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Sample records for dna alkylating agents

  1. DNA minor groove alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, W A

    2001-04-01

    Recent work on a number of different classes of anticancer agents that alkylate DNA in the minor groove is reviewed. There has been much work with nitrogen mustards, where attachment of the mustard unit to carrier molecules can change the normal patterns of both regio- and sequence-selectivity, from reaction primarily at most guanine N7 sites in the major groove to a few adenine N3 sites at the 3'-end of poly(A/T) sequences in the minor groove. Carrier molecules discussed for mustards are intercalators, polypyrroles, polyimidazoles, bis(benzimidazoles), polybenzamides and anilinoquinolinium salts. In contrast, similar targeting of pyrrolizidine alkylators by a variety of carriers has little effect of their patterns of alkylation (at the 2-amino group of guanine). Recent work on the pyrrolobenzodiazepine and cyclopropaindolone classes of natural product minor groove binders is also reviewed.

  2. Molecular design of sequence specific DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA alkylating agents have great interest for novel approach to cancer chemotherapy. We designed the conjugates between pyrrole (Py)-imidazole (Im) polyamides and DNA alkylating chlorambucil moiety possessing at different positions. The sequence-specific DNA alkylation by conjugates was investigated by using high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results showed that polyamide chlorambucil conjugates alkylate DNA at flanking adenines in recognition sequences of Py-Im polyamides, however, the reactivities and alkylation sites were influenced by the positions of conjugation. In addition, we synthesized conjugate between Py-Im polyamide and another alkylating agent, 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI). DNA alkylation reactivies by both alkylating polyamides were almost comparable. In contrast, cytotoxicities against cell lines differed greatly. These comparative studies would promote development of appropriate sequence-specific DNA alkylating polyamides against specific cancer cells.

  3. [Alkylating agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourquier, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    With the approval of mechlorethamine by the FDA in 1949 for the treatment of hematologic malignancies, alkylating agents are the oldest class of anticancer agents. Even though their clinical use is far beyond the use of new targeted therapies, they still occupy a major place in specific indications and sometimes represent the unique option for the treatment of refractory diseases. Here, we are reviewing the major classes of alkylating agents and their mechanism of action, with a particular emphasis for the new generations of alkylating agents. As for most of the chemotherapeutic agents used in the clinic, these compounds are derived from natural sources. With a complex but original mechanism of action, they represent new interesting alternatives for the clinicians, especially for tumors that are resistant to conventional DNA damaging agents. We also briefly describe the different strategies that have been or are currently developed to potentiate the use of classical alkylating agents, especially the inhibition of pathways that are involved in the repair of DNA lesions induced by these agents. In this line, the development of PARP inhibitors is a striking example of the recent regain of interest towards the "old" alkylating agents.

  4. Mechanisms of action of quinone-containing alkylating agents: DNA alkylation by aziridinylquinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, R H; Hartley, J A; Butler, J

    2000-11-01

    Aziridinyl quinones can be activated by cellular reductases eg. DT-diaphorase and cytochrome P450 reductase to form highly reactive DNA alkylating agents. The mechanisms by which this activation and alkylation take place are many and varied. Using clinically relevant and experimental agents this review will describe many of these mechanisms. The agents discussed are Mitomycin C, EO9 and analogues, diaziridinylbenzoquinones and the pyrrolo[1, 2-alpha]benzimidazolequinones.

  5. DNA Damage Induced by Alkylating Agents and Repair Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Natsuko Kondo; Akihisa Takahashi; Koji Ono; Takeo Ohnishi

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of alkylating agents are strongly attenuated by cellular DNA repair processes, necessitating a clear understanding of the repair mechanisms. Simple methylating agents form adducts at N- and O-atoms. N-methylations are removed by base excision repair, AlkB homologues, or nucleotide excision repair (NER). O 6-methylguanine (MeG), which can eventually become cytotoxic and mutagenic, is repaired by O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and O 6MeG:T mispairs are recognized...

  6. Design of novel antitumor DNA alkylating agents: the benzacronycine series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Laine, William; Gaslonde, Thomas; Michel, Sylvie; Tillequin, Francois; Koch, Michel; Léonce, Stéphane; Pierré, Alain; Bailly, Christian

    2004-03-01

    Acronycine, a natural alkaloid originally extracted from the bark of the Australian ash scrub Acronychia baueri, has shown a significant antitumor activity in animal models. Acronycine has been tested against human cancers in the early 1980s, but the clinical trials showed modest therapeutic effects and its development was rapidly discontinued. In order to optimize the antineoplastic effect, different benzoacronycine derivatives were synthesized. Among those, the di-acetate compound S23906-1 was recently identified as a promising anticancer drug candidate and a novel alkylating agent specifically reacting with the exocylic 2-NH2 group of guanines in DNA. The study of DNA bonding capacity of acronycine derivatives leads to the identification of the structural requirements for DNA alkylation. In nearly all cases, the potent alkylating agents, such as S23906-1, were found to be much more cytotoxic than the unreactive analogs such as acronycine itself or diol derivatives. Alkylation of DNA by the monoacetate derivative S28687-1, which is a highly reactive hydrolysis metabolite of S23906-1, occurs with a marked preference for the N2 position of guanine. Other bionucleophiles can react with S23906-1. The benzacronycine derivatives, which efficiently alkylate DNA, also covalently bind to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) but not to the oxidized product glutathione disulfide. Here we review the reactivity of S23906-1 and some derivatives toward DNA and GSH. The structure-activity relationships in the benzacronycine series validate the reaction mechanism implicating DNA as the main molecular target. S23906-1 stands as the most promising lead of a medicinal chemistry program aimed at discovering novel antitumor drugs based on the acronycine skeleton.

  7. Decreased stability of DNA in cells treated with alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankfurt, O.S. (Cedars Medical Center, Miami, FL (United States))

    1990-12-01

    A modified highly sensitive procedure for the evaluation of DNA damage in individual cells treated with alkylating agents is reported. The new methodology is based on the amplification of single-strandedness in alkylated DNA by heating in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. Human ovarian carcinoma cells A2780 were treated with nitrogen mustard (HN2), fixed in methanol, and stained with monoclonal antibody (MOAB) F7-26 generated against HN2-treated DNA. Binding of MOAB was measured by flow cytometry with indirect immunofluorescence. Intensive binding of MOAB to control and drug-treated cells was observed after heating in Tris buffer supplemented with MgCl{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of phosphates and MgCl{sub 2} during heating was necessary for the detection of HN2-induced changes in DNA stability. Fluorescence of HN2-treated cells decreased to background levels after treatment with single-strand-specific S{sub 1} nuclease. MOAB F7-26 interacted with single-stranded regions in DNA and did not bind to dsDNA or other cellular antigens. It is suggested that alkylation of guanines decreased the stability of the DNA molecule and increased the access of MOAB F7-26 to deoxycytidines on the opposite DNA strand.

  8. DNA Damage Induced by Alkylating Agents and Repair Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Natsuko; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ono, Koji; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of alkylating agents are strongly attenuated by cellular DNA repair processes, necessitating a clear understanding of the repair mechanisms. Simple methylating agents form adducts at N- and O-atoms. N-methylations are removed by base excision repair, AlkB homologues, or nucleotide excision repair (NER). O6-methylguanine (MeG), which can eventually become cytotoxic and mutagenic, is repaired by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and O6MeG:T mispairs are recognized by the mismatch repair system (MMR). MMR cannot repair the O6MeG/T mispairs, which eventually lead to double-strand breaks. Bifunctional alkylating agents form interstrand cross-links (ICLs) which are more complex and highly cytotoxic. ICLs are repaired by complex of NER factors (e.g., endnuclease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F-excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1), Fanconi anemia repair, and homologous recombination. A detailed understanding of how cells cope with DNA damage caused by alkylating agents is therefore potentially useful in clinical medicine. PMID:21113301

  9. Embryotoxicity induced by alkylating agents. Some methodological aspects of DNA alkylation studies in murine embryos using ethylmethanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Bochert, G; Rahm, U; Neubert, D

    1987-05-01

    Synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of some alkylated DNA purine bases are described. HPLC separation methods are developed for the determination of DNA alkylation rates in mammalian embryonic tissues. Following treatment of pregnant mice with the ethylating agent ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), an appreciable amount of alkylation (ethylation and methylation) was found in the nuclear DNA of the embryos during organogenesis. The results are discussed in context of our thesis that a certain amount of DNA alkylation in the embryos is correlated to the teratogenic potential of alkylating agents.

  10. Quantitative estimation of the extent of alkylation of DNA following treatment of mammalian cells with non-radioactive alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge); Regan, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Alkaline sucrose sedimentation has been used to quantitate phosphotriester formation following treatment of human cells with the monofunctional alkylating agents methyl and ethyl methanesulfonate. These persistent alkaline-labile lesions are not repaired during short-term culture conditions and thus serve as a useful and precise index of the total alkylation of the DNA.Estimates of alkylation by this procedure compare favorably with direct estimates by use of labeled alkylating agents.

  11. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for an organism's favorable response to alkylating agents. Furthermore, an individual's response to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity. PMID:22237395

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of novel caged DNA alkylating agents bearing 3,4-epoxypiperidine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Yuji; Kodama, Tetsuya; Miyashita, Kazuyuki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-07-14

    Previously, we reported that the 3,4-epoxypiperidine structure, whose design was based on the active site of DNA alkylating antitumor antibiotics, azinomycins A and B, possesses prominent DNA cleavage activity. In this report, novel caged DNA alkylating agents, which were designed to be activated by UV irradiation, were synthesized by the introduction of four photo-labile protecting groups to a 3,4-epoxypiperidine derivative. The DNA cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of the caged DNA alkylating agents were examined under UV irradiation. Four caged DNA alkylating agents showed various degrees of bioactivity depending on the photosensitivity of the protecting groups.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of sequence-specific DNA alkylating agents: effect of alkylation subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tatsuhiko; Sasaki, Shunta; Minoshima, Masafumi; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    We have demonstrated that hairpin pyrrole (Py)- imidazole (Im) polyamide-CBI conjugates selectively alkylate predetermined sequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of alkylation subunits, for example conjugates 1-4 with three types of DNA alkylating units, and Py-Im polyamides with indole linker. Conjugate 3 and 4 selectively alkylated the predetermined sequences as described previously, while conjugates 1 and 2 alkylate at mismatched sites.

  14. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  15. Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-12

    Alkylating agents constitute a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for a favourable response of an organism to alkylating agents. Furthermore, the response of an individual to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity.

  16. Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D.

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents constitute a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial ...

  17. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial fo...

  18. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Q; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Lowman, Xazmin H; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A; Pan, Min; O'Connor, Timothy R; Kong, Mei

    2017-11-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  19. ATM regulates 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A; Clarke, Ian D; Barszczyk, Mark S; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-10-01

    Alkylating agents are a first-line therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed, increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using an siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular, the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. Inhibition of ATM and MPG-mediated BER cooperate to sensitize tumor cells to alkylating agents, impairing tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with no toxicity to normal cells, providing an ideal therapeutic window. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. S - and N-alkylating agents diminish the fluorescence of fluorescent dye-stained DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesche, Robert; John, Harald; Kehe, Kai; Schmidt, Annette; Popp, Tanja; Balzuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Gudermann, Thomas; Steinritz, Dirk

    2017-01-25

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a chemical warfare agent, causes DNA alkylation, which is believed to be the main cause of its toxicity. SM DNA adducts are commonly used to verify exposure to this vesicant. However, the required analytical state-of-the-art mass-spectrometry methods are complex, use delicate instruments, are not mobile, and require laboratory infrastructure that is most likely not available in conflict zones. Attempts have thus been made to develop rapid detection methods that can be used in the field. The analysis of SM DNA adducts (HETE-G) by immunodetection is a convenient and suitable method. For a diagnostic assessment, HETE-G levels must be determined in relation to the total DNA in the sample. Total DNA can be easily visualized by the use of fluorescent DNA dyes. This study examines whether SM and related compounds affect total DNA staining, an issue that has not been investigated before. After pure DNA was extracted from human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), DNA was exposed to different S- and N-alkylating agents. Our experiments revealed a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the fluorescence signal of fluorescent dye-stained DNA after exposure to alkylating agents. After mass spectrometry and additional fluorescence measurements ruled out covalent modifications of ethidium bromide (EthBr) by SM, we assumed that DNA crosslinks caused DNA condensation and thereby impaired access of the fluorescent dyes to the DNA. DNA digestion by restriction enzymes restored fluorescence, a fact that strengthened our hypothesis. However, monofunctional agents, which are unable to crosslink DNA, also decreased the fluorescence signal. In subsequent experiments, we demonstrated that protons produced during DNA alkylation caused a pH decrease that was found responsible for the reduction in fluorescence. The use of an appropriate buffer system eliminated the adverse effect of alkylating agents on DNA staining with fluorescent dyes. An appropriate buffer system is thus

  1. Iminium ion chemistry of mitosene DNA alkylating agents. Enriched 13C NMR and isolation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, A; Skibo, E B

    2000-05-16

    Described herein is a study of the reductive alkylation chemistry of mitosene antitumor agents. We employed a 13C-enriched electrophilic center to probe the fate of the iminium ion resulting from reductive activation. The 13C-labeled center permitted the identification of complex products resulting from alkylation reactions. In the case of DNA reductive alkylation, the type and number of alkylation sites were readily assessed by 13C NMR. Although there has been much excellent work done in the area of mitosene chemistry and biochemistry, the present study provides a number of new findings: (1) The major fate of the iminium ion is head-to-tail polymerization, even in dilute solutions. (2) Dithionite reductive activation results in the formation of mitosene sulfite esters as well as the previously observed sulfonate adducts. (3) The mitosene iminium ion alkylates the adenosine 6-amino group as well as the guanosine 2-amino group. The identification of the latter adduct was greatly facilitated by the 13C-label at the electrophilic center. (4) The mitosene iminium ion alkylates DNA at both nitrogen and oxygen centers without any apparent base selectivity. The complexity of mitosene reductive alkylation of DNA will require continued adduct isolation studies.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of DNA minor groove binding alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K; Mascara, Gerard P; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W; Bobola, Michael S; Silber, John R; Gold, Barry

    2013-01-18

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases, the N-terminus was appended with an O-methyl sulfonate ester, while the C-terminus group was varied with nonpolar and polar side chains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) versus major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is >10-fold higher than that of the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells overexpressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to the expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and the diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization.

  3. A powerful selection assay for mixture libraries of DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Young-Wan; Boger, Dale L

    2004-08-04

    A simple and powerful selection assay that permits the separation (rpHPLC), quantitation (ELSD), and identification (ESI-MS) of thermally released adenine adducts derived from duocarmycin analogues is detailed that can establish the most effective DNA alkylating agents in synthetic combinatorial mixtures.

  4. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Q Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  5. DNA-directed alkylating ligands as potential antitumor agents: sequence specificity of alkylation by intercalating aniline mustards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Wakelin, L P

    1990-10-23

    The sequence preferences for alkylation of a series of novel parasubstituted aniline mustards linked to the DNA-intercalating chromophore 9-aminoacridine by an alkyl chain of variable length were studied by using procedures analogous to Maxam-Gilbert reactions. The compounds alkylate DNA at both guanine and adenine sites. For mustards linked to the acridine by a short alkyl chain through a para O- or S-link group, 5'-GT sequences are the most preferred sites at which N7-guanine alkylation occurs. For analogues with longer chain lengths, the preference of 5'-GT sequences diminishes in favor of N7-adenine alkylation at the complementary 5'-AC sequence. Magnesium ions are shown to selectively inhibit alkylation at the N7 of adenine (in the major groove) by these compounds but not the alkylation at the N3 of adenine (in the minor groove) by the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065. Effects of chromophore variation were also studied by using aniline mustards linked to quinazoline and sterically hindered tert-butyl-9-aminoacridine chromophores. The results demonstrate that in this series of DNA-directed mustards the noncovalent interactions of the carrier chromophores with DNA significantly modify the sequence selectivity of alkylation by the mustard. Relationships between the DNA alkylation patterns of these compounds and their biological activities are discussed.

  6. Inhibition of RecBCD enzyme by antineoplastic DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegielewska, Barbara; Beerman, Terry A; Bianco, Piero R

    2006-09-01

    To understand how bulky adducts might perturb DNA helicase function, three distinct DNA-binding agents were used to determine the effects of DNA alkylation on a DNA helicase. Adozelesin, ecteinascidin 743 (Et743) and hedamycin each possess unique structures and sequence selectivity. They bind to double-stranded DNA and alkylate one strand of the duplex in cis, adding adducts that alter the structure of DNA significantly. The results show that Et743 was the most potent inhibitor of DNA unwinding, followed by adozelesin and hedamycin. Et743 significantly inhibited unwinding, enhanced degradation of DNA, and completely eliminated the ability of the translocating RecBCD enzyme to recognize and respond to the recombination hotspot chi. Unwinding of adozelesin-modified DNA was accompanied by the appearance of unwinding intermediates, consistent with enzyme entrapment or stalling. Further, adozelesin also induced "apparent" chi fragment formation. The combination of enzyme sequestering and pseudo-chi modification of RecBCD, results in biphasic time-courses of DNA unwinding. Hedamycin also reduced RecBCD activity, albeit at increased concentrations of drug relative to either adozelesin or Et743. Remarkably, the hedamycin modification resulted in constitutive activation of the bottom-strand nuclease activity of the enzyme, while leaving the ability of the translocating enzyme to recognize and respond to chi largely intact. Finally, the results show that DNA alkylation does not significantly perturb the allosteric interaction that activates the enzyme for ATP hydrolysis, as the efficiency of ATP utilization for DNA unwinding is affected only marginally. These results taken together present a unique response of RecBCD enzyme to bulky DNA adducts. We correlate these effects with the recently determined crystal structure of the RecBCD holoenzyme bound to DNA.

  7. Immunological detection and quantification of DNA components structurally modified by alkylating carcinogens, mutagens and chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajewsky, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    The detection and quantification of defined reaction products of chemical mutagens and carcinogens (and of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents) with DNA require highly sensitive analytical techniques. The exceptional capability of immunoglobulins to recognize subtle alterations of molecular structure (especially when monoclonal antibodies are used to maximize specificity), outstanding sensitivity of immunoanalysis by high-affinity antibodies, and the fact that radioactively-labelled agents are not required suggest the utility of a radioimmunoassay to recognize and quantitate alkylated DNA products. We have recently developed a set of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (secreted by mouse x mouse as well as by rat x rat hybridomas; antibody affinity constants, 10 9 to > 10 10 lmol) specifically directed against several DNA alkylation products with possible relevance in relation to both mutagenesis and malignant transformation of mammalian cells. These alkylation products include 0 6 -N-butyldeoxyguanosine, and 0 4 -ethyldeoxythymidine. When used in a radioimmunassay, an antibody specific for 0 6 -ethyldeoxyguanosine, for example, will detect this product at an 0 6 -ethyldeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine molar ratio of approx. 3 x 10 -7 in a hydrolysate of 100 ug of DNA. The limit of detection can be lowered further if the respective alkyldeoxynucleosides are separated by HPLC from the DNA hydrolysate prior to the RIA. The anti-alkyldeoxynucleoside monoclonal antibodies can also be used to visualize, by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy combined with electronic image intensification, specific alkylation products in the nuclear DNA of individual cells, and to localize structurally modified bases in double-stranded DNA molecules by transmission electron microscopy

  8. Photo-triggered fluorescent theranostic prodrugs as DNA alkylating agents for mechlorethamine release and spatiotemporal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting; Pan, Rong; Xuan, Weimin; Wei, Yongyi; Liu, Kejian; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2015-06-28

    We describe a new theranostic strategy for selective delivery and spatiotemporal monitoring of mechlorethamine, a DNA alkylating agent. A photo-responsive prodrug is designed and composed of a photolabile o-nitrophenylethyl group, a DNA alkylating mechlorethamine drug and a coumarin fluorophore. Masking of the "N" in mechlorethamine in a positively charged state in the prodrug renders it inactive, non-toxic, selective and non-fluorescent. Indeed, the stable prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal cells with and without UV activation and is completely non-fluorescent. However, upon photo-irradiation, the active mechlorethamine is released and induces efficient DNA cross-links, accompanied by a strong fluorescence enhancement (152 fold). Furthermore, DNA cross-linking activity from the release can be transformed into anticancer activity observed in in vitro studies of tumor cells. Importantly, the drug release progress and the movement can be conveniently monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. The mechanistic study proves that the DNA cross-linking activity is mainly due to the release of DNA alkylating mechlorethamine. Altogether, the studies show the power of the theranostic strategy for efficient therapy in cancer treatment.

  9. The human cyclin B1 protein modulates sensitivity of DNA mismatch repair deficient prostate cancer cell lines to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L J; Rasmussen, M; Lützen, A; Bisgaard, H C; Singh, K K

    2000-05-25

    DNA damage caused by alkylating agents results in a G2 checkpoint arrest. DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficient cells are resistant to killing by alkylating agents and are unable to arrest the cell cycle in G2 phase after alkylation damage. We investigated the response of two MMR-deficient prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP to the alkylating agent MNNG. Our studies reveal that DU145 cancer cells are more sensitive to killing by MNNG than LNCaP. Investigation of the underlying reasons for lower resistance revealed that the DU145 cells contain low endogenous levels of cyclin B1. We provide direct evidence that the endogenous level of cyclin B1 modulates the sensitivity of MMR-deficient prostate cancer cells to alkylating agents.

  10. Increased susceptibility to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents of mice deficient in DNA repair methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, A; Sakumi, K; Sekiguchi, M

    2000-10-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase plays vital roles in preventing induction of mutations and cancer as well as cell death related to alkylating agents. Mice defective in the MGMT: gene, encoding the methyltransferase, were used to evaluate cell death-inducing and tumorigenic activities of therapeutic agents which have alkylation potential. MGMT(-/-) mice were considerably more sensitive to dacarbazine, a monofunctional triazene, than were wild-type mice, in terms of survival. When dacarbazine was administered i.p. to 6-week-old mice and survival at 30 days was enumerated, LD(50) values of MGMT(-/-) and MGMT(+/+) mice were 20 and 450 mg/kg body wt, respectively. Increased sensitivity of MGMT(-/-) mice to 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosou rea (ACNU), a bifunctional nitrosourea, was also noted. On the other hand, there was no difference in survival of MGMT(+/+) and MGMT(-/-) mice exposed to cyclophosphamide, a bifunctional nitrogen mustard. It appears that dacarbazine and ACNU produce O(6)-alkylguanine as a major toxic lesion, while cyclophosphamide yields other types of modifications in DNA which are not subjected to the action of the methyltransferase. MGMT(-/-) mice seem to be less refractory to the tumor-inducing effect of dacarbazine than are MGMT(+/+) mice. Thus, the level of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity is an important factor when determining susceptibility to drugs with the potential for alkylation.

  11. Histone H2AX is a critical factor for cellular protection against DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, J A; Zhao, M; Su, Y; Narayan, G; Geard, C R; Balajee, A S

    2008-09-25

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is a dose-dependent suppressor of oncogenic chromosome translocations. H2AX participates in DNA double-strand break repair, but its role in other DNA repair pathways is not known. In this study, role of H2AX in cellular response to alkylation DNA damage was investigated. Cellular sensitivity to two monofunctional alkylating agents (methyl methane sulfonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)) was dependent on H2AX dosage, and H2AX null cells were more sensitive than heterozygous cells. In contrast to wild-type cells, H2AX-deficient cells displayed extensive apoptotic death due to a lack of cell-cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase. Lack of G(2)/M checkpoint in H2AX null cells correlated well with increased mitotic irregularities involving anaphase bridges and gross chromosomal instability. Observation of elevated poly(ADP) ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) cleavage suggests that MNNG-induced apoptosis occurs by PARP-1-dependent manner in H2AX-deficient cells. Consistent with this, increased activities of PARP and poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymer synthesis were detected in both H2AX heterozygous and null cells. Further, we demonstrate that the increased PAR synthesis and apoptotic death induced by MNNG in H2AX-deficient cells are due to impaired activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Collectively, our novel study demonstrates that H2AX, similar to PARP-1, confers cellular protection against alkylation-induced DNA damage. Therefore, targeting either PARP-1 or histone H2AX may provide an effective way of maximizing the chemotherapeutic value of alkylating agents for cancer treatment.

  12. VP-16 and alkylating agents activate a common metabolic pathway for suppression of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Berger, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of etoposide (VP-16) are mediated by topoisomerase II production of protein crosslinked DNA strand breaks. Previous studies have shown that alkylating agent induced DNA damage results in expansion of dTTP pools and reduction of dCTP pools and DNA replication. Studies were conducted with V79 cells to determine whether the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment were similar to those induced by alkylating agents. Treatment with 0.5μM VP-16 prolonged the doubling time of V79 cells from 12 to 18 hrs and caused cell volume to increase from 1.1 to 1.6 x 10 -12 l. 2mM caffeine completely blocked the volume increase and substantially prevented the prolongation of doubling time. 5μM VP-16 reduced the rate of [ 3 H]TdR incorporation by 70%, whereas in the presence of 2mM caffeine, VP-16 caused only a 10% decrease in the rate of [ 3 H]TdR incorporation. 4 hr treatment with 5.0μM VP-16 increased dTTP levels from 65 +/- 10 pmol/10 6 cells to 80 +/- 13 pmol/10 6 cells and caused dCTP level to decline from 113 +/- 23 pmol/10 6 cells to 92 +/- 17 pmol/10 6 cells. These results indicate that the metabolic consequences of VP-16 treatment are similar to alkylating agent treatment and that an increase in dTTP pools with a subsequent effect on ribonucleotide reductase may be a final common pathway by which many cytotoxic agents suppress DNA synthesis

  13. Direct-acting DNA alkylating agents present in aqueous extracts of areca nut and its products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2012-11-19

    Areca nut is a carcinogen to humans and has been strongly associated with oral premalignant and malignant diseases. Previous studies speculated the presence of unknown direct-acting mutagens present in aqueous extracts of areca nut. We hypothesized whether any direct-acting alkylating agents are present in areca nut and its commercial products. In this study, calf thymus DNA was treated with four different aqueous extracts obtained from unripe and ripe areca nuts or their commercial products, namely, pan masala (without tobacco) and gutkha (with tobacco). Three N-alkylated purines including N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG), N3-methyladenine (N3-MeA), and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) were detected using sensitive and specific isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. The results showed that four types of aqueous extracts significantly induced the formation of N7-MeG and N3-MeA in a linear dose-response manner. Extracts from unripe areca nut exhibited higher methylating potency than those of ripe areca nut, while gutkha had higher methylating potency than pan masala. Meanwhile, gutkha made with areca nut and tobacco, was the only extract found to induce the formation of N7-EtG. Overall, this study first demonstrated that the presence of direct-acting alkylating agents in areca nut and its commercial products exist at a level that is able to cause significant DNA damage. Our findings may provide another mechanistic rationale for areca nut-mediated oral carcinogenesis and also highlight the importance and necessity of the identification of these direct-acting alkylating agents.

  14. Synthesis and DNA cleavage activity of Bis-3-chloropiperidines as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuravka, Ivonne; Roesmann, Rolf; Sosic, Alice; Wende, Wolfgang; Pingoud, Alfred; Gatto, Barbara; Göttlich, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen mustards are an important class of bifunctional alkylating agents routinely used in chemotherapy. They react with DNA as electrophiles through the formation of highly reactive aziridinium ion intermediates. The antibiotic 593A, with potential antitumor activity, can be considered a naturally occurring piperidine mustard containing a unique 3-chloropiperidine ring. However, the total synthesis of this antibiotic proved to be rather challenging. With the aim of designing simplified analogues of this natural product, we developed an efficient bidirectional synthetic route to bis-3-chloropiperidines joined by flexible, conformationally restricted, or rigid diamine linkers. The key step involves an iodide-catalyzed double cyclization of unsaturated bis-N-chloroamines to simultaneously generate both piperidine rings. Herein we describe the synthesis and subsequent evaluation of a series of novel nitrogen-bridged bis-3-chloropiperidines, enabling the study of the impact of the linker structure on DNA alkylation properties. Our studies reveal that the synthesized compounds possess DNA alkylating abilities and induce strand cleavage, with a strong preference for guanine residues. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. DNA Repair Modulates The Vulnerability of The Developing Brain to Alkylating Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, G.E.; Olivas, A.; Park, T.; Churchwell, M.; Doerge, D.; Samson, L. D.; Gerson, S.L.; Turker, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons of the developing brain are especially vulnerable to environmental agents that damage DNA (i.e., genotoxicants), but the mechanism is poorly understood. The focus of the present study is to demonstrate that DNA damage plays a key role in disrupting neurodevelopment. To examine this hypothesis, we compared the cytotoxic and DNA damaging properties of the methylating agents methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents chloroethylamine (CEA) and nitrogen mustard (HN2), in granule cell neurons derived from the cerebellum of neonatal wild type mice and three transgenic DNA repair strains. Wild type cerebellar neurons were significantly more sensitive to the alkylating agents DMS and HN2 than neuronal cultures treated with MAM or the half-mustard CEA. Parallel studies with neuronal cultures from mice deficient in alkylguanine DNA glycosylase (Aag-/-) or O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (Mgmt-/-), revealed significant differences in the sensitivity of neurons to all four genotoxicants. Mgmt-/- neurons were more sensitive to MAM and HN2 than the other genotoxicants and wild type neurons treated with either alkylating agent. In contrast, Aag-/- neurons were for the most part significantly less sensitive than wild type or Mgmt-/- neurons to MAM and HN2. Aag-/- neurons were also significantly less sensitive than wild type neurons treated with either DMS or CEA. Granule cell development and motor function were also more severely disturbed by MAM and HN2 in Mgmt-/- mice than in comparably treated wild type mice. In contrast, cerebellar development and motor function were well preserved in MAM treated Aag-/- or MGMT overexpressing (MgmtTg+) mice, even as compared with wild type mice suggesting that AAG protein increases MAM toxicity, whereas MGMT protein decreases toxicity. Surprisingly, neuronal development and motor function were severely disturbed in MgmtTg+ mice treated with HN2. Collectively, these in vitro

  16. Determination of alkylation of bacterial DNA as a rapid test for toxicological evaluation of alkylating xenobiotic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botzenhart, K.; Waldner-Sander, S.; Schweinsberg, F.

    1986-05-01

    Alkylated purine bases from hydrolized DNA can be separated by HPLC and quantified with a fluorescence detector. We applied this method to bacterial DNA. 7-methylguanine was detected after treatment of Serratia marcescens with iodoacetamide, dimethyl sulfate and with polluted air.

  17. Oxidants and not alkylating agents induce rapid mtDNA loss and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furda, Amy M.; Marrangoni, Adele M.; Lokshin, Anna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for proper mitochondrial function and encodes 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 polypeptides that make up subunits of complex I, III, IV, in the electron transport chain and complex V, the ATP synthase. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in processes such as premature aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer, it has not been shown whether persistent mtDNA damage causes a loss of oxidative phosphorylation. We addressed this question by treating mouse embryonic fibroblasts with either hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and measuring several endpoints, including mtDNA damage and repair rates using QPCR, levels of mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins using antibody analysis, and a pharmacologic profile of mitochondria using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. We show that a 60 min treatment with H2O2 causes persistent mtDNA lesions, mtDNA loss, decreased levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, a loss of ATP-linked oxidative phosphorylation and a loss of total reserve capacity. Conversely, a 60 min treatment with 2 mM MMS causes persistent mtDNA lesions but no mtDNA loss, no decrease in levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, and no mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that persistent mtDNA damage is not sufficient to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22766155

  18. Defective DNA cross-link removal in Chinese hamster cell mutants hypersensitive to bifunctional alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, C.A.; Thompson, L.H.; Mooney, C.L.; Salazar, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    DNA repair-deficient mutants from five genetic complementation groups isolated previously from Chinese hamster cells were assayed for survival after exposure to the bifunctional alkylating agents mitomycin C or diepoxybutane. Groups 1, 3, and 5 exhibited 1.6- to 3-fold hypersensitivity compared to the wild-type cells, whereas Groups 2 and 4 exhibited extraordinary hypersensitivity. Mutants from Groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 22 other bifunctional alkylating agents in a rapid assay that compared cytotoxicity of the mutants to the wild-type parental strain, AA8. With all but two of the compounds, the Group 2 mutant (UV4) was 15- to 60-fold more sensitive than AA8 or the Group 1 mutant (UV5). UV4 showed only 6-fold hypersensitivity to quinacrine mustard. Alkaline elution measurements showed that this compound produced few DNA interstrand cross-links but numerous strand breaks. Therefore, the extreme hypersensitivity of mutants from Groups 2 and 4 appeared specific for compounds the main cytotoxic lesions of which were DNA cross-links. Mutant UV5 was only 1- to 4-fold hypersensitive to all the compounds. Although the initial number of cross-links was similar for the three cell lines, the efficiency of removal of cross-links was lowest in UV4 and intermediate in UV5. These results suggest that the different levels of sensitivity are specifically related to different efficiencies of DNA cross-link removal. The phenotype of hypersensitivity to both UV radiation and cross-link damage exhibited by the mutants in Groups 2 and 4 appears to differ from those of the known human DNA repair syndromes

  19. A Short Review on the Synthetic Strategies of Duocarmycin Analogs that are Powerful DNA Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pravin C; Satam, Vijay; Lee, Moses

    2015-01-01

    The duocarmycins and CC-1065 are members of a class of DNA minor groove, AT-sequence selective, and adenine-N3 alkylating agents, isolated from Streptomyces sp. that exhibit extremely potent cytotoxicity against the growth of cancer cells grown in culture. Initial synthesis and structural modification of the cyclopropa[c] pyrrolo[3,2-e]indole (CPI) DNA-alkylating motif as well as the indole non-covalent binding region in the 1980s have led to several compounds that entered clinical trials as potential anticancer drugs. However, due to significant systemic toxicity none of the analogs have passed clinical evaluation. As a result, the intensity in the design, synthesis, and development of novel analogs of the duocarmycins has continued. Accordingly, in this review, which covers a period from the 1990s through the present time, the design and synthesis of duocarmycin SA are described along with the synthesis of novel and highly cytotoxic analogs that lack the chiral center. Examples of achiral analogs of duocarmycin SA described in this review include seco-DUMSA (39 and 40), seco-amino-CBI-TMI (13, Centanamycin), and seco-hydroxy-CBI-TMI (14). In addition, another novel class of biologically active duocarmycin SA analogs that contained the seco-iso-cyclopropylfurano[2,3-e]indoline (seco-iso-CFI) and seco-cyclopropyltetrahydrofurano[2,3-f]quinoline (seco-CFQ) DNA alkylating submit was also designed and synthesized. The synthesis of seco-iso-CFI-TMI (10, Tafuramycin A) and seco-CFQ-TMI (11, Tafuramycin B) is included in this review.

  20. Mutagenesis by alkylating agents: coding properties for DNA polymerase of poly (dC) template containing 3-methylcytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiteux, S.; Laval, J. (Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    After treatment of poly(dC) by the simple alkylating agent (/sup 3/H)dimethylsulfate, 90 percent of the radioactivity cochromatographed with 3-methylcytosine and 10 percent with 5-methylcytosine which is the normally occurring methylated base. In order to study the influence of 3-methylcytosine on DNA replication, untreated and MDS-treated poly(dC) were used as templates for E. coli DNA polymerase I. The alkylation of poly(dC) inhibits DNA chain elongation, and does not induce any mispairing under high fidelity conditions. The alteration of DNA polymerase I fidelity by manganese ions allows some replication of 3-methylcytosine which mispairs with either dAMP or dTMP. Our results suggest that 3-methylcytosine could be responsible, at least partially, for killing and the mutagenesis observed after cell treatment by alkylating agents.

  1. CC-1065 and the duocarmycins: unraveling the keys to a new class of naturally derived DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, D L; Johnson, D S

    1995-01-01

    Key studies defining the DNA alkylation properties and selectivity of a new class of exceptionally potent, naturally occurring antitumor antibiotics including CC-1065, duocarmycin A, and duocarmycin SA are reviewed. Recent studies conducted with synthetic agents containing deep-seated structural changes and the unnatural enantiomers of the natural products and related analogs have defined the structural basis for the sequence-selective alkylation of duplex DNA and fundamental relationships between chemical structure, functional reactivity, and biological properties. The agents undergo a reversible, stereoelectronically controlled adenine-N3 addition to the least substituted carbon of the activated cyclopropane within selected AT-rich sites. The preferential AT-rich non-covalent binding selectivity of the agents within the narrower, deeper AT-rich minor groove and the steric accessibility to the alkylation site that accompanies deep AT-rich minor groove penetration control the sequence-selective DNA alkylation reaction and stabilize the resulting adduct. For the agents that possess sufficient reactivity to alkylate DNA, a direct relationship between chemical or functional stability and biological potency has been defined. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7731958

  2. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  3. Persistence of DNA adducts, hypermutation and acquisition of cellular resistance to alkylating agents in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, R J; Fay, M F; Cosgrove, L; Y C Fung, K; Rundle-Thiele, D; Martin, J H

    2017-12-02

    Glioblastoma is a lethal form of brain tumour usually treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and an alkylating chemotherapeutic agent. Key to the success of this multimodal approach is maintaining apoptotic sensitivity of tumour cells to the alkylating agent. This initial treatment likely establishes conditions contributing to development of drug resistance as alkylating agents form the O 6 -methylguanine adduct. This activates the mismatch repair (MMR) process inducing apoptosis and mutagenesis. This review describes key juxtaposed drivers in the balance between alkylation induced mutagenesis and apoptosis. Mutations in MMR genes are the probable drivers for alkylation based drug resistance. Critical to this interaction are the dose-response and temporal interactions between adduct formation and MMR mutations. The precision in dose interval, dose-responses and temporal relationships dictate a role for alkylating agents in either promoting experimental tumour formation or inducing tumour cell death with chemotherapy. Importantly, this resultant loss of chemotherapeutic selective pressure provides opportunity to explore novel therapeutics and appropriate combinations to minimise alkylation based drug resistance and tumour relapse.

  4. Complex responses to alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip analysis, we previously found that, upon exposure to the simple alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate, the transcript levels for about one third of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome (∼2,000 transcripts) are induced or repressed during the first hour or two after exposure. In order to determine whether the responsiveness of these genes has any relevance to the protection of cells against alkylating agents we have undertaken several follow-up studies. First, we explored the specificity of this global transcriptional response to MMS by measuring the global response of S. cerevisiae to a broad range of agents that are known to induce DNA damage. We found that each agent produced a very different mRNA transcript profile, even though the exposure doses produced similar levels of toxicity. We also found that the selection of genes that respond to MMS is highly dependent upon what cell cycle phase the cells are in at the time of exposure. Computational clustering analysis of the dataset derived from a large number of exposures identified several promoter motifs that are likely to control some of the regulons that comprise this large set of genes that are responsive to DNA damaging agents. However, it should be noted that these agents damage cellular components other than DNA, and that the responsiveness of each gene need not be in response to DNA damage per se. We have also begun to study the response of other organisms to alkylating agents, and these include E. coli, cultured mouse and human cells, and mice. Finally, we have developed a high throughput phenotypic screening method to interrogate the role of all non-essential S. cerevisiae genes (about 4,800) in protecting S. cerevisiae against the deleterious effects of alkylating agents; we have termed this analysis 'genomic phenotyping'. This study has uncovered a plethora of new pathways that play a role in the recovery of eukaryotic cells after exposure to toxic

  5. DNA alkylating agents alleviate silencing of class II transactivator gene expression in L1210 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shawn P; Holtz, Renae; Lewandowski, Nicole; Tomasi, Thomas B; Fuji, Hiroshi

    2002-09-15

    MHC class II (Ia) Ag expression is inversely correlated with tumorigenicity and directly correlated with immunogenicity in clones of the mouse L1210 lymphoma (1 ). Understanding the mechanisms by which class II Ag expression is regulated in L1210 lymphoma may facilitate the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of some types of lymphoma and leukemia. This study demonstrates that the variation in MHC class II Ag expression among clones of L1210 lymphoma is due to differences in the expression of the class II transactivator (CIITA). Analysis of stable hybrids suggests that CIITA expression is repressed by a dominant mechanism in class II-negative L1210 clones. DNA-alkylating agents such as ethyl methanesulfonate and the chemotherapeutic drug melphalan activate CIITA and class II expression in class II negative L1210 cells, and this effect appears to be restricted to transformed cell lines derived from the early stages of B cell ontogeny. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the CIITA type III promoter is active in class II(-) L1210 cells, despite the fact that the endogenous gene is not expressed, which suggests that these cells have all of the transacting factors necessary for CIITA transcription. An inverse correlation between methylation of the CIITA transcriptional regulatory region and CIITA expression was observed among L1210 clones. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment activated CIITA expression in class II-negative L1210 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that 1) CIITA gene expression is repressed in class II(-) L1210 cells by methylation of the CIITA upstream regulatory region, and 2) treatment with DNA-alkylating agents overcomes methylation-based silencing of the CIITA gene in L1210 cells.

  6. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bifunctional Rhodium Intercalator Conjugates as Mismatch-Directing DNA Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2004-01-01

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covale...

  8. Profiling the nucleobase and structure selectivity of anticancer drugs and other DNA alkylating agents by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, Dennis; Sauter, Basilius

    2018-05-06

    Drugs that covalently modify DNA are components of most chemotherapy regimens, often serving as first-line treatments. Classically the chemical reactivity of DNA alkylators has been determined in vitro with short oligonucleotides. Here we use next generation RNA sequencing to report on the chemoselectivity of alkylating agents. We develop the method with the well-known clinically used DNA modifiying drugs streptozotocin and temozolomide, and then apply the technique to profile RNA modification with uncharacterized alkylation reactions such as with powerful electrophiles like trimethylsilyldiazomethane. The multiplexed and massively parallel format of NGS offers analyses of chemical reactivity in nucleic acids to be accomplished in less time with greater statistical power. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H; Engelward, Bevin P; Heinen, Christopher D; Johnson, George E; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance of a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  11. Sensitization of human carcinoma cells to alkylating agents by small interfering RNA suppression of 3-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Johanna; Duncan, Tod; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2005-11-15

    One of the major cytotoxic lesions generated by alkylating agents is DNA 3-alkyladenine, which can be excised by 3-alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG). Inhibition of AAG may therefore result in increased cellular sensitivity to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. To investigate this possibility, we have examined the role of AAG in protecting human tumor cells against such agents. Plasmids that express small interfering RNAs targeted to two different regions of AAG mRNA were transfected into HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and A2780-SCA ovarian carcinoma cells. Stable derivatives of both cell types with low AAG protein levels were sensitized to alkylating agents. Two HeLa cell lines with AAG protein levels reduced by at least 80% to 90% displayed a 5- to 10-fold increase in sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and the chemotherapeutic drugs temozolomide and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea. These cells showed no increase in sensitivity to UV light or ionizing radiation. After treatment with methyl methanesulfonate, AAG knockdown HeLa cells were delayed in S phase but accumulated in G2-M. Our data support the hypothesis that ablation of AAG activity in human tumor cells may provide a useful strategy to enhance the efficacy of current chemotherapeutic regimens that include alkylating agents.

  12. Comparison of alkylating agent and radiation carcinogenesis: some aspects of the possible involvement of effects on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawley, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    A series of alkylating agents was classified in terms of increasing relative ability to react at O-atom sites in DNA, MMS 6 -alkylguanines are directly miscoding bases. This series of agents was also used in a study of comparative carcinogenicity with respect to induction of thymic lymphoma in mice, a system in which x-irradiation yields tumors. A positive correlation between ability of agents to alkylate O-6 of guanine in DNA of thymus and carcinogenic potency was found. Although MMS was not active in this system, it was noted that it can induce tumors in other systems. The relationship between repair of alkylation and radiation induced damage in DNA was briefly discussed. The methylating agents induce single-strand breaks in DNA, and the principal repair system appears to fall into the category of short repair as denoted by Regan and Setlow (1974). These single-strand breaks may result from spontaneous hydrolytic depurinations of 3- and 7-methylpurines, or from enzymatic depurinations, e.g., of 3-alkyladenine and O 6 -alkylguanine. Aralkylating agents, which are also carcinogens, can evoke an alternative repair response of the uvr type

  13. Quantitative assessment of the dose-response of alkylating agents in DNA repair proficient and deficient ames tester strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Leilei; Guérard, Melanie; Zeller, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mutagenic and clastogenic effects of some DNA damaging agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) have been demonstrated to exhibit a nonlinear or even "thresholded" dose-response in vitro and in vivo. DNA repair seems to be mainly responsible for these thresholds. To this end, we assessed several mutagenic alkylators in the Ames test with four different strains of Salmonella typhimurium: the alkyl transferases proficient strain TA1535 (Ogt+/Ada+), as well as the alkyl transferases deficient strains YG7100 (Ogt+/Ada-), YG7104 (Ogt-/Ada+) and YG7108 (Ogt-/Ada-). The known genotoxins EMS, MMS, temozolomide (TMZ), ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and methylnitrosourea (MNU) were tested in as many as 22 concentration levels. Dose-response curves were statistically fitted by the PROAST benchmark dose model and the Lutz-Lutz "hockeystick" model. These dose-response curves suggest efficient DNA-repair for lesions inflicted by all agents in strain TA1535. In the absence of Ogt, Ada is predominantly repairing methylations but not ethylations. It is concluded that the capacity of alkyl-transferases to successfully repair DNA lesions up to certain dose levels contributes to genotoxicity thresholds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Abnormal sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from familial polyposis patients to DNA alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfknecht, T.R.; Little, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblast cell strains derived from different patients all afflicted with genetic predisposing to the development of intestinal polyposis and cancer were tested for their sensitivity to the lethal effects of the DNA alkylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. The genetic syndromes studied were: (a) adenomatosis of the colon and rectum only, an autosomal dominant trait; (b) Turcot's syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive polyposis syndrome also characterized by central nervous system tumors; and (c) Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome which, in addition to intestinal polyposis, is also clinically characterized by osteomas and soft tissue tumors. Fibroblasts from a patient with Turcot's syndrome were hypersensitive to MMS, having a D0 value of 0.24 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 value of 0.95 mM (p less than 0.01) compared with the normal average value of 1.3 mM. Fibroblasts from the Gardner's syndrome proband were moderately sensitive to MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine due to significant differences of D10 values of 0.60 mM (p less than 0.01), 15 mM (p less than 0.01), and 4.8 microM (p less than 0.025), respectively, versus the normal average values of 1.3 mM, 28 mM, and 9.4 microM. Fibroblasts from the clinically affected Gardner's syndrome daughter of the proband were significantly more sensitive to MMS treatment, D0 of 0.22 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 of 0.97 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average. This differential sensitivity to the several DNA alkylating agents suggests that different mechanisms of hypersensitivity to these chemicals may be associated with fibroblasts from the various forms of familial polyposis

  15. Research on DNA methylation of human osteosarcoma cell MGMT and its relationship with cell resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, WeiHao; Liu, Cheng; Li, DingFeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene methylation status and its protein expression, as well as the effects of demethylating agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) on MGMT gene expression and its resistance to alkylating agents, and to elucidate MGMT expression mechanism and significance in osteosarcoma. The human osteosarcoma cell lines Saos-2 and MG-63 were collected and treated with 5-Aza-CdR for 6 days. The cells not treated with 5-Aza-CdR were set as a negative control. The genomic DNA was extracted from the Saos-2 and MG-63 cells using methylation-specific PCR to detect the promoter CpG island methylation status of the MGMT gene. Cell sensitivity to alkylating agents before and after drug administration was detected by the MTT method. The variation in MGMT gene mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The MGMT promoter gene of normal Saos-2 cells was methylated, with reduced MGMT mRNA and protein expression; the MGMT mRNA and protein expression of Saos-2 cells treated with 5-Aza-CdR was obviously enhanced, and its sensitivity to alkylating agents was reversed. Meanwhile, with promoter CpG island unmethylation of the MGMT gene, MGMT protein was expressed in the normal MG-63 cells and the MG-63 cells treated with 5-Aza-CdR, and both showed resistance to alkylating agents. The methylation status of the MGMT gene promoter in human osteosarcoma cells reflected the cells' ability to induce MGMT protein expression and can be used as a molecular marker to project the sensitivity of cancer tissues to alkylating agent drugs.

  16. Transcriptional blockages in a cell-free system by sequence-selective DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, L R; Liu, A P; Denny, W A; Cullinane, C; Talarico, T; Phillips, D R

    2000-04-14

    There is considerable interest in DNA sequence-selective DNA-binding drugs as potential inhibitors of gene expression. Five compounds with distinctly different base pair specificities were compared in their effects on the formation and elongation of the transcription complex from the lac UV5 promoter in a cell-free system. All were tested at drug levels which killed 90% of cells in a clonogenic survival assay. Cisplatin, a selective alkylator at purine residues, inhibited transcription, decreasing the full-length transcript, and causing blockage at a number of GG or AG sequences, making it probable that intrastrand crosslinks are the blocking lesions. A cyclopropylindoline known to be an A-specific alkylator also inhibited transcription, with blocks at adenines. The aniline mustard chlorambucil, that targets primarily G but also A sequences, was also effective in blocking the formation of full-length transcripts. It produced transcription blocks either at, or one base prior to, AA or GG sequences, suggesting that intrastrand crosslinks could again be involved. The non-alkylating DNA minor groove binder Hoechst 33342 (a bisbenzimidazole) blocked formation of the full-length transcript, but without creating specific blockage sites. A bisbenzimidazole-linked aniline mustard analogue was a more effective transcription inhibitor than either chlorambucil or Hoechst 33342, with different blockage sites occurring immediately as compared with 2 h after incubation. The blockages were either immediately prior to AA or GG residues, or four to five base pairs prior to such sites, a pattern not predicted from in vitro DNA-binding studies. Minor groove DNA-binding ligands are of particular interest as inhibitors of gene expression, since they have the potential ability to bind selectively to long sequences of DNA. The results suggest that the bisbenzimidazole-linked mustard does cause alkylation and transcription blockage at novel DNA sites. in addition to sites characteristic of

  17. Role of DNA mismatch repair and p53 in signaling induction of apoptosis by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Hickman, Mark J.; Samson, Leona D.

    1999-01-01

    All cells are unavoidably exposed to chemicals that can alkylate DNA to form genotoxic damage. Among the various DNA lesions formed, O6-alkylguanine lesions can be highly cytotoxic, and we recently demonstrated that O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) and O6-chloroethylguanine (O6CEG) specifically initiate apoptosis in hamster cells. Here we show, in both hamster and human cells, that the MutSα branch of the DNA mismatch repair pathway (but not the MutSβ branch) is absolutely required for signaling the ...

  18. Inactivation of the DNA-repair gene MGMT and the clinical response of gliomas to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Garcia-Foncillas, J; Andion, E; Goodman, S N; Hidalgo, O F; Vanaclocha, V; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2000-11-09

    The DNA-repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) inhibits the killing of tumor cells by alkylating agents. MGMT activity is controlled by a promoter; methylation of the promoter silences the gene in cancer, and the cells no longer produce MGMT. We examined gliomas to determine whether methylation of the MGMT promoter is related to the responsiveness of the tumor to alkylating agents. We analyzed the MGMT promoter in tumor DNA by a methylation-specific polymerase-chain-reaction assay. The gliomas were obtained from patients who had been treated with carmustine (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, or BCNU). The molecular data were correlated with the clinical outcome. The MGMT promoter was methylated in gliomas from 19 of 47 patients (40 percent). This finding was associated with regression of the tumor and prolonged overall and disease-free survival. It was an independent and stronger prognostic factor than age, stage, tumor grade, or performance status. Methylation of the MGMT promoter in gliomas is a useful predictor of the responsiveness of the tumors to alkylating agents.

  19. Mitochondrial targeting of human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase protects against cell killing by chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Xu, Yi; Cooper, Ryan J; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Pollok, Karen E; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-04-15

    DNA repair capacity of eukaryotic cells has been studied extensively in recent years. Mammalian cells have been engineered to overexpress recombinant nuclear DNA repair proteins from ectopic genes to assess the impact of increased DNA repair capacity on genome stability. This approach has been used in this study to specifically target O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) to the mitochondria and examine its impact on cell survival after exposure to DNA alkylating agents. Survival of human hematopoietic cell lines and primary hematopoietic CD34(+) committed progenitor cells was monitored because the baseline repair capacity for alkylation-induced DNA damage is typically low due to insufficient expression of MGMT. Increased DNA repair capacity was observed when K562 cells were transfected with nuclear-targeted MGMT (nucl-MGMT) or mitochondrial-targeted MGMT (mito-MGMT). Furthermore, overexpression of mito-MGMT provided greater resistance to cell killing by 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) than overexpression of nucl-MGMT. Simultaneous overexpression of mito-MGMT and nucl-MGMT did not enhance the resistance provided by mito-MGMT alone. Overexpression of either mito-MGMT or nucl-MGMT also conferred a similar level of resistance to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and temozolomide (TMZ) but simultaneous overexpression in both cellular compartments was neither additive nor synergistic. When human CD34(+) cells were infected with oncoretroviral vectors that targeted O(6)-benzylguanine (6BG)-resistant MGMT (MGMT(P140K)) to the nucleus or the mitochondria, committed progenitors derived from infected cells were resistant to 6BG/BCNU or 6BG/TMZ. These studies indicate that mitochondrial or nuclear targeting of MGMT protects hematopoietic cells against cell killing by BCNU, TMZ, and MMS, which is consistent with the possibility that mitochondrial DNA damage and nuclear DNA damage contribute equally to alkylating agent-induced cell killing during chemotherapy.

  20. Synergy of irofulven in combination with other DNA damaging agents: synergistic interaction with altretamine, alkylating, and platinum-derived agents in the MV522 lung tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Michael J; McMorris, Trevor C; Rojas, Rafael J; Estes, Leita A; Suthipinijtham, Pharnuk

    2008-12-01

    Irofulven (MGI 114, NSC 683863) is a semisynthetic derivative of illudin S, a natural product present in the Omphalotus illudins (Jack O'Lantern) mushroom. This novel agent produces DNA damage, that in contrast to other agents, is predominately ignored by the global genome repair pathway of the nucleotide excision repair (NER)(2) system. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of irofulven when administered in combination with 44 different DNA damaging agents, whose damage is in general detected and repaired by the genome repair pathway. The human lung carcinoma MV522 cell line and its corresponding xenograft model were used to evaluate the activity of irofulven in combination with different DNA damaging agents. Two main classes of DNA damaging agents, platinum-derived agents, and select bifunctional alkylating agents, demonstrated in vivo synergistic or super-additive interaction with irofulven. DNA helicase inhibiting agents also demonstrated synergy in vitro, but an enhanced interaction with irofulven could not be demonstrated in vivo. There was no detectable synergistic activity between irofulven and agents capable of inducing DNA cleavage or intercalating into DNA. These results indicate that the antitumor activity of irofulven is enhanced when combined with platinum-derived agents, altretamine, and select alkylating agents such as melphalan or chlorambucil. A common factor between these agents appears to be the production of intrastrand DNA crosslinks. The synergistic interaction between irofulven and other agents may stem from the nucleotide excision repair system being selectively overwhelmed at two distinct points in the pathway, resulting in prolonged stalling of transcription forks, and subsequent initiation of apoptosis.

  1. Role of DNA mismatch repair and p53 in signaling induction of apoptosis by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, M J; Samson, L D

    1999-09-14

    All cells are unavoidably exposed to chemicals that can alkylate DNA to form genotoxic damage. Among the various DNA lesions formed, O(6)-alkylguanine lesions can be highly cytotoxic, and we recently demonstrated that O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)MeG) and O(6)-chloroethylguanine (O(6)CEG) specifically initiate apoptosis in hamster cells. Here we show, in both hamster and human cells, that the MutSalpha branch of the DNA mismatch repair pathway (but not the MutSbeta branch) is absolutely required for signaling the initiation of apoptosis in response to O(6)MeGs and is partially required for signaling apoptosis in response to O(6)CEGs. Further, O(6)MeG lesions signal the stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor, and such signaling is also MutSalpha-dependent. Despite this, MutSalpha-dependent apoptosis can be executed in a p53-independent manner. DNA mismatch repair status did not influence the response of cells to other inducers of p53 and apoptosis. Thus, it appears that mismatch repair status, rather than p53 status, is a strong indicator of the susceptibility of cells to alkylation-induced apoptosis. This experimental system will allow dissection of the signal transduction events that couple a specific type of DNA base lesion with the final outcome of apoptotic cell death.

  2. Role of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in the resistance of mouse spermatogenic cells to O6-alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M J; Abdul-Rahman, S; Baker, T G; Rafferty, J A; Margison, G P; Bibby, M C

    2000-07-01

    The O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase inactivator O(6)-benzylguanine was administered to BALB/c mice either alone or before exposure to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea to study the role of the DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in the protection of the testis against anti-cancer O(6)-alkylating agents. Exposure of the mice to 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea or O(6)-benzylguanine alone did not produce any marked testicular toxicity at the times studied. Testicular O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase concentrations were assayed between 0 and 240 min after O(6)-benzylguanine treatment and were shown to be > 95% depleted 15 min after treatment with O(6)-benzylguanine and remained at > 95% at all the times assayed. Histological examination, the reduction in testicular mass and the induction of spermatogenic cell apoptosis showed that this depletion significantly potentiated 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-induced testicular damage after treatment. Major histological damage was apparent 42 days after treatment, demonstrating that the stem spermatogonia were significantly affected by the combination. These results demonstrate that O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase plays a significant role in protecting the spermatogenic cells from damage caused by DNA alkylation and indicate that the observed toxicity may result from damage to stem spermatogonia.

  3. Mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Damia, G.; D‘Incalci, M.

    1998-01-01

    Alkylating agents are the most widely used anticancer drugs whose main target is the DNA, although how exactly the DNA lesions cause cell death is still not clear. The emergence of resistance to this class of drugs as well as to other antitumor agents is one of the major causes of failure of cancer treatment. This paper reviews some of the best characterized mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents. Pre- and post-target mechanisms are recognized, the former able to limit the formation of...

  4. Bifunctional alkylating agent-mediated MGMT-DNA cross-linking and its proteolytic cleavage in 16HBE cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jin; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jiqing; Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a bifunctional alkylating agent (BAA), contains two alkyl arms and can act as a cross-linking bridge between DNA and protein to form a DNA-protein cross-link (DPC). O 6 -methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme for alkyl adducts removal, is found to enhance cell sensitivity to BAAs and to promote damage, possibly due to its stable covalent cross-linking with DNA mediated by BAAs. To investigate MGMT-DNA cross-link (mDPC) formation and its possible dual roles in NM exposure, human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE was subjected to different concentrations of HN2, a kind of NM, and we found mDPC was induced by HN2 in a concentration-dependent manner, but the mRNA and total protein of MGMT were suppressed. As early as 1 h after HN2 treatment, high mDPC was achieved and the level maintained for up to 24 h. Quick total DPC (tDPC) and γ-H2AX accumulation were observed. To evaluate the effect of newly predicted protease DVC1 on DPC cleavage, we applied siRNA of MGMT and DVC1, MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), and NMS-873 (p97 inhibitor) and found that proteolysis plays a role. DVC1 was proven to be more important in the cleavage of mDPC than tDPC in a p97-dependent manner. HN2 exposure induced DVC1 upregulation, which was at least partially contributed to MGMT cleavage by proteolysis because HN2-induced mDPC level and DNA damage was closely related with DVC1 expression. Homologous recombination (HR) was also activated. Our findings demonstrated that MGMT might turn into a DNA damage promoter by forming DPC when exposed to HN2. Proteolysis, especially DVC1, plays a crucial role in mDPC repair. - Highlights: • Nitrogen mustard-induced MGMT-DNA cross-linking was detected in a living cell. • Concentration- and time-dependent manners of MGMT-DNA cross-linking were revealed. • Proteolysis played an important role in protein (MGMT)-DNA cross-linking repair. • DVC1 acts as a proteolytic enzyme in cross-linking repair in a p

  5. Photogeneration and reactivity of naphthoquinone methides as purine selective DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Daniela; Nadai, Matteo; Doria, Filippo; Percivalle, Claudia; Di Antonio, Marco; Palumbo, Manlio; Richter, Sara N; Freccero, Mauro

    2010-10-20

    A one-step protecting-group-free synthesis of both 6-hydroxy-naphthalene-2-carbaldehyde and the bifunctional binaphthalenyl derivative afforded 6-hydroxymethylnaphthalen-2-ol, 6-methylaminomethyl-naphthalen-2-ol, [(2-hydroxy-3-naphthyl)methyl]trimethyl ammonium iodide, and a small library of bifunctional binol analogues in good yields. Irradiation of naphthol quaternary ammonium salt and binol-derivatives (X = OH, NHR, NMe(3)(+), OCOCH(3), and L-proline) at 310 and 360 nm resulted in the photogeneration of the 2,6-naphthoquinone-6-methide (NQM) and binol quinone methide analogues (BQMs) by a water-mediated excited-state proton transfer (ESPT). The hydration, the mono- and bis-alkylation reactions of morpholine and 2-ethanethiol, as N and S prototype nucleophiles, by the transient NQM (λ(max) 310, 330 nm) and BQMs (λ(max) 360 nm) were investigated in water by product distribution analysis and laser flash photolysis (LFP). Both the photogeneration and the reactivity of NQM and BQMs exhibited striking differences. BQMs were at least 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than NQM, and they were generated much more efficiently from a greater variety of photoprecursors including the hydroxymethyl, quaternary ammonium salt and several binol-amino acids. On the contrary, the only efficient precursor of NQM was the quaternary ammonium salt. All water-soluble BQM precursors were further investigated for their ability to alkylate and cross-link plasmid DNA and oligonucleotides by gel electrophoresis: the BQMs were more efficient than the isomeric o-BQM (binol quinone methide analogue of 2,3-naphthoquinone-3-methide). Sequence analysis by gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and MS showed that the alkylation occurred at purines, with a preference for guanine. In particular, a BQM was able to alkylate N7 of guanines resulting in depurination at the oligonucleotide level, and ribose loss at the nucleotide level. The photoreactivity of BQM precursors translated into photocytotoxic and

  6. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-07-09

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents.

  7. Protection of hematopoietic cells from O(6)-alkylation damage by O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase gene transfer: studies with different O(6)-alkylating agents and retroviral backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, M; Bardenheuer, W; Sorg, U R; Seeber, S; Flasshove, M; Moritz, T

    2001-07-01

    Overexpression of O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can protect hematopoietic cells from O(6)-alkylation damage. To identify possible clinical applications of this technology we compared the effect of MGMT gene transfer on the hematotoxicity induced by different O(6)-alkylating agents in clinical use: the chloroethylnitrosoureas ACNU, BCNU, CCNU and the tetrazine derivative temozolomide. In addition, various retroviral vectors expressing the MGMT-cDNA were investigated to identify optimal viral backbones for hematoprotection by MGMT expression. Protection from ACNU, BCNU, CCNU or temozolomide toxicity was evaluated utilizing a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector (N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT) to transduce primary murine bone marrow cells. Increased resistance in murine colony-forming units (CFU) was demonstrated for all four drugs. In comparison to mock-transduced controls, after transduction with N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT the IC50 for CFU increased on average 4.7-fold for ACNU, 2.5-fold for BCNU, 6.3-fold for CCNU and 1.5-fold for temozolomide. To study the effect of the retroviral backbone on hematoprotection various vectors expressing the human MGMT-cDNA from a murine embryonic sarcoma virus LTR (MSCV-MGMT) or a hybrid spleen focus-forming/murine embryonic sarcoma virus LTR (SF1-MGMT) were compared with the N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT vector. While all vectors increased resistance of transduced human CFU to ACNU, the SF1-MGMT construct was most efficient especially at high ACNU concentrations (8-12 microg/ml). Similar results were obtained for protection of murine high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells. These data may help to optimize treatment design and retroviral constructs in future clinical studies aiming at hematoprotection by MGMT gene transfer.

  8. Amino acid nitrosation products as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santos, M del P; Calle, E; Casado, J

    2001-08-08

    Nitrosation reactions of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-amino acids whose reaction products can act as alkylating agents of DNA were investigated. To approach in vivo conditions for the two-step mechanism (nitrosation and alkylation), nitrosation reactions were carried out in aqueous acid conditions (mimicking the conditions of the stomach lumen) while the alkylating potential of the nitrosation products was investigated at neutral pH, as in the stomach lining cells into which such products can diffuse. These conclusions were drawn: (i) The alkylating species resulting from the nitrosation of amino acids with an -NH(2) group are the corresponding lactones; (ii) the sequence of alkylating power is: alpha-lactones > beta-lactones > gamma-lactones, coming respectively from the nitrosation of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-amino acids; and (iii) the results obtained may be useful in predicting the mutagenic effectiveness of the nitrosation products of amino acids.

  9. Mutational specificity of alkylating agents and the influence of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsfall, M.J.; Gordon, A.J.; Burns, P.A.; Zielenska, M.; van der Vliet, G.M.; Glickman, B.W. (York Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Alkylating treatments predominantly induce G:C = greater than A:T transitions, consistent with the predicted significance of the miscoding potential of the O6-alG lesion. However, the frequency and distribution of these events induced by any one compound may be diagnostic. SN1 agents that act via an alkyldiazonium cation, such as the N-nitroso compounds, preferentially generate G:C = greater than A:T transitions at 5'-RG-3' sites, while the more SN2 alkylsulfates and alkylalkane-sulfonates do not. The precise nature of this site bias and the possibility of strand bias are target dependent. The extent of this site bias and the contribution of other base substitutions are substituent size dependent. A similar 5'-RT-3' effect is seen for A:T = greater than G:C transitions, presumably directed by O4-alT lesions. The 5'-RG-3' effect, at least, likely reflects a deposition specificity arising from some aspect of helix geometry, although it may be further exaggerated by alkylation-specific repair. Excision repair appears to preferentially reduce the occurrence of ethylation-induced G:C = greater than A:T and A:T = greater than G:C transitions at sites flanked by A:T base pairs. This may be due to an enhancement of the helical distortion imposed by damage at such positions. A similar effect is not seen for methylation-induced mutations and in the case of propyl adducts, the influence of excision repair on the ultimate distribution of mutation cannot be as easily defined with respect to neighbouring sequence. 199 references.

  10. PARP-1 modulation of mTOR signaling in response to a DNA alkylating agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Ethier

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is widely involved in cell death responses. Depending on the degree of injury and on cell type, PARP activation may lead to autophagy, apoptosis or necrosis. In HEK293 cells exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanine (MNNG, we show that PARP-1 activation triggers a necrotic cell death response. The massive poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis following PARP-1 activation leads to the modulation of mTORC1 pathway. Shortly after MNNG exposure, NAD⁺ and ATP levels decrease, while AMP levels drastically increase. We characterized at the molecular level the consequences of these altered nucleotide levels. First, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated and the mTORC1 pathway is inhibited by the phosphorylation of Raptor, in an attempt to preserve cellular energy. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 is decreased as well as the phosphorylation of the mTORC2 component Rictor on Thr1135. Finally, Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 is lost and then, cell death by necrosis occurs. Inhibition of PARP-1 with the potent PARP inhibitor AG14361 prevents all of these events. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC can also abrogate all the signaling events caused by MNNG exposure suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS production is involved in PARP-1 activation and modulation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we show that PARP-1 activation and PAR synthesis affect the energetic status of cells, inhibit the mTORC1 signaling pathway and possibly modulate the mTORC2 complex affecting cell fate. These results provide new evidence that cell death by necrosis is orchestrated by the balance between several signaling pathways, and that PARP-1 and PAR take part in these events.

  11. DNA modification by alkylating compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruglyakova, E.E.

    1985-09-01

    Results are given for research on the physico-chemical properties of alkylating compounds - nitroso alkyl ureas (NAU) which possess a broad spectrum of biological activity, such as mutagenic, carcinogenic, and anti-tumor action that is due to the alkylation and carbamoylation of DNA as well as other cellular components. Identified chemical products of NAU interaction with DNA and its components are cited. Structural conversions of a DNA macromolecule resulting from its chemical modification are examined. NAU are used to discuss possible biological consequences of DNA modification. 148 references.

  12. Alkylating agents for Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Tan, Jianlong; Wu, Taixiang

    2009-01-21

    Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia (WM) is an uncommon B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by bone marrow infiltration and production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. Uncertainty remains if alkylating agents, such as chlorambucil, melphalan or cyclophosphamide, are an effective form of management. To assess the effects and safety of the alkylating agents on Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia (WM). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1, 2008), MEDLINE (1966 to 2008), EMBASE (1980 to 2008), the Chinese Biomedical Base (1982 to 2008) and reference lists of articles.We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings from 1990 to 2008. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing alkylating agents given concomitantly with radiotherapy, splenectomy, plasmapheresis, stem-cell transplantation in patients with a confirmed diagnosis of WM. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We collected adverse effects information from the trials. One trial involving 92 participants with pretreated/relapsed WM compared the effect of fludarabine versus the combination of cyclophosphamide (the alkylating agent), doxorubicin and prednisone (CAP). Compared to CAP, the Hazard ratio (HR) for deaths of treatment with fludarabine was estimated to be 1.04, with a standard error of 0.30 (95% CI 0.58 to 1.48) and it indicated that the mean difference of median survival time was -4.00 months, and 16.00 months for response duration. The relative risks (RR) of response rate was 2.80 (95% CI 1.10 to 7.12). There were no statistically difference in overall survival rate and median survival months, while on the basis of response rate and response duration, fludarabine seemed to be superior to CAP for pretreated/relapsed patients with macroglobulinaemia. Although alkylating agents have been used for decades they have never actually been tested in a proper randomised trial. This

  13. Light of DNA-alkylating agents in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells: a novel mixed EGFR/DNA targeting combi-molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guan-Can; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Li, Teng-Cheng; Liu, Wei; Fang, You-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the therapeutic effects of combi-molecule JDF12 on prostate cancer (PCa) DU145 cells remains still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the proteomic profile after JDF12 treatment in DU145 cells by comparing with that in Iressa treated cells and untreated cells. MTT was used to evaluate drug cytotoxicity, DAPI staining was done to assess apoptosis of cells, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle. iTRAQ and qPCR were employed to obtain the proteomic profiles of JDF12 treated, Iressa treated, and untreated DU145 cells, and validate the expression of selected differentially expressed proteins, respectively. JDF12 could significantly inhibit the proliferation and increase the apoptosis of DU145 cells when compared with Iressa or blank group. In total, 5071 proteins were obtained, out of which, 42, including 21 up-regulated and 21 down-regulated proteins, were differentially expressed in JDF12 group when compared with Iressa and blank groups. The up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in DNA damage/repair and energy metabolism; while the down-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell apoptosis. qPCR confirmed the expression of several biologically important proteins in DU145 cells after JDF12 treatment. The molecular mechanisms of DNA alkylating agents on PCa therapy that with the assistant of EGFR-blocker were revealed on proteomic level, which may increase the possible applications of DNA alkylating agents and JDF12 on PCa therapy.

  14. HeLa Cells Containing a Truncated Form of DNA Polymerase Beta are More Sensitized to Alkylating Agents than to Agents Inducing Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanra, Kalyani; Chakraborty, Anindita; Bhattacharyya, Nandan

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effects of alkylating and oxidative stress inducing agents on a newly identified variant of DNA polymerase beta (polβ Δ208-304) specific for ovarian cancer. Pol β Δ208-304 has a deletion of exons 11-13 which lie in the catalytic part of enzyme. We compared the effect of these chemicals on HeLa cells and HeLa cells stably transfected with this variant cloned into in pcDNAI/neo vector by MTT, colony forming and apoptosis assays. Polβ Δ208-304 cells exhibited greater sensitivity to an alkylating agent and less sensitivity towards H2O2 and UV when compared with HeLa cells alone. It has been shown that cell death in Pol β Δ208-304 transfected HeLa cells is mediated by the caspase 9 cascade. Exon 11 has nucleotidyl selection activity, while exons 12 and 13 have dNTP selection activity. Hence deletion of this part may affect polymerizing activity although single strand binding and double strand binding activity may remain same. The lack of this part may adversely affect catalytic activity of DNA polymerase beta so that the variant may act as a dominant negative mutant. This would represent clinical significance if translated into a clinical setting because resistance to radiation or chemotherapy during the relapse of the disease could be potentially overcome by this approach.

  15. Conformational change in human DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase upon alkylation of its active site by SN1 (indirect-acting) and SN2 (direct-acting) alkylating agents: breaking a "salt-link".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H K; Teo, A K; Ali, R B; Lim, A; Ayi, T C; Yarosh, D B; Li, B F

    1996-09-24

    Human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs DNA by transferring alkyl (R-) adducts from O6-alkylguanine (6RG) in DNA to its own cysteine residue at codon 145 (formation of R-MGMT). We show here that R-MGMT in cell extracts, which is sensitive to protease V8 cleavage at the glutamic acid residues at codons 30 (E30) and 172 (E172), can be specifically immunoprecipitated with an MGMT monoclonal antibody, Mab.3C7. This Mab recognizes an epitope of human MGMT including the lysine 107 (K107) which is within the most basic region that is highly conserved among mammalian MGMTs. Surprisingly, the K107L mutant protein is repair-deficient and readily cleaved by protease V8 similar to R-MGMT. We propose that R-MGMT adopted an altered conformation which exposed the Mab.3C7 epitope and rendered that protein sensitive to protease V8 attack. This proposal could be explained by the disruption of a structural "salt-link" within the molecule based on the available structural and biochemical data. The specific binding of Mab.3C7 to R-MGMT has been compared with the protease V8 method in the detection of R-MGMT in extracts of cells treated with low dosages of methyliodide (SN2) and O6-benzylguanine. Their identical behaviors in producing protease V8 sensitive R-MGMT and Mab.3C7 immunoprecipitates suggest that probably methyl iodide (an ineffective agent in producing 6RG in DNA) can directly alkylate the active site of cellular MGMT similar to O6-benzylguanine. The effectiveness of MeI in producing R-MGMT, i.e., inactivation of cellular MGMT, indicates that this agent can increase the effectiveness of environmental and endogenously produced alkylating carcinogens in producing the mutagenic O6-alkylguanine residues in DNA in vivo.

  16. O6-Methylguanine DNA Methyltransferase Status Does Not Predict Response or Resistance to Alkylating Agents in Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Nitya; Klimstra, David S; Horvat, Natally; Zhang, Liying; Chou, Joanne F; Capanu, Marinela; Basturk, Olca; Do, Richard Kinh Gian; Allen, Peter J; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Alkylating agents have activity in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WD panNETs). In glioblastoma multiforme, decreased activity of O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) predicts response; in panNETs, MGMT relevance is unknown. We identified patients with WD panNETs treated with alkylating agents, determined best overall response by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, and performed MGMT activity testing. Fifty-six patients were identified; 26 (46%) of the 56 patients experienced partial response, 24 (43%) of 56 experienced stable disease, and 6 (11%) of 56 experienced progression of disease. O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase status was available for 36 tumors. For tumors with partial response, 10 (67%) of 15 were MGMT deficient, and 5 (33%) of 15 were MGMT intact. For tumors with stable disease, 7 (47%) of 15 were MGMT deficient, and 8 (53%) of 15 were MGMT intact. For tumors with progression of disease, 3 (50%) of 6 were MGMT deficient, and 3 (50%) of 6 were MGMT intact. We observed response and resistance to alkylating agents in MGMT-deficient and MGMT-intact tumors. O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase status should not guide alkylating agent therapy in WD panNETs.

  17. Aryl sulfonate based anticancer alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Hamdullah Khadim; Arshad, Tanzila; Kanwal, Ghazala

    2018-05-01

    This research work revolves around synthesis of antineoplastic alkylating sulfonate esters with dual alkylating sites for crosslinking of the DNA strands. These molecules were evaluated as potential antineoplastic cross linking alkylating agents by reaction with the nucleoside of Guanine DNA nucleobase at both ends of the synthesized molecule. Synthesis of the alkylating molecules and the crosslinking with the guanosine nucleoside was monitored by MALDITOF mass spectroscopy. The synthesized molecule's crosslinking or adduct forming rate with the nucleoside was compared with that of 1,4 butane disulfonate (busulfan), in form of time taken for the appearance of [M+H] + . It was found that aryl sulfonate leaving group was causing higher rate of nucleophilic attack by the Lewis basic site of the nucleobase. Furthermore, the rate was also found to be a function of electron withdrawing or donating nature of the substituent on the aryl ring. Compound with strong electron withdrawing substituent on the para position of the ring reacted fastest. Hence, new alkylating agents were synthesized with optimized or desired reactivity.

  18. Possible targets for the aneugenic activity of alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerano, P. [IST-National Institute for Research on Cancer, Genova (Italy); Abbondandolo, A. [Univ. of Genova (Italy); Bonatti, S.; Simili, M. [CNR Institute of Mutagenesis and Differentiation, Pisa (Italy)

    1993-12-31

    Alkylating agents have been of invaluable help in mutation research for half a century. In all tested organisms, they have proved able to induce a large variety of genetic effects, including aneuploidy. Credible molecular models exist to explain the ability of alkylating agents to induce gene mutation and to act as initiators in carcinogenesis as a consequence of DNA alkylation at specific sites. On the contrary, neither the mechanism of aneuploidy induction nor the relevant cellular targets are known.

  19. DNA repair methyltransferase (Mgmt) knockout mice are sensitive to the lethal effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Glassner (Brian); G. Weeda (Geert); J.M. Allan (James); J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); N.H.E. Carls (Nick); I. Donker (Ingrid); B.P. Engelward (Bevin); R.J. Hampson (Richard); R. Hersmus (Remko); M.J. Hickman (Mark); R.B. Roth (Richard); H.B. Warren (Henry); M.M. Wu (Mavis); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have generated mice deficient in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase activity encoded by the murine Mgmt gene using homologous recombination to delete the region encoding the Mgmt active site cysteine. Tissues from Mgmt null mice displayed very low O6-methylguanine DNA

  20. Sensitization to radiation and alkylating agents by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is enhanced in cells deficient in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, Dana A; Shibata, Atsushi; Shibata, Akiko K; Woodbine, Lisa J; Jeggo, Penny A; Chalmers, Anthony J

    2010-06-01

    As single agents, chemical inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) are nontoxic and have clinical efficacy against BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient tumors. PARP inhibitors also enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation and alkylating agents but will only improve clinical outcomes if tumor sensitization exceeds effects on normal tissues. It is unclear how tumor DNA repair proficiency affects the degree of sensitization. We have previously shown that the radiosensitizing effect of PARP inhibition requires DNA replication and will therefore affect rapidly proliferating tumors more than normal tissues. Because many tumors exhibit defective DNA repair, we investigated the impact of double-strand break (DSB) repair integrity on the sensitizing effects of the PARP inhibitor olaparib. Sensitization to ionizing radiation and the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate was enhanced in DSB repair-deficient cells. In Artemis(-/-) and ATM(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts, sensitization was replication dependent and associated with defective repair of replication-associated damage. Radiosensitization of Ligase IV(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts was independent of DNA replication and is explained by inhibition of "alternative" end joining. After methylmethane sulfonate treatment, PARP inhibition promoted replication-independent accumulation of DSB, repair of which required Ligase IV. Our findings predict that the sensitizing effects of PARP inhibitors will be more pronounced in rapidly dividing and/or DNA repair defective tumors than normal tissues and show their potential to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by conventional DNA-damaging agents.

  1. The role of the HCR system in the repair of lethal lesions of Bacillus subtilis phages and their transfecting DNA damaged by radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizdalova, M.; Janovska, E.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the HCR system in the repair of prelethal lesions induced by UV light, γ radiation and alkylating agents was studied in the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage, its heat sensitive mutants (N3, N73 nad ts 1 ) and corresponding infectious DNA. The survival of phages and their transfecting DNA after treatment with UV light is substantially higher in hcr + cells than in hcr cells, the differences being more striking in intact phages than in their transfecting DNA's. Repair inhibitors reduce survival in hcr + cells: caffeine lowers the survival of UV-irradiated phage SPP1 in exponentially growing hcr + cells but has no effect on its survival in competent hcr + cells; acriflavin and ethidium bromide decrease the survival of the UV-irradiated SPP1 phage in both exponentially growing and competent hcr + cells to the level of survival observed in hcr cells; moreover, ethidium bromide lowers the number of infective centres in hcr + cells of the UV-irradiated DNA of the SPP1 phage. Repair inhibitors do not lower the survival of the UV-irradiated phages or their DNA in hcr cells. The repair mechanism under study also effectively repairs lesions induced by polyfunctional alkylating agents in the transfecting DNA's of B. subtilis phages but is not functional with lesions induced by these agents in free phages and lesions caused in the phages and their DNA by ethyl methanesulphonate or γ radiation. (author)

  2. L-β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) nitrosation generates a cytotoxic DNA damaging alkylating agent: An unexplored mechanism for neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potjewyd, G; Day, P J; Shangula, S; Margison, G P; Povey, A C

    2017-03-01

    L-β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a non-proteinic amino acid, that is neurotoxic in vitro and in animals, and is implicated in the causation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC) on Guam. Given that natural amino acids can be N-nitrosated to form toxic alkylating agents and the structural similarity of BMAA to other amino acids, our hypothesis was that N-nitrosation of BMAA might result in a toxic alkylating agent, providing a novel mechanistic hypothesis for BMAA action. We have chemically nitrosated BMAA with sodium nitrite to produce nitrosated BMAA (N-BMAA) which was shown to react with the alkyl-trapping agent, 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine, cause DNA strand breaks in vitro and was toxic to the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y under conditions in which BMAA itself was minimally toxic. Our results indicate that N-BMAA is an alkylating agent and toxin suggesting a plausible and previously unrecognised mechanism for the neurotoxic effects of BMAA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of novel alkylating drugs as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Elzbieta; Tolcher, Anthony W

    2004-06-01

    Although conventional alkylating drugs have proven efficacy in the treatment of malignancies, the agents themselves are not selective. Therefore, non-specific alkylation of cellular nucleophilic targets may contribute to many of the observed toxic effects. Novel approaches to drug discovery have resulted in candidate agents that are focused on 'soft alkylation'--alkylators with greater target selectivity. This review highlights the discovery of small molecule drugs that bind to DNA with higher selectivity, act in a unique hypoxic tumor environment, or covalently bind specific protein targets overexpressed in cancer, such as topoisomerase II, glutathione transferase pi1, beta-tubulin and histone deacetylase.

  4. Mechanisms of chemoresistance to alkylating agents in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaria, Jann N; Kitange, Gaspar J; James, C David; Plummer, Ruth; Calvert, Hilary; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2008-05-15

    Intrinsic or acquired chemoresistance to alkylating agents is a major cause of treatment failure in patients with malignant brain tumors. Alkylating agents, the mainstay of treatment for brain tumors, damage the DNA and induce apoptosis, but the cytotoxic activity of these agents is dependent on DNA repair pathways. For example, O6-methylguanine DNA adducts can cause double-strand breaks, but this is dependent on a functional mismatch repair pathway. Thus, tumor cell lines deficient in mismatch repair are resistant to alkylating agents. Perhaps the most important mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase, which can eliminate the cytotoxic O6-methylguanine DNA adduct before it causes harm. Another mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Consequently, efforts are ongoing to develop effective inhibitors of BER. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase plays a pivotal role in BER and is an important therapeutic target. Developing effective strategies to overcome chemoresistance requires the identification of reliable preclinical models that recapitulate human disease and which can be used to facilitate drug development. This article describes the diverse mechanisms of chemoresistance operating in malignant glioma and efforts to develop reliable preclinical models and novel pharmacologic approaches to overcome resistance to alkylating agents.

  5. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  6. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair proteins in human and murine tumor spheroids: implications for multicellular resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Green, Shane K; Bocci, Guido; Man, Shan; Emmenegger, Urban; Ebos, John M L; Weinerman, Adina; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Similar to other anticancer agents, intrinsic or acquired resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics is a major obstacle for cancer therapy. Current strategies aimed at overcoming this problem are mostly based on the premise that tumor cells acquire heritable genetic mutations that contribute to drug resistance. Here, we present evidence for an epigenetic, tumor cell adhesion-mediated, and reversible form of drug resistance that is associated with a reduction of DNA mismatch repair proteins PMS2 and/or MLH1 as well as other members of this DNA repair process. Growth of human breast cancer, human melanoma, and murine EMT-6 breast cancer cell lines as multicellular spheroids in vitro, which is associated with increased resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs, including alkylating agents, is shown to lead to a reproducible down-regulation of PMS2, MLH1, or, in some cases, both as well as MHS6, MSH3, and MSH2. The observed down-regulation is in part reversible by treatment of tumor spheroids with the DNA-demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine. Thus, treatment of EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma spheroids with 5-azacytidine resulted in reduced and/or disrupted cell-cell adhesion, which in turn sensitized tumor spheroids to cisplatin-mediated killing in vitro. Our results suggest that antiadhesive agents might sensitize tumor spheroids to alkylating agents in part by reversing or preventing reduced DNA mismatch repair activity and that the chemosensitization properties of 5-azacytidine may conceivably reflect its role as a potential antiadhesive agent as well as reversal agent for MLH1 gene silencing in human tumors.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of adaptive response to alkylating agents in Escherichia coli and some remarks on O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase in other organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibl, Karol

    2002-09-01

    Alkylating agents are environmental genotoxic agents with mutagenic and carcinogenic potential, however, their properties are also exploited in the treatment of malignant diseases. O(6)-Methylguanine is an important adduct formed by methylating agents that, if not repaired, can lead to mutations and death. Its repair is carried out by O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MTase) in an unique reaction in which methyl groups are transferred to the cysteine acceptor site of the protein itself. Exposure of Escherichia coli cells to sublethal concentrations of methylating agents triggers the expression of a set of genes, which allows the cells to tolerate DNA lesions, and this kind of inducible repair is called the adaptive response. The MTase of E. coli, encoded by the ada gene was the first MTase to be discovered and one of best characterised. Its repair and regulatory mechanisms are understood in considerable detail and this bacterial protein played a key role in identification of its counterparts in other living organisms. This review summarises the nature of alkylation damage in DNA and our current knowledge about the adaptive response in E. coli. I also include a brief mention of MTases from other organisms with the emphasis on the human MTase, which could play a crucial role in both cancer prevention and cancer treatment.

  8. Thioimidazolium Ionic Liquids as Tunable Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Ryan; Miao, Han; Antonietti, Markus

    2018-01-19

    Alkylating ionic liquids based on the thioimidazolium structure combine the conventional properties of ionic liquids, including low melting point and nonvolatility, with the alkylating function. Alkyl transfer occurs exclusively from the S-alkyl position, thus allowing for easy derivatization of the structure without compromising specificity. We apply this feature to tune the electrophilicty of the cation to profoundly affect the reactivity of these alkylating ionic liquids, with a caffeine-derived compound possessing the highest reactivity. Anion choice was found to affect reaction rates, with iodide anions assisting in the alkylation reaction through a "shuttling" process. The ability to tune the properties of the alkylating agent using the toolbox of ionic liquid chemistry highlights the modular nature of these compounds as a platform for alkylating agent design and integration in to future systems.

  9. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase status in neuroendocrine tumours: prognostic relevance and association with response to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, T; van Brakel, B; Vercherat, C; Hervieu, V; Forestier, J; Chayvialle, J-A; Molin, Y; Lombard-Bohas, C; Joly, M-O; Scoazec, J-Y

    2015-02-03

    O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) loss of expression has been suggested to be predictive of response to temozolomide in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), but so far, only limited data are available. We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT status, assessed by two molecular methods and immunohistochemistry, in a large series of NETs of different origins. A total of 107 patients, including 53 treated by alkylants (temozolomide, dacarbazine or streptozotocin), were retrospectively studied. In each case, we used methyl-specific PCR (MS-PCR) and pyrosequencing for evaluation of promoter methylation and immunohistochemistry for evaluation of protein status. MGMT promoter methylation was detected in 12 out of 99 (12%) interpretable cases by MS-PCR and in 24 out of 99 (24%) by pyrosequencing. O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase loss of expression was observed in 29 out of 89 (33%) interpretable cases. Status of MGMT was not correlated with overall survival (OS) from diagnosis. Progression-free survival and OS from first alkylant use (temozolomide, dacarbazine and streptozotocin) were higher in patients with MGMT protein loss (respectively, 20.2 vs 7.6 months, Palkylant-based chemotherapy in NETs.

  10. Sorbate-nitrite interactions: acetonitrile oxide as an alkylating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Prior, M Teresa; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Manso, José A; García-Santos, M Pilar; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-07-01

    Because chemical species with DNA-damaging and mutagenic activity are formed in sorbate-nitrite mixtures and because sorbic acid sometimes coexists with nitrite occurring naturally or incorporated as a food additive, the study of sorbate-nitrite interactions is important. Here, the alkylating potential of the products resulting from such interactions was investigated. Drawn were the following conclusions: (i) Acetonitrile oxide (ACNO) is the compound responsible for the alkylating capacity of sorbate-nitrite mixtures; (ii) ACNO alkylates 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP), a trap for alkylating agents with nucleophilic characteristics similar to those of DNA bases, forming an adduct (AD; epsilon = 1.4 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1); lambda = 519 nm); (iii) the NBP alkylation reaction complies with the rate equation, r = d[AD]/dt = k(alk)(ACNO)[ACNO][NBP]-k(hyd)(AD)[AD], k(alk)(ACNO) being the NBP alkylation rate constant for ACNO and k(hyd)(AD) the rate constant for the adduct hydrolysis reaction; (iv) the small fraction of ACNO forming the adduct with NBP, as well as the small magnitude of the quotient (k(alk) (ACNO)/k(hyd)(ACNO)) as compared with those reported for other alkylating agents, such as some lactones and N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas, reveals the ACNO effective alkylating capacity to be less significant; (v) the low value of the NBP-ACNO adduct life (defined as the total amount of adduct present along the progression of the NBP alkylation per unit of alkylating agent concentration) points to the high instability of this adduct; and (vi) the obtained results are in accordance with the low carcinogenicity of ACNO.

  11. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity is associated with response to alkylating agent therapy and with MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma and anaplastic glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobola, Michael S.; Alnoor, Mohammad; Chen, John Y.-S.; Kolstoe, Douglas D.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Blank, A.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Silber, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background CpG methylation in the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with better outcome following alkylating agent chemotherapy in glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic glioma (AG). To what extent improved response reflects low or absent MGMT activity in glioma tissue has not been unequivocally assessed. This information is central to developing anti-resistance therapies. Methods We examined the relationship of MGMT activity in 91 GBMs and 84 AGs with progression-free survival (PFS) following alkylator therapy and with promoter methylation status determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Results Cox regression analysis revealed that GBMs with high activity had a significantly greater risk for progression in dichotomous (P ≤ 0.001) and continuous (P ≤ 0.003) models, an association observed for different alkylator regimens, including concurrent chemo-radiation with temozolomide. Analysis of MGMT promoter methylation status in 47 of the GBMs revealed that methylated tumors had significantly lower activity (P ≤ 0.005) and longer PFS (P ≤ 0.036) compared to unmethylated tumors, despite overlapping activities. PFS was also significantly greater in methylated vs. unmethylated GBMs with comparable activity (P ≤ 0.005), and among unmethylated tumors with less than median activity (P ≤ 0.026), suggesting that mechanisms in addition to MGMT promote alkylator resistance. Similar associations of MGMT activity with PFS and promoter methylation status were observed for AGs. Conclusions Our results provide strong support for the hypotheses that MGMT activity promotes alkylator resistance and reflects promoter methylation status in malignant gliomas. General significance MGMT activity is an attractive target for anti-resistance therapy regardless of methylation status. PMID:25558448

  12. Potent antitumor bifunctional DNA alkylating agents, synthesis and biological activities of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakadiya, Rajesh; Dong, Huajin; Lee, Pei-Chih; Kapuriya, Naval; Zhang, Xiuguo; Chou, Ting-Chao; Lee, Te-Chang; Kapuriya, Kalpana; Shah, Anamik; Su, Tsann-Long

    2009-08-01

    A series of bifunctional DNA interstrand cross-linking agents, bis(hydroxymethyl)- and bis(carbamates)-8H-3a-azacyclopenta[a]indene-1-yl derivatives were synthesized for antitumor evaluation. The preliminary antitumor studies revealed that these agents exhibited potent cytotoxicity in vitro and antitumor therapeutic efficacy against human tumor xenografts in vivo. Furthermore, these derivatives have little or no cross-resistance to either Taxol or Vinblastine. Remarkably, complete tumor remission in nude mice bearing human breast carcinoma MX-1 xenograft by 13a,b and 14g,h and significant suppression against prostate adenocarcinoma PC3 xenograft by 13b were achieved at the maximum tolerable dose with relatively low toxicity. In addition, these agents induce DNA interstrand cross-linking and substantial G2/M phase arrest in human non-small lung carcinoma H1299 cells. The current studies suggested that these agents are promising candidates for preclinical studies.

  13. Alkylating agent (MNU)-induced mutation in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Masukawa, M.; Sekikawa, K.; Amano, T.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, some contradictory data about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments have been reported. We prepared a damaged template DNA produced with an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N-nitroso urea; MNU) to measure incorrect base-incorporation during DNA replication in microgravity. We examined whether mutation frequency is affected by microgravity during DNA replication for a DNA template damaged by an alkylating agent. Using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system, DNA synthesis by Taq polymerase or polymerase III was done during a US space shuttle mission (Discovery, STS-91). After the flight, DNA replication and mutation frequencies were measured. We found that there was almost no effect of microgravity on DNA replication and mutation frequency. It is suggested that microgravity might not affect at the stage of substrate incorporation in induced-mutation frequency.

  14. Toward hypoxia-selective DNA-alkylating agents built by grafting nitrogen mustards onto the bioreductively activated, hypoxia-selective DNA-oxidizing agent 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (tirapazamine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin M; Parsons, Zachary D; Barnes, Charles L; Gates, Kent S

    2014-08-15

    Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide) is a heterocyclic di-N-oxide that undergoes enzymatic deoxygenation selectively in the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors to generate a mono-N-oxide metabolite. This work explored the idea that the electronic changes resulting from the metabolic deoxygenation of tirapazamine analogues might be exploited to activate a DNA-alkylating species selectively in hypoxic tissue. Toward this end, tirapazamine analogues bearing nitrogen mustard units were prepared. In the case of the tirapazamine analogue 18a bearing a nitrogen mustard unit at the 6-position, it was found that removal of the 4-oxide from the parent di-N-oxide to generate the mono-N-oxide analogue 17a did indeed cause a substantial increase in reactivity of the mustard unit, as measured by hydrolysis rates and DNA-alkylation yields. Hammett sigma values were measured to quantitatively assess the magnitude of the electronic changes induced by metabolic deoxygenation of the 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide heterocycle. The results provide evidence that the 1,2,4-benzotiazine 1,4-dioxide unit can serve as an oxygen-sensing prodrug platform for the selective unmasking of bioactive agents in hypoxic cells.

  15. Effects of inhibitors of DNA repair on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by x-rays or alkylating agents in cultured human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.; Andersson, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the first part of this presentation the authors give examples of the synergistic enhancements that are obtained with various inhibitor combinations in G/sub 2/. The second part of the presentation deals with the effects of two agents, also well known for their capacity to potentiate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by physical and chemical agents, but with a different mechanism of action. These agents are caffeine and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB). Caffeine has for decades been used as an inhibitor of DNA repair although its mechanism of action has not been fully understood. 3AB has more recently come into focus as an efficient inhibitor of the synthesis of poly-(ADP-ribose), a substance believed to be of importance in connection with the repair of certain types of DNA damage. The results presented do not quite fit in with the general idea about the mode of action of these agents. All experiments were carried out with whole-blood cultures of human lymphocytes. When inhibitors were used as post-treatments, chromosomal aberrations were induced by X-rays or by the alkylating agents thiotepa (TT) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). X-rays were generated by a Siemens Stabilipan 200 apparatus, at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min. The tube (TR 200f) was operated at 180 kV, 10 mA and the radiation filtered through 4 mm Al

  16. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Chen, Ying-Jie; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Su, Tao; Li, Ting; Guo, Hui; Zhu, Pei-Li; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Cheng, Brian Chi-Yan; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lee, Sally Kin-Wah; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-04-01

    Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anfernee Kai-Wing Tse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy.

  18. DNA-Directed alkylating agents. 7. Synthesis, DNA interaction, and antitumor activity of bis(hydroxymethyl)- and bis(carbamate)-substituted pyrrolizines and imidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, G J; Fan, J Y; Tan, K; Denny, W A

    1998-11-19

    A series of bis(hydroxymethyl)-substituted imidazoles, thioimidazoles, and pyrrolizines and related bis(carbamates), linked to either 9-anilinoacridine (intercalating) or 4-(4-quinolinylamino)benzamide (minor groove binding) carriers, were synthesized and evaluated for sequence-specific DNA alkylation and cytotoxicity. The imidazole and thioimidazole analogues were prepared by initial synthesis of [(4-aminophenyl)alkyl]imidazole-, thioimidazole-, or pyrrolizine dicarboxylates, coupling of these with the desired carrier, and reduction to give the required bis(hydroxymethyl) alkylating moiety. The pyrrolizines were the most reactive alkylators, followed by the thioimidazoles, while the imidazoles were unreactive. The pyrrolizines and some of the thioimidazoles cross-linked DNA, as measured by agarose gel electrophoresis. Strand cleavage assays showed that none of the compounds reacted at purine N7 or N3 sites in the gpt region of the plasmid gpt2Eco, but the polymerase stop assay showed patterns of G-alkylation in C-rich regions. The corresponding thioimidazole bis(carbamates) were more selective than the bis(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolizines, with high-intensity bands at 5'-NCCN, 5'-NGCN and 5'-NCGN sequences in the PCR stopping assay ( indicates block sites). The data suggest that these targeted compounds, like the known thioimidazole bis(carbamate) carmethizole, alkylate exclusively at guanine residues via the 2-amino group, with little or no alkylation at N3 and N7 guanine or adenine sites. The cytotoxicities of the compounds correlated broadly with their reactivities, with the bis(hydroxymethyl)imidazoles being the least cytotoxic (IC50s >1 microM; P388 leukemia) and with the intercalator-linked analogues being more cytotoxic than the corresponding minor-groove-targeted ones. This was true also for the more reactive thioimidazole bis(carbamates) (IC50s 0.8 and 11 microM, respectively), but both were more active than the analogous "untargeted" carmethizole (IC50 20

  19. The Fanconi anemia pathway sensitizes to DNA alkylating agents by inducing JNK-p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Li, Yanlin; He, Miao; Song, Zhiguo; Lin, Shu; Yu, Zhaojin; Bai, Xuefeng; Wang, Enhua; Wei, Minjie

    2014-07-01

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the FA/BRCA pathway reversed resistance have received limited attention. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Fanconi anemia complementation group F protein (FANCF), a critical factor of the FA/BRCA pathway, on cancer cell apoptosis induced by DNA alkylating agents such as mitomycin c (MMC). We found that FANCF shRNA potentiated MMC-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. At a mechanistic level, FANCF shRNA downregulated the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and upregulated the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, accompanied by release of cyt-c and smac into the cytosol in MMC-treated cells. Furthermore, activation of caspase-3 and -9, other than caspase-8, cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), and a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) indicated that involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in FANCF silencing of MMC-treated breast cancer cells. A decrease in IAP family proteins XIAP and survivin were also observed following FANCF silencing in MMC-treated breast cancer cells. Notably, FANCF shRNA was able to increase p53 levels through activation of the JNK pathway in MMC-treated breast cancer cells. Furthermore, p53 inhibition using pifithrin-α abolished the induction of caspase-3 and PARP by FANCF shRNA and MMC, indicating that MMC-induced apoptosis is substantially enhanced by FANCF shRNA via p53-dependent mechanisms. To our knowledge, we provide new evidence for the potential application of FANCF as a chemosensitizer in breast cancer therapy.

  20. Distribution of methyl and ethyl adducts following alkylation with monofunctional alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, D T

    1990-07-01

    Alkylating agents, because of their ability to react directly with DNA either in vitro or in vivo, or following metabolic activation as in the case of the dialkylnitrosamines, have been used extensively in studying the mechanisms of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Their occurrence is widespread in the environment and human exposure from natural and pollutant sources is universal. Since most of these chemicals show varying degrees of both carcinogenicity and mutagenicity, and exhibit compound-specific binding patterns, they provide an excellent model for studying molecular dosimetry. Molecular dosimetry defines dose as the number of adducts bound per macromolecule and relates the binding of these adducts to the human mutagenic or carcinogenic response. This review complies DNA alkylation data for both methylating and ethylating agents in a variety of systems and discusses the role these alkylation products plays in molecular mutagenesis.

  1. From old alkylating agents to new minor groove binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyo, Stéphane; Montaudon, Danièle; Pourquier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents represent the oldest class of anticancer agents with the approval of mechloretamine by the FDA in 1949. Even though their clinical use is far beyond the use of new targeted therapies, they still occupy a major place in the treatment of specific malignancies, sometimes representing the unique option for the treatment of refractory tumors. Here, we are reviewing the major classes of alkylating agents, with a particular focus on the latest generations of compounds that specifically target the minor groove of the DNA. These naturally occurring derivatives have a unique mechanism of action that explains the recent regain of interest in developing new classes of alkylating agents that could be used in combination with other anticancer drugs to enhance tumor response in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis and Performance of a Biomimetic Indicator for Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Philip A; Love, Jennifer A

    2015-10-02

    4-(4-Nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) is a colorimetric indicator compound for many types of carcinogenic alkylating agents. Because of the similar reactivity of NBP and guanine in DNA, NBP serves as a DNA model. NBP assays are used in the toxicological screening of pharmaceutical compounds, detection of chemical warfare agents, environmental hygiene technology, preliminary toxicology tests, mutagenicity of medicinal compounds, and other chemical analyses. Nevertheless, the use of NBP as a DNA model suffers from the compound's low water solubility, its lack of reactive oxygen sites, and dissimilar steric encumbrance compared to DNA. We report herein the design and synthesis of NBP derivatives that address some of these issues. These derivatives have been tested in solution and found to be superior in the colorimetric assay of the alkylating anticancer drug cyclophosphamide. The derivatives have also been integrated into a polymeric silica material which changes color upon the exposure to dangerous alkylating agents, such as iodomethane vapor, without the need for an exogenous base. This material modernizes the NBP assay from a time-consuming laboratory analysis to a real-time solid state sensor, which requires neither solvent nor additional reagents and can detect both gas- and solution-phase alkylating agents.

  3. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-09-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of `spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centred radical intermediate. Although spin-centre shift is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underused by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylation reactions using alcohols as radical precursors. Because conventional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, increased temperatures or peroxides, a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have considerable use in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. Here we describe the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes, using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first, to our knowledge, broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. The value of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone.

  4. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C–H functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage1. One of the core principles that underlies DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimnation of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of ‘spin-center shift’ (SCS)2, during which an alcohol C–O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centered radical intermediate. While SCS is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underutilized by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylations using alcohols as radical precursors. Considering traditional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, elevated temperatures, or peroxides3–7, the development of a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have significant utility in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. In this manuscript, we describe the successful execution of this idea via the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis. The utility of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone. PMID:26308895

  5. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C-H functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-09-03

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage. One of the core principles underlying DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimination of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of 'spin-centre shift', during which an alcohol C-O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centred radical intermediate. Although spin-centre shift is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underused by the synthetic organic chemistry community. We wondered whether it would be possible to take advantage of this naturally occurring process to accomplish mild, non-traditional alkylation reactions using alcohols as radical precursors. Because conventional radical-based alkylation methods require the use of stoichiometric oxidants, increased temperatures or peroxides, a mild protocol using simple and abundant alkylating agents would have considerable use in the synthesis of diversely functionalized pharmacophores. Here we describe the development of a dual catalytic alkylation of heteroarenes, using alcohols as mild alkylating reagents. This method represents the first, to our knowledge, broadly applicable use of unactivated alcohols as latent alkylating reagents, achieved via the successful merger of photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. The value of this multi-catalytic protocol has been demonstrated through the late-stage functionalization of the medicinal agents, fasudil and milrinone.

  6. Effects of Photo-chemically Activated Alkylating Agents of the FR900482 Family on Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, Vidya; Ducept, Pascal; Williams, Robert M.; Luger, Karolin

    2007-01-01

    Bioreductive alkylating agents are an important class of clinical antitumor antibiotics that cross-link and mono-alkylate DNA. Here we use a synthetic photochemically activated derivative of FR400482 to investigate the molecular mechanism of this class of drugs in a biologically relevant context. We find that the organization of DNA into nucleosomes effectively protects it against drug-mediated cross-linking, while permitting mono-alkylation. This modification has the potential to form covale...

  7. Alkylation damage in DNA and RNA--repair mechanisms and medical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabløs, Finn; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Aas, Per Arne

    2004-01-01

    Alkylation lesions in DNA and RNA result from endogenous compounds, environmental agents and alkylating drugs. Simple methylating agents, e.g. methylnitrosourea, tobacco-specific nitrosamines and drugs like temozolomide or streptozotocin, form adducts at N- and O-atoms in DNA bases. These lesions...... are mainly repaired by direct base repair, base excision repair, and to some extent by nucleotide excision repair (NER). The identified carcinogenicity of O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-meG) is largely caused by its miscoding properties. Mutations from this lesion are prevented by O(6)-alkylG-DNA alkyltransferase......, inactivation of the MMR system in an AGT-defective background causes resistance to the killing effects of O(6)-alkylating agents, but not to the mutagenic effect. Bifunctional alkylating agents, such as chlorambucil or carmustine (BCNU), are commonly used anti-cancer drugs. DNA lesions caused by these agents...

  8. The Scarlet Letter of Alkylation: A Mini Review of Selective Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Reid, Tony; Knox, Susan J; Scicinski, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    If there were a stigma scale for chemotherapy, alkylating agents would be ranked at the top of the list. The chemical term alkylation is associated with nonselective toxicity, an association that dates back to the use of nitrogen mustards during World War I as chemical warfare agents. That this stigma persists and extends to compounds that, through selectivity, attempt to “tame” the indiscriminate destructive potential of alkylation is the subject of this review. Selective alkylation, as it i...

  9. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKK? inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Chen, Ying-Jie; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Su, Tao; Li, Ting; Guo, Hui; Zhu, Pei-Li; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Cheng, Brian Chi-Yan; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lee, Sally Kin-Wah; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Eleva...

  10. Differences in the regulation by poly(ADP-ribose) of repair of DNA damage from alkylating agents and ultraviolet light according to cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Bodell, W.J.; Morgan, W.F.; Zelle, B.

    1983-08-10

    Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by 3-aminobenzamide in various human and hamster cells influenced the responses to DNA damage from methyl methanesulfonate, but not from ultraviolet light. After exposure to methyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide increased the strand break frequency in all cell types studied, but only stimulated repair replication in lymphoid and HeLa cells, suggesting these are independent effects. 3-Aminobenzamide also inhibited the pathway for de novo synthesis of DNA purines, suggesting that some of its effects may be due to disturbance of precursor pathways and irrelevant to the role of poly(ADP-ribose) in repair. Previous claims that 3-aminobenzamide stimulates repair synthesis after exposure to UV light are probably artifacts, because the stimulations are only observed in lymphocytes in the presence of a high concentration of hydroxyurea that itself inhibits repair. The initial inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis and the excision of the major alkylation products and pyrimidine dimers were unaffected by 3-aminobenzamide. In general poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis appears to be uniquely involved in regulating the ligation stage of repair of alkylation damage but not ultraviolet damage. By regulating the ligation efficiency, poly(ADP-ribosylation) modulates the dynamic balance between incision and ligation, so as to minimize the frequency of DNA breaks. The ligation stage of repair of UV damage appears different and is not regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation).

  11. The antitumour activity of alkylating agents is not correlated with the levels of glutathione, glutathione transferase and O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase of human tumour xenografts. EORTC SPG and PAMM Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incalci, M; Bonfanti, M; Pifferi, A; Mascellani, E; Tagliabue, G; Berger, D; Fiebig, H H

    1998-10-01

    Twenty-three human xenografts, including five colon, five gastric, nine lung (three small cell lung cancer) and four breast carcinomas, were investigated for their sensitivity to nitrosoureas, dacarbazine (DTIC), cyclophosphamide (CTX) and cisplatin (DDP). In 12 cases, at least one of the drugs produced complete or partial remission, in 2, a minor regression was observed and in the other 9, treatment was ineffective. The level of sensitivity to each drug, using a score from 1 to 5, was correlated to three biochemical parameters reported to be involved in resistance to alkylating agents: glutathione (GSH), glutathione transferase (GST) and O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase (AGT). A wide variability was found in these parameters in the xenografts investigated. No correlation was found between any of the three parameters and sensitivity to the drugs used or between sensitivity to one drug and to any of the other drugs tested. These results illustrate the complexity of the question of resistance to alkylating agents and indicate that, at least in xenografts, the biochemical parameters examined are not predictive of response to alkylating agents.

  12. Molecular dosimetry of DNA damage caused by alkylation. I. Single-strand breaks induced by ethylating agents in cultured mammalian cells in relation to survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbondandolo, A.; Dogliotti, E.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Berends, F.

    1982-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with ethylating agents. DNA lesions giving rise to single-strand breaks (ssb) or alkali-labile sites were measured by centrifugation in alkaline sucrose gradients after lysis in alkali. 4 agents with different tendencies to ethylate preferentially

  13. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerchikov, Yulia; Borzin, Elena; Gannot, Yair; Shemesh, Ariel; Meltzman, Shai; Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Tal, Shay; Stolyarova, Sara; Nemirovsky, Yael; Tessler, Nir; Eichen, Yoav

    2011-08-01

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  14. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerchikov, Yulia; Borzin, Elena; Gannot, Yair; Shemesh, Ariel; Meltzman, Shai; Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Eichen, Yoav; Tal, Shay; Stolyarova, Sara; Nemirovsky, Yael; Tessler, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  15. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerchikov, Yulia; Borzin, Elena; Gannot, Yair; Shemesh, Ariel; Meltzman, Shai; Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Eichen, Yoav [Schulich Department of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, 32000, Haifa (Israel) (Israel); Tal, Shay [Present address: Systems Biology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Stolyarova, Sara; Nemirovsky, Yael; Tessler, Nir, E-mail: chryoav@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, 32000, Haifa (Israel)

    2011-08-17

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  16. Current approaches to improve the anticancer chemotherapy with alkylating agents: state of the problem in world and Ukraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsyshyna A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are frequently used in many established anticancer chemotherapies. They alkylate the genomic DNA at various sites. Alkylation of the guanine at the O6-position is cytotoxic, it has the strongest mutagenic potential, as well as can cause the tumor development. Alkyl groups at the O6-position of guanine are removed by the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT. The effectiveness of alkylating chemotherapy is limited by MGMT in cancer cells and adverse toxic side effects in normal cells. Different approaches consisting in the modulation of the MGMT expression and activity are under development now to improve the cancer chemotherapy. They include two main directions, in particular, the increase in chemosensitivity of cancer cells to alkylating drugs and the protection of normal cells from the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. This review is focused on current attempts to improve the alkylating chemotherapy of malignant tumours worldwide and state of the issue in Ukraine

  17. The scarlet letter of alkylation: a mini review of selective alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Reid, Tony; Knox, Susan J; Scicinski, Jan J

    2012-08-01

    If there were a stigma scale for chemotherapy, alkylating agents would be ranked at the top of the list. The chemical term alkylation is associated with nonselective toxicity, an association that dates back to the use of nitrogen mustards during World War I as chemical warfare agents. That this stigma persists and extends to compounds that, through selectivity, attempt to "tame" the indiscriminate destructive potential of alkylation is the subject of this review. Selective alkylation, as it is referred to herein, constitutes an extremely nascent and dynamic field in oncology. The pharmacodynamic response to this selective strategy depends on a delicate kinetic balance between specificity and the rate and extent of binding. Three representative compounds are presented: RRx-001, 3-bromopyruvate, and TH-302. The main impetus for the development of these compounds has been the avoidance of the serious complications of traditional alkylating agents; therefore, it is the thesis of this review that they should not experience stigma by association.

  18. Beyond Alkylating Agents for Gliomas: Quo Vadimus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puduvalli, Vinay K; Chaudhary, Rekha; McClugage, Samuel G; Markert, James

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in therapies have yielded notable success in terms of improved survival in several cancers. However, such treatments have failed to improve outcome in patients with gliomas for whom surgery followed by radiation therapy and chemotherapy with alkylating agents remain the standard of care. Genetic and epigenetic studies have helped identify several alterations specific to gliomas. Attempts to target these altered pathways have been unsuccessful due to various factors, including tumor heterogeneity, adaptive resistance of tumor cells, and limitations of access across the blood-brain barrier. Novel therapies that circumvent such limitations have been the focus of intense study and include approaches such as immunotherapy, targeting of signaling hubs and metabolic pathways, and use of biologic agents. Immunotherapeutic approaches including tumor-targeted vaccines, immune checkpoint blockade, antibody-drug conjugates, and chimeric antigen receptor-expressing cell therapies are in various stages of clinical trials. Similarly, identification of key metabolic pathways or converging hubs of signaling pathways that are tumor specific have yielded novel targets for therapy of gliomas. In addition, the failure of conventional therapies against gliomas has led to a growing interest among patients in the use of alternative therapies, which in turn has necessitated developing evidence-based approaches to the application of such therapies in clinical studies. The development of these novel approaches bears potential for providing breakthroughs in treatment of more meaningful and improved outcomes for patients with gliomas.

  19. Carboxymethyl chitin-glucan (CM-CG) protects human HepG2 and HeLa cells against oxidative DNA lesions and stimulates DNA repair of lesions induced by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamenová, Darina; Kováciková, Ines; Horváthová, Eva; Wsólová, Ladislava; Navarová, Jana

    2010-10-01

    A large number of functional foods, including those that contain β-d-glucans, have been shown to prevent human DNA against genotoxic effects and associated development of cancer and other chronic diseases. In this paper, carboxymethyl chitin-glucan (CM-CG) isolated from Aspergillus niger was investigated from two standpoints: (1) DNA-protective effects against oxidative DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) and alkylating DNA damage induced by MMS and MNNG, and (2) a potential effect on rejoining of MMS- and MNNG-induced single strand DNA breaks. The results obtained by the comet assay in human cells cultured in vitro showed that CM-CG reduced significantly the level of oxidative DNA lesions induced by H(2)O(2) but did not change the level of alkylating DNA lesions induced by MMS or MNNG. On the other side, the efficiency of DNA-rejoining of single strand DNA breaks induced by MMS and MNNG was significantly higher in HepG2 cells pre-treated with CM-CG. The antioxidative activity of carboxymethyl chitin-glucan was confirmed by the DPPH assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nearest neighbor affects G:C to A:T transitions induced by alkylating agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Glickman, B W; Horsfall, M J; Gordon, A J; Burns, P A

    1987-01-01

    The influence of local DNA sequence on the distribution of G:C to A:T transitions induced in the lacI gene of E. coli by a series of alkylating agents has been analyzed. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, two nitrosoureas and a nitrosamine, a strong preference for mutation at sites proceeded 5' by a purine base was noted. This preference was observed with both methyl and ethyl donors where the predicted common ultimate alkylating species is the alkyl diazonium ion. In contrast, this preference ...

  1. Quinone methides tethered to naphthalene diimides as selective G-quadruplex alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Antonio, Marco; Doria, Filippo; Richter, Sara N; Bertipaglia, Carolina; Mella, Mariella; Sissi, Claudia; Palumbo, Manlio; Freccero, Mauro

    2009-09-16

    We have developed novel G-quadruplex (G-4) ligand/alkylating hybrid structures, tethering the naphthalene diimide moiety to quaternary ammonium salts of Mannich bases, as quinone-methide precursors, activatable by mild thermal digestion (40 degrees C). The bis-substituted naphthalene diimides were efficiently synthesized, and their reactivity as activatable bis-alkylating agents was investigated in the presence of thiols and amines in aqueous buffered solutions. The electrophilic intermediate, quinone-methide, involved in the alkylation process was trapped, in the presence of ethyl vinyl ether, in a hetero Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction, yielding a substituted 2-ethoxychroman. The DNA recognition and alkylation properties of these new derivatives were investigated by gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and enzymatic assays. The alkylation process occurred preferentially on the G-4 structure in comparison to other DNA conformations. By dissecting reversible recognition and alkylation events, we found that the reversible process is a prerequisite to DNA alkylation, which in turn reinforces the G-quadruplex structural rearrangement.

  2. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jennifer A; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Lake, Annabelle; Eichinger, Lindsey W; Shah, Dharini; Jhun, Iny; Limsirichai, Prajit; Bronson, Roderick T; Christiani, David C; Meira, Lisiane B; Samson, Leona D

    2013-04-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER) is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  3. Aag DNA glycosylase promotes alkylation-induced tissue damage mediated by Parp1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Calvo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents comprise a major class of front-line cancer chemotherapeutic compounds, and while these agents effectively kill tumor cells, they also damage healthy tissues. Although base excision repair (BER is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, initiation of BER can be detrimental. Here we illustrate that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG mediates alkylation-induced tissue damage and whole-animal lethality following exposure to alkylating agents. Aag-dependent tissue damage, as observed in cerebellar granule cells, splenocytes, thymocytes, bone marrow cells, pancreatic β-cells, and retinal photoreceptor cells, was detected in wild-type mice, exacerbated in Aag transgenic mice, and completely suppressed in Aag⁻/⁻ mice. Additional genetic experiments dissected the effects of modulating both BER and Parp1 on alkylation sensitivity in mice and determined that Aag acts upstream of Parp1 in alkylation-induced tissue damage; in fact, cytotoxicity in WT and Aag transgenic mice was abrogated in the absence of Parp1. These results provide in vivo evidence that Aag-initiated BER may play a critical role in determining the side-effects of alkylating agent chemotherapies and that Parp1 plays a crucial role in Aag-mediated tissue damage.

  4. Effects of Photo-chemically Activated Alkylating Agents of the FR900482 Family on Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vidya; Ducept, Pascal; Williams, Robert M.; Luger, Karolin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bioreductive alkylating agents are an important class of clinical antitumor antibiotics that cross-link and mono-alkylate DNA. Here we use a synthetic photochemically activated derivative of FR400482 to investigate the molecular mechanism of this class of drugs in a biologically relevant context. We find that the organization of DNA into nucleosomes effectively protects it against drug-mediated cross-linking, while permitting mono-alkylation. This modification has the potential to form covalent cross-links between chromatin and nuclear proteins. Using in vitro approaches, we found that interstrand cross-linking of free DNA results in a significant decrease in basal and activated transcription. Finally, cross-linked plasmid DNA is inefficiently assembled into chromatin. Our studies suggest new pathways for the clinical effectiveness of this class of reagents. PMID:17524986

  5. Immunological detection of O6-methylguanine in alkylated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briscoe, W.T.; Spizizen, J.; Tan, E.M.

    1978-01-01

    Antibodies to O 6 -methyldeoxyguanosine were produced in rabbits and utilized in a radioimmunoassay to detect this nucleoside at picomole levels. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by the use of nucleoside analogues as inhibitors in the radioimmunoassay. The antibodies cross-reacted with O 6 -methylguanosine, O 6 -methylguanine, and O 6 -ethylguanosine. There was 10 4 to 10 6 times less sensitivity to inhibition by deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine, and guanosine than by O 6 -methyldeoxyguanosine. The radioimmunoassay also detected O 6 -methylguanine in DNA alkylated by agents known to produce O 6 -methylguanine, such as N'-methyl-N-nitrosourea. DNA alkylated with dimethyl sulfate, which does not produce O 6 -methylguanine in DNA, cross-reacted with the antibodies to a very limited extent. Such an assay system for modified nucleic acid components would be very useful in following the production, persistence, and repair of these lesions in a variety of cells and tissues treated with a broad spectrum of carcinogens and suspected carcinogens

  6. Cytotoxicity of alkylating agents towards sensitive and resistant strains of Escherichia coli in relation to extent and mode of alkylation of cellular macromolecules and repair of alkylation lesions in deoxyribonucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, P D; Brookes, P

    1968-09-01

    1. A quantitative study was made of the relationship between survival of colony-forming ability in Escherichia coli strains B/r and B(s-1) and the extents of alkylation of cellular DNA, RNA and protein after treatment with mono- or di-functional sulphur mustards, methyl methanesulphonate or iodoacetamide. 2. The mustards and methyl methanesulphonate react with nucleic acids in the cells, in the same way as found previously from chemical studies in vitro, and with proteins. Iodoacetamide reacts only with protein, principally with the thiol groups of cysteine residues. 3. The extents of alkylation of cellular constituents required to prevent cell division vary widely according to the strain of bacteria and the nature of the alkylating agent. 4. The extents of alkylation of the sensitive and resistant strains at a given dose of alkylating agent do not differ significantly. 5. Removal of alkyl groups from DNA of cells of the resistant strains B/r and 15T(-) after alkylation with difunctional sulphur mustard was demonstrated; the product di(guanin-7-ylethyl) sulphide, characteristic of di- as opposed to mono-functional alkylation, was selectively removed; the time-scale of this effect suggests an enzymic rather than a chemical mechanism. 6. The sensitive strain B(s-1) removed alkyl groups from DNA in this way only at very low extents of alkylation. When sensitized to mustard action by treatment with iodoacetamide, acriflavine or caffeine, the extent of alkylation of cellular DNA corresponding to a mean lethal dose was decreased to approximately 3 molecules of di(guanin-7-ylethyl) sulphide in the genome of this strain. 7. Relatively large numbers of monofunctional alkylations per genome can be withstood by this sensitive strain. Iodoacetamide had the weakest cytotoxic action of the agents investigated; methyl methanesulphonate was significantly weaker in effect than the monofunctional sulphur mustard, which was in turn weaker than the difunctional sulphur mustard. 8

  7. An adaptive response to alkylating agents in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, P; Shawcross, S G; Strike, P

    1988-11-01

    A simple method is described for demonstrating adaptation to alkylation damage in Aspergillus nidulans. One wild type, two MNNG-sensitive, and one MNNG-resistant strain all showed improvement in colony growth when challenged with MNNG following appropriate inducing pretreatments. Other alkylating agents (MMS, EMS) could also adapt mycelium to later MNNG challenge, while 4NQO and UV could not. The inducible effect was not transmissible through conidia. A standard reversion assay based upon methG proved impractical for studying mutation frequencies during alkylation treatments owing to variations in MNNG resistance amongst revertants.

  8. Atorvastatin Downregulates In Vitro Methyl Methanesulfonate and Cyclophosphamide Alkylation-Mediated Cellular and DNA Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Araujo-Lima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, and this class of drugs has been studied as protective agents against DNA damages. Alkylating agents (AAs are able to induce alkylation in macromolecules, causing DNA damage, as DNA methylation. Our objective was to evaluate atorvastatin (AVA antimutagenic, cytoprotective, and antigenotoxic potentials against DNA lesions caused by AA. AVA chemopreventive ability was evaluated using antimutagenicity assays (Salmonella/microsome assay, cytotoxicity, cell cycle, and genotoxicity assays in HepG2 cells. The cells were cotreated with AVA and the AA methyl methanesulfonate (MMS or cyclophosphamide (CPA. Our datum showed that AVA reduces the alkylation-mediated DNA damage in different in vitro experimental models. Cytoprotection of AVA at low doses (0.1–1.0 μM was observed after 24 h of cotreatment with MMS or CPA at their LC50, causing an increase in HepG2 survival rates. After all, AVA at 10 μM and 25 μM had decreased effect in micronucleus formation in HepG2 cells and restored cell cycle alterations induced by MMS and CPA. This study supports the hypothesis that statins can be chemopreventive agents, acting as antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, and cytoprotective components, specifically against alkylating agents of DNA.

  9. The Scarlet Letter of Alkylation: A Mini Review of Selective Alkylating Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Reid, Tony; Knox, Susan J; Scicinski, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    If there were a stigma scale for chemotherapy, alkylating agents would be ranked at the top of the list. The chemical term alkylation is associated with nonselective toxicity, an association that dates back to the use of nitrogen mustards during World War I as chemical warfare agents. That this stigma persists and extends to compounds that, through selectivity, attempt to “tame” the indiscriminate destructive potential of alkylation is the subject of this review. Selective alkylation, as it is referred to herein, constitutes an extremely nascent and dynamic field in oncology. The pharmacodynamic response to this selective strategy depends on a delicate kinetic balance between specificity and the rate and extent of binding. Three representative compounds are presented: RRx-001, 3-bromopyruvate, and TH-302. The main impetus for the development of these compounds has been the avoidance of the serious complications of traditional alkylating agents; therefore, it is the thesis of this review that they should not experience stigma by association. PMID:22937173

  10. Bis(trialkylsilyl) peroxides as alkylating agents in the copper-catalyzed selective mono-N-alkylation of primary amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryu; Sakurai, Shunya; Maruoka, Keiji

    2017-06-13

    The copper-catalyzed selective mono-N-alkylation of primary amides with bis(trialkylsilyl) peroxides as alkylating agents was reported. The results of a mechanistic study suggest that this reaction should proceed via a free radical process that includes the generation of alkyl radicals from bis(trialkylsilyl) peroxides.

  11. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. (CERHYD, Algiers (Algeria))

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. The synthesis and biological evaluation of new DNA-directed alkylating agents, phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates containing a urea linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvania, Bhavin; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Christian, Wilson; Chen, Tai-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hsi; Suman, Sharda; Tala, Kiran; Lee, Te-Chang; Shah, Anamik; Su, Tsann-Long

    2014-08-18

    We synthesized a series of phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates to study their antitumorigenic effects. These agents were prepared by the condensation of 4-[N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl isocyanate with 6-amino-4-methylamino or 4-anilinoquinolines. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that the C2-methylquinoline derivatives (18a-o) were generally more cytotoxic than the C2-phenylquinoline conjugates (23a-d) in inhibiting the cell growth of various human tumor cell lines in vitro. However, the methylamino or aniline substituents at C4 of quinoline did not influence the cytotoxic effects. The title conjugates were capable of inducing DNA cross-linking and promoting cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. This study demonstrates that phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates are generally more potent than phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinazoline conjugates against the cell growth of various tumor cell-lines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates [relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22]. The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents

  14. Repairability during G1 of the inductor leisure of exchanges in the sister chromatid induced by alkylating agents in DNA substituted and no substituted with BUDR, in cells of the salivary gland of mouse In vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez B, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this work you determines the repair of the lesions inductoras of Sister chromatid exchange (ICHs) generated in the cells of the salivary gland of mouse, for the treatment with the N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU), the N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU), the Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in early and slow G1 of the first one and the second cellular division, that is to say before and after the cells incorporate 5-bromine-2 -Desoxyuridine (BrdU) in the DNA. Groups witness non treaties were included with mutagen. The cells of the salivary gland repaired the generated lesions partially by the MNU, the MMS and the EMS in the 1st division, and only the lesions induced by the ENU and MMS were repaired partially in the 2nd division. The ENU generates injure that they were not repaired in the 1st division and those taken place by the EMS were little repaired in the 2nd division. The methylating agents generated but ICHs that the ethylating. One observes that the BrdU makes to the molecule of the DNA but susceptible to the damage generated by the alkylating agents that induce the formation of the ICHs. This susceptibility was incremented around 150% for the treatment with the MNU, the ENU and the MMS, on the other hand for the EMS it was 3 times minor. It is proposed that the one electronegative atom of this analog of the timine would to work as a nucleophyllic center with which the electrophyllic compounds react. (Author)

  15. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA.

  16. Regulation of DNA Alkylation Damage Repair: Lessons and Therapeutic Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Jennifer M; Sobol, Robert W; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2017-03-01

    Alkylation chemotherapy is one of the most widely used systemic therapies for cancer. While somewhat effective, clinical responses and toxicities of these agents are highly variable. A major contributing factor for this variability is the numerous distinct lesions that are created upon alkylation damage. These adducts activate multiple repair pathways. There is mounting evidence that the individual pathways function cooperatively, suggesting that coordinated regulation of alkylation repair is critical to prevent toxicity. Furthermore, some alkylating agents produce adducts that overlap with newly discovered methylation marks, making it difficult to distinguish between bona fide damaged bases and so-called 'epigenetic' adducts. Here, we discuss new efforts aimed at deciphering the mechanisms that regulate these repair pathways, emphasizing their implications for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA-adducts in fish exposed to alkylating carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giam, C.S.; Holliday, T.L.; Williams, J.L.; Bahnson, A.; Weller, R.; Hinton, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    There are limited studies on DNA-adduct formation following exposure of fish or fish cells to carcinogens. It will be essential to determine if procarcinogens and carcinogens form the same DNA-adducts in different liver cells and how these compare to those reported in mammalian livers. They are also interested in the influence of different alkylating agents on the type and quantity of DNA-adduct formation and repair in fish. While eggs or small fish are ideal for routine screening, large fish such as trout (Salmo gairdneri) is needed initially for the development of analytical procedures for the isolation, quantitation and identification of various adducts. Trout (Salmo gairdneri) weighing approximately 250 grams were acclimatized at 13 degree C before being given i.p. injection of diethylnitrosoamine (DEN). The exposure period varied, though most animals were sacrificed after 24 hours. Their livers were excised and DNA was isolated mainly according the procedure of Croy et al. The neutral thermal hydrolysate and the acid hydrolysate were analyzed by HPLC-Fluorescent detector for 7-ethylguanine and O 6 -ethylguanine, respectively. O 6 -ethylguanine was detected, 7-ethylguanine was not detected. Attempts are being made to improve the detection of the latter compound. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) was used to establish nanogram quantities of the ethylated bases. Laser desorption FT-IC-MS is particularly useful for characterizing thermally-labile and involatile nucleosides or nucleotides. Excretion of DEN was rapid and high. Exposure of trout (and other fish) to various ethylating agents will be discussed

  18. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the persistence in the induction of Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE) by alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez R, R.; Huerta V, C.; MOrales R, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    The persistence in the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) by the alkylating agents methyl and ethyl-methanesulfonates (MMS and EMS) was evaluated. For it, to groups of mice its were administered a dose of these agents and later its were analyzed the induced SCE's in two periods: early and late. Both agents caused high increments of SCE in the early period and small in the late one; however, the caused lately by EMS was significantly bigger. This late induction of SCE by EMS possibly is associated with an epigenetic change or with the presence of etiladucts in the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA. (Author)

  20. Determination of reaction rate constants for alkylation of 4-(p-nitrobenzyl) pyridine by different alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walles, S A

    1980-02-01

    The rate constants have been determined for the reaction between some different alkylating agents and 4-(p-nitrobenzyl) pyridine (NBP) in methanol. These constants have been compared with those for alkylation of aniline in water. All the constants were lower in methanol than in water but in different degrees. The rate constants of the different alkylating agents have been calculated at a nucleophilic strength n=2. The genetic risk defined as the degree of alkylation of a nucleophile (n=2) is equivalent to the rate constant kn=2 and the target dose. The dependence of the genetic risk on the rate constant (kn=2) is discussed.

  1. Regular character of chromatin degradation in lymphoid tissues after treatment with biological alkylating agents in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyasova, J.; Skalka, M.; Cejkova, M.

    1979-01-01

    The chromatin changes are reevaluated occurring in lymphoid tissues of mice treated with alkylating agents of the nitrogen-mustard type in relation to recent evidence on the nucleosomal organization of chromatin and to our new data on the regular character of chromatin degradation in lymphoid tissues of irradiated mice. DNA was isolated from nuclei at various intervals (1 to 18 h) after treatment of mice and subjected to gel electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Thymus chromatin from treated mice has been shown to degrade in a regular fashion and to yield discrete DNA fragments, resembling those that originate in lymphoid tissues of irradiated mice or in thymus nuclei digested with micrococcal nuclease in vitro. With increasing interval after treatment higher amounts of smaller DNA fragments appear. Chromatin in spleen cells responds to treatment in a similar way, whilst no degradation in vivo takes place in liver chromatin. Chromatin of LS/BL lymphosarcoma cells in mice treated with alkylating agents or with irradiation suffers from a similar regular degradation. The results stress the significance of the action of liberated or activated endogenous nuclease(s) in the development of chromatin damage in lymphoid cells after treatment with alkylating agents. (author)

  2. Ada response - a strategy for repair of alkylated DNA in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Alkylating agents are widespread in the environment and also occur endogenously. They can be cytotoxic or mutagenic to the cells introducing alkylated bases to DNA or RNA. All organisms have evolved multiple DNA repair mechanisms to counteract the effects of DNA alkylation: the most cytotoxic lesion, N(3)-methyladenine (3meA), is excised by AlkA glycosylase initiating base excision repair (BER); toxic N(1)-methyladenine (1meA) and N(3)-methylcytosine (3meC), induced in DNA and RNA, are removed by AlkB dioxygenase; and mutagenic and cytotoxic O(6)-methylguanine (O(6) meG) is repaired by Ada methyltransferase. In Escherichia coli, Ada response involves the expression of four genes, ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB, encoding respective proteins Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The Ada response is conserved among many bacterial species; however, it can be organized differently, with diverse substrate specificity of the particular proteins. Here, an overview of the organization of the Ada regulon and function of individual proteins is presented. We put special effort into the characterization of AlkB dioxygenases, their substrate specificity, and function in the repair of alkylation lesions in DNA/RNA. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  3. Ada response – a strategy for repair of alkylated DNA in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widespread in the environment and also occur endogenously. They can be cytotoxic or mutagenic to the cells introducing alkylated bases to DNA or RNA. All organisms have evolved multiple DNA repair mechanisms to counteract the effects of DNA alkylation: the most cytotoxic lesion, N3-methyladenine (3meA), is excised by AlkA glycosylase initiating base excision repair (BER); toxic N1-methyladenine (1meA) and N3-methylcytosine (3meC), induced in DNA and RNA, are removed by AlkB dioxygenase; and mutagenic and cytotoxic O6-methylguanine (O6meG) is repaired by Ada methyltransferase. In Escherichia coli, Ada response involves the expression of four genes, ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB, encoding respective proteins Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The Ada response is conserved among many bacterial species; however, it can be organized differently, with diverse substrate specificity of the particular proteins. Here, an overview of the organization of the Ada regulon and function of individual proteins is presented. We put special effort into the characterization of AlkB dioxygenases, their substrate specificity, and function in the repair of alkylation lesions in DNA/RNA. PMID:24810496

  4. Cu(I)-Catalyzed Enantioselective Friedel-Crafts Alkylation of Indoles with 2-Aryl-N-sulfonylaziridines as Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chen; Liu, Ren-Rong; Gao, Jian-Rong; Jia, Yi-Xia

    2016-07-01

    A highly enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles with N-sulfonylaziridines as alkylating agents has been developed by utilizing the complex of Cu(CH3CN)4BF4/(S)-Segphos as a catalyst. A range of optically active tryptamine derivatives are obtained in good to excellent yields and enantioselectivities (up to >99% ee) via a kinetic resolution process.

  5. HTB140 melanoma cells under proton irradiation and/or alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korićanac, L.; Petrović, I.; Privitera, G.; Cuttone, G.; Ristić-Fira, A.

    2007-09-01

    Chemoresistance is a major problem in the treatment of malignant melanoma. The mainstay of treatment for melanoma is the DNA-alkylating agent dacarbazine (DTIC). Fotemustine (FM), a member of the chloroethylnitrosourea group of alkylating agents, has also demonstrated significant antitumor effects in malignant melanoma. However, the intrinsic and acquired resistance of melanoma limits the clinical application of these drugs. Melanomas are also extremely radioresistant. With the objective of enhancing growth inhibition of melanoma cells, combined treatments of FM or DTIC with proton irradiation have been investigated. These effects were studied on HTB140 melanoma cell viability and proliferation. Cells exposed to treatment with FM and protons have shown inhibition of cell growth and significant reduction of proliferation capacity compared to single irradiation or drug treatment. Treatment with DTIC and protons has shown improved growth inhibition compared to appropriate single drug treatment, while the effects of single proton irradiation have been the most pronounced.

  6. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: brokers dealing with alkylated DNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schärer, Orlando D

    2012-07-13

    A new pathway for the repair of DNA alkylation damage is described in this issue of Molecular Cell (Latypov et al., 2012). Alkyltransferase-like enzymes mark O(6)-alkylguanine lesions and, depending on adduct size, channel them into global genome or transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA alkylation lesions and their repair in human cells: modification of the comet assay with 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hašplová, Katarína; Hudecová, Alexandra; Magdolénová, Zuzana; Bjøras, Magnar; Gálová, Eliška; Miadoková, Eva; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-01-05

    3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD) belongs to a new family of DNA glycosylases; it initiates repair of cytotoxic and promutagenic alkylated bases (its main substrates being 3-methyladenine and 7-methylguanine). The modification of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) using AlkD enzyme thus allows assessment of specific DNA alkylation lesions. The resulting baseless sugars are alkali-labile, and under the conditions of the alkaline comet assay they appear as DNA strand breaks. The alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to induce alkylation lesions and to optimize conditions for the modified comet assay method with AlkD on human lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells. We also studied cellular and in vitro DNA repair of alkylated bases in DNA in TK6 cells after treatment with MMS. Results from cellular repair indicate that 50% of DNA alkylation is repaired in the first 60 min. The in vitro repair assay shows that while AlkD recognises most alkylation lesions after 60 min, a cell extract from TK6 cells recognises most of the MMS-induced DNA adducts already in the first 15 min of incubation, with maximum detection of lesions after 60 min' incubation. Additionally, we tested the in vitro repair capacity of human lymphocyte extracts from 5 individuals and found them to be able to incise DNA alkylations in the same range as AlkD. The modification of the comet assay with AlkD can be useful for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies to detect alkylation damage and repair and also for human biomonitoring and molecular epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular response to alkylating agent MNNG is impaired in STAT1-deficients cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Koon, Laurent; Lesage, Denis; Lemadre, Elodie; Souissi, Inès; Fagard, Remi; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Fabre, Emmanuelle E; Schischmanoff, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The SN 1 alkylating agents activate the mismatch repair system leading to delayed G2 /M cell cycle arrest and DNA repair with subsequent survival or cell death. STAT1, an anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic transcription factor is known to potentiate p53 and to affect DNA-damage cellular response. We studied whether STAT1 may modulate cell fate following activation of the mismatch repair system upon exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Using STAT1-proficient or -deficient cell lines, we found that STAT1 is required for: (i) reduction in the extent of DNA lesions, (ii) rapid phosphorylation of T68-CHK2 and of S15-p53, (iii) progression through the G2 /M checkpoint and (iv) long-term survival following treatment with MNNG. Presence of STAT1 is critical for the formation of a p53-DNA complex comprising: STAT1, c-Abl and MLH1 following exposure to MNNG. Importantly, presence of STAT1 allows recruitment of c-Abl to p53-DNA complex and links c-Abl tyrosine kinase activity to MNNG-toxicity. Thus, our data highlight the important modulatory role of STAT1 in the signalling pathway activated by the mismatch repair system. This ability of STAT1 to favour resistance to MNNG indicates the targeting of STAT1 pathway as a therapeutic option for enhancing the efficacy of SN1 alkylating agent-based chemotherapy. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Pharmacology of dimethanesulfonate alkylating agents: busulfan and treosulfan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaup, Ariane; Paci, Angelo

    2013-03-01

    Among the dimethanesulfonates, busulfan, in combination with other alkylating agents or nucleoside analogues, is the cornerstone of high-dose chemotherapy. It is used, and followed hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, for the treatment of various hematologic malignancies and immunodeficiencies. Treosulfan, which is a hydrophilic analogue of busulfan, was the first dimethanesufonate registered for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Recently, treosulfan has been investigated for the treatment of hematologic malignancies in combination with the same second agents before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This work reviews the pharmacological data of these two dimethanesulfonates alkylating agents. Specifically, the article looks at their chemistry, metabolism, anticancer activity, and their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Busulfan has been investigated widely for more than three decades leading to a large and precise handling of this agent with numerous studies on activity and pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In contrast, the behavior of treosulfan is still under investigation and not fully described. The complexity of treosulfan's metabolism and mechanism of action gives rise to the need of a deeper understanding of its pharmacological activity in a context of high-dose chemotherapy. Specifically, there is a great need to better understand its pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics relationship.

  10. Molecular characterization of an adaptive response to alkylating agents in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A; Margison, Geoffrey P; Hatch, Amy; Fitzpatrick, David A; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary W

    2012-09-01

    An adaptive response to alkylating agents based upon the conformational change of a methylphosphotriester (MPT) DNA repair protein to a transcriptional activator has been demonstrated in a number of bacterial species, but this mechanism appears largely absent from eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus elicits an adaptive response to sub-lethal doses of the mono-functional alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have identified genes that encode MPT and O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) DNA repair proteins; deletions of either of these genes abolish the adaptive response and sensitize the organism to MNNG. In vitro DNA repair assays confirm the ability of MPT and AGT to repair methylphosphotriester and O(6)-methylguanine lesions respectively. In eukaryotes, the MPT protein is confined to a select group of fungal species, some of which are major mammalian and plant pathogens. The evolutionary origin of the adaptive response is bacterial and rooted within the Firmicutes phylum. Inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer between Firmicutes and Ascomycete ancestors introduced the adaptive response into the Fungal kingdom. Our data constitute the first detailed characterization of the molecular mechanism of the adaptive response in a lower eukaryote and has applications for development of novel fungal therapeutics targeting this DNA repair system.

  11. Molecular characterization of an adaptive response to alkylating agents in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hanlon, Karen A.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Hatch, Amy; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Owens, Rebecca A.; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive response to alkylating agents based upon the conformational change of a methylphosphotriester (MPT) DNA repair protein to a transcriptional activator has been demonstrated in a number of bacterial species, but this mechanism appears largely absent from eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus elicits an adaptive response to sub-lethal doses of the mono-functional alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have identified genes that encode MPT and O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) DNA repair proteins; deletions of either of these genes abolish the adaptive response and sensitize the organism to MNNG. In vitro DNA repair assays confirm the ability of MPT and AGT to repair methylphosphotriester and O6-methylguanine lesions respectively. In eukaryotes, the MPT protein is confined to a select group of fungal species, some of which are major mammalian and plant pathogens. The evolutionary origin of the adaptive response is bacterial and rooted within the Firmicutes phylum. Inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer between Firmicutes and Ascomycete ancestors introduced the adaptive response into the Fungal kingdom. Our data constitute the first detailed characterization of the molecular mechanism of the adaptive response in a lower eukaryote and has applications for development of novel fungal therapeutics targeting this DNA repair system. PMID:22669901

  12. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barault, L.; Amatu, A.; Bleeker, F. E.; Moutinho, C.; Falcomatà, C.; Fiano, V.; Cassingena, A.; Siravegna, G.; Milione, M.; Cassoni, P.; de Braud, F.; Rudà, R.; Soffietti, R.; Venesio, T.; Bardelli, A.; Wesseling, P.; de Witt Hamer, P.; Pietrantonio, F.; Siena, S.; Esteller, M.; Sartore-Bianchi, A.; Di Nicolantonio, F.

    2015-01-01

    O(6)-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA

  13. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove

  14. Inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and their enhancement of alkylating agent cytotoxicity in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, M.R.; Brown, D.M.; Hirst, D.G.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The chromosomal enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (ADPRP) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by both ionizing radiation and alkylating agents. The authors have shown that certain inhibitors of this enzyme decrease potentially lethal damage repair after X-rays. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible enhancement of alkylating agent damage in vivo by several of these ADPRP inhibitors. 3-aminobenzamide (200 mg/kg), caffeine (200 mg/kg), or nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg) given to RIF-1-tumor-bearing mice immediately before a dose of melphalan (L-PAM) (8 mg/kg) produced enhancement of tumor response as demonstrated by an in vivo in vitro tumor excision assay. Caffeine and nicotinamide provided the greatest enhancement of L-PAM cytotoxicity with at least a 100-fold increase in killing. Data are presented on the mechanism by which these drugs and other more potent inhibitors enhance the tumor cell killing by L-PAM and other alkylating agents

  15. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of laromustine, an emerging alkylating agent, in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ala F; Wisnewski, Adam V; King, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    1. Alkylating agents are capable of introducing an alkyl group into nucleophilic sites on DNA or RNA through covalent bond. Laromustine is an active member of a relatively new class of sulfonylhydrazine prodrugs under development as antineoplastic alkylating agents, and displays significant single-agent activity. 2. This is the first report of the population pharmacokinetic analysis of laromustine, 106 patients, 66 with hematologic malignancies and 40 with solid tumors, participated in five clinical trials worldwide. Of these, 104 patients were included in the final NONMEM analysis. 3. The population estimates for total clearance (CL) and volume of distribution of the central compartment (V 1 ) were 96.3 L/h and 45.9 L, associated with high inter-patient variability of 52.9% and 79.8% and inter-occasion variability of 26.7% and 49.3%, respectively. The population estimates for Q and V 2 were 73.2 L/h and 29.9 L, and inter-patient variability in V 2 was 63.1%, respectively. 4. The estimate of V ss (75.8 L) exceeds total body water, indicating that laromustine is distributed to tissues. The half-life is short, less than 1 h, reflecting rapid clearance. Population PK analysis showed laromustine pharmacokinetics to be independent of dose and organ function with no effect on subsequent dosing cycles.

  16. Therapeutic journery of nitrogen mustard as alkylating anticancer agents: Historic to future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh K; Kumar, Sahil; Prasad, D N; Bhardwaj, T R

    2018-05-10

    Cancer is considered as one of the most serious health problems today. The discovery of nitrogen mustard as an alkylating agent in 1942, opened a new era in the cancer chemotherapy. This valuable class of alkylating agent exerts its biological activity by binding to DNA, cross linking two strands, preventing DNA replication and ultimate cell death. At the molecular level, nitrogen lone pairs of nitrogen mustard generate a strained intermediate "aziridinium ion" which is very reactive towards DNA of tumor cell as well as normal cell resulting in various adverse side effects alogwith therapeutic implications. Over the last 75 years, due to its high reactivity and peripheral cytotoxicity, numerous modifications have been made in the area of nitrogen mustard to improve its efficacy as well as enhancing drug delivery specifically to tumor cells. This review mainly discusses the medicinal chemistry aspects in the development of various classes of nitrogen mustards (mechlorethamine, chlorambucil, melphalan, cyclophosphamide and steroidal based nitrogen mustards). The literature collection includes the historical and the latest developments in these areas. This comprehensive review also attempted to showcase the recent progress in the targeted delivery of nitrogen mustards that includes DNA directed nitrogen mustards, antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT), nitrogen mustard activated by glutathione transferase, peptide based nitrogen mustards and CNS targeted nitrogen mustards. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Therapy Sequence with Alkylating Agents and MGMT Status in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Sebastian; Boch, Michael; Rexin, Peter; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick; Rinke, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Alkylating chemotherapeutics with either a streptozotocin-(STZ) or temozolomide-(TEM) backbone are routinely used in patients with progressive and unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET). In addition, dacarbazine (DTIC) was described as an alternative alkylating therapy option for PNETs. The optimal treatment sequence with alkylating compounds and a potential use of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) level as predictive biomarker have not yet been sufficiently elucidated. The aim of our study was the evaluation of therapy sequence with either STZ-based treatment followed by DTIC (group A) or the inverse schedule with upfront DTIC (group B) and to correlate MGMT status with clinicopathological characteristics and response to therapy. We retrospectively analyzed 28 patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) who were treated with STZ-based therapy and DTIC. Additionally, in a second group MGMT immunohistochemistry was performed from primary and metastatic tumor sites. For statistical evaluation Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression methods and Fisher's exact test were used. There was no difference of objective response and disease control between either STZ-based therapy followed by DTIC treatment (group A) after progression or the reverse sequence (group B). Median time to progression (TTP) was estimated to be 21 months in both arms. First-line STZ-based chemotherapy was not superior to first-line DTIC treatment (16 vs. 13 months; p=0.8). MGMT status did not correlate with clinicopathological characteristics or response to therapy with these alkylating agents. Upfront chemotherapy with either STZ-based treatment or DTIC monotherapy showed similar efficacy and median TTP rates. In this study, MGMT protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry did not play an important role as a predictive marker for alkylating agents. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Nearest neighbor affects G:C to A:T transitions induced by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, B W; Horsfall, M J; Gordon, A J; Burns, P A

    1987-01-01

    The influence of local DNA sequence on the distribution of G:C to A:T transitions induced in the lacI gene of E. coli by a series of alkylating agents has been analyzed. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, two nitrosoureas and a nitrosamine, a strong preference for mutation at sites proceeded 5' by a purine base was noted. This preference was observed with both methyl and ethyl donors where the predicted common ultimate alkylating species is the alkyl diazonium ion. In contrast, this preference was not seen following treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. The observed preference for 5'PuG-3' site over 5'-PyG-3' sites corresponds well with alterations observed in the Ha-ras oncogene recovered after treatment with NMU. This indicates that the mutations recovered in the oncogenes are likely the direct consequence of the alkylation treatment and that the local sequence effects seen in E. coli also appear to occur in mammalian cells. PMID:3329097

  19. Nearest neighbor affects G:C to A:T transitions induced by alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, B.W.; Horsfall, M.J.; Gordon, A.J.E.; Burns, P.A.

    1987-12-01

    The influence of local DNA sequence on the distribution of G:C to A:T transitions induced in the lacI gene of E. coli by a series of alkylating agents has been analyzed. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, two nitrosoureas and a nitrosamine, a strong preference for mutation at sites proceeded 5' by a purine base was noted. This preferences was observed with both methyl and ethyl donors where the predicted common ultimate alkylating species in the alkyl diazonium ion. In contrast, this preferences was not seen following treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. The observed preference for 5'PuG-3' site over 5'-PyG-3' sites corresponds well with alterations observed in the Ha-ras oncogene recovered after treatment with NMU. This indicates that the mutations recovered in the oncogenes are likely the direct consequence of the alkylation treatment and that the local sequence effects seen in E. coli also appear to occur in mammalian cells.

  20. Effects of photochemically activated alkylating agents of the FR900482 family on chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vidya; Ducept, Pascal; Williams, Robert M; Luger, Karolin

    2007-05-01

    Bioreductive alkylating agents are an important class of clinical antitumor antibiotics that crosslink and monoalkylate DNA. Here, we use a synthetic, photochemically activated derivative of FR400482 to investigate the molecular mechanism of this class of drugs in a biologically relevant context. We find that the organization of DNA into nucleosomes effectively protects it against drug-mediated crosslinking, while permitting monoalkylation. This modification has the potential to lead to the formation of covalent crosslinks between chromatin and nuclear proteins. Using in vitro approaches, we found that interstrand crosslinking of free DNA results in a significant decrease in basal and activated transcription. Finally, crosslinked plasmid DNA is inefficiently assembled into chromatin. Our studies suggest pathways for the clinical effectiveness of this class of reagents.

  1. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Akira; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  2. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Akira, E-mail: onodera@pharm.kobegakuin.ac.jp [Department of Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Kawai, Yuichi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio [Department of Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  3. Alkylsilyl Peroxides as Alkylating Agents in the Copper-Catalyzed Selective Mono-N-Alkylation of Primary Amides and Arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryu; Sakurai, Shunya; Maruoka, Keiji

    2017-07-06

    The copper-catalyzed selective mono-N-alkylation of primary amides or arylamines using alkylsilyl peroxides as alkylating agents is reported. The reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions and exhibits a broad substrate scope with respect to the alkylsilyl peroxides, as well as to the primary amides and arylamines. Mechanistic studies suggest that the present reaction should proceed through a free-radical process that includes alkyl radicals generated from the alkylsilyl peroxides. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effect of radiation and alkylating agents on chromatin degradation in normal and malignant lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Yurashkova, V.; Ivannik, B.P.; Konov, A.V.; Drashil, V.

    1991-01-01

    Regularities of chromatin degradation in thymocytes and LS/BL tumor cells have been investigated. It has been shown that the rate of DNA degradation by Ca/Mg-dependent endonuclease in LS/BL tumor cells is 25 times lower than that in thymocytes, and radiation does not induce chormatin degradation. The alkylating agent TS 160 causes chromatin degradation in both LS/Bl cells and thymocytes. In contrast to radiation TS 160 inhibits the endogenous chromatin degradation by Ca/Mg-dependent endonuclease in thymocytes

  5. Hypoxia-Activated Alkylating Agents in BRCA1-Mutant Ovarian Serous Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Michael; Borad, Mitesh J; Bryce, Alan H

    2017-07-26

    Breast cancer 1 antigen (BRCA 1) and breast cancer 2 antigen (BRCA2) genes play a significant role in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair by means of interstrand crosslink repair, and deleterious germline mutations of these are responsible for most hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Therapeutic strategies which specifically target interstrand crosslink repair can therefore be helpful in patients with harmful mutations. We describe two patients with advanced ovarian cancer and deleterious BRCA1 mutations who were treated with TH-302, a hypoxia-activated alkylating agent.

  6. MGMT: key node in the battle against genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and apoptosis induced by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaina, Bernd; Christmann, Markus; Naumann, Steffen; Roos, Wynand P

    2007-08-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) plays a crucial role in the defense against alkylating agents that generate, among other lesions, O(6)-alkylguanine in DNA (collectively termed O(6)-alkylating agents [O(6)AA]). The defense is highly important, since O(6)AA are common environmental carcinogens, are formed endogenously during normal cellular metabolism and possibly inflammation, and are being used in cancer therapy. O(6)AA induced DNA damage is subject to repair, which is executed by MGMT, AlkB homologous proteins (ABH) and base excision repair (BER). Although this review focuses on MGMT, the mechanism of repair by ABH and BER will also be discussed. Experimental systems, in which MGMT has been modulated, revealed that O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)MeG) and O(6)-chloroethylguanine are major mutagenic, carcinogenic, recombinogenic, clastogenic and killing lesions. O(6)MeG-induced clastogenicity and cell death require MutS alpha-dependent mismatch repair (MMR), whereas O(6)-chloroethylguanine-induced killing occurs independently of MMR. Extensive DNA replication is required for O(6)MeG to provoke cytotoxicity. In MGMT depleted cells, O(6)MeG induces apoptosis almost exclusively, barely any necrosis, which is presumably due to the remarkable ability of secondarily formed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to trigger apoptosis via ATM/ATR, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and p73. Depending on the cellular background, O(6)MeG activates both the death receptor and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The inter-individual expression of MGMT in human lymphocytes is highly variable. Given the key role of MGMT in cellular defense, determination of MGMT activity could be useful for assessing a patient's drug sensitivity. MGMT is expressed at highly variable amounts in human tumors. In gliomas, a correlation was found between MGMT activity, MGMT promoter methylation and response to O(6)AA. Although the human MGMT gene is inducible by glucocorticoids and genotoxins such as radiation and

  7. Downregulation of hPMC2 imparts chemotherapeutic sensitivity to alkylating agents in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Nirmala; Liu, Lili; Xiong, Xiahui; Zhang, Junran; Montano, Monica M

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer cell lines have been reported to be resistant to the cyotoxic effects of temozolomide (TMZ). We have shown previously that a novel protein, human homolog of Xenopus gene which Prevents Mitotic Catastrophe (hPMC2) has a role in the repair of estrogen-induced abasic sites. Our present study provides evidence that downregulation of hPMC2 in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells treated with temozolomide (TMZ) decreases cell survival. This increased sensitivity to TMZ is associated with an increase in number of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in the DNA. We also show that treatment with another alkylating agent, BCNU, results in an increase in AP sites and decrease in cell survival. Quantification of western blot analyses and immunofluorescence experiments reveal that treatment of hPMC2 downregulated cells with TMZ results in an increase in γ-H2AX levels, suggesting an increase in double strand DNA breaks. The enhancement of DNA double strand breaks in TMZ treated cells upon downregulation of hPCM2 is also revealed by the comet assay. Overall, we provide evidence that downregulation of hPMC2 in breast cancer cells increases cytotoxicity of alkylating agents, representing a novel mechanism of treatment for breast cancer. Our data thus has important clinical implications in the management of breast cancer and brings forth potentially new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Antitumor activity of sequence-specific alkylating agents: pyrolle-imidazole CBI conjugates with indole linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sasaki, Shunta; Sakakibara, Yogo; Minoshima, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    DNA-targeting agents, including cisplatin, bleomycin and mitomycin C, are used routinely in cancer treatments. However, these drugs are extremely toxic, attacking normal cells and causing severe side effects. One important question to consider in designing anticancer agents is whether the introduction of sequence selectivity to DNA-targeting agents can improve their efficacy as anticancer agents. In the present study, the growth inhibition activities of an indole-seco 1,2,9,9a-tetrahydrocyclopropa[1,2-c]benz[1,2-e]indol-4-one (CBI) (1) and five conjugates with hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (2-6), which have different sequence specificities for DNA alkylation, were compared using 10 different cell lines. The average values of -log GI50 (50% growth inhibition concentration) for compounds 1-6 against the 10 cell lines were 8.33, 8.56, 8.29, 8.04, 8.23 and 8.83, showing that all of these compounds strongly inhibit cell growth. Interestingly, each alkylating agent caused significantly different growth inhibition patterns with each cell line. In particular, the correlation coefficients between the -log GI50 of compound 1 and its conjugates 2-6 showed extremely low values (Ralkylation lead to marked differences in biological activity. Comparison of the correlation coefficients between compounds 6 and 7, with the same sequence specificity as 6, and MS-247, with sequence specificity different from 6, when used against a panel of 37 human cancer cell lines further confirmed the above hypothesis.

  9. Antimitotic antitumor agents: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and biological characterization of N-aryl-N'-(2-chloroethyl)ureas as new selective alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounetou, E; Legault, J; Lacroix, J; C-Gaudreault, R

    2001-03-01

    A series of N-aryl-N'-(2-chloroethyl)ureas (CEUs) and derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against a wide panel of tumor cell lines. Systematic structure--activity relationship (SAR) studies indicated that: (i) a branched alkyl chain or a halogen at the 4-position of the phenyl ring or a fluorenyl/indanyl group, (ii) an exocyclic urea function, and (iii) a N'-2-chloroethyl moiety were required to ensure significant cytotoxicity. Biological experiments, such as immunofluorescence microscopy, confirmed that these promising compounds alter the cytoskeleton by inducing microtubule depolymerization via selective alkylation of beta-tubulin. Subsequent evaluations demonstrated that potent CEUs were weak alkylators, were non-DNA-damaging agents, and did not interact with the thiol function of either glutathione or glutathione reductase. Therefore, CEUs are part of a new class of antimitotic agents. Finally, among the series of CEUs evaluated, compounds 12, 15, 16, and 27 were selected for further in vivo trials.

  10. Overexpressed human metallothionein IIA gene protects Chinese hamster ovary cells from killing by alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaina, B.; Lohrer, H.; Karin, M.; Herrlich, P.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to detect survival advantages that cells gain by overexpressing metallothionein (MT). Chinese hamster ovary K1-2 cells and an x-ray-sensitive derivative were transfected with a bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-linked construct carrying the human metallothionein IIA (hMT-IIA) gene. Transfectants survived 40-fold higher levels of cadmium chloride, harbored at least 30 copies of hMT-IIA, and contained 25- to 166-fold more MT than the parent cells. Even under conditions of reduced glutathione synthesis, the transfectants were not more resistant to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and bleomycin than the parent cells. Thus free radicals generated by these agents cannot be scavenged efficiently by MT in vivo. The hMT-IIA transfectants, however, but not control transfectants harboring a BPV-MT promoter-neo construct, tolerated significantly higher doses of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Resistance and MT overexpression occurred irrespective of selection and cultivation in cadmium and zinc. There was no increase in resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and N-hydroxyethyl-N-chloroethylnitrosourea. MT did not affect the degree of overall DNA methylation after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea treatment nor the level of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The results suggest that MT participates as a cofactor or regulatory element in repair or tolerance of toxic alkylation lesions

  11. Overexpressed human metallothionein IIA gene protects Chinese hamster ovary cells from killing by alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaina, B.; Lohrer, H.; Karin, M.; Herrlich, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-04-01

    Experiments were designed to detect survival advantages that cells gain by overexpressing metallothionein (MT). Chinese hamster ovary K1-2 cells and an x-ray-sensitive derivative were transfected with a bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-linked construct carrying the human metallothionein IIA (hMT-IIA) gene. Transfectants survived 40-fold higher levels of cadmium chloride, harbored at least 30 copies of hMT-IIA, and contained 25- to 166-fold more MT than the parent cells. Even under conditions of reduced glutathione synthesis, the transfectants were not more resistant to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and bleomycin than the parent cells. Thus free radicals generated by these agents cannot be scavenged efficiently by MT in vivo. The hMT-IIA transfectants, however, but not control transfectants harboring a BPV-MT promoter-neo construct, tolerated significantly higher doses of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Resistance and MT overexpression occurred irrespective of selection and cultivation in cadmium and zinc. There was no increase in resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and N-hydroxyethyl-N-chloroethylnitrosourea. MT did not affect the degree of overall DNA methylation after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea treatment nor the level of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The results suggest that MT participates as a cofactor or regulatory element in repair or tolerance of toxic alkylation lesions.

  12. Overexpressed human metallothionein IIA gene protects Chinese hamster ovary cells from killing by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaina, B; Lohrer, H; Karin, M; Herrlich, P

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to detect survival advantages that cells gain by overexpressing metallothionein (MT). Chinese hamster ovary K1-2 cells and an x-ray-sensitive derivative were transfected with a bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-linked construct carrying the human metallothionein IIA (hMT-IIA) gene. Transfectants survived 40-fold higher levels of cadmium chloride, harbored at least 30 copies of hMT-IIA, and contained 25- to 166-fold more MT than the parent cells. Even under conditions of reduced glutathione synthesis, the transfectants were not more resistant to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and bleomycin than the parent cells. Thus free radicals generated by these agents cannot be scavenged efficiently by MT in vivo. The hMT-IIA transfectants, however, but not control transfectants harboring a BPV-MT promoter-neo construct, tolerated significantly higher doses of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Resistance and MT overexpression occurred irrespective of selection and cultivation in cadmium and zinc. There was no increase in resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and N-hydroxyethyl-N-chloroethylnitrosourea. MT did not affect the degree of overall DNA methylation after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea treatment nor the level of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The results suggest that MT participates as a cofactor or regulatory element in repair or tolerance of toxic alkylation lesions. Images PMID:2320583

  13. Kinetics of micronucleus induction and cytotoxicity caused by distinct antineoplastics and alkylating agents in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramírez, Pedro; Vallarino-Kelly, Teresita; Cruz-Vallejo, Virginia

    2014-01-30

    This mini-review aims to compare the differences in the kinetics of the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) and cytotoxicity by distinct antineoplastic and genotoxic agents in murine peripheral blood in vivo and to correlate these kinetics with the underlying processes. Comparisons were carried out using our previously obtained data with nominal doses causing similar levels of cytotoxicity, as measured in terms reduction of PCE. The aneuploidogens caused the most rapid induction of MN-PCEs and had the highest rates of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The promutagens cyclophosphamide and dimethylnitrosamine showed the most delayed responses and had the lowest genotoxic and cytotoxic efficiencies. DNA crosslinking agents had a similar delay of 4-5 h, greater than those of aneuploidogens, but differed in their cytotoxic and genotoxic efficiencies. Methylnitrosourea and 5-aza-cytidine caused greater delays than crosslinking agents. These delays can be due to the methylnitrosourea-mediated induction of formation of mono alkyl adducts which are interpreted as mismatches during DNA duplication, whereas 5-aza-cytidine requires incorporation into the DNA to induce breakage. This review allows us to conclude that the requirement for metabolic activation and the mechanisms of DNA breakage and of micronucleus induction are the main factors that affect the time of maximal MN-PCE induction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular signal for induction of the adaptive response to alkylating agents in E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, T.; Sedgwick, B.; Teo, I.; Kilpatrick, M.; McCarthy, T.; Hughes, S.

    1986-05-01

    Exposure of E. coli to simple alkylating agents such as methylnitrosourea causes the induction of at least three DNA repair functions, which are under the control of the ada gene. The intracellular signal for switching on the response has been identified as one of the two stereoisomers of methyl phosphotriesters generated in DNA by alkylation. The methyl group is transferred from the phosphotriester moiety to a specific cysteine residue within the regulatory Ada protein in a self-methylation reaction. This protein also corrects the mutagenic lesion O/sup 6/-methylguanine by transfer of its methyl group to a separate cysteine residue in the Ada protein. Methylation of the protein from repair of a DNA phosphotriester residue, but not from O/sup 6/-methylguanine, converts it to an activator of transcription of genes involved in the adaptive response. The activated form of the Ada protein enhances transcription by binding specifically to a sequence d(AAA--AAAGCGCA), located immediately upstream of the RNA polymerase binding site in relevant promoter regions.

  15. Sensitivity of HTB140 cell exposed to protons and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koricanac, L.; Petrovic, I.; Privitera, G.; Cuttone, G.; Ristic-Fira, A.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis due to resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimens. The mainstay of treatment remains DNA-alkylating agent dacarbazine (DTIC). Fotemustine (FM), chloroethylnitrosourea agent, also has demonstrated significant antitumoral effects in malignant melanoma. However, the resistance of melanoma cells limits their clinical application. In order to enhance the inhibition of melanoma cell growth, in this study, combined treatment of FM and DTIC with proton irradiation, was investigated. We analyzed the effects of combined treatment on HTB140 melanoma cell viability and proliferation. Significant inhibition of cell growth, especially cell proliferation, was obtained after treatment with protons and FM compare to single irradiation or drug treatment. Treatment with protons and DTIC has shown improved growth inhibition compare to appropriate single drug treatment, but not compare to irradiation as a single treatment. (author)

  16. Enhanced mutagenicity of low doses of alkylating agents and UV-light by inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, D.

    1986-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents and UV-light are potent inducers of gene mutations in mammalian cells. Most data on these agent are supporting the idea that 0/sup 6/-alkylguanine is the dominating lesion responsible for the mutations induced by the alkylating agents and thymine-dimers in the case of UV-light. However, little is known about the mutagenic fate of these lesions during the replicative process. This is an essential issue to investigate not the least because of quantitative aspects. By investigating the factors affecting the mutagenic yield of these lesions, they hope to get further information on the mechanisms(s) involved. To study this, a system was applied which involves synchronized V79 Chinese hamster cells and inhibitors of the replication process. By applying hydroxyurea (HU), as inhibitor of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) step in DNA synthesis, the effect of nucleotide pool imbalance has been studied at the HGPRT-locus using V79 Chinese hamster cells

  17. Detection and identification of alkylating agents by using a bioinspired "chemical nose".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Borzin, Elena; Gerchikov, Yulia; Tessler, Nir; Eichen, Yoav

    2009-10-12

    Alkylating agents are simple and reactive molecules that are commonly used in many and diverse fields such as organic synthesis, medicine, and agriculture. Some highly reactive alkylating species are also being used as blister chemical-warfare agents. The detection and identification of alkylating agents is not a trivial issue because of their high reactivity and simple structure. Herein, we report on a new multispot luminescence-based approach to the detection and identification of alkylating agents. In order to demonstrate the potential of the approach, seven pi-conjugated oligomers and polymers bearing nucleophilic pyridine groups, 1-7, were adsorbed onto a solid support and exposed to vapors of alkylators 8-15. The alkylation-induced color-shift patterns of the seven-spot array allow clear discrimination of the different alkylators. The spots are sensitive to minute concentrations of alkylators and, because the detection is based on the formation of new covalent bonds, these spots saturate at about 50 ppb.

  18. Acquisition of resistance to antitumor alkylating agent ACNU: a possible target of positron emission tomography monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Hideya [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita 010-0874 (Japan); Toyohara, Jun [Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Section, Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Kado, Hirotsugu [Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita 010-0874 (Japan); Nakagawa, Takao [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Takamatsu, Shinji [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Furukawa, Takako [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Kubota, Toshihiko [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)]. E-mail: yfuji@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp

    2006-01-15

    Early detection of tumor response to chemotherapy is of great importance for appropriate treatment of tumors. In this study, characteristics of two positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and[{sup 18}F]3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-thymidine (FLT), in the early detection of tumor cell response as well as tolerance development to chemotherapy was compared using rat C6 glioma cells and 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)-methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl) -3-nitrosoureahydrochloride (ACNU). ACNU is an alkylating agent known to induce drug resistance through expression of O {sup 6}-methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyl transferase (O {sup 6}-MGMT). We established an ACNU-resistant C6 glioma cell line (C6/ACNU) and investigated the effect of ACNU on the uptake of FLT and FDG. In C6 cells, DNA synthesis presented as [{sup 3}H]thymidine ([{sup 3}H]Thd) incorporation into DNA was quickly suppressed by ACNU. In C6/ACNU cells, the suppression was recovered promptly, indicating that DNA alkylation occurs initially but highly expressed O {sup 6}-MGMT repairs DNA, leading to the recovery of DNA synthesis. The patterns of FLT uptake in C6 and C6/ACNU were difficult to distinguish in the very early stage of the treatment, though it was reported that FLT uptake well correlated with proliferation in certain conditions. FDG uptake showed different patterns between the resistant and control cells, with significantly decreased uptake in C6 cells and unchanged uptake in C6/ACNU cells at 18-24 h after the treatment. Though difficult to be directly translated into clinical situation, the present study will provide a base to develop an appropriate protocol to assess tumor response to treatment by PET and to design effective treatment plans.

  19. Mutagenic effects of alkylating agents on prophage lambda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresler, S.; Kalinin, V.L.; Kuznetsova, L.V.

    1984-06-01

    An evaluation was made of the relative contribution of repair and reparative mechanisms to the mutagenic potency of several alkylating agents on thermoinducible prophage lambdacI857 ind/sup -/ in several stains of E. coli. Following treatment of lysogenic E. coli with the mutagens and heat induction, 0.02 N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) induced c mutations with a high frequency (ca. 10%) in both wild type E. coli and cells with repair mutations (recA13, lexA102, uvrA6, umuC36, xthA9, recF143, polA1, uvrD3, uvrD502). It appears that NUM-induced mutations are stabilized as replicative errors due to mismatched, altered bases. Delay in induction following exposure to NMU improves prophage survival and diminishes c mutant formation, regardless of the E. coli genotype. Evidently, carbamoylation is not involved in NMU mutagenicity since 0.02 M KNCO is nonmutagenic and is virtually without effect on prophage viability. Replicative mechanisms are also involved in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (15%) and ethyl methanesulfonate (2%) induced mutations, since the maximum yield of mutants was independent of recA/sup +/ genotype. However, the mutagenicity of methyl methanesulfonate was abolished by the recA mutation, indicating that the mutagenicity of this agent is repair-dependent. Mitomycin C (0.1%) and acridine mustard (0.3%) induce c mutations regardless of recA/sup +/ and, therefore, appear to do so by intercalation. 26 references, 6 figures.

  20. Non-random alkylation of DNA sequences induced in vivo by chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M.; Geri, C.; Bonatti, S.; Parenti, R. (Universita di Pisa (Italy))

    1989-08-01

    Previous studies of the interaction of alkylating agents on the eukaryotic genome support the idea that induction of DNA adducts is at specific genomic sites. Here we show molecular and cytological evidence that alkylation is rather specific. Mammalian cell cultures were exposed to different doses of mutagens and the DNA was analyzed by density gradient ultracentrifugation, hydroxylapatite fractionation, and by restriction enzyme analysis. Studies with the labelled mutagens N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine show that there is a non-random distribution of the adducts. The adducts are found more frequently in A-T, G-C rich satellite DNA and highly repetitive sequences. Analysis with restriction enzymes shows that both methyl and ethyl groups influence the restriction patterns of the enzymes HpaII and MspI that recognize specific endogenous DNA methylation. These data suggest, as a subsequent mechanism, a modification in the pattern of the normal endogenous methylation of 5-methylcytosine.

  1. Evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents as potential synthons for the labeling of oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vroegh, J; Elsinga, PH; Vaalburg, W

    Six fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents were selected as potentially suitable synthons for the labeling of antisense oligonucleotides. The selected synthons were evaluated in a model reaction with the monomer adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate. Of these synthons,

  2. The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two DNA methyltransferases for inducible repair of DNA alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyi; Aamodt, Randi M; Dalhus, Bjørn; Balasingham, Seetha; Helle, Ina; Andersen, Pernille; Tønjum, Tone; Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-06-10

    The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which encodes a composite protein of AdaA and AlkA and a separate AdaB/Ogt protein, was characterized. M. tuberculosis treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced transcription of the adaA-alkA and adaB genes, suggesting that M. tuberculosis mount an inducible response to methylating agents. Survival assays of the methyltransferase defective Escherichia coli mutant KT233 (ada ogt), showed that expression of the adaB gene rescued the alkylation sensitivity. Further, adaB but not adaA-alkA complemented the hypermutator phenotype of KT233. Purified AdaA-AlkA and AdaB possessed methyltransferase activity. These data suggested that AdaB counteract the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of O(6)-methylguanine, while AdaA-AlkA most likely transfers methyl groups from innocuous methylphosphotriesters. AdaA-AlkA did not possess alkylbase DNA glycosylase activity nor rescue the alkylation sensitivity of the E. coli mutant BK2118 (tag alkA). We propose that AdaA-AlkA is a positive regulator of the adaptive response in M. tuberculosis. It thus appears that the ada operon of M. tuberculosis suppresses the mutagenic effect of alkylation but not the cytotoxic effect of lesions such as 3-methylpurines. Collectively, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis hypermutator strains with defective adaptive response genes might sustain robustness to cytotoxic alkylation DNA damage and confer a selective advantage contributing to host adaptation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of promoter/enhancer region haplotypes on MGMT transcriptional regulation: a potential biomarker for human sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meixiang; Nekhayeva, Ilona; Cross, Courtney E; Rondelli, Catherine M; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2014-03-01

    The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) encodes the direct reversal DNA repair protein that removes alkyl adducts from the O6 position of guanine. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exist in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region. However, the haplotype structure encompassing these SNPs and their functional/biological significance are currently unknown. We hypothesized that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT transcription and can thus alter human sensitivity to alkylating agents. To identify the haplotype structure encompassing the MGMT P/E region SNPs, we sequenced 104 DNA samples from healthy individuals and inferred the haplotypes using the data generated. We identified eight SNPs in this region, namely T7C (rs180989103), T135G (rs1711646), G290A (rs61859810), C485A (rs1625649), C575A (rs113813075), G666A (rs34180180), C777A (rs34138162) and C1099T (rs16906252). Phylogenetics and Sequence Evolution analysis predicted 21 potential haplotypes that encompass these SNPs ranging in frequencies from 0.000048 to 0.39. Of these, 10 were identified in our study population as 20 paired haplotype combinations. To determine the functional significance of these haplotypes, luciferase reporter constructs representing these haplotypes were transfected into glioblastoma cells and their effect on MGMT promoter activity was determined. Compared with the most common (reference) haplotype 1, seven haplotypes significantly upregulated MGMT promoter activity (18-119% increase; P alkylating agents.

  4. Ovarian reserve after treatment with alkylating agents during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Teinturier, Cécile; Allodji, Rodrigue Sétchéou; Svetlova, Ekaterina; Frey, Marie-Alix; Oberlin, Odile; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Epelboin, Sylvie; Decanter, Christine; Pacquement, Helene; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Sudour-Bonnange, Helene; Baruchel, André; Lahlou, Najiba; De Vathaire, Florent

    2015-06-01

    What is the effect of different alkylating agents used without pelvic radiation to treat childhood cancer in girls on the ovarian reserve in survivors? Ovarian reserve seems to be particularly reduced in survivors who received procarbazine (in most cases for Hodgkin lymphoma) or high-dose chemotherapy; procarbazine but not cyclophosphamide dose is associated with diminished ovarian reserve. A few studies have demonstrated diminished ovarian reserve in survivors after various combination therapies, but the individual role of each treatment is difficult to assess. Prospective cross-sectional study, involving 105 survivors and 20 controls. One hundred and five survivors aged 17-40 years and 20 controls investigated on Days 2-5 of a menstrual cycle or Day 7 of an oral contraceptive pill-free interval. ovarian surface area (OS), total number of antral follicles (AFC), serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH). Survivors had a lower OS than controls: 3.5 versus 4.4 cm(2) per ovary (P = 0.0004), and lower AMH levels: 10.7 versus 22 pmol/l (P = 0.003). Ovarian markers (OS, AMH, AFC) were worse in patients who received high-dose compared with conventional-dose alkylating agents (P = 0.01 for OS, P = 0.002 for AMH, P < 0.0001 for AFC). Hodgkin lymphoma survivors seemed to have a greater reduction in ovarian reserve than survivors of leukaemia (P = 0.04 for AMH, P = 0.01 for AFC), sarcoma (P = 0.04 for AMH, P = 0.04 for AFC) and other lymphomas (P = 0.04 for AFC). A multiple linear regression analysis showed that procarbazine but not cyclophosphamide nor ifosfamide dose was associated with reduced OS (P = 0.0003), AFC (P = 0.0007), AMH (P < 0.0001) and higher FSH levels (P < 0.0001). The small percentage of participating survivors (28%) from the total cohort does not allow conclusion on fertility issues because of possible response bias. The association between procarbazine and HL makes it

  5. In vitro susceptibilities in lymphocytes from mothers and cord blood to the monofunctional alkylating agent EMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyatt, N P; Falque-Gonzalez, C; Farrar, D

    2007-01-01

    at the Bradford Royal Infirmary collected venous blood samples from mothers at the time of birth and venous cord blood post-delivery. Lymphocytes were isolated from both blood types and examined in the alkaline comet assay using the monofunctional alkylating agent ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS). There were...... no biologically significant differences when subjects were categorized into subgroups based on lifestyle habits and physical characteristics, and overall there were no statistically significant differences in levels of DNA damage in mothers (n=22) and babies (n=22), except at the basal level (P... values in babies were always lower over the EMS dose range. Whole blood was used in the micronucleus (MN) assay, and there was a significantly (Prate of MN in mothers (n=17), per 1000 binucleates, as compared with lymphocytes from their offspring (n=17) at the basal level. This may...

  6. Automated synthesis of an {sup 18}F-labelled pyridine-based alkylating agent for high yield oligonucleotide conjugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Sader, Jayden A.; Wilson, John S.; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Koslowsky, Ingrid; Wuest, Frank [Edmonton PET Centre, Division of Oncologic Imaging, Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Mercer, John R. [Edmonton PET Centre, Division of Oncologic Imaging, Department of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada)], E-mail: johnmerc@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2009-09-15

    Alkylating agents have been shown to be very promising for the radiolabelling of oligonucleotides with fluorine-18. In this report we describe the fully automated synthesis of 2-bromo-N-[3-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoropyridin-3-yloxy)propyl]acetamide ([{sup 18}F]FPyBrA) utilizing a modular synthesis unit. Reaction conditions for the coupling of this pyridine-based alkylating agent at the 5' end of a fully phosphorothioated random 20-mer DNA sequence were optimized to achieve very high radiochemical yields (>90%) and a maximum specific activity of 5-6 GBq/{mu}moL. The potential for rapid purification by solid phase extraction without need of chromatographic isolation of the radiolabelled oligonucleotide presents an overall benefit for the application of oligonucleotides in preclinical studies and potential clinical applications.

  7. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  8. Role of gene 59 of bacteriophage T4 in repair of uv-irradiated and alkylated DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Wu, J.L.; Yeh, Y.C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonsense mutants in gene 59 (amC5, am HL628) were used to study the role of this gene in the repair of uv-damaged and alkylated DNA of bacteriophage T4 in vivo. The higher sensitivity to uv irradiation and alkylation of gene 59 mutants after exposure to these agents was established by a comparison of the survival fractions with wild type. Zonal centrifugal analysis of both parental and nascent mutant intracellular DNA molecules after uv irradiation showed that immediately after exposure the size of single-stranded DNA fragments was the same as the wild-type intracellular DNA. However, the capability of rejoining fragmented intracellular DNA was greatly reduced in the mutant. In contrast, the wild-type-infected cells under the same condition resumed DNA replication and repaired its DNA to normal size. Methyl methanesulfonate induced more randomly fragmented intracellular DNA, when compared to uv irradiation. The rate of rejoining under these conditions as judged from their sedimentation profiles was also greatly reduced in mutant-infected cells. Further evidence is presented that uv repair is not a simple consequence of arrested DNA replication, which is a phenotype of the mutant when infected in a nonpermissive host, Escherichia coli B(su - ), but rather that the DNA repair function of gene 59 is independent of the replication function. These and other data presented indicate that a product(s) of gene 59 is essential for both repair of uv lesions and repair of alkylation damage of DNA in vivo. It is suggested that gene 59 may have two functions during viral development: DNA replication and replication repair of DNA molecules

  9. The Impact of Commonly Used Alkylating Agents on Artifactual Peptide Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains, Peter G; Robinson, Phillip J

    2017-09-01

    Iodoacetamide is by far the most commonly used agent for alkylation of cysteine during sample preparation for proteomics. An alternative, 2-chloroacetamide, has recently been suggested to reduce the alkylation of residues other than cysteine, such as the N-terminus, Asp, Glu, Lys, Ser, Thr, and Tyr. Here we show that although 2-chloroacetamide reduces the level of off-target alkylation, it exhibits a range of adverse effects. The most significant of these is methionine oxidation, which increases to a maximum of 40% of all Met-containing peptides, compared with 2-5% with iodoacetamide. Increases were also observed for mono- and dioxidized tryptophan. No additional differences between the alkylating reagents were observed for a range of other post-translational modifications and digestion parameters. The deleterious effects were observed for 2-chloroacetamide from three separate suppliers. The adverse impact of 2-chloroacetamide on methionine oxidation suggests that it is not the ideal alkylating reagent for proteomics.

  10. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. The adaptive response of E. coli to low levels of alkylating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.; Defais, M.; Samson, L.; Schendel, P.

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to characterise which gene products may be involved in the repair system induced in E. coli by growth on low levels of alkylating agent (the adaptive response) we have analysed mutants deficient in other known pathways of DNA repair for the ability to adapt to MNNG. Adaptive resistance to the killing effects of MNNG seems to require a functional DNA polymerase I whereas resistance to the mutagenic effects can occur in polymerase I deficient strains; similarly killing adaptation could not be observed in a dam3 mutant, which was nonetheless able to show mutational adaptation. These results suggest that these two parts of the adaptive response must, at least to some extent, be separable. Both adaptive responses can be seen in the absence of uvrD + uvrE + -dependent mismatch repair, DNA polymerase II activity, or recF-mediated recombination and they are not affected by decreased levels of adenyl cyclase. The data presented support our earlier conclusion that adaptive resistance to the killing and mutagenic effect of MNNG is the result of previously uncharacterised repair pathways. (orig.) [de

  12. Stimulatory and protective effects of alkylating agents applied in ultra-low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhalsky, A L; Shmarina, G V

    2001-01-01

    Alkylating drugs belonging to the nitrogen mustard family are known as cytostatic and immunosuppressive agents. Ultra-low doses of these drugs may demonstrate pharmacological effects unlike this category of drugs. In the case of a gradual dose decrease, the number of targets for alkylation is also reduced and the drug switches from cytostatic to cell growth modifier. We postulate that application of ultra-low doses of alkylating drugs may result in a beneficial effect in the therapy of diseases associated with chronic inflammation of the mucosa, especially with the signs of epithelial atrophy. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. The clinical pharmacology of alkylating agents in high-dose chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, A. D.; Smits, K. D.; Mathôt, R. A.; Schellens, J. H.; Rodenhuis, S.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used in high-dose chemotherapy regimens in combination with hematological support. Knowledge about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents administered in high doses is critical for the safe and efficient use of these regimens. The aim of this review is

  14. Effects of alkylating agents on dopamine D(3) receptors in rat brain: selective protection by dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K; Weiss, N T; Tarazi, F I; Kula, N S; Baldessarini, R J

    1999-11-13

    Dopamine D(3) receptors are structurally highly homologous to other D(2)-like dopamine receptors, but differ from them pharmacologically. D(3) receptors are notably resistant to alkylation by 1-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ), which readily alkylates D(2) receptors. We compared EEDQ with N-(p-isothiocyanatophenethyl)spiperone (NIPS), a selective D(2)-like receptor alkylating agent, for effects on D(3) and D(2) receptors in rat brain using autoradiographic analysis. Neither agent occluded D(3) receptors in vivo at doses that produced substantial blockade of D(2) receptors, even after catecholamine-depleting pretreatments. In vitro, however, D(3) receptors were readily alkylated by both NIPS (IC(50)=40 nM) and EEDQ (IC(50)=12 microM). These effects on D(3) sites were blocked by nM concentrations of dopamine, whereas microM concentrations were required to protect D(2) receptors from the alkylating agents. The findings are consistent with the view that alkylation of D(3) receptors in vivo is prevented by its high affinity for even minor concentrations of endogenous dopamine.

  15. Selective alkylation of T–T mismatched DNA using vinyldiaminotriazine–acridine conjugate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Usami, Akira; Yamaoki, Yudai; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Hazemi, Madoka E; Chikuni, Tomoko; Sato, Norihiro; Sasaki, Kaname; Katahira, Masato

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The alkylation of the specific higher-order nucleic acid structures is of great significance in order to control its function and gene expression. In this report, we have described the T–T mismatch selective alkylation with a vinyldiaminotriazine (VDAT)–acridine conjugate. The alkylation selectively proceeded at the N3 position of thymidine on the T–T mismatch. Interestingly, the alkylated thymidine induced base flipping of the complementary base in the duplex. In a model experiment for the alkylation of the CTG repeats DNA which causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the observed reaction rate for one alkylation increased in proportion to the number of T–T mismatches. In addition, we showed that primer extension reactions with DNA polymerase and transcription with RNA polymerase were stopped by the alkylation. The alkylation of the repeat DNA will efficiently work for the inhibition of replication and transcription reactions. These functions of the VDAT–acridine conjugate would be useful as a new biochemical tool for the study of CTG repeats and may provide a new strategy for the molecular therapy of DM1. PMID:29309639

  16. Selective alkylation of T-T mismatched DNA using vinyldiaminotriazine-acridine conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Usami, Akira; Yamaoki, Yudai; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Hazemi, Madoka E; Chikuni, Tomoko; Sato, Norihiro; Sasaki, Kaname; Katahira, Masato; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2018-02-16

    The alkylation of the specific higher-order nucleic acid structures is of great significance in order to control its function and gene expression. In this report, we have described the T-T mismatch selective alkylation with a vinyldiaminotriazine (VDAT)-acridine conjugate. The alkylation selectively proceeded at the N3 position of thymidine on the T-T mismatch. Interestingly, the alkylated thymidine induced base flipping of the complementary base in the duplex. In a model experiment for the alkylation of the CTG repeats DNA which causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the observed reaction rate for one alkylation increased in proportion to the number of T-T mismatches. In addition, we showed that primer extension reactions with DNA polymerase and transcription with RNA polymerase were stopped by the alkylation. The alkylation of the repeat DNA will efficiently work for the inhibition of replication and transcription reactions. These functions of the VDAT-acridine conjugate would be useful as a new biochemical tool for the study of CTG repeats and may provide a new strategy for the molecular therapy of DM1.

  17. DNA alkylation damage as a sensor of nitrosative stress in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Durbach, S I; Springer, B; Machowski, E E; North, R J; Papavinasasundaram, K G; Colston, M J; Böttger, E C; Mizrahi, V

    2003-01-01

    One of the cellular consequences of nitrosative stress is alkylation damage to DNA. To assess whether nitrosative stress is registered on the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mutants lacking an alkylation damage repair and reversal operon were constructed. Although hypersensitive to the genotoxic effects of N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in vitro, the mutants displayed no phenotype in vivo, suggesting that permeation of nitrosative stress to the level of cytotoxic DNA damage is res...

  18. E. coli mismatch repair enhances AT-to-GC mutagenesis caused by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kota; Yamada, Yoko; Takahashi, Eizo; Arimoto, Sakae; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Negishi, Kazuo; Negishi, Tomoe

    2017-03-01

    Alkylating agents are known to induce the formation of O 6 -alkylguanine (O 6 -alkG) and O 4 -alkylthymine (O 4 -alkT) in DNA. These lesions have been widely investigated as major sources of mutations. We previously showed that mismatch repair (MMR) facilitates the suppression of GC-to-AT mutations caused by O 6 -methylguanine more efficiently than the suppression of GC-to-AT mutations caused by O 6 -ethylguanine. However, the manner by which O 4 -alkyT lesions are repaired remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the repair pathway involved in the repair of O 4 -alkT. The E. coli CC106 strain, which harbors Δprolac in its genomic DNA and carries the F'CC106 episome, can be used to detect AT-to-GC reverse-mutation of the gene encoding β-galactosidase. Such AT-to-GC mutations should be induced through the formation of O 4 -alkT at AT base pairs. As expected, an O 6 -alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) -deficient CC106 strain, which is defective in both ada and agt genes, exhibited elevated mutant frequencies in the presence of methylating agents and ethylating agents. However, in the UvrA-deficient strain, the methylating agents were less mutagenic than in wild-type, while ethylating agents were more mutagenic than in wild-type, as observed with agents that induce O 6 -alkylguanine modifications. Unexpectedly, the mutant frequencies decreased in a MutS-deficient strain, and a similar tendency was observed in MutL- or MutH-deficient strains. Thus, MMR appears to promote mutation at AT base pairs. Similar results were obtained in experiments employing double-mutant strains harboring defects in both MMR and AGT, or MMR and NER. E. coli MMR enhances AT-to-GC mutagenesis, such as that caused by O 4 -alkylthymine. We hypothesize that the MutS protein recognizes the O 4 -alkT:A base pair more efficiently than O 4 -alkT:G. Such a distinction would result in misincorporation of G at the O 4 -alkT site, followed by higher mutation frequencies in wild

  19. Depletion of mammalian O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity by O6-benzylguanine provides a means to evaluate the role of this protein in protection against carcinogenic and therapeutic alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, M.E.; Pegg, A.E.; Moschel, R.

    1990-01-01

    O 6 -Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase was rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by exposure to O 6 -benzylguanine or the p-chlorobenzyl and p-methylbenzyl analogues. This inactivation was much more rapid than with O 6 -methylguanine: incubation with 2.5 μM O 6 -benzylguanine led to more than a 90% loss of activity within 10 min, whereas 0.2 mM O 6 -methylguanine for 60 min was required for the same reduction. O 6 -Benzylguanine was highly effective in depleting the alkyltransferase activity of cultured human colon tumor (HT29) cells. Complete loss of activity was produced within 15 min after addition of O 6 -benzylguanine to the culture medium and a maximal effect was obtained with 5 μM. In contrast, at least 100 μM O 6 -methylguanine for 4 hr was needed to get a maximal effect, and this reduced the alkyltransferase by only 80%. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with 10 μM O 6 -benzylguanine for 2 hr led to a dramatic increase in the cytotoxicity produced by the chemotherapeutic agents 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) or 2-chloroethyl(methylsulfonyl)methanesulfonate (Clomesone). Administration of O 6 -benzylguanine to mice at a dose of 10 mg/kg reduced alkyltransferase levels by more than 95% in both liver and kidney. These results indicate that depletion of the alkyltransferase by O 6 -benzylguanine may be used to investigate the role of the DNA repair protein in carcinogenesis and mutagensis and that this treatment may be valuable to increase the chemotherapeutic effectiveness of chloroethylating agents

  20. Effect O6-Guanine Alkylation on DNA Flexibility Studied by Comparative Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kara, M.; Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip; Zacharias, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 1 (2015), s. 23-32 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21893S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA alkylation * DNA repair * molecular simulation * molecular dynamics simulation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.248, year: 2015

  1. Combination of Bifunctional Alkylating Agent and Arsenic Trioxide Synergistically Suppresses the Growth of Drug-Resistant Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chih Lee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is a crucial factor in the failure of cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we explored the effect of combining alkylating agents and arsenic trioxide (ATO on the suppression of tumor cells with inherited or acquired resistance to therapeutic agents. Our results showed that combining ATO and a synthetic derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indenes (BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating agent causing DNA interstrand cross-links, was more effective in killing human cancer cell lines (H460, H1299, and PC3 than combining ATO and melphalan or thiotepa. We further demonstrated that the combination treatment of H460 cells with BO-1012 and ATO resulted in severe G2/M arrest and apoptosis. In a xenograft mouse model, the combination treatment with BO-1012 and ATO synergistically reduced tumor volumes in nude mice inoculated with H460 cells. Similarly, the combination of BO-1012 and ATO effectively reduced the growth of cisplatin-resistant NTUB1/P human bladder carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the repair of BO-1012-induced DNA interstrand cross-links was significantly inhibited by ATO, and consequently, γH2AX was remarkably increased and formed nuclear foci in H460 cells treated with this drug combination. In addition, Rad51 was activated by translocating and forming foci in nuclei on treatment with BO-1012, whereas its activation was significantly suppressed by ATO. We further revealed that ATO might mediate through the suppression of AKT activity to inactivate Rad51. Taken together, the present study reveals that a combination of bifunctional alkylating agents and ATO may be a rational strategy for treating cancers with inherited or acquired drug resistance.

  2. A Theoretical Study of the Mechanism of the Alkylation of Guanine by N- Nitroso Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    these chemical agents alkylate DNA, but, as yet, the precise mechanism is unknown. What is known is that the result is a DNA-mutagen adduct with an alkyl ... nitrosoureas , Singer et. al. found that about 25% of the alkylation caused by MNU was on the DNA phospate backbone while, for ENU, phosphate...sites. 1.3 Mutagenicity of N-Nitroso Compounds In early experimental work with agents which alkylate DNA, comparisons of ultraviolet absorption

  3. Effect of green juice and their bioactive compounds on genotoxicity induced by alkylating agents in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Gabriela Elibio; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Borges, Gabriela Daminelli; Teixeira, Karina Oliveira; Jesus, Maiellen Martins; Daumann, Francine; Ramlov, Fernanda; Carvalho, Tiago; Leffa, Daniela Dimer; Rohr, Paula; Moraes De Andrade, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Kale juice (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala D.C.) is a reliable source of dietary carotenoids and typically contains the highest concentrations of lutein (LT) and beta-carotene (BC) among green leafy vegetables. As a result of their antioxidant properties, dietary carotenoids are postulated to decrease the risk of disease occurrence, particularly certain cancers. The present study aimed to (1) examine the genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of natural and commercially available juices derived from Brassica oleracea and (2) assess influence of LT or BC against DNA damage induced by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MS) or cyclophosphamide (CP) in vivo in mice. Male Swiss mice were divided into groups of 6 animals, which were treated with water, natural, or commercial Brassica oleraceae juices (kale), LT, BC, MMS, or CP. After treatment, DNA damage was determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the comet assay. Results demonstrated that none of the Brassica oleraceae juices or carotenoids produced genotoxic effects. In all examined cell types, kale juices or carotenoids inhibited DNA damage induced by MMS or CP administered either pre- or posttreatment by 50 and 20%, respectively. Under our experimental conditions, kale leaf juices alone exerted no marked genotoxic or clastogenic effects. However, a significant decrease in DNA damage induced by MMS or CP was noted. This effect was most pronounced in groups that received juices, rather than carotenoids, suggesting that the synergy among constituents present in the food matrix may be more beneficial than the action of single compounds. Data suggest that the antigenotoxic properties of kale juices may be of therapeutic importance.

  4. Noncovalent DNA Binding Drives DNA Alkylation by Leinamycin. Evidence That the Z,E-5-(Thiazol-4-yl)-penta-2,4-dienone Moiety of the Natural Product Serves As An Atypical DNA Intercalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekry, Mostafa I.; Szekely, Jozsef; Dutta, Sanjay; Breydo, Leonid; Zang, Hong; Gates, Kent S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition and chemical modification of DNA are important in medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and biotechnology. Historically, natural products have revealed many interesting and unexpected mechanisms for noncovalent DNA binding and covalent DNA modification. The studies reported here characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficient alkylation of duplex DNA by the Streptomyces-derived natural product leinamycin. Previous studies suggested that alkylation of duplex DNA by activated leinamycin (2) is driven by noncovalent association of the natural product with the double helix. This is striking because leinamycin does not contain a classical noncovalent DNA-binding motif such as an intercalating unit, a groove binder, or a polycation. The experiments described here provide evidence that leinamycin is an atypical DNA-intercalating agent. A competition binding assay involving daunomycin-mediated inhibition of DNA alkylation by leinamycin provided evidence that activated leinamycin binds to duplex DNA with an apparent binding constant of approximately 4.3 ± 0.4 × 103 M−1. Activated leinamycin caused duplex unwinding and hydrodynamic changes in DNA-containing solutions that are indicative of DNA intercalation. Characterization of the reaction of activated leinamycin with palindromic duplexes containing 5'-CG and 5'-GC target sites, bulge-containing duplexes, and 5-methylcytosine-containing duplexes provided evidence regarding the orientation of leinamycin with respect to target guanine residues. The data allows construction of a model for the leinamycin-DNA complex suggesting how a modest DNA-binding constant combines with proper positioning of the natural product to drive efficient alkylation of guanine residues in the major groove of duplex DNA. PMID:21954957

  5. Fractionated dose studies with X-rays and various alkylating agents in P388 mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionated dose technique has been used in P388F cells to examine the effects of X-rays and four alkylating agents on survival and induction of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IudR) resistant variants. Fractionation intervals up to 5 1/2 h were used for X-rays and for the alkylating agents up to 192 h. Fractionation of the X-ray dose resulted in a sparing effect for survival and variant induction. A sparing effect was also observed for survival after treatment with alkylating agents. However, variant frequencies were observed as large as or greater than those produced by the full doses of alkylating agents. For such agents this would suggest that survival and variant induction are independent events. Differences in the effects of X-rays and alkylating agents cannot be explained by differences in growth rate or the recovery of viability after treatment

  6. Fractionated dose studies with X-rays and various alkylating agents in P388 mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionated dose technique was used in P388F cells to examine the effects of X-rays and four alkylating agents on survival and induction of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IudR) resistant variants. Fractionation intervals up to 51/2 h were used for X-rays and for the alkylating agents up to 192 h. Fractionation of the X-ray dose resulted in a sparing effect for survival and variant induction. A sparing effect was also observed for survival after treatment with alkylating agents. However, variant frequencies were observed as large as or greater than those produced by the full doses of alkylating agents. For such agents this would suggest that survival and variant induction are independent events. Differences in the effects of X-rays and alkylating agents cannot be explained by differences in growth rate or the recovery of viability after treatment. (author)

  7. Hybrid ligand-alkylating agents targeting telomeric G-quadruplex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Filippo; Nadai, Matteo; Folini, Marco; Di Antonio, Marco; Germani, Luca; Percivalle, Claudia; Sissi, Claudia; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Alcaro, Stefano; Artese, Anna; Richter, Sara N; Freccero, Mauro

    2012-04-14

    The synthesis, physico-chemical properties and biological effects of a new class of naphthalene diimides (NDIs) capable of reversibly binding telomeric DNA and alkylate it through an electrophilic quinone methide moiety (QM), are reported. FRET and circular dichroism assays showed a marked stabilization and selectivity towards telomeric G4 DNA folded in a hybrid topology. NDI-QMs' alkylating properties revealed a good reactivity on single nucleosides and selectivity towards telomeric G4. A selected NDI was able to significantly impair the growth of melanoma cells by causing telomere dysfunction and down-regulation of telomerase expression. These findings points to our hybrid ligand-alkylating NDIs as possible tools for the development of novel targeted anticancer therapies. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  8. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein.

  9. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  10. [Variability of the sensitivity of human lymphocytes to the antiproliferative action of alkylating agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veremko, L N; Telegin, L Iu; Pevnitskii, L A

    1983-05-01

    A study was made of variability of the sensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from different donors to an antiproliferative action of cyclophosphamide and thiophosphamide. A similar degree of the sensitivity was revealed to alkylating agents differing in the action mode, with this degree being independent of the "stimulation index" magnitude.

  11. Time course evaluation of N-nitrosodialkylamines-induced DNA alkylation and oxidation in liver of mosquito fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, M.-R.; Chang, Y.-Z.; Wong, R.-H.; Hu, C.-W.

    2009-01-01

    Here we simultaneously measured N7-alkylguanines and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in liver of small fish, respectively, to assess the time course of the formation and removal of alkylation and oxidative damage to DNA caused by N-nitrosodialkylamines. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) were killed at various times during (4 days) and post-exposure (16 days) to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) alone or their combination with concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/l. The modified guanine adducts were sensitively and selectively quantitated by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. During exposure, N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) in liver DNA increased with the duration and dose of N-nitrosodialkylamine exposure, while 8-oxodG was dose-dependently induced within 1 day. It was found that NDMA formed substantially more N7-alkylated guanines and 8-oxodG than NDEA on the basis of adducts formed per micromolar concentration, suggesting that NDMA can be more easily bioactivated than NDEA to form reactive alkylating agents with the concomitant formation of oxygen radicals. After cessation of exposure, N7-alkylguanines remained elevated for 1 day and then gradually decreased over time but still higher than the background levels, even at day 16 (half-lives of 7-8 days). However, 8-oxodG was excised quickly from liver DNA and returned to the background level within 4 days post-exposure (half-lives less than 2 days). Taken together, this study firstly demonstrated that in addition to alkylation, N-nitrosodialkylamines can concurrently cause oxidative damage to DNA in vivo

  12. Time course evaluation of N-nitrosodialkylamines-induced DNA alkylation and oxidation in liver of mosquito fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M -R [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y -Z [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wong, R -H [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-W. [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: windyhu@csmu.edu.tw

    2009-01-15

    Here we simultaneously measured N7-alkylguanines and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in liver of small fish, respectively, to assess the time course of the formation and removal of alkylation and oxidative damage to DNA caused by N-nitrosodialkylamines. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) were killed at various times during (4 days) and post-exposure (16 days) to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) alone or their combination with concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/l. The modified guanine adducts were sensitively and selectively quantitated by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. During exposure, N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) in liver DNA increased with the duration and dose of N-nitrosodialkylamine exposure, while 8-oxodG was dose-dependently induced within 1 day. It was found that NDMA formed substantially more N7-alkylated guanines and 8-oxodG than NDEA on the basis of adducts formed per micromolar concentration, suggesting that NDMA can be more easily bioactivated than NDEA to form reactive alkylating agents with the concomitant formation of oxygen radicals. After cessation of exposure, N7-alkylguanines remained elevated for 1 day and then gradually decreased over time but still higher than the background levels, even at day 16 (half-lives of 7-8 days). However, 8-oxodG was excised quickly from liver DNA and returned to the background level within 4 days post-exposure (half-lives less than 2 days). Taken together, this study firstly demonstrated that in addition to alkylation, N-nitrosodialkylamines can concurrently cause oxidative damage to DNA in vivo.

  13. Time course evaluation of N-nitrosodialkylamines-induced DNA alkylation and oxidation in liver of mosquito fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M.-R. [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y.-Z. [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wong, R.-H. [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-W. [Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: windyhu@csmu.edu.tw

    2009-01-15

    Here we simultaneously measured N7-alkylguanines and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in liver of small fish, respectively, to assess the time course of the formation and removal of alkylation and oxidative damage to DNA caused by N-nitrosodialkylamines. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) were killed at various times during (4 days) and post-exposure (16 days) to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) alone or their combination with concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/l. The modified guanine adducts were sensitively and selectively quantitated by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. During exposure, N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) in liver DNA increased with the duration and dose of N-nitrosodialkylamine exposure, while 8-oxodG was dose-dependently induced within 1 day. It was found that NDMA formed substantially more N7-alkylated guanines and 8-oxodG than NDEA on the basis of adducts formed per micromolar concentration, suggesting that NDMA can be more easily bioactivated than NDEA to form reactive alkylating agents with the concomitant formation of oxygen radicals. After cessation of exposure, N7-alkylguanines remained elevated for 1 day and then gradually decreased over time but still higher than the background levels, even at day 16 (half-lives of 7-8 days). However, 8-oxodG was excised quickly from liver DNA and returned to the background level within 4 days post-exposure (half-lives less than 2 days). Taken together, this study firstly demonstrated that in addition to alkylation, N-nitrosodialkylamines can concurrently cause oxidative damage to DNA in vivo.

  14. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barault, L; Amatu, A; Bleeker, F E; Moutinho, C; Falcomatà, C; Fiano, V; Cassingena, A; Siravegna, G; Milione, M; Cassoni, P; De Braud, F; Rudà, R; Soffietti, R; Venesio, T; Bardelli, A; Wesseling, P; de Witt Hamer, P; Pietrantonio, F; Siena, S; Esteller, M; Sartore-Bianchi, A; Di Nicolantonio, F

    2015-09-01

    O(6)-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) from plasma samples using an ultra-sensitive two-step digital PCR technique (methyl-BEAMing). Results were compared with two established techniques, methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and Bs-pyrosequencing. Thresholds for MGMT methylated status for each technique were established in a training set of 98 glioblastoma (GBM) patients. The prognostic and the predictive value of MGMT methylated status was validated in a second cohort of 66 GBM patients treated with temozolomide in which methyl-BEAMing displayed a better specificity than the other techniques. Cutoff values of MGMT methylation specific for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) tissue samples were established in a cohort of 60 patients treated with dacarbazine. In mCRC, both quantitative assays methyl-BEAMing and Bs-pyrosequencing outperformed MSP, providing better prediction of treatment response and improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) (P alkylating agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. An intron splice acceptor polymorphism in hMSH2 and risk of leukemia after treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrillow, Lisa J; Travis, Lois B; Smith, Alexandra G; Rollinson, Sara; Smith, Andrew J; Wild, Christopher P; Holowaty, Eric J; Kohler, Betsy A; Wiklund, Tom; Pukkala, Eero; Roman, Eve; Morgan, Gareth J; Allan, James M

    2003-08-01

    We sought to determine whether the -6 exon 13 T>C polymorphism in the DNA mismatch repair gene hMSH2 modulates susceptibility to acute myeloid leukemia after therapy and particularly after O(6)-guanine alkylating chemotherapy. We also determined the extent of microsatellite instability (MSI) in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) as a marker of dysfunctional DNA mismatch repair. Using a novel restriction fragment length polymorphism, verified by direct sequencing, we have genotyped 91 t-AML cases, 420 de novo acute myeloid leukemia cases, and 837 controls for the hMSH2 -6 exon 13 polymorphism. MSI was evaluated in presentation bone marrow from 34 cases using the mononucleotide microsatellite markers BAT16, BAT25, and BAT26. Distribution of the hMSH2 -6 exon 13 polymorphism was not significantly different between de novo acute myeloid leukemia cases and controls, with heterozygotes and homozygotes for the variant (C) allele representing 12.2 and 1.6%, respectively, of the control population. However, the variant (C) hMSH2 allele was significantly overrepresented in t-AML cases that had previously been treated with O(6)-guanine alkylating agents, including cyclophosphamide and procarbazine, compared with controls (odds ratio, 4.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-11.37). Thirteen of 34 (38%) t-AML cases were MSI positive, and 2 of these 13 cases were homozygous for the variant (C) allele, a frequency substantially higher than in the control population. Association of the hMSH2 -6 exon 13 variant (C) allele with leukemia after O(6)-guanine alkylating agents implicates this allele in conferring a nondisabling DNA mismatch repair defect with concomitant moderate alkylation tolerance, which predisposes to the development of t-AML via the induction of DNA mismatch repair-disabling mutations and high-grade MSI. Homozygosity for the hMSH2 variant in 2 of 13 MSI-positive t-AML cases provides some support for this model.

  16. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation by tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Tandem N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole (Py-Im) polyamides with good sequence-specific DNA-alkylating activities have been designed and synthesized. Three alkylating tandem Py-Im polyamides with different linkers, which each contained the same moiety for the recognition of a 10 bp DNA sequence, were evaluated for their reactivity and selectivity by DNA alkylation, using high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis. All three conjugates displayed high reactivities for the target sequence. In particular, polyamide 1, which contained a β-alanine linker, displayed the most-selective sequence-specific alkylation towards the target 10 bp DNA sequence. The tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates displayed greater sequence-specific DNA alkylation than conventional hairpin Py-Im polyamide conjugates (4 and 5). For further research, the design of tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates could play an important role in targeting specific gene sequences. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Alcohols as alkylating agents in heteroarene C?H functionalization

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jian; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Redox processes and radical intermediates are found in many biochemical processes, including deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and oxidative DNA damage 1 . One of the core principles that underlies DNA biosynthesis is the radical-mediated elimnation of H2O to deoxygenate ribonucleotides, an example of ?spin-center shift? (SCS) 2 , during which an alcohol C?O bond is cleaved, resulting in a carbon-centered radical intermediate. While SCS is a well-understood biochemical process, it is underutilize...

  18. A biochemical defect in the repair of alkylated DNA in cells from an immunodeficient patient (46BR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, I.A.; Broughton, B.C.; Day, R.S.; James, M.R.; Karran, P.; Mayne, L.V.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The fibroblast cell strain 46BR, derived from an immunodeficient individual, is hypersensitive to the lethal effects of a variety of DNA-damaging agents, this effect being particularly marked for monofunctional methylating agents. After U.V. irradiation 46BR cells show normal unscheduled DNA synthesis, daughter strand repair, and recovery of DNA and RNA synthesis. The inhibition of DNA replicative synthesis by U.V. is slightly less than that of normal cells. After gamma-irradiation the rejoining of strand breaks is normal as are the kinetics of replicative DNA synthesis. Following treatment with dimethylsulphate, replicative DNA synthesis is affected in a similar way to normal cells, unscheduled DNA synthesis may be increased relative to normal cells, but more strand breaks persist in 46BR than in normal cells. In addition 46BR cells are hypersensitive to the toxic effects of 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosyl transferase. This enzyme is involved in the ligation step of repair of alkylation damage. A hypothesis is presented suggesting that 46BR may be defective in DNA ligase I

  19. Sulfonium Salts as Alkylating Agents for Palladium-Catalyzed Direct Ortho Alkylation of Anilides and Aromatic Ureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkó, Dániel Cs; Elekes, Péter; Pázmándi, Vivien; Novák, Zoltán

    2018-02-02

    A novel method for the ortho alkylation of acetanilide and aromatic urea derivatives via C-H activation was developed. Alkyl dibenzothiophenium salts are considered to be new reagents for the palladium-catalyzed C-H activation reaction, which enables the transfer of methyl and other alkyl groups from the sulfonium salt to the aniline derivatives under mild catalytic conditions.

  20. Small molecule inhibitors of ERCC1-XPF protein-protein interaction synergize alkylating agents in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Barakat, Khaled H; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Matera, Eva-Laure; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Bouledrak, Karima; El Sabeh, Rana; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Wishart, David S; Cohen, Richard; Tuszynski, Jack; Dumontet, Charles

    2013-07-01

    The benefit of cancer chemotherapy based on alkylating agents is limited because of the action of DNA repair enzymes, which mitigate the damage induced by these agents. The interaction between the proteins ERCC1 and XPF involves two major components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Here, novel inhibitors of this interaction were identified by virtual screening based on available structures with use of the National Cancer Institute diversity set and a panel of DrugBank small molecules. Subsequently, experimental validation of the in silico screening was undertaken. Top hits were evaluated on A549 and HCT116 cancer cells. In particular, the compound labeled NSC 130813 [4-[(6-chloro-2-methoxy-9-acridinyl)amino]-2-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)methyl

  1. Nature of chromosome gaps induced by alkylating agents and γ-rays as revealed by caffeine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, B.

    1981-01-01

    In the cells of primary roots of Crepis capillaris, post-treatment with caffeine increased the frequency of gaps and chromosomal aberrations induced by the alkylating agents ethyleneimine and N-nitroso-N-methylurethane and γ-rays. The increase in the frequency of gaps was considerably lower than that observed in chromosomal aberrations, this being more strongly expressed in the case fo the alkylating agents. The potentiating effect of caffeine on the γ-ray-induced chromosomal gaps was a little higher in S as compared in G 2 . These results lead to the conclusion that the alkylating agents and the γ-rays might induce 2 types of chromosomal gap. (orig.)

  2. Effect of 3-aminobenzamide on the rate of ligation during repair of alkylated DNA in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of polyadenosine diphosphoribose polymerase, produced rapid reversible changes in single-strand break frequencies in DNA from primary human fibroblasts damaged by alkylating agents, but it did not cause such changes in the DNA of cells damaged by ultraviolet light. The increase in single-strand peak frequencies was not due to an accumulation of blocked repair sites, such as occurs with DNA polymerase inhibitors, but to a delay in the rejoining of induced breaks. 3-Aminobenzamide increases the net break frequency that results from a dynamic balance between excision and ligation. This balance appears to be regulated at the ligation step by adenosine diphosphate ribosylation, which is rapidly altered by addition or removal of 3-aminobenzamide. The rapidity with which strand break frequencies change in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide implies that individual strand breaks resulting from excision at any time after exposure have a lifetime of no more than about 30 min in the cell

  3. Antioxidant and antigenotoxic role of recombinant human erythropoeitin against alkylating agents: cisplatin and mitomycin C in cultured Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Soualeh, Nidhal; Achour, Abdellatif; Bacha, Hassen; Abid, Salwa

    2013-08-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) and mitomycin C (MMC), two alkylating agents used against various solid tumours, are a common source of acute kidney injury. Thus, strategies for minimizing CDDP and MMC toxicity are of a clinical interest. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective role of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) against oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by CDDP and MMC in cultured Vero cells. Three types of treatments were performed: (i) cells were treated with rhEPO 24 h before exposure to CDDP/MMC (pre-treatment), (ii) cells were treated with rhEPO and CDDP/MMC simultaneously (co-treatment), (iii) cells were treated with rhEPO 24 h after exposure to CDDP/MMC (post-treatment). Our results showed that rhEPO decreased the reactive oxygen species levels, the malondialdehyde levels and ameliorated glutathione (reduced and oxidized glutathione) modulation induced by CDDP and MMC in cultured Vero cells. Furthermore, rhEPO administration prevented alkylating agents-induced DNA damage accessed by comet test. Altogether, our results suggested a protective role of rhEPO, against CDDP- and MMC-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity, especially in pre-treatment condition.

  4. Repairability during G1 of the inductor leisure of exchanges in the sister chromatid induced by alkylating agents in DNA substituted and no substituted with BUDR, in cells of the salivary gland of mouse In vivo; Reparabilidad durante G1 de las lesiones inductoras de intercambios en las cromatidas hermanas inducidos por agentes alquilantes en ADN sustituido y no sustituido con BrdU, en celulas de la glandula salival de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez B, F

    2004-07-01

    In this work you determines the repair of the lesions inductoras of Sister chromatid exchange (ICHs) generated in the cells of the salivary gland of mouse, for the treatment with the N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU), the N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU), the Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in early and slow G1 of the first one and the second cellular division, that is to say before and after the cells incorporate 5-bromine-2 -Desoxyuridine (BrdU) in the DNA. Groups witness non treaties were included with mutagen. The cells of the salivary gland repaired the generated lesions partially by the MNU, the MMS and the EMS in the 1st division, and only the lesions induced by the ENU and MMS were repaired partially in the 2nd division. The ENU generates injure that they were not repaired in the 1st division and those taken place by the EMS were little repaired in the 2nd division. The methylating agents generated but ICHs that the ethylating. One observes that the BrdU makes to the molecule of the DNA but susceptible to the damage generated by the alkylating agents that induce the formation of the ICHs. This susceptibility was incremented around 150% for the treatment with the MNU, the ENU and the MMS, on the other hand for the EMS it was 3 times minor. It is proposed that the one electronegative atom of this analog of the timine would to work as a nucleophyllic center with which the electrophyllic compounds react. (Author)

  5. Effective chemotherapy of acute myelocytic leukemia occurring after alkylating agent or radiation therapy for prior malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, W.P.; Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven consecutive patients with acute myelocytic leukemia occurring as a second malignancy were treated with high-dose, timed, sequential chemotherapy. Eight of the patients were felt to have ''secondary'' acute leukemia because they had received an alkylating agent or radiation therapy. The other three patients were considered controls. Despite a median age of 65, four of the eight secondary leukemia patients achieved complete remission with this regimen. One of the three control patients also achieved complete remission. This remission rate and duration are comparable to what was achieved with this treatment of ''primary'' acute myelocytic leukemia during the same period of time. These results suggest that patients with leukemia occurring after an alkylating agent or radiation therapy are not at especially high risk if treated aggressively

  6. [Genetic differences in mice in the sensitivity to the immunodepressive action of alkylating agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N I; Telegin, L Iu; Pevnitskiĭ, L A

    1983-04-01

    The immunodepressant action of cyclophosphamide, thiophosphamide and sarcolysine was examined in experimental primary immune response in mice of different lines immunized with sheep red blood cells. DBA/2 and C3H/Sn mice were marked by the highest sensitivity to the immunodepressant action of the alkylating agents. BALB/c mice were relatively resistant to the immunodepressant action. Possible reasons for the interspecific differences found are discussed.

  7. Long Alkyl Chain Organophosphorus Coupling Agents for in Situ Surface Functionalization by Reactive Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Betke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Innovative synthetic approaches should be simple and environmentally friendly. Here, we present the surface modification of inorganic submicrometer particles with long alkyl chain organophosphorus coupling agents without the need of a solvent, which makes the technique environmentally friendly. In addition, it is of great benefit to realize two goals in one step: size reduction and, simultaneously, surface functionalization. A top-down approach for the synthesis of metal oxide particles with in situ surface functionalization is used to modify titania with long alkyl chain organophosphorus coupling agents. A high energy planetary ball mill was used to perform reactive milling using titania as inorganic pigment and long alkyl chain organophosphorus coupling agents like dodecyl and octadecyl phosphonic acid. The final products were characterized by IR, NMR and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal and elemental analysis as well as by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The process entailed a tribochemical phase transformation from the starting material anatase to a high-pressure modification of titania and the thermodynamically more stable rutile depending on the process parameters. Furthermore, the particles show sizes between 100 nm and 300 nm and a degree of surface coverage up to 0.8 mmol phosphonate per gram.

  8. A novel acetylation cycle of transcription co-activator Yes-associated protein that is downstream of Hippo pathway is triggered in response to SN2 alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Shoji; Hirayama, Jun; Kajiho, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Hata, Yutaka; Katada, Toshiaki; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2012-06-22

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes. Although cytoplasmic retention of YAP is known to be mediated by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation, post-translational modifications that regulate YAP in the nucleus remain unclear. Here we report the discovery of a novel cycle of acetylation/deacetylation of nuclear YAP induced in response to S(N)2 alkylating agents. We show that after treatment of cells with the S(N)2 alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate, YAP phosphorylation mediated by the Hippo pathway is markedly reduced, leading to nuclear translocation of YAP and its acetylation. This YAP acetylation occurs on specific and highly conserved C-terminal lysine residues and is mediated by the nuclear acetyltransferases CBP (CREB binding protein) and p300. Conversely, the nuclear deacetylase SIRT1 is responsible for YAP deacetylation. Intriguingly, we found that YAP acetylation is induced specifically by S(N)2 alkylating agents and not by other DNA-damaging stimuli. These results identify a novel YAP acetylation cycle that occurs in the nucleus downstream of the Hippo pathway. Intriguingly, our findings also indicate that YAP acetylation is involved in responses to a specific type of DNA damage.

  9. A Novel Acetylation Cycle of Transcription Co-activator Yes-associated Protein That Is Downstream of Hippo Pathway Is Triggered in Response to SN2 Alkylating Agents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Shoji; Hirayama, Jun; Kajiho, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Hata, Yutaka; Katada, Toshiaki; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes. Although cytoplasmic retention of YAP is known to be mediated by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation, post-translational modifications that regulate YAP in the nucleus remain unclear. Here we report the discovery of a novel cycle of acetylation/deacetylation of nuclear YAP induced in response to SN2 alkylating agents. We show that after treatment of cells with the SN2 alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate, YAP phosphorylation mediated by the Hippo pathway is markedly reduced, leading to nuclear translocation of YAP and its acetylation. This YAP acetylation occurs on specific and highly conserved C-terminal lysine residues and is mediated by the nuclear acetyltransferases CBP (CREB binding protein) and p300. Conversely, the nuclear deacetylase SIRT1 is responsible for YAP deacetylation. Intriguingly, we found that YAP acetylation is induced specifically by SN2 alkylating agents and not by other DNA-damaging stimuli. These results identify a novel YAP acetylation cycle that occurs in the nucleus downstream of the Hippo pathway. Intriguingly, our findings also indicate that YAP acetylation is involved in responses to a specific type of DNA damage. PMID:22544757

  10. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits repair of dimethylnitrosamine-induced DNA alkylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mufti, S.I.; Salvagnini, M.; Lieber, C.S.; Garro, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes a DNA repair deficiency. This was demonstrated in Sprague-Dawley rats injected with 14 C-labeled dimethylnitrosamine after being pair-fed isocaloric, ethanol, or carbohydrate control diets for 4 weeks. Hepatic DNA was isolated from rats killed at intervals over a 36 hour period after administration of the nitrosamine and concentrations of alkylated guanine derivatives were measured. While N7-methylguanine was lost at equivalent rates from the DNA of both diet groups, 06methylguanine, a promutagenic lesion, persisted at higher levels for longer periods of time in the DNA from the alcohol-fed animals

  11. Evaluation of the persistence in the induction of Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE) by alkylating agents; Evaluacion de la persistencia en la induccion de Intercambio en las Cromatidas Hermanas (ICH) por agentes alquilantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez R, R.; Huerta V, C.; MOrales R, P.R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The persistence in the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) by the alkylating agents methyl and ethyl-methanesulfonates (MMS and EMS) was evaluated. For it, to groups of mice its were administered a dose of these agents and later its were analyzed the induced SCE's in two periods: early and late. Both agents caused high increments of SCE in the early period and small in the late one; however, the caused lately by EMS was significantly bigger. This late induction of SCE by EMS possibly is associated with an epigenetic change or with the presence of etiladucts in the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of the persistence in the induction of Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE) by alkylating agents; Evaluacion de la persistencia en la induccion de Intercambio en las Cromatidas Hermanas (ICH) por agentes alquilantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez R, R; Huerta V, C; MOrales R, P R [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The persistence in the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) by the alkylating agents methyl and ethyl-methanesulfonates (MMS and EMS) was evaluated. For it, to groups of mice its were administered a dose of these agents and later its were analyzed the induced SCE's in two periods: early and late. Both agents caused high increments of SCE in the early period and small in the late one; however, the caused lately by EMS was significantly bigger. This late induction of SCE by EMS possibly is associated with an epigenetic change or with the presence of etiladucts in the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA. (Author)

  13. Alkylation Induced DNA Repair and Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-23

    unrepaired 3-methyladenine in DNA 29 2.4.1 Cytotoxic effects of persisting m3A in DNA 30 2.4.2 Mutagenic bypass synthesis of depurinat ,d DNA 30 3 CONCLUDING...induced by a single exposure to the ca’rcinogen N- methyl-N- nitrosourea (MNU) due to activation of the malignant Ha-ras-i locus. Analysis of the induced...ing CO:A uolymerase I for repair synthesis . Since DNA polymerase I would be required to complete repair after the in~uial activity of TagII, we tested

  14. N-alkylvaline levels in globin as a new type of biomarker in risk assessment of alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewalter, J

    1996-01-01

    Adducts with the N-terminal valine of erythrocyte globin can serve as individual biomarkers of systemic and cellular exposure to endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. In contrast to "detoxification markers" of this kind of mecapturic acids derived from alkylation of glutathione, individual N-alkylations of valine in globin reflect the formally "toxifying" part of the stress due to alkylating agents transformed into the ultimate toxicant. Thus, in contrast to the traditional methods of biological monitoring this approach enables a better evaluation of systemic exposure to reactive agents, adapted more sensibly to the exposure situation over the whole life span of erythrocytes, and it can serve as a specific biomarker of exposure for the purpose of health surveillance in occupational medicine. An individual evaluation of exposures in comparison with the range of corresponding background levels is discussed from the point of view of supplementary risk assessment in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed persons.

  15. Sensitization of gastric cancer cells to alkylating agents by glaucocalyxin B via cell cycle arrest and enhanced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur Rahman, Muhammad Saif; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Lingyan; Xie, Yuqiong; Li, Chunchun; Cao, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Severe side effects are major problems with chemotherapy of gastric cancer (GC). These side effects can be reduced by using sensitizing agents in combination with therapeutic drugs. In this study, the low/nontoxic dosage of glaucocalyxin B (GLB) was used with other DNA linker agents mitomycin C (MMC), cisplatin (DDP), or cyclophosphamide (CTX) to treat GC cells. Combined effectiveness of GLB with drugs was determined by proliferation assay. The molecular mechanisms associated with cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle, DNA repair/replication, apoptosis, and autophagy were investigated by immunoblotting for key proteins involved. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis were performed by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species level was also examined for identification of its role in apoptosis. Proliferation assay revealed that the addition of 5 µM GLB significantly sensitizes gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells to MMC, DDP, and CTX by decreasing half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) by up to 75.40%±5%, 45.10%±5%, and 52.10%±5%, respectively. GLB + drugs decreased the expression level of proteins involved in proliferation and migration, suggesting the anticancer potential of GLB + drugs. GLB + MMC, GLB + CTX, and GLB + DDP arrest the cells in G 0 /G 1 and G 1 /S phase, respectively, which may be the consequence of significant decrease in the level of enzymes responsible for DNA replication and telomerase shortening. Combined use of GLB with these drugs also induces DNA damage and apoptosis by activating caspase/PARP pathways and increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased autophagy in GC cells. GLB dosage sensitizes GC cells to the alkylating agents via arresting the cell cycle and enhancing cell death. This is of significant therapeutic importance in the reduction of side effects associated with these drugs.

  16. Nitric oxide donors attenuate clongenic potential in rat C6 glioma cells treated with alkylating chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jir-Jei; Yin, Jiu-Haw; Yang, Ding-I

    2007-05-11

    1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) kills tumor cells via multiple actions including alkylation and carbamoylation. Previously, we have reported that formation of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in glioma cells overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) contributed to nitric oxide (NO)-dependent carbamoylating chemoresistance against BCNU. To further characterize the effects of NO on alkylating cytotoxicity, colony formation assay was applied to evaluate the effects of various NO donors on rat C6 glioma cells challenged with alkylating agents. We demonstrate that NO donors including GSNO, diethylamine NONOate (DEA/NO), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) substantially reduced the extent of colony formation in glioma cells treated with alkylating agents, namely methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Without alkylating agents these NO-releasing agents alone had no effects on clongenic potential of rat C6 glioma cells. Among these three NO donors used, the effectiveness in potentiating alkylating cytotoxicity is in the order of "GSNO>DEA/NO>SNP" when applied at the same dosages. GSNO also exerted similar synergistic actions reducing the extents of colony formation when co-administrated with 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-hydrazine (compound #1), another alkylating agent that mimics the chloroethylating action of BCNU. Together with our previous findings, we propose that NO donors may be used as adjunct chemotherapy with alkylating agents for such malignant brain tumors as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In contrast, production of NO as a result of iNOS induction, such as that occurring after surgical resection of brain tumors, may compromise the efficacy of carbamoylating chemotherapy.

  17. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage.

  18. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies specific for deoxynucleosides structurally modified by alkylating agents: Applications for immunoanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamkiewicz, J.; Ahrens, O.; Rajewsky, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    So far the results of attempts to use monoclonal antibodies for the demonstration of carcinogen-DNA adducts in cells by immunostaining have been promising. Thus the authors have established a standardized procedure for the quantitation of specific alkyl-deoxynucleosides in the nuclear DNA of individual cells by direct immunofluorescence, using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled monoclonal antibodies and a computer-based image analysis of electronically intensified fluorescence signals. With a fluorescent anti-(O/sup 6/-EtdGuo) monoclonal antibody, the present detection limit for O/sup 6/-Etd-Guo in the nuclei of individual cells previously exposed to an ethylating N-nitroso compound (e.g., N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) is -- 700 O/sup 6/-EtdGuo molecules per diploid genome, i.e., similar to the detection limit for the same ethylation product in a hydrolysate of (O/sup 6/-EtdGuo)-containing DNA analyzed by competitive RIA

  19. Female cancer survivors exposed to alkylating-agent chemotherapy have unique reproductive hormone profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lauren; Sammel, Mary D; Schanne, Allison; Lechtenberg, Lara; Prewitt, Maureen; Gracia, Clarisa

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate reproductive hormone patterns in women exposed to alkylating-agent chemotherapy. Prospective cohort. University hospital. Normally menstruating mid-reproductive-age women (20-35 years old) who had previously been exposed to alkylating-agent chemotherapy for cancer treatment were compared with two healthy control populations: similarly-aged women and late-reproductive-age women (43-50 years old). Subjects collected daily urine samples for one cycle. Integrated urinary pregnanediol glucuronide (PDG) and estrone conjugate (E1c) and urinary excretion of gonadotropins (FSH and LH). Thirty-eight women (13 survivors, 11 same-age control subjects, 14 late-reproductive-age control subjects) provided 1,082 urine samples. Cycle length, luteal phase length, and evidence of luteal activity were similar among the groups. As expected, ovarian reserve was impaired in cancer survivors compared with same-age control subjects but similar between survivors and late-reproductive-age control subjects. In contrast, survivors had total and peak PDG levels that were similar to same-age control subjects and higher than those observed in late-reproductive-age control subjects. Survivors had higher E1c levels than both same-age and late-reproductive-age control subjects. There was no difference in urinary gonadotropins among the groups. Women exposed to alkylating agents have a unique reproductive hormone milieu that is not solely explained by age or ovarian reserve. The urinary hormone profile observed in survivors appears more similar to same-age control subjects than to late-reproductive-age women with similar ovarian reserve, which may suggest that age plays a more important role than ovarian reserve in the follicular dynamics of survivors. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glutathione Depletion Induced by c-Myc Downregulation Triggers Apoptosis on Treatment with Alkylating Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biroccio, Annamaria; Benassi, Barbara; Fiorentino, Francesco; Zupi, Gabriella

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Here we investigate the mechanism(s) involved in the c-Myc-dependent drug response of melanoma cells. By using three M14-derived c-Myc low-expressing clones, we demonstrate that alkylating agents, cisplatin and melphalan, trigger apoptosis in the c-Myc antisense transfectants, but not in the parental line. On the contrary, topoisomerase inhibitors, adriamycin and camptothecin, induce apoptosis to the same extent regardless of c-Myc expression. Because we previously demonstrated that c-Myc downregulation decreases glutathione (GSH) content, we evaluated the role of GSH in the apoptosis induced by the different drugs. In control cells treated with one of the alkylating agents or the others, GSH depletion achieved by l-buthionine-sulfoximine preincubation opens the apoptotic pathway. The apoptosis proceeded through early Bax relocalization, cytochrome c release, and concomitant caspase-9 activation, whereas reactive oxygen species production and alteration of mitochondria membrane potential were late events. That GSH was determining in the c-Myc-dependent drug-induced apoptosis was demonstrated by altering the intracellular GSH content of the c-Myc low-expressing cells up to the level of controls. Indeed, GSH ethyl ester-mediated increase of GSH abrogated apoptosis induced by cisplatin and melphalan by inhibition of Bax/cytochrome c redistribution. The relationship among c-Myc, GSH content, and the response to alkylating agent has been also evaluated in the M14 Myc overexpressing clones as well as in the melanoma JR8 c-Myc antisense transfectants. All together, these results demonstrate that GSH plays a key role in governing c-Myc-dependent drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:15153331

  1. Nuclear translocation of mismatch repair proteins MSH2 and MSH6 as a response of cells to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, M; Kaina, B

    2000-11-17

    Mammalian mismatch repair has been implicated in mismatch correction, the prevention of mutagenesis and cancer, and the induction of genotoxicity and apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of cells specifically with agents inducing O(6)-methylguanine in DNA, such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, elevates the level of MSH2 and MSH6 and increases GT mismatch binding activity in the nucleus. This inducible response occurs immediately after alkylation, is long-lasting and dose-dependent, and results from translocation of the preformed MutSalpha complex (composed of MSH2 and MSH6) from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. It is not caused by an increase in MSH2 gene activity. Cells expressing the DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), thus having the ability to repair O(6)-methylguanine, showed no translocation of MutSalpha, whereas inhibition of MGMT by O(6)-benzylguanine provoked the translocation. The results demonstrate that O(6)-methylguanine lesions are involved in triggering nuclear accumulation of MSH2 and MSH6. The finding that treatment of cells with O(6)-methylguanine-generating mutagens results in an increase of MutSalpha and GT binding activity in the nucleus indicates a novel type of genotoxic stress response.

  2. Evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents as potential synthons for the labeling of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, E.F.J. de E-mail: e.f.j.de.vries@pet.azg.nl; Vroegh, Joke; Elsinga, P.H.; Vaalburg, Willem

    2003-04-01

    Six fluorine-18-labeled alkylating agents were selected as potentially suitable synthons for the labeling of antisense oligonucleotides. The selected synthons were evaluated in a model reaction with the monomer adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate. Of these synthons, {alpha}-bromo-{alpha}'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-m-xylene and N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)-2-bromoacetamide were found to be the most promising. Labeling with the former synthon was less complicated and time consuming and gave higher uncorrected overall yields. The latter synthon required smaller amounts of the costly precursor to achieve acceptable labeling yields.

  3. Induction of specific Escherichia coli genes by sublethal treatments with alkylating agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Volkert, M R; Nguyen, D C

    1984-01-01

    Fusions of the lac operon to genes induced by treatment with sublethal levels of alkylating agents have been selected from random insertions of the Mu-dl(ApRlac) phage by screening for induction of beta-galactosidase activity in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate. Genetic analysis reveals that these fusions resulted from insertion of Mu-dl(ApRlac) into two regions of the chromosome. One region (aidA) is near his and, based on phenotypic effects, appears to represent insertion into the al...

  4. Mono- and Di-Alkylation Processes of DNA Bases by Nitrogen Mustard Mechlorethamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Olatz; de Cózar, Abel; Cossío, Fernando P

    2017-12-06

    The reactivity of nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine (mec) with purine bases towards formation of mono- (G-mec and A-mec) and dialkylated (AA-mec, GG-mec and AG-mec) adducts has been studied using density functional theory (DFT). To gain a complete overview of DNA-alkylation processes, direct chloride substitution and formation through activated aziridinium species were considered as possible reaction paths for adduct formation. Our results confirm that DNA alkylation by mec occurs via aziridine intermediates instead of direct substitution. Consideration of explicit water molecules in conjunction with polarizable continuum model (PCM) was shown as an adequate computational method for a proper representation of the system. Moreover, Runge-Kutta numerical kinetic simulations including the possible bisadducts have been performed. These simulations predicted a product ratio of 83:17 of GG-mec and AG-mec diadducts, respectively. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Comparison of checkpoint responses triggered by DNA polymerase inhibition versus DNA damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.-S.; Kuo, S.-R.; Melendy, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the different cellular responses to replication fork pausing versus blockage, early DNA damage response markers were compared after treatment of cultured mammalian cells with agents that either inhibit DNA polymerase activity (hydroxyurea (HU) or aphidicolin) or selectively induce S-phase DNA damage responses (the DNA alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and adozelesin). These agents were compared for their relative abilities to induce phosphorylation of Chk1, H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA), and intra-nuclear focalization of γ-H2AX and RPA. Treatment by aphidicolin and HU resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1, while HU, but not aphidicolin, induced focalization of γ-H2AX and RPA. Surprisingly, pre-treatment with aphidicolin to stop replication fork progression, did not abrogate HU-induced γ-H2AX and RPA focalization. This suggests that HU may act on the replication fork machinery directly, such that fork progression is not required to trigger these responses. The DNA-damaging fork-blocking agents, adozelesin and MMS, both induced phosphorylation and focalization of H2AX and RPA. Unlike adozelesin and HU, the pattern of MMS-induced RPA focalization did not match the BUdR incorporation pattern and was not blocked by aphidicolin, suggesting that MMS-induced damage is not replication fork-dependent. In support of this, MMS was the only reagent used that did not induce phosphorylation of Chk1. These results indicate that induction of DNA damage checkpoint responses due to adozelesin is both replication fork and fork progression dependent, induction by HU is replication fork dependent but progression independent, while induction by MMS is independent of both replication forks and fork progression

  6. Comparison of checkpoint responses triggered by DNA polymerase inhibition versus DNA damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.-S.; Kuo, S.-R.; Melendy, Thomas

    2003-11-27

    To better understand the different cellular responses to replication fork pausing versus blockage, early DNA damage response markers were compared after treatment of cultured mammalian cells with agents that either inhibit DNA polymerase activity (hydroxyurea (HU) or aphidicolin) or selectively induce S-phase DNA damage responses (the DNA alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and adozelesin). These agents were compared for their relative abilities to induce phosphorylation of Chk1, H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA), and intra-nuclear focalization of {gamma}-H2AX and RPA. Treatment by aphidicolin and HU resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1, while HU, but not aphidicolin, induced focalization of {gamma}-H2AX and RPA. Surprisingly, pre-treatment with aphidicolin to stop replication fork progression, did not abrogate HU-induced {gamma}-H2AX and RPA focalization. This suggests that HU may act on the replication fork machinery directly, such that fork progression is not required to trigger these responses. The DNA-damaging fork-blocking agents, adozelesin and MMS, both induced phosphorylation and focalization of H2AX and RPA. Unlike adozelesin and HU, the pattern of MMS-induced RPA focalization did not match the BUdR incorporation pattern and was not blocked by aphidicolin, suggesting that MMS-induced damage is not replication fork-dependent. In support of this, MMS was the only reagent used that did not induce phosphorylation of Chk1. These results indicate that induction of DNA damage checkpoint responses due to adozelesin is both replication fork and fork progression dependent, induction by HU is replication fork dependent but progression independent, while induction by MMS is independent of both replication forks and fork progression.

  7. Câncer e agentes antineoplásicos ciclo-celular específicos e ciclo-celular não específicos que interagem com o DNA: uma introdução Cancer and cell cicle-specific and cell cicle nonspecific anticancer DNA-interactive agents: an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia de Almeida

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy agents against cancer may be classified as "cell cycle-specific" or "cell cycle-nonspecific". Nevertheless, several of them have their biological activity related to any kind of action on DNA such as: antimetabolic agents (DNA synthesis inhibition, inherently reactive agents (DNA alkylating electrophilic traps for macromolecular nucleophiles from DNA through inter-strand cross-linking - ISC - alkylation and intercalating agents (drug-DNA interactions inherent to the binding made due to the agent penetration in to the minor groove of the double helix. The earliest and perhaps most extensively studied and most heavily employed clinical anticancer agents in use today are the DNA inter-strand cross-linking agents.

  8. [Expression and functions of adaptive response genes in Escherichia coli treated with mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents. Interference with SOS response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Makhova, E V; Moshkovskaia, E Iu

    1999-04-01

    The expression of genes belonging to the Ada regulon of Escherichia coli under the action of mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents--high-efficiency antitumor HMM, ACNU, and BCNU preparations--was studied. The functional specificity of the alkA, alkB, and aidB1 genes concerning both the structure and volume of DNA alkylation and the specificity of cell preadaptation was revealed. Additional experimental evidence for the role of the aidB1 gene as a unique "hazard gene", a component of the E. coli ada operon, was obtained. A phenomenon of positive interference between alternative SOS and Ada responses was observed for the first time upon gene expression.

  9. DNA Polymerase α (swi7) and the Flap Endonuclease Fen1 (rad2) Act Together in the S-Phase Alkylation Damage Response in S. pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulintchenko, Milana; Vengrova, Sonya; Eydmann, Trevor; Arumugam, Prakash; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase α is an essential enzyme mainly mediating Okazaki fragment synthesis during lagging strand replication. A specific point mutation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe polymerase α named swi7-1, abolishes imprinting required for mating-type switching. Here we investigate whether this mutation confers any genome-wide defects. We show that the swi7-1 mutation renders cells hypersensitive to the DNA damaging agents methyl methansulfonate (MMS), hydroxyurea (HU) and UV and incapacitates activation of the intra-S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. In addition we show that, in the swi7-1 background, cells are characterized by an elevated level of repair foci and recombination, indicative of increased genetic instability. Furthermore, we detect novel Swi1-, -Swi3- and Pol α- dependent alkylation damage repair intermediates with mobility on 2D-gel that suggests presence of single-stranded regions. Genetic interaction studies showed that the flap endonuclease Fen1 works in the same pathway as Pol α in terms of alkylation damage response. Fen1 was also required for formation of alkylation- damage specific repair intermediates. We propose a model to explain how Pol α, Swi1, Swi3 and Fen1 might act together to detect and repair alkylation damage during S-phase. PMID:23071723

  10. Base excision repair of chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage predominantly causes contractions of expanded GAA repeats associated with Friedreich's ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhao Lai

    Full Text Available Expansion of GAA·TTC repeats within the first intron of the frataxin gene is the cause of Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. However, no effective treatment for the disease has been developed as yet. In this study, we explored a possibility of shortening expanded GAA repeats associated with FRDA through chemotherapeutically-induced DNA base lesions and subsequent base excision repair (BER. We provide the first evidence that alkylated DNA damage induced by temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic DNA damaging agent can induce massive GAA repeat contractions/deletions, but only limited expansions in FRDA patient lymphoblasts. We showed that temozolomide-induced GAA repeat instability was mediated by BER. Further characterization of BER of an abasic site in the context of (GAA20 repeats indicates that the lesion mainly resulted in a large deletion of 8 repeats along with small expansions. This was because temozolomide-induced single-stranded breaks initially led to DNA slippage and the formation of a small GAA repeat loop in the upstream region of the damaged strand and a small TTC loop on the template strand. This allowed limited pol β DNA synthesis and the formation of a short 5'-GAA repeat flap that was cleaved by FEN1, thereby leading to small repeat expansions. At a later stage of BER, the small template loop expanded into a large template loop that resulted in the formation of a long 5'-GAA repeat flap. Pol β then performed limited DNA synthesis to bypass the loop, and FEN1 removed the long repeat flap ultimately causing a large repeat deletion. Our study indicates that chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage can induce large contractions/deletions of expanded GAA repeats through BER in FRDA patient cells. This further suggests the potential of developing chemotherapeutic alkylating agents to shorten expanded GAA repeats for treatment of FRDA.

  11. Sensitization of gastric cancer cells to alkylating agents by glaucocalyxin B via cell cycle arrest and enhanced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Rahman MS

    2017-08-01

    cells to the alkylating agents via arresting the cell cycle and enhancing cell death. This is of significant therapeutic importance in the reduction of side effects associated with these drugs. Keywords: glaucocalyxin B, mitomycin C, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, DNA linkers, side effects, gastric cancer

  12. Effect O6-guanine alkylation on DNA flexibility studied by comparative molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Mahmut; Drsata, Tomas; Lankas, Filip; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Alkylation of guanine at the O6 atom is a highly mutagenic DNA lesion because it alters the coding specificity of the base causing G:C to A:T transversion mutations. Specific DNA repair enzymes, e.g. O(6)-alkylguanin-DNA-Transferases (AGT), recognize and repair such damage after looping out the damaged base to transfer it into the enzyme active site. The exact mechanism how the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site within a large surplus of undamaged DNA is not fully understood. The O(6)-alkylation of guanine may change the deformability of DNA which may facilitate the initial binding of a repair enzyme at the damaged site. In order to characterize the effect of O(6)-methyl-guanine (O(6)-MeG) containing base pairs on the DNA deformability extensive comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on duplex DNA with central G:C, O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs were performed. The simulations indicate significant differences in the helical deformability due to the presence of O(6)-MeG compared to regular undamaged DNA. This includes enhanced base pair opening, shear and stagger motions and alterations in the backbone fine structure caused in part by transient rupture of the base pairing at the damaged site and transient insertion of water molecules. It is likely that the increased opening motions of O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs play a decisive role for the induced fit recognition or for the looping out of the damaged base by repair enzymes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. DNA unwinding by ASCC3 helicase is coupled to ALKBH3 dependent DNA alkylation repair and cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima; Sowa, Mathew E.; Xiong, Li-Jun; Wu, Feizhen; Park, Keyjung; Rubin, Mark; Gygi, Steve; Harper, J. Wade; Shi, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Demethylation by the AlkB dioxygenases represents an important mechanism for repair of N-alkylated nucleotides. However, little is known about their functions in mammalian cells. We report the purification of the ALKBH3 complex and demonstrate its association with the Activating Signal Co-integrator Complex (ASCC). ALKBH3 is overexpressed in various cancers, and both ALKBH3 and ASCC are important for alkylation damage resistance in these tumor cell lines. ASCC3, the largest subunit of ASCC, encodes a 3′-5′ DNA helicase, whose activity is crucial for the generation of single-stranded DNA upon which ALKBH3 preferentially functions for dealkylation. In cell lines that are dependent on ALKBH3 and ASCC3 for alkylation damage resistance, loss of ALKBH3 or ASCC3 leads to increased 3-methylcytosine and reduced cell proliferation, which correlates with pH2A.X and 53BP1 foci formation. Our data provide a molecular mechanism by which ALKBH3 collaborates with ASCC to maintain genomic integrity in a cell type specific manner. PMID:22055184

  14. Sequence selectivity of azinomycin B in DNA alkylation and cross-linking: a QM/MM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilnathan, Dhurairajan; Kalaiselvan, Anbarasan; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2013-01-01

    Azinomycin B--a well-known antitumor drug--forms cross-links with DNA through alkylation of purine bases and blocks tumor cell growth. This reaction has been modeled using the ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31+g(d):UFF) method to understand the mechanism and sequence selectivity. ONIOM results have been checked for reliability by comparing them with full quantum mechanics calculations for selected paths. Calculations reveal that, among the purine bases, guanine is more reactive and is alkylated by aziridine ring through the C10 position, followed by alkylation of the epoxide ring through the C21 position of Azinomycin B. While the mono alkylation is controlled kinetically, bis-alkylation is controlled thermodynamically. Solvent effects were included using polarized-continuum-model calculations and no significant change from gas phase results was observed.

  15. A yeast mutant specifically sensitive to bifunctional alkylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhland, A.; Kircher, M.; Wilborn, F.; Brendel, M.

    1981-01-01

    A mutation that specifically confers sensitivity to bi- and tri-functional alkylating agents is presented. No or little cross-sensitivity to radiation or monofunctional agents could be detected. Sensitivity does not seem to be due to preferential alkylation of mutant DNA as parent and mutant strain exhibit the same amount of DNA alkylation and the same pattern of DNA lesions including interstrand crosslinks. The mutation is due to a defect in a nuclear gene which has been designated SNM1 (sensitive to nitrogen mustard); it may control an important step in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (orig.(AJ)

  16. Protein Recognition in Drug-Induced DNA Alkylation: When the Moonlight Protein GAPDH Meets S23906-1/DNA Minor Groove Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savreux-Lenglet, Gaëlle; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2015-11-05

    DNA alkylating drugs have been used in clinics for more than seventy years. The diversity of their mechanism of action (major/minor groove; mono-/bis-alkylation; intra-/inter-strand crosslinks; DNA stabilization/destabilization, etc.) has undoubtedly major consequences on the cellular response to treatment. The aim of this review is to highlight the variety of established protein recognition of DNA adducts to then particularly focus on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) function in DNA adduct interaction with illustration using original experiments performed with S23906-1/DNA adduct. The introduction of this review is a state of the art of protein/DNA adducts recognition, depending on the major or minor groove orientation of the DNA bonding as well as on the molecular consequences in terms of double-stranded DNA maintenance. It reviews the implication of proteins from both DNA repair, transcription, replication and chromatin maintenance in selective DNA adduct recognition. The main section of the manuscript is focusing on the implication of the moonlighting protein GAPDH in DNA adduct recognition with the model of the peculiar DNA minor groove alkylating and destabilizing drug S23906-1. The mechanism of action of S23906-1 alkylating drug and the large variety of GAPDH cellular functions are presented prior to focus on GAPDH direct binding to S23906-1 adducts.

  17. Influence of some DNA-alkylating drugs on thermal stability, acid and osmotic resistance of the membrane of whole human erythrocytes and their ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I T; Gadjeva, V

    2000-09-01

    Human erythrocytes and their resealed ghosts were alkylated under identical conditions using three groups of alkylating antitumor agents: mustards, triazenes and chloroethyl nitrosoureas. Osmotic fragility, acid resistance and thermal stability of membranes were changed only in alkylated ghosts in proportion to the concentration of the alkylating agent. All the alkylating agents decreased acid resistance in ghosts. The clinically used drugs sarcolysine, dacarbazine and lomustine all decreased osmotic fragility and thermal stability of ghost membranes depending on their lipophilicity. DM-COOH did not decrease osmotic fragility and thermal stability of ghost membranes, while NEM increased thermal stability of membranes. The preliminary but not subsequent treatment of ghosts with DM-COOH fully abolished the alkylation-induced thermal labilization of ghost membrane proteins while NEM had a partial effect only. The present study gives direct evidence that alkylating agents, having a high therapeutic activity against malignant growth, bind covalently to proteins of cellular membranes.

  18. One-electron reduction of 2- and 6-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone bioreductive alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, I.; Wardman, P.; Lin, T.S.; Sartorelli, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    The semiquinones, Q.-, of derivatives of 2- and 6-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinones, some incorporating leaving groups with substituents such as CH 2 Br or CH 2 OCONHCH 3 , have been produced by radiolytic reduction of Q by (CH 3 )2COH radicals. The absorption spectra and decay kinetics of Q.- were all closely similar to that produced from 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, with no evidence for unimolecular elimination of a leaving group in the semiquinone form, but immediate loss of leaving group upon two-electron reduction of Q to the hydroquinone. The redox equilibria between Q/Q.- and O2/O2.- were characterized, and reduction potentials of the couples Q/Q.- in water at pH 7.6 were calculated. The implications of these observations for the use of these compounds as bioreductive alkylating agents or as radiosensitizers with potential selective activity toward hypoxic cells are discussed

  19. Complementarily addressed modification and cleavage of a single-stranded fragment of DNA with the aid of alkylating derivatives of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosalina, E.B.; Vlasov, V.V.; Kutyavin, I.V.; Mamaev, S.V.; Pletnev, A.G.; Podyminogin, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical modification of a 303-nucleotide single-stranded fragment of DNA by alkylating oligonucleotide derivatives bearing 4-[N-methyl-N-(2-chloroethyl)amino]benzyl groups in the 5'-terminal phosphate of the 3'-terminal ribose residue has been investigated. It has been shown that under the conditions of the formation of a complex with the DNA fragment both types of derivatives specifically alkylate nucleotides of the DNA fragments that are located directly adjacent to the sections complementary to the oligonucleotides bearing the reactive groups. Alkylation takes place with a high efficiency, and the DNA fragment can be cleaved specifically at the position of the alkylated nucleotides

  20. Residual injury to the hemopoietic microenvironment following sequential radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wathen, L.M.K.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the hemopoietic impact following combined therapy, mice received intraperitoneal doses of cyclophosphamide one week after 1500 rad leg irradiation. This treatment inhibited repopulation of endogenous nucleated cells to less than 60% of normal. Leg irradiation alone repressed the repopulation to about 75% of normal and cyclophosphamide alone suppressed to 80% of normal. Differential marrow counts revealed that marrow stromal cells were suppressed to less than 30% normal for 3 months following combined modality treatment. Studies were initiated to determine whether busulfan, an alkylating agent known to produce aplastic anemia, would cause microenvironmental damage similar to that seen following cyclophosphamide. The mice received intraperitoneal doses of busulfan one week after 1500 rad leg irradation. In general, the pattern of hemopoietic suppression was similar to that following sequential radiation and cyclophosphamide. However, at 4 and 6 months post-irradiation, the busulfan treated mice had a more severe suppression of CFU-S, CFU-C, and marrow stromal cells than mice treated with cyclophosphamide alone. In addition, an excessive number of myeloid blast cells and a severe erythroid depletion suggested that the BU-treated mice were preleukemic. Vascular patency was studied by injecting 51 Cr labeled autologous red blood cells into mice treated with the radiation and busulfan regimen. Combined modality therapy inhibited the ingress of 51 Cr labeled erythrocytes into the irradiated femur but either modality alone did not cause inhibition. It was concluded that a portion of the microenvironmental defect seen in the combined radiation and alkylating agent studies was the result of microvascular damage and that a portion was due to marrow stromal cell insufficiency

  1. Effect of the antitumoral alkylating agent 3-bromopyruvate on mitochondrial respiration: role of mitochondrially bound hexokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Clara; da Silva, Ana Paula Pereira; Galina, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The alkylating agent 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) has been used as an anti-tumoral drug due to its anti-proliferative property in hepatomas cells. This propriety is believed to disturb glycolysis and respiration, which leads to a decreased rate of ATP synthesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the alkylating agent 3-BrPA on the respiratory states and the metabolic steps of the mitochondria of mice liver, brain and in human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), O(2) consumption and dehydrogenase activities were rapidly dissipated/or inhibited by 3-BrPA in respiration medium containing ADP and succinate as respiratory substrate. 3-BrPA inhibition was reverted by reduced glutathione (GSH). Respiration induced by yeast soluble hexokinase (HK) was rapidly inhibited by 3-BrPA. Similar results were observed using mice brain mitochondria that present HK naturally bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. When the adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) was blocked by the carboxyatractiloside, the 3-BrPA effect was significantly delayed. In permeabilized human hepatoma HepG2 cells that present HK type II bound to mitochondria (mt-HK II), the inhibiting effect occurred faster when the endogenous HK activity was activated by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG). Inhibition of mt-HK II by glucose-6-phosphate retards the mitochondria to react with 3-BrPA. The HK activities recovered in HepG2 cells treated or not with 3-BrPA were practically the same. These results suggest that mitochondrially bound HK supporting the ADP/ATP exchange activity levels facilitates the 3-BrPA inhibition reaction in tumors mitochondria by a proton motive force-dependent dynamic equilibrium between sensitive and less sensitive SDH in the electron transport system.

  2. Concerted bis-alkylating reactivity of clerocidin towards unpaired cytosine residues in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sara N.; Menegazzo, Ileana; Fabris, Daniele; Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL) is a topoisomerase II poison, which cleaves DNA irreversibly at guanines (G) and reversibly at cytosines (C). Furthermore, the drug can induce enzyme-independent strand breaks at the G and C level. It has been previously shown that G-damage is induced by alkylation of the guanine N7, followed by spontaneous depurination and nucleic acid cleavage, whereas scission at C is obtained only after treatment with hot alkali, and no information is available to explain the nature of this damage. We present here a systematic study on the reactivity of CL towards C both in the DNA environment and in solution. Selected synthetic derivatives were employed to evaluate the role of each chemical group of the drug. The structure of CL–dC adduct was then characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and NMR: the adduct is a stable condensed ring system resulting from a concerted electrophilic attack of the adjacent carbonyl and epoxide groups of CL towards the exposed NH2 and N3, respectively. This reaction mechanism, shown here for the first time, is characterized by faster kinetic rates than alkylation at G, due to the fact that the rate-determining step, alkylation at the epoxide, is an intramolecular process, provided a Schiff base linking CL and C can rapidly form, whereas the corresponding reaction of G N7 is intermolecular. These results provide helpful hints to explain the reversible/irreversible nature of topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage produced by CL at C/G steps. PMID:15494453

  3. Inducible Alkylation of DNA by a Quinone Methide-Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugate†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Rokita, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    The reversibility of alkylation by a quinone methide intermediate (QM) avoids the irreversible consumption that plagues most reagents based on covalent chemistry and allows for site specific reaction that is controlled by the thermodynamics rather than kinetics of target association. This characteristic was originally examined with an oligonucleotide QM conjugate but broad application depends on alternative derivatives that are compatible with a cellular environment. Now, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) derivative has been constructed and shown to exhibit an equivalent ability to delivery the reactive QM in a controlled manner. This new conjugate demonstrates high selectivity for a complementary sequence of DNA even when challenged with an alternative sequence containing a single T/T mismatch. Alkylation of non-complementary sequences is only possible when a template strand is present to co-localize the conjugate and its target. For efficient alkylation in this example, a single-stranded region of the target is required adjacent to the QM conjugate. Most importantly, the intrastrand self adducts formed between the PNA and its attached QM remained active and reversible over more than eight days in aqueous solution prior to reaction with a chosen target added subsequently. PMID:22243337

  4. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barault, L.; Amatu, A.; Bleeker, F. E.; Moutinho, C.; Falcomatà, C.; Fiano, V.; Cassingena, A.; Siravegna, G.; Milione, M.; Cassoni, P.; de Braud, F.; Rudà, R.; Soffietti, R.; Venesio, T.; Bardelli, A.; Wesseling, P.; de Witt Hamer, P.; Pietrantonio, F.; Siena, S.; Esteller, M.; Sartore-Bianchi, A.; di Nicolantonio, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background: O6-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. Patients and methods: We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor and

  5. DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, causes a threshold in alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrer, Jörg; Frisch, Janina; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Thomas, Adam D; Reißig, Sonja; Waisman, Ari; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are causally linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). NOC induce DNA alkylations, including O (6)-methylguanine (O (6)-MeG) and N-methylated purines, which are repaired by O (6)-MeG-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase (AAG)-initiated base excision repair, respectively. In view of recent evidence of nonlinear mutagenicity for NOC-like compounds, the question arises as to the existence of threshold doses in CRC formation. Here, we set out to determine the impact of DNA repair on the dose-response of alkylation-induced CRC. DNA repair proficient (WT) and deficient (Mgmt (-/-), Aag (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-)) mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate to trigger CRC. Tumors were quantified by non-invasive mini-endoscopy. A non-linear increase in CRC formation was observed in WT and Aag (-/-) mice. In contrast, a linear dose-dependent increase in tumor frequency was found in Mgmt (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-) mice. The data were corroborated by hockey stick modeling, yielding similar carcinogenic thresholds for WT and Aag (-/-) and no threshold for MGMT lacking mice. O (6)-MeG levels and depletion of MGMT correlated well with the observed dose-response in CRC formation. AOM induced dose-dependently DNA double-strand breaks in colon crypts including Lgr5-positive colon stem cells, which coincided with ATR-Chk1-p53 signaling. Intriguingly, Mgmt (-/-) mice displayed significantly enhanced levels of γ-H2AX, suggesting the usefulness of γ-H2AX as an early genotoxicity marker in the colorectum. This study demonstrates for the first time a non-linear dose-response for alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and reveals DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, as a key node in determining a carcinogenic threshold. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Selected Alkylating Agents Can Overcome Drug Tolerance of G0-like Tumor Cells and Eradicate BRCA1-Deficient Mammary Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic, Marina; Blatter, Sohvi; Guyader, Charlotte; Gonggrijp, Maaike; Kersbergen, Ariena; Küçükosmanoğlu, Aslι; Sol, Wendy; Drost, Rinske; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2017-11-15

    Purpose: We aimed to characterize and target drug-tolerant BRCA1-deficient tumor cells that cause residual disease and subsequent tumor relapse. Experimental Design: We studied responses to various mono- and bifunctional alkylating agents in a genetically engineered mouse model for BRCA1/p53 -mutant breast cancer. Because of the large intragenic deletion of the Brca1 gene, no restoration of BRCA1 function is possible, and therefore, no BRCA1-dependent acquired resistance occurs. To characterize the cell-cycle stage from which Brca1 -/- ;p53 -/- mammary tumors arise after cisplatin treatment, we introduced the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI) construct into the tumor cells. Results: Despite repeated sensitivity to the MTD of platinum drugs, the Brca1 -mutated mammary tumors are not eradicated, not even by a frequent dosing schedule. We show that relapse comes from single-nucleated cells delaying entry into the S-phase. Such slowly cycling cells, which are present within the drug-naïve tumors, are enriched in tumor remnants. Using the FUCCI construct, we identified nonfluorescent G 0 -like cells as the population most tolerant to platinum drugs. Intriguingly, these cells are more sensitive to the DNA-crosslinking agent nimustine, resulting in an increased number of multinucleated cells that lack clonogenicity. This is consistent with our in vivo finding that the nimustine MTD, among several alkylating agents, is the most effective in eradicating Brca1 -mutated mouse mammary tumors. Conclusions: Our data show that targeting G 0 -like cells is crucial for the eradication of BRCA1/p53-deficient tumor cells. This can be achieved with selected alkylating agents such as nimustine. Clin Cancer Res; 23(22); 7020-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans with increased resistance to the alkylating agent, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, P; Shawcross, S G; Strike, P

    1988-05-01

    The isolation and characterisation of mutants of Aspergillus nidulans showing resistance to MNNG is described. Such isolates were stable through prolonged subculture in the absence of the selective agent, and resistance segregated as an allele of a single gene in meiotic and mitotic analysis. MNNG-resistant strains showed an increase in resistance to EMS and UV irradiation but no cross-resistance to MMS was detected. Possible mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents are discussed.

  9. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

  10. Microtubule disruption induced in vivo by alkylation of beta-tubulin by 1-aryl-3-(2-chloroethyl)ureas, a novel class of soft alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, J; Gaulin, J F; Mounetou, E; Bolduc, S; Lacroix, J; Poyet, P; Gaudreault, R C

    2000-02-15

    We have previously reported that 4-tert-butyl-[3-(2-chloroethyl)ureido] benzene (4-tBCEU), a potent cytotoxic agent, modulates the synthesis of tubulins, suggesting that its cytotoxicity may be mediated through an antimicrotubule mechanism. Indeed, 4-tBCEU and its 4-iso-propyl (4-isopropyl [3-(2-chloroethyl)ureido] benzene) and 4-sec-butyl (4-sec-butyl [3-(2-chloroethyl)ureido] benzene) homologues induced disruption of the cytoskeleton and arrest of the cell cycle in G2 transition and mitosis. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for microtubule disruption by 1-aryl-3-(2-chloroethyl)ureas (CEU), we first examined their cytotoxicity on Chinese hamster ovary cells resistant to vinblastine and colchicine due to the expression of mutated tubulins (CHO-VV 3-2). These cells showed resistance to CEU, e.g., 4-tBCEU having an IC50 of 21.3+/-1.1 microM as compared with an IC50 of 11.6+/-0.7 microM for wild-type cells, suggesting a direct effect of the drugs on tubulins. Western blot analysis confirmed the disruption of microtubules and evidenced the formation of an additional immunoreactive beta-tubulin with an apparent lower molecular weight on SDS polyacrylamide gel. Incubation of MDA-MB-231 cells with [urea-14C]-4-tBCEU revealed the presence of a radioactive protein that coincided with the additional beta-tubulin band, indicating that CEU could covalently bind to the beta-tubulin. The 4-tBCEU-binding site on beta-tubulin was identified by competition of the CEU with colchicine, vinblastine, and iodoacetamide, a specific alkylating agent of sulfhydryl groups of cysteine residues. Colchicine, but not vinblastine, prevented the formation of the additional beta-tubulin band, suggesting that 4-tBCEU alkylates either Cys239 or Cys354 residues near the colchicine-binding site. To determine the cysteine residue alkylated by 4-tBCEU, we incubated the radiolabeled drug with human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) that overexpress the betaIII-tubulin, an isoform where Cys239

  11. The relationship between reaction kinetics and mutagenic action of monofunctional alkylating agents in higher eukaryotic systems. IV. The effects of the excision-defective mei-9L1 and mus(2)201D1 mutants on alkylation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, E W; Dusenbery, R L; Smith, P D

    1985-04-01

    Repair-defective mutants of Drosophila melanogaster which identify two major DNA excision repair loci have been examined for their effects on alkylation-induced mutagenesis using the sex-linked recessive lethal assay as a measure of genotoxic endpoint. The alkylating agents (AAs) chosen for comparative analysis were selected on the basis of their reaction kinetics with DNA and included MMS, EMS, MNU, DMN, ENU, DEN and ENNG. Repair-proficient males were treated with the AAs and mated with either excision-defective mei-9L1 or mus(2)201D1 females or appropriate excision-proficient control females. The results of the present work suggest that a qualitative and quantitative relationship exists between the nature and the extent of chemical modification of DNA and the induction of of genetic alterations. The presence of either excision-defective mutant can enhance the frequency of mutation (hypermutability) and this hypermutability can be correlated with the Swain-Scott constant S of specific AAs such that as the SN1 character of the DNA alkylation reaction increases, the difference in response between repair-deficient and repair-proficient females decreases. The order of hypermutability of AAs with mei-9L1 relative to mei-9+ is MMS greater than MNU greater than DMN = EMS greater than iPMS = ENU = DEN = ENNG. When the percentage of lethal mutations induced in mei-9L1 females are plotted against those determined for control females, straight lines of different slopes are obtained. These mei-9L1/mei-9+ indices are: MMS = 7.6, MNU = 5.4, DMN = 2.4, EMS = 2.4 and iPMS = ENU = DEN = ENNG = 1. An identical order of hypermutability with similar indices is obtained for the mus(2)201 mutants: MMS(7.3) greater than MNU (5.4) greater than EMS(2.0) greater than ENU(1.1). Thus, absence of excision repair function has a significant effect on mutation production by AAs efficient in alkylating N-atoms in DNA but no measurable influence on mutation production by AAs most efficient in

  12. Bacillus subtilis mutants deficient in the adaptive response to simple alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morohoshi, F.; Munakata, N.

    1985-03-01

    Three mutant strains exhibiting hyper-sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not to methyl methanesulfonate, were selected by a replica method from mutagenized spores of Bacillus subtilis. All three were totally deficient in the adaptive response to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine with regard to both lethality and mutagenesis. The activity to destroy O/sup 6/-methylguanine residues in the methylated DNA was not elevated in the mutant cells by the pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. This deficiency corresponded to the persistance of O/sup 6/-methylguanine residues in the DNA of both control and pretreated mutant cells challenged with the drug. The lethal and mutagenic sensitivity of the mutant strains were observed only for methyl- or ethyl-nitroso compounds that are thought to be active as inducers and are also active in O-alkylation. Except for the insensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, the phenotypes of these mutants look very similar to those of ada mutants isolated previously in Escherichia coli.

  13. Antibody Drug Conjugates Differentiate Uptake and DNA Alkylation of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines in Tumors from Organs of Xenograft Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Erickson, Hans K; Polson, Andrew; Pillow, Thomas H; Yu, Shang-Fan; Wang, Hong; Dragovich, Peter S; Zhang, Donglu

    2016-12-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD)-dimer is a DNA minor groove alkylator, and its CD22 THIOMAB antibody drug conjugate (ADC) demonstrated, through a disulfide linker, an efficacy in tumor reduction for more than 7 weeks with minimal body weight loss in xenograft mice after a single 0.5-1 mg/kg i.v. dose. The DNA alkylation was investigated here in tumors and healthy organs of mice to understand the sustained efficacy and tolerability. The experimental procedures included the collection of tumors and organ tissues of xenograft mice treated with the ADC followed by DNA isolation/hydrolysis/quantitation and payload recovery from reversible DNA alkylation. PBD-dimer formed a considerable amount of adducts with tissue DNA, representing approximately 98% (at 24 hours), and 99% (at 96 hours) of the total PBD-dimer in tumors, and 78-89% in liver and lung tissues, suggesting highly efficient covalent binding of the released PBD-dimer to tissue DNA. The amount of PBD-DNA adducts in tumor tissues was approximately 24-fold (at 24 hours) and 70-fold (at 96 hours) greater than the corresponding amount of adducts in liver and lung tissues. In addition, the DNA alkylation levels increased 3-fold to 4-fold from 24 to 96 hours in tumors [41/10 6 base pairs (bp) at 96 hours] but remained at the same level (1/10 6 bp) in livers and lungs. These results support the typical target-mediated cumulative uptake of ADC into tumors and payload release that offers an explanation for its sustained antitumor efficacy. In addition, the low level of DNA alkylation in normal tissues is consistent with the tolerability observed in mice. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Dose-Effect Relationship of Alkylating Agents on Testicular Function in Male Survivors of Childhood Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servitzoglou, Marina; De Vathaire, Florent; Oberlin, Odile; Patte, Catherine; Thomas-Teinturier, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the gonadal function in male survivors of childhood lymphoma. We studied 171 male survivors of childhood lymphoma (83 with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma [B-NHL], 32 with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma [T-NHL], 50 with Hodgkin lymphoma [HL], and 6 with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma [ALCL]), measuring follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH] and luteinizing hormone [LH] levels at a median age of 21.1 (17-30.4) years after a median delay of 9.3 (2-22.4) years from treatment. FSH levels were above normal range (≥10 IU/L) in 42.1% and LH levels ≥8 IU/L in only 8.9% of survivors. In multivariate analysis, only the following chemotherapeutic agents were associated with higher FSH or LH levels: cyclophosphamide (P alkylating agents on childhood lymphoma survivors is dose dependent and not correlated to diagnosis, age, or pubertal status at diagnosis.

  15. In vitro study of cytotoxicity by U.V. radiation and differential sensitivity in combination with alkylating agents on established cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramudu, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of U.V. radiation or alkylating agents, such as actinomycin-D, cycloheximide and mitomycin-C (MMC), was studied on CHO, BHK and HeLa cells. U.V. radiation caused DNA ssb and dsb and were prevented by cycloheximide and actinomycin-D. MMC is known to be cytotoxic in CHO/BHK cells by forming free radical generation. MMC in combination with U.V. radiation enhanced DNA ssb ampersand dsb in these cell types. However, HeLa cells were insensitive to U.V. radiation. This insensitivity to U.V. radiation could be ascribed to the presence of glutathione transferase which is absent in CHO/BHK cell line

  16. DNA damage induced in mouse peritoneal exudate cells after in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents as determined by alkaline elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Yoshisuke; Miyanaga, Kumiko; Sato, Sei-ichi; Inui, Naomichi

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline elution technique for detecting DNA strand breaks has been applied to the study of DNA damage in mouse peritoneal exudate cells resulting from the in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents. The direct methylating agents methyl methanesulphonate and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced extensive breakage in samples taken 2 h after administration. The direct ethylating agents ethyl methanesulphonate and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea also induced DNA strand breaks, but to a lesser extent than the methylating agents. The indirect methylating agent dimethylnitrosamine showed hardly any effect in this system. A weak but positive response was observed upon treatment with the anti-neoplastic alkylating agent procarbazine hydrochloride. The whole-body irradiation of mice with 60 Co γ-rays also induced DNA strand breaks. The elution profiles for γ-ray irradiation were different from those of alkylating agents, and indicate that alkylating agents produce many more secondary lesions leading to DNA strand breaks than γ-rays. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea produced slightly more DNA strand breaks in mutagen-sensitive mice, which are derived from the CD-1 strain, than in ICR mice. (Author)

  17. DNA damage induced in mouse peritoneal exudate cells after in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents as determined by alkaline elution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi, Yoshisuke (Japan Tobacco Inc., Yokohama (Japan). Central Research Inst.); Miyanaga, Kumiko; Sato, Sei-ichi (Japan Tobacco Inc., Hatano, Kanagawa (Japan). Toxicology Research Lab.); Inui, Naomichi (Japan Tobacco Inc., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline elution technique for detecting DNA strand breaks has been applied to the study of DNA damage in mouse peritoneal exudate cells resulting from the in vivo administration of chemical and physical agents. The direct methylating agents methyl methanesulphonate and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced extensive breakage in samples taken 2 h after administration. The direct ethylating agents ethyl methanesulphonate and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea also induced DNA strand breaks, but to a lesser extent than the methylating agents. The indirect methylating agent dimethylnitrosamine showed hardly any effect in this system. A weak but positive response was observed upon treatment with the anti-neoplastic alkylating agent procarbazine hydrochloride. The whole-body irradiation of mice with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays also induced DNA strand breaks. The elution profiles for {gamma}-ray irradiation were different from those of alkylating agents, and indicate that alkylating agents produce many more secondary lesions leading to DNA strand breaks than {gamma}-rays. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea produced slightly more DNA strand breaks in mutagen-sensitive mice, which are derived from the CD-1 strain, than in ICR mice. (Author).

  18. Probing Conformational Changes in Human DNA Topoisomerase IIα by Pulsed Alkylation Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung; Collins, Tammy R. L.; Guan, Ziqiang; Chen, Vincent B.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes for solving DNA topological problems by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient double-strand break in a second segment. The reaction requires the enzyme to precisely control DNA cleavage and gate opening coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Using pulsed alkylation mass spectrometry, we were able to monitor the solvent accessibilities around 13 cysteines distributed throughout human topoisomerase IIα by measuring the thiol reactivities with monobromobimane. Most of the measured reactivities are in accordance with the predicted ones based on a homology structural model generated from available crystal structures. However, these results reveal new information for both the residues not covered in the structural model and potential differences between the modeled and solution holoenzyme structures. Furthermore, on the basis of the reactivity changes of several cysteines located at the N-gate and DNA gate, we could monitor the movement of topoisomerase II in the presence of cofactors and detect differences in the DNA gate between two closed clamp enzyme conformations locked by either 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the anticancer drug ICRF-193. PMID:22679013

  19. Quantum molecular modeling of the interaction between guanine and alkylating agents--2--nitrogen mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, A; Broch, H; Vasilescu, D

    1996-06-01

    The alkylation mechanism of guanine by nitrogen mustard (HN2) was studied by using a supermolecular modeling at the ab initio 6-31G level. Our computations show that interaction of guanine with the aziridinium form of HN2 necessitates a transition state for the N7 alkylation route. The pathway of N7-guanine alkylation by nitrogen and sulfur mustards is discussed on the basis of the Molecular Electrostatic Potential and HOMO-LUMO properties of these molecules.

  20. Synthetic Routes to N-9 Alkylated 8-Oxoguanines; Weak Inhibitors of the Human DNA Glycosylase OGG1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar R. Mahajan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase OGG1 is involved in base excision repair (BER, one of several DNA repair mechanisms that may counteract the effects of chemo- and radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. We envisage that potent inhibitors of OGG1 may be found among the 9-alkyl-8-oxoguanines. Thus we explored synthetic routes to 8-oxoguanines and examined these as OGG1 inhibitors. The best reaction sequence started from 6-chloroguanine and involved N-9 alkylation, C-8 bromination, and finally simultaneous hydrolysis of both halides. Bromination before N-alkylation should only be considered when the N-substituent is not compatible with bromination conditions. The 8-oxoguanines were found to be weak inhibitors of OGG1. 6-Chloro-8-oxopurines, byproducts in the hydrolysis of 2,6-halopurines, turned out to be slightly better inhibitors than the corresponding 8-oxoguanines.

  1. Digital PCR assessment of MGMT promoter methylation coupled with reduced protein expression optimises prediction of response to alkylating agents in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Amatu, Alessio; Milione, Massimo; Cassingena, Andrea; Ghezzi, Silvia; Caporale, Marta; Berenato, Rosa; Falcomatà, Chiara; Pellegrinelli, Alessio; Bardelli, Alberto; Nichelatti, Michele; Tosi, Federica; De Braud, Filippo; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Barault, Ludovic; Siena, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) is a repair protein, and its deficiency makes tumours more susceptible to the cytotoxic effect of alkylating agents. Five clinical trials with temozolomide or dacarbazine have been performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with selection based on methyl-specific PCR (MSP) testing with modest results. We hypothesised that mitigated results are consequences of unspecific patient selection and that alternative methodologies for MGMT testing such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) and digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could enhance patient enrolment. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded archival tumour tissue samples from four phase II studies of temozolomide or dacarbazine in MGMT MSP-positive mCRCs were analysed by IHC for MGMT protein expression and by methyl-BEAMing (MB) for percentage of promoter methylation. Pooled data were then retrospectively analysed according to objective response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). One hundred and five patients were included in the study. Twelve had achieved partial response (PR) (11.4%), 24 stable disease (SD; 22.9%) and 69 progressive disease (PD; 65.7%). Patients with PR/SD had lower IHC scores and higher MB levels than those with PD. MGMT expression by IHC was negatively and MB levels positively associated with PFS (p alkylating agents. Their combination could enhance patient selection in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll-deficient mutations in rice after treatment with radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, A.K.; Kaul, M.L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Three varieties of rice were treated with gamma rays and two alkylating agents EMS and DES, separately and in combinations, with a view to finding out the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in relation to the genotype and the nature of the mutagen. Chlorophyll mutation frequency was enhanced with increasing dose but dropped at very high doses (doses that induced over 90% seeding lethality in M 1 ). The fall was attributed to either the increased mutated sector and diplontic selection after exposure to very high doses or relatively high resistance of some of the seeds. Among chlorophyll mutants in M 2 induced by radiations as well as alkylating agents, the albina type formed the majority class. EMS induced a significantly higher proportion of albinas than did gamma rays

  3. Quantitative and subcellular localization analysis of the nuclear isoform dUTP pyrophosphatase in alkylating agent-induced cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaolan; Yu, Yingnian; Li, Qian; Wu, Danxiao; Tan, Zhengning; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jvping; Wu, Meiping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → MNNG-induced appearance of DUT-N in the extracellular fluid has cellular specificity. → MNNG alters the subcellular distribution of DUT-N in human cells in different ways. → DUT-N may be a potential biomarker to assess the risk of alkylating agents exposure. -- Abstract: Our previous proteome analysis showed that the nuclear isoform of dUTP pyrophosphatase (DUT-N) was identified in the culture medium of human amnion FL cells after exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). These results suggest that DUT-N may be a potential early biomarker to assess the risk of alkylating agents exposure. DUT-N is one of the two isoforms of deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase). Our current knowledge of DUT-N expression in human cells is very limited. In the current study, we first investigated the appearance of DUT-N in the culture medium of different human cell lines in response to a low concentration of MNNG exposure. We verified that the MNNG-induced appearance of DUT-N in the extracellular environment is cell-specific. Western blot analysis confirmed that the intracellular DUT-N changes responded to MNNG in a concentration-dependent and cell-specific manner. Furthermore, subcellular fraction experiments showed that 0.25 μM MNNG treatment dramatically increased the DUT-N expression levels in the cytoplasmic extracts prepared from both FL and HepG2 cells, increased DUT-N levels in nuclear extracts prepared from HepG2 cells, and decreased DUT-N levels in nuclear extracts from FL cells. Morphological studies using immunofluorescence showed that a low concentration of MNNG could alter the distribution of DUT-N in FL and HepG2 cells in different ways. Taken together, these studies indicate a role of DUT-N in alkylating agent-induced cell responses.

  4. The cyclophosphamide equivalent dose as an approach for quantifying alkylating agent exposure: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel M; Nolan, Vikki G; Goodman, Pamela J; Whitton, John A; Srivastava, DeoKumar; Leisenring, Wendy M; Neglia, Joseph P; Sklar, Charles A; Kaste, Sue C; Hudson, Melissa M; Diller, Lisa R; Stovall, Marilyn; Donaldson, Sarah S; Robison, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of the risk of adverse long-term outcomes such as second malignant neoplasms and infertility often requires reproducible quantification of exposures. The method for quantification should be easily utilized and valid across different study populations. The widely used Alkylating Agent Dose (AAD) score is derived from the drug dose distribution of the study population and thus cannot be used for comparisons across populations as each will have a unique distribution of drug doses. We compared the performance of the Cyclophosphamide Equivalent Dose (CED), a unit for quantifying alkylating agent exposure independent of study population, to the AAD. Comparisons included associations from three Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) outcome analyses, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and goodness of fit based on the Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). The CED and AAD performed essentially identically in analyses of risk for pregnancy among the partners of male CCSS participants, risk for adverse dental outcomes among all CCSS participants and risk for premature menopause among female CCSS participants, based on similar associations, lack of statistically significant differences between the areas under the ROC curves and similar model fit values for the AIC between models including the two measures of exposure. The CED is easily calculated, facilitating its use for patient counseling. It is independent of the drug dose distribution of a particular patient population, a characteristic that will allow direct comparisons of outcomes among epidemiological cohorts. We recommend the use of the CED in future research assessing cumulative alkylating agent exposure. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Risk of therapy-related leukaemia and preleukaemia after Hodgkin's disease. Relation to age, cumulative dose of alkylating agents, and time from chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Specht, L.; Larsen, S.O.

    1987-01-01

    391 patients treated intensively for Hodgkin's disease were followed for up to 15 years to evaluate the risk of therapy-related acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (t-ANLL) and preleukaemia. Only two independent factors, patient age and cumulative dose of alkylating agents, were related to the risk...... of t-ANLL. The hazard rate of t-ANLL was roughly proportional to the square of patient age and to the total cumulative dose of alkylating agents. In 320 patients treated with alkylating agents the cumulative risk of t-ANLL increased steadily from 1 year after the start of treatment and reached 13.......0% (SE 3.0) at 10 years after which time there were no further cases. Calculated from cessation of therapy with alkylating agents, however, the cumulative risk curve increased steeply during the first 1-2 years then gradually levelled out and no new cases were observed beyond 7 years. With a 15-year...

  6. Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin or alkylating agents for neuroendocrine tumors: Comparison of efficacy and search for predictive factors guiding treatment choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussol, Anne-Sophie; Joly, Marie-Odile; Vercherat, Cecile; Forestier, Julien; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Walter, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The alkylating agents (ALKYs) streptozotocin, dacarbazine, and temozolomide currently are the main drugs used in systemic chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The promising activity shown by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX) in previous studies prompted this study 1) to confirm the use of GEMOX in a larger population of NET patients, 2) to compare its efficacy with that of ALKYs, and 3) to explore whether the O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status could help in selecting the chemotherapy regimen. One hundred four patients with metastatic NETs (37 pancreatic NETs, 33 gastrointestinal NETs, 23 bronchial NETs, and 11 NETs of other/unknown origin) were treated with GEMOX between 2004 and 2014. Among these patients, 63 also received ALKYs. MGMT promoter gene methylation was assessed via pyrosequencing in 42 patients. Patients received a median of 6 courses of GEMOX. Twenty-four (23%) had an objective response (OR). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 7.8 and 31.6 months, respectively. In the 63 patients treated with both ALKYs and GEMOX, the ORs (22% and 22%) and the PFSs (7.5 and 7.3 months) were similar. The response was concordant in 53% of the patients. Promoter gene methylation of MGMT was associated with better outcomes with ALKYs (P = .03 for OR and P = .04 for PFS) but not GEMOX. GEMOX is effective against NETs; its activity is comparable to that of ALKYs, and it is not influenced by the MGMT status. Our data suggest that GEMOX might be preferred for patients with unmethylated MGMT tumors. Cancer 2015;121:3435-43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  7. Aag Hypoxanthine-DNA Glycosylase Is Synthesized in the Forespore Compartment and Involved in Counteracting the Genotoxic and Mutagenic Effects of Hypoxanthine and Alkylated Bases in DNA during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-García, Víctor M; Valenzuela-García, Luz I; Setlow, Peter; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2016-12-15

    Aag from Bacillus subtilis has been implicated in in vitro removal of hypoxanthine and alkylated bases from DNA. The regulation of expression of aag in B. subtilis and the resistance to genotoxic agents and mutagenic properties of an Aag-deficient strain were studied here. A strain with a transcriptional aag-lacZ fusion expressed low levels of β-galactosidase during growth and early sporulation but exhibited increased transcription during late stages of this developmental process. Notably, aag-lacZ expression was higher inside the forespore than in the mother cell compartment, and this expression was abolished in a sigG-deficient background, suggesting a forespore-specific mechanism of aag transcription. Two additional findings supported this suggestion: (i) expression of an aag-yfp fusion was observed in the forespore, and (ii) in vivo mapping of the aag transcription start site revealed the existence of upstream regulatory sequences possessing homology to σ G -dependent promoters. In comparison with the wild-type strain, disruption of aag significantly reduced survival of sporulating B. subtilis cells following nitrous acid or methyl methanesulfonate treatments, and the Rif r mutation frequency was significantly increased in an aag strain. These results suggest that Aag protects the genome of developing B. subtilis sporangia from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of base deamination and alkylation. In this study, evidence is presented revealing that aag, encoding a DNA glycosylase implicated in processing of hypoxanthine and alkylated DNA bases, exhibits a forespore-specific pattern of gene expression during B. subtilis sporulation. Consistent with this spatiotemporal mode of expression, Aag was found to protect the sporulating cells of this microorganism from the noxious and mutagenic effects of base deamination and alkylation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Alkylation damage causes MMR-dependent chromosomal instability in vertebrate embryos.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feitsma, H.; Akay, A.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents, like N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), are potent mutagens. Exposure to alkylating agents gives rise to O(6)-alkylguanine, a modified base that is recognized by DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins but is not repairable, resulting in

  9. Mycothiol-Deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants Are Hypersensitive to Alkylating Agents, Free Radicals, and Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Mamta; Newton, Gerald L.; Ko, Mary; Martinez, Gladys J.; Fahey, Robert C.; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2002-01-01

    Mycothiol (MSH; 1d-myo-inosityl 2-[N-acetyl-l-cysteinyl]amido-2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside) is the major low-molecular-weight thiol produced by mycobacteria. Mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 deficient in MSH production were produced by chemical mutagenesis as well as by transposon mutagenesis. One chemical mutant (mutant I64) and two transposon mutants (mutants Tn1 and Tn2) stably deficient in MSH production were isolated by screening for reduced levels of MSH content. The MSH contents of transposon mutants Tn1 and Tn2 were found to be less than 0.1% that of the parent strain, and the MSH content of I64 was found to be 1 to 5% that of the parent strain. All three strains accumulated 1d-myo-inosityl 2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside to levels 20- to 25-fold the level found in the parent strain. The cysteine:1d-myo-inosityl 2-amino-2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside ligase (MshC) activities of the three mutant strains were ≤2% that of the parent strain. Phenotypic analysis revealed that these MSH-deficient mutants possess increased susceptibilities to free radicals and alkylating agents and to a wide range of antibiotics including erythromycin, azithromycin, vancomycin, penicillin G, rifamycin, and rifampin. Conversely, the mutants possess at least 200-fold higher levels of resistance to isoniazid than the wild type. We mapped the mutation in the chemical mutant by sequencing the mshC gene and showed that a single amino acid substitution (L205P) is responsible for reduced MSH production and its associated phenotype. Our results demonstrate that there is a direct correlation between MSH depletion and enhanced sensitivity to toxins and antibiotics. PMID:12384335

  10. Cross-sensitivity of X-ray-hypersensitive cells derived from LEC strain rats to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okui, T.; Endoh, D.; Arai, S.; Isogai, E.; Hayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The cross-sensitivity of X-ray-hypersensitive lung fibroblasts from LEC strain (LEC) rats to other DNA-damaging agents was examined. The LEC cells were 2- to 3-fold more sensitive to bleomycin (BLM) that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and to a cross-linking agent, mitomycin C, than the cells from WKAH strain (WKAH) rats, while they were slightly sensitive to alkylating agents, ethyl nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not to UV-irradiation. Although no difference was observed in the initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks induced by BLM between LEC and WKAH cells, the repair process of DNA double-strand breaks was significantly slower in LEC cells than in WKAH cells

  11. Twenty-five year outcome of sequential abdominopelvic radiotherapy and alkylating agent chemotherapy for ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellairs, Ellen E.; Twiggs, Leo B.; Potish, Roger A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study of sequential surgery, abdominopelvic radiotherapy and single agent alkylating chemotherapy was conducted to evaluate survival and toxicity in the management of ovarian carcinoma. Methods: From 1970-1976, 95 women with stage I-III epithelial ovarian carcinoma were scheduled to receive postoperative radiotherapy consisting of 20.0 Gy to the whole abdomen (1.0 Gy/day), a 29.75 Gy pelvic boost (1.75 Gy/day) and 10 subsequent courses of Melphalan (1 mg/kg/course). Endpoints were overall survival, disease-free survival(DFS), and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: The evaluable 94 patients included 19 stage I, 25 stage II, and 50 stage III. Of the latter, 21 had no palpable disease postoperatively (IIIN) and 29 had postoperative palpable disease (IIIP). Overall survival at 5, 10, 15 and 20 years was 42%, 30%, 23% and 22%. DFS for the entire group was 54% at 5 years and remained 50% from 10 to 25 years. All but two recurrences were noted within the first 27 months. No recurrence or treatment-related deaths occurred after 8 years. After 10 years, the survival of the study group became parallel to the general population. Prognostic factors were only related to stage (p<.001) and the presence of postoperative palpable disease(p<.001). DFS at 25 years was 95 % for stage I, 71% at 5 years and 66% from 10 to 25 years for stage II, and 17% at 5 years and 11% thereafter for stage III patients(p<.001). Although no stage IIIP patients were cured, 25% lived beyond 2 years. Five year DFS was significantly better in IIIN (45%) vs. IIIP (0%) patients (p<.001). The 65 patients without postoperative palpable disease, (stage I-IIIN) achieved DFS at 5 and 25 years of 69%, and 61%, respectively. Of 31 patients undergoing a second-look surgery, 84% were found to be free of tumor. Two recurred at 3.5 and 7 years after surgery. Acute tolerance was acceptable. Chronic toxicity included an 11.7% rate of small bowel obstruction requiring surgery and a 3% rate of

  12. Use of 2-mercaptopyridine for the determination of alkylating agents in complex matrices: application to dimethyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerheide, J G; Scott, R A

    2005-01-30

    A rapid and sensitive method for the determination of alkylating agents in complex reaction mixtures was developed and characterized. Analyses are based on the alkylation of 2-mercaptopyridine by the analyte; the derivative is separated by RP-HPLC and measured by fluorescence detection. When applied to the determination of dimethyl sulfate, the method is linear over four orders of magnitude: 0.01-10mugmL(-1). By using recrystallized 2-mercaptopyridine, quantitation limits of 10ngmL(-1) can be achieved. Precision of the assay is 2% R.S.D. in the 1-10mugmL(-1) range and about 15% R.S.D. at 10ngmL(-1). Studies on the pH dependence of the derivatization reaction were key to minimizing interference from the dimethyl sulfate degradation product, monomethyl sulfate, in quenched reaction samples.

  13. Rituximab, alkylating agents or combination therapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: a monocentric non-randomised observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, A; Lévy, M; Copie-Bergman, C; Dupuis, J; Szablewski, V; Le Baleur, Y; Baia, M; Belhadj, K; Sobhani, I; Leroy, K; Haioun, C; Delchier, J-C

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus on the standard treatment of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma for Helicobacter pylori-negative patients and for patients with persistent disease despite H. pylori eradication. To evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of alkylating agents and rituximab alone or in combination. In this monocentric retrospective study, which included 106 patients who had not been previously treated with anti-cancer agents, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral alkylating agents monotherapy (n = 48), rituximab monotherapy (n = 28) and the therapy combining both drugs (n = 30). Evaluations were performed at weeks 6 (W6), 25 (W25), and 52 (W52) and after 2 years (W104). After a median follow-up period of 4.9 years (range 0.4-17.2 years), complete remission and overall response were significantly higher in patients in the combination therapy group at W104 (92% and 100% respectively) compared with patients treated with alkylating agents alone (66% and 68%) and rituximab alone (64% and 73%). The 5-year progression-free survival probabilities were 68%, 70% and 89% in patients treated with alkylating agents alone, rituximab alone and combination therapy respectively. Haematological adverse events were reported in 32 (30%) patients (mostly grade 1) and were more frequent in the two groups receiving alkylating agents (P = 0.05 and P alkylating agents alone. Rituximab has a better safety profile than regimens containing alkylating agents. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Quantum molecular modeling of the interaction between guanine and alkylating agents--1--sulfur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broch, H; Hamza, A; Vasilescu, D

    1996-06-01

    Interaction between Guanine and the episulfonium form of Sulfur mustard (HD) was studied using the ab initio LCAO-MO method at the HF/6-31G level. The alkylation mechanism on guanine-N7 was analyzed by using a supermolecular modeling. Our stereostructural results associated with the molecular electrostatic potentials and HOMO-LUMO properties, show that in vacuum the alkylation of the N7 of guanine by HD in the aggressive episulfonium form is a direct process without transition state and of which the pathway is determined.

  15. HeLa cell variants that differ in sensitivity to monofunctional alkylating agents, with independence of cytotoxic and mutagenic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. M.; Voorhis, W. C. Van; Spencer, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Different strains of the established human cell line HeLa differ substantially in sensitivity to ethyl methanesulfonate (EtMes). The EtMes doses effective for either cytotoxicity or mutation induction in a line of HeLa S3 cells are about 1/10th those required in the CCL2 HeLa line of the American Type Culture Collection. By plating the sensitive HeLa S3 line in the presence of highly cytotoxic doses of EtMes, we obtained a clone (designated A6) that displays about 7-fold greater resistance to EtMes toxicity. This A6 isolate is also cross resistant to other simple monofunctional alkylating agents—exhibiting about 4-fold increased resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and 10- to 15-fold increased resistance to N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine but is similar to the S3 parent in sensitivity to mitomycin C, UV radiation, and γ-rays. In contrast to the results for cytotoxicity, the A6 variant and the S3 parent showed the same high susceptibility to EtMes induction of ouabain-resistant mutations. This is direct biological evidence that different alkylation lesions are normally responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic effects. The S3 and A6 cell lines may differ in DNA repair capability specific to certain potentially lethal alkylation products. The comparative sensitivity of the A6 cells to alkylation mutagenesis may also prove useful in cell genetic studies by facilitating the generation of multiple mutants for recessive alleles and permitting exceptionally sensitive detection of specific mutagenic effects. PMID:291942

  16. Effect of the radioprotector WR 2721 on the response of metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma colonies to alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wist, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    WR 2721 protected ''artificial'' lung metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma against the cytotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide and melphalan. When mice were pretreated with WR 2721 30 min before exposure to the alkylating agents a significant increase in the number of lung metastases could be observed. This protection of micrometastases had a significant impact on survival in the case of cyclophosphamide treatment, but not in the case of melphalan treatment. The degree of protection at a standard dose of WR 2721 was dose dependent. (orig.)

  17. Mutagenic interactions between near-ultraviolet (365 nm) radiation and alkylating agents in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, E.C. de; Tyrell, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The mutagenic interaction between near-ultrviolet (365 nm) radiation and the alkylting agents ehtyl methanesulponate (EMS) and methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was studied in a repair-component and an excision-deficient stram of Escherichia coli. Near-UV raditation modified the metabolic response of of exposure to these chemicals and either reduced or increased their mutagenic efficiency. Based on these results, an experimental model was formulated to explain the mutagenic interactions that occur between near-UV and various agents that induce prototrophic reverants cia error-prone repair of DNA. According to this model, low doses of near-UV provoke conditions for mutation frequency decline (MFI) and lead to a mutagenic antagonism. With increasing near-Uv doses, damage to constitutive error-free repairs system increases, favouring the error-prone system and inhibiting the MFD. Under these conditions there will be a progressive decrease in antagonism until at high doses an enhancement of mutation frequency (positive interaction) will occur. (orig.)

  18. Pi-activated alcohols: an emerging class of alkylating agents for catalytic Friedel-Crafts reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Marco; Tragni, Michele

    2009-04-21

    The direct functionalization of aromatic compounds, via Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions with alcohols, is one of the cornerstones in organic chemistry. The present emerging area deals with the recent advances in the use of pi-activated alcohols in the catalytic and stereoselective construction of benzylic stereocenters.

  19. An active site aromatic triad in Escherichia coli DNA Pol IV coordinates cell survival and mutagenesis in different DNA damaging agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Benson

    Full Text Available DinB (DNA Pol IV is a translesion (TLS DNA polymerase, which inserts a nucleotide opposite an otherwise replication-stalling N(2-dG lesion in vitro, and confers resistance to nitrofurazone (NFZ, a compound that forms these lesions in vivo. DinB is also known to be part of the cellular response to alkylation DNA damage. Yet it is not known if DinB active site residues, in addition to aminoacids involved in DNA synthesis, are critical in alkylation lesion bypass. It is also unclear which active site aminoacids, if any, might modulate DinB's bypass fidelity of distinct lesions. Here we report that along with the classical catalytic residues, an active site "aromatic triad", namely residues F12, F13, and Y79, is critical for cell survival in the presence of the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. Strains expressing dinB alleles with single point mutations in the aromatic triad survive poorly in MMS. Remarkably, these strains show fewer MMS- than NFZ-induced mutants, suggesting that the aromatic triad, in addition to its role in TLS, modulates DinB's accuracy in bypassing distinct lesions. The high bypass fidelity of prevalent alkylation lesions is evident even when the DinB active site performs error-prone NFZ-induced lesion bypass. The analyses carried out with the active site aromatic triad suggest that the DinB active site residues are poised to proficiently bypass distinctive DNA lesions, yet they are also malleable so that the accuracy of the bypass is lesion-dependent.

  20. Pseudomonas putida AlkA and AlkB proteins comprise different defense systems for the repair of alkylation damage to DNA - in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Mielecki

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents introduce cytotoxic and/or mutagenic lesions to DNA bases leading to induction of adaptive (Ada response, a mechanism protecting cells against deleterious effects of environmental chemicals. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response involves expression of four genes: ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB. In Pseudomonas putida, the organization of Ada regulon is different, raising questions regarding regulation of Ada gene expression. The aim of the presented studies was to analyze the role of AlkA glycosylase and AlkB dioxygenase in protecting P. putida cells against damage to DNA caused by alkylating agents. The results of bioinformatic analysis, of survival and mutagenesis of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG treated P. putida mutants in ada, alkA and alkB genes as well as assay of promoter activity revealed diverse roles of Ada, AlkA and AlkB proteins in protecting cellular DNA against alkylating agents. We found AlkA protein crucial to abolish the cytotoxic but not the mutagenic effects of alkylans since: (i the mutation in the alkA gene was the most deleterious for MMS/MNNG treated P. putida cells, (ii the activity of the alkA promoter was Ada-dependent and the highest among the tested genes. P. putida AlkB (PpAlkB, characterized by optimal conditions for in vitro repair of specific substrates, complementation assay, and M13/MS2 survival test, allowed to establish conservation of enzymatic function of P. putida and E. coli AlkB protein. We found that the organization of P. putida Ada regulon differs from that of E. coli. AlkA protein induced within the Ada response is crucial for protecting P. putida against cytotoxicity, whereas Ada prevents the mutagenic action of alkylating agents. In contrast to E. coli AlkB (EcAlkB, PpAlkB remains beyond the Ada regulon and is expressed constitutively. It probably creates a backup system that protects P. putida strains defective in other DNA repair systems

  1. Pseudomonas putida AlkA and AlkB Proteins Comprise Different Defense Systems for the Repair of Alkylation Damage to DNA – In Vivo, In Vitro, and In Silico Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Saumaa, Signe; Wrzesiński, Michał; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M.; Żuchniewicz, Karolina; Sikora, Anna; Piwowarski, Jan; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Kivisaar, Maia; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents introduce cytotoxic and/or mutagenic lesions to DNA bases leading to induction of adaptive (Ada) response, a mechanism protecting cells against deleterious effects of environmental chemicals. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response involves expression of four genes: ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB. In Pseudomonas putida, the organization of Ada regulon is different, raising questions regarding regulation of Ada gene expression. The aim of the presented studies was to analyze the role of AlkA glycosylase and AlkB dioxygenase in protecting P. putida cells against damage to DNA caused by alkylating agents. The results of bioinformatic analysis, of survival and mutagenesis of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treated P. putida mutants in ada, alkA and alkB genes as well as assay of promoter activity revealed diverse roles of Ada, AlkA and AlkB proteins in protecting cellular DNA against alkylating agents. We found AlkA protein crucial to abolish the cytotoxic but not the mutagenic effects of alkylans since: (i) the mutation in the alkA gene was the most deleterious for MMS/MNNG treated P. putida cells, (ii) the activity of the alkA promoter was Ada-dependent and the highest among the tested genes. P. putida AlkB (PpAlkB), characterized by optimal conditions for in vitro repair of specific substrates, complementation assay, and M13/MS2 survival test, allowed to establish conservation of enzymatic function of P. putida and E. coli AlkB protein. We found that the organization of P. putida Ada regulon differs from that of E. coli. AlkA protein induced within the Ada response is crucial for protecting P. putida against cytotoxicity, whereas Ada prevents the mutagenic action of alkylating agents. In contrast to E. coli AlkB (EcAlkB), PpAlkB remains beyond the Ada regulon and is expressed constitutively. It probably creates a backup system that protects P. putida strains defective in other DNA repair systems against

  2. Stability of solutions of antineoplastic agents during preparation and storage for in vitro assays. General considerations, the nitrosoureas and alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, A G

    1985-01-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity of tumour biopsies is currently being determined using a variety of methods. For these chemosensitivity assays many drugs are required at short notice, and this in turn means that the drugs must generally be stored in solution. There are, however, a number of potential problems associated with dissolving and storing drugs for in vitro use, which include (a) drug adsorption; (b) effects of freezing; (c) drug stability under the normal conditions of dilution and setting up of an in vitro assay; and (d) insolubility of drugs in normal saline (NS) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). These problems are considered in general, and some recommendations for use of solutions of drugs in in vitro assays are suggested. The nitrosoureas and alkylating agents are also investigated in greater detail in this respect. The nitrosoureas are found to be very labile in PBS at pH 7, with 5% degradation (t0.95) occurring in 10-50 min at room temperature. These values are increased about 10-fold on refrigeration and about 5- to 10-fold on reduction of the pH of the medium to pH 4-5. At pH 7 and room temperature, t0.95 is observed in under 1 h with the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard, chlorambucil, melphalan, 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-bis(2-hydroxyethylamino)-1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ), dibromodulcitol, dibromomannitol, treosulphan, and procarbazine. Of the other alkylating agents, 4-hydroperoxycylophosphamide (sometimes used in vitro in place of cyclophosphamide), busulphan, dianhydrogalactitol, aziridinylbenzoquinone (AZQ), and dacarbazine have a t0.95 of between 2 and 24 h, while ifosfamide and pentamethylmelamine are both stable in aqueous solution for greater than 7 days. About half the drugs studied in detail have been stored frozen in solution for in vitro use, although very little is known about their stability under these conditions.

  3. The monofunctional alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine triggers apoptosis through p53-dependent and -independent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.-J.; Beardsley, Dillon I.; Adamson, Aaron W.; Brown, Kevin D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the cellular responses to DNA damaging events is the activation of programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. Apoptosis is an important process in limiting tumorigenesis by eliminating cells with damaged DNA. This view is reinforced by the finding that many genes with pro-apoptotic function are absent or altered in cancer cells. The tumor suppressor p53 performs a significant role in apoptotic signaling by controlling expression of a host of genes that have pro-apoptotic or pro-survival function. The S N 1 DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) triggers apoptosis and the upregulation/phosphorylation of p53; however, the mechanism(s) governing MNNG-induced cell death remain unresolved. We observed that the human lymphoblastoid cell line WTK-1, which expresses mutant p53, shows far less sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG than the closely related, p53-normal line TK-6. Exposure to 15 μM MNNG (LD50 at 24 h in TK-6) leads to a kinetically slower rate of apoptotic onset in WTK-1 cells compared to TK-6 as judged by viability assays and approaches that directly examine apoptotic onset. Similar results were obtained using an unrelated human lymphoblastoid line B310 expressing reduced levels of p53 due to E6 oncoprotein expression, indicating that MNNG activates both p53-dependent and -independent apoptotic mechanisms and that these two mechanisms are discernable by the rates which they trigger apoptotic onset. We document, during time points corresponding to peak apoptotic response in TK6, WTK-1, B310, and B310-E6, that these cell lines show marked decreases in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increases in cytochrome c within the cytosolic fraction of MNNG-treated cells. Consistent with these events, we observed that both caspase-9 and -3 are activated in our panel of lymphoblastoid cells after MNNG exposure. We also found, using both broad spectrum and specific inhibitors, that blocking caspase activity in TK-6 and

  4. PML expression in soft tissue sarcoma: prognostic and predictive value in alkylating agents/antracycline-based first line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele; Schiavon, Gaia; Frezza, Anna Maria; Silletta, Marianna; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Casali, Paolo; Dei Tos, Angelo P; Rossi, Sabrina; Rizzo, Sergio; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Tomasino, Rosa Maria; Russo, Antonio; Butrynski, James E; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are aggressive tumors representing alkylating agents/antracycline-based first line therapy. One hundred eleven patients affected by locally advanced and metastatic soft tissue sarcoma were selected. PML expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis in pathological samples and in the corresponding normal tissue from each case. PML immunohistochemical results were correlated with prognosis and with radiological response to alkylating agents/antracycline-based first line therapy. PML expression was significantly reduced in synovial sarcomas (P < 0.0001), in myofibroblastic sarcomas (P < 0.0001), angiosarcomas (P < 0.0001), in leiomyosarcomas (P = 0.003), in mixoid liposarcomas (P < 0.0001), and in dedifferentiated liposarcomas (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was found for pleomorphic sarcoma [31.8 (95% CI: 16.7-41.0); P = 0.21]. and pleomorphic liposarcomas (P = 0.51). Loss of PML expression was found to be statistically correlated with TTP (P < 0.0001), median duration of response (P = 0.007), and OS (P = 0.02). No correlation was observed between PML expression and treatment efficacy. PML IHC expression is down-regulated in synovial sarcomas, myofibroblastic sarcomas, angiosarcomas, liposarcoma, and leiomyosarcomas and its expression correlated with prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Overexpression of metallothionein in CHO cells and its effect on cell killing by ionizing radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrer, H.; Robson, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metallothionein protein protects cells from the toxic effects of heavy metal ions. To establish its protective function against ionizing radiation and alkylating agents, a model system was created by transfecting two CHO cell lines (wild-type, K1-2 and X-ray sensitive, xrs-2 subclone Bc11) with the human metallothionein II-A (hMTII-A) gene integrated in a bovine papilloma derived autonomously replicating vector. The isolated transfectants are cadmium-resistant (Cd 1 ), due to the overexpression of the hMTII-A gene. Their steady-state level of hMTII-A mRNA can be increased up to 40-fold after Cd treatment and 20-fold after induction with ionizing radiation. The transfected cell lines proved to be as sensitive as the recipient cell lines to ionizing radiation and bleomycin but the transfectants were significantly more resistant to N-methyl-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and mitomycin C (MMC). These results lead to the conclusion that the MT protein does provide a defence mechanism to protect cells from monofunctional alkylating and cross-linking agents but not from free radicals. (author)

  6. Overexpression of metallothionein in CHO cells and its effect on cell killing by ionizing radiation and alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrer, H.; Robson, T. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Cancer Research Unit)

    1989-12-01

    Metallothionein protein protects cells from the toxic effects of heavy metal ions. To establish its protective function against ionizing radiation and alkylating agents, a model system was created by transfecting two CHO cell lines (wild-type, K1-2 and X-ray sensitive, xrs-2 subclone Bc11) with the human metallothionein II-A (hMTII-A) gene integrated in a bovine papilloma derived autonomously replicating vector. The isolated transfectants are cadmium-resistant (Cd{sup 1}), due to the overexpression of the hMTII-A gene. Their steady-state level of hMTII-A mRNA can be increased up to 40-fold after Cd treatment and 20-fold after induction with ionizing radiation. The transfected cell lines proved to be as sensitive as the recipient cell lines to ionizing radiation and bleomycin but the transfectants were significantly more resistant to N-methyl-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and mitomycin C (MMC). These results lead to the conclusion that the MT protein does provide a defence mechanism to protect cells from monofunctional alkylating and cross-linking agents but not from free radicals. (author).

  7. Novel Synthetic Monothiourea Aspirin Derivatives Bearing Alkylated Amines as Potential Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norsyafikah Asyilla Nordin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of aspirin bearing alkylated amines moieties 1–12 were synthesised by reacting isothiocyanate with a series of aniline derivatives in overall yield of 16–56%. The proposed structures of all the synthesised compounds were confirmed using elemental analysis, FTIR, and 1H and  13C NMR spectroscopy. All compounds were evaluated for antibacterial activities against E. coli and S. aureus via turbidimetric kinetic and Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Compound 5 bearing meta -CH3 substituent showed the highest relative inhibition zone diameter against tested bacteria compared to ortho and para substituent. Furthermore, aspirin derivatives bearing shorter chains exhibited better bacterial inhibition than longer alkyl chains.

  8. The influence of oxazaphosphorines alkylating agents on autonomic nervous system activity in rat experimental cystitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Baranowska, Agnieszka; Thor, Piotr J

    2013-01-01

    The oxazaphosphorines alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide; CP and ifosfamide; IF) are often used in common clinical practice. However, treatment with CP/IF is burdened with the risk of many adverse drug reactions, especially including hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) that is associated with bladder overactivity symptoms (OAB). The HC pathophysiology is still not fully displayed; it seems that autonomic nervous system (ANS) functional abnormalities play important role in this disturbance. The aim of our study was to reveal the potential ANS differences in rat experimental HC model, evoked by CP and IF by an indirect ANS assessment--heart rate variability (HRV) study. We carried out our experimental research in three essential groups: control group (group 1), cyclophosphamide-induced HC (CP-HC; group 2) one and ifosfamide-induced HC (IF-HC; group 3) one. CP was i.p. administrated four times in dose of 75 mg/kg body weight while IF-treated rats received i.p. five drug doses; 50 mg/kg body weight. Control rats were administrated i.p. vehicle in appropriate volumes as CP/IF treated animals. HRV studies were performed the next day after the last oxazaphosphorines dose. Standard time- and spectral (frequency) domain parameters were estimated. We confirmed the HC development after both CP/IF in macroscopic assessment and bladder wet weight measurement; however, it was more aggravated in CP-HC group. Moreover, we demonstrated HRV disturbances, suggesting ANS impairment after both studied oxazaphosphorines, however, consistent with the findings mentioned above, the autonomic dysfunction was more emphasized after CP. CP treatment was also associated with changes of non-normalized HRV spectral components percentage distribution--a marked very low frequency--VLF [%] increase together with low frequency--LF [%] and high frequency--HF [%] decrease were observed. Taking into consideration the next findings, demonstrating the lack of both normalized power spectral components (nLF and n

  9. In vitro sensitivity of normal and hereditary retinoblastoma fibroblasts to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, W.G.; Byrne, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the ability of nine fibroblast cell strains from patients with the hereditary form of retinoblastoma (RB) to handle various types of DNA-damaging agents and compared the results with those obtained in nine normal strains. Cell strains were exposed to gamma-radiation, which causes DNA scission; actinomycin D, a DNA-intercalating agent; and mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylating agent leading to DNA-DNA cross-linking. Cell strains were studied for their ability to survive in a cytotoxicity assay. Nine normal strains exhibited a mean D0 (inverse of the slope of the straight line portion of the survival curve) of 134-178 cGy after radiation exposure, compared to a range of 119-186 cGy in the nine RB strains (P = 0.33). Similarly, exposure to actinomycin D led to D0 values of 0.024-0.069 microgram/ml in the nine normal strains and D0 values of 0.016-0.067 microgram/ml in the RB strains (P = 0.64). The nine RB strains did exhibit a small overall increase in sensitivity after exposure to mitomycin C, with D0 values ranging from 0.14-0.32 microgram/ml versus 0.19-0.66 microgram/ml in the nine normal strains (P = 0.002); however, when the two most resistant normal strains were excluded from analysis, results were similar. Three RB cell strains derived from individuals who had either developed second cancers or who had a family history of additional sarcomas consistently exhibited increases in sensitivity to all three DNA-damaging agents studied compared with other hereditary RB cell strains as well as normal strains. The results suggest that normal human fibroblast cell strains exhibit a wide response to DNA-damaging agents, especially chemical agents. Most hereditary RB strains exhibit sensitivity well within the normal range; however, strains from RB patients predisposed to second cancers exhibit increases in sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

  10. Alkylating chemotherapeutic agents cyclophosphamide and melphalan cause functional injury to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Kevin; Morse, Ruth; Sanders, Kelly; Hows, Jill; Donaldson, Craig

    2011-07-01

    The adverse effects of melphalan and cyclophosphamide on hematopoietic stem cells are well-known; however, the effects on the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) residing in the bone marrow are less well characterised. Examining the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on patient MSCs in vivo is difficult due to variability in patients and differences in the drug combinations used, both of which could have implications on MSC function. As drugs are not commonly used as single agents during high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) regimens, there is a lack of data comparing the short- or long-term effects these drugs have on patients post treatment. To help address these problems, the effects of the alkylating chemotherapeutic agents cyclophosphamide and melphalan on human bone marrow MSCs were evaluated in vitro. Within this study, the exposure of MSCs to the chemotherapeutic agents cyclophosphamide or melphalan had strong negative effects on MSC expansion and CD44 expression. In addition, changes were seen in the ability of MSCs to support hematopoietic cell migration and repopulation. These observations therefore highlight potential disadvantages in the use of autologous MSCs in chemotherapeutically pre-treated patients for future therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, this study suggests that if the damage caused by chemotherapeutic agents to marrow MSCs is substantial, it would be logical to use cultured allogeneic MSCs therapeutically to assist or repair the marrow microenvironment after HDC.

  11. Determination of methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl- and 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acids as biomarkers of exposure to alkylating agents in cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Gerhard; Urban, Michael; Hagedorn, Heinz-Werner; Serafin, Richard; Feng, Shixia; Kapur, Sunil; Muhammad, Raheema; Jin, Yan; Sarkar, Mohamadi; Roethig, Hans-Juergen

    2010-10-01

    Alkylating agents occur in the environment and are formed endogenously. Tobacco smoke contains a variety of alkylating agents or precursors including, among others, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), acrylonitrile and ethylene oxide. We developed and validated a method for the simultaneous determination of methylmercapturic acid (MMA, biomarker for methylating agents such as NDMA and NNK), 2-hydroxyethylmercapturic acid (HEMA, biomarker for ethylene oxide) and 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid (CEMA, biomarker for acrylonitrile) in human urine using deuterated internal standards of each compound. The method involves liquid/liquid extraction of the urine sample, solid phase extraction on anion exchange cartridges, derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr), liquid/liquid extraction of the reaction mixture and LC-MS/MS analysis with positive electrospray ionization. The method was linear in the ranges of 5.00-600, 1.00-50.0 and 1.50-900 ng/ml for MMA, HEMA and CEMA, respectively. The method was applied to two clinical studies in adult smokers of conventional cigarettes who either continued smoking conventional cigarettes, were switched to test cigarettes consisting of either an electrically heated cigarette smoking system (EHCSS) or having a highly activated carbon granule filter that were shown to have reduced exposure to specific smoke constituents, or stopped smoking. Urinary excretion of MMA was found to be unaffected by switching to the test cigarettes or stop smoking. Urinary HEMA excretion decreased by 46 to 54% after switching to test cigarettes and by approximately 74% when stopping smoking. Urinary CEMA excretion decreased by 74-77% when switching to test cigarettes and by approximately 90% when stopping smoking. This validated method for urinary alkylmercapturic acids is suitable to distinguish differences in exposure not only between smokers and nonsmokers but also between smoking of conventional and

  12. Glioblastoma and chemoresistance to alkylating agents: Involvement of apoptosis, autophagy, and unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Mehrpour, Maryam; Shojaei, Shahla; Harlos, Craig; Pitz, Marshall; Hamai, Ahmed; Siemianowicz, Krzysztof; Likus, Wirginia; Wiechec, Emilia; Toyota, Brian D; Hoshyar, Reyhane; Seyfoori, Amir; Sepehri, Zahra; Ande, Sudharsana R; Khadem, Forough; Akbari, Mohsen; Gorman, Adrienne M; Samali, Afshin; Klonisch, Thomas; Ghavami, Saeid

    2018-04-01

    Despite advances in neurosurgical techniques and radio-/chemotherapy, the treatment of brain tumors remains a challenge. This is particularly true for the most frequent and fatal adult brain tumor, glioblastoma (GB). Upon diagnosis, the average survival time of GB patients remains only approximately 15months. The alkylating drug temozolomide (TMZ) is routinely used in brain tumor patients and induces apoptosis, autophagy and unfolded protein response (UPR). Here, we review these cellular mechanisms and their contributions to TMZ chemoresistance in brain tumors, with a particular emphasis on TMZ chemoresistance in glioma stem cells and GB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The 18F-labelled alkylating agent 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl triflate: synthesis and specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstroem, P.; Stone-Elander, S.

    1995-01-01

    A method for synthesizing the alkylating agent 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl triflate labelled with [ 18 ]fluoride in the two position is presented. Ethyl [2- 18 )F]-trifluoroacetate was synthesized by the nucleophilic reaction of [ 18 F]F - with ethyl bromodifluoroacetate in DMSO (45-60%, 5 min, 80 o C) and subsequently converted to [2- 18 F]-2,2,2-trifluoroethanol using alane in THF (85-95%, 2 min, 40 o C. Reaction with triflic anhydride in 2,6-lutidine produced [2- 18 F]-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl triflate (70-80%, 1 min, 0 o C. In all three cases the product was removed from the reaction vessel by heating to distil under a stream of nitrogen. [2- 18 F]-2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl triflate was used to label 2-oxoquazepam by N-alkylation in a toulene:DMF mixture (80-85%, 20 min, 120 o C). Although no-carrier-added [ 18 )F]F - was used, considerable unlabelled ethyl trifluoroacetate was produced in the first reaction. Varying the conditions for the fluoro-debromination reaction did not appreciably improve the relative ratio of labelled to unlabelled ester. The specific activity of the labelled 1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one obtained from 1850 MBq [ 18 F]F - was found to be ≅37 MBq/μmol (1mCi/μmol). (Author)

  14. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    '-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  15. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurz, Ebba U; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2004-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a master switch controlling the cell cycle in response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...

  16. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurz, Ebba U; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a master switch controlling the cell cycle in response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...

  17. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho

    2007-01-01

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant

  18. [Sensitivity of the splenic immunocompetent cells of mice with different genotypes to the action of alkylating agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevnitskiĭ, L A; Telegin, L Iu; Ir, K N

    1985-08-01

    It has been established in experiments in vitro that splenocytes of DBA/2GSto mice are more sensitive to the immunosuppressant action of the alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide, sarcolysine and thiophosphamide) than splenocytes of BALB/cGLacSto mice. Splenocytes of C3H/SnRap mice exhibit and intermediate type of sensitivity. T-lymphocytes of the spleen of BALB/cGLacSto and DBA/2GSto mice are more sensitive in vitro to the action of active metabolites of cyclophosphamide as compared to B-lymphocytes, with both types of the cells of DBA/2GSto mice being affected to a greater extent than the cells of BALB/cGLacSto mice.

  19. Alkylating Agent-Induced NRF2 Blocks Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis via Control of Glutathione Pools and Protein Thiol Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Masamsetti, V Pragathi; Loranc, Eva; Tonapi, Sonal S; Gorthi, Aparna; Bernard, Xavier; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Moreira, José C F; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-12-01

    Alkylating agents are a commonly used cytotoxic class of anticancer drugs. Understanding the mechanisms whereby cells respond to these drugs is key to identify means to improve therapy while reducing toxicity. By integrating genome-wide gene expression profiling, protein analysis, and functional cell validation, we herein demonstrated a direct relationship between NRF2 and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to alkylating agents, which is coordinated by the availability of glutathione (GSH) pools. GSH is essential for both drug detoxification and protein thiol homeostasis within the ER, thus inhibiting ER stress induction and promoting survival, an effect independent of its antioxidant role. NRF2 accumulation induced by alkylating agents resulted in increased GSH synthesis via GCLC/GCLM enzyme, and interfering with this NRF2 response by either NRF2 knockdown or GCLC/GCLM inhibition with buthionine sulfoximine caused accumulation of damaged proteins within the ER, leading to PERK-dependent apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of NRF2, through KEAP1 depletion or NRF2-myc overexpression, or increasing GSH levels with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione-ethyl-ester, decreased ER stress and abrogated alkylating agents-induced cell death. Based on these results, we identified a subset of lung and head-and-neck carcinomas with mutations in either KEAP1 or NRF2/NFE2L2 genes that correlate with NRF2 target overexpression and poor survival. In KEAP1-mutant cancer cells, NRF2 knockdown and GSH depletion increased cell sensitivity via ER stress induction in a mechanism specific to alkylating drugs. Overall, we show that the NRF2-GSH influence on ER homeostasis implicates defects in NRF2-GSH or ER stress machineries as affecting alkylating therapy toxicity. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 3000-14. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Alkylating agent induced NRF2 blocks endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis via control of glutathione pools and protein thiol homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Masamsetti, V. Pragathi; Loranc, Eva; Tonapi, Sonal S.; Gorthi, Aparna; Bernard, Xavier; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Moreira, José C. F.; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a commonly used cytotoxic class of anticancer drugs. Understanding the mechanisms whereby cells respond to these drugs is key to identify means to improve therapy while reducing toxicity. By integrating genome-wide gene expression profiling, protein analysis and functional cell validation, we herein demonstrated a direct relationship between NRF2 and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to alkylating agents, which is coordinated by the availability of glutathione (GSH) pools. GSH is essential for both drug detoxification and protein thiol homeostasis within the ER, thus inhibiting ER stress induction and promoting survival; an effect independent of its antioxidant role. NRF2 accumulation induced by alkylating agents resulted in increased GSH synthesis via GCLC/GCLM enzyme, and interfering with this NRF2 response by either NRF2 knockdown or GCLC/GCLM inhibition with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) caused accumulation of damaged proteins within the ER, leading to PERK-dependent apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of NRF2, through KEAP1 depletion or NRF2-myc overexpression, or increasing GSH levels with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or glutathione-ethyl-ester (GSH-E), decreased ER stress and abrogated alkylating agents-induced cell death. Based on these results, we identified a subset of lung and head-and-neck carcinomas with mutations in either KEAP1 or NRF2/NFE2L2 genes that correlate with NRF2 targets overexpression and poor survival. In KEAP1 mutant cancer cells, NRF2 knockdown and GSH depletion increased cell sensitivity via ER stress induction in a mechanism specific to alkylating drugs. Overall, we show that the NRF2-GSH influence on ER homeostasis implicates defects in NRF2-GSH or ER stress machineries as affecting alkylating therapy toxicity. PMID:27638861

  1. Overproduction of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase DNA-binding domain blocks alkylation-induced DNA repair synthesis in mammalian cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Molinete; W. Vermeulen (Wim); A. Bürkle; J. Mé nissier-de Murcia; J.H. Küpper; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G. de Murcia

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe zinc-finger DNA-binding domain (DBD) of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP, EC 2.4.2.30) specifically recognizes DNA strand breaks induced by various DNA-damaging agents in eukaryotes. This, in turn, triggers the synthesis of polymers of ADP-ribose linked to nuclear proteins during

  2. Investigating the heterogeneity of alkylating agents' efficacy and toxicity between sexes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide (MAIAGE study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fresneau, Brice; Hackshaw, A.; Hawkins, D. S.; Paulussen, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Judson, I.; Litière, S.; Dirksen, U.; Lewis, I.; van den Berg, H.; Gaspar, N.; Gelderblom, H.; Whelan, J.; Boddy, A. V.; Wheatley, K.; Pignon, J. P.; de Vathaire, F.; Le Deley, M. C.; Le Teuff, G.

    2017-01-01

    A marginal interaction between sex and the type of alkylating agent was observed for event-free survival in the Euro-EWING99-R1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in Ewing sarcoma. To further evaluate this interaction, we performed an individual patient data

  3. Formation of enamines by alkylation of imines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiszwolf, G.J.; Kloosterziel, H.

    1966-01-01

    cf. CA 64, 12473c. With ice-cooling, 1 equiv. alkylating agent was added to one equiv. of the imine in 1M soln. in a solvent in the presence of NaH to give both N- and C-alkylated products. The following summarizes the date (imine, solvent, alkylating agent, % unreacted imine, % N-alkylated product,

  4. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of alkylating agents, methylnitrosourea and temozolomide, using the rat Pig-a assay with total red blood cells or reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Shigeharu; Yamada, Katsuya; Kato, Tatsuya; Ando, Masamitsu; Inoue, Yoshimi; Iwase, Yumiko; Uno, Yoshifumi

    2016-11-15

    A collaborative study of the endogenous phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (Pig-a) gene mutation assay was conducted by the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group with a single-dosing regimen of test chemicals administered to male rats. As a part of the study, two DNA alkylating agents, methylnitrosourea (MNU) and temozolomide (TMZ), were dosed by single oral gavage at 25, 50, and 100mg/kg body weight. Pig-a mutant analysis of total red blood cells (RBCs; RBC Pig-a assay) and reticulocytes (RETs; PIGRET assay) was performed on Days 8, 15 and 29 after the administration. Both chemicals increased Pig-a mutants among RBCs and RETs with dose dependency on all days examined. The mutant frequencies were higher among RETs compared with RBCs, indicating that the PIGRET assay could detect mutagenicity more sensitively than the RBC Pig-a assay after a single dose of test chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular evolution of Theta-class glutathione transferase for enhanced activity with the anticancer drug 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and other alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anna-Karin; Shokeer, Abeer; Mannervik, Bengt

    2010-05-01

    Glutathione transferase (GST) displaying enhanced activity with the cytostatic drug 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and structurally related alkylating agents was obtained by molecular evolution. Mutant libraries created by recursive recombination of cDNA coding for human and rodent Theta-class GSTs were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and screened with the surrogate substrate 4-nitrophenethyl bromide (NPB) for enhanced alkyltransferase activity. A mutant with a 70-fold increased catalytic efficiency with NPB, compared to human GST T1-1, was isolated. The efficiency in degrading BCNU had improved 170-fold, significantly more than with the model substrate NPB. The enhanced catalytic activity of the mutant GST was also 2-fold higher with BCNU than wild-type mouse GST T1-1, which is 80-fold more efficient than wild-type human GST T1-1. We propose that GSTs catalyzing inactivation of anticancer drugs may find clinical use in protecting sensitive normal tissues to toxic side-effects in treated patients, and as selectable markers in gene therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting the plasma membrane of neoplastic cells through alkylation: a novel approach to cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendowski, Matthew; Fondy, Thomas P

    2015-08-01

    Although DNA-directed alkylating agents and related compounds have been a mainstay in chemotherapeutic protocols due to their ability to readily interfere with the rapid mitotic progression of malignant cells, their clinical utility is limited by DNA repair mechanisms and immunosuppression. However, the same destructive nature of alkylation can be reciprocated at the cell surface using novel plasma membrane alkylating agents. Plasma membrane alkylating agents have elicited long term survival in mammalian models challenged with carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Further, a specialized group of plasma membrane alkylating agents known as tetra-O-acetate haloacetamido carbohydrate analogs (Tet-OAHCs) potentiates a substantial leukocyte influx at the administration and primary tumor site, indicative of a potent immune response. The effects of plasma membrane alkylating agents may be further potentiated through the use of another novel class of chemotherapeutic agents, known as dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) inhibitors, since many cancer types are known to rely on the DHAP pathway for lipid synthesis. Despite these compelling data, preliminary clinical trials for plasma membrane-directed agents have yet to be considered. Therefore, this review is intended for academics and clinicians to postulate a novel approach of chemotherapy; altering critical malignant cell signaling at the plasma membrane surface through alkylation, thereby inducing irreversible changes to functions needed for cell survival.

  7. Lethal and mutagenic effects of radiation and alkylating agents on two strains of mouse L5178Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.H.; Horng, M.; Beer, J.Z.

    1986-01-01

    The two closely related strains of L5178Y (LY) mouse lymphoma cells, LY-R and LY-S, have been shown to differ in their sensitivity to UV and ionizing radiation. In the present work, the lethal and mutagenic effects of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), methyl nitrosourea (MNU) and UV radiation (254 nm) were compared in the two strains. Mutability at the Na + /K + -ATPase locus as well as the HGPRT locus was determined. The authors found strain LY-S to be more resistant than strain LY-R to the lethal effects of UV radiation. In contrast, strain LY-S was more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of the two alkylating agents. In spite of these differences in sensitivity, the authors found strain LY-S to be less mutable than strain LY-R by all 3 agents at the HGPRT locus. At the Na + /K + -ATPase locus, strain LY-S was also less mutable than strain LY-R by equal concentrations of EMS and UV radiation and by equitoxic concentrations of MNU. However, the difference between the strains was much more pronounced at the HGPRT locus than at the Na + /K + -ATPase locus. The authors have suggested that the interaction of unrepaired lesions in strain LY-S tends to cause an excess of deletions and multilocus effects, which in turn result in a locus-dependent decrease in the recovery of viable LY-S mutant cells. (Auth.)

  8. Aag-initiated base excision repair drives alkylation-induced retinal degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Lisiane B; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A; Green, Stephanie L; Calvo, Jennifer A; Bronson, Roderick T; Shah, Dharini; Samson, Leona D

    2009-01-20

    Vision loss affects >3 million Americans and many more people worldwide. Although predisposing genes have been identified their link to known environmental factors is unclear. In wild-type animals DNA alkylating agents induce photoreceptor apoptosis and severe retinal degeneration. Alkylation-induced retinal degeneration is totally suppressed in the absence of the DNA repair protein alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) in both differentiating and postmitotic retinas. Moreover, transgenic expression of Aag activity restores the alkylation sensitivity of photoreceptors in Aag null animals. Aag heterozygotes display an intermediate level of retinal degeneration, demonstrating haploinsufficiency and underscoring that Aag expression confers a dominant retinal degeneration phenotype.

  9. Synthesis of omega-hydroxy carboxylic acids and alpha,omega-dimethyl ketones using alpha,omega-diols as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Yosuke; Hyotanishi, Megumi; Miller, Brittany E; Maeda, Kensaku; Obora, Yasushi; Ishii, Yasutaka

    2010-03-05

    Synthesis of omega-hydroxy carboxylic acids and alpha,omega-dimethyl diketones was successfully achieved by using alpha,omega-diols as alkylating agents under the influence of an iridium catalyst. For example, the alkylation of butyl cyanoacetate with 1,13-tridecanediol in the presence of [IrCl(cod)](2) or [IrCl(coe)(2)](2) gave rise to butyl 2-cyano-15-hydroxypentadecanoate in good yield which is easily converted to cyclopentadecanolide (CPDL). In addition, the alkylation of acetone with 1,10-decanediol in the presence of [IrCl(cod)](2) and KOH resulted in an important muscone precursor, 2,15-hexadecanedione (HDDO), in good yield.

  10. Interfce alkylation of ethyldiphenylphosphinylacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarkevich, A.N.; Tsvetkov, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The paper deals with the alkylation of the methyline group of ethyldiphenylphosphinylacetate (1) by different alkylating agents in the presence of Cs 2 CO 3 . In all cases the application of Cs 2 CO 3 results in a significant increase of reaction rate. 10 refs., 3 tabs

  11. Bladder urotoxicity pathophysiology induced by the oxazaphosphorine alkylating agents and its chemoprevention 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Dobrek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of oxazaphosphorines (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide in the treatment of numerous neoplastic disorders is associated with their essential adverse effect in the form of hemorrhagic cystitis, which considerably limits the safety and efficacy of their pharmacotherapy. HC is a complex inflammatory response, induced by toxic oxazaphosphorines metabolite – acrolein with subsequent immunocompetetive cells activation and release of many proinflammatory agents. However, there are some chemoprotectant agents which help reduce the HC exacerbation.The article briefly discuses the mechanism of action of oxazaphosphorines, the pathophysiology of the hemorrhagic cystitis development and currently accepted chemopreventive agents, applied to the objective of urotoxicity amelioration. Moreover, the rationale for some phytopharmaceuticals administration as novel bladder protective compounds accompanying cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide therapy was also mentioned. 

  12. Increased sensitivity of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta 1 null cells to alkylating agents reveals a novel link between TGFbeta signaling and O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase promoter hypermethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Vijayachandra, K; Penner, C; Glick, A

    2001-06-01

    Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-signaling pathway and gene silencing through hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands are two frequent alterations in human and experimental cancers. Here we report that nonneoplastic TGFbeta1-/- keratinocyte cell lines exhibit increased sensitivity to cell killing by alkylating agents, and this is due to lack of expression of the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In TGFbeta1-/- but not TGFbeta1+/- cell lines, the CpG dinucleotides in the MGMT promoter are hypermethylated, as measured by restriction enzyme analysis and methylation specific polymerase chain reaction. In one unstable TGFbeta1+/- cell line, loss of the wild type TGFbeta1 allele correlates with the appearance of methylation in the MGMT promoter. Bisulfite sequencing shows that in the KO3 TGFbeta1-/- cell line nearly all of the 28 CpG sites in the MGMT promoter 475 base pairs upstream of the start site of transcription are methylated, whereas most are unmethylated in the H1 TGFbeta1+/- line. Treatment of the TGFbeta1-/- cell lines with 5-azacytidine causes reexpression of MGMT mRNA and demethylation of CpG islands in the promoter. Analysis of the time course of methylation using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction shows a lack of methylation in primary TGFbeta1-/- keratinocytes and increasing methylation with passage number of immortalized clones. Subcloning of early passage clones reveals a remarkable heterogeneity and instability of the methylation state in the TGFbeta1-/- keratinocytes. Thus, the TGFbeta1-/- genotype does not directly regulate MGMT methylation but predisposes cells to immortalization-associated MGMT hypermethylation.

  13. DNA alkylation and tumor induction in regenerating rat liver after cell cycle-related continuous N-nitrosodimethylamine infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabes, H.M.; Kerler, R.; Wilhelm, R.

    1983-01-01

    Synchronized regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy was used to study cell cycle-related DNA base alkylation and liver carcinogenesis. A continuous iv infusion of (/sup 14/C)N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/hour was given to inbred male Wistar Af/Han rats over a period of 8 hours either during the G1 phase, hydroxyurea-synchronized DNA synthesis, or the G2+M-phase of regenerating liver or to untreated rats (G0-phase liver--carcinogen dose, 1.5 mg/kg/hour). Two hours after the end of the infusion, the amount of 7-methylguanine was highest in the G0-phase liver, with a decrease in the G1 phase, the S-phase, and the G2+M-phase. After continuous DMN exposure, the O/sub 6/-methylguanine:7-methylguanine ratio was lower in the S-phase and G2+M-phase livers than in the G0-phase and G1-phase livers, indicating an increased O/sub 6/-methylguanine repair during DNA synthesis and the G2+M-phase. Liver tumors in rats treated by continuous DMN infusion either during the G0 phase or the S-phase developed only after carcinogen exposure during DNA synthesis.

  14. Reichardt's dye and its reactions with the alkylating agents 4-chloro-1-butanol, ethyl methanesulfonate, 1-bromobutane and Fast Red B - a potentially useful reagent for the detection of genotoxic impurities in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Damion K; Whitcombe, Michael J; McCrossen, Sean; Piletsky, Sergey

    2009-04-01

    Alkylating agents are potentially genotoxic impurities that may be present in drug products. These impurities occur in pharmaceuticals as by-products from the synthetic steps involved in drug production, as impurities in starting materials or from in-situ reactions that take place in the final drug product. Currently, analysis for genotoxic impurities is typically carried out using either HPLC/MS or GC/MS. These techniques require specialist expertise, have long analysis times and often use sample clean-up procedures. Reichardt's dye is well known for its solvatochromic properties. In this paper the dye's ability to undergo alkylation is reported. The reaction between Reichardt's dye and alkylating agents such as 4-chloro-1-butanol and ethyl methanesulfonate was monitored spectrophotometrically at 618 nm in acetonitrile and 624 nm in N,N-dimethylformamide. Changes in absorption were observed using low levels of alkylating agent (5-10 parts per million). Alkylation of the dye with 4-chloro-1-butanol and ethyl methanesulfonate was confirmed. Reichardt's dye, and its changing UV absorption, was examined in the presence of paracetamol (10 and 100 mg/ml). Whilst the alkylation-induced changes in UV absorption were not as pronounced as with standard solutions, detection of alkylation was still possible. Using standard solutions and in the presence of a drug matrix, Reichardt's dye shows promise as a reagent for detection of low levels of industrially important alkylating agents.

  15. Slx4 becomes phosphorylated after DNA damage in a Mec1/Tel1-dependent manner and is required for repair of DNA alkylation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Sonja; Rouse, John

    2005-01-01

    Members of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, mutated in several syndromes associated with cancer predisposition, are key regulators of genome stability. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLX4 gene is required for cell viability in the absence of Sgs1, the only yeast RecQ helicase. SLX4 encodes one subunit of the heterodimeric Slx1–Slx4 endonuclease, although its cellular function is not clear. Slx1–Slx4 was reported to preferentially cleave replication fork-like structures in vitro, and cells lacking SLX4 are hypersensitive to DNA alkylation damage. Here we report that Slx4 becomes phosphorylated in cells exposed to a wide range of genotoxins. Even though it has been proposed that the role of Slx4 is restricted to S-phase, Slx4 phosphorylation is observed in cells arrested in G1 or G2 phases of the cell cycle, but not during an unperturbed cell cycle. Slx4 phosphorylation is completely abolished in cells lacking the Mec1 and Tel1 protein kinases, critical regulators of genome stability, but is barely affected in the absence of both Rad53 and Chk1 kinases. Finally we show that, whereas both Slx1 and Slx4 are dispensable for activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, Slx4, but not Slx1, is required for repair of DNA alkylation damage in both aynchronously growing cells and in G2-phase-arrested cells. These results reveal Slx4 as a new target of the Mec1/Tel1 kinases, with a crucial role in DNA repair that is not restricted to the processing of stalled replisomes. PMID:15975089

  16. Investigation of J-shaped dose-responses induced by exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Katherine E; Hoffmann, George R; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2017-07-01

    Hormesis is defined as a biphasic dose-response where biological effects of low doses of a stressor demonstrate the opposite effect to high-dose effects of the same stressor. Hormetic, or J-shaped, dose-response relationships are relatively rarely observed in toxicology, resulting in a limited understanding and even some skepticism of the concept. Low dose-response studies for genotoxicity endpoints have been performed at Swansea University for over a decade. However, no statistically significant decreases below control genotoxicity levels have been detected until recently. A hormetic-style dose-response following a 24h exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) was observed in a previous study for HPRT mutagenesis in the human lymphoblastoid cell line AHH-1. A second recent study demonstrated a J-shaped dose-response for the induction of micronuclei by MNU in a 24h treatment in a similar test system. Following mechanistic investigations, it was hypothesized that p53 may be responsible for the observed hormetic phenomenon. As genotoxic carcinogens are a major causative factor of many cancers, consideration of hormesis in carcinogenesis could be important in safety assessment. The data examined here offer possible insights into hormesis, including its estimated prevalence, underlying mechanisms and lack of generalizability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radioiodinated 2-nitrobenzyl carbamates as bioreductive alkylating agents for tissue hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthbert, P.A.; Wearring, A.V.; Chamberlain, M.J.; Hunter, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Three N-methylcarbamates of iodonitrobenzyl alcohols (4-iodo-2-nitrobenzyl alcohol 2, 5-iodo-2-nitrobenzyl alcohol 3 and 4-iodo-2,6-dinitrobenzyl alcohol 4) bearing [ 125 I] have been prepared and characterized for their lipophilicity, their reduction potentials and the in vivo lability of the radioiodine in healthy mice. Based upon these results, 2 and 4 were tested in tumor-bearing mice showing limited uptake of radioactivity in tumours and a tumor-to-blood ratio of less than 1. Consequently these particular carbamates are not satisfactory as hypoxia imaging agents. (author)

  18. Radioiodinated 2-nitrobenzyl carbamates as bioreductive alkylating agents for tissue hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, P.A.; Hunter, D.H.; Wearring, A.V.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Three N-methylcarbamates of iodonitrobenzyl alcohols (4-iodo-2-nitrobenzyl alcohol 2, 5-iodo-2-nitrobenzyl alcohol 3 and 4-iodo-2,6-dinitrobenzyl alcohol 4) bearing [ 125 I] have been prepared and characterized for their lipophilicity, their reduction potentials and the in vivo lability of the radioiodine in healthy mice. Based upon these results, 2 and 4 were tested in tumour-bearing mice showing limited uptake of radioactivity in tumours and a tumour-to-blood ratio of less than 1. Consequently these particular carbamates are not satisfactory as hypoxia imaging agents. (Author)

  19. Selection of genetically modified hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo using alkylating agent lysomustine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, F N; Grinenko, T S; Levit, G L; Krasnov, V P; Belyavsky, A V

    2010-09-15

    Efficient gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells is vital for the success of gene therapy of hematopoietic and immune system disorders. An in vivo selection system based on a mutant form of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase gene (MGMTm) is considered one of the more promising strategies for expansion of hematopoietic cells transduced with viral vectors. Here we demonstrate that MGMTm-expressing cells can be efficiently selected using lysomustine, a nitrosourea derivative of lysine. K562 and murine bone marrow cells expressing MGMTm are protected from the cytotoxic action of lysomustine in vitro. We also show in a murine model that MGMTm-transduced hematopoietic cells can be expanded in vivo on transplantation into sublethally irradiated recipients followed by lysomustine treatment. These results indicate that lysomustine can be used as a potent novel chemoselection drug applicable for gene therapy of hematopoietic and immune system disorders. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) and Cancer Gene Therapy: Use of the Human N-mythlpurien DNA Glycosylase (MPG) to Sensitize Breast Cancer Cells to Low Dose Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harvey, Tia

    2003-01-01

    The DNA Base Excision Repair (PER) pathway is responsible for the repair of alkylation and oxidative DNA damage resulting in protection against the deleterious effects of endogenous and exogenous agents encountered on a daily basis...

  1. Kinetic studies of 2-(2'-Haloethyl) and 2-ethenyl substituted quinazolinone alkylating agents. Acid-catalyzed dehydrohalogenation and alkylation involving a quinazolinone prototropic tautomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempcy, R O; Skibo, E B

    1993-07-01

    The mechanism of halide elimination from 2-haloethyl-5,8-dihydroxyquinazolin-4(3H)-ones was studied in aqueous buffer by means of a pH-rate profile, buffer dilution studies, isotopic labeling, and kinetic isotope effects. From the results of these studies, it is apparent that a quinazolinone tautomer, arising from a prototropic shift of the C(l') proton to the N(1) position, is formed in the rate determining step of elimination. Monobasic phosphate acts as a bifunctional catalyst for the tautomerism. The halide then eliminates from the tautomer to afford the alkene derivative. Conversely, hydroxyethyl mercaptide adds to the alkene to afford the tautomer. The significance of these studies lies in the discovery of a prototropic tautomer of quinazolinone, which is reversibly formed in aqueous buffer under mild conditions, and in the discovery of alkylation chemistry useful in the design of quinazolinone-based enzyme inhibitors.

  2. Identification and Characterization of uvrA, a DNA Repair Gene of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    alkylating agents , such as methyl-N-nitro~N~nitrosoguanidine(MNNG), N-methyl-N~ nitrosourea (MNU), and to a lesser extent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS...6,4) Photoproduct 17 c. Thymine Glycols and Cross-links 17 3. Ionizing Radiation Damage " 17 4. Chemical Damage 20 a. Alkylating Agents .20 b. Cross...Examples of base damage induced by ionizing radiation 19 6. Nucleotide centers in DNA that are most reactive to alkylating agents 21 7. Schematic

  3. Exploring the Role of Genetic Modifiers in DNA Repair and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    organismal sensitivity to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N- nitrosourea . Can- cer Res. 63: 7047–7050. Goytisolo, F. A., E. Samper, J. Martin-Caballero, P...this study refers to this distinction. DNA- alkylating agents (methyl methanesulfonate [MMS], ethylmethanesulfonate [EMS], melphalan, etc.) are of...particular interest at low doses, as this class of genotoxic agents encompasses a number of natural and industrial environmental carcinogens (2). Alkylating

  4. PARP inhibitors protect against sex- and AAG-dependent alkylation-induced neural degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, Mariacarmela; Corrigan, Joshua J; Fake, Kimberly R; Calvo, Jennifer A; Samson, Leona D

    2017-09-15

    Alkylating agents are commonly used to treat cancer. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway for repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. The initiation of BER by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG, a.k.a. MPG) can mediate alkylation-induced cytotoxicity in specific cells in the retina and cerebellum of male mice. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag -transgenic ( AagTg ) mice is abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). Here, we tested whether PARP inhibitors can also prevent alkylation-induced retinal and cerebellar degeneration in male and female WT and AagTg mice. Importantly, we found that WT mice display sex-dependent alkylation-induced retinal damage (but not cerebellar damage), with WT males being more sensitive than females. Accordingly, estradiol treatment protects males against alkylation-induced retinal degeneration. In AagTg male and female mice, the alkylation-induced tissue damage in both the retina and cerebellum is exacerbated and the sex difference in the retina is abolished. PARP inhibitors, much like Parp1 gene deletion, protect against alkylation-induced AAG-dependent neuronal degeneration in WT and AagTg mice, regardless of the gender, but their efficacy in preventing alkylation-induced neuronal degeneration depends on PARP inhibitor characteristics and doses. The recent surge in the use of PARP inhibitors in combination with cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents might represent a powerful tool for obtaining increased therapeutic efficacy while avoiding the collateral effects of alkylating agents in healthy tissues.

  5. Improved DNA condensation, stability, and transfection with alkyl sulfonyl-functionalized PAMAM G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rata-Aguilar, Azahara, E-mail: azahara@ugr.es; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Jódar-Reyes, Ana Belén; Ortega-Vinuesa, Juan Luis [University of Granada, Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics (Spain); Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco [University of Granada, Organic Chemistry Department, Institute of Biotechnology (Spain); Martín-Rodríguez, Antonio [University of Granada, Biocolloid and Fluid Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we have used a second-generation PAMAM grafted with octadecyl sulfonyl chains to condense plasmid DNA. The influence of this modification at different levels was investigated by comparison with original PAMAM G2. The condensation process and temporal stability of the complexes was studied with DLS, finding that the aliphatic chains influence DNA compaction via hydrophobic forces and markedly improve the formation and temporal stability of a single populated system with a hydrodynamic diameter below 100 nm. Interaction with a cell membrane model was also evaluated with a pendant drop tensiometer, resulting in further incorporation of the C18-PAMAM dendriplexes onto the interface. The improvement observed in transfection with our C18 grafted PAMAM is ascribed to the size, stability, and interfacial behavior of the complexes, which in turn are consequence of the DNA condensation process and the interactions involved.

  6. A survey of the sequence-specific interaction of damaging agents with DNA: emphasis on antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, V

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning the sequence specificity of DNA-damaging agents. DNA-damaging agents are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. It is important to understand fully the determinants of DNA sequence specificity so that more effective DNA-damaging agents can be developed as antitumor drugs. There are five main methods of DNA sequence specificity analysis: cleavage of end-labeled fragments, linear amplification with Taq DNA polymerase, ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR), single-strand ligation PCR, and footprinting. The DNA sequence specificity in purified DNA and in intact mammalian cells is reviewed for several classes of DNA-damaging agent. These include agents that form covalent adducts with DNA, free radical generators, topoisomerase inhibitors, intercalators and minor groove binders, enzymes, and electromagnetic radiation. The main sites of adduct formation are at the N-7 of guanine in the major groove of DNA and the N-3 of adenine in the minor groove, whereas free radical generators abstract hydrogen from the deoxyribose sugar and topoisomerase inhibitors cause enzyme-DNA cross-links to form. Several issues involved in the determination of the DNA sequence specificity are discussed. The future directions of the field, with respect to cancer chemotherapy, are also examined.

  7. Development of the adverse outcome pathway "alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations" using the OECD's users' handbook supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauk, Carole L; Lambert, Iain B; Meek, M E Bette; Douglas, George R; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD) Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) programme aims to develop a knowledgebase of all known pathways of toxicity that lead to adverse effects in humans and ecosystems. A Users' Handbook was recently released to provide supplementary guidance on AOP development. This article describes one AOP-alkylation of DNA in male premeiotic germ cells leading to heritable mutations. This outcome is an important regulatory endpoint. The AOP describes the biological plausibility and empirical evidence supporting that compounds capable of alkylating DNA cause germ cell mutations and subsequent mutations in the offspring of exposed males. Alkyl adducts are subject to DNA repair; however, at high doses the repair machinery becomes saturated. Lack of repair leads to replication of alkylated DNA and ensuing mutations in male premeiotic germ cells. Mutations that do not impair spermatogenesis persist and eventually are present in mature sperm. Thus, the mutations are transmitted to the offspring. Although there are some gaps in empirical support and evidence for essentiality of the key events for certain aspects of this AOP, the overall AOP is generally accepted as dogma and applies broadly to any species that produces sperm. The AOP was developed and used in an iterative process to test and refine the Users' Handbook, and is one of the first publicly available AOPs. It is our hope that this AOP will be leveraged to develop other AOPs in this field to advance method development, computational models to predict germ cell effects, and integrated testing strategies. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  8. Identification in the mu-opioid receptor of cysteine residues responsible for inactivation of ligand binding by thiol alkylating and reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibelet, G; Capeyrou, R; Dietrich, G; Emorine, L J

    1997-05-19

    Inactivation by thiol reducing and alkylating agents of ligand binding to the human mu-opioid receptor was examined. Dithiothreitol reduced the number of [3H]diprenorphine binding sites. Replacement by seryl residues of either C142 or C219 in extracellular loops 1 and 2 of the mu receptor resulted in a complete loss of opioid binding. A disulfide bound linking C142 to C219 may thus be essential to maintain a functional conformation of the receptor. We also demonstrated that inactivation of ligand binding upon alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide occurred at two sites. Alteration of the more sensitive (IC50 = 20 microM) did not modify antagonists binding but decreased agonist affinity almost 10-fold. Modification of the less reactive site (IC50 = 2 mM) decreased the number of both agonist and antagonist binding sites. The alkylation site of higher sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide was shown by mutagenesis experiments to be constituted of both C81 and C332 in transmembrane domains 1 and 7 of the mu-opioid receptor.

  9. The effect of various S-alkylating agents on the chromatographic behavior of cysteine-containing peptides in reversed-phase chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuehui; Shamshurin, Dmitry; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the influence of various alkylation chemistries on the reversed phase (RP) HPLC behavior of Cys-containing peptides under the most popular RP-HPLC conditions used in proteomics: C18 phases with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or formic acid (FA) as the ion pairing modifiers, and separation at pH 10. Akylating agents studied are iodoacetamide (IAM), iodoacetic acid (IAA), 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP), acrylamide (AA) and methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS). These were compared against the retention of identical peptides without alkylation, i.e. free cysteines. The intrinsic hydrophobicity values of the Cys residue under formic acid conditions for these modifications were found to increase in the following order: 4-VPalkylated Cys using TFA eluent. Switching to a basic condition dramatically decreases the retention of free cysteine and IAA-alkylated analytes due to the ionization of side-chains. The opposite effect is observed for 4-VP, which become neutral at basic pHs. The careful measurement of the hydrophobic contributions for these residues is vital to the development of accurate peptide retention prediction models; the incorporation of these modifications into our Sequence Specific Retention Calculator model is presented. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Cumulative alkylating agent exposure and semen parameters in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel M; Liu, Wei; Kutteh, William H; Ke, Raymond W; Shelton, Kyla C; Sklar, Charles A; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Pui, Ching-Hon; Klosky, James L; Spunt, Sheri L; Metzger, Monika L; Srivastava, DeoKumar; Ness, Kirsten K; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2014-10-01

    Few data define the dose-specific relation between alkylating agent exposure and semen variables in adult survivors of childhood cancer. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that increased exposure to alkylating agents would be associated with decreased sperm concentration in a cohort of adult male survivors of childhood cancer who were not exposed to radiation therapy for their childhood cancer. We did semen analysis on 214 adult male survivors of childhood cancer (median age 7·7 years [range 0·01-20·3] at diagnosis, 29·0 years [18·4-56·1] at assessment, and a median of 21·0 years [10·5-41·6] since diagnosis) who had received alkylating agent chemotherapy but no radiation therapy. Alkylating agent exposure was estimated using the cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (CED). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for oligospermia (sperm concentration >0 and <15 million per mL) and azoospermia were calculated with logistic regression modelling. Azoospermia was noted in 53 (25%) of 214 participants, oligospermia in 59 (28%), and normospermia (sperm concentration ≥15 million per mL) in 102 (48%) participants. 31 (89%) of 35 participants who received CED less than 4000 mg/m(2) were normospermic. CED was negatively correlated with sperm concentration (correlation coefficient=-0·37, p<0·0001). Mean CED was 10 830 mg/m(2) (SD 7274) in patients with azoospermia, 8480 mg/m(2) (4264) in patients with oligospermia, and 6626 mg/m(2) (3576) in patients with normospermia. In multivariable analysis, CED was significantly associated with an increased risk per 1000 mg/m(2) CED for azoospermia (OR 1·22, 95% CI 1·11-1·34), and for oligospermia (1·14, 1·04-1·25), but age at diagnosis and age at assessment were not. Impaired spermatogenesis was unlikely when the CED was less than 4000 mg/m(2). Although sperm concentration decreases with increasing CED, there was substantial overlap of CED associated with normospermia, oligospermia, and azoospermia. These data can

  11. Impact of gender on efficacy and acute toxicity of alkylating agent -based chemotherapy in Ewing sarcoma: secondary analysis of the Euro-Ewing99-R1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Henk; Paulussen, Michael; Le Teuff, Gwénaël; Judson, Ian; Gelderblom, Hans; Dirksen, Uta; Brennan, Bernadette; Whelan, Jeremy; Ladenstein, Ruth Lydia; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Kruseova, Jarmila; Hjorth, Lars; Kühne, Thomas; Brichard, Benedicte; Wheatley, Keith; Craft, Alan; Juergens, Heribert; Gaspar, Nathalie; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Based on the randomised Euro-EWING99-R1 trial, vincristine, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide (VAC) may be able to replace vincristine, adriamycin, ifosfamide (VAI) in the treatment of standard-risk Ewing sarcoma. However some heterogeneity of treatment effect by gender was observed. The current exploratory study aimed at investigating the influence of gender on treatment efficacy and acute toxicity. Impact of gender on event-free survival (EFS), acute toxicity by course, switches between treatment arms and cumulative dose of alkylating agents was evaluated in multivariable models adjusted for age including terms to test for heterogeneity of treatment effect by gender. The analysis of the EFS was performed on the intention-to-treat population. EFS did not significantly differ between the 509 males and 347 females (p=0.33), but an interaction in terms of efficacy was suspected between treatment and gender (p=0.058): VAC was associated with poorer EFS than VAI in males, hazard ratio (HR) (VAC/VAI)=1.37 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.98-1.90], contrasting with HR=0.81 [95%CI, 0.53-1.24] in females. Severe toxicity was more frequent in females, whatever the toxicity type. Thirty patients switched from VAI to VAC (9/251 males, 4%, and 21/174 females, 12%) mostly due to renal toxicity, and three from VAC to VAI (2/258 males, 0.8%, and 1/173 females, 0.6%). A reduction of alkylating agent cumulative dose >20% was more frequent in females (15% versus 9%, p=0.005), with no major difference between VAC and VAI (10% versus 13%, p=0.15). Differences of acute toxicity rate and cumulative doses of alkylating agents could not explain the marginal interaction observed in the Euro-EWING99-R1 trial data. Effects of gender-dependent polymorphism/activity of metabolic enzymes (e.g. known for CYP2B6) of ifosfamide versus cyclophosphamide should be explored. External data are required to further evaluate whether there is heterogeneity of alkylating agent effect by gender. NCT00987636 and

  12. Alkyl chloroformates in sample derivatization strategies for GC analysis. Review on a decade use of the reagents as esterifying agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hušek, Petr; Šimek, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2006), s. 23-43 ISSN 1573-4129 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/04/0192 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : alkyl chloroformates * organic acids * instantaneous deriva tization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.120, year: 2006

  13. 4-Alkylated homoibotenic acid (HIBO) analogues: versatile pharmacological agents with diverse selectivity profiles towards metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulf; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    4-Alkylated analogues of homoibotenic acid (HIBO) have previously shown high potency and selectivity at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamic acid receptor (iGluR and mGluR) subtypes. Compounds with different selectivity profiles are valuable pharmacological tools for neuropharmacological studies...

  14. Reactions of 4-nitro-1,2,3-triazole with alkylating agents and compounds with activated multiple bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vereshchagin, L.I.; Kuznetsova, N.I.; Kirillova, L.P.; Shcherbakov, V.V.; Sukhanov, G.T.; Gareev, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    When 4-nitro-1,2,3-triazole is alkylated, a mixture of N1- and N2-isomers is formed, with the latter usually predominating. The same behavior is also observed in addition reactions of 4-nitrotriazole to activated multiple bonds.

  15. Alkylation of enolate anions formation of enol ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiszwolf, G.J.; Kloosterziel, H.

    1970-01-01

    The alkylation of ambident enolate anions-obtained from aliphatic ketones (and one particular type of aldehyde)-was studied using various solvents, bases, alkylating agents and substrates. Alkylation with a reactive alkylating agent (dialkyl sulfates, triethyloxonium fluoroborate) in an aprotic

  16. In vitro testing of drug combinations employing nilotinib and alkylating agents with regard to pretransplant conditioning treatment of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Luft, Thomas; Dreger, Peter; Ho, Anthony D; Jens Zeller, W; Fruehauf, Stefan; Topaly, Julian

    2014-08-01

    The prognosis of patients with advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) remains dismal despite the availability of targeted therapies and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Increasing the antileukemic efficacy of the pretransplant conditioning regimen may be a strategy to increase remission rates and duration. We therefore investigated the antiproliferative effects of nilotinib in combination with drugs that are usually used for conditioning: the alkylating agents mafosfamide, treosulfan, and busulfan. Drug combinations were tested in vitro in different imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL-positive cell lines. A tetrazolium-based MTT assay was used for the assessment and quantification of growth inhibition after exposure to alkylating agents alone or to combinations with nilotinib. Drug interaction was analyzed using the median-effect method of Chou and Talalay, and combination index (CI) values were calculated according to the classic isobologram equation. Treatment of imatinib-sensitive, BCR-ABL-positive K562 and LAMA84 cells with nilotinib in combination with mafosfamide, treosulfan, or busulfan resulted in synergistic (CI 1) effects, respectively. In imatinib-resistant K562-R and LAMA84-R cells, all applied drug combinations were synergistic (CI conditioning regimens for allo-SCT in advanced-phase CML.

  17. Glioma cell death induced by irradiation or alkylating agent chemotherapy is independent of the intrinsic ceramide pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Gramatzki

    Full Text Available Resistance to genotoxic therapy is a characteristic feature of glioma cells. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS catalyzes ceramide metabolism. Increased ceramide levels have been suggested to enhance chemotherapy-induced death of cancer cells.Microarray and clinical data for ASM and GCS in astrocytomas WHO grade II-IV were acquired from the Rembrandt database. Moreover, the glioblastoma database of the Cancer Genome Atlas network (TCGA was used for survival data of glioblastoma patients. For in vitro studies, increases in ceramide levels were achieved either by ASM overexpression or by the GCS inhibitor DL-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP in human glioma cell lines. Combinations of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation and ASM overexpression, PPMP or exogenous ceramide were applied in parental cells. The anti-glioma effects were investigated by assessing proliferation, metabolic activity, viability and clonogenicity. Finally, viability and clonogenicity were assessed in temozolomide (TMZ-resistant cells upon treatment with PPMP, exogenous ceramide, alkylating chemotherapy, irradiation or their combinations.Interrogations from the Rembrandt and TCGA database showed a better survival of glioblastoma patients with low expression of ASM or GCS. ASM overexpression or PPMP treatment alone led to ceramide accumulation but did not enhance the anti-glioma activity of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation. PPMP or exogenous ceramide induced acute cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells. Combined treatments with chemotherapy or irradiation led to additive, but not synergistic effects. Finally, no synergy was found when TMZ-resistant cells were treated with exogenous ceramide or PPMP alone or in combination with TMZ or irradiation.Modulation of intrinsic glioma cell ceramide levels by ASM overexpression or GCS inhibition does not enhance the anti-glioma activity of

  18. Dose-Response for Multiple Biomarkers of Exposure and Genotoxic Effect Following Repeated Treatment of Rats with the Alkylating Agents, MMS and MNU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J; Schisler, Melissa R; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Pottenger, Lynn H

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the dose-response relationship for various in vivo endpoints of exposure and effect were investigated using the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and methylnitrosourea (MNU). Six male F344 rats/group were dosed orally with 0, 0.5, 1, 5, 25 or 50mg/kg bw/day (mkd) of MMS, or 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50 mkd of MNU, for 4 consecutive days and sacrificed 24h after the last dose. The dose-responses for multiple biomarkers of exposure and genotoxic effect were investigated. In MMS-treated rats, the hemoglobin adduct level, a systemic exposure biomarker, increased linearly with dose (r (2) = 0.9990, P agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Telomeric Allelic Imbalance Indicates Defective DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA-Damaging Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Kim, Ji-Young

    2012-01-01

    with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In serous ovarian cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, higher levels of NtAI forecast a better initial response. We found an inverse relationship between BRCA1 expression and NtAI in sporadic TNBC and serous ovarian cancers without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation...... of defective DNA repair in cell lines and tumors and correlated these signatures to platinum sensitivity. The number of subchromosomal regions with allelic imbalance extending to the telomere (NtAI) predicted cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and pathologic response to preoperative cisplatin treatment in patients...... also benefit from these agents. NtAI, a genomic measure of unfaithfully repaired DNA, may identify cancer patients likely to benefit from treatments targeting defective DNA repair. Cancer Discov; 2(4); 366–75. ©2012 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 288...

  20. Genomic phenotyping by barcode sequencing broadly distinguishes between alkylating agents, oxidizing agents, and non-genotoxic agents, and reveals a role for aromatic amino acids in cellular recovery after quinone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, J Peter; Quirós Pesudo, Laia; McRee, Siobhan K; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Carmichael, Paul; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Toxicity screening of compounds provides a means to identify compounds harmful for human health and the environment. Here, we further develop the technique of genomic phenotyping to improve throughput while maintaining specificity. We exposed cells to eight different compounds that rely on different modes of action: four genotoxic alkylating (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitroso-urea (BCNU), N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU)), two oxidizing (2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione (menadione, MEN), benzene-1,4-diol (hydroquinone, HYQ)), and two non-genotoxic (methyl carbamate (MC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) compounds. A library of S. cerevisiae 4,852 deletion strains, each identifiable by a unique genetic 'barcode', were grown in competition; at different time points the ratio between the strains was assessed by quantitative high throughput 'barcode' sequencing. The method was validated by comparison to previous genomic phenotyping studies and 90% of the strains identified as MMS-sensitive here were also identified as MMS-sensitive in a much lower throughput solid agar screen. The data provide profiles of proteins and pathways needed for recovery after both genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. In addition, a novel role for aromatic amino acids in the recovery after treatment with oxidizing agents was suggested. The role of aromatic acids was further validated; the quinone subgroup of oxidizing agents were extremely toxic in cells where tryptophan biosynthesis was compromised.

  1. Genomic phenotyping by barcode sequencing broadly distinguishes between alkylating agents, oxidizing agents, and non-genotoxic agents, and reveals a role for aromatic amino acids in cellular recovery after quinone exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Peter Svensson

    Full Text Available Toxicity screening of compounds provides a means to identify compounds harmful for human health and the environment. Here, we further develop the technique of genomic phenotyping to improve throughput while maintaining specificity. We exposed cells to eight different compounds that rely on different modes of action: four genotoxic alkylating (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU, N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl-N-nitroso-urea (BCNU, N-ethylnitrosourea (ENU, two oxidizing (2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione (menadione, MEN, benzene-1,4-diol (hydroquinone, HYQ, and two non-genotoxic (methyl carbamate (MC and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO compounds. A library of S. cerevisiae 4,852 deletion strains, each identifiable by a unique genetic 'barcode', were grown in competition; at different time points the ratio between the strains was assessed by quantitative high throughput 'barcode' sequencing. The method was validated by comparison to previous genomic phenotyping studies and 90% of the strains identified as MMS-sensitive here were also identified as MMS-sensitive in a much lower throughput solid agar screen. The data provide profiles of proteins and pathways needed for recovery after both genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. In addition, a novel role for aromatic amino acids in the recovery after treatment with oxidizing agents was suggested. The role of aromatic acids was further validated; the quinone subgroup of oxidizing agents were extremely toxic in cells where tryptophan biosynthesis was compromised.

  2. Mutations at the mei-41, mus(1)101, mus(1)103, mus(2)205 and mus(3)310 loci of Drosophila exhibit differential UDS responses with different DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    5 mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, reported to perform normal or only slightly reduced excision repair of UV damage, were examined by an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. 2 mutants, classified as completely or partially proficient for both excision and postreplication repair of UV damage, mus(1)103 and mus(2)205, were found to give positive UDS responses only for UV damage. These mutants exhibit no measurable UDS activity following DNA damage by several different alkylating agents and X-rays. 3 mutants, classified as having no defect in excision repair, but measurable defects in postreplication repair of UV damage, exhibit 3 different response patterns. The mutant mei-41 exhibits a highly positive UDS response following damage by all agents, consistent with its prior classification as excision-repair-proficient, but postreplication-repair-deficient for UV damage. The mutant mus(1)101, however, exhibits a strong positive UDS response following only UV damage and appears to be blocked in the excision repair of damage produced by both alkylating agents and X-irradiation. Finally, mus(3)310 exhibits no UDS response to alkylation, X-ray or UV damage. This is not consistent with its previous classification. Results obtained w0272the qualitative in vitro UDS assay are entirely consistent with the results from two separate in vivo measures of excision repair deficiency followign DNA damage, larval hypersensitivity to killing and hypermutability in the sex-linked recessive lethal test. (Auth.)

  3. Improving the spectrophotometric determination of the alkylating activity of anticancer agents: a new insight into the mechanism of the NBP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, Karen M E; Journé, Fabrice; Gerbaux, Pascal; Morandini, Renato; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel; Ghanem, Ghanem E

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, the mechanism of the nitrobenzylpyridine (NBP) method to measure the alkylating activity of drugs originally described by Epstein et al. [J. Epstein, R.W. Rosenthal, R.J. Ess, Anal. Chem. 27 (1955) 1435-1439] and modified later by others was revisited using melphalan, m-sarcolysin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide. Its direct application to determine the activity of these drugs in human serum and aqueous media is described and discussed. This method, based on the formation of a chromophore due to the reaction between the alkylating agent and NBP, was significantly improved by extracting as quickly as possible the reaction product(s) into chloroform before adding alkali to develop the color. This significantly limited the degradation by hydrolysis of the products and enhanced the yield of the end chromophore in the organic phase. The reaction time was optimized by monitoring each compound color development. The best reaction time for each compound was selected and a higher stability of the extracted color over at least 1h was obtained (compared to a couple of minutes in previous studies). Most interestingly, water evaporation due to heating had little or no effect on the linearity of standard curves evaluated in the micromolar concentration range. Both the sensitivity and reproducibility of the method were therefore significantly improved. There appears to be a direct correlation between compound hydrolysis and alkylation activity; the relative reactivity is different among the compounds owing to the rate of (i) production, (ii) the relative proportions and (iii) the hydrolysis of the intermediates. A general mechanism for the nucleophilic competitive substitution is proposed.

  4. Distributed Drug Discovery, Part 2: Global Rehearsal of Alkylating Agents for the Synthesis of Resin-Bound Unnatural Amino Acids and Virtual D3 Catalog Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Drug Discovery (D3) proposes solving large drug discovery problems by breaking them into smaller units for processing at multiple sites. A key component of the synthetic and computational stages of D3 is the global rehearsal of prospective reagents and their subsequent use in the creation of virtual catalogs of molecules accessible by simple, inexpensive combinatorial chemistry. The first section of this article documents the feasibility of the synthetic component of Distributed Drug Discovery. Twenty-four alkylating agents were rehearsed in the United States, Poland, Russia, and Spain, for their utility in the synthesis of resin-bound unnatural amino acids 1, key intermediates in many combinatorial chemistry procedures. This global reagent rehearsal, coupled to virtual library generation, increases the likelihood that any member of that virtual library can be made. It facilitates the realistic integration of worldwide virtual D3 catalog computational analysis with synthesis. The second part of this article describes the creation of the first virtual D3 catalog. It reports the enumeration of 24 416 acylated unnatural amino acids 5, assembled from lists of either rehearsed or well-precedented alkylating and acylating reagents, and describes how the resulting catalog can be freely accessed, searched, and downloaded by the scientific community. PMID:19105725

  5. Preliminary study of mechanism of action of SN38 derivatives. Physicochemical data, evidence of interaction and alkylation of DNA octamer d(GCGATCGC)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumczuk, Beata; Kawęcki, Robert; Bocian, Wojciech; Bednarek, Elżbieta; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech

    2017-02-01

    The synthesis of water-soluble SN38 derivatives is presented, and their stability in solutions used during drug development studies has been investigated. A preliminary study of mechanism of action of 9-aminomethyl SN38 is presented. Using NMR techniques, the interaction of the oligomer d(GCGATCGC) 2 is studied, showing that the terminal GC base pairs are the main site of interaction. Using pulsed field gradient spin echo and mass spectroscopy, evidence of a spontaneous alkylation reaction of the DNA oligomer with SN38 derivatives is presented. A proposed mechanism of reaction is suggested. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Synthesis and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of 13-n-Alkyl Berberine and Palmatine Analogues as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By introducing long carbon-chain alkyl groups at the C-13 position of berberine and palmatine, 13-n-hexyl/13-n-octyl berberine and palmatine chloride analogues 4ad were synthesized and examined by MTT assays for cytotoxic activity in seven human cancer cell lines (7701QGY, SMMC7721, HepG2, CEM, CEM/VCR, KIII, Lewis, yielding IC50 values of 0.02 ± 0.01–13.58 ± 2.84 μM. 13-n-Octyl palmatine (compound 4d gave the most potent inhibitor activity, with an IC50 of 0.02 ± 0.01 μM for SMMC7721. In all cases, the 13-n-alkyl berberine and palmatine analogues 4ad were more cytotoxic than berberine and palmatine. In addition, compounds 4ad also exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than berberine and palmatine in mice with S180 sarcoma xenografted in vivo. The primary screening results indicated that the 13-n-hexyl/13-n-octyl berberine and palmatine analogues might be valuable source for new potent anticancer drug candidates.

  7. Formaldehyde and tobacco smoke as alkylating agents: the formation of N-methylenvaline in pathologists and in plastic laminate workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Roberto; Romanazzi, Valeria; Pirro, Valentina; Degan, Raffaella; Pignata, Cristina; Suppo, Elisa; Pazzi, Marco; Vincenti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between the concentration of formaldehyde in air and the alkylation of hemoglobin to form a terminal N-methylenvaline residue in three occupationally exposed groups: a) technicians of pathology wards, b) workers of the plastic laminates industry, and c) a control group. All subjects recruited in this study were also tested on their smoking habits. Formaldehyde adsorbed on passive air samplers was quantified by HPLC with UV detection (360 nm), cotinine was quantified by GC-MS. Terminal hemoglobin N-methylenvaline was determined by treating globine under reducing conditions with pentafluorophenyl isothiocyanate to yield a derivative, subsequently detected by GC-MS. One-way analysis of variance was performed to compare among the three groups the biomarkers considered in this study. For air-FA and N-methylenvaline a difference between the three groups was detected (p alkylation to form N-methylenvaline molecular adduct in two occupationally exposed groups of subjects considered in the present study. In comparison with occupational exposition, tobacco smoke proved to have a minor impact on the formation of N-methylenvaline molecular adduct. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced DNA repair in mouse satellite DNA after treatment with methylmethanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodell, W J; Banerjee, M R

    1976-01-01

    We have measured DNA repair in mouse satellite and main band DNA as resolved by Ag+-Cs2SO4 centrifugation in response to treatment with the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. We find that there is a statistically significant lower incorporation of 3H-Tdr into the satellite DNA as compared to the main band at varying periods after treatment with the alkylating agents. This suggests a reduced repair activity in the satellite DNA. We have measured the extent of binding of 14C-methyl methanesulfonate to the satellite, and main band DNA, and no difference in binding was observed, indicating that the reduced repair activity of satellite DNA is not due to a difference in binding of alkylating agents. We believe that the reduced incorporation of 3H-Tdr into satellite DNA may be due to its location in the condensed chromatin fraction. PMID:184436

  9. [Multiple organ failure presumably due to alkylating agents used as preconditioning drugs for autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in an acute promyelocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Tori; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Ebe, Yusuke; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Koike, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old male was diagnosed as having acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in 2006. He received induction chemotherapy including all-trans retinoic acid and initially achieved a complete remission (CR). After several courses of consolidation therapy combining anthracyclines and cytarabine, he maintained CR. In 2009, an APL relapse was diagnosed, and he was treated with arsenic trioxide. Since he achieved a second CR, he underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) with a conditioning regimen consisting of busulfan and melphalan. At four months after auto-PBSCT, he developed a pneumothorax and acute respiratory failure. He died despite intensive therapy. Autopsy findings included various atypical and apoptotic cells in his pulmonary tissue. These changes were confirmed in multiple organs throughout the body, suggesting them to be drug-induced. The findings in this case suggested multiple organ failure due to alkylating agents.

  10. Antigenotoxic effects of Citrus aurentium L. fruit peel oil on mutagenicity of two alkylating agents and two metals in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Eşref; Kocaoğlu, Serap; Cetin, Huseyin; Kaya, Bülent

    2009-07-01

    Antigenotoxic effects of Citrus aurentium L. (Rutaceae) fruit peel oil (CPO) in combination with mutagenic metals and alkylating agents were studied using the wing spot test of D. melanogaster. The four reference mutagens, potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), cobalt chloride (CoCl2), ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) were clearly genotoxic. CPO alone at doses from 0.1 to 0.5% in Tween 80 was not mutagenic and did not enhance the mutagenic effect of the reference mutagens. However, antigenotoxic effects of CPO were clearly demonstrated in chronic cotreatments with mutagens and oil, by a significant decrease in wing spots induced by all four mutagens. The D. melanogaster wing spot test was found to be a suitable assay for detecting antigenotoxic effects in vivo. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The alkylation of imine anions formation of enamines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiszwolf, G.J.; Kloosterziel, H.

    1970-01-01

    The ambident anions derived from imines were alkylated using a variety of solvents and alkylating agents. Under reactive conditions enamines (N-alkylation) are formed as the main products instead of the usually obsd. homologous imines (C-alkylation). The influence of the type of imine, solvent, and

  12. Inroads into base excision repair I. The discovery of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease. "An endonuclease for depurinated DNA in Escherichia coli B," Canadian Journal of Biochemistry, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Verly, W G; Paquette Y

    2004-11-02

    DNA treated with alkylating agents is incised at sites of damage by cell extracts. A key component of this DNA repair function was shown by Verly and co-workers to be an endonuclease acting at secondary lesions, apurinic sites, rather than directly at alkylated nucleotide residues.

  13. Rescue of Mitomycin C- or Psoralen-Inactivated Micrococcus Radiodurans by Additional Exposure to Radiation or Alkylating Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M. Trier

    1982-01-01

    The processing of damaged DNA was altered in a mitomycin C-sensitive mutant (mtcA) of Micrococcus radiodurans. Even though the mutant retained resistance to 254-nm UV radiation, it did not, in contrast to the wild-type strain, show any excessive DNA degradation or cell death when incubated...

  14. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents Against Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    pol eta when replicating damaged DNA. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS: Mutagenesis, DNA polymerases, nucleoside analogs, chemotherapeutic agents 16. SECURITY ...such as polymerase eta, iota , and kappa that are involved in replicating damaged DNA. Our kinetic data obtained under Task 1B indicates that pol eta

  15. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA; Investigacao eletroquimica e calorimetrica da interacao de novos agentes antitumorais biscationicos com DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lauris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Julio Cesar Dias, E-mail: cdonnici@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Campus A.C. Simoes. Inst. de Quimica e Biotecnologia; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Denadai, Angelo Marcio Leite [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Timoteo, MG (Brazil). Campus VII; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; Montanari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-{alpha}-{omega}-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the thermodynamic properties of binding interactions between DNA and these ligands. A double stranded calf thymus DNA immobilized on an electrode surface was used to study the possible DNA-interacting abilities of these compounds towards dsDNA in situ. A remarkable interaction of these compounds with DNA was demonstrated and their potential application as anticancer agents was furthered. (author)

  16. Alkylation sensitivity screens reveal a conserved cross-species functionome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilar, David; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Brown, Ashley R.; Tang, Jiang-bo; Li, Jianfeng; McDonald, Peter R.; Shun, Tong Ying; Braganza, Andrea; Wang, Xiao-hong; Maniar, Salony; St Croix, Claudette M.; Lazo, John S.; Pollack, Ian F.; Begley, Thomas J.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    To identify genes that contribute to chemotherapy resistance in glioblastoma, we conducted a synthetic lethal screen in a chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma derived cell line with the clinical alkylator temozolomide (TMZ) and an siRNA library tailored towards “druggable” targets. Select DNA repair genes in the screen were validated independently, confirming the DNA glycosylases UNG and MYH as well as MPG to be involved in the response to high dose TMZ. The involvement of UNG and MYH is likely the result of a TMZ-induced burst of reactive oxygen species. We then compared the human TMZ sensitizing genes identified in our screen with those previously identified from alkylator screens conducted in E. coli and S. cerevisiae. The conserved biological processes across all three species composes an Alkylation Functionome that includes many novel proteins not previously thought to impact alkylator resistance. This high-throughput screen, validation and cross-species analysis was then followed by a mechanistic analysis of two essential nodes: base excision repair (BER) DNA glycosylases (UNG, human and mag1, S. cerevisiae) and protein modification systems, including UBE3B and ICMT in human cells or pby1, lip22, stp22 and aim22 in S. cerevisiae. The conserved processes of BER and protein modification were dual targeted and yielded additive sensitization to alkylators in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, dual targeting of BER and protein modification genes in human cells did not increase sensitivity, suggesting an epistatic relationship. Importantly, these studies provide potential new targets to overcome alkylating agent resistance. PMID:23038810

  17. Normal development of hamster and rabbit eggs fertilized by spermatozoa labelled with the fluorescent thiol alkylating agent, monobromobimane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, A.D.; Cummins, J.M.; Kuehl, T.J.; Seidel, G.E. Jr.; Yanagimachi, R.

    1986-01-01

    Cauda epididymal spermatozoa of the golden hamster were labelled with the thiol-alkylating reagent, monobromobimane (MB). Female hamsters underwent uterine insemination with labelled spermatozoa at laparotomy under metofane anesthesia. All 12 females examined between 5 and 54 h postinsemination yielded a total of 83/100 (83%) eggs in the process of fertilization or embryos. Under ultraviolet (UV) exposure all exhibited a fluorescent tail which, in the 4- and 8-cell embryos, could be seen to be fraying or disintegrating. As cleavage progressed, labelled tail components came to be restricted among the blastomeres such that at the 4- and 8-cell stage the tail could be seen in only one to three blastomeres. To study complete development and pregnancy another 12 females received uterine insemination. After recovery from anesthesia (approximately equal to 4 h) these females were mated with a vasectomized male bearing a dominant genetic marker (black eyes) to allow unequivocal determination of paternity in the fetuses and young produced. Seven became pregnant with one female losing her pregnancy about Day 7 of gestation. Two females sacrificed on Day 13 produced 17 normal fetuses and one resorption. Four females delivered 16 young, all normal at birth and in subsequent growth and fertility. In addition, insemination of female rabbits with MB-labelled spermatozoa yielded normal embryos (50/52 96%) from 3 does on Day 2 and (38/64 60%) from 4 does on Days 4 or 5. Two normal litters (9 bunnies) have delivered from 3 does allowed to carry to term

  18. New validated LC-MS/MS method for the determination of three alkylated adenines in human urine and its application to the monitoring of alkylating agents in cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongfeng; Hou, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiaotao; Wang, An; Liu, Yong; Hu, Qingyuan

    2014-09-01

    A highly specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for simultaneous determination of urinary N(3)-methyladenine (N(3)-MeA), N(3)-ethyladenine (N(3)-EtA), and N(3)-(2-hydroxyethyl)adenine (N(3)-HOEtA). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column, with a mobile phase gradient prepared from aqueous 10 mM ammonium formate-acetonitrile (5:95 v/v, pH 4.0). Quantification of the analytes was done by multiple reaction monitoring using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer in positive-ionization mode. The limits of quantification were 0.13, 0.02, and 0.03 ng/mL for N(3)-MeA, N(3)-EtA, and N(3)-HOEtA, respectively. Intraday and interday variations (relative standard deviations) ranged from 0.6 to 1.3 % and from 3.7 to 7.5 %. The recovery ranges of N(3)-MeA, N(3)-EtA, and N(3)-HOEtA in urine were 80.1-97.3 %, 83.3-90.0 %, and 100.0-110.0 %, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to urine samples from 251 volunteers including 193 regular smokers and 58 nonsmokers. The results showed that the levels of urinary N(3)-MeA, N(3)-EtA, and N(3)-HOEtA in smokers were significantly higher than those in nonsmokers. Furthermore, the level of urinary N(3)-MeA in smokers was found to be positively correlated with the level of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (r = 0.48, P alkylating agent exposure.

  19. Poly (ADP-ribose) catabolism in mammalian cells exposed to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Gonzalez, R.; Althaus, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    DNA damage inflicted by the alkylating agens N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoquanidine, or by UV stimulated the catabolism of protein-bound poly (ADP-ribose) in the chromatin of cultured hepatocytes. The stimulation was highest at the largest doses of DNA-damaging treatment. As a consequence, the half-life of ADP-ribosyl polymers may drop to less than 41 s. This rapid turnover contrasts with the slow catabolism of a constitutive fraction of polymers exhibiting a half-life of 7.7 h. These data suggest that post-incisional stimulation of poly (ADP-ribose) biosynthesis in DNA-excision repair is coupled with an adaptation of poly (ADP-ribose) catabolism in mammalian cells. (Author). 37 refs.; 3 figs

  20. Absence of specificity in inhibition of DNA repair replication by DNA-binding agents, cocarcinogens, and steroids in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Painter, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Although many chemicals, including cocarcinogens, DNA-binding agents, and steroids, inhibit repair replication of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA in human lymphocytes and proliferating cells in culture, none of these chemicals is specific. Our results show that all the chemicals we tested inhibit normal DNA synthesis as much as or more than they inhibit repair replication. There is thus no evidence in our results to support the hypothesis that cocarcinogens are specific inhibitors of DNA repair or that any of the chemicals studied might be useful adjuncts to tumor therapy merely because of specific inhibition of radiation repair mechanisms

  1. Synthesis and serotonin transporter activity of sulphur-substituted alpha-alkyl phenethylamines as a new class of anticancer agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Keating, John J.; Butler, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that some serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) ligands have the potential to act as pro-apoptotic agents in the treatment of cancer adds greatly to their diverse pharmacological application. 4-Methylthioamphetamine (MTA) is a selective ligand for SERT over other monoamine...

  2. The combination of BH3-mimetic ABT-737 with the alkylating agent temozolomide induces strong synergistic killing of melanoma cells independent of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven N Reuland

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma has poor prognosis and is refractory to most conventional chemotherapies. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ is commonly used in treating melanoma but has a disappointing response rate. Agents that can act cooperatively with TMZ and improve its efficacy are thus highly sought after. The BH3 mimetic ABT-737, which can induce apoptosis by targeting pro-survival Bcl-2 family members, has been found to enhance the efficacy of many conventional chemotherapeutic agents in multiple cancers. We found that combining TMZ and ABT-737 induced strong synergistic apoptosis in multiple human melanoma cell lines. When the drugs were used in combination in a mouse xenograft model, they drastically reduced tumor growth at concentrations where each individual drug had no significant effect. We found that TMZ treatment elevated p53 levels, and that the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa was elevated in TMZ/ABT-737 treated cells. Experiments with shRNA demonstrated that the synergistic effect of TMZ and ABT-737 was largely dependent on Noxa. Experiments with nutlin-3, a p53 inducer, demonstrated that p53 induction was sufficient for synergistic cell death with ABT-737 in a Noxa-dependent fashion. However, p53 was not necessary for TMZ/ABT-737 synergy as demonstrated by a p53-null line, indicating that TMZ and ABT-737 together induce Noxa in a p53-independent fashion. These results demonstrate that targeting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members is a promising method for treating metastatic melanoma, and that clinical trials with TMZ and Bcl-2 inhibitors are warranted.

  3. Acrolein inhibits cytokine gene expression by alkylating cysteine and arginine residues in the NF-kappaB1 DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cherie; Li, Jimei; Jonscher, Karen; Yang, Teng-Chieh; Reigan, Philip; Quintana, Megan; Harvey, Jean; Freed, Brian M

    2007-07-06

    Cigarette smoke is a potent inhibitor of pulmonary T cell responses, resulting in decreased immune surveillance and an increased incidence of respiratory tract infections. The alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes in cigarette smoke (acrolein and crotonaldehyde) inhibited production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human T cells but did not inhibit production of IL-8. The saturated aldehydes (acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and butyraldehyde) in cigarette smoke were inactive. Acrolein inhibited induction of NF-kappaB DNA binding activity after mitogenic stimulation of T cells but had no effect on induction of NFAT or AP-1. Acrolein inhibited NF-kappaB1 (p50) binding to the IL-2 promoter in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay by >99%. Using purified recombinant p50 in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we demonstrated that acrolein was 2000-fold more potent than crotonaldehyde in blocking DNA binding to an NF-kappaB consensus sequence. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and tandem mass spectrometry demonstrated that acrolein alkylated two amino acids (Cys-61 and Arg-307) in the DNA binding domain. Crotonaldehyde reacted with Cys-61, but not Arg-307, whereas the saturated aldehydes in cigarette smoke did not react with p50. These experiments demonstrate that aldehydes in cigarette smoke can regulate gene expression by direct modification of a transcription factor.

  4. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells

  5. Noncanonical regulation of alkylation damage resistance by the OTUD4 deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Majid, Mona C; Soll, Jennifer M; Brickner, Joshua R; Dango, Sebastian; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2015-06-12

    Repair of DNA alkylation damage is critical for genomic stability and involves multiple conserved enzymatic pathways. Alkylation damage resistance, which is critical in cancer chemotherapy, depends on the overexpression of alkylation repair proteins. However, the mechanisms responsible for this upregulation are unknown. Here, we show that an OTU domain deubiquitinase, OTUD4, is a positive regulator of ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, two DNA demethylases critical for alkylation repair. Remarkably, we find that OTUD4 catalytic activity is completely dispensable for this function. Rather, OTUD4 is a scaffold for USP7 and USP9X, two deubiquitinases that act directly on the AlkB proteins. Moreover, we show that loss of OTUD4, USP7, or USP9X in tumor cells makes them significantly more sensitive to alkylating agents. Taken together, this work reveals a novel, noncanonical mechanism by which an OTU family deubiquitinase regulates its substrates, and provides multiple new targets for alkylation chemotherapy sensitization of tumors. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšíková, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Bačkor, M.; Kozurková, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2014), s. 182-186 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Lichens * DNA-binding * Topoisomerase I, II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  7. DNA cleavage agents from Schisandra propinqua var. sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... 2Engineering Research Center of Sustainable Development and Utilization of Biomass Energy, Ministry of ... DNA strand breakage process is involved in various bio- ..... Bioactive prenylated flavonoids from the stem bark.

  8. Subacute Low Dose Nerve Agent Exposure Causes DNA Fragmentation in Guinea Pig Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    1 SUBACUTE LOW DOSE NERVE AGENT EXPOSURE CAUSES DNA FRAGMENTATION IN GUINEA PIG LEUKOCYTES. Jitendra R. Dave1, John R. Moffett1, Sally M...DNA fragmentation in blood leukocytes from guinea pigs by ‘Comet’ assay after exposure to soman at doses ranging from 0.1LD50 to 0.4 LD50, once per...computer. Data obtained for exposure to soman demonstrated significant increases in DNA fragmentation in circulating leukocytes in CWNA treated guinea pigs as

  9. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links

  10. Global DNA hypermethylation-associated cancer chemotherapy resistance and its reversion with the demethylating agent hydralazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benitez-Bribiesca Luis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy continues to be a major obstacle for successful anticancer therapy. It has been shown that cells exposed to toxic concentrations of commonly used cancer chemotherapy agents develop DNA hypermetylation. Hence, demethylating agents could play a role in overcoming drug resistance. Methods MCF-7 cells were rendered adriamycin-resistant by weekly treatment with adriamycin. Wild-type and the resulting MCF-7/Adr cells were analyzed for global DNA methylation. DNA methyltransferase activity and DNA methyltransferase (dnmt gene expression were also determined. MCF-7/Adr cells were then subjected to antisense targeting of dnmt1, -3a, and -b genes and to treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor hydralazine to investigate whether DNA demethylation restores sensitivity to adriamycin. Results MCF-7/Adr cells exhibited the multi-drug resistant phenotype as demonstrated by adriamycin resistance, mdr1 gene over-expression, decreased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin, and cross-resistance to paclitaxel. The mdr phenotype was accompanied by global DNA hypermetylation, over-expression of dnmt genes, and increased DNA methyltransferase activity as compared with wild-type MCF-7 cells. DNA demethylation through antisense targeting of dnmts or hydralazine restored adriamycin sensitivity of MCF-7/Adr cells to a greater extent than verapamil, a known inhibitor of mdr protein, suggesting that DNA demethylation interferes with the epigenetic reprogramming that participates in the drug-resistant phenotype. Conclusion We provide evidence that DNA hypermethylation is at least partly responsible for development of the multidrug-resistant phenotype in the MCF-7/Adr model and that hydralazine, a known DNA demethylating agent, can revert the resistant phenotype.

  11. Induction of heat-labile sites in DNA of mammalian cells by the antitumor alkylating drug CC-1065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsido, T.J.; Woynarowski, J.M.; Baker, R.M.; Gawron, L.S.; Beerman, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    CC-1065 is a very potent antitumor antibiotic capable of covalent and noncovalent binding to the minor groove of naked DNA. Upon thermal treatment, covalent adducts formed between CC-1065 and DNA generate strand break. The authors have shown that this molecular damage can be detected following CC-1065 treatment of mammalian whole cells. Using alkaline sucrose gradient analysis, They observe thermally induced breakage of [ 14 C]thymidine-prelabeled DNA from drug-treated African green monkey kidney BSC-1 cells. Very little damage to cellular DNA by CC-1065 can be detected without first heating the drug-treated samples. CC-1065 can also generate heat-labile sites within DNA during cell lysis and heating, subsequent to the exposure of cells to drug, suggesting that a pool of free and noncovalently bound drug is available for posttreatment adduct formation. This effect was controlled for by mixing [ 3 H]thymidine-labeled untreated cells with the [ 14 C]thymidine-labeled drug-treated samples. The lowest drug dose at which heat-labile sites were detected was 3 nM CC-1065 (3 single-stranded breaks/10 6 base pairs). This concentration reduced survival of BSC-1 cells to 0.1% in cytotoxicity assays. The generation of CC-1065-induced lesions in cellular DNA is time dependent (the frequency of lesions caused by a 60 nM treatment reaching a plateau at 2 h) and is not readily reversible. The results of this study demonstrate that CC-1065 does generate heat-labile sites with the cellular DNA of intact cells and suggest that a mechanism of cytotoxic action of CC-1065 involves formation of covalent adducts to DNA

  12. Iridium-catalyzed direct synthesis of tryptamine derivatives from indoles: exploiting n-protected β-amino alcohols as alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Silvia; Mari, Michele; Bedini, Annalida; Piersanti, Giovanni; Spadoni, Gilberto

    2015-03-20

    The selective C3-alkylation of indoles with N-protected ethanolamines involving the "borrowing hydrogen" strategy is described. This method provides convenient and sustainable access to several tryptamine derivatives.

  13. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal.

  14. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal

  15. Analysis of DNA polymerase activity in Petunia protoplasts treated with clastogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benediktsson, I.; Spampinato, C.P.; Andreo, C.S.; Schieder, O.

    1994-01-01

    Clastogenic agents, i.e. agents that can induce chromosome or DNA breakage, have been shown to enhance the role of direct gene transfer to protoplasts. The effect was analysed at the enzymatic level using protoplast homogenates as well as intact protoplasts. For that purpose existing procedures were modified to enable measurement of DNA polymerase in vivo. In the system used, external DNA was able to enter the cells without the addition of membrane-permeabilizing compounds. When comparing total DNA polymerase activity of protoplasts irradiated with X-rays or UV-light with that of untreated cells we did not observe significant differences. Incubation of protoplasts with high doses of bleomycin affected total DNA polymerase activity negatively. but dideoxythymidine triphosphate-sensitive activity was not influenced. We conclude that the DNA strand-breaks induced by low doses of X-rays. UV-light or bleomycin do not increase the total or the repair-DNA polymerase activity and. therefore. that the increase in the transformation rates after DNA strand-breaking is not preceded by enhanced DNA polymerase activity. (author)

  16. Hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in primary degenerations of excitable tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Defects in DNA-repair mechanisms render xeroderma pigmentosum cells hypersensitive to killing by the uv-type of DNA-damaging agent. Some xeroderma pigmentosum patients develop a primary neuronal degeneration, and cell lines from patients with the earliest onset of neurodegeneration are the most sensitive to killing by uv radiation. These findings led to the neuronal DNA integrity theory which holds that when the integrity of neuronal DNA is destroyed by the accumulation of unrepaired DNA damaged spontaneously or by endogenous metabolites, the neurons will undergo a primary degeneration. Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome, a demyelinating disorder with a primary retinal degeneration, are also hypersensitive to the uv-type of DNA-damaging agent. Cells from patients with the primary neuronal degeneration of ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to the x-ray-type of DNA-damaging agent. Cells from other patients with primary degeneration of excitable tissue also have hypersensitivity to the x-ray-type of DNA-damaging agent. These disorders include (1) primary neuronal degenerations which are either genetic (e.g., Huntington disease, familial dysautonomia, Friedreich ataxia) or sporadic (e.g., Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease), (2) primary muscle degenerations (e.g., Duchenne muscular dystrophy), and (3) a primary retinal degeneration (Usher syndrome). Death of excitable tissue in vivo in these radiosensitive diseases may result from unrepaired DNA. This hypersensitivity provides the basis for developing suitable presymptomatic and prenatal tests for these diseases, for elucidating their pathogenesis, and for developing future therapies. 119 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  17. Alkylation induced cerebellar degeneration dependent on Aag and Parp1 does not occur via previously established cell death mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie M Margulies

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are ubiquitous in our internal and external environments, causing DNA damage that contributes to mutations and cell death that can result in aging, tissue degeneration and cancer. Repair of methylated DNA bases occurs primarily through the base excision repair (BER pathway, a multi-enzyme pathway initiated by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag, also known as Mpg. Previous work demonstrated that mice treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS undergo cerebellar degeneration in an Aag-dependent manner, whereby increased BER initiation by Aag causes increased tissue damage that is dependent on activation of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (Parp1. Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism of cerebellar granule neuron (CGN sensitivity to MMS using primary ex vivo neuronal cultures. We first established a high-throughput fluorescent imaging method to assess primary neuron sensitivity to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Next, we verified that the alkylation sensitivity of CGNs is an intrinsic phenotype that accurately recapitulates the in vivo dependency of alkylation-induced CGN cell death on Aag and Parp1 activity. Finally, we show that MMS-induced CGN toxicity is independent of all the cellular events that have previously been associated with Parp-mediated toxicity, including mitochondrial depolarization, AIF translocation, calcium fluxes, and NAD+ consumption. We therefore believe that further investigation is needed to adequately describe all varieties of Parp-mediated cell death.

  18. Alkylation induced cerebellar degeneration dependent on Aag and Parp1 does not occur via previously established cell death mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulies, Carrie M; Chaim, Isaac Alexander; Mazumder, Aprotim; Criscione, June; Samson, Leona D

    2017-01-01

    Alkylating agents are ubiquitous in our internal and external environments, causing DNA damage that contributes to mutations and cell death that can result in aging, tissue degeneration and cancer. Repair of methylated DNA bases occurs primarily through the base excision repair (BER) pathway, a multi-enzyme pathway initiated by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag, also known as Mpg). Previous work demonstrated that mice treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) undergo cerebellar degeneration in an Aag-dependent manner, whereby increased BER initiation by Aag causes increased tissue damage that is dependent on activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (Parp1). Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism of cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) sensitivity to MMS using primary ex vivo neuronal cultures. We first established a high-throughput fluorescent imaging method to assess primary neuron sensitivity to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Next, we verified that the alkylation sensitivity of CGNs is an intrinsic phenotype that accurately recapitulates the in vivo dependency of alkylation-induced CGN cell death on Aag and Parp1 activity. Finally, we show that MMS-induced CGN toxicity is independent of all the cellular events that have previously been associated with Parp-mediated toxicity, including mitochondrial depolarization, AIF translocation, calcium fluxes, and NAD+ consumption. We therefore believe that further investigation is needed to adequately describe all varieties of Parp-mediated cell death.

  19. Protection by thiols against poisoning by radiomimetic agents. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacq, Z.M.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented of reports of studies aimed at detecting a protective effect of thiols against radiomimetic alkylating agents such as those used in cancer therapy (nitrogen mustards (HN2), sarcolysine, busulfan, etc.). Protection by thiols against alkylating agents has been observed in mammals, plant cells, bacteria, isolated mammalian cells and in model systems. The lack of correlation between the protective power of various thiols against radiomimetic agents and ionizing radiations indicates that different mechanisms are involved. Studies have been made of the toxicity of the protector and the competition factor, increased excretion of detoxication products of alkylating agents, decreased alkylation of DNA and RNA both in vivo and in vitro, the protection of hematopoietic tissues, tumours and the adrenal cortex, and the modification of the effects of nitrosoalkylamines, carbon tetrachloride and fungistatics by thiols. The restriction of DNA alkylation by the competitive removal of radiomimetic agents is thought to account for the protective effect of thiols against radiomimetic agents. (U.K.)

  20. Sensitization of human cells by inhibitors of DNA synthesis following the action of DNA-damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filatov, M.V.; Noskin, L.A. (Leningrad Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (USSR))

    1983-08-01

    Inhibitors of DNA synthesis 1-..beta..-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ac) and hydroxyurea (Hu) taken together drastically sensitized human cells to the killing effect of DNA-damaging agents. For UV-irradiation this sensitization depended on the cells' ability for excision repair. By using viscoelastometric methods of measurement of double-strand breaks (DSB) in the genome, it was established that the first DSB were generated after incubation of the damaged cells in the mixture of inhibitors at about the same dose when sensitization appeared. A scheme is proposed to describe molecular events associated with the phenomenon studied. 35 refs.

  1. Sea urchin coelomocytes are resistant to a variety of DNA damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loram, Jeannette; Raudonis, Renee; Chapman, Jecar; Lortie, Mae [Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George' s, Bermuda, GE 01 (Bermuda); Bodnar, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bodnar@bios.edu [Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George' s, Bermuda, GE 01 (Bermuda)

    2012-11-15

    Increasing anthropogenic activities are creating environmental pressures that threaten marine ecosystems. Effective environmental health assessment requires the development of rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective tools to predict negative impacts at the individual and ecosystem levels. To this end, a number of biological assays using a variety of cells and organisms measuring different end points have been developed for biomonitoring programs. The sea urchin fertilization/development test has been useful for evaluating environmental toxicology and it has been proposed that sea urchin coelomocytes represent a novel cellular biosensor of environmental stress. In this study we investigated the sensitivity of coelomocytes from the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus to a variety of DNA-damaging agents including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). LD{sub 50} values determined for coelomocytes after 24 h of exposure to these DNA damaging agents indicated a high level of resistance to all treatments. Significant increases in the formation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP or abasic) sites in DNA were only detected using high doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, MMS and UV radiation. Comparison of sea urchin coelomocytes with hemocytes from the gastropod mollusk Aplysia dactylomela and the decapod crustacean Panulirus argus indicated that sensitivity to different DNA damaging agents varies between species. The high level of resistance to genotoxic agents suggests that DNA damage may not be an informative end point for environmental health assessment using sea urchin coelomocytes however, natural resistance to DNA damaging agents may have implications for the occurrence of neoplastic disease in these animals.

  2. Sea urchin coelomocytes are resistant to a variety of DNA damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loram, Jeannette; Raudonis, Renee; Chapman, Jecar; Lortie, Mae; Bodnar, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Increasing anthropogenic activities are creating environmental pressures that threaten marine ecosystems. Effective environmental health assessment requires the development of rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective tools to predict negative impacts at the individual and ecosystem levels. To this end, a number of biological assays using a variety of cells and organisms measuring different end points have been developed for biomonitoring programs. The sea urchin fertilization/development test has been useful for evaluating environmental toxicology and it has been proposed that sea urchin coelomocytes represent a novel cellular biosensor of environmental stress. In this study we investigated the sensitivity of coelomocytes from the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus to a variety of DNA-damaging agents including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). LD 50 values determined for coelomocytes after 24 h of exposure to these DNA damaging agents indicated a high level of resistance to all treatments. Significant increases in the formation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP or abasic) sites in DNA were only detected using high doses of H 2 O 2 , MMS and UV radiation. Comparison of sea urchin coelomocytes with hemocytes from the gastropod mollusk Aplysia dactylomela and the decapod crustacean Panulirus argus indicated that sensitivity to different DNA damaging agents varies between species. The high level of resistance to genotoxic agents suggests that DNA damage may not be an informative end point for environmental health assessment using sea urchin coelomocytes however, natural resistance to DNA damaging agents may have implications for the occurrence of neoplastic disease in these animals.

  3. Examining multi-component DNA-templated nanostructures as imaging agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading non-invasive tool for disease imaging and diagnosis. Although MRI exhibits high spatial resolution for anatomical features, the contrast resolution is low. Imaging agents serve as an aid to distinguish different types of tissues within images. Gadolinium chelates, which are considered first generation designs, can be toxic to health, while ultra-small, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have low tissue-targeting efficiency and rapid bio-distribution, resulting to an inadequate detection of the MRI signal and enhancement of image contrast. In order to improve the utility of MRI agents, the challenge in composition and structure needs to be addressed. One-dimensional (1D), superparamagnetic nanostructures have been reported to enhance magnetic and in vivo properties and therefore has a potential to improve contrast enhancement in MRI images. In this dissertation, the structure of 1D, multi-component NP chains, scaffolded on DNA, were pre-clinically examined as potential MRI agents. First, research was focused on characterizing and understanding the mechanism of proton relaxation for DNA-templated NP chains using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Proton relaxation and transverse relaxivity were higher in multi-component NP chains compared to disperse NPs, indicating the arrangement of NPs on a 1D structure improved proton relaxation sensitivity. Second, in vitro evaluation for potential issues in toxicity and contrast efficiency in tissue environments using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner was performed. Cell uptake of DNA-templated NP chains was enhanced after encapsulating the nanostructure with layers of polyelectrolytes and targeting ligands. Compared to dispersed NPs, DNA-templated NP chains improved MRI contrast in both the epithelial basement membrane and colon cancer tumors scaffolds. The last part of the project was focused on developing a novel MRI agent that detects changes in DNA methylation

  4. Structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures in the presence of chaotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Krainer, Georg; Grundmeier, Guido; Schlierf, Michael; Keller, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    DNA origami represent powerful platforms for single-molecule investigations of biomolecular processes. The required structural integrity of the DNA origami may, however, pose significant limitations regarding their applicability, for instance in protein folding studies that require strongly denaturing conditions. Here, we therefore report a detailed study on the stability of 2D DNA origami triangles in the presence of the strong chaotropic denaturing agents urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and its dependence on concentration and temperature. At room temperature, the DNA origami triangles are stable up to at least 24 h in both denaturants at concentrations as high as 6 M. At elevated temperatures, however, structural stability is governed by variations in the melting temperature of the individual staple strands. Therefore, the global melting temperature of the DNA origami does not represent an accurate measure of their structural stability. Although GdmCl has a stronger effect on the global melting temperature, its attack results in less structural damage than observed for urea under equivalent conditions. This enhanced structural stability most likely originates from the ionic nature of GdmCl. By rational design of the arrangement and lengths of the individual staple strands used for the folding of a particular shape, however, the structural stability of DNA origami may be enhanced even further to meet individual experimental requirements. Overall, their high stability renders DNA origami promising platforms for biomolecular studies in the presence of chaotropic agents, including single-molecule protein folding or structural switching.

  5. Detecting the effects of toxic agents on spermatogenesis using DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, N.B.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of spermatogenesis suggest that DNA probes can be used to monitor the effects of toxic agents in male germ cells of mammals. Molecular hybridization analyses with DNA probes can provide a reproducible methodology capable of detecting changes ranging from massive deletions to single base pair substitutions in the genome of exposed individuals. A constantly increasing number of DNA probes that can be used to detect such alterations in human sperm DNA exist for both ubiquitously expressed proteins and for genes solely expressed in the testis. In this chapter, the currently available testicular stage-specific and/or cell type-specific DNA probes and the techniques by which they can be utilized in reproductive toxicology studies are discussed. The advantages, limitations, and future technological advances of this novel biological marker system for the human male reproductive system are also considered

  6. Investigating the heterogeneity of alkylating agents' efficacy and toxicity between sexes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide (MAIAGE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, Brice; Hackshaw, A; Hawkins, D S; Paulussen, M; Anderson, J R; Judson, I; Litière, S; Dirksen, U; Lewis, I; van den Berg, H; Gaspar, N; Gelderblom, H; Whelan, J; Boddy, A V; Wheatley, K; Pignon, J P; De Vathaire, F; Le Deley, M C; Le Teuff, G

    2017-08-01

    A marginal interaction between sex and the type of alkylating agent was observed for event-free survival in the Euro-EWING99-R1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in Ewing sarcoma. To further evaluate this interaction, we performed an individual patient data meta-analysis of RCTs assessing cyclophosphamide versus ifosfamide in any type of cancer. A literature search produced two more eligible RCTs (EICESS92 and IRS-IV). The endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS, main endpoint) and overall survival (OS). The hazard ratios (HRs) of the treatment-by-sex interaction and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were assessed using stratified multivariable Cox models. Heterogeneity of the interaction across age categories and trials was explored. We also assessed this interaction for severe acute toxicity using logistic models. The meta-analysis comprised 1,528 pediatric and young adult sarcoma patients from three RCTs: Euro-EWING99-R1 (n = 856), EICESS92 (n = 155), and IRS-IV (n = 517). There were 224 PFS events in Euro-EWING99-R1 and 200 in the validation set (EICESS92 + IRS-IV), and 171 and 154 deaths in each dataset, respectively. The estimated treatment-by-sex interaction for PFS in Euro-EWING99-R1 (HR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.00-3.00) was not replicated in the validation set (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.55-1.72), without heterogeneity across trials (P = 0.62). In the pooled analysis, the treatment-by-sex interaction was not significant (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 0.89-1.95, P = 0.17), without heterogeneity across age categories (P = 0.88) and trials (P = 0.36). Similar results were observed for OS. No significant treatment-by-sex interaction was observed for leucopenia/neutropenia (P = 0.45), infection (P = 0.64), or renal toxicity (P = 0.20). Our meta-analysis did not confirm the hypothesis of a treatment-by-sex interaction on efficacy or toxicity outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Comparison of the Lonidamine Potentiated Effect of Nitrogen Mustard Alkylating Agents on the Systemic Treatment of DB-1 Human Melanoma Xenografts in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S; Putt, Mary E; Leeper, Dennis B; Garman, Bradley; Nathanson, Katherine L; Glickson, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Previous NMR studies demonstrated that lonidamine (LND) selectively diminishes the intracellular pH (pHi) of DB-1 melanoma and mouse xenografts of a variety of other prevalent human cancers while decreasing their bioenergetic status (tumor βNTP/Pi ratio) and enhancing the activities of melphalan and doxorubicin in these cancer models. Since melphalan and doxorubicin are highly toxic agents, we have examined three other nitrogen (N)-mustards, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide and bendamustine, to determine if they exhibit similar potentiation by LND. As single agents LND, melphalan and these N-mustards exhibited the following activities in DB-1 melanoma xenografts; LND: 100% tumor surviving fraction (SF); chlorambucil: 100% SF; cyclophosphamide: 100% SF; bendamustine: 79% SF; melphalan: 41% SF. When combined with LND administered 40 min prior to administration of the N-mustard (to maximize intracellular acidification) the following responses were obtained; chlorambucil: 62% SF; cyclophosphamide: 42% SF; bendamustine: 36% SF; melphalan: 10% SF. The effect of LND on the activities of these N-mustards is generally attributed to acid stabilization of the aziridinium active intermediate, acid inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase, which acts as a scavenger of aziridinium, and acid inhibition of DNA repair by O6-alkyltransferase. Depletion of ATP by LND may also decrease multidrug resistance and increase tumor response. At similar maximum tolerated doses, our data indicate that melphalan is the most effective N-mustard in combination with LND when treating DB-1 melanoma in mice, but the choice of N-mustard for coadministration with LND will also depend on the relative toxicities of these agents, and remains to be determined.

  8. Hypersensitivity of hypoxia grown Mycobacterium smegmatis to DNA damaging agents: implications of the DNA repair deficiencies in attenuation of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, Kervin; Kurthkoti, Krishna; Varshney, Umesh

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacteria are an important group of pathogenic bacteria. We generated a series of DNA repair deficient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism, to understand the importance of various DNA repair proteins (UvrB, Ung, UdgB, MutY and Fpg) in survival of the pathogenic strains. Here, we compared tolerance of the M. smegmatis strains to genotoxic stress (ROS and RNI) under aerobic, hypoxic and recovery conditions of growth by monitoring their survival. We show an increased susceptibility of mycobacteria to genotoxic stress under hypoxia. UvrB deficiency led to high susceptibility of M. smegmatis to the DNA damaging agents. Ung was second in importance in strains with single deficiencies. Interestingly, we observed that while deficiency of UdgB had only a minor impact on the strain's susceptibility, its combination with Ung deficiency resulted in severe consequences on the strain's survival under genotoxic stress suggesting a strong interdependence of different DNA repair pathways in safeguarding genomic integrity. Our observations reinforce the possibility of targeting DNA repair processes in mycobacteria for therapeutic intervention during active growth and latency phase of the pathogen. High susceptibility of the UvrB, or the Ung/UdgB deficient strains to genotoxic stress may be exploited in generation of attenuated strains of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA repair in mammalian cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cells defective in one or more aspects of repair are killed and often mutagenized more readily than normal cells by DNA damaging agents, and humans whose cells are deficient in repair are at an increased carcinogenic risk compared to normal individuals. The excision repair of uv induced pyrimidine dimers is a well studied system, but the details of the steps in this repair system are far from being understood in human cells. We know that there are a number of chemicals that mimic uv in that normal human cells repair DNA damage from both these agents and from uv by a long patch excision repair system, and that xeroderma pigmentosum cells defective in repair of uv are also defective in the repair of damage from these chemicals. The chemicals we have investigated are AAAF, 4-NQO, DMBA-epoxide, and ICR-170. We describe experiments, using several techniques, in which DNA excision repair is measured after treatment of various human cell strains with combinations of uv and these agents. If two agents have a common rate limiting step then, at doses high enough to saturate the repair system, one would expect the observed repair after a treatment with a combination of agents to be equal to that from one agent alone. Such is not the case for normal human or excision-deficient XP cells. In the former repair is additive and in the latter repair is usually appreciably less than that observed with either agent alone. Models that attempt to explain these surprising results involve complexes of enzymes and cofactors

  10. The DinB•RecA complex of Escherichia coli mediates an efficient and high-fidelity response to ubiquitous alkylation lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Rands, Thomas J; Godoy, Veronica G

    2014-03-01

    Alkylation DNA lesions are ubiquitous, and result from normal cellular metabolism as well as from treatment with methylating agents and chemotherapeutics. DNA damage tolerance by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases has an important role in cellular resistance to alkylating agents. However, it is not yet known whether Escherichia coli (E. coli) DNA Pol IV (DinB) alkylation lesion bypass efficiency and fidelity in vitro are similar to those inferred by genetic analyses. We hypothesized that DinB-mediated bypass of 3-deaza-3-methyladenine, a stable analog of 3-methyladenine, the primary replication fork-stalling alkylation lesion, would be of high fidelity. We performed here the first kinetic analyses of E. coli DinB•RecA binary complexes. Whether alone or in a binary complex, DinB inserted the correct deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) opposite either lesion-containing or undamaged template; the incorporation of other dNTPs was largely inefficient. DinB prefers undamaged DNA, but the DinB•RecA binary complex increases its catalytic efficiency on lesion-containing template, perhaps as part of a regulatory mechanism to better respond to alkylation damage. Notably, we find that a DinB derivative with enhanced affinity for RecA, either alone or in a binary complex, is less efficient and has a lower fidelity than DinB or DinB•RecA. This finding contrasts our previous genetic analyses. Therefore, mutagenesis resulting from alkylation lesions is likely limited in cells by the activity of DinB•RecA. These two highly conserved proteins play an important role in maintaining genomic stability when cells are faced with ubiquitous DNA damage. Kinetic analyses are important to gain insights into the mechanism(s) regulating TLS DNA polymerases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Exposure of E. coli to DNA-methylating agents impairs biofilm formation and invasion of eukaryotic cells via down regulation of the N-acetylneuraminate lyase NanA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eDi Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation damage can be induced by endogenous and exogenous chemical agents, which has led every living organism to develop suitable response strategies. We investigated protein expression profiles of Escherichia coli upon exposure to the alkylating agent methyl-methane sulfonate (MMS by differential proteomics. Quantitative proteomic data showed a massive downregulation of enzymes belonging to the glycolytic pathway and fatty acids degradation, strongly suggesting a decrease of energy production. A strong reduction in the expression of the N-acetylneuraminate lyases (NanA involved in the sialic acid metabolism was also observed. Using a null NanA mutant and DANA, a substrate analogue acting as competitive inhibitor, we demonstrated that down regulation of NanA affects biofilm formation and adhesion properties of E. coli MV1161. Exposure to alkylating agents also decreased biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 eukaryotic cell line by the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC strain LF82. Our data showed that methylation stress impairs E. coli adhesion properties and suggest a possible role of NanA in biofilm formation and bacteria host interactions.

  12. Genome-Wide Requirements for Resistance to Functionally Distinct DNA-Damaging Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic and therapeutic differences in the cellular response to DNA-damaging compounds are not completely understood, despite intense study. To expand our knowledge of DNA damage, we assayed the effects of 12 closely related DNA-damaging agents on the complete pool of ~4,700 barcoded homozygous deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In our protocol, deletion strains are pooled together and grown competitively in the presence of compound. Relative strain sensitivity is determined by hybridization of PCR-amplified barcodes to an oligonucleotide array carrying the barcode complements. These screens identified genes in well-characterized DNA-damage-response pathways as well as genes whose role in the DNA-damage response had not been previously established. High-throughput individual growth analysis was used to independently confirm microarray results. Each compound produced a unique genome-wide profile. Analysis of these data allowed us to determine the relative importance of DNA-repair modules for resistance to each of the 12 profiled compounds. Clustering the data for 12 distinct compounds uncovered both known and novel functional interactions that comprise the DNA-damage response and allowed us to define the genetic determinants required for repair of interstrand cross-links. Further genetic analysis allowed determination of epistasis for one of these functional groups.

  13. Involvement of stress-activated protein kinase in the cellular response to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine and other DNA-damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, A; Datta, R; Yuan, Z M; Kharbanda, S; Kufe, D

    1995-12-01

    The cellular response to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) includes activation of Jun/AP-1, induction of c-jun transcription, and programmed cell death. The stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases stimulate the transactivation function of c-jun by amino terminal phosphorylation. The present work demonstrates that ara-C activates p54 SAP kinase. The finding that SAP kinase is also activated by alkylating agents (mitomycin C and cisplatinum) and the topoisomerase I inhibitor 9-amino-camptothecin supports DNA damage as an initial signal in this cascade. The results demonstrate that ara-C also induces binding of SAP kinase to the SH2/SH3-containing adapter protein Grb2. SAP kinase binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2, while interaction of the p85 alpha-subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex. The results also demonstrate that ara-C treatment is associated with inhibition of lipid and serine kinase activities of PI 3-kinase. The potential significance of the ara-C-induced interaction between SAP kinase and PI 3-kinase is further supported by the demonstration that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, stimulates SAP kinase activity. The finding that Wortmannin treatment is also associated with internucleosomal DNA fragmentation may support a potential link between PI 3-kinase and regulation of both SAP kinase and programmed cell death.

  14. Bifunctional RuII -Complex-Catalysed Tandem C-C Bond Formation: Efficient and Atom Economical Strategy for the Utilisation of Alcohols as Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bivas Chandra; Chakrabarti, Kaushik; Shee, Sujan; Paul, Subhadeep; Kundu, Sabuj

    2016-12-12

    Catalytic activities of a series of functional bipyridine-based Ru II complexes in β-alkylation of secondary alcohols using primary alcohols were investigated. Bifunctional Ru II complex (3 a) bearing 6,6'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine (6DHBP) ligand exhibited the highest catalytic activity for this reaction. Using significantly lower catalyst loading (0.1 mol %) dehydrogenative carbon-carbon bond formation between numerous aromatic, aliphatic and heteroatom substituted alcohols were achieved with high selectivity. Notably, for the synthesis of β-alkylated secondary alcohols this protocol is a rare one-pot strategy using a metal-ligand cooperative Ru II system. Remarkably, complex 3 a demonstrated the highest reactivity compared to all the reported transition metal complexes in this reaction. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Reaction of the (111) faces of single-crystal indium phosphide with alkylating agents: evidence for selective reaction of the p-rich face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spool, A.M.; Daube, K.A.; Mallouk, T.E.; Belmont, J.A.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1986-05-28

    We wish to report that the P-rich, (111)B, face of single-crystal InP, but not the In-rich, (111)A, face of the same crystal, reacts with molecular reagents to yield surface-bound material derived from the apparent alkylation of a surface P atom. Exploitation of surface functional groups has been demonstrated to be very important in the attachment of molecular reagents and polymers to electrode surfaces. Electrodes derivatized with molecules have potential uses in analysis, fuel cells, electrosynthetic cells, and photoelectrochemical cells. We now wish to present evidence showing that an important photoelectrode material, InP, can be functionalized with molecules by reaction of the P-rich, (111)B, face with alkylating reagents.

  16. [The biochemical mechanisms of the action of N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas. The possible reasons for drug resistance to these compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrkin, A B; Gorbacheva, L B

    1996-01-01

    N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas exhibit a wide spectrum of antitumor activity. They react as alkylating agents at nucleophilic sites in purine and pyrimidine moieties of DNA. The predominant site of this alkylation is N7 of guanine, which is followed by the site N3 of adenine and 06 of guanine. The formation and persistence of 0(6)-alkylguanine (0(6)-AG) may be of primary importance in cytotoxicity of the nitrosoureas. 0(6)-AG adducts of DNA of the tumor cells are repaired by protein 0(6)-alkylguanine-DNA transferase (0(6)-AGT) which transfers the alkyl group to internal cysteine residue being the acceptor protein for the alkyl group in an irreversible transfer reaction. 0(6)-AGT can protect the tumor cells against 0(6)-AG adducts by the way of inhibiting the formation of the DNA interstrand cross-links 0(6)-AGT plays an important role in the drug resistance because it repairs the DNA alkyl adducts at the 0(6) position of guanine. The 0(6)-AGT activity inversely correlates with the cytotoxic effect of the nitrosoureas. The agents like 0(6)-methylguanosine, 0(6)-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine, and some 0(6)-benzylated guanine derivatives are effective inactivators of 0(6)-AGT, and thus can be used to enhance the cytotoxicity of N-nitrosoureas. The activation of 0(6)-AGT and other repairing enzymes such as alpha and beta DNA-polymerases as well as an increase in the level of reduced glutathione may be used in developing the resistance to the nitrosoureas.

  17. Alkylation of N-substituted 2-phenylacetamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLOBODAN D. PETROVIC

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Various N-substituted phenylacetamides were alkylated using different alkylating agents under neutral and basic conditions. Reactions were performed at different reaction temperatures and in various solvents. Also, a number of various catalysts were used including phase-transfer catalysts. Reactions were followed using GC or GC-MS technique and the presence as well as the yields of the alkylation products were established. Generally, the best yield and high selectivity in the studied reactions were achieved under basic conditions where in the certain cases some products, mostly N-product, were obtained solely in quantitative yields.

  18. Synthesis and antitumor activity evaluation of a novel combi-nitrosourea prodrug: Designed to release a DNA cross-linking agent and an inhibitor of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guohui; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Lijiao; Fan, Tengjiao; Zhang, Shufen; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-05-01

    The drug resistance of CENUs induced by O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), which repairs the O(6)-alkylated guanine and subsequently inhibits the formation of dG-dC cross-links, hinders the application of CENU chemotherapies. Therefore, the discovery of CENU analogs with AGT inhibiting activity is a promising approach leading to novel CENU chemotherapies with high therapeutic index. In this study, a new combi-nitrosourea prodrug 3-(3-(((2-amino-9H-purin-6-yl)oxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (6), designed to release a DNA cross-linking agent and an inhibitor of AGT, was synthesized and evaluated for its antitumor activity and ability to induce DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). The results indicated that 6 exhibited higher cytotoxicity against mer(+) glioma cells compared with ACNU, BCNU, and their respective combinations with O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). Quantifications of dG-dC cross-links induced by 6 were performed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Higher levels of dG-dC cross-link were observed in 6-treated human glioma SF763 cells (mer(+)), whereas lower levels of dG-dC cross-link were observed in 6-treated calf thymus DNA, when compared with the groups treated with BCNU and ACNU. The results suggested that the superiority of 6 might result from the AGT inhibitory moiety, which specifically functions in cells with AGT activity. Molecular docking studies indicated that five hydrogen bonds were formed between the O(6)-BG analogs released from 6 and the five residues in the active pocket of AGT, which provided a reasonable explanation for the higher AGT-inhibitory activity of 6 than O(6)-BG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. When alcohol is the answer: Trapping, identifying and quantifying simple alkylating species in aqueous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penketh, Philip G; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Rui; Ishiguro, Kimiko; Sartorelli, Alan C; Ratner, Elena S

    2016-09-01

    Alkylating agents are a significant class of environmental carcinogens as well as commonly used anticancer therapeutics. Traditional alkylating activity assays have utilized the colorimetric reagent 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (4NBP). However, 4NBP based assays have a relatively low sensitivity towards harder, more oxophilic alkylating species and are not well suited for the identification of the trapped alkyl moiety due to adduct instability. Herein we describe a method using water as the trapping agent which permits the trapping of simple alkylating electrophiles with a comparatively wide range of softness/hardness and permits the identification of donated simple alkyl moieties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genotoxicity studies on DNA-interactive telomerase inhibitors with application as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Dean J; Cemeli, Eduardo; Carder, Joanna; Fearnley, Jamie; Estdale, Sian; Perry, Philip J; Jenkins, Terence C; Anderson, Diana

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase-targeted strategies have aroused recent interest in anti-cancer chemotherapy, because DNA-binding drugs can interact with high-order tetraplex rather than double-stranded (duplex) DNA targets in tumour cells. However, the protracted cell-drug exposure times necessary for clinical application require that telomerase inhibitory efficacy must be accompanied by both low inherent cytotoxicity and the absence of mutagenicity/genotoxicity. For the first time, the genotoxicity of a number of structurally diverse DNA-interactive telomerase inhibitors is examined in the Ames test using six Salmonella typhimurium bacterial strains (TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, TA98, TA100, and TA102). DNA damage induced by each agent was also assessed using the Comet assay with human lymphocytes. The two assay procedures revealed markedly different genotoxicity profiles that are likely to reflect differences in metabolism and/or DNA repair between bacterial and mammalian cells. The mutational spectrum for a biologically active fluorenone derivative, shown to be mutagenic in the TA100 strain, was characterised using a novel and rapid assay method based upon PCR amplification of a fragment of the hisG46 allele, followed by RFLP analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates that the majority (84%) of mutations induced by this compound are C --> A transversions at position 2 of the missense proline codon of the hisG46 allele. However, despite its genotoxic bacterial profile, this fluorenone agent gave a negative response in the Comet assay, and demonstrates how unwanted systemic effects (e.g., cytotoxicity and genotoxicity) can be prevented or ameliorated through suitable molecular fine-tuning of a candidate drug in targeted human tumour cells. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  2. The use of anthracycline at first-line compared to alkylating agents or nucleoside analogs improves the outcome of salvage treatments after relapse in follicular lymphoma The REFOLL study by the Fondazione Italiana Linfomi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giuseppe; Marcheselli, Luigi; Dondi, Alessandra; Bottelli, Chiara; Tucci, Alessandra; Luminari, Stefano; Arcaini, Luca; Merli, Michele; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Boccomini, Carola; Puccini, Benedetta; Micheletti, Moira; Martinelli, Giovanni; Rossi, Andrea; Zilioli, Vittorio Ruggero; Bozzoli, Valentina; Balzarotti, Monica; Bolis, Silvia; Cabras, Maria Giuseppina; Federico, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) patients experience multiple remissions and relapses and commonly receive multiple treatment lines. A crucial question is whether anthracyclines should be used at first-line or whether they would be better "reserved" for relapse and whether FL outcome can be optimized by definite sequences of treatments. Randomized trials can be hardly designed to address this question. In this retrospective multi-institutional study, time-to-next-treatment after first relapse was analyzed in 510 patients who had received either alkylating agents- or anthracycline- or nucleoside analogs-based chemotherapy with/without rituximab at first-line and different second-line therapies. After a median of 42 months, median time-to-next-treatment after relapse was 41 months (CI95%:34-47 months). After adjustment for covariates, first-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy with/without rituximab was associated with better time-to-next-treatment after any salvage than alkylating agents-based chemotherapy with/without rituximab or nucleoside analogs-based chemotherapy with/without rituximab (HR:0.74, P = 0.027). The addition of rituximab to first-line chemotherapy had no significant impact (HR:1.22, P = 0.140). Autologs stem cell transplantation performed better than any other salvage treatment (HR:0.53, P < 0.001). First-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy significantly improved time-to-next-treatment even in patients receiving salvage autologs stem cell transplantation (P = 0.041). This study supports the concept that in FL previous treatments significantly impact on the outcome of subsequent therapies. The outcome of second-line treatments, either with salvage chemoimmunotherapy or with autologs stem cell transplantation, was better when an anthracycline-containing regimen was used at first-line. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, December 15, 1982-July 15, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The molecular changes in DNA of mutations induced at the well-defined locus alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in Drosophila melanogaster were compared between null mutants induced by x-rays, the alkylating agent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and decay of tritium incorporated into specific sites of DNA

  4. Parainfluenza Virus Infection Sensitizes Cancer Cells to DNA-Damaging Agents: Implications for Oncolytic Virus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Candace R; Parks, Griffith D

    2018-04-01

    A parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) with mutations in the P/V gene (P/V-CPI - ) is restricted for spread in normal cells but not in cancer cells in vitro and is effective at reducing tumor burdens in mouse model systems. Here we show that P/V-CPI - infection of HEp-2 human laryngeal cancer cells results in the majority of the cells dying, but unexpectedly, over time, there is an emergence of a population of cells that survive as P/V-CPI - persistently infected (PI) cells. P/V-CPI - PI cells had elevated levels of basal caspase activation, and viability was highly dependent on the activity of cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins (IAPs) such as Survivin and XIAP. In challenge experiments with external inducers of apoptosis, PI cells were more sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and cell death. This increased cisplatin sensitivity correlated with defects in DNA damage signaling pathways such as phosphorylation of Chk1 and translocation of damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) to the nucleus. Cisplatin-induced killing of PI cells was sensitive to the inhibition of wild-type (WT) p53-inducible protein 1 (WIP1), a phosphatase which acts to terminate DNA damage signaling pathways. A similar sensitivity to cisplatin was seen with cells during acute infection with P/V-CPI - as well as during acute infections with WT PIV5 and the related virus human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2). Our results have general implications for the design of safer paramyxovirus-based vectors that cannot establish PI as well as the potential for combining chemotherapy with oncolytic RNA virus vectors. IMPORTANCE There is intense interest in developing oncolytic viral vectors with increased potency against cancer cells, particularly those cancer cells that have gained resistance to chemotherapies. We have found that infection with cytoplasmically replicating parainfluenza virus can result in increases in the killing of cancer cells by agents that induce DNA damage, and this is linked

  5. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H T; Moreira, José C F; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival.

  6. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfeu Zanotto-Filho

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair, DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival.

  7. Activation of cGAS-dependent antiviral responses by DNA intercalating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Thomas, Belinda J; Ferrand, Jonathan; McArthur, Kate; Bardin, Philip G; Williams, Bryan R G; Gantier, Michael P

    2017-01-09

    Acridine dyes, including proflavine and acriflavine, were commonly used as antiseptics before the advent of penicillins in the mid-1940s. While their mode of action on pathogens was originally attributed to their DNA intercalating activity, work in the early 1970s suggested involvement of the host immune responses, characterized by induction of interferon (IFN)-like activities through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate here that sub-toxic concentrations of a mixture of acriflavine and proflavine instigate a cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS)-dependent type-I IFN antiviral response. This pertains to the capacity of these compounds to induce low level DNA damage and cytoplasmic DNA leakage, resulting in cGAS-dependent cGAMP-like activity. Critically, acriflavine:proflavine pre-treatment of human primary bronchial epithelial cells significantly reduced rhinovirus infection. Collectively, our findings constitute the first evidence that non-toxic DNA binding agents have the capacity to act as indirect agonists of cGAS, to exert potent antiviral effects in mammalian cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh; Azam, Ameer

    2010-01-01

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. 119 Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K b = 8.42 x 10 4 M -1 . The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  9. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Azam, Ameer [Center of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India)

    2010-05-14

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. {sup 119}Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K{sub b} = 8.42 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  10. Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of ionizing radiations become refractory to high doses of radiation as well as to chemical mutagens that induce double-strand breaks in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Sheldon; Afzal, Veena; Wiencke, J.K.; Olivieri, G.; Michaeli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The results indicate that prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of X-rays reduces the number of chromosome breaks induced by double-strand breaks, and perhaps even by cross-links, in DNA, but has the opposite effect on breaks induced by the alkylating agent MMS. The results also show that the induced repair mechanism is different from that observed in the adaptive reponse that follows exposure to low doses of alkylating agents. (author)

  11. Alkylation of hydrothiophosphoryl compounds in conditions of interphase catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aladzheva, I.M.; Odinets, I.L.; Petrovskij, P.V.; Mastryukova, T.A.; Kabachkin, M.I.

    1993-01-01

    A method of interphase catalysis permitted to develop a common method for synthesis of compounds with thiophosphoryl group. The effect of nature of hydrothiophosphoryl compound, alkylating agent, two-phase system and reaction conditions on alkylation product yields was investigated in detail

  12. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  13. FANCG knockout CHO cells display sensitivity to diverse DNA damaging agents and possible genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, J.M.; Tebbs, R.S.; Yamada, N.A.; Salazar, E.P.; Kopf, V.L.; Thompson, L.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The function of the proteins encoded by the genes responsible for the disease Fanconi anemia (FA) have not been elucidated. Several of these proteins (FancA, C, E, F, and G) form a complex in the nucleus, and cells deficient in any one of these proteins are sensitive to crosslinking agents, suggesting a possible role for these proteins in some aspect of DNA repair, chromosomal maintenance, or replication. We constructed a FancG knockout mutant (FGKO40) in CHO AA8 cells, as well as FancG-corrected FGKO40 cells (KO40BP6, which is a pool of six BAC-clone transformants). FGKO40 cells are sensitive to a wide variety of DNA damaging agents. Sensitivity to the cross-linking agents MMC (3x) and chloroethyl-nitrosourea (3x) does not exceed that of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) (4x), methyl-nitrosourea (4x), or ethyl-nitrosourea (3x), or the purine analog 6-thioguanine (5x). Other agents show mild sensitivity in FGKO40 cells: ionizing radiation (1.2x), UV-C (1.5x), hydroxyurea (1.2x), camptothecin (1.2x), and excess thymidine (normal). The length of S phase was carefully measured by monitoring the progression of highly synchronous G1 cells obtained by centrifugal elutriation. FGKO40 cells traversed S phase normally but had a slightly longer G2 phase than parental cells. Treatment of synchronized G1 cells with MMS did not increase S phase in parental or mutant cells, but again G2 was slightly longer for FGKO40. Mutation rates were measured at the hrpt and aprt loci, where gene inactivation confers resistance to 6-thioguanine or 8-azaadenine, respectively. FGKO40 had a slightly reduced mutation rate for hprt mutants, suggesting reduced recovery of large deletions at this locus. Moreover, the rate of methotrexate resistance was elevated 2.5-fold in mutant cells compared to controls. Resistance to this drug is generally associated with amplification of the dhfr locus, suggesting FancG plays a role in this aspect of genome stability. We suggest that the defect in FGKO

  14. Parp1 protects against Aag-dependent alkylation-induced nephrotoxicity in a sex-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jennifer A; Allocca, Mariacarmela; Fake, Kimberly R; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Corrigan, Joshua J; Bronson, Roderick T; Samson, Leona D

    2016-07-19

    Nephrotoxicity is a common toxic side-effect of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. Although the base excision repair (BER) pathway is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. We have shown that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase, Aag (a.k.a. Mpg), an enzyme that initiates BER, mediates alkylation-induced whole-animal lethality and cytotoxicity in the pancreas, spleen, retina, and cerebellum, but not in the kidney. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag-transgenic mice (AagTg) was abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp1). Here we report that Parp1-deficient mice expressing increased Aag (AagTg/Parp1-/-) develop sex-dependent kidney failure upon exposure to the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and suffer increased whole-animal lethality compared to AagTg and wild-type mice. Macroscopic, histological, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed morphological kidney damage including dilated tubules, proteinaceous casts, vacuolation, collapse of the glomerular tuft, and deterioration of podocyte structure. Moreover, mice exhibited clinical signs of kidney disease indicating functional damage, including elevated blood nitrogen urea and creatinine, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria. Pharmacological Parp inhibition in AagTg mice also resulted in sensitivity to MMS-induced nephrotoxicity. These findings provide in vivo evidence that Parp1 modulates Aag-dependent MMS-induced nephrotoxicity in a sex-dependent manner and highlight the critical roles that Aag-initiated BER and Parp1 may play in determining the side-effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

  15. Labelling of living mammalian spermatozoa with the fluorescent thiol alkylating agent, monobromobimane (MB): immobilization upon exposure to ultraviolet light and analysis of acrosomal status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.M.; Fleming, A.D.; Crozet, N.; Kuehl, T.J.; Kosower, N.S.; Yanagimachi, R.

    1986-01-01

    Living spermatozoa of seven mammalian species were treated with the thiol-alkylating fluorescent labelling compound, monobromobimane (MBBR). MB-labelling alone had no effect on sperm motility, nor on the time course or ability of golden hamster spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction when capacitated in vitro. Exposure of MB-labelled spermatozoa to ultraviolet (UV) light and excitation of the MB fluorochrome resulted in virtually immediate immobilization of the spermatozoa without affecting acrosomal status. UV exposure of unlabelled spermatozoa for up to 30 sec had no effect upon motility. Immobilization of MB-labelled spermatozoa depended on the midpiece being irradiated, as irradiation of the head alone, or of the more distal parts of the principal piece, had little or no effect upon motility. Labelling with MB followed by immobilization of individually selected spermatozoa was most useful for detailing the course and site of occurrence of the acrosome reaction during penetration of the cumulus oophorus by golden hamster spermatozoa in vitro. In these often hyperactivated spermatozoa, precise determination of the acrosomal status could not often otherwise be made due to the difficulty in visualizing the acrosomal region of a vigorously thrashing, hyperactivated spermatozoon. This technique should prove valuable in a variety of studies on sperm motility, capacitation and fertilization, and could also be extended to other cell systems

  16. Histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferase mobilizes NER factors to regulate tolerance against alkylation damage in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Li, Adelicia Yongling; Yeo, Yee Phan; Chen, Ee Sin

    2018-04-09

    The Set2 methyltransferase and its target, histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36), affect chromatin architecture during the transcription and repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. Set2 also confers resistance against the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), through an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) exhibit MMS hypersensitivity when expressing a set2 mutant lacking the catalytic histone methyltransferase domain or a H3K36R mutant (reminiscent of a set2-null mutant). Set2 acts synergistically with base excision repair factors but epistatically with nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, and determines the timely nuclear accumulation of the NER initiator, Rhp23, in response to MMS. Set2 facilitates Rhp23 recruitment to chromatin at the brc1+ locus, presumably to repair alkylating damage and regulate the expression of brc1+ in response to MMS. Set2 also show epistasis with DNA damage checkpoint proteins; regulates the activation of Chk1, a DNA damage response effector kinase; and acts in a similar functional group as proteins involved in homologous recombination. Consistently, Set2 and H3K36 ensure the dynamicity of Rhp54 in DNA repair foci formation after MMS treatment. Overall, our results indicate a novel role for Set2/H3K36me in coordinating the recruitment of DNA repair machineries to timely manage alkylating damage.

  17. Efficacy and toxicity of the combination chemotherapy of thalidomide, alkylating agent, and steroid for relapsed/refractory myeloma patients: a report from the Korean Multiple Myeloma Working Party (KMMWP) retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jihyun; Min, Chang-Ki; Kim, Kihyun; Han, Jae-Joon; Moon, Joon Ho; Kang, Hye Jin; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Won Sik; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Je-Jung; Choi, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the treatment responses, toxicities, and survival outcomes of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who received daily thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone (CTD) or daily thalidomide, melphalan, and prednisolone (MTP) at 17 medical centers in Korea. Three-hundred and seventy-six patients were enrolled. The combined chemotherapy of thalidomide, corticosteroid, and an alkylating agent (TAS) was second-line chemotherapy in 142 (37.8%) patients, and third-line chemotherapy in 135 (35.9%) patients. The response rate overall was 69.4%. Patients who were not treated with bortezomib and lenalidomide before TAS showed a higher response rate compared to those who were exposed to these agents. The estimated median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 10.4 months and 28.0 months, respectively. The adverse events during TAS were generally tolerable, but 39 (10.4%) patients experienced severe infectious complications. There were no differences in terms of efficacy between CTD and MTP, but infectious complications were more common in CTD group. TAS is an effective treatment regimen which induces a high response rate in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients. Due to the high incidence of grade 3 or 4 infection, proper management of infection is necessary during the TAS treatment, especially the CTD. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Protonation of 1-alkyl-2-allyllithium-0-carboranes and 1-methyl-2-allylmaonesium chloride-0-carborane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, N.N.; Kazantsev, A.V.; Zakharkin, L.I.

    1975-01-01

    The ratio of 1-alkyl-2-allyl and 1-alkyl-2-propenyl-0-carboranes generated in protonation of 1-alkyl-2-lithium allyl-0-carboranes with various protolytic agents in ether, THF and liquid ammonia depends on the nature of protolytic agent and solvent. The rat:o of these allyl and propenyl isomers is also affected by steric effects of the protolytic agent and 0-carborane nucleus

  19. Solar ultraviolet light potentiates stannous chloride effects as a DNA damaging agent: a spectrophotometrical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, J.C.P. de; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Leitao, A.C.; Caldeira-de-Araujo, A.; Lage, C.; Leitao, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Stannous chloride (Sn Cl 2 ) is a reducing agent widely used to reduce 99m Tc in several radio pharmaceuticals compounds. In spite of being used in nuclear medicine, its genotoxic effects are under investigation in our laboratory. In E. coli, Sn Cl 2 has been shown to have lethal and mutagenic effects, which are thought to occur mainly via active oxygen species. In order to detect some possible direct influence of Sn Cl 2 on nucleic acid, DNA, nucleotides and isolated bases were allowed to react with S N Cl 2 in an in vitro system and the effects analyzed spectro photometrically. Since Sn Cl 2 absorbs light in the UV region, we expected that UV could modify the Sn Cl 2 effects on DNA. Our results indicate that: a. Sn Cl 2 or UV (312 nm, 10 5 J/m 2 ) alone caused only slight alterations in the 260-nm absorption peak of supercoiled plasmid DNA (p U C 9.1); b. Sn Cl 2 + UV (312 nm, 10 5 J/m 2 ) led DNA (p U C 9.1) to a complete loss of its characteristic absorption in the 260-nm region; and c. when reacting with isolated A T P or T T P, Sn Cl 2 + UV (312 nm, 5 x 10 4 J/m 2 ) caused a significant decrease in their 260-nm absorption peaks, as compared to Sn CL 2 alone. Put together, our results indicate that Sn Cl 2 effects are potentiated by the action of solar UV light

  20. Isobutane alkylation over solid catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozorezov, Y.I.; Lisin, V.I.

    1979-05-01

    Commercial alumina modified with 6Vertical Bar3< by wt boron trifluoride was active in isobutane alkylation with ethylene in a flow reactor at 5:1 isobutane-ethylene and 5-20 min reaction time. The reaction rate was first-order in ethylene and increased with increasing temperature (20/sup 0/-80/sup 0/C) and ethylene pressure (0.2-3 atm). The calculated activation energy was 8.4 kj. Kinetic data and the activity of tert.-butyl chloride, but not ethyl chloride as alkylating agents in place of ethylene suggested a carbonium-ion chain mechanism involving both surface and gas-phase reactions. The ethylene-based yield of the alkylate decreased from 132 to 41Vertical Bar3< by wt after nine hours on stream, and its bromine number increased from 0.2 to 1 g Br/sub 2//100 ml. This inhibition was attributed to adsorption on the active acidic sites of the reaction products, particularly C/sub 10//sup +/ olefins. Catalyst stabilization could probably be achieved by selecting an appropriate solvent that would continuously desorb the inhibiting products from the catalyst surface.

  1. Effects of changes in intracellular iron pool on AlkB-dependent and AlkB-independent mechanisms protecting E.coli cells against mutagenic action of alkylating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Anna; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M.; Poznański, Jarosław; Pilżys, Tomasz; Marcinkowski, Michał; Dylewska, Małgorzata; Piwowarski, Jan [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Jakubczak, Wioletta; Pawlak, Katarzyna [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Grzesiuk, Elżbieta, E-mail: elag@ibb.waw.pl [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The intracellular free iron in E.coli hemH appear to be double that in wt strain. • Increased Fe(II) and AlkB concentrations result in decreased MMS-induced mutations. • Dealkylation of dNTPs takes place in the presence of Fe(II) and not requires AlkB. - Abstract: An Escherichia coli hemH mutant accumulates protoporphyrin IX, causing photosensitivity of cells to visible light. Here, we have shown that intracellular free iron in hemH mutants is double that observed in hemH{sup +} strain. The aim of this study was to recognize the influence of this increased free iron concentration on AlkB-directed repair of alkylated DNA by analyzing survival and argE3 → Arg{sup +} reversion induction after λ > 320 nm light irradiation and MMS-treatment in E. coli AB1157 hemH and alkB mutants. E.coli AlkB dioxygenase constitutes a direct single-protein repair system using non-hem Fe(II) and cofactors 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) to initiate oxidative dealkylation of DNA/RNA bases. We have established that the frequency of MMS-induced Arg{sup +} revertants in AB1157 alkB{sup +}hemH{sup –}/pMW1 strain was 40 and 26% reduced comparing to the alkB{sup +}hemH{sup –} and alkB{sup +}hemH{sup +}/pMW1, respectively. It is noteworthy that the effect was observed only when bacteria were irradiated with λ > 320 nm light prior MMS-treatment. This finding indicates efficient repair of alkylated DNA in photosensibilized cells in the presence of higher free iron pool and AlkB concentrations. Interestingly, a 31% decrease in the level of Arg{sup +} reversion was observed in irradiated and MMS-treated hemH{sup –}alkB{sup –} cells comparing to the hemH{sup +}alkB{sup –} strain. Also, the level of Arg{sup +} revertants in the irradiated and MMS treated hemH{sup –} alkB{sup –} mutant was significantly lower (by 34%) in comparison to the same strain but MMS-treated only. These indicate AlkB-independent repair involving Fe ions and reactive oxygen

  2. Photoinduced alkylation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dondi, D.; Fagnoni, M.; Albini, A.

    2002-07-01

    Some {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes have been alkylated generating alkyl radicals from alcohols and dioxolanes in mixed aqueous-organic solution though photoinduced hydrogen abstraction by disodium benzophenondisulfonate when exposed to solar light (6 to 14 hours for 10 g amounts). (Author) 8 refs.

  3. Electrochemistry of potentially bioreductive alkylating quinones : Part 1. Electrochemical properties of relatively simple quinones, as model compounds of mitomycin- and aziridinylquinone-type antitumour agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driebergen, R.J.; den Hartigh, J.; Holthuis, J.J.M.; Hulshoff, A.; van Oort, W.J.; Postma kelder, S.J.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of methyl-, hydroxy and amino substituents on the electrochemical behaviour of simple 1,4-naphtho-and 1,4-benzoquinones, model compounds of many quinoid antitumour agents, in aqueous media was studied. Significant changes in electrochemical behaviour were observed, potentially the

  4. DNA repair in human cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP 2 fibroblasts were treated with uv plus uv-mimetic chemicals. The uv dose used was sufficient to saturate the uv excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a uv specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from uv and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of uv and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from uv or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170

  5. DNA damage-inducible transcripts in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Alamo, I. Jr.; Hollander, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Hybridization subtraction at low ratios of RNA to cDNA was used to enrich for the cDNA of transcripts increased in Chinese hamster cells after UV irradiation. Forty-nine different cDNA clones were isolated. Most coded for nonabundant transcripts rapidly induced 2- to 10-fold after UV irradiation. Only 2 of the 20 cDNA clones sequenced matched known sequences (metallothionein I and II). The predicted amino acid sequence of one cDNA had two localized areas of homology with the rat helix-destabilizing protein. These areas of homology were at the two DNA-binding sites of this nucleic acid single-strand-binding protein. The induced transcripts were separated into two general classes. Class I transcripts were induced by UV radiation and not by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Class II transcripts were induced by UV radiation and by methyl methanesulfonate. Many class II transcripts were induced also by H2O2 and various alkylating agents but not by heat shock, phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate, or DNA-damaging agents which do not produce high levels of base damage. Since many of the cDNA clones coded for transcripts which were induced rapidly and only by certain types of DNA-damaging agents, their induction is likely a specific response to such damage rather than a general response to cell injury

  6. Moderate variations in CDC25B protein levels modulate the response to DNA damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aressy, B.; Bugler, B.; Valette, A.; Ducommun, B.; Biard, D.

    2008-01-01

    CDC25B, one of the three members of the CDC25 dual-specificity phosphatase family, plays a critical role in the control of the cell cycle and in the checkpoint response to DNA damage. CDC25B is responsible for the initial dephosphorylation and activation of the cyclin-dependent kinases, thus initiating the train of events leading to entry into mitosis. The critical role played by CDC25B is illustrated by the fact that it is specifically required for checkpoint recovery and that unscheduled accumulation of CDC25B is responsible for illegitimate entry into mitosis. Here, we report that in p53 colon carcinoma cells, a moderate increase in the CDC25B level is sufficient to impair the DNA damage checkpoint, to increase spontaneous mutagenesis, and to sensitize cells to ionising radiation and genotoxic agents. Using a tumour cell spheroid assay as an alternative to animal studies, we demonstrate that the level of CDC25B expression modulates growth inhibition and apoptotic death. Since CDC25B overexpression has been observed in a significant number of human cancers, including colon carcinoma, and is often associated with high grade tumours and poor prognosis, our work suggests that the expression level of CDC25B might be a potential key parameter of the cellular response to cancer therapy. (authors)

  7. A germline FANCA alteration that is associated with increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, David C; Sailer, Verena; Xue, Hui; Cheng, Hongwei; Collins, Colin C; Gleave, Martin; Wang, Yuzhuo; Demichelis, Francesca; Beltran, Himisha; Rubin, Mark A; Rickman, David S

    2017-09-01

    Defects in genes involved in DNA damage repair (DDR) pathway are emerging as novel biomarkers and targets for new prostate cancer drug therapies. A previous report revealed an association between an exceptional response to cisplatin treatment and a somatic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of FANCA in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer who also harbored a germline FANCA variant (S1088F). Although germline FANCA mutations are the most frequent alterations in patients with Fanconi anemia, germline alterations are less common in prostate cancer. We hypothesized that the germline S1088F FANCA variant in combination with FANCA LOH was deleterious for FANCA function and contributed to the patient's exceptional response to cisplatin. We show that although it properly localizes to the nucleus, the S1088F FANCA mutant protein disrupts the FANC protein complex resulting in increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Because molecular stratification is emerging as a strategy for treating men with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer harboring specific DDR gene defects, our findings suggest that more biomarker studies are needed to better define clinically relevant germline and somatic alterations. © 2017 Wilkes et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Williamson alkylation approach to the synthesis of poly(alkyl vinyl ether) copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markova, D.; Christova, D.; Velichkova, R.

    2008-01-01

    A method for synthesis of poly(alkyl vinyl ether-co-vinyl alcohol) copolymers was developed based on the Williamson's alkylation of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) with alkyl iodides. The influence of the alkylating agent and the reaction conditions on the efficiency of the modification reaction was investigated. The copolymers obtained were characterized by means of 1 H NMR and GPC. It was proved that by applying the proposed method copolymers of different composition and properties containing methyl vinyl ether, ethyl vinyl ether as well as n-butyl vinyl ether units could be prepared. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-vinyl alcohol)s of high degree of methylation exhibit sharp temperature response at 38-39 deg C in aqueous solution typical of the so-called smart polymers. (authors)

  9. Protective roles of bacterioruberin and intracellular KCl in the resistance of Halobacterium salinarium against DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahmohammadi, H.R.; Asgarani, E.; Terato, Hiroaki; Saito, Takeshi; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Gekko, Kunihiko; Yamamoto, Osamu; Ide, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Halobacterium salinarium, a member of the extremely halophilic archaebacteria, contains a C 50 -carotenoid namely bacterioruberin. We have previously reported the high resistance of this organism against the lethal actions of DNA-damaging agents including ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light (UV). In this study, we have examined whether bacterioruberin and the highly concentrated salts in this bacterium play protective roles against the lethal actions of ionizing radiation, UV, hydrogen peroxide, and mitomycin-C (MMC). The colourless mutant of H. salinarium deficient in bacterioruberin was more sensitive than the red-pigmented wild-type to all tested DNA-damaging agents except MMC. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of H. salinarium chromosomal DNA at various concentrations of KCl (0-3.5 M) were similar to that of B-DNA, indicating that no conformational changes occurred as a result of high salt concentrations. However, DNA strand-breaks induced by ionizing radiation were significantly reduced by the presence of either bacterioruberin or concentrated KCl, presumably due to scavenging of free radicals. These results suggest that bacterioruberin and intracellular KCl of H. salinarium protect this organism against the lethal effects of oxidative DNA-damaging agents. (author)

  10. Base damage within single-strand DNA underlies in vivo hypermutability induced by a ubiquitous environmental agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chan

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA must be in single-strand form for important transactions such as replication, transcription, and recombination to occur. The single-strand DNA (ssDNA is more prone to damage than double-strand DNA (dsDNA, due to greater exposure of chemically reactive moieties in the nitrogenous bases. Thus, there can be agents that damage regions of ssDNA in vivo while being inert toward dsDNA. To assess the potential hazard posed by such agents, we devised an ssDNA-specific mutagenesis reporter system in budding yeast. The reporter strains bear the cdc13-1 temperature-sensitive mutation, such that shifting to 37°C results in telomere uncapping and ensuing 5' to 3' enzymatic resection. This exposes the reporter region, containing three closely-spaced reporter genes, as a long 3' ssDNA overhang. We validated the ability of the system to detect mutagenic damage within ssDNA by expressing a modified human single-strand specific cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3G. APOBEC3G induced a high density of substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in frequent, simultaneous inactivation of two reporter genes. We then examined the mutagenicity of sulfites, a class of reactive sulfur oxides to which humans are exposed frequently via respiration and food intake. Sulfites, at a concentration similar to that found in some foods, induced a high density of mutations, almost always as substitutions at cytosines in the ssDNA overhang strand, resulting in simultaneous inactivation of at least two reporter genes. Furthermore, sulfites formed a long-lived adducted 2'-deoxyuracil intermediate in DNA that was resistant to excision by uracil-DNA N-glycosylase. This intermediate was bypassed by error-prone translesion DNA synthesis, frequently involving Pol ζ, during repair synthesis. Our results suggest that sulfite-induced lesions in DNA can be particularly deleterious, since cells might not possess the means to repair or bypass such lesions

  11. Use of scintillometric quantitation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes for the screening of genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis has been considered as a suitable endpoint for the screening of genotoxic agents. Experimentally, unscheduled DNA synthesis is most frequently measured by autoradiography. The purpose of this report was to examine the usefulness of the liquid scintillation counting technique in measuring unscheduled DNA synthesis response in isolated rat hepatocytes. The various liquid scintillation counting-based unscheduled DNA synthesis assay procedures were examined according to the following groupings: (1) procedures based on the acid precipitation of cellular macromolecules, (2) procedures based on isopycnic gradient centrifugation of solubilized cells, (3) procedures based on nuclei isolation in conjunction with other DNA purification methods, and (4) procedures based on the selective retention of hepatocellular DNA. Limited cases in which test chemicals gave positive unscheduled DNA synthesis response in liquid scintillation counting-based assays and negative unscheduled DNA synthesis response in autoradiography-based assays are presented. It is concluded that liquid scintillation counting-based unscheduled DNA synthesis assays represent an appropriate system for inclusion in carcinogenicity and mutagenicity testing programs

  12. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  13. The light activated alkylation of glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, H.S.

    2001-04-01

    The work contained in this thesis focuses on the light-initiated alkylation of the α-centre of glycine compounds. The elaboration of the glycines in this manner represents a versatile, clean and cost effective alternative to ionic routes to higher α-amino acids. Preliminary investigations demonstrated that a range of nitrogen protecting groups were compatible with the radical alkylation. A variety of solvents could also be used although solvents with easily removable hydrogen atoms were found to interfere with the alkylation. Furthermore, a number of photo-initiators were investigated and the use of di-tert-butyl peroxide was found to afford the desired phenylalanine products in up to 27% yield (54% based on recovered starting material) when toluene was used as the alkylating agent. A range of different precursor concentrations was investigated and it was found that the optimum concentration of the glycine precursor was 0.13 mol dm -3 ; the phenylalanine yields were reduced when the concentration was less than this value. Owing to the poor UV absorption by di-tert-butyl peroxide, benzophenone (an effective photosensitiser) was added to the reaction mixture and this was shown to increase the alkylation yields. The ratio of reagents which produced the highest yield of phenylalanine products was found to be 1 : 5 : 5 : 10 for glycine : di-tert-butyl peroxide : benzophenone : toluene. This produced the phenylalanine product in up to 37% yield (57% based on recovered starting material). A number of substituents. (e.g. F, Cl etc.) could be attached to the aromatic ring of the toluene alkylating agent, affording substituted phenylalanines in 5 - 36% under these conditions. The formation of chiral phenylalanine products was probed by reacting glycine precursors bearing chiral auxiliaries. However, low diastereoselectivities were observed; the d.r. ranged from 1 : 1.1 to 1 : 1.5 only when chiral ester and amide protecting groups were used. In the final chapter, the α-alkylation

  14. Trial of using antibodies as carriers of alkylating agents. Pt. 2. Evaluation of ability to form /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide + immune antibody complexes with homologous antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzeciak, J; Felus, E; Nolewajka, E; Szaflarski, J; Dudziak, Z [Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide was found to combine with ..gamma..-globulin fractions of immune sera. Immune sera incubated with /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide retained ability to react specifically with homologou antigen in vitro in the system: MN antigens of human erythrocytes + rabbit anti-MN antibody, and probably reacted selectively with target antigens in vivo in the system: antigens of guinea pig kidney tissue + rabbit antibodies against these antigens. Hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination and precipitation in agar gel tests were used in the experiments. Ability to combine of the immune antibody + /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide complex with homologous antigens was evaluated by measurements of radioactivity of studied materials (erythrocyte agglutinates and organ homogenates). The results indicate feasibility of using immune antibodies as carriers of cytostatic agents.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy. Synthesis of boronated amines- and DNA intercalating agents for potential use in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaneolhosseini, H.

    1998-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary cancer treatment modality, involving the delivery of a suitable boron compound to tumour cells followed by irradiation of the tumour by thermal neutrons. Boronated agents can selectively be delivered to tumour cells either directly with tumour-specific boron compounds, or by use of targeting strategies. However, the efficacy of this method would increase if the boron agents are localised in the cell nucleus rather than in the cell cytoplasm when neutron irradiation takes place. With these considerations in mind, some boronated DNA intercalating/interacting agents such as phenanthridine- acridine- spermidine- and naphthalimide derivatives were synthesised. Aminoalkyl-o-carboranes were synthesised in order to be used both for coupling to macromolecules and also for halogenation of their corresponding nido-derivatives. The amino groups were introduced using the Gabriel reagent N, N-dibenzyl iminodicarboxylate to provide 1-(aminomethyl)- and 1-(2-aminoethyl)-o-carboranes. The first attempt to achieve the possibility to accumulate a higher concentration of boron atoms in the cell nucleus was to synthesize carboranyl phenanthridinium analogues by reacting a p- or o-carboranyl moiety with phenanthridine, a chromophore with a planar aromatic ring system as DNA intercalator. Boronated acridine-spermidine, boronated diacridine, and boronated dispermidine were obtained in order to increase water solubility to avoid the interaction of these agents with non-DNA sides of the cell, especially membranes; and to enhance the feasibility of a higher DNA-binding constant and also decrease the DNA-drug dissociation rate. Finally, the synthesis of a boronated naphthalimide derivative was carried out by nucleophilic reaction of a primary aminoalkyl-p-carborane with naphthalic anhydride. Biological evaluations on DNA-binding, toxicity, and cellular binding with carboranyl phenanthridinium analogues, boronated acridine- and spermidine are described

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence sensing of N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases, nucleotides and DNA by the luminescent Tb (III) - 8-alkyl-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbaldehyde probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azab, Hassan A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt); Khairy, Gasser M., E-mail: gasser_chemist@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, Aljouf University, P.O. Box # 2014, Skaka 41421 (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt); Abd El-Ghany, N.; Ahmed, Marwa A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    A time-resolved (gated) luminescence-based method for the detection of some of N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases, nucleotides, and DNA using terbium- 8-alkyl-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbaldehyde (AOCC) complex in 1:2 metal: ligand ratio in microtiterplate format has been evolved. The linear range for determination of the selected biomolecules is 0.1–1.0 µM. The detection limit was in the range of 0.0371–0.106 µM. The thermodynamic parameters, and binding constants (K) of N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases, nucleotides with Tb (III) –(AOCC) {sub 2} complex were calculated. Positive and negative values of entropy (ΔS) and enthalpy (ΔH) changes for Tb (III) –(AOCC){sub 2}– N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases or nucleotides ternary complexes were evaluated. Selectivity of Tb (III) -complex towards different biomolecules has been studied using ratiometric methods of analysis by comparison of biomolecules binding affinities for Tb (III) -complex. Interaction of Tb (III) complex with DNA has been studied.

  17. Time-resolved fluorescence sensing of N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases, nucleotides and DNA by the luminescent Tb (III) - 8-alkyl-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbaldehyde probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azab, Hassan A.; Khairy, Gasser M.; Abd El-Ghany, N.; Ahmed, Marwa A.

    2016-01-01

    A time-resolved (gated) luminescence-based method for the detection of some of N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases, nucleotides, and DNA using terbium- 8-alkyl-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbaldehyde (AOCC) complex in 1:2 metal: ligand ratio in microtiterplate format has been evolved. The linear range for determination of the selected biomolecules is 0.1–1.0 µM. The detection limit was in the range of 0.0371–0.106 µM. The thermodynamic parameters, and binding constants (K) of N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases, nucleotides with Tb (III) –(AOCC) 2 complex were calculated. Positive and negative values of entropy (ΔS) and enthalpy (ΔH) changes for Tb (III) –(AOCC) 2 – N-acetyl amino acids, nucleobases or nucleotides ternary complexes were evaluated. Selectivity of Tb (III) -complex towards different biomolecules has been studied using ratiometric methods of analysis by comparison of biomolecules binding affinities for Tb (III) -complex. Interaction of Tb (III) complex with DNA has been studied.

  18. Modulation of the toxicity and antitumour activity of alkylating drugs by steroids.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, R.; Harrap, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    The steroids prednisolone and progesterone significantly altered the therapeutic indices of the alkylating agents, nitrogen mustard, melphalan, cyclophosphamide, phenyl acetic mustard and chlorambucil. For nitrogen mustard, chlorambucil and phenyl acetic mustard, prednisolone reduced host toxicity in the rat and enhanced the antitumour effectiveness against alkylating-agent-resistant strains of the Yoshida sarcoma and Walker carcinosarcoma. Progesterone also increased the therapeutic index of...

  19. DNA and cancer biology: role in radiation and drug sensitivity, carcinogenesis and mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yielding, K.L.

    1974-01-01

    The DNA excision repair mechanism is an important factor in the resistance exhibited by tumor cells toward both x rays and alkylating agents as demonstrated by the fact that the chemical alterations to cellular DNA caused by these agents are substrates for the repair enzymes. Furthermore, experiments performed in our laboratory demonstrate that: (a) tumor sensitivity to alkylating agents and x-ray can be increased by inhibition of the repair process, and (b) there is a suggestion that this sensitization can be achieved with some degree of selectivity, thereby improving the balance of sensitivites between tumor and normal tissue. Other work from this laboratory has shown that cocarcinogens probably act by preventing repair of carcinogenic damage to the DNA genome. The possibility has also been raised that mistakes made during repair synthesis might be responsible for some genetic diversity and for the mutations which arise in resting cells. (U.S.)

  20. Isobutane/olefin-alkylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waitkamp, J.; Maixner, S.

    1983-11-01

    Isobutane/olefin-alkylation - technology and reaction mechanism of a refinery process for production of high octane gasoline components: The alkylation of i-butane with olefins, especially with butenes, is a process for the conversion of light byproducts of a catalytic cracker to high quality gasoline components. Alkylate is a complex mixture of i-paraffins containing 5 to ca. 12 carbon atoms. Due to their octane numbers the four trimethylpentane isomers are the most desirable product components. Indeed, under optimum process conditions these isomers are the main products. Presently, alkylation capacity in the western world amounts to more than 40x10/sup 6/ t/a. Most units are located in the USA. Two liquid-phase processes using sulfuric acid and hydrofluoric acid, respectively, are of commercial importance. At present, there is a definite trend towards HF-alkylation. The reaction mechanism which proceeds via carbocations, is extremely complex. It is composed of a great variety of individual steps. Modern mechanistic concepts are discussed.

  1. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) localizes to mitochondria and interacts with mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Barbara; Samson, Leona D

    2013-03-01

    Due to a harsh environment mitochondrial genomes accumulate high levels of DNA damage, in particular oxidation, hydrolytic deamination, and alkylation adducts. While repair of alkylated bases in nuclear DNA has been explored in detail, much less is known about the repair of DNA alkylation damage in mitochondria. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and removes numerous alkylated bases, but to date AAG has only been detected in the nucleus, even though mammalian mitochondria are known to repair DNA lesions that are specific substrates of AAG. Here we use immunofluorescence to show that AAG localizes to mitochondria, and we find that native AAG is present in purified human mitochondrial extracts, as well as that exposure to alkylating agent promotes AAG accumulation in the mitochondria. We identify mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB) as a novel interacting partner of AAG; interaction between mtSSB and AAG is direct and increases upon methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment. The consequence of this interaction is specific inhibition of AAG glycosylase activity in the context of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but not a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) substrate. By inhibiting AAG-initiated processing of damaged bases, mtSSB potentially prevents formation of DNA breaks in ssDNA, ensuring that base removal primarily occurs in dsDNA. In summary, our findings suggest the existence of AAG-initiated BER in mitochondria and further support a role for mtSSB in DNA repair. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Loss of Atrx sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents through p53-mediated death pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Conte

    Full Text Available Prevalent cell death in forebrain- and Sertoli cell-specific Atrx knockout mice suggest that Atrx is important for cell survival. However, conditional ablation in other tissues is not associated with increased death indicating that diverse cell types respond differently to the loss of this chromatin remodeling protein. Here, primary macrophages isolated from Atrx(f/f mice were infected with adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase or β-galactosidase, and assayed for cell survival under different experimental conditions. Macrophages survive without Atrx but undergo rapid apoptosis upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS activation suggesting that chromatin reorganization in response to external stimuli is compromised. Using this system we next tested the effect of different apoptotic stimuli on cell survival. We observed that survival of Atrx-null cells were similar to wild type cells in response to serum withdrawal, anti-Fas antibody, C2 ceramide or dexamethasone treatment but were more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Cell survival could be rescued by re-introducing Atrx or by removal of p53 demonstrating the cell autonomous nature of the effect and its p53-dependence. Finally, we demonstrate that multiple primary cell types (myoblasts, embryonic fibroblasts and neurospheres were sensitive to 5-FU, cisplatin, and UV light treatment. Together, our results suggest that cells lacking Atrx are more sensitive to DNA damaging agents and that this may result in enhanced death during development when cells are at their proliferative peak. Moreover, it identifies potential treatment options for cancers associated with ATRX mutations, including glioblastoma and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  3. O6-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) overexpression in melanoma cells induces resistance to nitrosoureas and temozolomide but sensitizes to mitomycin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passagne, Isabelle; Evrard, Alexandre; Depeille, Philippe; Cuq, Pierre; Cupissol, Didier; Vian, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Alkylating agents play an important role in the chemotherapy of malignant melanomas. The activity of alkylating agents depends on their capacity to form alkyl adducts with DNA, in some cases causing cross-linking of DNA strands. However, the use of these agents is limited by cellular resistance induced by the DNA repair enzyme O 6 -methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) which removes alkyl groups from alkylated DNA strands. To determine to what extent the expression of MGMT in melanoma cells induces resistance to alkylating agents, the human cell line CAL77 Mer- (i.e., MGMT deficient) were transfected with pcMGMT vector containing human MGMT cDNA. Several clones expressing MGMT at a high level were selected to determine their sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Melanoma-transfected cells were found to be significantly less sensitive to nitrosoureas (carmustine, fotemustine, streptozotocin) and temozolomide with an increase of IC 5 values between 3 and 14 when compared to parent cells. No difference in cell survival rates between MGMT-proficient and -deficient cells was observed for melphalan, chlorambucil, busulphan, thiotepa and cisplatin which preferentially induce N 7 guanine lesions. Surprisingly, MGMT overexpression increased the sensitivity of CAL77 cells to mitomycin C by approximately 10-fold. Treatment of clonal cell lines with buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase which depletes cellular glutathione, completely reversed this unexpected increase in sensitivity to mitomycin C. This observation suggests that glutathione is involved in the sensitivity of MGMT-transfected cells to mitomycin C and may act synergistically with MGMT via an unknown mechanism

  4. O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) overexpression in melanoma cells induces resistance to nitrosoureas and temozolomide but sensitizes to mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passagne, Isabelle; Evrard, Alexandre; Depeille, Philippe; Cuq, Pierre; Cupissol, Didier; Vian, Laurence

    2006-03-01

    Alkylating agents play an important role in the chemotherapy of malignant melanomas. The activity of alkylating agents depends on their capacity to form alkyl adducts with DNA, in some cases causing cross-linking of DNA strands. However, the use of these agents is limited by cellular resistance induced by the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) which removes alkyl groups from alkylated DNA strands. To determine to what extent the expression of MGMT in melanoma cells induces resistance to alkylating agents, the human cell line CAL77 Mer- (i.e., MGMT deficient) were transfected with pcMGMT vector containing human MGMT cDNA. Several clones expressing MGMT at a high level were selected to determine their sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Melanoma-transfected cells were found to be significantly less sensitive to nitrosoureas (carmustine, fotemustine, streptozotocin) and temozolomide with an increase of IC(50) values between 3 and 14 when compared to parent cells. No difference in cell survival rates between MGMT-proficient and -deficient cells was observed for melphalan, chlorambucil, busulphan, thiotepa and cisplatin which preferentially induce N(7) guanine lesions. Surprisingly, MGMT overexpression increased the sensitivity of CAL77 cells to mitomycin C by approximately 10-fold. Treatment of clonal cell lines with buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase which depletes cellular glutathione, completely reversed this unexpected increase in sensitivity to mitomycin C. This observation suggests that glutathione is involved in the sensitivity of MGMT-transfected cells to mitomycin C and may act synergistically with MGMT via an unknown mechanism.

  5. Identify alkylation hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that extensive experience shows that alkylation plants regardless of acid catalyst choice, can be operated safely, and with minimum process risk to employees or neighbors. Both types of plants require a comprehensive and fully supported hazard management program that accounts for differing physical properties of the acids involved. Control and mitigation cost to refiners will vary considerably from plant to plant and location to location. In the author's experience, the order of magnitude costs will be about $1 to $2 million for a sulfuric acid (SA) alkylation plant, and about $10 to $15 million for a hydrofluoric acid (HF) plant. These costs include water supply systems and impoundment facilities for contaminated runoff water. The alkylation process, which chemically reacts isobutane and light olefins in the presence of a strong acid catalyst into a premium gasoline component is described