galacta, C. ingens, C. incommunis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Galactomyces geotrichum, and Dipodascus albidus. Cluster III comprised C. tepae, C. antillancae and its synonym C. bondarzewiae, C. ancudensis, C. petrohuensis, C. santjacobensis, C. ciferrii (anamorph of Stephanoascus ciferrii), Arxula terrestris, C. castrensis, C. valdiviana, C. paludigena, C. blankii, C. salmanticensis, C. auringiensis, C. bertae, and its synonym C. bertae var. chiloensis, C. edax (anamorph of Stephanoascus smithiae), Arxula adeninivorans, and C. steatolytica (synonym of Zygoascus hellenicus). Cluster IV comprised C. cantarellii, C. vinaria, Dipodascopsis uninucleata, and Lipomyces lipofer. Two galactose-lacking and Q-8-forming species, C. stellata and Pichia pastoris, and 5 galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. apicola, C. bombi, C. bombicola, C. geochares, and C. insectalens, were included in Cluster II. Two galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. drimydis and C

  9. The complete DNA sequence of vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, S J; Johnson, G P; Perkus, M E; Davis, S W; Winslow, J P; Paoletti, E

    1990-11-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the genome of vaccinia virus has been determined. The genome consisted of 191,636 bp with a base composition of 66.6% A + T. We have identified 198 "major" protein-coding regions and 65 overlapping "minor" regions, for a total of 263 potential genes. Genes encoded by the virus were located by examination of DNA sequence characteristics and compared with existing vaccinia virus mapping analyses, sequence data, and transcription data. These genes were found to be compactly organized along the genome with relatively few regions of noncoding sequences. Whereas several similarities to proteins of known function were discerned, the function of the majority of proteins encoded by these open reading frames is as yet undetermined.

  10. ThioFinder: a web-based tool for the identification of thiopeptide gene clusters in DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available Thiopeptides are a growing class of sulfur-rich, highly modified heterocyclic peptides that are mainly active against Gram-positive bacteria including various drug-resistant pathogens. Recent studies also reveal that many thiopeptides inhibit the proliferation of human cancer cells, further expanding their application potentials for clinical use. Thiopeptide biosynthesis shares a common paradigm, featuring a ribosomally synthesized precursor peptide and conserved posttranslational modifications, to afford a characteristic core system, but differs in tailoring to furnish individual members. Identification of new thiopeptide gene clusters, by taking advantage of increasing information of DNA sequences from bacteria, may facilitate new thiopeptide discovery and enrichment of the unique biosynthetic elements to produce novel drug leads by applying the principle of combinatorial biosynthesis. In this study, we have developed a web-based tool ThioFinder to rapidly identify thiopeptide biosynthetic gene cluster from DNA sequence using a profile Hidden Markov Model approach. Fifty-four new putative thiopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters were found in the sequenced bacterial genomes of previously unknown producing microorganisms. ThioFinder is fully supported by an open-access database ThioBase, which contains the sufficient information of the 99 known thiopeptides regarding the chemical structure, biological activity, producing organism, and biosynthetic gene (cluster along with the associated genome if available. The ThioFinder website offers researchers a unique resource and great flexibility for sequence analysis of thiopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters. ThioFinder is freely available at http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/ThioFinder/.

  11. Understanding Long-Range Correlations in DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W; Kaneko, K; Wentian Li; Thomas G Marr; Kunihiko Kaneko

    1994-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, we review the literature on statistical long-range correlation in DNA sequences. We examine the current evidence for these correlations, and conclude that a mixture of many length scales (including some relatively long ones) in DNA sequences is responsible for the observed 1/f-like spectral component. We note the complexity of the correlation structure in DNA sequences. The observed complexity often makes it hard, or impossible, to decompose the sequence into a few statistically stationary regions. We suggest that, based on the complexity of DNA sequences, a fruitful approach to understand long-range correlation is to model duplication, and other rearrangement processes, in DNA sequences. One model, called ``expansion-modification system", contains only point duplication and point mutation. Though simplistic, this model is able to generate sequences with 1/f spectra. We emphasize the importance of DNA duplication in its contribution to the observed long-range correlation in DNA sequen...

  12. Phylogeny of all major groups of cetaceans based on DNA sequences from three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinkovitch, M C; Meyer, A; Powell, J R

    1994-11-01

    Traditionally, living cetaceans (order Cetacea) are classified into two highly distinct suborders: the echolocating toothed whales, Odontoceti, and the filter-feeding baleen whales, Mysticeti. A molecular phylogeny based on 1,352 base pairs of two mitochondrial ribosomal gene segments and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for all major groups of cetaceans contradicts this long-accepted taxonomic subdivision. One group of toothed whales, the sperm whales, is more closely related to the morphologically highly divergent baleen whales than to other odontocetes. This finding suggests that the suborder Odontoceti constitutes an unnatural grouping and challenges the conventional scenario of a long, independent evolutionary history of odontocetes and mysticetes. The superfamily Delphinoidea (dolphins, porpoises, and white whales) appears to be monophyletic; the Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, is its sister species. This river dolphin is genetically more divergent from the morphologically similar marine dolphins than the sperm whales are from the morphologically dissimilar baleen whales. The phylogenetic relationships among the three families of Delphinoidea remain uncertain, and we suggest that the two cladogenetic events that generated these three clades occurred within a very short period of time. Among the baleen whales, the bowhead is basal, and the gray whale is the sister species to the rorquals (family Balaenopteridae). The phylogenetic position of beaked whales (Ziphioidea) remains weakly supported by molecular data. Based on molecular clock assumptions, the mitochondrial-DNA data suggest a more recent origin of baleen whales (approximately 25 mya) than has been previously assumed (> 40 mya). This revised phylogeny has important implications for the rate and mode of evolution of morphological and physiological innovations in cetaceans.

  13. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  14. Higher level phylogeny of Satyrinae butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) based on DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Carlos; Wahlberg, Niklas; Weingartner, Elisabet; Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa; Nylin, Sören; Freitas, André V L; Brower, Andrew V Z

    2006-07-01

    We have inferred the first empirically supported hypothesis of relationships for the cosmopolitan butterfly subfamily Satyrinae. We used 3090 base pairs of DNA from the mitochondrial gene COI and the nuclear genes EF-1alpha and wingless for 165 Satyrinae taxa representing 4 tribes and 15 subtribes, and 26 outgroups, in order to test the monophyly of the subfamily and elucidate phylogenetic relationships of its major lineages. In a combined analysis, the three gene regions supported an almost fully resolved topology, which recovered Satyrinae as polyphyletic, and revealed that the current classification of suprageneric taxa within the subfamily is comprised almost completely of unnatural assemblages. The most noteworthy findings are that Manataria is closely related to Melanitini; Palaeonympha belongs to Euptychiina; Oressinoma, Orsotriaena and Coenonympha group with the Hypocystina; Miller's (1968). Parargina is polyphyletic and its components group with multiple distantly related lineages; and the subtribes Elymniina and Zetherina fall outside the Satyrinae. The three gene regions used in a combined analysis prove to be very effective in resolving relationships of Satyrinae at the subtribal and tribal levels. Further sampling of the taxa closely related to Satyrinae, as well as more extensive sampling of genera within the tribes and subtribes for this group will be critical to test the monophyly of the subfamily and establish a stronger basis for future biogeographical and evolutionary studies.

  15. Genomic DNA pooling strategy for next-generation sequencing-based rare variant discovery in abdominal aortic aneurysm regions of interest-challenges and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; Nijman, I.J.; Medic, J.; Mokry, M.; Renkens, I.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Kloosterman, W.P.; Baas, A.F.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The costs and efforts for sample preparation of hundreds of individuals, their genomic enrichment for regions of interest, and sufficient deep sequencing bring a significant burden to next-generation sequencing-based experiments. We investigated whether pooling of samples at the level of genomic DNA

  16. Quantitative, small-scale, fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis implemented on a capillary electrophoresis-based DNA sequence analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sarah; McKenzie, Marian; Butler, Ruth; Baldwin, Samantha; Sutton, Kevin; Batey, Ian; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M

    2011-06-15

    Fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) is an analytical method for characterizing carbohydrate chain length that has been applied to neutral, charged, and N-linked oligosaccharides and that has been implemented using diverse separation platforms, including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis. In this article, we describe three substantial improvements to FACE: (i) reducing the amount of starch and APTS required in labeling reactions and systematically analyzing the effect of altering the starch and 8-amino-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (APTS) concentrations on the reproducibility of the FACE peak area distributions; (ii) implementing FACE on a multiple capillary DNA sequencer (an ABI 3130xl), enabling higher throughput than is possible on other separation platforms; and (iii) developing a protocol for producing quantitative output of peak heights and areas using genetic marker analysis software. The results of a designed experiment to determine the effect of decreasing both the starch and fluorophore concentrations on the sensitivity and reproducibility of FACE electrophoregrams are presented. Analysis of the peak area distributions of the FACE electrophoregrams identified the labeling reaction conditions that resulted in the smallest variances in the peak area distributions while retaining strong fluorescence signals from the capillary-based DNA sequencer.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Thai oyster (Ostreidae) based on partial sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussarawit, Somchai; Gravlund, Peter; Glenner, Henrik;

    2006-01-01

    Ten oyster species of the family Ostreidae (Subfamilies Crassostreinae and Lophinae) from Thailand were studied using morphological data and mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene sequences. Additional sequence data from five specimens of Ostreidae and one specimen of Tridacna gigas were downloaded from Gen...

  18. Molecular phylogeny of the large carpenter bees, genus Xylocopa (Hymenoptera: apidae), based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, R; Cooper, S J; Schwarz, M P

    2000-12-01

    Carpenter bees, genus Xylocopa Latreille, a group of bees found on all continents, are of particular interest to behavioral ecologists because of their utility for studies of the evolution of mating strategies and sociality. This paper presents phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of two mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase 1 and cytochrome b for 22 subgenera of Xylocopa. Maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods were used to infer phylogenetic relationships. The analyses resulted in three resolved clades of subgenera: a South American group (including the subgenera Stenoxylocopa, Megaxylocopa, and Neoxylocopa), a group including the subgenera Xylocopa s.s. and Ctenoxylocopa, and an Ethiopean group (including the subgenera Afroxylocopa, Mesotrichia, Alloxylocopa, Platynopoda, Hoploxylocopa, and Koptortosoma). The relationships between the 11 other subgenera and the resolved clades are unclear. Within the Ethiopian group we found a clear separation of the African and the Oriental taxa and apparent polyphyly of the subgenus Koptortosoma. Using an evolutionary rate for ants, we investigated whether Gondwana vicariance or more recent dispersal events could best explain the present-day distribution of subgenera. Although some taxa show divergences that approach Gondwanan breakup times, most divergences between geographic groups are too recent to support a vicariance hypothesis.

  19. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  20. Automated Template Quantification for DNA Sequencing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanetich, Kathryn M.; Yan, Wilson; Wunderlich, Kathleen M.; Weston, Jennifer; Walkup, Ward G.; Simeon, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The quantification of plasmid DNA by the PicoGreen dye binding assay has been automated, and the effect of quantification of user-submitted templates on DNA sequence quality in a core laboratory has been assessed. The protocol pipets, mixes and reads standards, blanks and up to 88 unknowns, generates a standard curve, and calculates template concentrations. For pUC19 replicates at five concentrations, coefficients of variance were 0.1, and percent errors were from 1% to 7% (n = 198). Standard curves with pUC19 DNA were nonlinear over the 1 to 1733 ng/μL concentration range required to assay the majority (98.7%) of user-submitted templates. Over 35,000 templates have been quantified using the protocol. For 1350 user-submitted plasmids, 87% deviated by ≥ 20% from the requested concentration (500 ng/μL). Based on data from 418 sequencing reactions, quantification of user-submitted templates was shown to significantly improve DNA sequence quality. The protocol is applicable to all types of double-stranded DNA, is unaffected by primer (1 pmol/μL), and is user modifiable. The protocol takes 30 min, saves 1 h of technical time, and costs approximately $0.20 per unknown. PMID:16461949

  1. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  2. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Safiye [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush, E-mail: faridbodf@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajloo, Davood [School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh [Department of Microbial Biotechnology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10{sup −15} to 1 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL{sup −1} with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. - Highlights: • New DNA biosensor is designed for sub-femtomolar detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA sequence. • Reduced graphene oxide decorated Ceria nanoparticles was used as a new immobilization platform. • Biosensor was successfully used to detect A. hydrophila DNA sequence in fish pond water.

  3. Nanoelectronic devices and measurements toward nanocrystal-based optoelectronics and DNA sequencing with solid-state nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lauren J.

    Nanoelectronics are critical to exploring nanoscale materials: including nanocrystals, which could revolutionize optoelectronics, and DNA, which could revolutionize medicine. Our suspended silicon nitride membranes combined with electron beam lithography and transmission electron microscopy have been essential to our device fabrication and measurements. Nanocyrstal-based optoelectronics have garnered much interest, and thus new ways of increasing their transport are constantly being researched. We used ligand exchanges to decrease the interparticle spacing of nanocrystal films, which is known to augment transport. Using gaps only a few nanoparticles-wide, we measured transport and found that current could be controlled with annealing, hydrazine treatment, and voltage-sweeping. Annealing destroyed the insulating ligand surrounding each nanocrystal and allowed the particles to move closer. This usually increased the photocurrent, without significantly increasing the dark current. However, this was ineffective on sub-monolayers. Hydrazine was similar, except it replaced the ligand, rather than destroying it, and it was effective on sub-monolayers; however, it caused a large increase in the dark current as well as the photocurrent. Sweeping the voltage overnight could increase or decrease the photocurrent of a sample depending on whether the sample was illuminated or in the dark, corresponding to traps being emptied or filled. In addition to nanocrystals, our devices were used in solution to sense DNA. We fabricated nanelectrodes and nanowires next to nanopores and showed DNA translocations ionically. We also developed methods to make the pores hydrophilic without the use of piranha; we instead used rapid thermal annealing, heated ozone treatments, and oxygen/hydrogen plasmas. While high rates of device failure was a challenge, recommendations for future experiments are presented, including grounding of all equipment and an extreme focus on sample cleanliness. We have

  4. Systematics of Penicillium simplicissimum based on rDNA sequences, morphology and secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuthill, D.E.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    supported by differences in micromorphological characters, particularly of the conidia and phialides, and the production of distinct profiles of secondary metabolites by each species. Group-I introns, located in the SSU rDNA, were identified in six of the 21 isolates; their presence was used to test...

  5. Genetic diversity based on 28S rDNA sequences among populations of Culex quinquefasciatus collected at different locations in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivelkumar, S; Ramaraj, P; Veeramani, V; Janarthanan, S

    2015-09-01

    The basis of the present study was to distinguish the existence of any genetic variability among populations of Culex quinquefasciatus which would be a valuable tool in the management of mosquito control programmes. In the present study, population of Cx. quinquefasciatus collected at different locations in Tamil Nadu were analyzed for their genetic variation based on 28S rDNA D2 region nucleotide sequences. A high degree of genetic polymorphism was detected in the sequences of D2 region of 28S rDNA on the predicted secondary structures in spite of high nucleotide sequence similarity. The findings based on secondary structure using rDNA sequences suggested the existence of a complex genotypic diversity of Cx. quinquefasciatus population collected at different locations of Tamil Nadu, India. This complexity in genetic diversity in a single mosquito population collected at different locations is considered an important issue towards their influence and nature of vector potential of these mosquitoes.

  6. [A method for determining DNA sequence by labeling the end of the molecule and cleaving at the base. Isolation of DNA fragments, end-labeling, cleavage, electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel and analysis of results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxam, A M; Gilbert, W

    1986-01-01

    We elaborate basic chemical principles and current laboratory procedures for sequencing end-labeled DNA by partial cleavage and gel electrophoresis (A. M. Maxam and W. Gilbert, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1977, v. 74, p. 560-564). We provide step-by-step protocols for 32P-labeling DNA ends, segregating the labeled ends by cutting with a second restriction enzyme or separating strands, partially cleaving the DNA at specific bases with reagents, electrophoresing the labeled products of cleavage on sequencing gels, and interpreting sequencing band patterns. Many of these procedures have been condensed, to make them faster and easier, and some are new. We also discuss sequencing strategies, and suggest a technique which will reduce plasmid or viral DNA to a collection of singly-end-labeled fragments in one day, for efficient sequencing of these chromosomes in 250-nucleotide blocks.

  7. Simple, multiplexed, PCR-based barcoding of DNA enables sensitive mutation detection in liquid biopsies using sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Krzyzanowski, Paul M; Jackson, Jennifer B; Egyud, Matthew; Stein, Lincoln; Godfrey, Tony E

    2016-06-20

    Detection of cell-free DNA in liquid biopsies offers great potential for use in non-invasive prenatal testing and as a cancer biomarker. Fetal and tumor DNA fractions however can be extremely low in these samples and ultra-sensitive methods are required for their detection. Here, we report an extremely simple and fast method for introduction of barcodes into DNA libraries made from 5 ng of DNA. Barcoded adapter primers are designed with an oligonucleotide hairpin structure to protect the molecular barcodes during the first rounds of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and prevent them from participating in mis-priming events. Our approach enables high-level multiplexing and next-generation sequencing library construction with flexible library content. We show that uniform libraries of 1-, 5-, 13- and 31-plex can be generated. Utilizing the barcodes to generate consensus reads for each original DNA molecule reduces background sequencing noise and allows detection of variant alleles below 0.1% frequency in clonal cell line DNA and in cell-free plasma DNA. Thus, our approach bridges the gap between the highly sensitive but specific capabilities of digital PCR, which only allows a limited number of variants to be analyzed, with the broad target capability of next-generation sequencing which traditionally lacks the sensitivity to detect rare variants.

  8. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization.

  9. O⁶-carboxymethylguanine in DNA forms a sequence context-dependent wobble base-pair structure with thymine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Tsunoda, Masaru; Kikuchi, Yuji; Wilkinson, Oliver; Millington, Christopher L; Margison, Geoffrey P; Williams, David M; Takénaka, Akio

    2014-06-01

    N-Nitrosation of glycine and its derivatives generates potent alkylating agents that can lead to the formation of O(6)-carboxymethylguanine (O(6)-CMG) in DNA. O(6)-CMG has been identified in DNA derived from human colon tissue and its occurrence has been linked to diets high in red and processed meats, implying an association with the induction of colorectal cancer. By analogy to O(6)-methylguanine, O(6)-CMG is expected to be mutagenic, inducing G-to-A mutations that may be the molecular basis of increased cancer risk. Previously, the crystal structure of the DNA dodecamer d(CGCG[O(6)-CMG]ATTCGCG) has been reported, in which O(6)-CMG forms a Watson-Crick-type pair with thymine similar to the canonical A:T pair. In order to further investigate the versatility of O(6)-CMG in base-pair formation, the structure of the DNA dodecamer d(CGC[O(6)-CMG]AATTTGCG) containing O(6)-CMG at a different position has been determined by X-ray crystallography using four crystal forms obtained under conditions containing different solvent ions (Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) or Na(+)) with and without Hoechst 33258. The most striking finding is that the pairing modes of O(6)-CMG with T are quite different from those previously reported. In the present dodecamer, the T bases are displaced (wobbled) into the major groove to form a hydrogen bond between the thymine N(3) N-H and the carboxyl group of O(6)-CMG. In addition, a water molecule is bridged through two hydrogen bonds between the thymine O(2) atom and the 2-amino group of O(6)-CMG to stabilize the pairing. These interaction modes commonly occur in the four crystal forms, regardless of the differences in crystallization conditions. The previous and the present results show that O(6)-CMG can form a base pair with T in two alternative modes: the Watson-Crick type and a high-wobble type, the nature of which may depend on the DNA-sequence context.

  10. Towards the development of a DNA-sequence based approach to serotyping of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Julie MJ

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fliC and fljB genes in Salmonella code for the phase 1 (H1 and phase 2 (H2 flagellin respectively, the rfb cluster encodes the majority of enzymes for polysaccharide (O antigen biosynthesis, together they determine the antigenic profile by which Salmonella are identified. Sequencing and characterisation of fliC was performed in the development of a molecular serotyping technique. Results FliC sequencing of 106 strains revealed two groups; the g-complex included those exhibiting "g" or "m,t" antigenic factors, and the non-g strains which formed a second more diverse group. Variation in fliC was characterised and sero-specific motifs identified. Furthermore, it was possible to identify differences in certain H antigens that are not detected by traditional serotyping. A rapid short sequencing assay was developed to target serotype-specific sequence motifs in fliC. The assay was evaluated for identification of H1 antigens with a panel of 55 strains. Conclusion FliC sequences were obtained for more than 100 strains comprising 29 different H1 alleles. Unique pyrosequencing profiles corresponding to the H1 component of the serotype were generated reproducibly for the 23 alleles represented in the evaluation panel. Short read sequence assays can now be used to identify fliC alleles in approximately 97% of the 50 medically most important Salmonella in England and Wales. Capability for high throughput testing and automation give these assays considerable advantages over traditional methods.

  11. Comparison of microsatellite length polymorphism and multilocus sequence typing for DNA-Based typing of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Cabaret, Odile; Lecellier, Gael; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Hoinard, Damien; Raoux, Dorothée; Costa, Jean-Marc; Dromer, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2007-12-01

    For genotyping Candida albicans isolates, two PCR-based methods have recently emerged: multilocus sequence typing (MLST), based on the sequence of selected genes, and microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP), based on the length of PCR products containing variable numbers of short DNA repeats. To compare the two methods in their abilities to differentiate and group C. albicans isolates, we selected 50 independent isolates collected at the National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals. MLST typing was performed using sequencing of seven loci as described at (http://test1.mlst.net). The MLP method consisted of a single multiplex PCR testing three different loci. Dendrograms were constructed by the unweighted pair group cluster method with Euclidean metric for both methods. The correlation between the distance matrices was performed with a Mantel test tested with 1,000 random permutations. The sensitivity and specificity of the MLP typing system were determined after allocating MLST groups for the greater number of isolates of each distinct MLP group. The discriminatory power index was >0.99, and the distances between the isolates were highly correlated with both systems. The Mantel coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient were 35,699 and 0.32, respectively (P < or = 1.2 x 10(-6)). Using MLP, the average specificity and sensitivity of clustering compared to MLST were 83% and 73%, respectively, when the singletons were excluded. The two methods are similarly discriminatory and can be interchangeable depending on the objectives. MLP is less expensive and faster than MLST. However, MLST is currently more accurate and additional standardization is needed for MLP.

  12. New stopping criteria for segmenting DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    2001-01-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) in the model selection framework. When this stopping criterion is applied to a left telomere sequence of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the complete genome sequence of bacterium Escherichia coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified (e.g. subtelomeric units, replication origin, and replication terminus), and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  13. Isolation by restriction endonuclease digestion and base-specific affinity chromatography of rat-embryo DNA sequences disproportionately enriched in virogenic bromodeoxyuridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S A

    1981-02-01

    Control and bromodeoxyuridine-containing rat-embryo-cell DNA were digested by the restriction endonucleases Hpa II and Msp I and were subsequently analyzed by agarose-gel electrophoresis as well as DNA-affinity chromatography. By the former technique, it appeared that no substantial differences existed between the two DNA samples with respect to the amount or distribution of methylcytosine. On the other hand, it was obvious following base-specific DNA chromatography that the virogenic analog was markedly concentrated in particular nucleotide sequences which demonstrated a proportionately greater affinity for the (A-T)-specific adsorbent irrespective of digestion by either restriction endonuclease.

  14. A novel constraint for thermodynamically designing DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Biotechnological and biomolecular advances have introduced novel uses for DNA such as DNA computing, storage, and encryption. For these applications, DNA sequence design requires maximal desired (and minimal undesired hybridizations, which are the product of a single new DNA strand from 2 single DNA strands. Here, we propose a novel constraint to design DNA sequences based on thermodynamic properties. Existing constraints for DNA design are based on the Hamming distance, a constraint that does not address the thermodynamic properties of the DNA sequence. Using a unique, improved genetic algorithm, we designed DNA sequence sets which satisfy different distance constraints and employ a free energy gap based on a minimum free energy (MFE to gauge DNA sequences based on set thermodynamic properties. When compared to the best constraints of the Hamming distance, our method yielded better thermodynamic qualities. We then used our improved genetic algorithm to obtain lower-bound DNA sequence sets. Here, we discuss the effects of novel constraint parameters on the free energy gap.

  15. A novel constraint for thermodynamically designing DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Bin; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Changjun

    2013-01-01

    Biotechnological and biomolecular advances have introduced novel uses for DNA such as DNA computing, storage, and encryption. For these applications, DNA sequence design requires maximal desired (and minimal undesired) hybridizations, which are the product of a single new DNA strand from 2 single DNA strands. Here, we propose a novel constraint to design DNA sequences based on thermodynamic properties. Existing constraints for DNA design are based on the Hamming distance, a constraint that does not address the thermodynamic properties of the DNA sequence. Using a unique, improved genetic algorithm, we designed DNA sequence sets which satisfy different distance constraints and employ a free energy gap based on a minimum free energy (MFE) to gauge DNA sequences based on set thermodynamic properties. When compared to the best constraints of the Hamming distance, our method yielded better thermodynamic qualities. We then used our improved genetic algorithm to obtain lower-bound DNA sequence sets. Here, we discuss the effects of novel constraint parameters on the free energy gap.

  16. Local Renyi entropic profiles of DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinga Susana

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent report the authors presented a new measure of continuous entropy for DNA sequences, which allows the estimation of their randomness level. The definition therein explored was based on the Rényi entropy of probability density estimation (pdf using the Parzen's window method and applied to Chaos Game Representation/Universal Sequence Maps (CGR/USM. Subsequent work proposed a fractal pdf kernel as a more exact solution for the iterated map representation. This report extends the concepts of continuous entropy by defining DNA sequence entropic profiles using the new pdf estimations to refine the density estimation of motifs. Results The new methodology enables two results. On the one hand it shows that the entropic profiles are directly related with the statistical significance of motifs, allowing the study of under and over-representation of segments. On the other hand, by spanning the parameters of the kernel function it is possible to extract important information about the scale of each conserved DNA region. The computational applications, developed in Matlab m-code, the corresponding binary executables and additional material and examples are made publicly available at http://kdbio.inesc-id.pt/~svinga/ep/. Conclusion The ability to detect local conservation from a scale-independent representation of symbolic sequences is particularly relevant for biological applications where conserved motifs occur in multiple, overlapping scales, with significant future applications in the recognition of foreign genomic material and inference of motif structures.

  17. SWORDS: A statistical tool for analysing large DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Probal Chaudhuri; Sandip Das

    2002-02-01

    In this article, we present some simple yet effective statistical techniques for analysing and comparing large DNA sequences. These techniques are based on frequency distributions of DNA words in a large sequence, and have been packaged into a software called SWORDS. Using sequences available in public domain databases housed in the Internet, we demonstrate how SWORDS can be conveniently used by molecular biologists and geneticists to unmask biologically important features hidden in large sequences and assess their statistical significance.

  18. Molecular systematics of Indian Alysicarpus (Fabaceae) based on analyses of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AKRAM GHOLAMI; SHWETA SUBRAMANIAM; R. GEETA; ARUN K. PANDEY

    2017-06-01

    Alysicarpus Necker ex Desvaux (Fabaceae, Desmodieae) consists of ∼30 species that are distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of theworld. In India, the genus is represented by ca. 18 species, ofwhich seven are endemic. Sequences of the nuclear Internal transcribed spacer from38 accessions representing 16 Indian specieswere subjected to phylogeneticanalyses. The ITS sequence data strongly support the monophyly of the genus Alysicarpus. Analyses revealed four major well-supported clades within Alysicarpus. Ancestral state reconstructions were done for two morphological characters, namely calyx length in relation to pod (macrocalyx and microcalyx) and pod surface ornamentation (transversely rugose and nonrugose). The present study is the first report on molecular systematics of Indian Alysicarpus.

  19. Taxonomic and genetic status of lancelet in Weihai coastal waters based on mitochondrial DNA sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhu, Qian

    2011-05-01

    Lancelets (subphylum Cephalochordata) are a transitional species between invertebrates and vertebrates. They are currently listed in the Second Order of Protected Animals in China. Lancelets were first documented in the waters around the city of Weihai (Shandong, China) in 2002. However, little is known about the phylogeny of this population. We analyzed the sequences of cytochrome b (Cyt b) and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (CO I) genes from samples collected from coastal waters in the cities of Weihai and Qingdao (˜150 km to the south). We analyzed 176 sequences, of which 150 were novel sequences and 26 were obtained from GenBank. Our results suggest that (1) lancelets in the two cities belong to the species Branchiostoma japonicus and have a high level of genetic diversity; (2) there is a high level of gene flow and low level of genetic differentiation between lancelets from the two cities; (3) demographic expansion occurred an estimated 1.1 million years (Ma) ago (mid Pleistocene) for lancelets in Weihai-Qingdao; and (4) the divergence between B. belcheri and B. japonicus was estimated at between 37.75 Ma (early Oligocene)-46.5 Ma (late Eocene).

  20. Solid-Phase Purification of Synthetic DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajkowski, Andrzej; Cieslak, Jacek; Beaucage, Serge L

    2016-08-05

    Although high-throughput methods for solid-phase synthesis of DNA sequences are currently available for synthetic biology applications and technologies for large-scale production of nucleic acid-based drugs have been exploited for various therapeutic indications, little has been done to develop high-throughput procedures for the purification of synthetic nucleic acid sequences. An efficient process for purification of phosphorothioate and native DNA sequences is described herein. This process consists of functionalizing commercial aminopropylated silica gel with aminooxyalkyl functions to enable capture of DNA sequences carrying a 5'-siloxyl ether linker with a "keto" function through an oximation reaction. Deoxyribonucleoside phosphoramidites functionalized with the 5'-siloxyl ether linker were prepared in yields of 75-83% and incorporated last into the solid-phase assembly of DNA sequences. Capture of nucleobase- and phosphate-deprotected DNA sequences released from the synthesis support is demonstrated to proceed near quantitatively. After shorter than full-length DNA sequences were washed from the capture support, the purified DNA sequences were released from this support upon treatment with tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride in dry DMSO. The purity of released DNA sequences exceeds 98%. The scalability and high-throughput features of the purification process are demonstrated without sacrificing purity of the DNA sequences.

  1. A Long PCR–Based Approach for DNA Enrichment Prior to Next-Generation Sequencing for Systematic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Uribe-Convers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We present an alternative approach for molecular systematic studies that combines long PCR and next-generation sequencing. Our approach can be used to generate templates from any DNA source for next-generation sequencing. Here we test our approach by amplifying complete chloroplast genomes, and we present a set of 58 potentially universal primers for angiosperms to do so. Additionally, this approach is likely to be particularly useful for nuclear and mitochondrial regions. Methods and Results: Chloroplast genomes of 30 species across angiosperms were amplified to test our approach. Amplification success varied depending on whether PCR conditions were optimized for a given taxon. To further test our approach, some amplicons were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000. Conclusions: Although here we tested this approach by sequencing plastomes, long PCR amplicons could be generated using DNA from any genome, expanding the possibilities of this approach for molecular systematic studies.

  2. Base excision of oxidative purine and pyrimidine DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a DNA glycosylase with sequence similarity to endonuclease III from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, L; Bjørås, M; Pirovano, M; Alseth, I; Berdal, K G; Seeberg, E

    1996-10-01

    One gene locus on chromosome I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein (YAB5_YEAST; accession no. P31378) with local sequence similarity to the DNA repair glycosylase endonuclease III from Escherichia coli. We have analyzed the function of this gene, now assigned NTG1 (endonuclease three-like glycosylase 1), by cloning, mutant analysis, and gene expression in E. coli. Targeted gene disruption of NTG1 produces a mutant that is sensitive to H2O2 and menadione, indicating that NTG1 is required for repair of oxidative DNA damage in vivo. Northern blot analysis and expression studies of a NTG1-lacZ gene fusion showed that NTG1 is induced by cell exposure to different DNA damaging agents, particularly menadione, and hence belongs to the DNA damage-inducible regulon in S. cerevisiae. When expressed in E. coli, the NTG1 gene product cleaves plasmid DNA damaged by osmium tetroxide, thus, indicating specificity for thymine glycols in DNA similarly as is the case for EndoIII. However, NTG1 also releases formamidopyrimidines from DNA with high efficiency and, hence, represents a glycosylase with a novel range of substrate recognition. Sequences similar to NTG1 from other eukaryotes, including Caenorhabditis elegans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and mammals, have recently been entered in the GenBank suggesting the universal presence of NTG1-like genes in higher organisms. S. cerevisiae NTG1 does not have the [4Fe-4S] cluster DNA binding domain characteristic of the other members of this family.

  3. Remarks on the validity of Myxobolus ampullicapsulatus and Myxobolus honghuensis (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) based on SSU rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y J; Li, N N; Tang, F H; Dong, J L

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we isolated three populations of Myxobolus ampullicapsulatus from the gills of crucian carp, Carassius auratus auratus, two from Yongchuan, Chongqing area and one from Poyang Lake, Jiangxi area, China, sequenced their complete small subunit ribosome RNA gene, analyzed their genetic distance and gene similarity, and explored their relationship based on Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses of their small subunit ribosomal DNA. The results combined with their morphological characteristics suggest that M. ampullicapsulatus infecting the gills and pharynx of allogynogenetic gibel carp, Carassius auratus gibelio, should be Myxobolus honghuensis. This study highlights the importance of DNA sequence comparisons for distinguishing Myxobolus species and indicates that the intra-species identification for the two Myxobolus species mentioned in the present research should be less than ten variation sites. In morphology, M. honghuensis Liu et al. (2012) parasitic on the gills of C. auratus auratus (goldfish) was collected from Chongqing area, and its mature spore was 16.5-19.5 × 8.5-10.0 μm in size, polar capsule was 7.0-10.0 × 2.5-4.0 μm in size, and polar filament had 9-10 coils. M. honghuensis Liu et al. (2012) isolated from the pharynx of C. auratus gibelio was sampled in Hubei area, and its mature spore was 15.1-19.5 × 9.0-11.3 μm in size, polar capsule was 7.9-8.1 × 3.0-4.5 μm in size, and polar filament had 7-8 coils.

  4. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  5. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous.

  6. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  7. The historical biogeography of Pteroglossus aracaris (Aves, Piciformes, Ramphastidae based on Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio L. Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Neotropical birds, including Pteroglossus aracaris, do not have an adequate fossil record to be used as time constraints in molecular dating. Hence, the evolutionary timeframe of the avian biota can only be inferred using alternative time constraints. We applied a Bayesian relaxed clock approach to propose an alternative interpretation for the historical biogeography of Pteroglossus based on mitochondrial DNA sequences, using different combinations of outgroups and time constraints obtained from outgroup fossils, vicariant barriers and molecular time estimates. The results indicated that outgroup choice has little effect on the Bayesian posterior distribution of divergence times within Pteroglossus , that geological and molecular time constraints seem equally suitable to estimate the Bayesian posterior distribution of divergence times for Pteroglossus , and that the fossil record alone overestimates divergence times within the fossil-lacking ingroup. The Bayesian estimates of divergence times suggest that the radiation of Pteroglossus occurred from the Late Miocene to the Pliocene (three times older than estimated by the “standard” mitochondrial rate of 2% sequence divergence per million years, likely triggered by Andean uplift, multiple episodes of marine transgressions in South America, and formation of present-day river basins. The time estimates are in agreement with other Neotropical taxa with similar geographic distributions.

  8. Geographic structure and demographic history of Iranian brown bear (Ursus arctos based on mtDNA control region sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ashrafzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the brown bear's range has declined and its populations in some areas have faced extinction. Therefore, to have a comprehensive picture of genetic diversity and geographic structure of populations is essential for effective conservation strategies. In this research, we sequenced a 271bp segment of mtDNA control region of seven Iranian brown bears, where a total dataset of 467 sequences (brown and polar bears were used in analyses. Overall, 113 different haplotypes and 77 polymorphic sites were identified within the segment. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Iranian brown bears were not nested in any other clades. The low values of Nm (range=0.014-0.187 and high values of Fst (range=0.728-0.972 among Iranian bears and others revealed a genetically significant differentiation. We aren't found any significant signal of demographic reduction in Iranian bears. The time to the most recent common ancestor of Iranian brown bears (Northern Iran was found to be around 19000 BP.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships of elapid snakes based on cytochrome b mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowinski, J B; Keogh, J S

    2000-04-01

    Published molecular phylogenetic studies of elapid snakes agree that the marine and Australo-Melanesian forms are collectively monophyletic. Recent studies, however, disagree on the relationships of the African, American, and Asian forms. To resolve the relationships of the African, American, and Asian species to each other and to the marine/Australo-Melanesian clade, we sequenced the entire cytochrome b gene for 28 elapids; 2 additional elapid sequences from GenBank were also included. This sample includes all African, American, and Asian genera (except for the rare African Pseudohaje), as well as a representative sample of marine/Australo-Melanesian genera. The data were analyzed by the methods of maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood. Both types of analyses yielded similar trees, from which the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Homoroselaps falls outside a clade formed by the remaining elapids; (2) the remaining elapids are divisible into two broad sister clades, the marine/Australo-Melanesian species vs the African, American, and Asian species; (3) American coral snakes cluster with Asian coral snakes; and (4) the "true" cobra genus Naja is probably not monophyletic as the result of excluding such genera as Boulengerina and Paranaja.

  10. A new clade, based on partial LSU rDNA sequences, of unarmoured dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reñé, Albert; de Salas, Miguel; Camp, Jordi; Balagué, Vanessa; Garcés, Esther

    2013-09-01

    The order Gymnodiniales comprises unarmoured dinoflagellates. However, the lack of sequences hindered determining the phylogenetic positions and systematic relationships of several gymnodinioid taxa. In this study, a monophyletic clade was defined for the species Ceratoperidinium margalefii Loeblich III, Gyrodinium falcatum Kofoid & Swezy, three Cochlodinium species, and two Gymnodinium-like dinoflagellates. Despite their substantial morphotypic differentiation, Cochlodinium cf. helix, G. falcatum and 'Gymnodinium' sp. 1 share a common shape of the acrobase. The phylogenetic data led to the following conclusions: (1) C. margalefii is closely related to several unarmoured dinoflagellates. Its sulcus shape has been observed for the first time. (2) G. falcatum was erroneously assigned to the genus Gyrodinium and is transferred to Ceratoperidinium (C. falcatum (Kofoid & Swezy) Reñé & de Salas comb. nov.). (3) The genus Cochlodinium is polyphyletic and thus artificial; our data support its separation into three different genera. (4) The two Gymnodinium-like species could not be morphologically or phylogenetically related to any other gymnodinioid species sequenced to date. While not all studied species have been definitively transferred to the correct genus, our study is a step forward in the classification of inconspicuous unarmoured dinoflagellates. The family Ceratoperidiniaeceae and the genus Ceratoperidinium are emended.

  11. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences.

  12. Characterization of Three Species of Thrips on Weeping Fig, Nutmeg, and Marine Seruni Plants Based on Mtcoi DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia Kurniawaty

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrips are widely reported as pests in vegetable crops. However, the existence of Phlaeothripidae members has a less concern in Indonesia. Phlaeothripidae is the only family of  Tubulifera Suborder and some reports suggested that they had potential to be pests in several crops due to their ability to roll up and to make galls on leaves. The first step in pest management attempt is to identify the pest accurately and quickly, so the pest management can be on target and more efficient. One of the identification methods is the molecular identification using DNA barcoding techniques. This study aimed to characterize and to compare species thrips in banyan, nutmeg, and marine seruni based on their molecular characteristics. This research was conducted in Bogor and Kuningan. The process of molecular characterization consisteds of four steps  DNA total extraction, amplification by using PCR, COI gene sequence, and data analysis.  PCR programme was succesfully to amplified mtCOI gene fragment at 710 bp. The length of mtCOI gene of Gynaikothrips uzeli, Haplothrips ganglbaueri, and Pseudophilothrips ichini were 704, 686, and 702 bp dominated by A and T bases with nucleotide variation value of 27.8%. This results confirmed that molecular characterization using mtCOI gene mitochondrial had successfully supported the morphological data. How to CiteKurniawaty, N., Hidayat, P. & Rauf, A. (2016. Characterization of Three Species of Thrips on Banyan, Nutmeg, and Marine Seruni Plants Based on Coi Gene. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 185-192.

  13. The phylogeny of diphyllobothriid tapeworms (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) based on ITS-2 rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Flora J; Horák, A; Stefka, J; Aydogdu, A; Scholz, T

    2004-09-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of sequences of the ITS-2 rRNA genes of 20 samples of pseudophyllidean cestodes of the family Diphyllobothriidae (Ligula, Digramma, Diphyllobothrium, and Schistocephalus) from different hosts and geographical regions revealed that: (1) the inclusion of ligulids (previously family Ligulidae) to the Diphyllobothriidae is correct; (2) Schistocephalus appears as the most basal taxon of the Diphyllobothriidae, well separated from Ligula and Digramma, thus supporting the validity of Schistocephalinae Dubinina, 1962; (3) Digramma belonged with samples of Ligula, thus suggesting its invalidity as a genus; and (4) isolates of Ligula, presumably belonging to Ligula intestinalis, are paraphyletic, indicating that this species may represent a complex of separate taxa. Our results indicate the necessity for a taxonomic revision of the family Diphyllobothriidae.

  14. Novel evolutionary lineages in Labeobarbus (Cypriniformes; Cyprinidae) based on phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshera, Kebede A; Harris, Phillip M; Mayden, Richard L

    2016-03-22

    Phylogenetic relationships within Labeobarbus, the large-sized hexaploid cyprinids, were examined using cytochrome b gene sequences from a broad range of geographic localities and multiple taxa. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods revealed novel lineages from previously unsampled drainages in central (Congo River), eastern (Genale River) and southeastern (Revue and Mussapa Grande rivers) Africa. Relationships of some species of Varicorhinus in Africa (excluding 'V.' maroccanus) render Labeobarbus as paraphyletic. 'Varicorhinus' beso, 'V.' jubae, 'V.' mariae, 'V.' nelspruitensis, and 'V.' steindachneri are transferred to Labeobarbus. Bayesian estimation of time to most recent common ancestor suggested that Labeobarbus originated in the Late Miocene while lineage diversification began during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene and continued to the late Pleistocene. The relationships presented herein provide phylogenetic resolution within Labeobarbus and advances our knowledge of genetic diversity within the lineage as well as provides some interesting insight into the hydrographic and geologic history of Africa.

  15. Biodiversity and molecular ecology of Russula and Lactarius in Alaska based on soil and sporocarp DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geml J.; D.L. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Although critical for the functioning of ecosystems, fungi are poorly known in highlatitude regions. This paper summarizes the results of the first genetic diversity assessments of Russula and Lactarius, two of the most diverse and abundant fungal genera in Alaska. SU rDNA sequences from both curated sporocarp collections and soil PCR clone libraries sampled in...

  16. Phylogenetic relationships and generic delimitation in Inuleae subtribe Inulinae (Asteraceae) based on ITS and cpDNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englund, Marcus; Pornpongrungrueng, Pimwadee; Gustafsson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships in Inuleae subtribe Inulinae (Asteraceae) were investigated. DNA sequence data from three chloroplast regions (ndhF, trnL-F and psbA-trnH) and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were analysed separately and in combination using parsimony...

  17. Mesoscopic Model for Free Energy Landscape Analysis of DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia-Rojo, R; Mazo, J J; Falo, F; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021908

    2012-01-01

    A mesoscopic model which allows us to identify and quantify the strength of binding sites in DNA sequences is proposed. The model is based on the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model for the DNA chain coupled to a Brownian particle which explores the sequence interacting more importantly with open base pairs of the DNA chain. We apply the model to promoter sequences of different organisms. The free energy landscape obtained for these promoters shows a complex structure that is strongly connected to their biological behavior. The analysis method used is able to quantify free energy differences of sites within genome sequences.

  18. Dicrocoelium chinensis and Dicrocoelium dendriticum (Trematoda: Digenea) are distinct lancet fluke species based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Yan, Hong-Bin; Otranto, Domenico; Wang, Xing-Ye; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Jia, Wan-Zhong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-10-01

    Lancet flukes parasitize the bile ducts and gall bladder of a range of mammals, including humans, causing dicrocoeliosis. In the present study, we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes as well as the first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2=ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of two lancet flukes, Dicrocoelium chinensis and D. dendriticum. Sequence comparison of a conserved mt gene and nuclear rDNA sequences among multiple individual lancet flukes revealed substantial nucleotide differences between the species but limited sequence variation within each of them. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated amino acid and multiple mt rrnS sequences using Bayesian inference supported the separation of D. chinensis and D. dendriticum into two distinct species-specific clades. Results of the present study support the proposal that D. dendriticum and D. chinensis represent two distinct lancet flukes. While providing the first mt genomes from members of the superfamily Plagiorchioidea, the novel mt markers described herein will be useful for further studies of the diagnosis, epidemiology and systematics of the lancet flukes and other trematodes of human and animal health significance.

  19. A phylogenetic analysis of Pseudonaja (Hydrophiinae, Elapidae, Serpentes) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Adam; Donnellan, Stephen C; Hutchinson, Mark N; Hutchinson, Rhonda G

    2005-11-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial ND4 and adjacent tRNA sequences for a geographically extensive series of specimens reveals nine major clades within Pseudonaja, of which six are largely coincident with nominal taxa (P. affinis, P. guttata, P. inframacula, P. ingrami, P. modesta, and P. textilis). The remaining three clades are composed of specimens presently referred to P. nuchalis. Two of these clades correspond with the "Darwin" and "Southern" morphs of previous authors, while the third clade incorporates the "Orange with black head" and "Pale head, grey nape" morphs. We are unable to confirm the presence of consistent karyotypic differences between "Orange with black head" and "Pale head, grey nape" specimens, however, P. inframacula, P. textilis, and P. nuchalis "Darwin" are found to exhibit distinctive karyotypes, as previously reported. These results, in conjunction with additional observations of karyotpic and morphological variation, are consistent with nine historically-independent lineages (i.e., species) within Pseudonaja. There is strong support for a clade composed of P. affinis, P. inframacula, P. ingrami, P. textilis, and the three P. nuchalis lineages, and for the relationships (P. inframacula, P. nuchalis "Southern") and (P. nuchalis "Darwin", P. nuchalis "Orange with black head"--"Pale head, grey nape" ).

  20. Demographic History of Indigenous Populations in Mesoamerica Based on mtDNA Sequence Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio González-Martín

    Full Text Available The genetic characterization of Native American groups provides insights into their history and demographic events. We sequenced the mitochondrial D-loop region (control region of 520 samples from eight Mexican indigenous groups. In addition to an analysis of the genetic diversity, structure and genetic relationship between 28 Native American populations, we applied Bayesian skyline methodology for a deeper insight into the history of Mesoamerica. AMOVA tests applying cultural, linguistic and geographic criteria were performed. MDS plots showed a central cluster of Oaxaca and Maya populations, whereas those from the North and West were located on the periphery. Demographic reconstruction indicates higher values of the effective number of breeding females (Nef in Central Mesoamerica during the Preclassic period, whereas this pattern moves toward the Classic period for groups in the North and West. Conversely, Nef minimum values are distributed either in the Lithic period (i.e. founder effects or in recent periods (i.e. population declines. The Mesomerican regions showed differences in population fluctuation as indicated by the maximum Inter-Generational Rate (IGRmax: i Center-South from the lithic period until the Preclassic; ii West from the beginning of the Preclassic period until early Classic; iii North characterized by a wide range of temporal variation from the Lithic to the Preclassic. Our findings are consistent with the genetic variations observed between central, South and Southeast Mesoamerica and the North-West region that are related to differences in genetic drift, structure, and temporal survival strategies (agriculture versus hunter-gathering, respectively. Interestingly, although the European contact had a major negative demographic impact, we detect a previous decline in Mesoamerica that had begun a few hundred years before.

  1. Demographic History of Indigenous Populations in Mesoamerica Based on mtDNA Sequence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Regalado-Liu, Lucía; Arroyo-Peña, Sergio; Tirado, Sergio; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Sandoval, Karla; Coble, Michael D.; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    The genetic characterization of Native American groups provides insights into their history and demographic events. We sequenced the mitochondrial D-loop region (control region) of 520 samples from eight Mexican indigenous groups. In addition to an analysis of the genetic diversity, structure and genetic relationship between 28 Native American populations, we applied Bayesian skyline methodology for a deeper insight into the history of Mesoamerica. AMOVA tests applying cultural, linguistic and geographic criteria were performed. MDS plots showed a central cluster of Oaxaca and Maya populations, whereas those from the North and West were located on the periphery. Demographic reconstruction indicates higher values of the effective number of breeding females (Nef) in Central Mesoamerica during the Preclassic period, whereas this pattern moves toward the Classic period for groups in the North and West. Conversely, Nef minimum values are distributed either in the Lithic period (i.e. founder effects) or in recent periods (i.e. population declines). The Mesomerican regions showed differences in population fluctuation as indicated by the maximum Inter-Generational Rate (IGRmax): i) Center-South from the lithic period until the Preclassic; ii) West from the beginning of the Preclassic period until early Classic; iii) North characterized by a wide range of temporal variation from the Lithic to the Preclassic. Our findings are consistent with the genetic variations observed between central, South and Southeast Mesoamerica and the North-West region that are related to differences in genetic drift, structure, and temporal survival strategies (agriculture versus hunter-gathering, respectively). Interestingly, although the European contact had a major negative demographic impact, we detect a previous decline in Mesoamerica that had begun a few hundred years before. PMID:26292226

  2. Demographic History of Indigenous Populations in Mesoamerica Based on mtDNA Sequence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Regalado-Liu, Lucía; Arroyo-Peña, Sergio; Tirado, Sergio; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Sandoval, Karla; Coble, Michael D; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    The genetic characterization of Native American groups provides insights into their history and demographic events. We sequenced the mitochondrial D-loop region (control region) of 520 samples from eight Mexican indigenous groups. In addition to an analysis of the genetic diversity, structure and genetic relationship between 28 Native American populations, we applied Bayesian skyline methodology for a deeper insight into the history of Mesoamerica. AMOVA tests applying cultural, linguistic and geographic criteria were performed. MDS plots showed a central cluster of Oaxaca and Maya populations, whereas those from the North and West were located on the periphery. Demographic reconstruction indicates higher values of the effective number of breeding females (Nef) in Central Mesoamerica during the Preclassic period, whereas this pattern moves toward the Classic period for groups in the North and West. Conversely, Nef minimum values are distributed either in the Lithic period (i.e. founder effects) or in recent periods (i.e. population declines). The Mesomerican regions showed differences in population fluctuation as indicated by the maximum Inter-Generational Rate (IGRmax): i) Center-South from the lithic period until the Preclassic; ii) West from the beginning of the Preclassic period until early Classic; iii) North characterized by a wide range of temporal variation from the Lithic to the Preclassic. Our findings are consistent with the genetic variations observed between central, South and Southeast Mesoamerica and the North-West region that are related to differences in genetic drift, structure, and temporal survival strategies (agriculture versus hunter-gathering, respectively). Interestingly, although the European contact had a major negative demographic impact, we detect a previous decline in Mesoamerica that had begun a few hundred years before.

  3. Inferring the demographic history from DNA sequences: An importance sampling approach based on non-homogeneous processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Kaci Azzou, S; Larribe, F; Froda, S

    2016-10-01

    In Ait Kaci Azzou et al. (2015) we introduced an Importance Sampling (IS) approach for estimating the demographic history of a sample of DNA sequences, the skywis plot. More precisely, we proposed a new nonparametric estimate of a population size that changes over time. We showed on simulated data that the skywis plot can work well in typical situations where the effective population size does not undergo very steep changes. In this paper, we introduce an iterative procedure which extends the previous method and gives good estimates under such rapid variations. In the iterative calibrated skywis plot we approximate the effective population size by a piecewise constant function, whose values are re-estimated at each step. These piecewise constant functions are used to generate the waiting times of non homogeneous Poisson processes related to a coalescent process with mutation under a variable population size model. Moreover, the present IS procedure is based on a modified version of the Stephens and Donnelly (2000) proposal distribution. Finally, we apply the iterative calibrated skywis plot method to a simulated data set from a rapidly expanding exponential model, and we show that the method based on this new IS strategy correctly reconstructs the demographic history.

  4. Phylogeny of the major lineages of Membracoidea (Insecta: Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha) based on 28S rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, C H; Rakitov, R A; Holmes, J L; Black, W C

    2001-02-01

    Analysis of sequences from a 3.5-kb region of the nuclear ribosomal 28S DNA gene spanning divergent domains D2-D10 supports the hypothesis, based on fossil, biogeographic, and behavioral evidence, that treehoppers (Aetalionidae and Membracidae) are derived from leafhoppers (Cicadellidae). Maximum-parsimony analysis indicated that treehoppers are the sister group of a lineage comprising the currently recognized cicadellid subfamilies Agalliinae, Megophthalminae, Adelungiinae, and Ulopinae. Based on this phylogenetic estimate, the derivation of treehoppers approximately coincided with shifts in physiology and behavior, including loss of brochosome production and a reversal from active, jumping nymphs to sessile, nonjumping nymphs. Myerslopiidae, traditionally placed as a tribe of the cicadellid subfamily Ulopinae, represented a basal lineage distinct from other extant membracoids. The analysis recovered a large leafhopper lineage comprising a polyphyletic Deltocephalinae (sensu stricto) and its apparent derivatives Koebeliinae, Eupelicinae (polyphyletic), Selenocephalinae, and Penthimiinae. Clades comprising Macropsinae, Neocoelidiinae, Scarinae, Iassinae, Coelidiinae, Eurymelinae + Idiocerinae, Evacanthini + Pagaroniini, Aphrodinae + Ledrinae (in part), Stenocotini + Tartessinae, and Cicadellini + Proconiini were also recovered with moderate to high branch support. Cicadellinae (sensu lato), Ledrinae, Typhlocybinae, and Xestocephalinae were consistently polyphyletic on the most-parsimonious topologies, but constraining these groups to be monophyletic did not significantly increase the length of the cladograms. Relationships among the major lineages received low branch support, suggesting that more data are needed to provide a robust phylogenetic estimate.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons why mtDNA is the molecule of

  6. Effects of Sequence on Transmission Properties of DNA Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Rui-Xin; YAN Xun-Ling; YANG Bing

    2008-01-01

    A double helix model of charge transport in DNA molecule is given and the transmission spectra of four DNA sequences are obtained. The calculated results show that the transmission characteristics of DNA are not only related to the longitudinal transport but also to the transverse transport of molecule. The periodic sequence with the same composition has stronger conduction ability. With the increasing of bases composition, the conductive ability reduces, but the weight of θ direction rises in charge transfer.

  7. DNA Polymerases Drive DNA Sequencing-by-Synthesis Technologies: Both Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yao eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. E. coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ⱷ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ⱷ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  8. Phylogeny of the sea hares in the aplysia clade based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Timothy; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2004-02-20

    Sea hare species within the Aplysia clade are distributed worldwide. Their phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships are, however, still poorly known. New molecular evidence is presented from a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene (cox1) that improves our understanding of the phylogeny of the group. Based on these data a preliminary discussion of the present distribution of sea hares in a biogeographic context is put forward. Our findings are consistent with only some aspects of the current taxonomy and nomenclatural changes are proposed. The first, is the use of a rank free classification for the different Aplysia clades and subclades as opposed to previously used genus and subgenus affiliations. The second, is the suggestion that Aplysia brasiliana (Rang, 1828) is a junior synonym of Aplysia fasciata (Poiret, 1789). The third, is the elimination of Neaplysia since its only member is confirmed to be part of the large Varria clade.

  9. Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus (Digenea): Species differentiation based on mtDNA (Barcode) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmame, Laura; Huffman, Jane; Cole, Rebecca; Dayanandan, Selvadurai; Tkach, Vasyl; McLaughlin, J. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Flukes belonging to Sphaeridiotrema are important parasites of waterfowl, and 2 morphologically similar species Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus, have been implicated in waterfowl mortality in North America. Cytochrome oxidase I (barcode region) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences from specimens of S. globulus and S. pseudoglobulus, obtained from naturally and experimentally infected hosts from New Jersey and Quebec, respectively, confirmed that these species were distinct. Barcode sequences of the 2 species differed at 92 of 590 nucleotide positions (15.6%) and the translated sequences differed by 13 amino acid residues. Partial LSU-rDNA sequences differed at 29 of 1,208 nucleotide positions (2.4%). Additional barcode sequences from specimens collected from waterfowl in Wisconsin and Minnesota and morphometric data obtained from specimens acquired along the north shore of Lake Superior revealed the presence of S. pseudoglobulus in these areas. Although morphometric data suggested the presence of S. globulus in the Lake Superior sample, it was not found among the specimens sequenced from Wisconsin or Minnesota.

  10. Cloning and sequencing of mouse GABA transporter complementary DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAMANTHONYC.W.; LIHEGUO; 等

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the mouse GABA transporter has been isolated and sequenced.The results show that the mouse GABA transporter cDNA differs from that of the rat by 60 base pairs at the open reading frame region but the deduced amino acid sequences of the two cDNAs are identical and both composed of 599 amino acids.However,the amino acid sequence is different from the sequence deduced from a recently published mouse GABA transporter cDNA.

  11. Inferring multiple refugia and phylogeographical patterns in Pinus massoniana based on nucleotide sequence variation and DNA fingerprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Ge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pinus massoniana, an ecologically and economically important conifer, is widespread across central and southern mainland China and Taiwan. In this study, we tested the central-marginal paradigm that predicts that the marginal populations tend to be less polymorphic than the central ones in their genetic composition, and examined a founders' effect in the island population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the phylogeography and population structuring of the P. massoniana based on nucleotide sequences of cpDNA atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer, intron regions of the AdhC2 locus, and microsatellite fingerprints. SAMOVA analysis of nucleotide sequences indicated that most genetic variants resided among geographical regions. High levels of genetic diversity in the marginal populations in the south region, a pattern seemingly contradicting the central-marginal paradigm, and the fixation of private haplotypes in most populations indicate that multiple refugia may have existed over the glacial maxima. STRUCTURE analyses on microsatellites revealed that genetic structure of mainland populations was mediated with recent genetic exchanges mostly via pollen flow, and that the genetic composition in east region was intermixed between south and west regions, a pattern likely shaped by gene introgression and maintenance of ancestral polymorphisms. As expected, the small island population in Taiwan was genetically differentiated from mainland populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The marginal populations in south region possessed divergent gene pools, suggesting that the past glaciations might have low impacts on these populations at low latitudes. Estimates of ancestral population sizes interestingly reflect a recent expansion in mainland from a rather smaller population, a pattern that seemingly agrees with the pollen record.

  12. Genetic Variation of Cassava Mealybug, Phenacoccus manihoti (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae, Based on DNA Sequences from Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsalek RATTANAWANNEE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the genetic variation and genetic structure of the Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero, one of the most serious insect pests of cassava worldwide, in populations in Thailand, using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence based analysis. The samples of P. manihoti were collected from 28 major cassava-growing areas within 18 provinces in Thailand. Our field survey results showed that the northeastern and eastern regions of Thailand were widely and highly infested with P. manihoti. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 2 mitochondrial clades and a single nuclear clade, which corresponded to low genetic variability. This suggests that P. manihoti has a high potential to spread aggressively throughout the cassava-growing areas in Thailand that in which it was first found in 2008. In addition, the generally low genetic divergence observed may be due to the highly prevalent parthenogenetic reproduction of this insect pest species. Further research is therefore necessary to develop proportional prevention and surveillance programs for early detection and rapid response. In addition, the genetic structure and variability of P. manihoti populations from neighboring countries should be studied.

  13. Phylogeny of leafcutter ants in the genus Atta Fabricius (Formicidae: Attini) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Maurício; Solomon, Scott E; Mueller, Ulrich G; Martins, Vanderlei G; Carvalho, Alfredo O R; Vieira, Luiz G E; Silva-Pinhati, Ana Carla O

    2009-06-01

    Leafcutting ants of the genus Atta are the most conspicuous members of the tribe Attini, the fungus-growing ants. Atta species have long attracted the attention of naturalists, and have since become a common model system for the study of complex insect societies as well as for the study of coevolutionary dynamics due to their numerous interactions with fungi and other microbes. Nevertheless, systematics and taxonomy of the 15 species in the genus Atta have proven challenging, due in part to the extreme levels of worker polymorphism these species display, leading to disagreements about the validity of as many as five different subgenera and calling into question the monophyly of the genus. Here, we use DNA sequence information from fragments of three mitochondrial genes (COI, tRNA leucine and COII) and one nuclear gene (EF1-alphaF1), totaling 1070 base pairs, to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of Atta species using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference techniques. Our results provide support for monophyly of the genus Atta, and suggest that the genus is divided into four monophyletic groups, which correspond to four of the five previously erected Atta subgenera: Atta sensu stricto and Archeatta, each with species composition identical to earlier proposals; Neoatta and Epiatta, with major differences in species composition from earlier proposals. The current geographic ranges of these species suggest that the historical separation of South America from Central and North America has played a role in speciation within this genus.

  14. Phylogeny of hard- and soft-tick taxa (Acari: Ixodida) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W C; Piesman, J

    1994-01-01

    Ticks are parasitiform mites that are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. A phylogeny for tick families, subfamilies, and genera has been described based on morphological characters, life histories, and host associations. To test the existing phylogeny, we sequenced approximately 460 bp from the 3' end of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) in 36 hard- and soft-tick species; a mesostigmatid mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, was used as an outgroup. Phylogenies derived using distance, maximum-parsimony, or maximum-likelihood methods were congruent. The existing phylogeny was largely supported with four exceptions. In hard ticks (Ixodidae), members of Haemaphysalinae were monophyletic with the primitive Amblyomminae and members of Hyalomminae grouped within the Rhipicephalinae. In soft ticks (Argasidae), the derived phylogeny failed to support a monophyletic relationship among members of Ornithodorinae and supported placement of Argasinae as basal to the Ixodidae, suggesting that hard ticks may have originated from an Argas-like ancestor. Because most Argas species are obligate bird octoparasites, this result supports earlier suggestions that hard ticks did not evolve until the late Cretaceous. PMID:7937832

  15. Characterization of Lactobacillus from Algerian goat's milk based on phenotypic, 16S rDNA sequencing and their technological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Marroki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen strains of Lactobacillus isolated from goat's milk from farms in north-west of Algeria were characterized. Isolates were identified by phenotypic, physiological and genotypic methods and some of their important technological properties were studied. Phenotypic characterization was carried out by studying physiological, morphological characteristics and carbohydrate fermentation patterns using API 50 CHL system. Isolates were also characterized by partial 16S rDNA sequencing. Results obtained with phenotypic methods were correlated with the genotypic characterization and 13 isolates were identified as L. plantarum, two isolates as L. rhamnosus and one isolate as L. fermentum. Three isolates identified as L. plantarum by phenotypic characterization were found to be L. pentosus by the genotypic method. A large diversity in technological properties (acid production in skim milk, exopolysaccharide production, aminopeptidase activity, antibacterial activity and antibiotic susceptibility was observed. Based on these results, two strains of L. plantarum (LbMS16 and LbMS21 and one strain of L. rhamnosus (LbMF25 have been tentatively selected for use as starter cultures in the manufacture of artisanal fermented dairy products in Algeria.

  16. The phylogeny of native and exotic scallops cultured in China based on 16S rDNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Baozhong; DONG Bo; XIANG Jianhai; WANG Zaizhao

    2007-01-01

    Scallops of the Family Pectinidae are a valuable resource in marine industry of the world.Understanding the phylogeny of the family is important for the development of the industry. In this study,partial 16S mitochondrial rDNA genes were obtained from 8 scallop species that are commonly cultured indigenous and transplanted species in China. Phylogenetic relationships of Pectinidae were analyzed based on the 8 sequences and other 5 published ones in GenBank, representing 9 genera of the family. The molecular phylogeny trees were constructed using 3 methods with software PHYLIP. The results showe that total 13 species of scallops clustered in 4 clades. Pecten maximus joins P. jacobaeus then Amusium pleuronectes in cluster, indicating close relationship of genus Amusium with Pecten in evolution. P. yessoensis is close to Chlamysfarreri and C. islandica. No enough material was available to single out genus Patinopecten as an independent monophyletic subfamily. The position ofAdamussium colbecki indicates that it is far from genus Pecten but near to genus Chlamys in evolution.

  17. Genetic heterogeneity and phylogeny of Trichuris spp. from captive non-human primates based on ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallero, Serena; De Liberato, Claudio; Friedrich, Klaus G; Di Cave, David; Masella, Valentina; D'Amelio, Stefano; Berrilli, Federica

    2015-08-01

    Nematodes of the genus Trichuris, known as whipworms, are recognized to infect numerous mammalian species including humans and non-human primates. Several Trichuris spp. have been described and species designation/identification is traditionally based on host-affiliation, although cross-infection and hybridization events may complicate species boundaries. The main aims of the present study were to genetically characterize adult Trichuris specimens from captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) and grivets (Chlorocebus aethiops), using the ribosomal DNA (ITS) as molecular marker and to investigate the phylogeny and the extent of genetic variation also by comparison with data on isolates from other humans, non-human primates and other hosts. The phylogenetic analysis of Trichuris sequences from M. fuscata and C. aethiops provided evidences of distinct clades and subclades thus advocating the existence of additional separated taxa. Neighbor Joining and Bayesian trees suggest that specimens from M. fuscata may be distinct from, but related to Trichuris trichiura, while a close relationship is suggested between the subclade formed by the specimens from C. aethiops and the subclade formed by T. suis. The tendency to associate Trichuris sp. to host species can lead to misleading taxonomic interpretations (i.e. whipworms found in primates are identified as T. trichiura). The results here obtained confirm previous evidences suggesting the existence of Trichuris spp. other than T. trichiura infecting non-human living primates.

  18. Validated primer set that prevents nuclear DNA sequences of mitochondrial origin co-amplification: a revision based on the New Human Genome Reference Sequence (GRCh37).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Amanda; Santos, Cristina; Barbena, Elena; Mateiu, Ligia; Alvarez, Luis; Nogués, Ramon; Aluja, Maria Pilar

    2011-03-01

    A new human genome reference sequence--GRCh37--was recently generated and made available by the Genome Reference Consortium. Since the prior disposable human reference sequence--hg18--was previously used for the mitochondrial DNA primer BLAST validation, a revision of those previously published primer pairs is required. Thus, the aim of this Short Communication is to perform an in silico BLAST test of the published disposable nine primer pairs using the new human reference sequence and to report the pertinent modifications. The new analysis showed that one of the tested primer pairs requires a revision. Therefore, a new validated primer pair, which specifically amplifies the mitochondrial region located between positions 6520 and 9184, is presented.

  19. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for radiation molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repin Mikhail V

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this work is to obtain the correct relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for the use at FISH analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Results The relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the male and female human diploid genomes have been calculated from the publicly available international Human Genome Project data. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of human chromosomes were compared with the data recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001. The differences in the values of the relative DNA contents of chromosomes obtained by using different approaches for 15 human chromosomes, mainly for large chromosomes, were below 2%. For the chromosomes 13, 17, 20 and 22 the differences were above 5%. Conclusion New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes were obtained. This approach, based on the genome sequence, can be recommended for the use in radiation molecular cytogenetics.

  20. Long range correlations in DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, A K

    2002-01-01

    The so called long range correlation properties of DNA sequences are studied using the variance analyses of the density distribution of a single or a group of nucleotides in a model independent way. This new method which was suggested earlier has been applied to extract slope parameters that characterize the correlation properties for several intron containing and intron less DNA sequences. An important aspect of all the DNA sequences is the properties of complimentarity by virtue of which any two complimentary distributions (like GA is complimentary to TC or G is complimentary to ATC) have identical fluctuations at all scales although their distribution functions need not be identical. Due to this complimentarity, the famous DNA walk representation whose statistical interpretation is still unresolved is shown to be a special case of the present formalism with a density distribution corresponding to a purine or a pyrimidine group. Another interesting aspect of most of the DNA sequences is that the factorial m...

  1. Primary structure of fox (Vulpes vulpes) proinsulin based on sequence studies of pancreatic peptides and cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiertek, D; Gromowska, M; Andersen, A S; Hansen, P H; Majewski, T; Izdebski, J

    2000-08-01

    Insulin and C-peptide were extracted and purified from fox (Vulpes vulpes) pancreas using gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography and HPLC. Chromatographic data for the insulin, as well as for its oxidized and carboxymethylated chains proved it to be identical to that of polar fox (Alopex lagopus) and dog. The sequence analysis of a peptide which was assumed to be the corresponding C-peptide revealed that it comprises 23 amino acid residues and is identical to the C-peptide fragment isolated from dog pancreas: it differs from polar fox C-peptide by a single substitution (Asp-->Glu). mRNA was isolated from pancreatic tissue and cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription. A polymerase chain reaction was performed using gene-specific primers to obtain a DNA fragment corresponding to part of fox proinsulin. DNA sequencing revealed 100% identity to dog proinsulin at the protein level, although some amino acids were encoded by different codons. The total sequence of proinsulin was deduced from these results.

  2. Ancient DNA analyses of museum specimens from selected Presbytis (primate: Colobinae) based on partial Cyt b sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aifat, N. R.; Yaakop, S.; Md-Zain, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species has categorized Malaysian primates from being data deficient to critically endanger. Thus, ancient DNA analyses hold great potential to understand phylogeny, phylogeography and population history of extinct and extant species. Museum samples are one of the alternatives to provide important sources of biological materials for a large proportion of ancient DNA studies. In this study, a total of six museum skin samples from species Presbytis hosei (4 samples) and Presbytis frontata (2 samples), aged between 43 and 124 years old were extracted to obtain the DNA. Extraction was done by using QIAGEN QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit and the ability of this kit to extract museum skin samples was tested by amplification of partial Cyt b sequence using species-specific designed primer. Two primer pairs were designed specifically for P. hosei and P. frontata, respectively. These primer pairs proved to be efficient in amplifying 200bp of the targeted species in the optimized PCR conditions. The performance of the sequences were tested to determine genetic distance of genus Presbytis in Malaysia. From the analyses, P. hosei is closely related to P. chrysomelas and P. frontata with the value of 0.095 and 0.106, respectively. Cyt b gave a clear data in determining relationships among Bornean species. Thus, with the optimized condition, museum specimens can be used for molecular systematic studies of the Malaysian primates.

  3. Sequence dependent hole evolution in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D

    2004-06-01

    The paper examines thedynamical behavior of a radical cation(G(+*)) generated in adouble stranded DNA for differentoligonucleotide sequences. The resonancehole tunneling through an oligonucleotidesequence is studied by the method ofnumerical integration of self-consistentquantum-mechanical equations. The holemotion is considered quantum mechanicallyand nucleotide base oscillations aretreated classically. The results obtaineddemonstrate a strong dependence of chargetransfer on the type of nucleotidesequence. The rates of the hole transferare calculated for different nucleotidesequences and compared with experimentaldata on the transfer from (G(+*))to a GGG unit.

  4. An optimized and low-cost FPGA-based DNA sequence alignment--a step towards personal genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hurmat Ali; Hasan, Laiq; Ahmad, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequence alignment is a cardinal process in computational biology but also is much expensive computationally when performing through traditional computational platforms like CPU. Of many off the shelf platforms explored for speeding up the computation process, FPGA stands as the best candidate due to its performance per dollar spent and performance per watt. These two advantages make FPGA as the most appropriate choice for realizing the aim of personal genomics. The previous implementation of DNA sequence alignment did not take into consideration the price of the device on which optimization was performed. This paper presents optimization over previous FPGA implementation that increases the overall speed-up achieved as well as the price incurred by the platform that was optimized. The optimizations are (1) The array of processing elements is made to run on change in input value and not on clock, so eliminating the need for tight clock synchronization, (2) the implementation is unrestrained by the size of the sequences to be aligned, (3) the waiting time required for the sequences to load to FPGA is reduced to the minimum possible and (4) an efficient method is devised to store the output matrix that make possible to save the diagonal elements to be used in next pass, in parallel with the computation of output matrix. Implemented on Spartan3 FPGA, this implementation achieved 20 times performance improvement in terms of CUPS over GPP implementation.

  5. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Arlinghaus, H.F. (Atom Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  6. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arlinghaus, H.F. [Atom Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-06-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  7. Code domains in tandem repetitive DNA sequence structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P

    1992-10-01

    Traditionally, many people doing research in molecular biology attribute coding properties to a given DNA sequence if this sequence contains an open reading frame for translation into a sequence of amino acids. This protein coding capability of DNA was detected about 30 years ago. The underlying genetic code is highly conserved and present in every biological species studied so far. Today, it is obvious that DNA has a much larger coding potential for other important tasks. Apart from coding for specific RNA molecules such as rRNA, snRNA and tRNA molecules, specific structural and sequence patterns of the DNA chain itself express distinct codes for the regulation and expression of its genetic activity. A chromatin code has been defined for phasing of the histone-octamer protein complex in the nucleosome. A translation frame code has been shown to exist that determines correct triplet counting at the ribosome during protein synthesis. A loop code seems to organize the single stranded interaction of the nascent RNA chain with proteins during the splicing process, and a splicing code phases successive 5' and 3' splicing sites. Most of these DNA codes are not exclusively based on the primary DNA sequence itself, but also seem to include specific features of the corresponding higher order structures. Based on the view that these various DNA codes are genetically instructive for specific molecular interactions or processes, important in the nucleus during interphase and during cell division, the coding capability of tandem repetitive DNA sequences has recently been reconsidered.

  8. Molecular phylogenetics of Caryophyllales based on nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid rbcL, atpB,and matK DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuénoud, P.; Savolainen, V.; Chatrou, L.W.; Powell, M.; Grayer, R.J.; Chase, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    To study the inter- and infrafamilial phylogenetic relationships in the order Caryophyllales sensu lato (s.l.), 930 base pairs of the matK plastid gene have been sequenced and analyzed for 127 taxa. In addition, these sequences have been combined with the rbcL plastid gene for 53 taxa and with the r

  9. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    We propose a method of DNA sequencing by combining the physical method of nanopore electrical measurements and Southern's sequencing-by-hybridization. The new key ingredient, essential to both lowering the costs and increasing the precision, is an asymmetric nanopore sandwich device capable of measuring the DNA hybridization probe twice separated by a designed waiting time. Those incorrect probes appearing only once in nanopore ionic current traces are discriminated from the correct ones that appear twice. This method of discrimination is similar to the principle of kinetic proofreading proposed by Hopfield and Ninio in gene transcription and translation processes. An error analysis is of this nanopore kinetic proofreading (nKP) technique for DNA sequencing is carried out in comparison with the most precise 3' dideoxy termination method developed by Sanger. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading.

  10. Extracting biological knowledge from DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Vega, F.M. [CINVESTAV-IPN (Mexico); Thieffry, D. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-Saint-Genese (Belgium)]|[Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelos (Mexico); Collado-Vides, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelos (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    This session describes the elucidation of information from dna sequences and what challenges computational biologists face in their task of summarizing and deciphering the human genome. Techniques discussed include methods from statistics, information theory, artificial intelligence and linguistics. 1 ref.

  11. An approach to sequence DNA without tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sanjun; Saraf, Ravi F.

    2002-10-01

    Microarray technology is playing an increasingly important role in biology and medicine and its application to genomics for gene expression analysis has already reached the market with a variety of commercially available instruments. In these combinatorial analysis methods, known probe single-strand DNA (ssDNA) 'primers' are attached in clusters of typically 100 µm × 100 µm pixels. Each pixel of the array has a slightly different sequence. On exposure to 'unknown' target ssDNA, the pixels with the right complementary probe ssDNA sequence convert to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by a hybridization reaction. To transduct the conversion of the pixel to dsDNA, the target ssDNA is labelled with a photoluminescent tag during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification process. Due to the statistical distribution of the tags in the target ssDNA, it becomes significantly difficult to implement these methods as a diagnostic tool in a pathology laboratory. A method to sequence DNA without tagging the molecule is developed. The fabrication process is compatible with current microelectronics and (emerging) soft-material fabrication technologies, allowing the method to be integrable with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip devices. An estimated sensitivity of 10-12 g on a 1 cm2 device area is obtained.

  12. gargammel: a sequence simulator for ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Gabriel; Hanghøj, Kristian; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-10-29

    Ancient DNA has emerged as a remarkable tool to infer the history of extinct species and past populations. However, many of its characteristics, such as extensive fragmentation, damage and contamination, can influence downstream analyses. To help investigators measure how these could impact their analyses in silico, we have developed gargammel, a package that simulates ancient DNA fragments given a set of known reference genomes. Our package simulates the entire molecular process from post-mortem DNA fragmentation and DNA damage to experimental sequencing errors, and reproduces most common bias observed in ancient DNA datasets.

  13. Sequence dependence of electron-induced DNA strand breakage revealed by DNA nanoarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian; Rackwitz, Jenny; Cauët, Emilie;

    2014-01-01

    sections for electron induced single strand breaks in specific 13 mer oligonucleotides we used atomic force microscopy analysis of DNA origami based DNA nanoarrays. We investigated the DNA sequences 5'-TT(XYX)3TT with X = A, G, C and Y = T, BrU 5-bromouracil and found absolute strand break cross sections...

  14. Inconsistencies in Neanderthal genomic DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Wall

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Two recently published papers describe nuclear DNA sequences that were obtained from the same Neanderthal fossil. Our reanalyses of the data from these studies show that they are not consistent with each other and point to serious problems with the data quality in one of the studies, possibly due to modern human DNA contaminants and/or a high rate of sequencing errors.

  15. A novel molecular beacon-based method for isothermal detection of sequence-specific DNA via T7 RNA polymerase-aided target regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Wu, Shan; Ma, Jin-Liang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-06-15

    Developing molecular beacon (MB)-based method for DNA detection has been of great interest to many researchers because of its intrinsic advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and specificity. In this work, we have developed a novel MB-based method for isothermal detection of sequence-specific DNA via T7 RNA polymerase-aided target regeneration strategy. The proposed method involves three primary processes of target-mediated ligation by T4 DNA ligase, transcription reaction by T7 RNA polymerase, and MB switch for signal output. Upon the hybridization with DNA target, a rationally designed MB and a pair of primers encoded with T7 promoter sequence were ligated via the formation of a phosphodiester bond by T4 DNA ligase. The resultant joint fragment acted as template to initiate T7 RNA polymerase-mediated transcription reaction. Correspondingly, a great amount of RNA strands complementary to MB and partial primers were transcribed to initiate new cyclic reactions of MB switch, ligation, and transcription. With such signal amplification strategy of the regeneration of target-like RNA fragments, our proposed assay achieved a detection limit as low as ∼10 pM, which was ∼3 orders of magnitude lower than the traditional MB-based method with a recognition mechanism in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio between MB and target molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA splice site sequences clustering method for conservativeness analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanwei Zhang; Qinke Peng; Tao Xu

    2009-01-01

    DNA sequences that are near to splice sites have remarkable conservativeness,and many researchers have contributed to the prediction of splice site.In order to mine the underlying biological knowledge,we analyze the conservativeness of DNA splice site adjacent sequences by clustering.Firstly,we propose a kind of DNA splice site sequences clustering method which is based on DBSCAN,and use four kinds of dissimilarity calculating methods.Then,we analyze the conservative feature of the clustering results and the experimental data set.

  17. Relationships of scincid lizards (Mabuya spp; Reptilia: Scincidae) from the Cape Verde islands based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, A; Jesus, J; Pinheiro, M; Harris, D J

    2001-05-01

    Partial DNA sequences from two mitochondrial (mt) and one nuclear gene (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, and C-mos) were used to estimate the phylogenetic relationships among the six extant species of skinks endemic to the Cape Verde Archipelago. The species form a monophyletic unit, indicating a single colonization of the islands, probably from West Africa. Mabuya vaillanti and M. delalandii are sister taxa, as indicated by morphological characters. Mabuya fogoensis and M. stangeri are closely related, but the former is probably paraphyletic. Mabuya spinalis and M. salensis are also probably paraphyletic. Within species, samples from separate islands always form monophyletic groups. Some colonization events can be hypothesized, which are in line with the age of the islands. C-mos variation is concordant with the topology derived from mtDNA.

  18. Genetic identification of istiophorid larvae from the Gulf of Mexico based on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J L; Alvarado Bremer, J R

    2017-03-01

    Assigning relative importance of spawning and nursery habitats for threatened and endangered teleosts, such as those seen in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), relies on the proper identification of the early life-history stages of the species of concern. Here, sequencing a portion of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) I as barcodes is recommended to identify istiophorid (billfish) larvae in the Atlantic Ocean because of its high resolution and the intrinsic value of the levels of genetic variation that can be extracted from these data. The universality of the primers employed here demonstrates their utility for not only the positive identification of istiophorids in the GoM, but for any larval teleost occurring in areas recognized as larval hotspots worldwide.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons

  20. Which Are More Random: Coding or Noncoding DNA Sequences?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fang; ZHENG Wei-Mou

    2002-01-01

    Evidence seems to show that coding DNA is more random than noncoding DNA, but other conflictingevidence also exists. Based on the third-base degeneracy of codons, we regard the third position of codons as a 'noisy'position. By deleting one fixed position of non-overlapping triplets in a given sequence, three masked sequences may bededuced from the sequence. We have investigated the block-to-site mutual information functions of coding and noncodingsequences in yeast without and with the masking. Characteristics that distinguish coding from noncoding DNA havebeen found. It is observed that the strong correlations in the coding regions may be blocked by the third base of codons,and the proper masking can extract the correlations. Distribution of dimeric tandem repeats of unmasked sequences isalso compared with that of masked sequences.

  1. Nanogrid rolling circle DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Porreca, Gregory J.; Shendure, Jay; Rosenbaum, Abraham Meir

    2017-04-18

    The present invention relates to methods for sequencing a polynucleotide immobilized on an array having a plurality of specific regions each having a defined diameter size, including synthesizing a concatemer of a polynucleotide by rolling circle amplification, wherein the concatemer has a cross-sectional diameter greater than the diameter of a specific region, immobilizing the concatemer to the specific region to make an immobilized concatemer, and sequencing the immobilized concatemer.

  2. Self-organizing maps: A tool to ascertain taxonomic relatedness based on features derived from 16S rDNA sequence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D V Raje; H J Purohit; Y P Badhe; S S Tambe; B D Kulkarni

    2010-12-01

    Exploitation of microbial wealth, of which almost 95% or more is still unexplored, is a growing need. The taxonomic placements of a new isolate based on phenotypic characteristics are now being supported by information preserved in the 16S rRNA gene. However, the analysis of 16S rDNA sequences retrieved from metagenome, by the available bioinformatics tools, is subject to limitations. In this study, the occurrences of nucleotide features in 16S rDNA sequences have been used to ascertain the taxonomic placement of organisms. The tetra- and penta-nucleotide features were extracted from the training data set of the 16S rDNA sequence, and was subjected to an artificial neural network (ANN) based tool known as self-organizing map (SOM), which helped in visualization of unsupervised classification. For selection of significant features, principal component analysis (PCA) or curvilinear component analysis (CCA) was applied. The SOM along with these techniques could discriminate the sample sequences with more than 90% accuracy, highlighting the relevance of features. To ascertain the confidence level in the developed classification approach, the test data set was specifically evaluated for Thiobacillus, with Acidiphilium, Paracocus and Starkeya, which are taxonomically reassigned. The evaluation proved the excellent generalization capability of the developed tool. The topology of genera in SOM supported the conventional chemo-biochemical classification reported in the Bergey manual.

  3. Self-organizing maps: a tool to ascertain taxonomic relatedness based on features derived from 16S rDNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raje, D V; Purohit, H J; Badhe, Y P; Tambe, S S; Kulkarni, B D

    2010-12-01

    Exploitation of microbial wealth, of which almost 95% or more is still unexplored, is a growing need. The taxonomic placements of a new isolate based on phenotypic characteristics are now being supported by information preserved in the 16S rRNA gene. However, the analysis of 16S rDNA sequences retrieved from metagenome, by the available bioinformatics tools, is subject to limitations. In this study, the occurrences of nucleotide features in 16S rDNA sequences have been used to ascertain the taxonomic placement of organisms. The tetra- and penta-nucleotide features were extracted from the training data set of the 16S rDNA sequence, and was subjected to an artificial neural network (ANN) based tool known as self-organizing map (SOM), which helped in visualization of unsupervised classification. For selection of significant features, principal component analysis (PCA) or curvilinear component analysis (CCA) was applied. The SOM along with these techniques could discriminate the sample sequences with more than 90% accuracy, highlighting the relevance of features. To ascertain the confidence level in the developed classification approach, the test data set was specifically evaluated for Thiobacillus, with Acidiphilium, Paracocus and Starkeya, which are taxonomically reassigned. The evaluation proved the excellent generalization capability of the developed tool. The topology of genera in SOM supported the conventional chemo-biochemical classification reported in the Bergey manual.

  4. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony V; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  5. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  6. Veronica: Chemical characters for the support of phylogenetic relationships based on nuclear ribosomal and plastid DNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albach, Dirk C.; Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Özgökce, Fevzi;

    2005-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses have revealed many relationships in Veronica (Plantaginaceae) never anticipated before. However, phytochemical characters show good congruence with DNA-based analyses. We have analysed a combined data set of 49 species and subspecies derived from the nuclear riboso...

  7. Genetic variation of Kaempferia (Zingiberaceae) in Thailand based on chloroplast DNA (psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techaprasan, J; Klinbunga, S; Ngamriabsakul, C; Jenjittikul, T

    2010-10-05

    Genetic variation and species authentication of 71 Kaempferia accessions (representing 15 recognized, six new, and four unidentified species) found indigenously in Thailand were examined by determining chloroplast psbA-trnH and partial petA-psbJ spacer sequences. Ten closely related species (Boesenbergia rotunda, Gagnepainia godefroyi, G. thoreliana, Globba substrigosa, Smithatris myanmarensis, S. supraneanae, Scaphochlamys biloba, S. minutiflora, S. rubescens, and Stahlianthus sp) were also included. After sequence alignments, 1010 and 865 bp in length were obtained for the respective chloroplast DNA sequences. Intraspecific sequence variation was not observed in Kaempferia candida, K. angustifolia, K. laotica, K. galanga, K. pardi sp nov., K. bambusetorum sp nov., K. albomaculata sp nov., K. minuta sp nov., Kaempferia sp nov. 1, and G. thoreliana, for which more than one specimen was available. In contrast, intraspecific sequence polymorphisms were observed in various populations of K. fallax, K. filifolia, K. elegans, K. pulchra, K. rotunda, K. marginata, K. parviflora, K. larsenii, K. roscoeana, K. siamensis, and G. godefroyi. A strict consensus tree based on combined psbA-trnH and partial petA-psbJ sequences revealed four major groups of Kaempferia species. We suggest that the genus Kaempferia is a polyphyletic group, as K. candida was distantly related and did not group with other Kaempferia species. Polymorphic sites and indels of psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ can be used as DNA barcodes for species diagnosis of most Kaempferia and outgroup species. Nuclear DNA polymorphism should be examined to determine if there has been interspecific hybridization and chloroplast DNA introgression in these taxa.

  8. GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION AMONG POPULATIONS OF Chromobotia macracanthus BLEEKER FROM SUMATRA AND KALIMANTAN BASED ON SEQUENCING GENE OF MTDNA CYTOCHROME B AND NUCLEUS DNA RAG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarto Sudarto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on genetic differentiation among populations of Chromobotia macracanthus Bleeker from Sumatra, based on sequencing gene of mtDNA Cytochrome b and nucleus DNA RAG2 has been done. The objectives of the study were to obtain the representation of genetic differentiation among population of clown loach fishes or botia (Chromobotia macracanthus from Sumatra and Kalimantan and to estimate the time divergence of both population group of botia. Samples of botia population were taken from 3 rivers in Sumatra namely Batanghari, Musi, and Tulang Bawang and one river from Kalimantan namely Kapuas. The genetic analysis was based on the sequencing of mtDNA Cytochrome b and nucleus DNA RAG2. The statistical analysis was done by using APE package on R language. The parameters observed were: nucleotide diversity, genetic distance, and neighbor-joining tree. The result showed that the highest nucleotide diversity was fish population of Musi, while the other two populations, Tulang Bawang (Sumatra and Kapuas (Kalimantan, were considered as the lowest genetic diversity especially based on nucleus DNA RAG2 sequencing. Based on mtDNA Cytochrome-b sequencing, the most distinct population among those populations based on genetic distance were fish populations of Musi and Kapuas. According to the result of neighbor-joining tree analysis, the populations of botia were classified into two groups namely group of Sumatra and group of Kalimantan. The estimation of time divergence among group of population of Sumatra and Kalimantan based on mtDNA Cytochrome b was about 9.25—9.46 million years (Miocene era. The high genetic differences between groups of Sumatra and Kalimantan suggested that the effort of restocking botia from Sumatra into Kalimantan has to be done carefully, because it may disturb the gene originality of both botia populations.

  9. Electrochemical measurement for analysis of DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.B.; Hong, J.S.; Pak, J.H. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Y.M. [National Institute of Health, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    One of the important roles of a DNA chip is the capability of detecting genetic diseases and mutations by analyzing DNA sequence. For a successful electrochemical genotyping, several aspects should be considered including the chemical treatment of electrode surface, DNA immobilization on electrode, hybridization, choice of an intercalator to be selectively bound to double standed DNA, and an equipment for detecting and analyzing the output singal. Au was used as the electrode material, 2-mercaptoethanol was used for linking DNA to Au electrode, and methylene blue was used as an indicator that can be bound to a double stranded DNA selectively. From the analysis of reductive current of this indicator that was bound to a double stranded DNA on an electrode, a normal double stranded DNA was able to be distinguished from a single stranded DNA in just a few seconds. Also, it was found that the peak reduction current of indicator is proportional to the concentration of target DNA to be hybridized with probe DNA. Therefore, it is possible to realize a simple and cheap DNA sensor using the electrochemical measurement for genotyping. (author). 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The phylogenetic history of Selaginellaceae based on DNA sequences from the plastid and nucleus: extreme substitution rates and rate heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korall, Petra; Kenrick, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Molecular phylogenetic research on Selaginellaceae has focused on the plastid gene rbcL, which in this family has unusually high substitution rates. Here we develop a molecular data set from the nuclear 26S ribosomal DNA gene with the aim of evaluating and extending the results of previous phylogenetic research. The 26S rDNA and the rbcL regions were sequenced for a sample of 23 species, which represent the main elements of species diversity in the family. The data were analysed independently and in combination using both maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Although several between genome differences were found, the general pattern of relationships uncovered by all analyses was very similar. Results corroborate the previous study supporting new groupings not previously recognised on morphological grounds. Substitution rates in the 26S rDNA were also found to be high (26% informative) for the region analysed, but lower than for rbcL (37% informative). These data indicate that high substitution rates might be widespread in all three genomes (i.e., plastid, mitochondrion, and nucleus).

  11. The spatial and temporal distribution of microalgae in the South China Sea:evidence from GIS-based analysis of 18S rDNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of microalgae in the South China Sea and to demonstrate the environmental factors controlling the diversity of microalgae by GIS (geographic information system)-based analysis of 18S rDNA sequences. Six 18S rDNA libraries were constructed from environmental samples collected at different sites in the study area, and more than 600 18S rDNA sequences were determined. The rDNA sequence data were then analyzed by DIVA-GIS software to display the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton’s composition. It was shown that the autotrophic eukaryotic plankton dominated over the heterotrophic cells in most of our clone libraries, and the dominating phytoplankton was Dinophyceae except for Bacillariophyta at the Xiamen harbor. The percentages of these two groups were controlled by water temperature and salinity. Our results also revealed that the species composition of Chlorophyta showed a close relationship with latitude, changing from Prasinophyceae at the high latitude to Trebouxiophyceae at the low latitude. Several newly classified picoplankton lineages were first uncovered in the South China Sea, including the pico-sized green alga Ostreococcus sp. and Picochlorum eukaryotum, and picobiliphytes, which was just discovered in 2007 with unknown affinities to other eukaryotes. Their spatial and temporal variation were also analyzed and discussed.

  12. The spatial and temporal distribution of microalgae in the South China Sea: evidence from GIS-based analysis of 18S rDNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LvYan; HUANG QiaoJuan; WU ShuHui; LIN Duan; CHEN JiaHui; CHEN YueQin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of microalgae in the South China Sea and to demonstrate the environmental factors controlling the diversity of microalgae by GIS (geographic information system)-based analysis of 18S rDNA sequences. Six 18S rDNA libraries were constructed from environmental samples collected at different sites in the study area, and more than 600 18S rDNA sequences were determined. The rDNA sequence data were then analyzed by DIVA-GIS software to display the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton's composition. It was shown that the autotrophic eukaryotic plankton dominated over the heterotrophic cells in most of our clone libraries, and the dominating phytoplankton was Dinophyceae except for Bacillariophyta at the Xiamen harbor. The percentages of these two groups were controlled by water temperature and salinity. Our results also revealed that the species composition of Chlorophyta showed a close relationship with latitude, changing from Prasinophyceae at the high latitude to Trebouxiophyceae at the low latitude. Several newly classified picoplankton lineages were first uncovered in the South China Sea, including the pico-sized green alga Ostreococcus sp. and Picochlorum eukaryotum, and picobiliphytes, which was just discovered in 2007 with unknown affinities to other eukaryotes. Their spatial and temporal variation were also analyzed and discussed.

  13. Biometric Authentication Using ElGamal Cryptosystem And DNA Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.SAMUEL SUSAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics are automated methods of identifying a person or verifying the identity of a person based on a Physiological or behavioral characteristic. Physiological haracteristics include hand or finger images, facial characteristics and iris recognition. Behavioral characteristics include dynamic signature verification, speaker verification and keystroke dynamics. DNA is unique feature among individuals. DNA provides high security level, long term stability, user acceptance and is intrusive. Combining ElGamal cryptosystem and DNA sequence, a novel biometric authentication scheme is proposed.

  14. NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suman; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing protocol for the DNA methylation analysis of genomes. This approach allows the rapid and efficient construction of NGS-ready libraries with a large number of PCR products that have been individually amplified from bisulfite-converted DNA. This approach also employs a bioinformatics strategy to sort the raw sequence reads generated from NGS platforms and subsequently to derive DNA methylation levels for individual loci. The results demonstrated that this NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing approach provide not only DNA methylation levels but also informative DNA methylation patterns that have not been seen through other existing methods.•This protocol provides an efficient method generating NGS-ready libraries from individually amplified PCR products.•This protocol provides a bioinformatics strategy sorting NGS-derived raw sequence reads.•This protocol provides deep bisulfite sequencing results that can measure DNA methylation levels and patterns of individual loci.

  15. Phylogenetic relationships in the Gesnerioideae (Gesneriaceae) based on nrDNA ITS and cpDNA trnL-F and trnE-T spacer region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Elizabeth A; Roalson, Eric H; Skog, Laurence E; Boggan, John K; Idnurm, Alexander

    2002-02-01

    The Gesnerioideae includes most of the New World members of the Gesneriaceae family and is currently considered to include five tribes: Beslerieae, Episcieae, Gesnerieae, Gloxinieae, and Napeantheae. This study presents maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS), and the chloroplast DNA trnL intron, trnL-trnF intergenic spacer region, and trnE-trnT intergenic spacer region sequences. The ITS and cpDNA data sets strongly support the monophyly of a Beslerieae/Napeantheae clade; an Episcieae clade; a Gesnerieae clade; a Gloxinieae clade minus Sinningia, Sinningia relatives, and Gloxinia sarmentiana; and a Sinningia/Paliavana/Vanhouttea clade. This is the first study to provide strong statistical support for these tribes/clades. These analyses suggest that Sinningia and relatives should be considered as a separate tribe. Additionally, generic relationships are explored, including the apparent polyphyly of Gloxinia. Chromosome number changes are minimized on the proposed phylogeny, with the exception of the n = 11 taxa of the Gloxinieae. Scaly rhizomes appear to have been derived once in the Gloxinieae sensu stricto. The number of derivations of the inferior ovary is unclear: either there was one derivation with a reversal to a superior ovary in the Episcieae, or there were multiple independent derivations of the inferior ovary.

  16. A New Isolate of the Genus Malassezia Based on the Sequence Analysis of 26S and ITS1 in Ribosomal DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mirhendi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia species considered to be the etiological agents of pityriasis versicolor andMalassezia follicolitis in humans. Recently, on the basis of molecular data, four new specieswere added to the genus. In total, 11 species have been described and accepted sofar. In this study we describe a new isolate of Malassezia based on the nucleotide sequenceof 26SrDNA and ITS1 regions, as the accepted critical markers for description ofthe species.The yeast was isolated from a hamster. Two primer pairs, one for amplification of D1/D2-26Sr DNA and another for the ITS1 region were used in PCR. The PCR products weresequenced and analyzed to compare with other similar sequences which are already depositedin the GenBank. The 26SrDNA PCR product was also digested with the restrictionenzyme CfoI.Malassezia-specific universal primer pairs successfully amplified the 26srDNA and ITS1regions of the new isolate, providing a single PCR product of about 580 and 280 basepairs, respectively. After digestion of the 26s PCR product with the enzyme CfoI, a uniqueand different RFLP pattern was observed. Sequence analysis of D1/D226s and ITS1 regionswere compared with the same regions in all already described Malassezia species,which implied a different and unique new sequences. The phylogenetic tree of both regionsshowed that the isolate could be a different Malassezia isolate.Regarding the new RFLP pattern of D1/D226SrDBA and the unique nucleotide sequence ofboth D1/D2 26SrDNA and ITS1 regions, we propose the isolate to be a new Malassezia.

  17. Palindromic sequence artifacts generated during next generation sequencing library preparation from historic and ancient DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan Star

    Full Text Available Degradation-specific processes and variation in laboratory protocols can bias the DNA sequence composition from samples of ancient or historic origin. Here, we identify a novel artifact in sequences from historic samples of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, which forms interrupted palindromes consisting of reverse complementary sequence at the 5' and 3'-ends of sequencing reads. The palindromic sequences themselves have specific properties - the bases at the 5'-end align well to the reference genome, whereas extensive misalignments exists among the bases at the terminal 3'-end. The terminal 3' bases are artificial extensions likely caused by the occurrence of hairpin loops in single stranded DNA (ssDNA, which can be ligated and amplified in particular library creation protocols. We propose that such hairpin loops allow the inclusion of erroneous nucleotides, specifically at the 3'-end of DNA strands, with the 5'-end of the same strand providing the template. We also find these palindromes in previously published ancient DNA (aDNA datasets, albeit at varying and substantially lower frequencies. This artifact can negatively affect the yield of endogenous DNA in these types of samples and introduces sequence bias.

  18. DNA-Based Nanopore Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2016-12-05

    Nanopore sensing is an attractive, label-free approach that can measure single molecules. Although initially proposed for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing, nanopore sensors have been successfully employed in the detection of a wide variety of substrates. Early successes were mostly achieved based on two main strategies by 1) creating sensing elements inside the nanopore through protein mutation and chemical modification or 2) using molecular adapters to enhance analyte recognition. Over the past five years, DNA molecules started to be used as probes for sensing rather than substrates for sequencing. In this Minireview, we highlight the recent research efforts of nanopore sensing based on DNA-mediated characteristic current events. As nanopore sensing is becoming increasingly important in biochemical and biophysical studies, DNA-based sensing may find wider applications in investigating DNA-involving biological processes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Reprint of "Identification of staphylococcal species based on variations in protein sequences (mass spectrometry) and DNA sequence (sodA microarray)".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooken, Jennifer; Fox, Karen; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim; Wunschel, David; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martínez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    This report is among the first using sequence variation in newly discovered protein markers for staphylococcal (or indeed any other bacterial) speciation. Variation, at the DNA sequence level, in the sodA gene (commonly used for staphylococcal speciation) provided excellent correlation. Relatedness among strains was also assessed using protein profiling using microcapillary electrophoresis and pulsed field electrophoresis. A total of 64 strains were analyzed including reference strains representing the 11 staphylococcal species most commonly isolated from man (Staphylococcus aureus and 10 coagulase negative species [CoNS]). Matrix assisted time of flight ionization/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI MS/MS) were used for peptide analysis of proteins isolated from gel bands. Comparison of experimental spectra of unknowns versus spectra of peptides derived from reference strains allowed bacterial identification after MALDI TOF MS analysis. After LC-MS/MS analysis of gel bands bacterial speciation was performed by comparing experimental spectra versus virtual spectra using the software X!Tandem. Finally LC-MS/MS was performed on whole proteomes and data analysis also employing X!tandem. Aconitate hydratase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase served as marker proteins on focused analysis after gel separation. Alternatively on full proteomics analysis elongation factor Tu generally provided the highest confidence in staphylococcal speciation.

  20. Detection of the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri by using conventional and real-time PCR based on a single copy DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The amoeba-flagellate Naegleria fowleri is a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This thermophilic species occurs worldwide and tends to proliferate in warm aquatic environment. The PAM cases remain rare but this infection is mostly fatal. Here, we describe a single copy region which has been cloned and sequenced, and was used for both conventional and real-time PCR. Targeting a single-copy DNA sequence allows to directly quantify the N. fowleri cells. The real-time PCR results give a detection limit of 1 copy per reaction with high reproducibility without the need of a Taqman probe. This procedure is of interest as compared to other procedures which are mostly based on the detection of multi-copy DNA associated with a Taqman probe.

  1. Base sequence effects on DNA replication influenced by bulky adducts. Final report, March 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.

    1997-05-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are environmental pollutants that are present in air, food, and water. While PAH compounds are chemically inert and are sparingly soluble in aqueous solutions, in living cells they are metabolized to a variety of oxygenated derivatives, including the high mutagenic and tumorigenic diol epoxide derivatives. The diol epoxides of the sterically hindered fjord region compound benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]PhDE) are among the most powerful tumorigenic compounds in animal model test systems. In this project, site-specifically modified oligonucleotides containing single B[c]PhDE-N{sup 6}-dA lesions derived from the reactions of the 1S,2R,3R,4S and 1R,2S,3S,4R diol epoxides of B[c]PhDE with dA residues were synthesized. The replication of DNA catalyzed by a prokaryotic DNA polymerase (the exonuclease-free Klenow fragment E. Coli Po1 I) in the vicinity of the lesion at base-specific sites on B[c]PhDE-modified template strands was investigated in detail. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for the insertion of single deoxynucleotide triphosphates into growing DNA (primer) strands using the modified dA* and the bases just before and after the dA* residue as templates, depend markedly on the stereochemistry of the B[c]PhDE-modified dA residues. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which bulky PAH-DNA adducts affect normal DNA replication.

  2. DNA Sequencing in Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vai, Stefania; Lari, Martina; Caramelli, David

    2016-02-01

    During the last three decades, DNA analysis on degraded samples revealed itself as an important research tool in anthropology, archaeozoology, molecular evolution, and population genetics. Application on topics such as determination of species origin of prehistoric and historic objects, individual identification of famous personalities, characterization of particular samples important for historical, archeological, or evolutionary reconstructions, confers to the paleogenetics an important role also for the enhancement of cultural heritage. A really fast improvement in methodologies in recent years led to a revolution that permitted recovering even complete genomes from highly degraded samples with the possibility to go back in time 400,000 years for samples from temperate regions and 700,000 years for permafrozen remains and to analyze even more recent material that has been subjected to hard biochemical treatments. Here we propose a review on the different methodological approaches used so far for the molecular analysis of degraded samples and their application on some case studies.

  3. cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project cDNA sequence quality data Data detail Data name cDNA sequence quality... data Description of data contents Phred's quality score. PHD format, one file to a single cDNA data, and co...ription Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  4. Phylogeography of the rice frog, Fejervarya multistriata (Anura: Ranidae), from China based on mtDNA D-loop sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Zhong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2008-08-01

    The rice frog, Fejervarya multistriata, is an amphibian widely distributed in China. In this study, we sampled the species across its distributional area in China and sequenced the mtDNA D-loop to investigate the genetic diversity and geographical pattern of the frog population. The results revealed 38 haplotypes in the population, with K2P values varying from 0.19% to 4.22%. Both a phylogenetic analysis and a nested clade analysis (NCA) detected two geographically isolated lineages respectively distributed around the Yangtze drainage (Yangtze lineage) and the south of China (southern lineage). NCA inferred a contiguous range expansion within the Yangtze lineage and allopatric fragmentation within the southern lineage, which might be partly due to the limited samples from this lineage. Accordingly, Fu's Fs test also indicated a population expansion after glacial movement. Therefore, we assumed that the species history responding to glacial events shaped the present population pattern of F. multistriata on the Chinese mainland.

  5. Design and Assembly of DNA Sequence Libraries for Chromosomal Insertion in Bacteria Based on a Set of Modified MoClo Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Milbredt, Sarah; Sperlea, Theodor; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-12-16

    Efficient assembly of large DNA constructs is a key technology in synthetic biology. One of the most popular assembly systems is the MoClo standard in which restriction and ligation of multiple fragments occurs in a one-pot reaction. The system is based on a smart vector design and type IIs restriction enzymes, which cut outside their recognition site. While the initial MoClo vectors had been developed for the assembly of multiple transcription units of plants, some derivatives of the vectors have been developed over the last years. Here we present a new set of MoClo vectors for the assembly of fragment libraries and insertion of constructs into bacterial chromosomes. The vectors are accompanied by a computer program that generates a degenerate synthetic DNA sequence that excludes "forbidden" DNA motifs. We demonstrate the usability of the new approach by construction of a stable fluorescence repressor operator system (FROS).

  6. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  7. Effects of sequence on DNA wrapping around histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vanessa

    2011-03-01

    A central question in biophysics is whether the sequence of a DNA strand affects its mechanical properties. In epigenetics, these are thought to influence nucleosome positioning and gene expression. Theoretical and experimental attempts to answer this question have been hindered by an inability to directly resolve DNA structure and dynamics at the base-pair level. In our previous studies we used a detailed model of DNA to measure the effects of sequence on the stability of naked DNA under bending. Sequence was shown to influence DNA's ability to form kinks, which arise when certain motifs slide past others to form non-native contacts. Here, we have now included histone-DNA interactions to see if the results obtained for naked DNA are transferable to the problem of nucleosome positioning. Different DNA sequences interacting with the histone protein complex are studied, and their equilibrium and mechanical properties are compared among themselves and with the naked case. NLM training grant to the Computation and Informatics in Biology and Medicine Training Program (NLM T15LM007359).

  8. Phylogenetic study of Oryzoideae species and related taxa of the Poaceae based on atpB-rbcL and ndhF DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xu; Yuan, Zhengrong; Tong, Xin; Li, Qiushi; Gao, Weiwei; Qin, Minjian; Liu, Zhihua

    2012-05-01

    Oryzoideae (Poaceae) plants have economic and ecological value. However, the phylogenetic position of some plants is not clear, such as Hygroryza aristata (Retz.) Nees. and Porteresia coarctata (Roxb.) Tateoka (syn. Oryza coarctata). Comprehensive molecular phylogenetic studies have been carried out on many genera in the Poaceae. The different DNA sequences, including nuclear and chloroplast sequences, had been extensively employed to determine relationships at both higher and lower taxonomic levels in the Poaceae. Chloroplast DNA ndhF gene and atpB-rbcL spacer were used to construct phylogenetic trees and estimate the divergence time of Oryzoideae, Bambusoideae, Panicoideae, Pooideae and so on. Complete sequences of atpB-rbcL and ndhF were generated for 17 species representing six species of the Oryzoideae and related subfamilies. Nicotiana tabacum L. was the outgroup species. The two DNA datasets were analyzed, using Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian analysis methods. The molecular phylogeny revealed that H. aristata (Retz.) Nees was the sister to Chikusichloa aquatica Koidz. Moreover, P. coarctata (Roxb.) Tateoka was in the genus Oryza. Furthermore, the result of evolution analysis, which based on the ndhF marker, indicated that the time of origin of Oryzoideae might be 31 million years ago.

  9. Motivations for undertaking DNA sequencing-based non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal aneuploidy: a qualitative study with early adopter patients in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huso Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A newly introduced cell-free fetal DNA sequencing based non-invasive prenatal testing (DNA-NIPT detects Down syndrome with sensitivity of 99% at early gestational stage without risk of miscarriage. Attention has been given to its public health implications; little is known from consumer perspectives. This qualitative study aimed to explore women's motivations for using, and perceptions of, DNA-NIPT in Hong Kong. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In-depth interviews were conducted with 45 women who had undertaken DNA-NIPT recruited by purposive sampling based on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. The sample included 31 women identified as high-risk from serum and ultrasound based Down syndrome screening (SU-DSS. Thematic narrative analysis examined informed-decision making of the test and identified the benefits and needs. Women outlined a number of reasons for accessing DNA-NIPT: reducing the uncertainty associated with risk probability-based results from SU-DSS, undertaking DNA-NIPT as a comprehensive measure to counteract risk from childbearing especially at advanced age, perceived predictive accuracy and absence of risk of harm to fetus. Accounts of women deemed high-risk or not high-risk are distinctive in a number of respects. High-risk women accessed DNA-NIPT to get a clearer idea of their risk. This group perceived SU-DSS as an unnecessary and confusing procedure because of its varying, protocol-dependent detection rates. Those women not deemed high-risk, in contrast, undertook DNA-NIPT for psychological assurance and to reduce anxiety even after receiving the negative result from SU-DSS. CONCLUSIONS: DNA-NIPT was regarded positively by women who chose this method of screening over the routine, less expensive testing options. Given its perceived utility, health providers need to consider whether DNA-NIPT should be offered as part of universal routine care to women at high-risk for fetal aneuploidy. If this is the case, then

  10. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... HBV is distributed into various genotypes based on nucleic acid sequence variation. ... compared to genotype B and higher incidence of HCC in genotype D ... DNA sequencing technology to sequence HBV DNA polymerase ...

  11. Phylogeny and divergence of Chinese Angiopteridaceae based on chloroplast DNA sequence data (rbcL and trnL-F)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChunXiang; LU ShuGang

    2007-01-01

    Marattioid ferns are an ancient lineage of primitive vascular plants that first appeared in the middle Carboniferous. Extant members are almost exclusively restricted to tropical regions, and the species-rich family Angiopteridaceae are limited in their distribution to the eastern hemisphere; relationships within the group are currently vague. Here the phylogenetic relationship between Angiopteris Hoffm. and Archangiopteris Christ et Gies. was evaluated based on the sequence analysis of chloroplast rbcL gene and trnL-F intergenic spacer with MEGA2 and MrBayes v3.0b4. On the basis of the phylogenetic pattern and fossil record, we further estimated the divergence time for the two genera. The phylogenetic trees revealed that all species of Angiopteris and Archangiopteris in this study formed a monophyletic group with strong statistical support, but the relationship between the two genera remained unresolved based on individual sequence analysis. On the other hand, the sequence analyses of combined data set revealed that Archangiopteris species diverged first, indicating that Archangiopteris may not be a direct derivative as traditionally assumed. The clade of Angiopteris and Archangiopteris appears to have diversified in the late Oligocene (≈26 Ma) based on the molecular estimate. Thus, the evolutionary history of extant Angiopteris and Archangiopteris has been characterized by ancient origin and recent diversification, and these groups are not relic and endangered lineages as traditionally considered.

  12. Molecular phylogeny of parasitic Platyhelminthes based on sequences of partial 28S rDNA D1 and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Ung; Chun, Ha-Chung; Huh, Sun

    2007-09-01

    The phylogenic relationships existing among 14 parasitic Platyhelminthes in the Republic of Korea were investigated via the use of the partial 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1 region and the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (mCOI) DNA sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analyzed by length, G + C %, nucleotide differences and gaps in order to determine the analyzed phylogenic relationships. The phylogenic patterns of the 28S rDNA D1 and mCOI regions were closely related within the same class and order as analyzed by the PAUP 4.0 program, with the exception of a few species. These findings indicate that the 28S rDNA gene sequence is more highly conserved than are the mCOI gene sequences. The 28S rDNA gene may prove useful in studies of the systematics and population genetic structures of parasitic Platyhelminthes.

  13. A zinc(II)-based two-dimensional MOF for sensitive and selective sensing of HIV-1 ds-DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hai-Qing; Qiu, Gui-Hua; Liang, Zhen [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of New Drug Screening, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Min-Min [The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Sun, Bin; Qin, Liang; Yang, Shui-Ping; Chen, Wen-Hua [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of New Drug Screening, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Chen, Jin-Xiang, E-mail: jxchen@smu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of New Drug Screening, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2016-05-30

    Coordination reaction of a known three-dimensional (3D) polymer precursor {Na_3[Na_9(Cbdcp)_6(H_2O)_1_8]}{sub n} (A, Cbdcp = N-(4-carboxybenzyl)-(3,5-dicarboxyl)pyridinium) with Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O in H{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}O/DMF at 100 °C and in the presence of aspirin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as modulators, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (bpe) or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpea) as ancillary ligands afforded six novel Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), that is, {[Zn(Cbdcp)(H_2O)_3]·H_2O}{sub n} (1, 1D zigzag chain), {[Zn(HCbdcp)_2]·H_2O}{sub n} (2, 2D sheet), {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpe)_1_/_2]·2H_2O}{sub n} (3, 3D polymer), {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpe)_1_/_2]·2H_2O}{sub n} (4, 2D network), {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpea)_1_/_2]·2H_2O}{sub n} (5, 3D polymer) and {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpea)_1_/_2]·2H_2O}{sub n} (6, 2D network). Among them, compound 2 contains aromatic rings, positively charged pyridinium, Zn{sup 2+} cation centers and carboxylic acid groups lined up on the 2D sheet structure with a certain extended surface exposure. The unique structure of 2 facilitates effective association with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) labeled probe single stranded DNA (probe ss-DNA, delineates as P-DNA) to yield a P-DNA@2 system, and leads to fluorescence quenching of FAM via a photoinduced electron transfer process. The P-DNA@2 system is effective and reliable for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 ds-DNA (HIV ds-DNA) sequences and capable of distinguishing complementary HIV ds-DNA from mismatched target sequences with the detection limit as low as 10 pM (S/N = 3). - Graphical abstract: Six water-stable zinc(II) zwitterionic carboxylate compounds with 1D chain, 2D and 3D networks were synthesized. Compound 2 can interact with the probe DNA through noncovalent bonds to form P-DNA@2 system. This system can be used as an effective, fluorescent sensing platform for the detection of HIV ds-DNA with the detection limit as low as 10 pM. - Highlights: • Six water-stable zinc

  14. Statistical method evaluation for differentially methylated CpGs in base resolution next-generation DNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Baheti, Saurabh; Sun, Zhifu

    2016-12-31

    High-throughput bisulfite methylation sequencing such as reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), Agilent SureSelect Human Methyl-Seq (Methyl-seq) or whole-genome bisulfite sequencing is commonly used for base resolution methylome research. These data are represented either by the ratio of methylated cytosine versus total coverage at a CpG site or numbers of methylated and unmethylated cytosines. Multiple statistical methods can be used to detect differentially methylated CpGs (DMCs) between conditions, and these methods are often the base for the next step of differentially methylated region identification. The ratio data have a flexibility of fitting to many linear models, but the raw count data take consideration of coverage information. There is an array of options in each datatype for DMC detection; however, it is not clear which is an optimal statistical method. In this study, we systematically evaluated four statistic methods on methylation ratio data and four methods on count-based data and compared their performances with regard to type I error control, sensitivity and specificity of DMC detection and computational resource demands using real RRBS data along with simulation. Our results show that the ratio-based tests are generally more conservative (less sensitive) than the count-based tests. However, some count-based methods have high false-positive rates and should be avoided. The beta-binomial model gives a good balance between sensitivity and specificity and is preferred method. Selection of methods in different settings, signal versus noise and sample size estimation are also discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. CanScript, an 18-Base pair DNA sequence, boosts tumor cell-specific promoter activity: implications for targeted gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Richards, Nathan G; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Yeo, Charles J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Brody, Jonathan R; Sawicki, Janet A

    2010-11-01

    Gene therapy protocols for the treatment of cancer often employ gene promoter sequences that are known to be over-expressed in specific tumor cell types relative to normal cells. These promoters, while specific, are often weakly active. It would be desirable to increase the activity of such promoters, while at the same time retain specificity, so that the therapeutic gene is more robustly expressed. Using a luciferase reporter DNA construct in both in vitro cell transfection assays and in vivo mouse tumor models, we have determined that in the absence of any other DNA sequence, a previously identified 18-base pair enhancer sequence called CanScript, lying upstream of the MSLN gene, has ~25% of the promoter activity of CAG, a very strong non-specific promoter/enhancer, in tumor cells in which MSLN is highly expressed. Furthermore, tandem repeat copies of CanScript enhance transcription in a dose-dependent manner and, when coupled with promoter sequences that are active in tumor cells, increase promoter activity. These findings suggest that the incorporation of CanScript into gene constructs may have application in enhancing activity of promoters used in cancer-targeting gene therapy strategies, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy.

  16. A DNA sequence alignment algorithm using quality information and a fuzzy inference method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwangbaek Kim; Minhwan Kim; Youngwoon Woo

    2008-01-01

    DNA sequence alignment algorithms in computational molecular biology have been improved by diverse methods.In this paper.We propose a DNA sequence alignment that Uses quality information and a fuzzy inference method developed based on the characteristics of DNA fragments and a fuzzy logic system in order to improve conventional DNA sequence alignment methods that uses DNA sequence quality information.In conventional algorithms.DNA sequence alignment scores are calculated by the global sequence alignment algorithm proposed by Needleman-Wunsch,which is established by using quality information of each DNA fragment.However,there may be errors in the process of calculating DNA sequence alignment scores when the quality of DNA fragment tips is low.because only the overall DNA sequence quality information are used.In our proposed method.an exact DNA sequence alignment can be achieved in spite of the low quality of DNA fragment tips by improvement of conventional algorithms using quality information.Mapping score parameters used to calculate DNA sequence alignment scores are dynamically adjusted by the fuzzy logic system utilizing lengths of DNA fragments and frequencies of low quality DNA bases in the fragments.From the experiments by applying real genome data of National Center for Bioteclmology Information,we could see that the proposed method is more efficient than conventional algorithms.

  17. PCR primers for metazoan mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji J Machida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans.

  18. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  19. Phylogenetic relationships of Brazilian isolates of Pythium insidiosum based on ITS rDNA and cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, M I; Botton, S A; Pereira, D I B; Robe, L J; Jesus, F P K; Mahl, C D; Costa, M M; Alves, S H; Santurio, J M

    2012-09-14

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that is the causative agent of pythiosis. Advances in molecular methods have enabled increased accuracy in the diagnosis of pythiosis, and in studies of the phylogenetic relationships of this oomycete. To evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil, and also regarding to other American and Thai isolates, in this study a total of thirty isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil was used and had their ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 rDNA (ITS) region and the partial sequence of cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) gene sequenced and analyzed. The outgroup consisted of six isolates of other Pythium species and one of Lagenidium giganteum. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and COX II genes were conducted, both individually and in combination, using four different methods: Maximum parsimony (MP); Neighbor-joining (NJ); Maximum likelihood (ML); and Bayesian analysis (BA). Our data supported P. insidiosum as monophyletic in relation to the other Pythium species, and COX II showed that P. insidiosum appears to be subdivided into three major polytomous groups, whose arrangement provides the Thai isolates as paraphyletic in relation to the Brazilian ones. The molecular analyses performed in this study suggest an evolutionary proximity among all American isolates, including the Brazilian and the Central and North America isolates, which were grouped together in a single entirely polytomous clade. The COX II network results presented signals of a recent expansion for the American isolates, probably originated from an Asian invasion source. Here, COX II showed higher levels bias, although it was the source of higher levels of phylogenetic information when compared to ITS. Nevertheless, the two markers chosen for this study proved to be entirely congruent, at least with respect to phylogenetic relationships between different isolates of P. insidiosum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  20. Detection of germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 based on cDNA sequencing in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Fu Wang; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Tai-Ming Zhang; Meng-Hong Sun; Da-Ren Shi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2based on mRNA sequencing to identify hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families.METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 14 members from 12 different families fulfilling Amsterdam criteria Ⅱ. mRNA of hMLH1 and hMSH2 was reversed with special primers and heat-resistant reverse transcriptase. cDNA was amplified with expand long template PCR and cDNA sequendng analysis was followed.RESULT: Seven germline mutations were found in 6families (6/12, 50%), in 4 hMLH1 and 3 hMSH2 mutations (4/12, 33.3%); (3/12, 25%). The mutation types involved 4 missense, 1 silent and 1 frame shift mutations as well as 1 mutation in the non-coding area. Four out of the seven mutations have not been reported previously. The 4 hMLH1mutations were distributed in exons 8, 12, 16, and 19. The 3hMSH2 mutations were distributed in exons 1 and 2. Six out of the 7 mutations were pathological, which were distributed in 5 HNPCC families.CONCLUSION: Germline mutations of hMLH1 and hMSH2 can be found based on cDNA sequencing so as to identify HNPCC family, which is highly sensitive and has the advantages of cost and time saving.

  1. A well-resolved phylogeny of the trees of Puerto Rico based on DNA barcode sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarella, Robert; Uriarte, María; Erickson, David L; Swenson, Nathan G; Zimmerman, Jess K; Kress, W John

    2014-01-01

    The use of phylogenetic information in community ecology and conservation has grown in recent years. Two key issues for community phylogenetics studies, however, are (i) low terminal phylogenetic resolution and (ii) arbitrarily defined species pools. We used three DNA barcodes (plastid DNA regions rbcL, matK, and trnH-psbA) to infer a phylogeny for 527 native and naturalized trees of Puerto Rico, representing the vast majority of the entire tree flora of the island (89%). We used a maximum likelihood (ML) approach with and without a constraint tree that enforced monophyly of recognized plant orders. Based on 50% consensus trees, the ML analyses improved phylogenetic resolution relative to a comparable phylogeny generated with Phylomatic (proportion of internal nodes resolved: constrained ML = 74%, unconstrained ML = 68%, Phylomatic = 52%). We quantified the phylogenetic composition of 15 protected forests in Puerto Rico using the constrained ML and Phylomatic phylogenies. We found some evidence that tree communities in areas of high water stress were relatively phylogenetically clustered. Reducing the scale at which the species pool was defined (from island to soil types) changed some of our results depending on which phylogeny (ML vs. Phylomatic) was used. Overall, the increased terminal resolution provided by the ML phylogeny revealed additional patterns that were not observed with a less-resolved phylogeny. With the DNA barcode phylogeny presented here (based on an island-wide species pool), we show that a more fully resolved phylogeny increases power to detect nonrandom patterns of community composition in several Puerto Rican tree communities. Especially if combined with additional information on species functional traits and geographic distributions, this phylogeny will (i) facilitate stronger inferences about the role of historical processes in governing the assembly and composition of Puerto Rican forests, (ii) provide insight into Caribbean

  2. A well-resolved phylogeny of the trees of Puerto Rico based on DNA barcode sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Muscarella

    Full Text Available The use of phylogenetic information in community ecology and conservation has grown in recent years. Two key issues for community phylogenetics studies, however, are (i low terminal phylogenetic resolution and (ii arbitrarily defined species pools.We used three DNA barcodes (plastid DNA regions rbcL, matK, and trnH-psbA to infer a phylogeny for 527 native and naturalized trees of Puerto Rico, representing the vast majority of the entire tree flora of the island (89%. We used a maximum likelihood (ML approach with and without a constraint tree that enforced monophyly of recognized plant orders. Based on 50% consensus trees, the ML analyses improved phylogenetic resolution relative to a comparable phylogeny generated with Phylomatic (proportion of internal nodes resolved: constrained ML = 74%, unconstrained ML = 68%, Phylomatic = 52%. We quantified the phylogenetic composition of 15 protected forests in Puerto Rico using the constrained ML and Phylomatic phylogenies. We found some evidence that tree communities in areas of high water stress were relatively phylogenetically clustered. Reducing the scale at which the species pool was defined (from island to soil types changed some of our results depending on which phylogeny (ML vs. Phylomatic was used. Overall, the increased terminal resolution provided by the ML phylogeny revealed additional patterns that were not observed with a less-resolved phylogeny.With the DNA barcode phylogeny presented here (based on an island-wide species pool, we show that a more fully resolved phylogeny increases power to detect nonrandom patterns of community composition in several Puerto Rican tree communities. Especially if combined with additional information on species functional traits and geographic distributions, this phylogeny will (i facilitate stronger inferences about the role of historical processes in governing the assembly and composition of Puerto Rican forests, (ii provide insight into

  3. DNA sequencing by nanopores: advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Zheng, Ming; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Developing inexpensive and simple DNA sequencing methods capable of detecting entire genomes in short periods of time could revolutionize the world of medicine and technology. It will also lead to major advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes. It has been shown that nanopores have the ability of single-molecule sensing of various biological molecules rapidly and at a low cost. This has stimulated significant experimental efforts in developing DNA sequencing techniques by utilizing biological and artificial nanopores. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the nanopore sequencing field with a focus on the nature of nanopores and on sensing mechanisms during the translocation. Current challenges and alternative methods are also discussed.

  4. Bisulfite sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA (BisChIP-seq) directly informs methylation status of histone-modified DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Statham, A.L.; Robinson, M.D.; Song, J.Z.; Coolen, M.W.; Stirzaker, C.; Clark, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    The complex relationship between DNA methylation, chromatin modification, and underlying DNA sequence is often difficult to unravel with existing technologies. Here, we describe a novel technique based on high-throughput sequencing of bisulfite-treated chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA (BisChIP-seq),

  5. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  6. Evaluation of direct 16S rDNA sequencing as a metagenomics-based approach to screening bacteria in bottled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Trine; Skånseng, Beate; Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-09-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of food, feed, and water supplies poses a threat to human health worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection technique that could replace the current labor-intensive and time-consuming culture-based methods is highly desirable. In addition to species-specific assays, such as PCR, there is a need for generic methods to screen for unknown pathogenic microorganisms in samples. This work presents a metagenomics-based direct-sequencing approach for detecting unknown microorganisms, using Bacillus cereus (as a model organism for B. anthracis) in bottled water as an example. Total DNA extraction and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used in combination with principle component analysis and multicurve resolution to study detection level and possibility for identification. Results showed a detection level of 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/L. Using this method, it was possible to separate 2 B. cereus strains by the principal component plot, despite the close sequence resemblance. A linear correlation between the artificial contamination level and the relative amount of the Bacillus artificial contaminant in the metagenome was observed, and a relative amount value above 0.5 confirmed the presence of Bacillus. The analysis also revealed that background flora in the bottled water varied between the different water types that were included in the study. This method has the potential to be adapted to other biological matrices and bacterial pathogens for fast screening of unknown bacterial threats in outbreak situations.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of the family Araucariaceae based on the DNA sequences of eight genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Nian; ZHU Yong; WEI ZongXian; CHEN Jie; WANG QingBiao; JIAN ShuGuang; ZHOU DangWei; SHI Jing; YANG Yong; ZHONG Yang

    2009-01-01

    Araucariaceae is one of the most primitive families of the living conifers,and its phylogenetic relationships and divergence times are critically important issues.The DNA sequences of 8 genes,i.e.,nuclear ribosomal 18S and 26S rRNA,chloroplast 16S rRNA,rbcL,mafK and rps4,and mitochondrial coxl and atp1,obtained from this study and GenBank were used for constructing the molecular phylogenetic trees of Araucariaceae,indicating that the phylogenetic relationships among the three genera of this family should be ((Wollemia,Agathis),Araucaria).On the basis of the fossil calibrations of Wollemia and the two tribes Araucaria and Eutacta of the genus Araucaria,the divergence time of Araucariaceae was estimated to be (308±53) million years ago,that is,the origin of the family was in the Late Carboniferous rather than Triassic as a traditional view.With the same gene combination,the divergence times of the genera Araucaria and Agathis were (246 ±47) and (61±5) Ma,respectively.Statistical analyses on the phylogenetic trees generated by using different genes and comparisons of thedivergence times estimated by using those genes suggested that the chloroplast mafK and rps4 genes are most suitable for investigating the phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of the family Araucariaceae.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvatsi, A; Karaiskou, N; Apostolidis, A; Kirmizidis, G

    2001-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences were determined in 54 unrelated Greeks, coming from different regions in Greece, for both segments HVR-I and HVR-II. Fifty-two different mtDNA haplotypes were revealed, one of which was shared by three individuals. A very low heterogeneity was found among Greek regions. No one cluster of lineages was specific to individuals coming from a certain region. The average pairwise difference distribution showed a value of 7.599. The data were compared with that for other European or neighbor populations (British, French, Germans, Tuscans, Bulgarians, and Turks). The genetic trees that were constructed revealed homogeneity between Europeans. Median networks revealed that most of the Greek mtDNA haplotypes are clustered to the five known haplogroups and that a number of haplotypes are shared among Greeks and other European and Near Eastern populations.

  9. Directed PCR-free engineering of highly repetitive DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preissler Steffen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly repetitive nucleotide sequences are commonly found in nature e.g. in telomeres, microsatellite DNA, polyadenine (poly(A tails of eukaryotic messenger RNA as well as in several inherited human disorders linked to trinucleotide repeat expansions in the genome. Therefore, studying repetitive sequences is of biological, biotechnological and medical relevance. However, cloning of such repetitive DNA sequences is challenging because specific PCR-based amplification is hampered by the lack of unique primer binding sites resulting in unspecific products. Results For the PCR-free generation of repetitive DNA sequences we used antiparallel oligonucleotides flanked by restriction sites of Type IIS endonucleases. The arrangement of recognition sites allowed for stepwise and seamless elongation of repetitive sequences. This facilitated the assembly of repetitive DNA segments and open reading frames encoding polypeptides with periodic amino acid sequences of any desired length. By this strategy we cloned a series of polyglutamine encoding sequences as well as highly repetitive polyadenine tracts. Such repetitive sequences can be used for diverse biotechnological applications. As an example, the polyglutamine sequences were expressed as His6-SUMO fusion proteins in Escherichia coli cells to study their aggregation behavior in vitro. The His6-SUMO moiety enabled affinity purification of the polyglutamine proteins, increased their solubility, and allowed controlled induction of the aggregation process. We successfully purified the fusions proteins and provide an example for their applicability in filter retardation assays. Conclusion Our seamless cloning strategy is PCR-free and allows the directed and efficient generation of highly repetitive DNA sequences of defined lengths by simple standard cloning procedures.

  10. Improved Algorithm for Analysis of DNA Sequences Using Multiresolution Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Inbamalar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics and genomic signal processing use computational techniques to solve various biological problems. They aim to study the information allied with genetic materials such as the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, the ribonucleic acid (RNA, and the proteins. Fast and precise identification of the protein coding regions in DNA sequence is one of the most important tasks in analysis. Existing digital signal processing (DSP methods provide less accurate and computationally complex solution with greater background noise. Hence, improvements in accuracy, computational complexity, and reduction in background noise are essential in identification of the protein coding regions in the DNA sequences. In this paper, a new DSP based method is introduced to detect the protein coding regions in DNA sequences. Here, the DNA sequences are converted into numeric sequences using electron ion interaction potential (EIIP representation. Then discrete wavelet transformation is taken. Absolute value of the energy is found followed by proper threshold. The test is conducted using the data bases available in the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI site. The comparative analysis is done and it ensures the efficiency of the proposed system.

  11. Improved algorithm for analysis of DNA sequences using multiresolution transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbamalar, T M; Sivakumar, R

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics and genomic signal processing use computational techniques to solve various biological problems. They aim to study the information allied with genetic materials such as the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the ribonucleic acid (RNA), and the proteins. Fast and precise identification of the protein coding regions in DNA sequence is one of the most important tasks in analysis. Existing digital signal processing (DSP) methods provide less accurate and computationally complex solution with greater background noise. Hence, improvements in accuracy, computational complexity, and reduction in background noise are essential in identification of the protein coding regions in the DNA sequences. In this paper, a new DSP based method is introduced to detect the protein coding regions in DNA sequences. Here, the DNA sequences are converted into numeric sequences using electron ion interaction potential (EIIP) representation. Then discrete wavelet transformation is taken. Absolute value of the energy is found followed by proper threshold. The test is conducted using the data bases available in the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) site. The comparative analysis is done and it ensures the efficiency of the proposed system.

  12. Bisprimer--a program for the design of primers for bisulfite-based genomic sequencing of both plant and Mammalian DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacova, Viera; Janousek, Bohuslav

    2012-01-01

    Plants and animals differ in the sequence context of the methylated sites in DNA. Plants exhibit cytosine methylation in CG, CHG, and CHH sites, whereas CG methylation is the only form present in mammals (with an exception of the early embryonic development). This fact must be taken into account in the design of primers for bisulfite-based genomic sequencing because CHG and CHH sites can remain unmodified. Surprisingly, no user-friendly primer design program is publicly available that could be used to design primers in plants and to simultaneously check the properties of primers such as the potential for primer-dimer formation. For studies concentrating on particular DNA loci, the correct design of primers is crucial. The program, called BisPrimer, includes 2 different subprograms for the primer design, the first one for mammals and the second one for angiosperm plants. Each subprogram is divided into 2 variants. The first variant serves to design primers that preferentially bind to the bisulfite-modified primer-binding sites (C to U conversion). This type of primer preferentially amplifies the bisulfite-converted DNA strands. This feature can help to avoid problems connected with an incomplete bisulfite modification that can sometimes occur for technical reasons. The second variant is intended for the analysis of samples that are supposed to consist of a mixture of DNA molecules that have different levels of cytosine methylation (e.g., pollen DNA). In this case, the aim is to minimize the selection in favor of either less methylated or more methylated molecules.

  13. Noninvasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) through maternal plasma DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Yifan; Li, Xuchao

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been already used to perform noninvasive prenatal paternity testing from maternal plasma DNA. The frequently used technologies were PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and SNP typing array, respectively. Here, we...... developed a noninvasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) based on SNP typing with maternal plasma DNA sequencing. We evaluated the influence factors (minor allele frequency (MAF), the number of total SNP, fetal fraction and effective sequencing depth) and designed three different selective SNP panels...... paternity test using STR multiplex system. Our study here proved that the maternal plasma DNA sequencing-based technology is feasible and accurate in determining paternity, which may provide an alternative in forensic application in the future....

  14. Genetic variation between two Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) populations in the eastern China based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongfang; Zhong, Lijing; Liu, Bofeng; Li, Jiayi; Ni, Qingyong; Xu, Huailiang

    2013-06-01

    Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a threatened primate species endemic to China. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were conducted in 66 Tibetan individuals from Sichuan (SC), Huangshan (HS), and Fujian (FJ) based on a 477-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA control region. Four new haplotypes were defined, and a relatively high level of genetic diversity was first observed in FJ populations (Hd = 0.7661). Notably, a continuous approximately 10 bp-fragment deletion was observed near the 5' end of the mtDNA control region of both HS and FJ populations when compared with that of SC population, and a sharing haplotype was found between the two populations, revealing a closer genetic relationship. However, significant genetic differentiation (FST = 0.8700) and more poor gene exchange (Nm < 1) had occurred among three populations. This study mainly provide a further insight into the genetic relationship between HS and FJ Tibetan macaque populations, but it may be necessary to carry out further study with extra samples from other locations in the geographic coverage of the two subspecies (M. thibetana pullus and M. thibetana huangshanensis).

  15. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusling, David A; Fox, Keith R

    2014-05-15

    DNA is the most exploited biopolymer for the programmed self-assembly of objects and devices that exhibit nanoscale-sized features. One of the most useful properties of DNA nanostructures is their ability to be functionalized with additional non-nucleic acid components. The introduction of such a component is often achieved by attaching it to an oligonucleotide that is part of the nanostructure, or hybridizing it to single-stranded overhangs that extend beyond or above the nanostructure surface. However, restrictions in nanostructure design and/or the self-assembly process can limit the suitability of these procedures. An alternative strategy is to couple the component to a DNA recognition agent that is capable of binding to duplex sequences within the nanostructure. This offers the advantage that it requires little, if any, alteration to the nanostructure and can be achieved after structure assembly. In addition, since the molecular recognition of DNA can be controlled by varying pH and ionic conditions, such systems offer tunable properties that are distinct from simple Watson-Crick hybridization. Here, we describe methodology that has been used to exploit and characterize the sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures, with the aim of generating functional assemblies for bionanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

  16. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    CERN Document Server

    Satarifard, Vahid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assessed. Simulation results demonstrate the strong effect of the pore shape as well as geometrical symmetry on free energy barrier, orientations and dynamic of DNA translocation through graphene nanopore. Our study proposes that the symmetric circular geometry of monolayer graphene nanopore with high pulling velocity can be used for DNA sequencing.

  17. Qualitatively predicting acetylation and methylation areas in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tho Hoan; Tran, Dang Hung; Ho, Tu Bao; Satou, Kenji; Valiente, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged by the wrapping of DNA around histone octamers to form nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy, acetylation, and methylation, which have a major impact on all nuclear processes involving DNA, have been recently mapped across the yeast genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarrays. However, this experimental protocol is laborious and expensive. Moreover, experimental methods often produce noisy results. In this paper, we introduce a computational approach to the qualitative prediction of nucleosome occupancy, acetylation, and methylation areas in DNA sequences. Our method uses support vector machines to discriminate between DNA areas with high and low relative occupancy, acetylation, or methylation, and rank k-gram features based on their support for these DNA modifications. Experimental results on the yeast genome reveal genetic area preferences of nucleosome occupancy, acetylation, and methylation that are consistent with previous studies. Supplementary files are available from http://www.jaist.ac.jp/~tran/nucleosome/.

  18. Can DNA-Based Ecosystem Assessments Quantify Species Abundance? Testing Primer Bias and Biomass--Sequence Relationships with an Innovative Metabarcoding Protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Elbrecht

    Full Text Available Metabarcoding is an emerging genetic tool to rapidly assess biodiversity in ecosystems. It involves high-throughput sequencing of a standard gene from an environmental sample and comparison to a reference database. However, no consensus has emerged regarding laboratory pipelines to screen species diversity and infer species abundances from environmental samples. In particular, the effect of primer bias and the detection limit for specimens with a low biomass has not been systematically examined, when processing samples in bulk. We developed and tested a DNA metabarcoding protocol that utilises the standard cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI barcoding fragment to detect freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa. DNA was extracted in bulk, amplified in a single PCR step, and purified, and the libraries were directly sequenced in two independent MiSeq runs (300-bp paired-end reads. Specifically, we assessed the influence of specimen biomass on sequence read abundance by sequencing 31 specimens of a stonefly species with known haplotypes spanning three orders of magnitude in biomass (experiment I. Then, we tested the recovery of 52 different freshwater invertebrate taxa of similar biomass using the same standard barcoding primers (experiment II. Each experiment was replicated ten times to maximise statistical power. The results of both experiments were consistent across replicates. We found a distinct positive correlation between species biomass and resulting numbers of MiSeq reads. Furthermore, we reliably recovered 83% of the 52 taxa used to test primer bias. However, sequence abundance varied by four orders of magnitudes between taxa despite the use of similar amounts of biomass. Our metabarcoding approach yielded reliable results for high-throughput assessments. However, the results indicated that primer efficiency is highly species-specific, which would prevent straightforward assessments of species abundance and biomass in a sample. Thus, PCR-based

  19. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2015-02-26

    Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair single-strand DNA (ssDNA) with a homologous double-strand DNA (dsDNA) template. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a ninth nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy, and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Sequence-Based Feature for the Identification of DNA-Binding Sites in Proteins Using Jensen–Shannon Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Khanh Linh Dang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of protein-DNA interactions is essential to fully understand the molecular activities of life. Many research groups have developed various tools which are either structure- or sequence-based approaches to predict the DNA-binding residues in proteins. The structure-based methods usually achieve good results, but require the knowledge of the 3D structure of protein; while sequence-based methods can be applied to high-throughput of proteins, but require good features. In this study, we present a new information theoretic feature derived from Jensen–Shannon Divergence (JSD between amino acid distribution of a site and the background distribution of non-binding sites. Our new feature indicates the difference of a certain site from a non-binding site, thus it is informative for detecting binding sites in proteins. We conduct the study with a five-fold cross validation of 263 proteins utilizing the Random Forest classifier. We evaluate the functionality of our new features by combining them with other popular existing features such as position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM, orthogonal binary vector (OBV, and secondary structure (SS. We notice that by adding our features, we can significantly boost the performance of Random Forest classifier, with a clear increment of sensitivity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC.

  1. Applications of recursive segmentation to the analysis of DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Haghighi, Fatameh; Grosse, Ivo

    2002-07-01

    Recursive segmentation is a procedure that partitions a DNA sequence into domains with a homogeneous composition of the four nucleotides A, C, G and T. This procedure can also be applied to any sequence converted from a DNA sequence, such as to a binary strong(G + C)/weak(A + T) sequence, to a binary sequence indicating the presence or absence of the dinucleotide CpG, or to a sequence indicating both the base and the codon position information. We apply various conversion schemes in order to address the following five DNA sequence analysis problems: isochore mapping, CpG island detection, locating the origin and terminus of replication in bacterial genomes, finding complex repeats in telomere sequences, and delineating coding and noncoding regions. We find that the recursive segmentation procedure can successfully detect isochore borders, CpG islands, and the origin and terminus of replication, but it needs improvement for detecting complex repeats as well as borders between coding and noncoding regions.

  2. Chaos game representation (CGR)-walk model for DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jie; Xu Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Chaos game representation (CGR) is an iterative mapping technique that processes sequences of units, such as nucleotides in a DNA sequence or amino acids in a protein, in order to determine the coordinates of their positions in a continuous space. This distribution of positions has two features: one is unique, and the other is source sequence that can be recovered from the coordinates so that the distance between positions may serve as a measure of similarity between the corresponding sequences. A CGR-walk model is proposed based on CGR coordinates for the DNA sequences. The CGR coordinates are converted into a time series, and a long-memory ARFIMA (p, d, q) model, where ARFIMA stands for autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average, is introduced into the DNA sequence analysis. This model is applied to simulating real CGR-walk sequence data of ten genomic sequences. Remarkably long-range correlations are uncovered in the data, and the results from these models are reasonably fitted with those from the ARFIMA (p, d, q) model.

  3. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Saba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction procedure though which a pure template DNA is yielded and it can be used in polymerase chain reactions (PCR. Considering the fact that DNA extraction from these microorganisms is time consuming and laborious, we developed and standardized a safe, rapid and inexpensive miniprep protocol. Methods:  According to our results, amplification of various genomic regions including SSU, LSU, ITS, β-tubulin, actin, RPB2, and EF-1 resulted in a reproducible and efficient DNA extraction from a wide range of microorganisms yielding adequate pure genomic material for reproducible PCR-amplifications. Results:   This method relies on a temporary shock of increased concentrations of detergent which can be applied concomitant with multiple freeze-thaws to yield sufficient amount of DNA for PCR amplification of multiple or single fragments(s of the genome. As an advantage, the recipe seems very flexible, thus, various optional steps can be included depending on the samples used.Conclusion:   Having the needed flexibility in each step, this protocol is applicable on a very wide range of samples. Hence, various steps can be included depending on the desired quantity and quality.

  4. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Saba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction procedure though which a pure template DNA is yielded and it can be used in polymerase chain reactions (PCR. Considering the fact that DNA extraction from these microorganisms is time consuming and laborious, we developed and standardized a safe, rapid and inexpensive miniprep protocol. Methods:  According to our results, amplification of various genomic regions including SSU, LSU, ITS, β-tubulin, actin, RPB2, and EF-1 resulted in a reproducible and efficient DNA extraction from a wide range of microorganisms yielding adequate pure genomic material for reproducible PCR-amplifications. Results:   This method relies on a temporary shock of increased concentrations of detergent which can be applied concomitant with multiple freeze-thaws to yield sufficient amount of DNA for PCR amplification of multiple or single fragments(s of the genome. As an advantage, the recipe seems very flexible, thus, various optional steps can be included depending on the samples used.Conclusion:   Having the needed flexibility in each step, this protocol is applicable on a very wide range of samples. Hence, various steps can be included depending on the desired quantity and quality.

  5. Label-Free DNA Sequencing Using Millikan Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Dettloff, Roger; Leiske, Danielle; Chow, Andrea; Farinas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A label-free method for DNA sequencing based on the principle of the Millikan oil drop experiment was developed. This sequencing-by-synthesis approach sensed increases in bead charge as nucleotides were added by a polymerase to DNA templates attached to beads. The balance between an electrical force, which was dependent on the number of nucleotide charges on a bead, and opposing hydrodynamic drag and restoring tether forces resulted in a bead velocity that was a function of the number of nucl...

  6. Rapid DNA sequencing by horizontal ultrathin gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, R L; Smith, L M

    1991-01-01

    A horizontal polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparatus has been developed that decreases the time required to separate the DNA fragments produced in enzymatic sequencing reactions. The configuration of this apparatus and the use of circulating coolant directly under the glass plates result in heat exchange that is approximately nine times more efficient than passive thermal transfer methods commonly used. Bubble-free gels as thin as 25 microns can be routinely cast on this device. The application to these ultrathin gels of electric fields up to 250 volts/cm permits the rapid separation of multiple DNA sequencing reactions in parallel. When used in conjunction with 32P-based autoradiography, the DNA bands appear substantially sharper than those obtained in conventional electrophoresis. This increased sharpness permits shorter autoradiographic exposure times and longer sequence reads. Images PMID:1870968

  7. Label-free DNA sequencing using Millikan detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettloff, Roger; Leiske, Danielle; Chow, Andrea; Farinas, Javier

    2015-10-15

    A label-free method for DNA sequencing based on the principle of the Millikan oil drop experiment was developed. This sequencing-by-synthesis approach sensed increases in bead charge as nucleotides were added by a polymerase to DNA templates attached to beads. The balance between an electrical force, which was dependent on the number of nucleotide charges on a bead, and opposing hydrodynamic drag and restoring tether forces resulted in a bead velocity that was a function of the number of nucleotides attached to the bead. The velocity of beads tethered via a polymer to a microfluidic channel and subjected to an oscillating electric field was measured using dark-field microscopy and used to determine how many nucleotides were incorporated during each sequencing-by-synthesis cycle. Increases in bead velocity of approximately 1% were reliably detected during DNA polymerization, allowing for sequencing of short DNA templates. The method could lead to a low-cost, high-throughput sequencing platform that could enable routine sequencing in medical applications.

  8. Statistical Methods for Population Genetic Inference Based on Low-Depth Sequencing Data from Modern and Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand

    that is required before being able to make inferences from the data introduces multiple levels of uncertainty, especially for low-depth data. Therefore methods that take into account the inherent uncertainty are needed for being able to make robust inferences in the downstream analysis of such data. This poses...... a problem for a range of key summary statistics within populations genetics where existing methods are based on the assumption that the true genotypes are known. Motivated by this I present: 1) a new method for the estimation of relatedness between pairs of individuals, 2) a new method for estimating...... neutrality test statistics, which are commonly used for finding genomic regions that have been under natural selection, 3) a new method for estimating individual admixture proportions, which can be used for finding population structure and 4) a general framework for analysis of high-throughput sequencing...

  9. Isolation and identification of spoilage microorganisms using food-based media combined with rDNA sequencing: ranch dressing as a model food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Joy G; Jones, Joseph M; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2009-05-01

    Investigating microbial spoilage of food is hampered by the lack of suitable growth media and protocols to characterize the causative agents. Microbial spoilage of salad dressing is sporadic and relatively unpredictable, thus processors struggle to develop strategies to minimize or prevent spoilage of this product. The objectives of this study were to (i) induce and characterize spoilage events in ranch-style dressing as a model food, and (ii) isolate and identify the causative microorganisms using traditional and food-based media, coupled with rDNA sequence analysis. Ranch dressing (pH 4.4) was prepared and stored at 25 degrees C for 14 d and microbial populations were recovered on MRS agar and ranch dressing agar (RDA), a newly formulated food-based medium. When isolates suspected as the spoilage agents were inoculated into ranch dressing and held at 25 degrees C for 9-10 d, three unique spoilage events were characterized. Using rDNA sequence comparisons, spoilage organisms were identified as Lactobacillus brevis, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Torulaspora delbrueckii. P. acidilactici produced flat-sour spoilage, whereas Lb. brevis resulted in product acidification and moderate gas production. The RDA medium allowed for optimum recovery of the excessive gas-producing spoilage yeast, T. delbrueckii. The isolation and identification strategy utilized in this work should assist in the characterization of spoilage organisms in other food systems.

  10. Bamboo tea: reduction of taxonomic complexity and application of DNA diagnostics based on rbcL and matK sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häser, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background Names used in ingredient lists of food products are trivial and in their nature rarely precise. The most recent scientific interpretation of the term bamboo (Bambusoideae, Poaceae) comprises over 1,600 distinct species. In the European Union only few of these exotic species are well known sources for food ingredients (i.e., bamboo sprouts) and are thus not considered novel foods, which would require safety assessments before marketing of corresponding products. In contrast, the use of bamboo leaves and their taxonomic origin is mostly unclear. However, products containing bamboo leaves are currently marketed. Methods We analysed bamboo species and tea products containing bamboo leaves using anatomical leaf characters and DNA sequence data. To reduce taxonomic complexity associated with the term bamboo, we used a phylogenetic framework to trace the origin of DNA from commercially available bamboo leaves within the bambusoid subfamily. For authentication purposes, we introduced a simple PCR based test distinguishing genuine bamboo from other leaf components and assessed the diagnostic potential of rbcL and matK to resolve taxonomic entities within the bamboo subfamily and tribes. Results Based on anatomical and DNA data we were able to trace the taxonomic origin of bamboo leaves used in products to the genera Phyllostachys and Pseudosasa from the temperate “woody” bamboo tribe (Arundinarieae). Currently available rbcL and matK sequence data allow the character based diagnosis of 80% of represented bamboo genera. We detected adulteration by carnation in four of eight tea products and, after adapting our objectives, could trace the taxonomic origin of the adulterant to Dianthus chinensis (Caryophyllaceae), a well known traditional Chinese medicine with counter indications for pregnant women. PMID:27957401

  11. Bamboo tea: reduction of taxonomic complexity and application of DNA diagnostics based on rbcL and matK sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Horn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Names used in ingredient lists of food products are trivial and in their nature rarely precise. The most recent scientific interpretation of the term bamboo (Bambusoideae, Poaceae comprises over 1,600 distinct species. In the European Union only few of these exotic species are well known sources for food ingredients (i.e., bamboo sprouts and are thus not considered novel foods, which would require safety assessments before marketing of corresponding products. In contrast, the use of bamboo leaves and their taxonomic origin is mostly unclear. However, products containing bamboo leaves are currently marketed. Methods We analysed bamboo species and tea products containing bamboo leaves using anatomical leaf characters and DNA sequence data. To reduce taxonomic complexity associated with the term bamboo, we used a phylogenetic framework to trace the origin of DNA from commercially available bamboo leaves within the bambusoid subfamily. For authentication purposes, we introduced a simple PCR based test distinguishing genuine bamboo from other leaf components and assessed the diagnostic potential of rbcL and matK to resolve taxonomic entities within the bamboo subfamily and tribes. Results Based on anatomical and DNA data we were able to trace the taxonomic origin of bamboo leaves used in products to the genera Phyllostachys and Pseudosasa from the temperate “woody” bamboo tribe (Arundinarieae. Currently available rbcL and matK sequence data allow the character based diagnosis of 80% of represented bamboo genera. We detected adulteration by carnation in four of eight tea products and, after adapting our objectives, could trace the taxonomic origin of the adulterant to Dianthus chinensis (Caryophyllaceae, a well known traditional Chinese medicine with counter indications for pregnant women.

  12. Next-generation sequencing offers new insights into DNA degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-01-01

    The processes underlying DNA degradation are central to various disciplines, including cancer research, forensics and archaeology. The sequencing of ancient DNA molecules on next-generation sequencing platforms provides direct measurements of cytosine deamination, depurination and fragmentation r...

  13. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library a...

  14. RDNAnalyzer: A tool for DNA secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Shehzadi, Abida; Nadeem, Shahid; Husnain, Tayyab

    2012-01-01

    RDNAnalyzer is an innovative computer based tool designed for DNA secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. It can randomly generate the DNA sequence or user can upload the sequences of their own interest in RAW format. It uses and extends the Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm and has various application for the sequence analysis. It predicts the DNA secondary structure and base pairings. It also provides the tools for routinely performed sequence analysis by the biological scientists such as DNA replication, reverse compliment generation, transcription, translation, sequence specific information as total number of nucleotide bases, ATGC base contents along with their respective percentages and sequence cleaner. RDNAnalyzer is a unique tool developed in Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 using Microsoft Visual C# and Windows Presentation Foundation and provides user friendly environment for sequence analysis. It is freely available. http://www.cemb.edu.pk/sw.html RDNAnalyzer - Random DNA Analyser, GUI - Graphical user interface, XAML - Extensible Application Markup Language.

  15. Dialects of the DNA uptake sequence in Neisseriaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In all sexual organisms, adaptations exist that secure the safe reassortment of homologous alleles and prevent the intrusion of potentially hazardous alien DNA. Some bacteria engage in a simple form of sex known as transformation. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and in related bacterial species, transformation by exogenous DNA is regulated by the presence of a specific DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS, which is present in thousands of copies in the respective genomes. DUS affects transformation by limiting DNA uptake and recombination in favour of homologous DNA. The specific mechanisms of DUS-dependent genetic transformation have remained elusive. Bioinformatic analyses of family Neisseriaceae genomes reveal eight distinct variants of DUS. These variants are here termed DUS dialects, and their effect on interspecies commutation is demonstrated. Each of the DUS dialects is remarkably conserved within each species and is distributed consistent with a robust Neisseriaceae phylogeny based on core genome sequences. The impact of individual single nucleotide transversions in DUS on meningococcal transformation and on DNA binding and uptake is analysed. The results show that a DUS core 5'-CTG-3' is required for transformation and that transversions in this core reduce DNA uptake more than two orders of magnitude although the level of DNA binding remains less affected. Distinct DUS dialects are efficient barriers to interspecies recombination in N. meningitidis, N. elongata, Kingella denitrificans, and Eikenella corrodens, despite the presence of the core sequence. The degree of similarity between the DUS dialect of the recipient species and the donor DNA directly correlates with the level of transformation and DNA binding and uptake. Finally, DUS-dependent transformation is documented in the genera Eikenella and Kingella for the first time. The results presented here advance our understanding of the function and evolution of DUS and genetic

  16. Nonlinear Aspects of Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-03-01

    One of the most remarkable features of human DNA is that 97 percent is not coding for proteins. Studying this noncoding DNA is important both for practical reasons (to distinguish it from the coding DNA as the human genome is sequenced), and for scientific reasons (why is the noncoding DNA present at all, if it appears to have little if any purpose?). In this talk we discuss new methods of analyzing coding and noncoding DNA in parallel, with a view to uncovering different statistical properties of the two kinds of DNA. We also speculate on possible roles of noncoding DNA. The work reported here was carried out primarily by P. Bernaola-Galvan, S. V. Buldyrev, P. Carpena, N. Dokholyan, A. L. Goldberger, I. Grosse, S. Havlin, H. Herzel, J. L. Oliver, C.-K. Peng, M. Simons, H. E. Stanley, R. H. R. Stanley, and G. M. Viswanathan. [1] For a brief overview in language that physicists can understand, see H. E. Stanley, S. V. Buldyrev, A. L. Goldberger, S. Havlin, C.-K. Peng, and M. Simons, "Scaling Features of Noncoding DNA" [Proc. XII Max Born Symposium, Wroclaw], Physica A 273, 1-18 (1999). [2] I. Grosse, H. Herzel, S. V. Buldyrev, and H. E. Stanley, "Species Independence of Mutual Information in Coding and Noncoding DNA," Phys. Rev. E 61, 5624-5629 (2000). [3] P. Bernaola-Galvan, I. Grosse, P. Carpena, J. L. Oliver, and H. E. Stanley, "Identification of DNA Coding Regions Using an Entropic Segmentation Method," Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1342-1345 (2000). [4] N. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, "Distributions of Dimeric Tandem Repeats in Non-coding and Coding DNA Sequences," J. Theor. Biol. 202, 273-282 (2000). [5] R. H. R. Stanley, N. V. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, "Clumping of Identical Oligonucleotides in Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences," J. Biomol. Structure and Design 17, 79-87 (1999). [6] N. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, "Distribution of Base Pair Repeats in Coding and Noncoding DNA

  17. Automated DNA sequence-based early warning system for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mellmann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA usually requires the implementation of often rigorous infection-control measures. Prompt identification of an MRSA epidemic is crucial for the control of an outbreak. In this study we evaluated various early warning algorithms for the detection of an MRSA cluster. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Between 1998 and 2003, 557 non-replicate MRSA strains were collected from staff and patients admitted to a German tertiary-care university hospital. The repeat region of the S. aureus protein A (spa gene in each of these strains was sequenced. Using epidemiological and typing information for the period 1998-2002 as reference data, clusters in 2003 were determined by temporal-scan test statistics. Various early warning algorithms (frequency, clonal, and infection control professionals [ICP] alerts were tested in a prospective analysis for the year 2003. In addition, a newly implemented automated clonal alert system of the Ridom StaphType software was evaluated. A total of 549 of 557 MRSA were typeable using spa sequencing. When analyzed using scan test statistics, 42 out of 175 MRSA in 2003 formed 13 significant clusters (p < 0.05. These clusters were used as the "gold standard" to evaluate the various algorithms. Clonal alerts (spa typing and epidemiological data were 100% sensitive and 95.2% specific. Frequency (epidemiological data only and ICP alerts were 100% and 62.1% sensitive and 47.2% and 97.3% specific, respectively. The difference in specificity between clonal and ICP alerts was not significant. Both methods exhibited a positive predictive value above 80%. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid MRSA outbreak detection, based on epidemiological and spa typing data, is a suitable alternative for classical approaches and can assist in the identification of potential sources of infection.

  18. A Nano-Biosensor for DNA Sequence Detection Using Absorption Spectra of SWNT-DNA Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor based on Single Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT-Poly (GTn ssDNA hybrid has been developed for medical diagnostics. The absorption spectrum of this assay is determined with the help of a Shimadzu UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. Two distinct bands each containing three peaks corresponding to first and second van Hove singularities in the density of states of the nanotubes were observed in the absorption spectrum. When a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA having a sequence complementary to probic DNA is added to the ssDNA-SWNT conjugates, hybridization takes place, which causes the red shift of absorption spectrum of nanotubes. On the other hand, when the DNA is noncomplementary, no shift in the absorption spectrum occurs since hybridization between the DNA and probe does not take place. The red shifting of the spectrum is considered to be due to change in the dielectric environment around nanotubes.

  19. An assessment on DNA microarray and sequence-based methods for the characterization of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus from Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, Adebayo O.; Oyedara, Omotayo; Okon, Kenneth; Raji, Adeola; Peters, Georg; von Müller, Lutz; Schaumburg, Frieder; Herrmann, Mathias; Ruffing, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen causing nosocomial and community-acquired infections worldwide. In the characterization of this opportunistic pathogen, DNA microarray hybridization technique is used as an alternative to sequence based genotyping to obtain a comprehensive assessment on the virulence, resistance determinants, and population structure. The objective of this study was to characterize a defined collection of S. aureus isolates from Nigeria using the microarray technique, and to assess the extent that it correlates with sequence-based genotyping methods. The clonal diversity and genomic content of 52 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) were investigated by spa typing, MLST and DNA microarray hybridization. More than half (55.8%) of these isolates were associated with clonal complexes (CCs) typically associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones i.e., CC1, CC5, CC8, CC30, and CC45. Certain genes linked with virulence (hlgA and clfA) and adherence (ebpS, fnbA, sspA, sspB, and sspP) were detected in all isolates. A number of genes or gene clusters were associated with distinct clonal types. The enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) was linked with CC5, CC25, CC30, CC45, and CC121, enterotoxin H gene (seh) with CC1, exfoliative toxin D gene (etd) with CC25 and CC80, and the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B gene (edinB) with CC25, CC80, and CC152. The excellent agreement between data from DNA microarray and MLST in the delineation of Nigerian MSSA isolates indicates that the microarray technique is a useful tool to provide information on antibiotic resistance, clonal diversity and virulence factors associated with infection and disease. PMID:26539185

  20. Sequence-selective DNA recognition with peptide-bisbenzamidine conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mateo I; Vázquez, Olalla; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2013-07-22

    Transcription factors (TFs) are specialized proteins that play a key role in the regulation of genetic expression. Their mechanism of action involves the interaction with specific DNA sequences, which usually takes place through specialized domains of the protein. However, achieving an efficient binding usually requires the presence of the full protein. This is the case for bZIP and zinc finger TF families, which cannot interact with their target sites when the DNA binding fragments are presented as isolated monomers. Herein it is demonstrated that the DNA binding of these monomeric peptides can be restored when conjugated to aza-bisbenzamidines, which are readily accessible molecules that interact with A/T-rich sites by insertion into their minor groove. Importantly, the fluorogenic properties of the aza-benzamidine unit provide details of the DNA interaction that are eluded in electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA). The hybrids based on the GCN4 bZIP protein preferentially bind to composite sequences containing tandem bisbenzamidine-GCN4 binding sites (TCAT⋅AAATT). Fluorescence reverse titrations show an interesting multiphasic profile consistent with the formation of competitive nonspecific complexes at low DNA/peptide ratios. On the other hand, the conjugate with the DNA binding domain of the zinc finger protein GAGA binds with high affinity (KD≈12 nM) and specificity to a composite AATTT⋅GAGA sequence containing both the bisbenzamidine and the TF consensus binding sites.

  1. Real-time DNA sequencing from single polymerase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, John; Fehr, Adrian; Gray, Jeremy; Luong, Khai; Lyle, John; Otto, Geoff; Peluso, Paul; Rank, David; Baybayan, Primo; Bettman, Brad; Bibillo, Arkadiusz; Bjornson, Keith; Chaudhuri, Bidhan; Christians, Frederick; Cicero, Ronald; Clark, Sonya; Dalal, Ravindra; Dewinter, Alex; Dixon, John; Foquet, Mathieu; Gaertner, Alfred; Hardenbol, Paul; Heiner, Cheryl; Hester, Kevin; Holden, David; Kearns, Gregory; Kong, Xiangxu; Kuse, Ronald; Lacroix, Yves; Lin, Steven; Lundquist, Paul; Ma, Congcong; Marks, Patrick; Maxham, Mark; Murphy, Devon; Park, Insil; Pham, Thang; Phillips, Michael; Roy, Joy; Sebra, Robert; Shen, Gene; Sorenson, Jon; Tomaney, Austin; Travers, Kevin; Trulson, Mark; Vieceli, John; Wegener, Jeffrey; Wu, Dawn; Yang, Alicia; Zaccarin, Denis; Zhao, Peter; Zhong, Frank; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen

    2009-01-02

    We present single-molecule, real-time sequencing data obtained from a DNA polymerase performing uninterrupted template-directed synthesis using four distinguishable fluorescently labeled deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). We detected the temporal order of their enzymatic incorporation into a growing DNA strand with zero-mode waveguide nanostructure arrays, which provide optical observation volume confinement and enable parallel, simultaneous detection of thousands of single-molecule sequencing reactions. Conjugation of fluorophores to the terminal phosphate moiety of the dNTPs allows continuous observation of DNA synthesis over thousands of bases without steric hindrance. The data report directly on polymerase dynamics, revealing distinct polymerization states and pause sites corresponding to DNA secondary structure. Sequence data were aligned with the known reference sequence to assay biophysical parameters of polymerization for each template position. Consensus sequences were generated from the single-molecule reads at 15-fold coverage, showing a median accuracy of 99.3%, with no systematic error beyond fluorophore-dependent error rates.

  2. Association studies using family pools of outcrossing crops based on allele-frequency estimates from DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Jensen, Just; Asp, Torben

    2014-01-01

    effect from F2-family pools was verified and it was shown that the underestimation of the allele effect is correctly described. The optimal design for an association study when sequencing budget would be fixed is obtained using large sample size and lower sequence depth, and using higher SNP density...... types of family pools and is also directly applicable for association studies in polyploids....

  3. Nucleosome DNA sequence structure of isochores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant differences in G+C content between different isochore types suggest that the nucleosome positioning patterns in DNA of the isochores should be different as well. Results Extraction of the patterns from the isochore DNA sequences by Shannon N-gram extension reveals that while the general motif YRRRRRYYYYYR is characteristic for all isochore types, the dominant positioning patterns of the isochores vary between TAAAAATTTTTA and CGGGGGCCCCCG due to the large differences in G+C composition. This is observed in human, mouse and chicken isochores, demonstrating that the variations of the positioning patterns are largely G+C dependent rather than species-specific. The species-specificity of nucleosome positioning patterns is revealed by dinucleotide periodicity analyses in isochore sequences. While human sequences are showing CG periodicity, chicken isochores display AG (CT periodicity. Mouse isochores show very weak CG periodicity only. Conclusions Nucleosome positioning pattern as revealed by Shannon N-gram extension is strongly dependent on G+C content and different in different isochores. Species-specificity of the pattern is subtle. It is reflected in the choice of preferentially periodical dinucleotides.

  4. Functionalized nanopore-embedded electrodes for rapid DNA sequencing

    CERN Document Server

    He, Haiying; Pandey, Ravindra; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; Sanvito, Stefano; Grigoriev, Anton; Ahuja, Rajeev; Karna, Shashi P

    2007-01-01

    The determination of a patient's DNA sequence can, in principle, reveal an increased risk to fall ill with particular diseases [1,2] and help to design "personalized medicine" [3]. Moreover, statistical studies and comparison of genomes [4] of a large number of individuals are crucial for the analysis of mutations [5] and hereditary diseases, paving the way to preventive medicine [6]. DNA sequencing is, however, currently still a vastly time-consuming and very expensive task [4], consisting of pre-processing steps, the actual sequencing using the Sanger method, and post-processing in the form of data analysis [7]. Here we propose a new approach that relies on functionalized nanopore-embedded electrodes to achieve an unambiguous distinction of the four nucleic acid bases in the DNA sequencing process. This represents a significant improvement over previously studied designs [8,9] which cannot reliably distinguish all four bases of DNA. The transport properties of the setup investigated by us, employing state-o...

  5. A molecular phylogenetic study of the Palmae (Arecaceae) based on atpB, rbcL, and 18S nrDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, William J

    2002-02-01

    Notoriously slow rates of molecular evolution and convergent evolution among some morphological characters have limited phylogenetic resolution for the palm family (Arecaceae). This study adds nuclear DNA (18S SSU rRNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA; atpB and rbcL) sequence data for 65 genera of palms and characterizes molecular variation for each molecule. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated with maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony techniques for the new data and for previously published molecular data for 45 palm genera. Maximum parsimony analysis was also used to compare molecular and morphological data for 33 palm genera. Incongruence among datasets was detected between cpDNA and 18S data and between molecular and morphological data. Most conflict between nuclear and cpDNA data was associated with the genus Nypa. Several taxa showed relatively long branches with 18S data, but phylogenetic resolution of these taxa was essentially the same for 18S and cpDNA data. Base composition bias for 18S that contributed to erroneous phylogenetic resolution in other taxa did not seem to be present in Palmae. Morphological data were incongruent with all molecular data due to apparent morphological homoplasy for Caryoteae, Ceroxyloideae, Iriarteae, and Thrinacinae. Both cpDNA and nuclear 18S data firmly resolved Caryoteae with Borasseae of Coryphoideae, suggesting that at least some morphological characters used to place Caryoteae in Arecoideae are homoplastic. In this study, increased character sampling seems to be more important than increased taxon sampling; a comparison of the full (65-taxon) and reduced (45- and 33-taxon) datasets suggests little difference in core topology but considerably more nodal support with the increased character sample sizes. These results indicate a general trend toward a stable estimate of phylogenetic relationships for the Palmae. Although the 33-taxon topologies are even better resolved, they lack several critical taxa and are

  6. DNA qualification workflow for next generation sequencing of histopathological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Simbolo

    Full Text Available Histopathological samples are a treasure-trove of DNA for clinical research. However, the quality of DNA can vary depending on the source or extraction method applied. Thus a standardized and cost-effective workflow for the qualification of DNA preparations is essential to guarantee interlaboratory reproducible results. The qualification process consists of the quantification of double strand DNA (dsDNA and the assessment of its suitability for downstream applications, such as high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We tested the two most frequently used instrumentations to define their role in this process: NanoDrop, based on UV spectroscopy, and Qubit 2.0, which uses fluorochromes specifically binding dsDNA. Quantitative PCR (qPCR was used as the reference technique as it simultaneously assesses DNA concentration and suitability for PCR amplification. We used 17 genomic DNAs from 6 fresh-frozen (FF tissues, 6 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues, 3 cell lines, and 2 commercial preparations. Intra- and inter-operator variability was negligible, and intra-methodology variability was minimal, while consistent inter-methodology divergences were observed. In fact, NanoDrop measured DNA concentrations higher than Qubit and its consistency with dsDNA quantification by qPCR was limited to high molecular weight DNA from FF samples and cell lines, where total DNA and dsDNA quantity virtually coincide. In partially degraded DNA from FFPE samples, only Qubit proved highly reproducible and consistent with qPCR measurements. Multiplex PCR amplifying 191 regions of 46 cancer-related genes was designated the downstream application, using 40 ng dsDNA from FFPE samples calculated by Qubit. All but one sample produced amplicon libraries suitable for next-generation sequencing. NanoDrop UV-spectrum verified contamination of the unsuccessful sample. In conclusion, as qPCR has high costs and is labor intensive, an alternative effective standard

  7. DNA qualification workflow for next generation sequencing of histopathological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbolo, Michele; Gottardi, Marisa; Corbo, Vincenzo; Fassan, Matteo; Mafficini, Andrea; Malpeli, Giorgio; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Histopathological samples are a treasure-trove of DNA for clinical research. However, the quality of DNA can vary depending on the source or extraction method applied. Thus a standardized and cost-effective workflow for the qualification of DNA preparations is essential to guarantee interlaboratory reproducible results. The qualification process consists of the quantification of double strand DNA (dsDNA) and the assessment of its suitability for downstream applications, such as high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We tested the two most frequently used instrumentations to define their role in this process: NanoDrop, based on UV spectroscopy, and Qubit 2.0, which uses fluorochromes specifically binding dsDNA. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used as the reference technique as it simultaneously assesses DNA concentration and suitability for PCR amplification. We used 17 genomic DNAs from 6 fresh-frozen (FF) tissues, 6 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 3 cell lines, and 2 commercial preparations. Intra- and inter-operator variability was negligible, and intra-methodology variability was minimal, while consistent inter-methodology divergences were observed. In fact, NanoDrop measured DNA concentrations higher than Qubit and its consistency with dsDNA quantification by qPCR was limited to high molecular weight DNA from FF samples and cell lines, where total DNA and dsDNA quantity virtually coincide. In partially degraded DNA from FFPE samples, only Qubit proved highly reproducible and consistent with qPCR measurements. Multiplex PCR amplifying 191 regions of 46 cancer-related genes was designated the downstream application, using 40 ng dsDNA from FFPE samples calculated by Qubit. All but one sample produced amplicon libraries suitable for next-generation sequencing. NanoDrop UV-spectrum verified contamination of the unsuccessful sample. In conclusion, as qPCR has high costs and is labor intensive, an alternative effective standard workflow for

  8. Two Dimensional Yau-Hausdorff Distance with Applications on Comparison of DNA and Protein Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Tian

    Full Text Available Comparing DNA or protein sequences plays an important role in the functional analysis of genomes. Despite many methods available for sequences comparison, few methods retain the information content of sequences. We propose a new approach, the Yau-Hausdorff method, which considers all translations and rotations when seeking the best match of graphical curves of DNA or protein sequences. The complexity of this method is lower than that of any other two dimensional minimum Hausdorff algorithm. The Yau-Hausdorff method can be used for measuring the similarity of DNA sequences based on two important tools: the Yau-Hausdorff distance and graphical representation of DNA sequences. The graphical representations of DNA sequences conserve all sequence information and the Yau-Hausdorff distance is mathematically proved as a true metric. Therefore, the proposed distance can preciously measure the similarity of DNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences by the Yau-Hausdorff distance show the accuracy and stability of our approach in similarity comparison of DNA or protein sequences. This study demonstrates that Yau-Hausdorff distance is a natural metric for DNA and protein sequences with high level of stability. The approach can be also applied to similarity analysis of protein sequences by graphic representations, as well as general two dimensional shape matching.

  9. Two Dimensional Yau-Hausdorff Distance with Applications on Comparison of DNA and Protein Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kun; Yang, Xiaoqian; Kong, Qin; Yin, Changchuan; He, Rong L; Yau, Stephen S-T

    2015-01-01

    Comparing DNA or protein sequences plays an important role in the functional analysis of genomes. Despite many methods available for sequences comparison, few methods retain the information content of sequences. We propose a new approach, the Yau-Hausdorff method, which considers all translations and rotations when seeking the best match of graphical curves of DNA or protein sequences. The complexity of this method is lower than that of any other two dimensional minimum Hausdorff algorithm. The Yau-Hausdorff method can be used for measuring the similarity of DNA sequences based on two important tools: the Yau-Hausdorff distance and graphical representation of DNA sequences. The graphical representations of DNA sequences conserve all sequence information and the Yau-Hausdorff distance is mathematically proved as a true metric. Therefore, the proposed distance can preciously measure the similarity of DNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences by the Yau-Hausdorff distance show the accuracy and stability of our approach in similarity comparison of DNA or protein sequences. This study demonstrates that Yau-Hausdorff distance is a natural metric for DNA and protein sequences with high level of stability. The approach can be also applied to similarity analysis of protein sequences by graphic representations, as well as general two dimensional shape matching.

  10. A new DNA sequence assembly program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, J K; Smith, K f; Staden, R

    1995-01-01

    We describe the Genome Assembly Program (GAP), a new program for DNA sequence assembly. The program is suitable for large and small projects, a variety of strategies and can handle data from a range of sequencing instruments. It retains the useful components of our previous work, but includes many novel ideas and methods. Many of these methods have been made possible by the program's completely new, and highly interactive, graphical user interface. The program provides many visual clues to the current state of a sequencing project and allows users to interact in intuitive and graphical ways with their data. The program has tools to display and manipulate the various types of data that help to solve and check difficult assemblies, particularly those in repetitive genomes. We have introduced the following new displays: the Contig Selector, the Contig Comparator, the Template Display, the Restriction Enzyme Map and the Stop Codon Map. We have also made it possible to have any number of Contig Editors and Contig Joining Editors running simultaneously even on the same contig. The program also includes a new 'Directed Assembly' algorithm and routines for automatically detecting unfinished segments of sequence, to which it suggests experimental solutions. Images PMID:8559656

  11. Construction and Application of a Large-scale DNA Sequence Analysis System Based on PC/Linux%基于PC/Linux的核酸序列分析系统的 构建及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张成岗; 欧阳曙光; 张绍文; 瞿祥虎; 鱼咏涛; 周钢桥; 吴松锋; 贺福初

    2001-01-01

    More and more DNA sequences have been obtained since the start-up of human genome project. Powerful system is badly needed for data mining on these DNA sequences. Based on a personal computer and Linux operating system, the Phred/Phrap/Consed software and Blast software were used to construct a platform for batch analysis of the sequences, including identifying raw DNA sequence from chromatogram file, vector sequence removing, contig analysis (sequence assembly), repeat sequence identifying and sequence similarity analysis. Result demonstrated that this robust platform could accelerate data analysis for large-scale DNA sequencing.%基于PC机和Linux操作系统, 利用Phred/Phrap/Consed软件和Blast软件, 构建了核酸序列大规模自动分析系统. 该套系统可自动完成从测序峰图向核酸序列的转化、载体序列去除、序列自动拼接、重复序列鉴定以及序列的相似性分析, 可加速对大规模测序数据的分析和利用.

  12. Sequencing of megabase plus DNA by hybridization: Method development ENT. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-01-31

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is the only sequencing method based on the experimental determination of the content of oligonucleotide sequences. The data acquisition relies on the natural process of base pairing. It is possible to determine the content of complementary oligosequences in the target DNA by the process of hybridization with oligonucleotide probes of known sequences.

  13. [Characterization and modification of phage T7 DNA polymerase for use in DNA sequencing]: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This project focuses on the DNA polymerase and accessory proteins of phage T7 for use in DNA sequence analysis. T7 DNA polymerase (gene 5 protein) interacts with accessory proteins for the acquisition of properties such as processivity that are necessary for DNA replication. One goal is to understand these interactions in order to modify the proteins to increase their usefulness with DNA sequence analysis. Using a genetically modified gene 5 protein lacking 3' to 5' exonuclease activity we have found that in the presence of manganese there is no discrimination against dideoxynucleotides, a property that enables novel approaches to DNA sequencing using automated technology. Pyrophosphorolysis can create problems in DNA sequence determination, a problem that can be eliminated by the addition of pyrophosphatase. Crystals of the gene 5 protein/thioredoxin complex have now been obtained and X-ray diffraction analysis will be undertaken once their quality has been improved. Amino acid changes in gene 5 protein have been identified that alter its interaction with thioredoxin. Characterization of these proteins should help determine how thioredoxin confers processivity on polymerization. We have characterized the 17 DNA binding protein, the gene 2.5 protein, and shown that it interacts with gene 5 protein and gene 4 protein. The gene 2.5 protein mediates homologous base pairing and strand uptake. Gene 5.5 protein interacts with E. coli Hl protein and affects gene expression. Biochemical and genetic studies on the T7 56-kDa gene 4 protein, the helicase, are focused on its physical interaction with T7 DNA polymerase and the mechanism by which the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates fuels its unidirectional translocation on DNA.

  14. [Characterization and modification of phage T7 DNA polymerase for use in DNA sequencing]: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This project focuses on the DNA polymerase and accessory proteins of phage T7 for use in DNA sequence analysis. T7 DNA polymerase (gene 5 protein) interacts with accessory proteins for the acquisition of properties such as processivity that are necessary for DNA replication. One goal is to understand these interactions in order to modify the proteins to increase their usefulness with DNA sequence analysis. Using a genetically modified gene 5 protein lacking 3` to 5` exonuclease activity we have found that in the presence of manganese there is no discrimination against dideoxynucleotides, a property that enables novel approaches to DNA sequencing using automated technology. Pyrophosphorolysis can create problems in DNA sequence determination, a problem that can be eliminated by the addition of pyrophosphatase. Crystals of the gene 5 protein/thioredoxin complex have now been obtained and X-ray diffraction analysis will be undertaken once their quality has been improved. Amino acid changes in gene 5 protein have been identified that alter its interaction with thioredoxin. Characterization of these proteins should help determine how thioredoxin confers processivity on polymerization. We have characterized the 17 DNA binding protein, the gene 2.5 protein, and shown that it interacts with gene 5 protein and gene 4 protein. The gene 2.5 protein mediates homologous base pairing and strand uptake. Gene 5.5 protein interacts with E. coli Hl protein and affects gene expression. Biochemical and genetic studies on the T7 56-kDa gene 4 protein, the helicase, are focused on its physical interaction with T7 DNA polymerase and the mechanism by which the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates fuels its unidirectional translocation on DNA.

  15. Improved taboo search algorithm for designing DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Zhang; Jin Xu; Xiutang Geng; Jianhua Xiao; Linqiang Pan

    2008-01-01

    The design of DNA sequences is one of the most practical and important research topics in DNA computing.We adopt taboo search algorithm and improve the method for the systematic design of equal-length DNA sequences,which can satisfy certain combinatorial and thermodynamic constraints.Using taboo search algorithm,our method can avoid trapping into local optimization and can find a set of good DNA sequences satisfying required constraints.

  16. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  17. Automated parallel DNA sequencing on multiple channel microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Ren, H; Gao, Q; Roach, D J; Loder, R T; Armstrong, T M; Mao, Q; Blaga, I; Barker, D L; Jovanovich, S B

    2000-05-09

    We report automated DNA sequencing in 16-channel microchips. A microchip prefilled with sieving matrix is aligned on a heating plate affixed to a movable platform. Samples are loaded into sample reservoirs by using an eight-tip pipetting device, and the chip is docked with an array of electrodes in the focal plane of a four-color scanning detection system. Under computer control, high voltage is applied to the appropriate reservoirs in a programmed sequence that injects and separates the DNA samples. An integrated four-color confocal fluorescent detector automatically scans all 16 channels. The system routinely yields more than 450 bases in 15 min in all 16 channels. In the best case using an automated base-calling program, 543 bases have been called at an accuracy of >99%. Separations, including automated chip loading and sample injection, normally are completed in less than 18 min. The advantages of DNA sequencing on capillary electrophoresis chips include uniform signal intensity and tolerance of high DNA template concentration. To understand the fundamentals of these unique features we developed a theoretical treatment of cross-channel chip injection that we call the differential concentration effect. We present experimental evidence consistent with the predictions of the theory.

  18. Decoding long nanopore sequencing reads of natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H; Derrington, Ian M; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Adey, Andrew; Nova, Ian C; Craig, Jonathan M; Langford, Kyle W; Samson, Jenny Mae; Daza, Riza; Doering, Kenji; Shendure, Jay; Gundlach, Jens H

    2014-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing of DNA is a single-molecule technique that may achieve long reads, low cost and high speed with minimal sample preparation and instrumentation. Here, we build on recent progress with respect to nanopore resolution and DNA control to interpret the procession of ion current levels observed during the translocation of DNA through the pore MspA. As approximately four nucleotides affect the ion current of each level, we measured the ion current corresponding to all 256 four-nucleotide combinations (quadromers). This quadromer map is highly predictive of ion current levels of previously unmeasured sequences derived from the bacteriophage phi X 174 genome. Furthermore, we show nanopore sequencing reads of phi X 174 up to 4,500 bases in length, which can be unambiguously aligned to the phi X 174 reference genome, and demonstrate proof-of-concept utility with respect to hybrid genome assembly and polymorphism detection. This work provides a foundation for nanopore sequencing of long, natural DNA strands.

  19. Stenostomum cf. leucops (Platyhelminthes in Thailand: a surface observation using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetic analysis based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arin Ngamniyom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stenostomum contains small turbellaria that are widely distributed in freshwater environments worldwide. However, there are only rare reports or studies of this genus from Thailand. Therefore, the objective of this study was to report S. cf. leucops in Thailand collected from Pathum Thani Province. The worm morphology and surface topography using scanning electron microscopy were determined. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree of S. cf. leucops was analysed with 17 flatworms based on the 18S ribosomal DNA sequences. The phylogenetic relationship shared a common ancestry of Catenulida species, and S. cf. leucops displayed a monophyletic pattern within Stenostomum spp. The results of the morphological and molecular data are discussed. These results may increase the knowledge of freshwater microturbellarians in Thailand.

  20. Phylogeography, genetic diversity and demographic history of the Iranian Kurdish groups based on mtDNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FATAH ZAREI; HASSAN RAJABI-MAHAM

    2016-12-01

    Throughout the history of modern humans, the current Kurdish-inhabited area has served as part of a tricontinental crossroad for major human migrations. Also, a significant body of archaeological evidence points to this area as the site of Neolithic transition. To investigate the phylogeography, origins and demographic history, mtDNA D-loop region of individuals representing four Kurdish groups from Iran were analysed. Our data indicated that most of the Kurds mtDNA lineages belong to branches of the haplogroups with the Western Eurasian origin; with small fractions of the Eastern Eurasian and sub-Saharan African lineages. The low level of mtDNA diversity observed in the Havrami group presented a bias towards isolation or increased drift due to small population size; while in the Kurmanji group it indicated a bias towards drift or mass migration events during the 5–18th century AD. The Mantel test showed strong isolation by distance, and AMOVA results for global and regional scales confirmed that the geography had acted as the main driving force in shaping the current pattern of mtDNA diversity, rather than linguistic similarity. The results of demographic analyses, in agreement with archaeological data, revealed a recent expansion of the Kurds (∼9,500 years before present) related to the Neolithic transition from hunting and gathering, to farmingand cattle breeding in the Near East. Further, the high frequencies of typical haplogroups for early farmers (H; 37.1%) and hunter-gatherers (U; 13.8%) in the Kurds may testify the earlier hunter-gatherers in the Kurdish-inhabited area that adopted and admixed the Kurds ancestors following the Neolithic transition.

  1. Myriapod monophyly and relationships among myriapod classes based on nearly complete 28S and 18S rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Yong-Hua; Song, Da-Xiang; Sun, Hong-Ying; Zhou, Kai-Ya

    2006-12-01

    Myriapods play a pivotal position in the arthropod phylogenetic tree. The monophyly of Myriapoda and its internal relationships have been difficult to resolve. This study combined nearly complete 28S and 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences (3,826 nt in total) to estimate the phylogenetic position of Myriapoda and phylogenetic relationships among four myriapod classes. Our data set consists of six new myriapod sequences and homologous sequences for 18 additional species available in GenBank. Among the six new myriapod sequences, those of the one pauropod and two symphylans are very important additions because they were such difficult taxa to classify in past molecular-phylogenetic studies. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses. All methods yielded moderate to strong support for the monophyly of Myriapoda. Symphyla grouped strongly with Pauropoda under all analytical conditions. The KH test rejected the traditional view of Dignatha and Progoneata, and the topology obtained here, though not significantly supported, was Diplopoda versus ((Symphyla + Pauropoda) + Chilopoda).

  2. Effect of dephasing on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwolak, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krems, Matt [NON LANL; Pershin, Yuriy V [NON LANL; Di Ventra, Massimiliano [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of dephasing on DNA sequencing in a nanopore via transverse electronic transport. To do this, we couple classical molecular dynamics simulations with transport calculations using scattering theory. Previous studies, which did not include dephasing, have shown that by measuring the transverse current of a particular base multiple times, one can get distributions of currents for each base that are distinguishable. We introduce a dephasing parameter into transport calculations to simulate the effects of the ions and other fluctuations. These effects lower the overall magnitude of the current, but have little effect on the current distributions themselves. The results of this work further implicate that distinguishing DNA bases via transverse electronic transport has potential as a sequencing tool.

  3. Sequence selective naked-eye detection of DNA harnessing extension of oligonucleotide-modified nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Daniela; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    DNA polymerases can efficiently and sequence selectively incorporate oligonucleotide (ODN)-modified nucleotides and the incorporated oligonucleotide strand can be employed as primer in rolling circle amplification (RCA). The effective amplification of the DNA primer by Φ29 DNA polymerase allows the sequence-selective hybridisation of the amplified strand with a G-quadruplex DNA sequence that has horse radish peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings we develop a system that allows DNA detection with single-base resolution by naked eye.

  4. A blind testing design for authenticating ancient DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Golenberg, E M; Shoshani, J

    1997-04-01

    Reproducibility is a serious concern among researchers of ancient DNA. We designed a blind testing procedure to evaluate laboratory accuracy and authenticity of ancient DNA obtained from closely related extant and extinct species. Soft tissue and bones of fossil and contemporary museum proboscideans were collected and identified based on morphology by one researcher, and other researchers carried out DNA testing on the samples, which were assigned anonymous numbers. DNA extracted using three principal isolation methods served as template in PCR amplifications of a segment of the cytochrome b gene (mitochondrial genome), and the PCR product was directly sequenced and analyzed. The results show that such a blind testing design performed in one laboratory, when coupled with phylogenetic analysis, can nonarbitrarily test the consistency and reliability of ancient DNA results. Such reproducible results obtained from the blind testing can increase confidence in the authenticity of ancient sequences obtained from postmortem specimens and avoid bias in phylogenetic analysis. A blind testing design may be applicable as an alternative to confirm ancient DNA results in one laboratory when independent testing by two laboratories is not available.

  5. POSA: Perl Objects for DNA Sequencing Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungerius Bart J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capillary DNA sequencing machines allow the generation of vast amounts of data with little hands-on time. With this expansion of data generation, there is a growing need for automated data processing. Most available software solutions, however, still require user intervention or provide modules that need advanced informatics skills to allow implementation in pipelines. Results Here we present POSA, a pair of new perl objects that describe DNA sequence traces and Phrap contig assemblies in detail. Methods included in POSA include basecalling with quality scores (by Phred, contig assembly (by Phrap, generation of primer3 input and automated SNP annotation (by PolyPhred. Although easily implemented by users with only limited programming experience, these objects considerabily reduce hands-on analysis time compared to using the Staden package for extracting sequence information from raw sequencing files and for SNP discovery. Conclusions The POSA objects allow a flexible and easy design, implementation and usage of perl-based pipelines to handle and analyze DNA sequencing data, while requiring only minor programming skills.

  6. Phylogenetic relationships in Solanaceae and related species based on cpDNA sequence from plastid trnE-trnT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Montewka Melotto-Passarin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergenic spacers of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA are very useful in phylogenetic and population genetic studiesof plant species, to study their potential integration in phylogenetic analysis. The non-coding trnE-trnT intergenic spacer ofcpDNA was analyzed to assess the nucleotide sequence polymorphism of 16 Solanaceae species and to estimate its ability tocontribute to the resolution of phylogenetic studies of this group. Multiple alignments of DNA sequences of trnE-trnT intergenicspacer made the identification of nucleotide variability in this region possible and the phylogeny was estimated by maximumparsimony and rooted with Convolvulaceae Ipomoea batatas, the most closely related family. Besides, this intergenic spacerwas tested for the phylogenetic ability to differentiate taxonomic levels. For this purpose, species from four other families wereanalyzed and compared with Solanaceae species. Results confirmed polymorphism in the trnE-trnT region at different taxonomiclevels.

  7. Molecular phylogenetic systematics of twelve species of Acipenseriformes based on mtDNA ND4L -ND4 gene sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Acipenseriformes is an endangered primitive fish group, which occupies a special place in the history of ideas concerning fish evolution, even in vertebrate evolution. However, the classification and evolution of the fishes have been debated. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ND4L and partial ND4 genes were first sequenced in twelve species of the order Acipenseriformes, including endemic Chinese species. The following points were drawn from DNA sequences analysis: (i) the two species of Huso can be ascribed to Acipenser; (ii) A. dabryanus is the mostly closely related to A. sinensis, and most likely the landlocked form of A. sinensis; (iii) genus Acipenser in trans-Pacific region might have a common origin; (iv) mtDNA ND4L and ND4 genes are the ideal genetic markers for phylogenetic analysis of the order Acipenseriformes.

  8. Development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis sequence based on poly(L-glutamic acid) modified electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MERVE YESIL; SONER DONMEZ; FATMA ARSLAN

    2016-11-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by avidin-biotin interaction of a biotinylated probe and avidin-attached, poly(L-glutamic) acid coated pencil graphite electrode (PGA/PGE) for detection of specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA sequence. The discrimination of fully complementary hybridization and mismatch hybridization was carried out by electrochemical reduction current of Meldola’s Blue (MDB) in square wave voltammetry (SWV). The calibration graph of the DNA biosensor was linear between 1.5–12.5 nM and the detection limit was calculated as 1.3 nM. The proposed biosensor successfully discriminated short andlong oligonucleotides related to DNA sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in optimal condition.

  9. 基于仿射聚类的宏基因组序列物种聚类%Metagenomic DNA Sequence Binning based on Affinity Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂鹏宇; 潘玮华; 徐云

    2013-01-01

    随着下一代测序技术的迅猛发展,宏基因组学已经成为新的研究热点,宏基因组学序列聚类问题使用无参考的方法,对包含多个物种的宏基因组序列进行有效分离。为此,提出一种结合相似度信息和结构信息的宏基因组物种聚类算法,并引入仿射聚类来进行序列物种聚类。实验数据表明该方法聚类精度高、执行速度快。我们也开发了基于该方法的宏基因组序列物种聚类软件。%Nowadays, with the rapid development of the next generation sequencing technologies, metagenomics have become a new hotspot,However research in metagenomics faces the issue of binning --- identification and taxonomic characterization of the NGS short reads. To solve this problem, this paper first analyzes the next generation sequencing technology characteristics, statistical characteristics of metagenomic sequence, then proposes a new clustering method for DNA sequence binning. Test results show that this method has a very good clustering accuracy. In the same time, we developed an software for metagenomic binning based on this algorithm MetaBinning.

  10. Thermochemical and kinetic evidence for nucleotide-sequence-dependent RecA-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittung, P; Ellouze, C; Maraboeuf, F; Takahashi, M; Nordèn, B

    1997-05-01

    RecA catalyses homologous recombination in Escherichia coli by promoting pairing of homologous DNA molecules after formation of a helical nucleoprotein filament with single-stranded DNA. The primary reaction of RecA with DNA is generally assumed to be unspecific. We show here, by direct measurement of the interaction enthalpy by means of isothermal titration calorimetry, that the polymerisation of RecA on single-stranded DNA depends on the DNA sequence, with a high exothermic preference for thymine bases. This enthalpic sequence preference of thymines by RecA correlates with faster binding kinetics of RecA to thymine DNA. Furthermore, the enthalpy of interaction between the RecA x DNA filament and a second DNA strand is large only when the added DNA is complementary to the bound DNA in RecA. This result suggests a possibility for a rapid search mechanism by RecA x DNA filaments for homologous DNA molecules.

  11. DNA based computers II

    CERN Document Server

    Landweber, Laura F; Baum, Eric B

    1998-01-01

    The fledgling field of DNA computers began in 1994 when Leonard Adleman surprised the scientific community by using DNA molecules, protein enzymes, and chemicals to solve an instance of a hard computational problem. This volume presents results from the second annual meeting on DNA computers held at Princeton only one and one-half years after Adleman's discovery. By drawing on the analogy between DNA computing and cutting-edge fields of biology (such as directed evolution), this volume highlights some of the exciting progress in the field and builds a strong foundation for the theory of molecular computation. DNA computing is a radically different approach to computing that brings together computer science and molecular biology in a way that is wholly distinct from other disciplines. This book outlines important advances in the field and offers comprehensive discussion on potential pitfalls and the general practicality of building DNA based computers.

  12. Environmental DNA sequencing primers for eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The time it takes to isolate individuals from environmental samples and then extract DNA from each individual is one of the problems with generating molecular data from meiofauna such as eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers. The lack of consistent morphological information and the extreme abundance of these classes makes morphological identification of rare, or even common cryptic taxa a large and unwieldy task. This limits the ability to perform large-scale surveys of the diversity of these organisms. Here we demonstrate a culture-independent molecular survey approach that enables the generation of large amounts of eutardigrade and bdelloid rotifer sequence data directly from soil. Our PCR primers, specific to the 18s small-subunit rRNA gene, were developed for both eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers. Results The developed primers successfully amplified DNA of their target organism from various soil DNA extracts. This was confirmed by both the BLAST similarity searches and phylogenetic analyses. Tardigrades showed much better phylogenetic resolution than bdelloids. Both groups of organisms exhibited varying levels of endemism. Conclusion The development of clade-specific primers for characterizing eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers from environmental samples should greatly increase our ability to characterize the composition of these taxa in environmental samples. Environmental sequencing as shown here differs from other molecular survey methods in that there is no need to pre-isolate the organisms of interest from soil in order to amplify their DNA. The DNA sequences obtained from methods that do not require culturing can be identified post-hoc and placed phylogenetically as additional closely related sequences are obtained from morphologically identified conspecifics. Our non-cultured environmental sequence based approach will be able to provide a rapid and large-scale screening of the presence, absence and diversity of

  13. Environmental DNA sequencing primers for eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The time it takes to isolate individuals from environmental samples and then extract DNA from each individual is one of the problems with generating molecular data from meiofauna such as eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers. The lack of consistent morphological information and the extreme abundance of these classes makes morphological identification of rare, or even common cryptic taxa a large and unwieldy task. This limits the ability to perform large-scale surveys of the diversity of these organisms. Here we demonstrate a culture-independent molecular survey approach that enables the generation of large amounts of eutardigrade and bdelloid rotifer sequence data directly from soil. Our PCR primers, specific to the 18s small-subunit rRNA gene, were developed for both eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers. Results The developed primers successfully amplified DNA of their target organism from various soil DNA extracts. This was confirmed by both the BLAST similarity searches and phylogenetic analyses. Tardigrades showed much better phylogenetic resolution than bdelloids. Both groups of organisms exhibited varying levels of endemism. Conclusion The development of clade-specific primers for characterizing eutardigrades and bdelloid rotifers from environmental samples should greatly increase our ability to characterize the composition of these taxa in environmental samples. Environmental sequencing as shown here differs from other molecular survey methods in that there is no need to pre-isolate the organisms of interest from soil in order to amplify their DNA. The DNA sequences obtained from methods that do not require culturing can be identified post-hoc and placed phylogenetically as additional closely related sequences are obtained from morphologically identified conspecifics. Our non-cultured environmental sequence based approach will be able to provide a rapid and large-scale screening of the presence, absence and diversity of Bdelloidea and Eutardigrada in

  14. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence-based identification of bacteria in laboratory rodents: a practical approach in laboratory animal bacteriology diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Köhrer, Karl; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Correct identification of bacteria is crucial for the management of rodent colonies. Some bacteria are difficult to identify phenotypically outside reference laboratories. In this study, we evaluated the utility of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing as a means of identifying a collection of 30 isolates of rodent origin which are conventionally difficult to identify. Sequence analysis of the first approximate 720 to 880 bp of the 5'- end of 16S rDNA identified 25 isolates (83.33%) with ≥ 99% similarity to a sequence of a type strain, whereas three isolates (10%) displayed a sequence similarity ≥ 97% but spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi and Paracoccus yeei or others not yet reported in mouse bacterial species such as Leucobacter chironomi, Neisseria perflava and Pantoea dispersa were observed. In conclusion, the sequence analysis of 16S rDNA proved to be a useful diagnostic tool, with higher performance characteristics than the classical phenotypic methods, for identification of laboratory animal bacteria. For the first time this method allowed us to document the association of certain bacterial species with the laboratory mouse. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Sequencing strategy of mitochondrial HV1 and HV2 DNA with length heteroplasmy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Sørensen, E; Eriksen, Birthe

    2002-01-01

    We describe a method to obtain reliable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences downstream of the homopolymeric stretches with length heteroplasmy in the sequencing direction. The method is based on the use of junction primers that bind to a part of the homopolymeric stretch and the first 2-4 bases...

  16. Delineating relative homogeneous G+C domains in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W

    2001-10-03

    The concept of homogeneity of G+C content is always relative and subjective. This point is emphasized and quantified in this paper using a simple example of one sequence segmented into two subsequences. Whether the sequence is homogeneous or not can be answered by whether the two-subsequence model describes the DNA sequence better than the one-sequence model. There are at least three equivalent ways of looking at the 1-to-2 segmentation: Jensen-Shannon divergence measure, log likelihood ratio test, and model selection using Bayesian information criterion. Once a criterion is chosen, a DNA sequence can be recursively segmented into multiple domains. We use one subjective criterion called segmentation strength based on the Bayesian information criterion. Whether or not a sequence is homogeneous and how many domains it has depend on this criterion. We compare six different genome sequences (yeast S. cerevisiae chromosome III and IV, bacterium M. pneumoniae, human major histocompatibility complex sequence, longest contigs in human chromosome 21 and 22) by recursive segmentations at different strength criteria. Results by recursive segmentation confirm that yeast chromosome IV is more homogeneous than yeast chromosome III, human chromosome 21 is more homogeneous than human chromosome 22, and bacterial genomes may not be homogeneous due to short segments with distinct base compositions. The recursive segmentation also provides a quantitative criterion for identifying isochores in human sequences. Some features of our recursive segmentation, such as the possibility of delineating domain borders accurately, are superior to those of the moving-window approach commonly used in such analyses.

  17. Analysis of p53 gene mutations in human gliomas by polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, F H; Kupsky, W J; Li, Y W; Sreepathi, P

    1994-03-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene have been recognized in brain tumors, and clonal expansion of p53 mutant cells has been shown to be associated with glioma progression. However, studies on the p53 gene have been limited by the need for frozen tissues. We have developed a method utilizing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the direct analysis of p53 mutation by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and by direct DNA sequencing of the p53 gene using a single 10-microns paraffin-embedded tissue section. We applied this method to screen for p53 gene mutations in exons 5-8 in human gliomas utilizing paraffin-embedded tissues. Twenty paraffin blocks containing tumor were selected from surgical specimens from 17 different adult patients. Tumors included six anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), nine glioblastomas (GBs), and two mixed malignant gliomas (MMGs). The tissue section on the stained glass slide was used to guide microdissection of an unstained adjacent tissue section to ensure > 90% of the tumor cell population for p53 mutational analysis. Simultaneously, microdissection of the tissue was also carried out to obtain normal tissue from adjacent areas as a control. Mutations in the p53 gene were identified in 3 of 17 (18%) patients by PCR-SSCP analysis and subsequently confirmed by PCR-based DNA sequencing. Mutations in exon 5 resulting in amino acid substitution were found in one thalamic AA (codon 158, CGC > CTT: Arg > Leu) and one cerebral hemispheric GB (codon 151, CCG > CTG: Pro > Leu).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Cloning, characterization, and properties of seven triplet repeat DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Kang, S; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1996-07-12

    Several neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetically unstable triplet repeat sequences (CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, or AAG.CTT) in or near the responsible genes. We implemented novel cloning strategies with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to clone seven of the triplet repeat sequences (GTA.TAC, GAT.ATC, GTT.AAC, CAC.GTG, AGG.CCT, TCG.CGA, and AAG.CTT), and the adjoining paper (Ohshima, K., Kang, S., Larson, J. E., and Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16784-16791) describes studies on TTA.TAA. This approach in conjunction with in vivo expansion studies in Escherichia coli enabled the preparation of at least 81 plasmids containing the repeat sequences with lengths of approximately 16 up to 158 triplets in both orientations with varying extents of polymorphisms. The inserts were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as DNA polymerase pausings, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chemical probe analyses to evaluate the capacity to adopt negative supercoil induced non-B DNA conformations. AAG.CTT and AGG.CCT form intramolecular triplexes, and the other five repeat sequences do not form any previously characterized non-B structures. However, long tracts of TCG.CGA showed strong inhibition of DNA synthesis at specific loci in the repeats as seen in the cases of CTG.CAG and CGG.CCG (Kang, S., Ohshima, K., Shimizu, M., Amirhaeri, S., and Wells, R. D.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27014-27021). This work along with other studies (Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 2875-2878) on CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, and TTA.TAA makes available long inserts of all 10 triplet repeat sequences for a variety of physical, molecular biological, genetic, and medical investigations. A model to explain the reduction in mRNA abundance in Friedreich's ataxia based on intermolecular triplex formation is proposed.

  19. Indirect readout of DNA sequence by p22 repressor: roles of DNA and protein functional groups in modulating DNA conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lydia-Ann; Watkins, Derrick; Williams, Loren Dean; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2013-01-09

    The repressor of bacteriophage P22 (P22R) discriminates between its various DNA binding sites by sensing the identity of non-contacted base pairs at the center of its binding site. The "indirect readout" of these non-contacted bases is apparently based on DNA's sequence-dependent conformational preferences. The structures of P22R-DNA complexes indicate that the non-contacted base pairs at the center of the binding site are in the B' state. This finding suggests that indirect readout and therefore binding site discrimination depend on P22R's ability to either sense and/or impose the B' state on the non-contacted bases of its binding sites. We show here that the affinity of binding sites for P22R depends on the tendency of the central bases to assume the B'-DNA state. Furthermore, we identify functional groups in the minor groove of the non-contacted bases as the essential modulators of indirect readout by P22R. In P22R-DNA complexes, the negatively charged E44 and E48 residues are provocatively positioned near the negatively charged DNA phosphates of the non-contacted nucleotides. The close proximity of the negatively charged groups on protein and DNA suggests that electrostatics may play a key role in the indirect readout process. Changing either of two negatively charged residues to uncharged residues eliminates the ability of P22R to impose structural changes on DNA and to recognize non-contacted base sequence. These findings suggest that these negatively charged amino acids function to force the P22R-bound DNA into the B' state and therefore play a key role in indirect readout by P22R.

  20. A phylogeny of the Lampropeltis mexicana complex (Serpentes: Colubridae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences suggests evidence for species-level polyphyly within Lampropeltis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Robert W; Pastorini, Jennifer; Burbrink, Frank T; Forstner, Michael R J

    2007-05-01

    The systematic relationships of snakes in the Lampropeltis mexicana complex (L. mexicana, L. alterna, and L. ruthveni) are poorly known despite several taxonomic studies over the last 80 years. Mitochondrial DNA sequences were used to infer the phylogeny of the L. mexicana complex. At least one representative sample from the nine currently recognized species of Lampropeltis was sequenced. Our results suggest that a deep basal split resulted in the divergence of two groups of Lampropeltis, with one group occupying the upland areas of western United States and most of western and central Mexico, and the other northeastern Mexico and the lowland areas of the southern United States. Results also revealed that the L. mexicana complex and Lampropeltis triangulum are polyphyletic, with taxa from both groups nested together in deeply divergent northern and southern clades. These results are incongruent with previous hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships based on morphology, and suggest that morphological characters shared among the various tri-colored Lampropeltis (e.g., hemipenal structure and tri-colored pattern) may be difficult to interpret phylogenetically.

  1. Cluster analysis of human and animal pathogenic Microsporum species and their teleomorphic states, Arthroderma species, based on the DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimura, K; Tamura, Y; Murakami, A; Kano, R; Nakamura, Y; Hasegawa, A; Uchida, K; Yamaguchi, H

    2001-01-01

    We performed a cluster analysis of human and animal pathogenic Microsporum species and their teleomorphic states, Arthroderma species, including A. otae-related species (M. canis, M. audouinii, M. distortum, M. equinum, M. langeronii, and M. ferrugineum) and M. gypseum complex (A. fulvum, A. gypseum, and A. incurvatum) using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1). The dendrogram showed the members of A. otae-related species to be monophyletic and to construct an extremely closely related cluster with a long horizontal branch. This ITS1-homologous group of A. otae was organized in 6 unique genotypes, while sequences of the members of the ITS1-homologous group of M. gypseum complex are more diverse. This ITS1-based database of Microsporum species and their teleomorphic states will provide a useful and reliable species identification system: it is time-saving (takes two to three days), accurate and applicable even to strains with atypical morphological features or in a non-culturable state.

  2. Measuring cation dependent DNA polymerase fidelity landscapes by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael Zamft

    Full Text Available High-throughput recording of signals embedded within inaccessible micro-environments is a technological challenge. The ideal recording device would be a nanoscale machine capable of quantitatively transducing a wide range of variables into a molecular recording medium suitable for long-term storage and facile readout in the form of digital data. We have recently proposed such a device, in which cation concentrations modulate the misincorporation rate of a DNA polymerase (DNAP on a known template, allowing DNA sequences to encode information about the local cation concentration. In this work we quantify the cation sensitivity of DNAP misincorporation rates, making possible the indirect readout of cation concentration by DNA sequencing. Using multiplexed deep sequencing, we quantify the misincorporation properties of two DNA polymerases--Dpo4 and Klenow exo(---obtaining the probability and base selectivity of misincorporation at all positions within the template. We find that Dpo4 acts as a DNA recording device for Mn(2+ with a misincorporation rate gain of ∼2%/mM. This modulation of misincorporation rate is selective to the template base: the probability of misincorporation on template T by Dpo4 increases >50-fold over the range tested, while the other template bases are affected less strongly. Furthermore, cation concentrations act as scaling factors for misincorporation: on a given template base, Mn(2+ and Mg(2+ change the overall misincorporation rate but do not alter the relative frequencies of incoming misincorporated nucleotides. Characterization of the ion dependence of DNAP misincorporation serves as the first step towards repurposing it as a molecular recording device.

  3. Next generation sequencing of DNA-launched Chikungunya vaccine virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Forrester, Naomi [Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, GNL, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Tretyakova, Irina [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Weaver, Scott [Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, GNL, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3′ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. - Highlights: • Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging pandemic threat. • In vivo DNA-launched attenuated CHIKV is a novel vaccine technology. • DNA-launched virus was sequenced using HiSeq2000 and compared to the 181/25 virus. • DNA-launched virus has lower frequency of SNPs at E2-12 and E2-82 attenuation loci.

  4. Short sequence effect of ancient DNA on mammoth phylogenetic analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guilian SHENG; Lianjuan WU; Xindong HOU; Junxia YUAN; Shenghong CHENG; Bojian ZHONG; Xulong LAI

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of Elephantidae has been intensively studied in the past few years, especially after 2006. The molecular approaches have made great contribution to the assumption that the extinct woolly mammoth has a close relationship with the Asian elephant instead of the African elephant. In this study, partial ancient DNA sequences of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene in mitochondrial genome were successfully retrieved from Late Pleistocene Mammuthus primigenius bones collected from Heilongjiang Province in Northeast China. Both the partial and complete homologous cyt b gene sequences and the whole mitochondrial genome sequences extracted from GenBank were aligned and used as datasets for phylogenetic analyses. All of the phylogenetic trees, based on either the partial or the complete cyt b gene, reject the relationship constructed by the whole mitochondrial genome, showing the occurrence of an effect of sequence length of cyt b gene on mammoth phylogenetic analyses.

  5. Model identification for DNA sequence-structure relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Stephen Dwyer; Chiu, Anita; Chizeck, Howard Jay

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the use of algebraic state-space models for the sequence dependent properties of DNA. By considering the DNA sequence as an input signal, rather than using an all atom physical model, computational efficiency is achieved. A challenge in deriving this type of model is obtaining its structure and estimating its parameters. Here we present two candidate model structures for the sequence dependent structural property Slide and a method of encoding the models so that a recursive least squares algorithm can be applied for parameter estimation. These models are based on the assumption that the value of Slide at a base-step is determined by the surrounding tetranucleotide sequence. The first model takes the four bases individually as inputs and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.90 A. The second model takes the four bases pairwise and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.88 A. These values indicate that the accuracy of these models is within the useful range for structure prediction. Performance is comparable to published predictions of a more physically derived model, at significantly less computational cost.

  6. An improved chloroplast DNA extraction procedure for whole plastid genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Hu, Na; Huang, Hui; Gao, Ju; Zhao, You-Jie; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes supply valuable genetic information for evolutionary and functional studies in plants. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes with the application of second-generation sequencing technology in plastid genome sequencing projects. However, cost-effective high-throughput chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) extraction becomes a major bottleneck restricting the application, as conventional methods are difficult to make a balance between the quality and yield of cpDNAs. We first tested two traditional methods to isolate cpDNA from the three species, Oryza brachyantha, Leersia japonica and Prinsepia utihis. Both of them failed to obtain properly defined cpDNA bands. However, we developed a simple but efficient method based on sucrose gradients and found that the modified protocol worked efficiently to isolate the cpDNA from the same three plant species. We sequenced the isolated DNA samples with Illumina (Solexa) sequencing technology to test cpDNA purity according to aligning sequence reads to the reference chloroplast genomes, showing that the reference genome was properly covered. We show that 40-50% cpDNA purity is achieved with our method. Here we provide an improved method used to isolate cpDNA from angiosperms. The Illumina sequencing results suggest that the isolated cpDNA has reached enough yield and sufficient purity to perform subsequent genome assembly. The cpDNA isolation protocol thus will be widely applicable to the plant chloroplast genome sequencing projects.

  7. [Molecular identification and detection of moon jellyfish (Aurelia sp.) based on partial sequencing of mitochondrial 16S rDNA and COI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Yan; Zhen, Yu; Wang, Guo-shan; Mi, Tie-Zhu; Yu, Zhi-gang

    2013-03-01

    Taking the moon jellyfish Aurelia sp. commonly found in our coastal sea areas as test object, its genome DNA was extracted, the partial sequences of mt-16S rDNA (650 bp) and mt-COI (709 bp) were PCR-amplified, and, after purification, cloning, and sequencing, the sequences obtained were BLASTn-analyzed. The sequences of greater difference with those of the other jellyfish were chosen, and eight specific primers for the mt-16S rDNA and mt-COI of Aurelia sp. were designed, respectively. The specificity test indicated that the primer AS3 for the mt-16S rDNA and the primer AC3 for the mt-COI were excellent in rapidly detecting the target jellyfish from Rhopilema esculentum, Nemopilema nomurai, Cyanea nozakii, Acromitus sp., and Aurelia sp., and thus, the techniques for the molecular identification and detection of moon jellyfish were preliminarily established, which could get rid of the limitations in classical morphological identification of Aurelia sp. , being able to find the Aurelia sp. in the samples more quickly and accurately.

  8. Analytical workflow of double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing based on empirical and in silico optimization in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-04-01

    Double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-Seq) enables high-throughput genome-wide genotyping with next-generation sequencing technology. Consequently, this method has become popular in plant genetics and breeding. Although computational in silico prediction of restriction sites from the genome sequence is recognized as an effective approach for choosing the restriction enzymes to be used, few reports have evaluated the in silico predictions in actual experimental data. In this study, we designed and demonstrated a workflow for in silico and empirical ddRAD-Seq analysis in tomato, as follows: (i)in silico prediction of optimum restriction enzymes from the reference genome, (ii) verification of the prediction by actual ddRAD-Seq data of four restriction enzyme combinations, (iii) establishment of a computational data processing pipeline for high-confidence single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling, and (iv) validation of SNP accuracy by construction of genetic linkage maps. The quality of SNPs based on de novo assembly reference of the ddRAD-Seq reads was comparable with that of SNPs obtained using the published reference genome of tomato. Comparisons of SNP calls in diverse tomato lines revealed that SNP density in the genome influenced the detectability of SNPs by ddRAD-Seq. In silico prediction prior to actual analysis contributed to optimization of the experimental conditions for ddRAD-Seq, e.g. choices of enzymes and plant materials. Following optimization, this ddRAD-Seq pipeline could help accelerate genetics, genomics, and molecular breeding in both model and non-model plants, including crops.

  9. Molecular phylogenetic systematics of twelve species of Acipenseriformes based on mtDNA ND4L -ND4 gene sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张四明; 张亚平; 郑向忠; 陈永久; 邓怀; 汪登强; 危起伟; 张云武; 聂龙; 吴清江

    2000-01-01

    Acipenseriformes is an endangered primitive fish group, which occupies a special place in the history of ideas concerning fish evolution, even in vertebrate evolution. However, the classification and evolution of the fishes have been debated. The mitochondrial DMA (mtDNA) ND4L and partial A7D4 genes were first sequenced in twelve species of the order Acipenseriformes, including endemic Chinese species. The following points were drawn from DNA sequences analysis: (i) the two species of Huso can be ascribed to Acipenser; (ii) A. dabryanus is the mostly closely related to A. sinensis, and most likely the landlocked form of A. sinensis; (iii) genus Acipenser in trans-Pacific region might have a common origin; (iv) mtDNA ND4L and ND4 genes are the ideal genetic markers for phylogenetic analysis of the order Acipenseriformes.

  10. Affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed t...

  11. Phylogeny of New World Salvia subgenus Calosphace (Lamiaceae) based on cpDNA (psbA-trnH) and nrDNA (ITS) sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Aaron A; Walker, Jay B; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2013-07-01

    Salvia subgenus Calosphace (Lamiaceae) is economically and ethnomedicinally significant and comprised of more than 500 species. Although strongly supported as monophyletic, it has received no comprehensive systematic research since the initial establishment of 91 taxonomic sections in 1939. Representative taxa of 73 sections of Calosphace were sampled to investigate the phylogenetic relationships and identify major lineages using chloroplast (intergenic spacer psbA-trnH) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (internal transcribed spacer). Phylogenetic analysis of the combined data sets established monophyly of seven sections (Blakea, Corrugatae, Erythrostachys, Hastatae, Incarnatae, Microsphace, and Sigmoideae) and four major lineages (S. axillaris, "Hastatae clade", "Uliginosae clade", and "core Calosphace"). Sections spanning two or more centers of diversity are not supported by our results; rather, supported relationships exhibit significant geographic structure. Mexico is supported as the geographic origin of Calosphace, and no more than seven dispersal events to South America are required to account for current disjunct distributions.

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of black Dahe pig based on DNA sequences analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lizhou; Yu, Long; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Chao; Shi, Xiaodong; Ding, Wei; Zhu, Lei; Guo, Songchang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of black Dahe pigs, we collected 175 samples from 5 local populations and sequenced them using a combination of two selected molecular markers for mitochondrial cytochrome b and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB. Overall, the results of AMOVA and phylogenetic tree and gene flow analyses detected high levels of gene flow among the five populations, particularly individual pigs from Dahe town (Pop1) or Yingshang town (Pop2) to other populations (Pop3, Pop4, and Pop5). The genetic diversity analyses showed that the diversity indices of the five populations did not vary significantly, but they were much lower than those of other Chinese pig species. These results suggest that distinct gene flow, unstable population pattern, and lower genetic diversity have been influenced mainly by human introductions for economic ends. These findings provide genetic information that could be used for the preservation and further genetic improvement of the black Dahe pig, as well as an important reference for the evaluation, conservation, and utilization of the genetic resources of this breed.

  13. Phylogeny of the Labeoninae (Teleostei, Cypriniformes) based on nuclear DNA sequences and implications on character evolution and biogeography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanping ZHENG; Junxing YANG; Xiaoyong CHEN

    2012-01-01

    The Labeoninae is a subfamily of the family Cyprinidae,Order Cypriniformes.Oromandibular morphology within the Labeoninae is the greatest among cyprinid fishes.Although several phylogenetic studies about labeonines have been undertaken the results have been inconsistent and a comprehensive phylogeny is needed.Further,an incongruence between morphological and molecular phylogeny requires a systematic exploration of the significance of morphological characters on the basis of the molecular phylogeny.In this study,a total of 292 nucleotide sequences from 73 individuals (representing 24 genera and 73 species) of Labeoninae were analyzed.The results of the phylogenetic analysis indicate that there are four major clades within Labeoninae and three monophyletic lineages within the fourth clade.Results of the character evolution show that all oromandibular morphological characters are homoplastically distributed on the molecular phylogenetic tree and suggests that these characters evolved several times during the history of labeonines.In particular,the labeonine,a specific disc on the lower lip,has been acquired three times and reversed twice.These morphological characters do not have systematic significance but can be useful for taxonomy.The results of biogeography suggest that the Labeoninae originated from Southeast Asia and separately dispersed to Africa,East Asia and South Asia.

  14. Isolation of DNA for Sequence Analysis from Herbarium Material of Some Lichen Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Aras, Sümer; CANSARAN, Demet

    2006-01-01

    An improved protocol for the isolation of DNA from herbarium material of some lichen specimens is described. The isolated DNA is suitable for PCR reactions for DNA sequence analysis. The hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) based protocol defined in this study provides a number of advantages, mainly speed and reliability. In addition, different DNA extraction protocols were examined to determine the yield of DNA from the thallus of lichen specimens. The methods examined include a CTAB ba...

  15. Isolation of DNA for Sequence Analysis from Herbarium Material of Some Lichen Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Aras, Sümer; CANSARAN, Demet

    2014-01-01

    An improved protocol for the isolation of DNA from herbarium material of some lichen specimens is described. The isolated DNA is suitable for PCR reactions for DNA sequence analysis. The hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) based protocol defined in this study provides a number of advantages, mainly speed and reliability. In addition, different DNA extraction protocols were examined to determine the yield of DNA from the thallus of lichen specimens. The methods examined include a CTAB ba...

  16. Next generation semiconductor based sequencing of bitter taste receptor genes in different pig populations and association analysis using a selective DNA pool-seq approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribani, A; Bertolini, F; Schiavo, G; Scotti, E; Utzeri, V J; Dall'Olio, S; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P; Fontanesi, L

    2017-02-01

    Taste perception in animals affects feed intake and may influence production traits. In particular, bitter is sensed by receptors encoded by the family of TAS2R genes. In this research, using a DNA pool-seq approach coupled with next generation semiconductor based target resequencing, we analysed nine porcine TAS2R genes (TAS2R1, TAS2R3, TAS2R4, TAS2R7, TAS2R9, TAS2R10, TAS2R16, TAS2R38 and TAS2R39) to identify variability and, at the same time, estimate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies in several populations and testing differences in an association analysis. Equimolar DNA pools were prepared for five pig breeds (Italian Duroc, Italian Landrace, Pietrain, Meishan and Casertana) and wild boars (5-10 individuals each) and for two groups of Italian Large White pigs with extreme and divergent back fat thickness (50 + 50 pigs). About 1.8 million reads were obtained by sequencing amplicons generated from these pools. A total of 125 SNPs were identified, of which 37 were missense mutations. Three of them (p.Ile53Phe and p.Trp85Leu in TAS2R4; p.Leu37Ser in TAS2R39) could have important effects on the function of these bitter taste receptors, based on in silico predictions. Variability in wild boars seems lower than that in domestic breeds potentially as a result of selective pressure in the wild towards defensive bitter taste perception. Three SNPs in TAS2R38 and TAS2R39 were significantly associated with back fat thickness. These results may be important to understand the complexity of taste perception and their associated effects that could be useful to develop nutrigenetic approaches in pig breeding and nutrition. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  17. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farkhondeh Saba; Moslem Papizadeh; Javad Khansha; Mahshid Sedghi; Mehrnoosh Rasooli; Mohammad Ali Amoozegar; Mohammad Reza Soudi; Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh Fazeli

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction...

  18. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farkhondeh Saba; Moslem Papizadeh; Javad Khansha; Mahshid Sedghi; Mehrnoosh Rasooli; Mohammad Ali Amoozegar; Mohammad Reza Soudi; Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh Fazeli

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction...

  19. New scoring schema for finding motifs in DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowzari-Dalini Abbas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pattern discovery in DNA sequences is one of the most fundamental problems in molecular biology with important applications in finding regulatory signals and transcription factor binding sites. An important task in this problem is to search (or predict known binding sites in a new DNA sequence. For this reason, all subsequences of the given DNA sequence are scored based on an scoring function and the prediction is done by selecting the best score. By assuming no dependency between binding site base positions, most of the available tools for known binding site prediction are designed. Recently Tomovic and Oakeley investigated the statistical basis for either a claim of dependence or independence, to determine whether such a claim is generally true, and they presented a scoring function for binding site prediction based on the dependency between binding site base positions. Our primary objective is to investigate the scoring functions which can be used in known binding site prediction based on the assumption of dependency or independency in binding site base positions. Results We propose a new scoring function based on the dependency between all positions in biding site base positions. This scoring function uses joint information content and mutual information as a measure of dependency between positions in transcription factor binding site. Our method for modeling dependencies is simply an extension of position independency methods. We evaluate our new scoring function on the real data sets extracted from JASPAR and TRANSFAC data bases, and compare the obtained results with two other well known scoring functions. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the new approach improves known binding site discovery and show that the joint information content and mutual information provide a better and more general criterion to investigate the relationships between positions in the TFBS. Our scoring function is formulated by simple

  20. Viral discovery and sequence recovery using DNA microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wang

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of the constant threat posed by emerging infectious diseases and the limitations of existing approaches used to identify new pathogens, there is a great demand for new technological methods for viral discovery. We describe herein a DNA microarray-based platform for novel virus identification and characterization. Central to this approach was a DNA microarray designed to detect a wide range of known viruses as well as novel members of existing viral families; this microarray contained the most highly conserved 70mer sequences from every fully sequenced reference viral genome in GenBank. During an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in March 2003, hybridization to this microarray revealed the presence of a previously uncharacterized coronavirus in a viral isolate cultivated from a SARS patient. To further characterize this new virus, approximately 1 kb of the unknown virus genome was cloned by physically recovering viral sequences hybridized to individual array elements. Sequencing of these fragments confirmed that the virus was indeed a new member of the coronavirus family. This combination of array hybridization followed by direct viral sequence recovery should prove to be a general strategy for the rapid identification and characterization of novel viruses and emerging infectious disease.

  1. Southeast Asian mouth-brooding Betta fighting fish (Teleostei: Perciformes) species and their phylogenetic relationships based on mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 DNA sequences and analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Kowasupat, Chanon; Laosinchai, Parames; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Phongdara, Amornrat; Senapin, Saengchan; Wanna, Warapond; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Kühne, Jens; Fasquel, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Fighting fish species in the genus Betta are found in several Southeast Asian countries. Depending on the mode of paternal care for fertilized eggs and hatchlings, various species of the betta fish are classified as mouth brooders or nest builders whose members in turn have been grouped according to their similarities mainly in morphology. The mouth brooders as well as some nest builders involved in the present study include fishes discovered and identified subsequent to previous reports on species groupings and their positions on phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences that differ from those used by us in this study. From the mitochondrial COI gene and nuclear ITS1 gene sequences and more accurate analyses we conclude that the following members of the mouth-brooding pairs, named differently previously, are virtually identical, viz the Betta prima-Betta pallida pair and Betta ferox-Betta apollon pair. The Betta simplex, hitherto believed to be one species, could possibly be genetically split into 2 distinct species. In addition, several other established type-locality fishes could harbor cryptic species as judged by genetic differences. Assignments of fish species to groups reported earlier may have to be altered somewhat by the present genetic findings. We propose here a new Betta fish phylogenetic tree which, albeit being similar to the previous ones, is clearly different from them. Our gene-based evidence also leads to assignments of some fishes to new species groups and alters the positions of some species on the new phylogenetic tree, thus implying different ancestral relationships.

  2. Yeast DNA sequences initiating gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Astrid; Tran, Thi Tuyen; Jacob, Daniela; Mayer, Martin; Freytag, Barbara; Appel, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    DNA transfer between pro- and eukaryotes occurs either during natural horizontal gene transfer or as a result of the employment of gene technology. We analysed the capacity of DNA sequences from a eukaryotic donor organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to serve as promoter region in a prokaryotic recipient (Escherichia coli) by creating fusions between promoterless luxAB genes from Vibrio harveyi and random DNA sequences from S. cerevisiae and measuring the luminescence of transformed E. coli. Fifty-four out of 100 randomly analysed S. cerevisiae DNA sequences caused considerable gene expression in E. coli. Determination of transcription start sites within six selected yeast sequences in E. coli confirmed the existence of bacterial -10 and -35 consensus sequences at appropriate distances upstream from transcription initiation sites. Our results demonstrate that the probability of transcription of transferred eukaryotic DNA in bacteria is extremely high and does not require the insertion of the transferred DNA behind a promoter of the recipient genome.

  3. Methods for sequencing GC-rich and CCT repeat DNA templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a PCR-based method of cycle sequencing DNA and other polynucleotide sequences having high CG content and regions of high GC content, and includes for example DNA strands with a high Cytosine and/or Guanosine content and repeated motifs such as CCT repeats.

  4. A phylogeny of the schoenoid sedges (Cyperaceae: Schoeneae) based on plastid DNA sequences, with special reference to the genera found in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboom, G Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Despite its large size (about 700 species), the australy-centred sedge tribe Schoeneae has received little explicit phylogenetic study, especially using molecular data. As a result, generic relationships are poorly understood, and even the monophyly of the tribe is open to question. In this study, plastid DNA sequences (rbcL, trnL-trnF, and rps16) drawn from a broad array of Schoeneae are analysed using Bayesian and parsimony-based approaches to infer a framework phylogeny for the tribe. Both analytical methods broadly support the monophyly of Schoeneae, Bayesian methods doing so with good support. Within the schoenoid clade, there is strong support for a series of monophyletic generic groupings whose interrelationships are unclear. These lineages form a large polytomy at the base of Schoeneae that may be indicative of past radiation, probably following the fragmentation of Gondwana. Most of these lineages contain both African and non-African members, suggesting a history of intercontinental dispersal. The results of this study clearly identify the relationships of the African-endemic schoenoid genera and demonstrate that the African-Australasian genus Tetraria, like Costularia, is polyphyletic. This pattern is morphologically consistent and suggests that these genera require realignment.

  5. Degradation of fungal DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sinus fungal balls hampers reliable sequence-based identification of fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, Odile; Toussain, Guillaume; Abermil, Nassera; Alsamad, Issam Abd; Botterel, Françoise; Costa, Jean-Marc; Papon, Jean-François; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Identification of the etiologic agent responsible for sinus fungal ball (SFB) is rarely obtained due to either the culture of patient specimens not being ordered or if cultures were inoculated they proved to be negative. Obviously, this has a significant impact on the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies. We investigated whether paraffin-embedded (PE) tissues, the only materials often available, were suitable for the correct identification of the responsible fungi. We obtained PE tissues of SFB from 16 different patients who had risk factors for invasive fungal infections. DNA was extracted using an automated extractor and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequenced following amplification with two sets of primers designed to amplify >300 bp fragments. This was attempted in parallel with a real-time quantitative PCR assay targeting Aspergillus spp. mitochondrial DNA designed to amplify <150 bp fragments. ITS sequencing succeeded in appropriately identifying the etiologic agents in 10 of the 16 samples (nine Aspergillus fumigatus, one Lewia spp.). In contrast, the <150 bp PCR assay amplified all specimens correctly except the one involving Lewia spp. If fungal identification is warranted to understand the pathophysiology of SFB and guide clinicians, we cannot rely only on ITS sequencing of the DNA obtained from PE tissues. The main reason is probably due to the fact that formalin prevents amplification of long DNA fragments and consequently, frozen or fresh tissues should be employed.

  6. A High-Throughput Process for the Solid-Phase Purification of Synthetic DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajkowski, Andrzej; Cieślak, Jacek; Beaucage, Serge L

    2017-06-19

    An efficient process for the purification of synthetic phosphorothioate and native DNA sequences is presented. The process is based on the use of an aminopropylated silica gel support functionalized with aminooxyalkyl functions to enable capture of DNA sequences through an oximation reaction with the keto function of a linker conjugated to the 5'-terminus of DNA sequences. Deoxyribonucleoside phosphoramidites carrying this linker, as a 5'-hydroxyl protecting group, have been synthesized for incorporation into DNA sequences during the last coupling step of a standard solid-phase synthesis protocol executed on a controlled pore glass (CPG) support. Solid-phase capture of the nucleobase- and phosphate-deprotected DNA sequences released from the CPG support is demonstrated to proceed near quantitatively. Shorter than full-length DNA sequences are first washed away from the capture support; the solid-phase purified DNA sequences are then released from this support upon reaction with tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride in dry dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and precipitated in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The purity of solid-phase-purified DNA sequences exceeds 98%. The simulated high-throughput and scalability features of the solid-phase purification process are demonstrated without sacrificing purity of the DNA sequences. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. DNA sequence chromatogram browsing using JAVA and CORBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, J D; Buehler, E; Hillier, L

    1999-03-01

    DNA sequence chromatograms (traces) are the primary data source for all large-scale genomic and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing projects. Access to the sequencing trace assists many later analyses, for example contig assembly and polymorphism detection, but obtaining and using traces is problematic. Traces are not collected and published centrally, they are much larger than the base calls derived from them, and viewing them requires the interactivity of a local graphical client with local data. To provide efficient global access to DNA traces, we developed a client/server system based on flexible Java components integrated into other applications including an applet for use in a WWW browser and a stand-alone trace viewer. Client/server interaction is facilitated by CORBA middleware which provides a well-defined interface, a naming service, and location independence. [The software is packaged as a Jar file available from the following URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/jparsons. Links to working examples of the trace viewers can be found at http://corba.ebi.ac.uk/EST. All the Washington University mouse EST traces are available for browsing at the same URL.

  8. High-Quality Exome Sequencing of Whole-Genome Amplified Neonatal Dried Blood Spot DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Lescai, Francesco; Grove, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    and WB vs WB sample types yielded similar concordance rates, with values close to 100%. WgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples performs with great accuracy and efficiency in exome sequencing. The wgaDNA performed similarly to matched high-quality reference--whole-blood DNA--based on concordance rates calculated...

  9. From DNA sequence to transcriptional behaviour: a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Eran; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    Complex transcriptional behaviours are encoded in the DNA sequences of gene regulatory regions. Advances in our understanding of these behaviours have been recently gained through quantitative models that describe how molecules such as transcription factors and nucleosomes interact with genomic sequences. An emerging view is that every regulatory sequence is associated with a unique binding affinity landscape for each molecule and, consequently, with a unique set of molecule-binding configurations and transcriptional outputs. We present a quantitative framework based on existing methods that unifies these ideas. This framework explains many experimental observations regarding the binding patterns of factors and nucleosomes and the dynamics of transcriptional activation. It can also be used to model more complex phenomena such as transcriptional noise and the evolution of transcriptional regulation.

  10. RevTrans: multiple alignment of coding DNA from aligned amino acid sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2003-01-01

    The simple fact that proteins are built from 20 amino acids while DNA only contains four different bases, means that the 'signal-to-noise ratio' in protein sequence alignments is much better than in alignments of DNA. Besides this information-theoretical advantage, protein alignments also benefit...... proteins. It is therefore preferable to align coding DNA at the amino acid level and it is for this purpose we have constructed the program RevTrans. RevTrans constructs a multiple DNA alignment by: (i) translating the DNA; (ii) aligning the resulting peptide sequences; and (iii) building a multiple DNA...... alignment by 'reverse translation' of the aligned protein sequences. In the resulting DNA alignment, gaps occur in groups of three corresponding to entire codons, and analogous codon positions are therefore always lined up. These features are useful when constructing multiple DNA alignments for phylogenetic...

  11. Preparing DNA libraries for multiplexed paired-end deep sequencing for Illumina GA sequencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mike S; Taylor, Ronald K

    2011-02-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, also known as deep sequencing, is becoming a more affordable and efficient way to identify SNP mutations, deletions, and insertions in DNA sequences across several different strains. Two major obstacles preventing the widespread use of deep sequencers are the costs involved in services used to prepare DNA libraries for sequencing and the overall accuracy of the sequencing data. This unit describes the preparation of DNA libraries for multiplexed paired-end sequencing using the Illumina GA series sequencer. Self-preparation of DNA libraries can help reduce overall expenses, especially if optimization is required for the different samples, and use of the Illumina GA Sequencer can improve the quality of the data.

  12. New method to study DNA sequences: the languages of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Gino; Mayer-Foulkes, David

    2008-04-01

    Recently, several authors have reported statistical evidence for deterministic dynamics in the flux of genetic information, suggesting that evolution involves the emergence and maintenance of a fractal landscape in DNA chains. Here we examine the idea that motif repetition lies at the origin of these statistical properties of DNA. To analyse repetition patterns we apply a modification of the BDS statistic, devised to analyze complex economic dynamics and adapted here to DNA sequence analysis. This provides a new method to detect structured signals in genetic information. We compare naturally occurring DNA sequences along the evolutionary tree with randomly generated sequences and also with simulated sequences with repetition motifs. For easier understanding, we also define a new statistic for a DNA sequence that constitutes a specific fingerprint. The new methods are applied to exon and intron DNA sequences, finding specific statistical differences. Moreover, by analysing DNA sequences of different species from Bacteria to Man, we explore the evolution of these linguistic DNA features along the evolutionary tree. The results are consistent with the idea that all the flux of DNA information need not be random, but may be structured along the evolutionary tree. The implications for evolutionary theory are discussed.

  13. Sequence-Dependent Fluorescence of Cy3- and Cy5-Labeled Double-Stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschy, Nicole; Sack, Matej; Somoza, Mark M

    2016-03-16

    The fluorescent intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 dyes is strongly dependent on the nucleobase sequence of the labeled oligonucleotides. Sequence-dependent fluorescence may significantly influence the data obtained from many common experimental methods based on fluorescence detection of nucleic acids, such as sequencing, PCR, FRET, and FISH. To quantify sequence dependent fluorescence, we have measured the fluorescence intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 bound to the 5' end of all 1024 possible double-stranded DNA 5mers. The fluorescence intensity was also determined for these dyes bound to the 5' end of fixed-sequence double-stranded DNA with a variable sequence 3' overhang adjacent to the dye. The labeled DNA oligonucleotides were made using light-directed, in situ microarray synthesis. The results indicate that the fluorescence intensity of both dyes is sensitive to all five bases or base pairs, that the sequence dependence is stronger for double- (vs single-) stranded DNA, and that the dyes are sensitive to both the adjacent dsDNA sequence and the 3'-ssDNA overhang. Purine-rich sequences result in higher fluorescence. The results can be used to estimate measurement error in experiments with fluorescent-labeled DNA, as well as to optimize the fluorescent signal by considering the nucleobase environment of the labeling cyanine dye.

  14. Statistical assignment of DNA sequences using Bayesian phylogenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Huelsenbeck, John P.;

    2008-01-01

    -analysis of previously published ancient DNA data and show that, with high statistical confidence, most of the published sequences are in fact of Neanderthal origin. However, there are several cases of chimeric sequences that are comprised of a combination of both Neanderthal and modern human DNA....

  15. Levenshtein error-correcting barcodes for multiplexed DNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschmann, Tilo; Bystrykh, Leonid V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: High-throughput sequencing technologies are improving in quality, capacity and costs, providing versatile applications in DNA and RNA research. For small genomes or fraction of larger genomes, DNA samples can be mixed and loaded together on the same sequencing track. This so-called multi

  16. Bothaella manhi, a new species of tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae) from the Cuc Phuong National Park of Vietnam based on morphology and DNA sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    COOK, SHELLEY; LIEN, NGO GIANG; MCALISTER, ERICA; HARBACH, RALPH E.

    2012-01-01

    A new species of genus Bothaella (Diptera: Culicidae) collected along with two other species of the genus during surveys for flavivirus isolations in the Cuc Phuong National Park in northern Vietnam is formally described and named as Bothaella manhi, sp. n. The adults, pupa and fourth-instar larva are characterized, the male genitalia and the two immature stages are illustrated and DNA sequence data are included for regions coding for sections of the COI and COII genes (mtDNA). The species is compared and distinguished from the other species of the genus, and sequence data are used to hypothesise its phylogenetic relationship with Bo. helenae and Bo. kleini, the other two species collected during the survey. PMID:23155353

  17. Diagnostic description and geographic distribution of four new cryptic species of the blue-spotted maskray species complex (Myliobatoidei: Dasyatidae; Neotrygon spp.) based on DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, Philippe; Arlyza, Irma S.; Hoareau, Thierry B.; Shen, Kang-Ning

    2017-08-01

    Nine morphologically similar but genetically distinct lineages in the blue-spotted maskray species complex, previously Neotrygon kuhlii (Müller and Henle) qualify as cryptic species. Four of these lineages have been previously described as Neotrygon australiae Last, White and Séret, Neotrygon caeruleopunctata Last, White and Séret, Neotrygon orientale Last, White and Séret, and Neotrygon varidens (Garman), but the morphological characters used in the descriptions offered poor diagnoses and their geographic distributions were not delineated precisely. The objective of the present work is to complete the description of the cryptic species in the complex. Here, an additional four lineages are described as new species on the basis of their mitochondrial DNA sequences: Neotrygon bobwardi, whose distribution extends from the northern tip of Aceh to the western coast of Sumatera; Neotrygon malaccensis, sampled from the eastern part of the Andaman Sea and from the Malacca Strait; Neotrygon moluccensis, from the eastern half of the Banda Sea; and Neotrygon westpapuensis from the central portion of northern West Papua. The geographic distributions of N. australiae, N. coeruleopunctata, N. orientale, and N. varidens are updated. For each species, a diagnosis is provided in the form of a combination of private or partly-private nucleotides at 2-4 nucleotide sites along a 519-base pair fragment of the CO1 gene. We believe that the present taxonomic revision will provide information relevant to the sound management and conservation of cryptic species of the blue-spotted maskray in the Coral Triangle region.

  18. Molecular phylogenetic position of endangered Wilfredomys within Sigmodontinae (Cricetidae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences and comments on Wiedomyini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leonardo Ferreira; Passaia, Milena Henrique; Rodrigues, Fernando Pacheco; Peters, Felipe Bortolotto; Sponchiado, Jonas; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Christoff, Alexandre Uarth

    2015-07-20

    Wilfredomys, a monotypic genus of endangered sigmodontine rats, was historically related to the tribe Thomasomyini or considered "incertae sedis". Given no molecular data is available for Wilfredomys, the phylogenetic position of this taxon is uncertain in relation to modern, molecular hypotheses of sigmodontine relationships. We investigate the phylogeny of Wilfredomys to provide a hypothesis of its position within Sigmodontinae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses recovered Wilfredomys oenax as sister to Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, and Wie. cerradensis fell out sister to this clade. At the genus level, Phaenomys is sister to Wilfredomys + Wiedomys, forming a novel and well-supported sigmodontine clade. Our results suggest that tribe Wiedomyini should encompass Wilfredomys in addition to Wiedomys and Cholomys, thus the hypothesis that Wiedomys is paraphyletic should be investigated further. Another plausible classification scheme consistent with our results would be to expand Wiedomyini to encompass the clade composed of Phaenomys + Wilfredomys + Wiedomys. Last, our recovery of an "Atlantic clade" composed of lineages restricted to eastern South America supports the idea that this region has likely played an important role in sigmodontine diversification.

  19. Synthetic oligonucleotides with particular base sequences from the cDNA encoding proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG induce interferons and activate natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, T; Yano, O; Kuramoto, E; Kimura, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Yamamoto, S

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of 45-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide, having sequence randomly selected from the known cDNA encoding BCG proteins, were tested for their capability to augment natural killer (NK) cell activity of mouse spleen cells in vitro. Six out of the 13 oligonucleotides showed the activity, while the others did not. In order to know the minimal and essential sequence(s) responsible for the biological activity, 2 kinds of 30-mer and 5 kinds of 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments of an active 45-mer nucleotide were tested for their activity. One of the 30-mer oligonucleotides, designated BCG-A4a, was active, but the other 30-mer was inactive. All of the 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments were inactive. The BCG-A4a also stimulated the spleen cells to produce interferon (IFN)-alpha and -gamma. An experiment using anti-IFN antisera showed that the NK cell activation by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to the IFN-alpha produced. It was noticed that all of the biologically active oligonucleotides possessed one or more palindrome sequence(s), and the inactive ones did not, with an exception of a 45-mer inactive oligonucleotide containing overlapping palindrome sequences (GGGCCCGGG). These findings strongly suggest that certain palindrome sequences, like GACGTC, GGCGCC and TGCGCA, are essential for 30-mer oligonucleotides, like BCG-A4a, to induce IFNs.

  20. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of whipworm nematodes inferred from DNA sequences of cox1 mtDNA and 18S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, Rocío; Nadler, Steven; De Rojas, Manuel; Zurita, Antonio; Petrášová, Jana; Cutillas, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and ribosomal 18S genes. The taxa consisted of different described species and several host-associated isolates (undescribed taxa) of Trichuris collected from hosts from Spain. Sequence data from mitochondrial cox1 (partial gene) and nuclear 18S near-complete gene were analyzed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, as separate and combined datasets, to evaluate phylogenetic relationships among taxa. Phylogenetic results based on 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were robust for relationships among species; cox1 sequences delimited species and revealed phylogeographic variation, but most relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved by mitochondrial sequences. The phylogenetic hypotheses for both genes strongly supported monophyly of Trichuris, and distinct genetic lineages corresponding to described species or nematodes associated with certain hosts were recognized based on cox1 sequences. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on concatenated sequences of the two loci, cox1 (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)) and 18S rDNA, were congruent with the overall topology inferred from 18S and previously published results based on internal transcribed spacer sequences. Our results demonstrate that the 18S rDNA and cox1 mtDNA genes provide resolution at different levels, but together resolve relationships among geographic populations and species in the genus Trichuris.

  1. Artificial intelligence approach in analysis of DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brézillon, P J; Zaraté, P; Saci, F

    1993-01-01

    We present an approach for designing a knowledge-based system, called Sequence Acquisition In Context (SAIC), that will be able to cooperate with a biologist in the analysis of DNA sequences. The main task of the system is the acquisition of the expert knowledge that the biologist uses for solving ambiguities from gel autoradiograms, with the aim of re-using it later for solving similar ambiguities. The various types of expert knowledge constitute what we call the contextual knowledge of the sequence analysis. Contextual knowledge deals with the unavoidable problems that are common in the study of the living material (eg noise on data, difficulties of observations). Indeed, the analysis of DNA sequences from autoradiograms belongs to an emerging and promising area of investigation, namely reasoning with images. The SAIC project is developed in a theoretical framework that is shared with other applications. Not all tasks have the same importance in each application. We use this observation for designing an intelligent assistant system with three applications. In the SAIC project, we focus on knowledge acquisition, human-computer interaction and explanation. The project will benefit research in the two other applications. We also discuss our SAIC project in the context of large international projects that aim to re-use and share knowledge in a repository.

  2. Bacterial DNA Sequence Compression Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando J. Pinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the advances in DNA sequencing techniques have contributed to an unprecedented growth of genomic data. This fact has increased the interest in DNA compression, not only from the information theory and biology points of view, but also from a practical perspective, since such sequences require storage resources. Several compression methods exist, and particularly, those using finite-context models (FCMs have received increasing attention, as they have been proven to effectively compress DNA sequences with low bits-per-base, as well as low encoding/decoding time-per-base. However, the amount of run-time memory required to store high-order finite-context models may become impractical, since a context-order as low as 16 requires a maximum of 17.2 x 109 memory entries. This paper presents a method to reduce such a memory requirement by using a novel application of artificial neural networks (ANN to build such probabilistic models in a compact way and shows how to use them to estimate the probabilities. Such a system was implemented, and its performance compared against state-of-the art compressors, such as XM-DNA (expert model and FCM-Mx (mixture of finite-context models , as well as with general-purpose compressors. Using a combination of order-10 FCM and ANN, similar encoding results to those of FCM, up to order-16, are obtained using only 17 megabytes of memory, whereas the latter, even employing hash-tables, uses several hundreds of megabytes.

  3. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA- mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA- mediated reaction to...addition, we have expanded our efforts to include DNA- mediated HF etching of SiÜ2, DNA- mediated nanoimprinting lithography, DNA-based patterning of self...detailed kinetics study of DNA- mediated chemical reactions. Examples of such reactions include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of inorganic oxide and HF

  4. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  5. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  6. Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Analysis of South-East Asian Duck Populations Based on the mtDNA D-loop Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, H.; Seo, D. W.; Bhuiyan, M. S. A.; Choi, N. R.; Hoque, M. R.; Heo, K. N.; Lee, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D–loop region is widely used for exploring genetic relationships and for investigating the origin of various animal species. Currently, domestic ducks play an important role in animal protein supply. In this study, partial mtDNA D–loop sequences were obtained from 145 samples belonging to six South-East Asian duck populations and commercial duck population. All these populations were closely related to the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), as indicated by their mean overall genetic distance. Sixteen nucleotide substitutions were identified in sequence analyses allowing the distinction of 28 haplotypes. Around 42.76% of the duck sequences were classified as Hap_02, which completely matched with Anas platyrhynchos duck species. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree also revealed that South-East Asian duck populations were closely related to Anas platyrhynchos. Network profiles were also traced using the 28 haplotypes. Overall, results showed that those duck populations D-loop haplotypes were shared between several duck breeds from Korea and Bangladesh sub continental regions. Therefore, these results confirmed that South-East Asian domestic duck populations have been domesticated from Anas platyrhynchos duck as the maternal origins. PMID:27004808

  7. Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

  8. A pattern matching approach for the estimation of alignment between any two given DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, K; Sriraam, N; Richard, R J A

    2007-08-01

    For a given DNA sequence, it is well known that pair wise alignment schemes are used to determine the similarity with the DNA sequences available in the databanks. The efficiency of the alignment decides the type of amino acids and its corresponding proteins. In order to evaluate the given DNA sequence for its proteomic identity, a pattern matching approach is proposed in this paper. A block based semi-global alignment scheme is introduced to determine the similarity between the DNA sequences (known and given). The two DNA sequences are divided into blocks of equal length and alignment is performed which minimizes the computational complexity. The efficiency of the alignment scheme is evaluated using the parameter, percentage of similarity (POS). Four essential DNA version of the amino acids that emphasize the importance of proteomic functionalities are chosen as patterns and matching is performed with the known and given DNA sequences to determine the similarity between them. The ratio of amino acid counts between the two sequences is estimated and the results are compared with that of the POS value. It is found from the experimental results that higher the POS value and the pattern matching higher are the similarity between the two DNA sequences. The optimal block is also identified based on the POS value and amino acids count.

  9. Choosing the best heuristic for seeded alignment of DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhler Jeremy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seeded alignment is an important component of algorithms for fast, large-scale DNA similarity search. A good seed matching heuristic can reduce the execution time of genomic-scale sequence comparison without degrading sensitivity. Recently, many types of seed have been proposed to improve on the performance of traditional contiguous seeds as used in, e.g., NCBI BLASTN. Choosing among these seed types, particularly those that use information besides the presence or absence of matching residue pairs, requires practical guidance based on a rigorous comparison, including assessment of sensitivity, specificity, and computational efficiency. This work performs such a comparison, focusing on alignments in DNA outside widely studied coding regions. Results We compare seeds of several types, including those allowing transition mutations rather than matches at fixed positions, those allowing transitions at arbitrary positions ("BLASTZ" seeds, and those using a more general scoring matrix. For each seed type, we use an extended version of our Mandala seed design software to choose seeds with optimized sensitivity for various levels of specificity. Our results show that, on a test set biased toward alignments of noncoding DNA, transition information significantly improves seed performance, while finer distinctions between different types of mismatches do not. BLASTZ seeds perform especially well. These results depend on properties of our test set that are not shared by EST-based test sets with a strong bias toward coding DNA. Conclusion Practical seed design requires careful attention to the properties of the alignments being sought. For noncoding DNA sequences, seeds that use transition information, especially BLASTZ-style seeds, are particularly useful. The Mandala seed design software can be found at http://www.cse.wustl.edu/~yanni/mandala/.

  10. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA.

  11. DNA Sequencing as a Tool to Monitor Marine Ecological Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly D. Goodwin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many ocean policies mandate integrated, ecosystem-based approaches to marine monitoring, driving a global need for efficient, low-cost bioindicators of marine ecological quality. Most traditional methods to assess biological quality rely on specialized expertise to provide visual identification of a limited set of specific taxonomic groups, a time-consuming process that can provide a narrow view of ecological status. In addition, microbial assemblages drive food webs but are not amenable to visual inspection and thus are largely excluded from detailed inventory. Molecular-based assessments of biodiversity and ecosystem function offer advantages over traditional methods and are increasingly being generated for a suite of taxa using a “microbes to mammals” or “barcodes to biomes” approach. Progress in these efforts coupled with continued improvements in high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics pave the way for sequence data to be employed in formal integrated ecosystem evaluation, including food web assessments, as called for in the European Union Marine Strategy Framework Directive. DNA sequencing of bioindicators, both traditional (e.g., benthic macroinvertebrates, ichthyoplankton and emerging (e.g., microbial assemblages, fish via eDNA, promises to improve assessment of marine biological quality by increasing the breadth, depth, and throughput of information and by reducing costs and reliance on specialized taxonomic expertise.

  12. Application of Quaternion in improving the quality of global sequence alignment scores for an ambiguous sequence target in Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, D.; Bustamam, A.; Novianti, T.; Ardaneswari, G.

    2017-07-01

    DNA sequence can be defined as a succession of letters, representing the order of nucleotides within DNA, using a permutation of four DNA base codes including adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). The precise code of the sequences is determined using DNA sequencing methods and technologies, which have been developed since the 1970s and currently become highly developed, advanced and highly throughput sequencing technologies. So far, DNA sequencing has greatly accelerated biological and medical research and discovery. However, in some cases DNA sequencing could produce any ambiguous and not clear enough sequencing results that make them quite difficult to be determined whether these codes are A, T, G, or C. To solve these problems, in this study we can introduce other representation of DNA codes namely Quaternion Q = (PA, PT, PG, PC), where PA, PT, PG, PC are the probability of A, T, G, C bases that could appear in Q and PA + PT + PG + PC = 1. Furthermore, using Quaternion representations we are able to construct the improved scoring matrix for global sequence alignment processes, by applying a dot product method. Moreover, this scoring matrix produces better and higher quality of the match and mismatch score between two DNA base codes. In implementation, we applied the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm using Octave, to analyze our target sequence which contains some ambiguous sequence data. The subject sequences are the DNA sequences of Streptococcus pneumoniae families obtained from the Genebank, meanwhile the target DNA sequence are received from our collaborator database. As the results we found the Quaternion representations improve the quality of the sequence alignment score and we can conclude that DNA sequence target has maximum similarity with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  13. Extraction of high-molecular-weight genomic DNA for long-read sequencing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayjonade, Baptiste; Gouzy, Jérôme; Donnadieu, Cécile; Pouilly, Nicolas; Marande, William; Callot, Caroline; Langlade, Nicolas; Muños, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    De novo sequencing of complex genomes is one of the main challenges for researchers seeking high-quality reference sequences. Many de novo assemblies are based on short reads, producing fragmented genome sequences. Third-generation sequencing, with read lengths >10 kb, will improve the assembly of complex genomes, but these techniques require high-molecular-weight genomic DNA (gDNA), and gDNA extraction protocols used for obtaining smaller fragments for short-read sequencing are not suitable for this purpose. Methods of preparing gDNA for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries could be adapted, but these approaches are time-consuming, and commercial kits for these methods are expensive. Here, we present a protocol for rapid, inexpensive extraction of high-molecular-weight gDNA from bacteria, plants, and animals. Our technique was validated using sunflower leaf samples, producing a mean read length of 12.6 kb and a maximum read length of 80 kb.

  14. A MapReduce Framework for DNA Sequencing Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Ghoneimy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomics and Next Generation Sequencers (NGS like Illumina Hiseq produce data in the order of ‎‎200 billion base pairs in a single one-week run for a 60x human genome coverage, which ‎requires modern high-throughput experimental technologies that can ‎only be tackled with high performance computing (HPC and specialized software algorithms called ‎‎“short read aligners”. This paper focuses on the implementation of the DNA sequencing as a set of MapReduce programs that will accept a DNA data set as a FASTQ file and finally generate a VCF (variant call format file, which has variants for a given DNA data set. In this paper MapReduce/Hadoop along with Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA, Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM ‎tools, are fully utilized to provide various utilities for manipulating alignments, including sorting, merging, indexing, ‎and generating alignments. The Map-Sort-Reduce process is designed to be suited for a Hadoop framework in ‎which each cluster is a traditional N-node Hadoop cluster to utilize all of the Hadoop features like HDFS, program ‎management and fault tolerance. The Map step performs multiple instances of the short read alignment algorithm ‎‎(BoWTie that run in parallel in Hadoop. The ordered list of the sequence reads are used as input tuples and the ‎output tuples are the alignments of the short reads. In the Reduce step many parallel instances of the Short ‎Oligonucleotide Analysis Package for SNP (SOAPsnp algorithm run in the cluster. Input tuples are sorted ‎alignments for a partition and the output tuples are SNP calls. Results are stored via HDFS, and then archived in ‎SOAPsnp format. ‎ The proposed framework enables extremely fast discovering somatic mutations, inferring population genetical ‎parameters, and performing association tests directly based on sequencing data without explicit genotyping or ‎linkage-based imputation. It also demonstrate that this method achieves comparable

  15. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2013-12-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution.

  16. DNA Shape Dominates Sequence Affinity in Nucleosome Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosomes provide the basic unit of compaction in eukaryotic genomes, and the mechanisms that dictate their position at specific locations along a DNA sequence are of central importance to genetics. In this Letter, we employ molecular models of DNA and proteins to elucidate various aspects of nucleosome positioning. In particular, we show how DNA's histone affinity is encoded in its sequence-dependent shape, including subtle deviations from the ideal straight B-DNA form and local variations of minor groove width. By relying on high-precision simulations of the free energy of nucleosome complexes, we also demonstrate that, depending on DNA's intrinsic curvature, histone binding can be dominated by bending interactions or electrostatic interactions. More generally, the results presented here explain how sequence, manifested as the shape of the DNA molecule, dominates molecular recognition in the problem of nucleosome positioning.

  17. Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Capsosiphon fulvescens (Ulotrichales, Chlorophyta from Korea Based on rbcL and 18S rDNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Mi Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsosiphon fulvescens is a filamentous green algae in the class Ulvophyceae. It has been consumed as food with unique flavor and soft texture to treat stomach disorders and hangovers, and its economic value justifies studying its nutritional and potential therapeutic effects. In contrast to these applications, only a few taxonomic studies have been conducted on C. fulvescens. In particular, classification and phylogenetic relationships of the C. fulvescens below the order level are controversial. To determine its phylogenetic position in the class, we used rbcL and 18S rDNA sequences as molecular markers to construct phylogenetic trees. The amplified rbcL and 18S rDNA sequences from 4 C. fulvescens isolates (Jindo, Jangheung, Wando, and Koheung, Korea were used for phylogenetic analysis by employing three different phylogenetic methods: neighbor joining (NJ, maximum parsimony (MP, and maximum likelihood (ML. The rbcL phylogenetic tree showed that all taxa in the order Ulvales were clustered as a monophyletic group and resolved the phylogenetic position of C. fulvescens in the order Ulotrichales. The significance of our study is that the 18S rDNA phylogenetic tree shows the detailed taxonomic position of C. fulvescens. In our result, C. fulvescens is inferred as a member of Ulotrichaceae, along with Urospora and Acrosiphonia.

  18. Next Generation Sequencing of Ancient DNA: Requirements, Strategies and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knapp

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The invention of next-generation-sequencing has revolutionized almost all fields of genetics, but few have profited from it as much as the field of ancient DNA research. From its beginnings as an interesting but rather marginal discipline, ancient DNA research is now on its way into the centre of evolutionary biology. In less than a year from its invention next-generation-sequencing had increased the amount of DNA sequence data available from extinct organisms by several orders of magnitude. Ancient DNA  research is now not only adding a temporal aspect to evolutionary studies and allowing for the observation of evolution in real time, it also provides important data to help understand the origins of our own species. Here we review progress that has been made in next-generation-sequencing of ancient DNA over the past five years and evaluate sequencing strategies and future directions.

  19. The Study of Correlation Structures of DNA Sequences A Critical Review

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    1997-01-01

    The study of correlation structure in the primary sequences of DNA is reviewed. The issues reviewed include: symmetries among 16 base-base correlation functions, accurate estimation of correlation measures, the relationship between $1/f$ and Lorentzian spectra, heterogeneity in DNA sequences, different modeling strategies of the correlation structure of DNA sequences, the difference of correlation structure between coding and non-coding regions (besides the period-3 pattern), and source of broad distribution of domain sizes. Although some of the results remain controversial, a body of work on this topic constitutes a good starting point for future studies.

  20. Reduced Representation Libraries from DNA Pools Analysed with Next Generation Semiconductor Based-Sequencing to Identify SNPs in Extreme and Divergent Pigs for Back Fat Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele Bovo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that could be associated with back fat thickness (BFT in pigs. To achieve this goal, we evaluated the potential and limits of an experimental design that combined several methodologies. DNA samples from two groups of Italian Large White pigs with divergent estimating breeding value (EBV for BFT were separately pooled and sequenced, after preparation of reduced representation libraries (RRLs, on the Ion Torrent technology. Taking advantage from SNAPE for SNPs calling in sequenced DNA pools, 39,165 SNPs were identified; 1/4 of them were novel variants not reported in dbSNP. Combining sequencing data with Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip genotyping results on the same animals, 661 genomic positions overlapped with a good approximation of minor allele frequency estimation. A total of 54 SNPs showing enriched alleles in one or in the other RRLs might be potential markers associated with BFT. Some of these SNPs were close to genes involved in obesity related phenotypes.

  1. 不同产地大麻的ITS全序列分析%Identification of cannabis from different growing areas based on rDNA ITS sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代勇; 姜黎; 皮建华; 孙琴

    2012-01-01

      目的:对分别采自云南、新疆两个地区的大麻植物,通过ITS序列的分析,从分子水平进行鉴定。方法:采用DNA提取试剂盒提取大麻的ITS全序列DNA,经过PCR扩增,胶回收后测序,所得序列与从Genbank中获取3个大麻科植物的ITS全序列比对,以葎草的ITS全序列为外源基因构建了大麻属的系统发育树。结果:对获得的基因序列进行同源性分析,NCBI数据库中登陆的大麻相应序列与新疆大麻(毒品大麻)的ITS全序列亲缘关系性最近,为99%;云南大麻(工业大麻)与新疆大麻(毒品大麻)亲缘关系较远。结论:ITS序列能够较准确的将毒品大麻和工业大麻区分开。%  objective:To identify cannabis sativa plants from Yunnan and Xinjiang areas on molecular level by internal transcribed spaces (ITS) sequence analysis. Methods:The complete ITS sequencing of cannabis sativa was determined through DNA extraction by Plant Genomic DNA Kit, PCR amplification, glue recovery and sequencing. Then the phylogenetic tree of cannabinaceae was constructed by comparing with the complete ITS sequencing of three cannabis plants from GenBank. Results: The gene sequence of cannabis by homology analysis showed that the genetic relationship between NCBI database and Xinjiang cannabis (drugs hemp) was the nearest, the homology reaches 99%; but the relationship between Yunnan cannabis (industrial hemp) and Xinjiang cannabis is farther. Conclusion: The cannabis from different sources could be identified by ITS sequence .

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Tilletia and allied genera in order Tilletiales (Ustilaginomycetes; Exobasidiomycetidae) based on large subunit nuclear rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castlebury, Lisa A; Carris, Lori M; Vinky, Kálmán

    2005-01-01

    The order Tilletiales (Ustilaginomycetes, Basidiomycota) includes six genera (Conidiosporomyces, Erratomyces, Ingoldiomyces, Neovossia, Oberwinkleria and Tilletia) and approximately 150 species. All members of Tilletiales infect hosts in the grass family Poaceae with the exception of Erratomyces spp., which occur on hosts in the Fabaceae. Morphological features including teliospore ornamentation, number and nuclear condition of primary basidiospores and ability of primary basidiospores to conjugate and form an infective dikaryon were studied in conjunction with sequence analysis of the large subunit nuclear rDNA gene (nLSU). Analysis based on nLSU data shows that taxa infecting hosts in the grass subfamily Pooideae form one well supported lineage. This lineage comprises most of the reticulate-spored species that germinate to form a small number of rapidly conjugating basidiospores and includes the type species Tilletia tritici. Two tuberculate-spored species with a large number of nonconjugating basidiospores, T. indica and T. walkeri, and Ingoldiomyces hyalosporus are also included in this lineage. Most of the species included in the analysis with echinulate, verrucose or tuberculate teliospores that germinate to form a large number (>30) of nonconjugating basidiospores infect hosts in the subfamilies Panicoideae, Chloridoideae, Arundinoideae and Ehrhartoideae. This group of species is more diverse than the pooid-infecting taxa and in general do not form well supported clades corresponding to host subfamily. The results of this work suggest that morphological characters used to segregate Neovossia, Conidiosporomyces and Ingoldiomyces from Tilletia are not useful generic level characters and that all included species can be accommodated in the genus Tilletia.

  3. Phylogeny of the Cucurbitales based on DNA sequences of nine loci from three genomes: implications for morphological and sexual system evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Bing; Simmons, Mark P; Kocyan, Alexander; Renner, Susanne S

    2006-05-01

    The Cucurbitales are a clade of rosids with a worldwide distribution and a striking heterogeneity in species diversity among its seven family members: the Anisophylleaceae (29-40 species), Begoniaceae (1400 spp.), Coriariaceae (15 spp.), Corynocarpaceae (6 spp.), Cucurbitaceae (800 spp.), Datiscaceae (2 spp.), and Tetramelaceae (2 spp.). Most Cucurbitales have unisexual flowers, and species are monoecious, dioecious, andromonoecious, or androdioecious. To resolve interfamilial relationships within the order and to polarize morphological character evolution, especially of flower sexual systems, we sequenced nine plastids (atpB, matK, ndhF, rbcL, the trnL-F region, and the rpl20-rps12 spacer), nuclear (18S and 26S rDNA), and mitochondrial (nad1 b/c intron) genes (together approximately 12,000 bp) of 26 representatives of the seven families plus eight outgroup taxa from six other orders of the Eurosids I. Cucurbitales are strongly supported as monophyletic and are closest to Fagales, albeit with moderate support; both together are sister to Rosales. The deepest split in the Cucurbitales is that between the Anisophylleaceae and the remaining families; next is a clade of Corynocarpaceae and Coriariaceae, followed by Cucurbitaceae, which are sister to a clade of Begoniaceae, Datiscaceae, and Tetramelaceae. Based on this topology, stipulate leaves, inferior ovaries, parietal placentation, and one-seeded fruits are inferred as ancestral in Cucurbitales; exstipulate leaves, superior ovaries, apical placentation, and many-seeded fruits evolved within the order. Bisexual flowers are reconstructed as ancestral, but dioecy appears to have evolved already in the common ancestor of Begoniaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Datiscaceae, and Tetramelaceae, and then to have been lost repeatedly in Begoniaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Both instances of androdioecy (Datisca glomerata and Schizopepon bryoniifolius) evolved from dioecious ancestors, corroborating recent hypotheses about androdioecy often

  4. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  5. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Gang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10-11 M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  6. Composition and interrelationships of a large Neotropical freshwater fish group, the subfamily Cheirodontinae (Characiformes: Characidae): a case study based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariguela, T C; Ortí, G; Avelino, G S; Abe, K T; Oliveira, C

    2013-07-01

    Characidae is the most species-rich family of freshwater fishes in the order Characiformes, with more than 1000 valid species that correspond to approximately 55% of the order. Few hypotheses about the composition and internal relationships within this family are available and most fail to reach an agreement. Among Characidae, Cheirodontinae is an emblematic group that includes 18 genera (1 fossil) and approximately 60 described species distributed throughout the Neotropical region. The taxonomic and systematic history of Cheirodontinae is complex, and only two hypotheses about the internal relationships in this subfamily have been reported to date. In the present study, we test the composition and relationships of fishes assigned to Cheirodontinae based on a broad taxonomic sample that also includes some characid incertae sedis taxa that were previously considered to be part of Cheirodontinae. We present phylogenetic analyses of a large molecular dataset of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Our results reject the monophyly of Cheirodontinae as previously conceived, as well as the tribes Cheirodontini and Compsurini, and the genera Cheirodon, Compsura, Leptagoniates, Macropsobrycon, Odontostilbe, and Serrapinnus. On the basis of these results we propose: (1) the exclusion of Amazonspinther and Spintherobolus from the subfamily Cheirodontinae since they are the sister-group of all remaining Characidae; (2) the removal of Macropsobrycon xinguensis of the genus Macropsobrycon; (3) the removal of Leptagoniates pi of the genus Leptagoniates; (4) the inclusion of Leptagoniates pi in the subfamily Cheirodontinae; (5) the removal of Cheirodon stenodon of the genus Cheirodon and its inclusion in the subfamily Cheirodontinae under a new genus name; (6) the need to revise the polyphyletic genera Compsura, Odontostilbe, and Serrapinnus; and (7) the division of Cheirodontinae in three newly defined monophyletic tribes: Cheirodontini, Compsurini, and Pseudocheirodontini

  7. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey.

  8. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    coding regions are the DNA uptake sequences (DUS) required for natural genetic transformation. More importantly, we found a significantly higher density of DUS within genes involved in DNA repair, recombination, restriction-modification and replication than in any other annotated gene group......Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  9. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes...

  10. PNA Directed Sequence Addressed Self-Assembly of DNA Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2008-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) can be designed to target duplex DNA with very high sequence specificity and efficiency via various binding modes. We have designed three domain PNA clamps, that bind stably to predefined decameric homopurine targets in large dsDNA molecules and via a third PNA domain sequence specifically recognize another PNA oligomer. We describe how such three domain PNAs have utility for assembling dsDNA grid and clover leaf structures, and in combination with SNAP-tag technology of protein dsDNA structures.

  11. DNA interactions with a Methylene Blue redox indicator depend on the DNA length and are sequence specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2010-06-01

    A DNA molecular beacon approach was used for the analysis of interactions between DNA and Methylene Blue (MB) as a redox indicator of a hybridization event. DNA hairpin structures of different length and guanine (G) content were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 5'-end. Binding of MB to the folded hairpin DNA was electrochemically studied and compared with binding to the duplex structure formed by hybridization of the hairpin DNA to a complementary DNA strand. Variation of the electrochemical signal from the DNA-MB complex was shown to depend primarily on the DNA length and sequence used: the G-C base pairs were the preferential sites of MB binding in the duplex. For short 20 nts long DNA sequences, the increased electrochemical response from MB bound to the duplex structure was consistent with the increased amount of bound and electrochemically readable MB molecules (i.e. MB molecules that are available for the electron transfer (ET) reaction with the electrode). With longer DNA sequences, the balance between the amounts of the electrochemically readable MB molecules bound to the hairpin DNA and to the hybrid was opposite: a part of the MB molecules bound to the long-sequence DNA duplex seem to be electrochemically mute due to long ET distance. The increasing electrochemical response from MB bound to the short-length DNA hybrid contrasts with the decreasing signal from MB bound to the long-length DNA hybrid and allows an "off"-"on" genosensor development.

  12. DNA sequencing technology, walking with modular primers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanovsky, L.

    1996-12-31

    The success of the Human Genome Project depends on the development of adequate technology for rapid and inexpensive DNA sequencing, which will also benefit biomedical research in general. The authors are working on DNA technologies that eliminate primer synthesis, the main bottleneck in sequencing by primer walking. They have developed modular primers that are assembled from three 5-mer, 6-mer or 7-mer modules selected from a presynthesized library of as few as 1,000 oligonucleotides ({double_bond}4, {double_bond}5, {double_bond}7). The three modules anneal contiguously at the selected template site and prime there uniquely, even though each is not unique for the most part when used alone. This technique is expected to speed up primer walking 30 to 50 fold, and reduce the sequencing cost by a factor of 5 to 15. Time and expensive will be saved on primer synthesis itself and even more so due to closed-loop automation of primer walking, made possible by the instant availability of primers. Apart from saving time and cost, closed-loop automation would also minimize the errors and complications associated with human intervention between the walks. The author has also developed two additional approaches to primer-library based sequencing. One involves a branched structure of modular primers which has a distinctly different mechanism of achieving priming specificity. The other introduces the concept of ``Differential Extension with Nucleotide Subsets`` as an approach increasing priming specificity, priming strength and allowing cycle sequencing. These approaches are expected to be more robust than the original version of the modular primer technique.

  13. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...... of different origin, The typical genomic periodicity for Bacteria is 11 bp whilst it is 10 bp for Archaea, Eukaryotes have more complex spectra but the dominant period in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is 10.2 bp. These periodicities are most likely reflective of differences in chromatin structure....

  14. Current-voltage characteristics of double-strand DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerril, L. M.; Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; de Oliveira, E. L.; de Sousa, J. S.

    2009-09-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of sequences of double-strand DNA molecules. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of artificial sequences (the long-range correlated Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro one) and a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system. The random sequence is presented here with the same first neighbors pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the transmissivity spectra, although the I-V curves seem to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  15. Current-voltage characteristics of double-strand DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerril, L.M.; Moreira, D.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal-RN (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@dfte.ufrn.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal-RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal-RN (Brazil); Oliveira, E.L. de; Sousa, J.S. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60455-760, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil)

    2009-09-07

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of sequences of double-strand DNA molecules. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of artificial sequences (the long-range correlated Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro one) and a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system. The random sequence is presented here with the same first neighbors pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the transmissivity spectra, although the I-V curves seem to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  16. Peptide Synthesis on a Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Nina; Peersen, Olve B; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2016-09-01

    Methods for displaying large numbers of peptides on solid surfaces are essential for high-throughput characterization of peptide function and binding properties. Here we describe a method for converting the >10(7) flow cell-bound clusters of identical DNA strands generated by the Illumina DNA sequencing technology into clusters of complementary RNA, and subsequently peptide clusters. We modified the flow-cell-bound primers with ribonucleotides thus enabling them to be used by poliovirus polymerase 3D(pol) . The primers hybridize to the clustered DNA thus leading to RNA clusters. The RNAs fold into functional protein- or small molecule-binding aptamers. We used the mRNA-display approach to synthesize flow-cell-tethered peptides from these RNA clusters. The peptides showed selective binding to cognate antibodies. The methods described here provide an approach for using DNA clusters to template peptide synthesis on an Illumina flow cell, thus providing new opportunities for massively parallel peptide-based assays.

  17. Phylogeny based on 16S rDNA and nifH sequences of Ralstonia taiwanensis strains isolated from nitrogen-fixing nodules of Mimosa pudica, in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subhash Chandra; Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2004-05-01

    Bacterial symbionts present in the indeterminate-type nitrogen (N)-fixing nodules of Mimosa pudica grown in North and South India showed maximum similarity to Ralstonia taiwanensis on the basis of carbon-source utilization patterns and 16S rDNA sequence. Isolates from the nodules of M. pudica from North India and South India showed identical ARDRA (Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis) patterns with Sau3AI and RsaI, but AluI revealed dimorphy between the North Indian and South Indian isolates. Alignment of 16S rDNA sequences revealed similarity of North Indian isolates with an R. taiwanensis strain isolated from M. pudica in Taiwan, whereas South Indian isolates showed closer relatedness with the isolates from Mimosa diplotricha. Alignment of nifH sequences from both North Indian and South Indian isolates with that of the related isolates revealed their closer affinity to alpha-rhizobia, suggesting that nif genes in the beta-rhizobia might have been acquired from alpha-rhizobia via lateral transfer during co-occupancy of nodules by alpha-rhizobia and progenitors of R. taiwanensis, members of the beta-subclass of Proteobacteria. Immunological cross-reaction of the bacteroid preparation of M. pudica nodules showed strong a positive signal with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, whereas a weak positive cross-reaction was observed with free-living R. taiwanensis grown microaerobically in minimal medium with and without NH4Cl. In spite of the expression of dinitrogenase reductase under free-living conditions, acetylene reduction was not observed under N-free conditions even after prolonged incubation.

  18. High-speed automated DNA sequencing utilizing from-the-side laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S.; Brumley, Robert L., Jr.; Buxton, Erin C.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1995-04-01

    The Human Genome Initiative is an ambitious international effort to map and sequence the three billion bases of DNA encoded in the human genome. If successfully completed, the resultant sequence database will be a tool of unparalleled power for biomedical research. One of the major challenges of this project is in the area of DNA sequencing technology. At this time, virtually all DNA sequencing is based upon the separation of DNA fragments in high resolution polyacrylamide gels. This method, as generally practiced, is one to two orders of magnitude too slow and expensive for the successful completion of the Human Genome projection. One reasonable approach is improved sequencing of DNA fragments is to increase the performance of such gel-based sequencing methods. Decreased sequencing times may be obtained by increasing the magnitude of the electric field employed. This is not possible with conventional sequencing, due to the fact that the additional heat associated with the increased electric field cannot be adequately dissipated. Recent developments in the use of thin gels have addressed this problem. Performing electrophoresis in ultrathin (50 to 100 microns) gels greatly increases the heat transfer efficiency, thus allowing the benefits of larger electric fields to be obtained. An increase in separation speed of about an order of magnitude is readily achieved. Thin gels have successfully been used in capillary and slab formats. A detection system has been designed for use with a multiple fluorophore sequencing strategy in horizontal ultrathin slab gels. The system employs laser through-the-side excitation and a cooled CCD detector; this allows for the parallel detection of up to 24 sets of four fluorescently labeled DNA sequencing reactions during their electrophoretic separation in ultrathin (115 micrometers ) denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Four hundred bases of sequence information is obtained from 100 ng of M13 template DNA in an hour, corresponding to an

  19. Characteristics of alternating current hopping conductivity in DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Song-Shan; Xu Hui; Wang Huan-You; Guo Rui

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model to describe alternating current (AC) conductivity of DNA sequences,in which DNA is considered as a one-dimensional (1D) disordered system,and electrons transport via hopping between localized states.It finds that AC conductivity in DNA sequences increases as the frequency of the external electric field rises,and it takes the form of σac(ω)~ω2 ln2(1/ω).Also AC conductivity of DNA sequences increases with the increase of temperature,this phenomenon presents characteristics of weak temperature-dependence.Meanwhile,the AC conductivity in an off diagonally correlated case is much larger than that in the uncorrelated case of the Anderson limit in low temperatures,which indicates that the off-diagonal correlations in DNA sequences have a great effect on the AC conductivity,while at high temperature the off-diagonal correlations no longer play a vital role in electric transport. In addition,the proportion of nucleotide pairs p also plays an important role in AC electron transport of DNA sequences.For p<0.5,the conductivity of DNA sequence decreases with the increase of p,while for p > 0.5,the conductivity increases with the increase of p.

  20. PCR master mixes harbour murine DNA sequences. Caveat emptor!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W Tuke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: XMRV is the most recently described retrovirus to be found in Man, firstly in patients with prostate cancer (PC and secondly in 67% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS and 3.7% of controls. Both disease associations remain contentious. Indeed, a recent publication has concluded that "XMRV is unlikely to be a human pathogen". Subsequently related but different polytropic MLV (pMLV sequences were also reported from the blood of 86.5% of patients with CFS. and 6.8% of controls. Consequently we decided to investigate blood donors for evidence of XMRV/pMLV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Testing of cDNA prepared from the whole blood of 80 random blood donors, generated gag PCR signals from two samples (7C and 9C. These had previously tested negative for XMRV by two other PCR based techniques. To test whether the PCR mix was the source of these sequences 88 replicates of water were amplified using Invitrogen Platinum Taq (IPT and Applied Biosystems Taq Gold LD (ABTG. Four gag sequences (2D, 3F, 7H, 12C were generated with the IPT, a further sequence (12D by ABTG re-amplification of an IPT first round product. Sequence comparisons revealed remarkable similarities between these sequences, endogeous MLVs and the pMLV sequences reported in patients with CFS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Methodologies for the detection of viruses highly homologous to endogenous murine viruses require special caution as the very reagents used in the detection process can be a source of contamination and at a level where it is not immediately apparent. It is suggested that such contamination is likely to explain the apparent presence of pMLV in CFS.

  1. DNA authentication of Plantago Herb based on nucleotide sequences of 18S-28S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Fatma Pinar; Yamashita, Hiromi; Guo, Yahong; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masao; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Goda, Yukihiro; Mizukami, Hajime

    2007-07-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were amplified from 23 plant- and herbarium specimens belonging to eight Plantago species (P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major, P. erosa, P. hostifolia, P. camtschatica, P. virginica and P. lanceolata). Sequence comparison indicated that these Plantago species could be identified based on the sequence type of the ITS locus. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions amplified from the crude drug Plantago Herb obtained in the markets indicated that all the drugs from Japan were derived from P. asiatica whereas the samples obtained in China were originated from various Plantago species including P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major and P. erosa.

  2. Bacterial repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences are DNA targets for Insertion Sequence elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pareja Eduardo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile elements are involved in genomic rearrangements and virulence acquisition, and hence, are important elements in bacterial genome evolution. The insertion of some specific Insertion Sequences had been associated with repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP elements. Considering that there are a sufficient number of available genomes with described REPs, and exploiting the advantage of the traceability of transposition events in genomes, we decided to exhaustively analyze the relationship between REP sequences and mobile elements. Results This global multigenome study highlights the importance of repetitive extragenic palindromic elements as target sequences for transposases. The study is based on the analysis of the DNA regions surrounding the 981 instances of Insertion Sequence elements with respect to the positioning of REP sequences in the 19 available annotated microbial genomes corresponding to species of bacteria with reported REP sequences. This analysis has allowed the detection of the specific insertion into REP sequences for ISPsy8 in Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, ISPa11 in P. aeruginosa PA01, ISPpu9 and ISPpu10 in P. putida KT2440, and ISRm22 and ISRm19 in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 genome. Preference for insertion in extragenic spaces with REP sequences has also been detected for ISPsy7 in P. syringae DC3000, ISRm5 in S. meliloti and ISNm1106 in Neisseria meningitidis MC58 and Z2491 genomes. Probably, the association with REP elements that we have detected analyzing genomes is only the tip of the iceberg, and this association could be even more frequent in natural isolates. Conclusion Our findings characterize REP elements as hot spots for transposition and reinforce the relationship between REP sequences and genomic plasticity mediated by mobile elements. In addition, this study defines a subset of REP-recognizer transposases with high target selectivity that can be useful in the development of new tools for

  3. Genetic Characterization of Fasciola Isolates from West Azerbaijan Province Iran Based on ITS1 and ITS2 Sequence of Ribosomal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALAVANI, Hossein; GHOLIZADEH, Saber; HAZRATI TAPPEH, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fascioliasis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica, has medical and economic importance in the world. Molecular approaches comparing traditional methods using for identification and characterization of Fasciola spp. are precise and reliable. The aims of current study were molecular characterization of Fasciola spp. in West Azerbaijan Province, Iran and then comparative analysis of them using GenBank sequences. Methods: A total number of 580 isolates were collected from different hosts in five cities of West Azerbaijan Province, in 2014 from 90 slaughtered cattle (n=50) and sheep (n=40). After morphological identification and DNA extraction, designing specific primer were used to amplification of ITS1, 5.8s and ITS2 regions, 50 samples were conducted to sequence, randomly. Result: Using morphometric characters 99.14% and 0.86% of isolates identified as F. hepatica and F. gigantica, respectively. PCR amplification of 1081 bp fragment and sequencing result showed 100% similarity with F. hepatica in ITS1 (428 bp), 5.8s (158 bp), and ITS2 (366 bp) regions. Sequence comparison among current study sequences and GenBank data showed 98% identity with 11 nucleotide mismatches. However, in phylogenetic tree F. hepatica sequences of West Azerbaijan Province, Iran, were in a close relationship with Iranian, Asian, and African isolates. Conclusions: Only F. hepatica species is distributed among sheep and cattle in West Azerbaijan Province Iran. However, 5 and 6 bp variation in ITS1 and ITS2 regions, respectively, is not enough to separate of Fasciola spp. Therefore, more studies are essential for designing new molecular markers to correct species identification. PMID:27095969

  4. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesionek-Kupnicka Dorota

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. Methods To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense. Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. Conclusion In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis.

  5. Sequencing the hypervariable regions of human mitochondrial DNA using massively parallel sequencing: Enhanced data acquisition for DNA samples encountered in forensic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carey; Peters, Dixie; Warshauer, David; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA testing is a useful tool in the analysis of forensic biological evidence. In cases where nuclear DNA is damaged or limited in quantity, the higher copy number of mitochondrial genomes available in a sample can provide information about the source of a sample. Currently, Sanger-type sequencing (STS) is the primary method to develop mitochondrial DNA profiles. This method is laborious and time consuming. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can increase the amount of information obtained from mitochondrial DNA samples while improving turnaround time by decreasing the numbers of manipulations and more so by exploiting high throughput analyses to obtain interpretable results. In this study 18 buccal swabs, three different tissue samples from five individuals, and four bones samples from casework were sequenced at hypervariable regions I and II using STS and MPS. Sample enrichment for STS and MPS was PCR-based. Library preparation for MPS was performed using Nextera® XT DNA Sample Preparation Kit and sequencing was performed on the MiSeq™ (Illumina, Inc.). MPS yielded full concordance of base calls with STS results, and the newer methodology was able to resolve length heteroplasmy in homopolymeric regions. This study demonstrates short amplicon MPS of mitochondrial DNA is feasible, can provide information not possible with STS, and lays the groundwork for development of a whole genome sequencing strategy for degraded samples.

  6. ATRF Houses the Latest DNA Sequencing Technologies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer By the end of October, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) will be one of the few facilities in the world to house all of the latest DNA sequencing technologies.

  7. Report on achievements in fiscal 1999 on the project for research and development of an intellectual base creating and utilizing technology. Development of a base sequencer for ultra-difficult-to-read DNA; 1999 nendo chiteki kiban sosei riyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Chonandoku DNA enki hairetsu sequencer no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in fiscal 1999 on developing a device to read ultra-difficult-to-read DNA basic sequence. When DNA synthesizes complementary chains by using DNA polymerase , the DNA incorporates deoxyribonucleatide triphosphates (dNTP, available in four kinds), stretches the complementary chains, and discharges pyrophosphoric acid at the same time. Light is emitted when this is converted into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by using sulfurylase, and reacted with luciferase. Progress of the complementary chain synthesis can be known by monitoring this reaction. Which nucleic acid having been put into has caused the complementary chain synthesis can be known by sending the four kinds of dNTPs independently into the reacting section in the respective sequences, and the basic sequence of the subject DNA can be decided. It was so devised that the excess dNTP in the pre-reaction is decomposed by enzyme not to remain because the reaction is performed being divided step-wise. The problems in the development include: achievement of sequential complementary chain synthesis at high rate and with high reaction yield, decision of reacting conditions suitable for automation and micronization, and development of a module that can supply dNTP being the reaction material into the reacting section sequentially. A prospect was attained on developing the elementary technology. (NEDO)

  8. Nanopore DNA sequencing and epigenetic detection with a MspA nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H.

    epigenetic base modifications such as DNA methylation and describe challenges in detecting such modifications. I then introduce nanopore sequencing and discuss how it has potential to address challenges in both sequencing and modified base detection. Chapter 1 concludes with a summary of previous nanopore work that has formed the foundation for this thesis. Chapter 2 describes our work using a DNA polymerase to control DNA translocation through the pore. Chapter 3 discusses how the DNA polymerase/MspA based system developed in Chapter 2 can be used to detect epigenetically modified bases 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. In Chapter 4 I describe our work to generate and decode long nanopore reads of DNA. Homemade alignment algorithms are used to align nanopore reads to known sequence with applications ranging from species identification to hybrid genome assembly. Chapter 5 concludes the thesis and lays out a road map for the ultimate realization of de novo nanopore DNA sequencing and commercialization of an MspA-based device.

  9. Repetitive DNA Sequences in Wheat and Its Relatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-yong; LI Da-yong

    2001-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences form a large portion of eukaryote genomes. Using wheat ( Triticum )as a model, the classification, features and functions of repetitive DNA sequences in the Tritieeae grass tribe is reviewed as well as the role of these sequences in genome differentiation, control and regulation of homologous chromosome synapsis and pairing. Transposable elements, as an important portion of dispersed repetitives,may play an essential role in gene mutation of the host. Dynamic models for change of copy number and sequences of the repetitive family are also presented after the models of Charlesworth et al. Application of repetitive DNA sequences in the study of evolution, chromosome fingerprinting and marker assisted gene transfer and breeding are described by taking wheat as an example.

  10. An improved chloroplast DNA extraction procedure for whole plastid genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chloroplast genomes supply valuable genetic information for evolutionary and functional studies in plants. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes with the application of second-generation sequencing technology in plastid genome sequencing projects. However, cost-effective high-throughput chloroplast DNA (cpDNA extraction becomes a major bottleneck restricting the application, as conventional methods are difficult to make a balance between the quality and yield of cpDNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first tested two traditional methods to isolate cpDNA from the three species, Oryza brachyantha, Leersia japonica and Prinsepia utihis. Both of them failed to obtain properly defined cpDNA bands. However, we developed a simple but efficient method based on sucrose gradients and found that the modified protocol worked efficiently to isolate the cpDNA from the same three plant species. We sequenced the isolated DNA samples with Illumina (Solexa sequencing technology to test cpDNA purity according to aligning sequence reads to the reference chloroplast genomes, showing that the reference genome was properly covered. We show that 40-50% cpDNA purity is achieved with our method. CONCLUSION: Here we provide an improved method used to isolate cpDNA from angiosperms. The Illumina sequencing results suggest that the isolated cpDNA has reached enough yield and sufficient purity to perform subsequent genome assembly. The cpDNA isolation protocol thus will be widely applicable to the plant chloroplast genome sequencing projects.

  11. PNA Directed Sequence Addressed Self-Assembly of DNA Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2008-0