WorldWideScience

Sample records for diversity training initiatives

  1. Designing, Developing, and Implementing Diversity Training: Guidelines for Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Tanna M.; Horner, Erin R.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses diversity in the workplace and offers guidelines for practitioners in designing, developing, and implementing diversity training. Highlights include linking the diversity initiative to the organization's mission, cultural climate assessments, reviewing policies and procedures, needs assessment, learner analysis, establishing objectives,…

  2. Disability Diversity Training in the Workplace: Systematic Review and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brian N; Deiches, Jon; Morrison, Blaise; Chan, Fong; Bezyak, Jill L

    2016-09-01

    Purpose Misinformation and negative attitudes toward disability contribute to lower employment rates among people with disabilities. Diversity training is an intervention intended to improve intergroup relations and reduce prejudice. We conducted a systematic review to determine the use and effectiveness of disability diversity training aimed at improving employment outcomes for employees with disabilities. Methods Five databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies of disability diversity training interventions provided within the workplace. Studies identified for inclusion were assessed for quality of methodology. Results Of the total of 1322 articles identified by the search, three studies met the criteria for inclusion. Two of the three articles focused specifically on training to improve outcomes related to workplace injuries among existing employees. The other study provided an initial test of a more general disability diversity training program. Conclusions There is currently a lack of empirically validated diversity training programs that focus specifically on disability. A number of disability diversity trainings and resources exist, but none have been well researched. Related literature on diversity training and disability awareness suggests the possibility for enhancing diversity training practices through training design, content, participant, and outcomes considerations. By integrating best practices in workplace diversity training with existing disability training resources, practitioners and researchers may be able to design effective disability diversity training programs.

  3. The interplay of diversity training and diversity beliefs on team creativity in nationality diverse teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Astrid C; Buengeler, Claudia; Eckhoff, Robert A; van Ginkel, Wendy P; Voelpel, Sven C

    2015-09-01

    Attaining value from nationality diversity requires active diversity management, which organizations often employ in the form of diversity training programs. Interestingly, however, the previously reported effects of diversity training are often weak and, sometimes, even negative. This situation calls for research on the conditions under which diversity training helps or harms teams. We propose that diversity training can increase team creativity, but only for teams with less positive pretraining diversity beliefs (i.e., teams with a greater need for such training) and that are sufficiently diverse in nationality. Comparing the creativity of teams that attended nationality diversity training versus control training, we found that for teams with less positive diversity beliefs, diversity training increased creative performance when the team's nationality diversity was high, but undermined creativity when the team's nationality diversity was low. Diversity training had less impact on teams with more positive diversity beliefs, and training effects were not contingent upon these teams' diversity. Speaking to the underlying process, we showed that these interactive effects were driven by the experienced team efficacy of the team members. We discuss theoretical and practical implications for nationality diversity management. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The interplay of diversity training and diversity beliefs on team creativity in nationality diverse teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, A.C.; Buengeler, C.; Eckhoff, R.A.; van Ginkel, W.P.; Voelpel, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Attaining value from nationality diversity requires active diversity management, which organizations often employ in the form of diversity training programs. Interestingly, however, the previously reported effects of diversity training are often weak and, sometimes, even negative. This situation

  5. Perceptions of Diversity Training Needs in High Tech Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Devorah A.; Gurtov, Ellene

    A study questioned 12 human resource personnel, corporation managers, and diversity trainers about their perceptions of diversity training needs in Pacific Northwest high tech organizations. The overarching research questions for the study were as follows: (1) What are the most frequently reported diversity training needs among human resource…

  6. Personality Traits and Training Initiation Process: Intention, Planning, and Action Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna, Mariola; Purc, Ewelina

    2016-01-01

    The article aims at investigating the role of personality traits in relation to training initiation. Training initiation is conceptualized as a goal realization process, and explained using goal theories. There are three stages of the process analyzed: intention to undertake training, plan formulation, and actual training undertaking. Two studies tested the relationships between five personality traits, defined according to the five factor model, and the stages of the goal realization process. In Study 1, which explains training intention and training plans' formulation, 155 employees participated. In Study 2, which was time-lagged with two measurement points, and which explains intention, plans, and training actions undertaken, the data from 176 employees was collected at 3 month intervals. The results of these studies show that personality traits, mainly openness to experience, predict the training initiation process to some degree: intention, plans, and actual action initiation. The findings allow us to provide recommendations for practitioners responsible for human resource development. The assessment of openness to experience in employees helps predict their motivation to participate in training activities. To increase training motivation it is vital to strengthen intentions to undertake training, and to encourage training action planning.

  7. Diversity and cultural competence training in health care organizations: hallmarks of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Ellen Foster; Dreachslin, Janice L; Sinioris, Marie

    2007-01-01

    The authors reviewed recent literature on diversity training interventions and identified effective practices for health care organizations. Self-reported satisfaction was especially likely to be found as a result of training, whereas attitude change measured by standardized instruments was mixed. Although those responsible for diversity training in the workplace agree that behavioral change is key, awareness building and associated attitude change remain the focus of most diversity training in the workplace. Consequently, the authors recommend a systems approach to diversity training interventions wherein training is a key component of a health care organization's strategic approach to organizational performance, and diversity training is linked to the organizations' strategic goals for improved quality of care. The systems approach requires these steps: determine diversity and cultural competence goals in the context of strategy, measure current performance against needs, design training to address the gap, implement the training, assess training effectiveness, and strive for continuous improvement. Higher level evaluations measuring whether employees have transferred learning from training to their jobs are paramount to the systems approach to diversity training interventions. Measuring other positive changes in a "return on investment" format can be used to convince stakeholders of training's value.

  8. INITIAL TRAINING OF RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Alejandra Cruz-Pallares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The document presents results of a research that used as strategy a complementary training project with thirty-three students of a Bachelors Degree in Primary School 1997(DPS,1997 of an Education Faculty for the initial training of investigators, applied by four teachers members of the academic research group in Mexico; that develops through process of action research methodology. Highlighted in results is the strengthening of the competition of reading, understanding and writing scientific texts, which is analogous to the first feature of the graduate profile called intellectual skills. Among the conclusions it is emphasized that the initial training of teachers in a task that is quite interesting, challenging and complex, as is the educational complex phenomenon.

  9. Backlash! The Challenge to Diversity Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Michael; Payne, Tamara

    1992-01-01

    Awareness of diversity in the workplace is on the rise, but so is a backlash to some of the issues that it raises. Ways to prevent backlash include getting management support, involving employees in training design, using an inclusive definition of diversity, acknowledging resistance, valuing sameness, and affirming the value of individual views.…

  10. A study of cultural diversity training practices in company-owned franchise restaurants

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang-Uk Charles

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cultural diversity training practices and to determine the deterrence factors associated instituting cultural diversity training. It attempted to measure the overall effectiveness of cultural diversity training in franchise restaurants. A total of 300 franchise restaurants were surveyed. Three practicing and fiftyeight non-practicing cultural diversity training companies participated in the study. The findings indicated that high tur...

  11. An Attack on Inclusive Education in Secondary Education. Limitations in Initial Teacher Training in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel López-Torrijo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education is hard to implement in secondary schools. Probably, one of the determining factors lies in teachers' initial  training that determines their attitude, identity and professional practice. This research analyses the initial teacher education programmes for Secondary Education, Higher Secondary Education, called bachillerato in Spain, and Vocational and Artistic training in the five best valued Spanish universities in the education field, according to the ranking I-UGR, after the European convergence process in the European Higher Education Area. The study analyses the national regulations that govern this training. A quantitative study was conducted to examine the number of credits dedicated to inclusive education and also a review of the contents of these subjects was carried out. The study concludes that this initial teacher training provides sufficient theoretical basis regarding the conceptualization of inclusive education and the skills to deal with the tutorship and academic and professional orientation. However, important limitations in training prevent future teachers from identifying students’ and context’s special educational needs, and the attention to diversity through different methods and curriculum adaptations.

  12. Leadership Training for Cultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Searetha

    1996-01-01

    Addresses leadership in a diverse society, especially in schools and the workplace, and examines one school administrator's success at getting a resistant faculty and principal to incorporate multicultural education into the school environment and curriculum. A 10-day multicultural leadership training program is described. (GR)

  13. College and Career Counseling Training Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board's (SREB) College and Career Counseling Training Initiative works to increase the knowledge and skills of counselors who advise students on their postsecondary aspirations. Membership in the initiative provides access to Strategies in College and Career Counseling, a series of online training modules that can…

  14. Motivation and Training Initiation: Evidence from Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielniczuk, Emilia; Laguna, Mariola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the self-determination theory and the model of action phases, the present study aims to provide insight into motivational factors that are important for training initiation. It investigates the relations between three types of motivation (intrinsic, extrinsic and amotivation) and training initiation: intention to initiate new…

  15. White Librarianship in Blackface: Diversity Initiatives in LIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Hathcock

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Brief: Whiteness—an ideological practice that can extend beyond notions of racial supremacy to other areas of dominance—has permeated every aspect of librarianship, extending even to the initiatives we claim are committed to increasing diversity. This state of affairs, however, need not remain. This article examines the ways in which whiteness controls diversity initiatives in […

  16. Surface Warfare Officers Initial Training For Future Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    9 A school is initial rating specific technical training that is given to sailors. 14 Figure 4. Less...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT SURFACE WARFARE OFFICERS— INITIAL TRAINING FOR FUTURE SUCCESS March 2018...professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SURFACE WARFARE OFFICERS—INITIAL TRAINING FOR FUTURE SUCCESS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Arron J

  17. Reactions to Diversity: Using Theater to Teach Medical Students about Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Kimberley D; Dwyer, Paul; Luscombe, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Training medical students to understand the effects of culture and marginalization on health outcomes is important to the future health of increasingly diverse populations. We devised and evaluated a short training module on working with diversity to challenge students’ thinking about the role of both patient and practitioner culture in health outcomes. The workshop combined didactic teaching about culture as a social determinant of health using the cultural humility model, interactive exercises, and applied theater techniques. We evaluated changes in the students’ perceptions and attitudes over time using the Reaction to Diversity Inventory. There was initial significant improvement. Women and students with no past diversity training responded best. However, scores largely reverted to baseline over 12 months. PMID:29349320

  18. Reactions to Diversity: Using Theater to Teach Medical Students about Cultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Kimberley D; Dwyer, Paul; Luscombe, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Training medical students to understand the effects of culture and marginalization on health outcomes is important to the future health of increasingly diverse populations. We devised and evaluated a short training module on working with diversity to challenge students' thinking about the role of both patient and practitioner culture in health outcomes. The workshop combined didactic teaching about culture as a social determinant of health using the cultural humility model, interactive exercises, and applied theater techniques. We evaluated changes in the students' perceptions and attitudes over time using the Reaction to Diversity Inventory. There was initial significant improvement. Women and students with no past diversity training responded best. However, scores largely reverted to baseline over 12 months.

  19. Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counseling Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Respect for diversity and for values different from one's own is a central value of counseling psychology training programs. The valuing of diversity is also consistent with the profession of psychology as mandated by the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and as discussed in the Guidelines and…

  20. Evaluator competencies in the context of diversity training: The practitioners' point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froncek, Benjamin; Mazziotta, Agostino; Piper, Verena; Rohmann, Anette

    2018-04-01

    Evaluator competencies have been discussed since the beginnings of program evaluation literature. More recently, the Essential Competencies for Program Evaluators (Ghere et al., 2006; Stevahn, King, Ghere & Minnema, 2005a) have proven to be a useful taxonomy for learning and improving evaluation practice. Evaluation is critical to diversity training activities, and diversity training providers face the challenge of conducting evaluations of their training programs. We explored what competencies are viewed as instrumental to conducting useful evaluations in this specific field of evaluation practice. In an online survey, N = 172 diversity training providers were interviewed via an open answer format about their perceptions of evaluator competencies, with n = 95 diversity training providers contributing statements. The Essential Competencies for Program Evaluators were used to conduct a deductive qualitative content analysis of the statements. While systematic inquiry, reflective practice, and interpersonal competence were well represented, situational analysis and project management were not. Implications are discussed for evaluation capacity building among diversity training providers and for negotiating evaluation projects with evaluation professionals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reactions to Diversity: Using Theater to Teach Medical Students about Cultural Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley D Ivory

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Training medical students to understand the effects of culture and marginalization on health outcomes is important to the future health of increasingly diverse populations. We devised and evaluated a short training module on working with diversity to challenge students’ thinking about the role of both patient and practitioner culture in health outcomes. The workshop combined didactic teaching about culture as a social determinant of health using the cultural humility model, interactive exercises, and applied theater techniques. We evaluated changes in the students’ perceptions and attitudes over time using the Reaction to Diversity Inventory. There was initial significant improvement. Women and students with no past diversity training responded best. However, scores largely reverted to baseline over 12 months.

  2. Values education for the initial teachers’ training of basic education in México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azucena Ochoa Cervantes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins contextualizing theoretically the performance in values for teacher education, in order to define the criteria to make the analysis. Then analyzes the Mexican model of initial training of teachers. After an exegesis of legislation and technical documents, it lists the eight competencies to develop during the six grades of primary education, these are: 1 knowledge and care of himself, 2 self-regulation and responsible exercise of freedom, 3 respect and appreciation for diversity 4 sense of belonging to the community, nation and humanity, 5 management and conflict resolution, 6 social participation and policy, 7 attachment to the legality and 8 sense of Justice, understanding and appreciation for democracy. These are the keys to raise demands to train teachers. Then is carried out a mid-term discussion, between the two theoretical sections initials. Thus becomes to contrast - ought to reality. This is done through a case study. The conclusions follow this. And ends with proposals and references used.

  3. Current Status and Future Trends of Diversity Initiatives in the Workplace: Diversity Experts' Perspectives. Diversity in the Workforce Series Report #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    To obtain information on workplace diversity initiatives and programs, 12 diversity experts were interviewed. Participants identified organizational and individual barriers to the advancement of diverse groups in the workplace. The following factors were most likely to influence diversity in the workplace: demographic changes, global marketplace,…

  4. Tolerance as Civility in Contemporary Workplace Diversity Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bergen, C. W.; Collier, George

    2013-01-01

    Valuing diversity emphasizes the awareness, recognition, understanding, and appreciation of human differences and revolves around creating an inclusive environment in which everyone feels esteemed. This generally takes place through a series of management education and training programs that attempt to improve interpersonal relationships among…

  5. Clinical psychology students' perceptions of diversity training: a study of exposure and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Debbie; Callands, Tamora A; Radcliffe, Alison M; Luebbe, Aaron M; Klonoff, Elizabeth A

    2009-10-01

    This study examined clinical psychology graduate students' definitions of diversity and their perceptions of their exposure to and satisfaction regarding their level of diversity training. Four hundred and ninety-one students from Counsel of University Directors of Clinical Psychology (CUDCP) member programs completed an online survey. Overall, students perceived that their programs considered diversity narrowly, concentrating primarily on ethnicity, race, and culture to the neglect of sexual orientation, religion, language, and physical disability. Likewise, students expressed greater satisfaction with training regarding ethnicity/race and gender than broader areas of diversity, but rated the importance of addressing all areas of diversity as high. Although this study underscores the limited experience that students perceive they have had with various underrepresented groups, programs appear to have incorporated a variety of diversity training modalities that could be expanded upon to meet the interests of psychology students.

  6. Current Status of Diversity Initiatives in Selected Multinational Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with eight diversity managers in multinational corporations revealed a variety of domestic and international diversity initiatives, especially in leadership and management. Formal and informal methods were used to plan them. Business unit managers were responsible for implementation. Evaluation was difficult and time consuming. (SK)

  7. Diversity in laboratory animal science: issues and initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Leanne; Ardayfio, Krystal L; Blickman, Andrew; Greenhill, Lisa; Hill, William; Sharp, Patrick; Talmage, Roberta; Plaut, Victoria C; Goren, Matt

    2010-03-01

    Since diversity in the workplace began receiving scholarly attention in the late 1980s, many corporations and institutions have invested in programs to address and manage diversity. We encourage laboratory animal science to address the challenges and to build on the strengths that personal diversity brings to our field and workplaces. Diversity is already becoming increasingly relevant in the workplace and the laboratory animal science field. By addressing issues related to diversity, laboratory animal science could benefit and potentially fulfill its goals more successfully. To date, diversity has received minimal attention from the field as a whole. However, many individuals, workplaces, and institutions in industry, academia, and the uniformed services that are intimately involved with the field of laboratory animal science are actively addressing issues concerning diversity. This article describes some of these programs and activities in industry and academia. Our intention is that this article will provide useful examples of inclusion-promoting activities and prompt further initiatives to address diversity awareness and inclusion in laboratory animal science.

  8. Residency Training: The need for an integrated diversity curriculum for neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendale, Nicole; Josephson, S Andrew

    2017-12-12

    Providing culturally responsive care to an increasingly multicultural population is essential and requires formal cultural humility training for residents. We sought to understand the current prevalence and need for this type of training within neurology programs and to pilot an integrated curriculum locally. We surveyed via email all program directors of academic neurology programs nationally regarding the prevalence of and need for formal cultural responsiveness training. Forty-seven program directors (36%) responded to the survey. The majority of respondents did not have a formalized diversity curriculum in their program (65%), but most (85%) believed that training in cultural responsiveness was important. We developed locally an integrated diversity curriculum as a proof of concept. The curriculum covered topics of diversity in language, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, and socioeconomic status designed to focus on the needs of the local community. Program evaluation included a pre and post survey of the learner attitudes toward cultural diversity. There is an unmet need for cultural responsiveness training within neurology residencies, and integrating this curriculum is both feasible and efficacious. When adapted to address cultural issues of the local community, this curriculum can be generalizable to both academic and community organizations. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. The State of Multiculturalism and Diversity in Undergraduate Psychology Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Milton A.; Shannon, Casey R.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, diversity and multiculturalism have received considerable attention in the field of psychology. While there have been notable efforts to ensure these important areas are addressed in undergraduate psychology training, little is known about this undertaking. The present study examined how diversity and multiculturalism…

  10. Heroes and Holidays: The Status of Diversity Initiatives at Liberal Arts College Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Studies about diversity initiatives in academic libraries have primarily focused on large research libraries. But what kinds of diversity work occur at smaller libraries? This study examines the status of diversity initiatives, especially those aimed at students, at national liberal arts college libraries. Results from a survey of library…

  11. Lessons learned from a community-academic initiative: the development of a core competency-based training for community-academic initiative community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yumary; Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community-academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI-CHW training program. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results demonstrated that a core competency-based training can successfully affect CHWs' perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. This program demonstrates that a core competency-based framework coupled with CAI-research-specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI-CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles.

  12. Organizational and Managerial Outcomes of a Cultural Diversity Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Romanski-Livingston, Linda G.

    1998-01-01

    Workforce parity among cultural groups in America has been an unobtainable goal for years. The present diversity in our society dictates a new mandate for majority managers in their approach toward working beside and supervising these cultural groups. In order to achieve full inclusion and reach their fullest potential many employees, minorities and women, in these cultural groups, along with managers, are attending or participating in diversity training classes. Although diversity has sev...

  13. Integrating Practice Guidelines into Professional Training: Implications for Diversity Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miville, Marie L.; Duan, Changming; Nutt, Roberta L.; Waehler, Charles A.; Suzuki, Lisa; Pistole, M. Carole; Arredondo, Patricia; Duffy, Michael; Mejia, Brenda X.; Corpus, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The authors present the findings of a special task group (STG) organized to explore effective training strategies for the practice guidelines focused on diverse populations. They provide a brief literature review and summarize survey data from academic training directors regarding current use of practice guidelines. The authors then describe the…

  14. FORMACIÓN INICIAL DEL PROFESORADO PARA LA INCLUSIÓN DE LA DIVERSIDAD CULTURAL / INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING FOR THE CULTURAL DIVERSITY INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Figueredo Canosa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: La presente investigación se centra en la descripción y el análisis de la formación inicial que recibe el profesorado de Educación Primaria en Andalucía, con relación al trabajo en contextos de diversidad cultural. Para ello optamos por un diseño metodológico cualitativo de corte descriptivo-interpretativo, empleando el análisis documental y de contenido como técnica de investigación. Ello permite detectar y estudiar las referencias a la diversidad cultural, tanto explícitas como implícitas, presentes en las distintas dimensiones de análisis: Objetivos, Competencias, Contenidos, Resultados de Aprendizaje, Estrategias Formativas y Sistemas de Evaluación. Los resultados apuntan que, a pesar de que la totalidad de los diseños curriculares analizados incluyen referencias a la diversidad cultural, observamos que dichas referencias son escasas. Asimismo, no se aprecia planificación ni coordinación en relación con el proceso de adquisición de competencias interculturales, ni se detecta un tratamiento transversal de las mismas a lo largo de los planes de estudio. ABSTRACT: This research is focused on the description and analysis of the initial training received by primary education teachers in Andalusia in connection with work in culturally diverse contexts. To this end, a qualitative method design with a descriptive and interpretive approach was chosen, using documental and content analysis as a research technique. This allows the identification and study of references to cultural diversity, explicit and implicit, present in the different dimensions of analysis: objectives, competencies, contents, learning outcomes, formative strategies and evaluation systems. The results indicate that, although all the curricular designs examined include references to cultural diversity, these references are scarce. Additionally, planning and coordination in relation to the intercultural competencies acquisition process is not observed

  15. Introduction to the EC's Marie Curie Initial Training Network (MC-ITN) project: Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy (PARTNER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Magrin, Giulio

    2013-07-01

    PARTNER (Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy) is a project funded by the European Commission's Marie Curie-ITN funding scheme through the ENLIGHT Platform for 5.6 million Euro. PARTNER has brought together academic institutes, research centres and leading European companies, focusing in particular on a specialized radiotherapy (RT) called hadron therapy (HT), interchangeably referred to as particle therapy (PT). The ultimate goal of HT is to deliver more effective treatment to cancer patients leading to major improvement in the health of citizens. In Europe, several hundred million Euro have been invested, since the beginning of this century, in PT. In this decade, the use of HT is rapidly growing across Europe, and there is an urgent need for qualified researchers from a range of disciplines to work on its translational research. In response to this need, the European community of HT, and in particular 10 leading academic institutes, research centres, companies and small and medium-sized enterprises, joined together to form the PARTNER consortium. All partners have international reputations in the diverse but complementary fields associated with PT: clinical, radiobiological and technological. Thus the network incorporates a unique set of competencies, expertise, infrastructures and training possibilities. This paper describes the status and needs of PT research in Europe, the importance of and challenges associated with the creation of a training network, the objectives, the initial results, and the expected long-term benefits of the PARTNER initiative.

  16. Introduction to the EC's marie curie initial training network (MC-ITN) project. Particle training network for European radiotherapy (PARTNER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Magrin, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    PARTNER (Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy) is a project funded by the European Commission's Marie Curie-ITN funding scheme through the ENLIGHT Platform for 5.6 million Euro. PARTNER has brought together academic institutes, research centres and leading European companies, focusing in particular on a specialized radiotherapy (RT) called hadron therapy (HT), interchangeably referred to as particle therapy (PT). The ultimate goal of HT is to deliver more effective treatment to cancer patients leading to major improvement in the health of citizens. In Europe, several hundred million Euro have been invested, since the beginning of this century, in PT. In this decade, the use of HT is rapidly growing across Europe, and there is an urgent need for qualified researchers from a range of disciplines to work on its translational research. In response to this need, the European community of HT, and in particular 10 leading academic institutes, research centres, companies and small and medium-sized enterprises, joined together to form the PARTNER consortium. All partners have international reputations in the diverse but complementary fields associated with PT: clinical, radiobiological and technological. Thus the network incorporates a unique set of competencies, expertise, infrastructures and training possibilities. This paper describes the status and needs of PT research in Europe, the importance of and challenges associated with the creation of a training network, the objectives, the initial results, and the expected long-term benefits of the PARTNER initiative. (author)

  17. Initial training for trainers the spiral process or ''getting trained while training''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croes, R.

    1996-01-01

    The initial training program for trainers is part of an overall gradual development towards full professionalism. Based on the two key words, responsibility and autonomy, the global aim is to provide assistance to new instructors so that they become full actors in their own training process and to prepare them to deal with all the different situations they may meet. The SPIRAL process lasts one full year and could be characterized in four words: alternation, support, individualization and project. From the first weeks in the process, the new trainers already deliver training instructions. The SPIRAL year terminates with the presentation to the project before an evaluation board. The evaluation takes into account the project and the on going assessment of acquisition of knowledge and skills

  18. Initiatives in the Education and Training of Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Alan, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Eight articles on educational technology's application to youth education and training describe United Kingdom's Junior Army leadership skills training; educational technology within Youth Training Scheme (YTS); YTS hotel and catering industry initiatives; Coventry's computer based learning project; cross-cultural courseware transfer; mathematics…

  19. Lessons Learned From a Community–Academic Initiative: The Development of a Core Competency–Based Training for Community–Academic Initiative Community Health Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community–academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI–CHW training program. Methods. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results. Results demonstrated that a core competency–based training can successfully affect CHWs’ perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. Conclusions. This program demonstrates that a core competency–based framework coupled with CAI-research–specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI–CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles. PMID:22594730

  20. The West Virginia Occupational Safety and Health Initiative: practicum training for a new marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J D; Becker, P E; Stockdale, T; Ducatman, A M

    1999-05-01

    Occupational medicine practice has experienced a shift from larger corporate medical departments to organizations providing services for a variety of industries. Specific training needs will accompany this shift in practice patterns; these may differ from those developed in the traditional industrial or corporate medical department setting. The West Virginia Occupational Health and Safety Initiative involves occupational medicine residents in consultation to a variety of small industries and businesses. It uses the expertise of occupational physicians, health and safety extension faculty, and faculty in engineering and industrial hygiene. Residents participate in multidisciplinary evaluations of worksites, and develop competencies in team-building, workplace health and safety evaluation, and occupational medical consulting. Specific competencies that address requirements for practicum training are used to measure the trainee's acquisition of knowledge and skills. Particular attention is paid to the acquisition of group problem-solving expertise, skills relevant to the current market in practice opportunities, and the specific career interests of the resident physician. Preliminary evaluation indicates the usefulness of training in evaluation of diverse industries and worksites. We offer this program as a training model that can prepare residents for the challenges of a changing marketplace for occupational health and safety services.

  1. Enjoying Cultural Differences Assists Teachers in Learning about Diversity and Equality. An Evaluation of Antidiscrimination and Diversity Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnšek, Nada

    2013-01-01

    The present study is based on a quasi-experimental research design and presents the results of an evaluation of Antidiscrimination and Diversity Training that took place at the Faculty of Education in Ljubljana, rooted in the anti-bias approach to educating diversity and equality issues (Murray & Urban, 2012). The experimental group included…

  2. Society of Pediatric Psychology Diversity Award: Training Underrepresented Minority Students in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Monica J.; Crosby, Lori E.

    2016-01-01

    Improving diversity, particularly among trainees and professionals from underrepresented ethnic minority backgrounds, has been a long-stated goal for the field of Psychology. Research has provided strategies and best practices, such as ensuring cultural sensitivity and relevance in coursework, clinical and research training, promoting a supportive and inclusive climate, providing access to cultural and community opportunities, and increasing insight and cultural competence among professionals (Rogers & Molina, 2006). Despite this, the rates of psychologists from ethnically diverse and underrepresented minority (URM) backgrounds remain low and few published studies have described programmatic efforts to increase diversity within the field. This paper describes the INNOVATIONS training model, which provides community and culturally related research experiences, graduate-school related advising, and mentoring to high school and college students. The paper also examines how the model may support enrollment of URM students in doctoral programs in psychology. Findings indicate that INNOVATIONS supported students’ transition from high school and college to graduate programs (with approximately 75% of students enrolling in Master’s and Doctoral programs). INNOVATIONS also supported students, including those from URM backgrounds, enrolling in doctoral programs (41.7%). Students who were trained in the research assistant track were most likely to enroll in psychology doctoral programs, perhaps as a result of the intensive time and training committed to research and clinical experiences. Data support the importance of research training for URM students pursuing psychology graduate study and the need to ensure cultural relevance of the training. Implications for clinical and pediatric psychology are discussed. PMID:28603680

  3. Diversity Training for Community Aged Care Workers: An Interdisciplinary Meta-Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Claudia; Ogrin, Rajna; Al-Zubaidi, Hamzah; Appannah, Arti; McMillan, Sally; Barrett, Elizabeth; Browning, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Population ageing signals the need for a responsive community aged care workforce respectful of older people's diverse healthcare needs. Person-centered care premises individual needs and preferences to enhance participation in health care. Training for diversity does not yet exist for this workforce, but is necessary to ensure appropriate care…

  4. Radiation protection training for diverse general employee populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation protection training for the general employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has undergone a great deal of restructuring in the last two years. The number of personnel totally dedicated to nuclear facilities is less than a fifth of our employees and the percentage of contracted employees who are dedicated radiation workers is much smaller. However, the aging of our facilities and increasing emphasis on environmental control means that everyone needs to understand the basics of radiation protection. In accordance with changing DOE guidelines and internal ORNL policies, greater emphasis has been placed on keeping training focused on current issues, training the total workforce, and requiring some type of testing or feedback mechanism. This report describes efforts to instill respect, but not fear, of radiation in the work environment. Flexible tools are being developed to meet this objective for several diverse general employee populations. Continuing efforts include consideration of computer-based training for retraining, developing additional modules for specialized groups and jobs, and testing/documentation appropriate to each population segment. 6 refs

  5. The CRINE initiative -- Education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlewood, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    CRINE's aim is to have everyone in the industry working in new ways and doing so because it is second nature. CRINE is an acronym for Cost Reduction Initiative for the New Era, is an industry-wide program now under way in the UK continental shelf oil and gas fields whose main objective is to achieve thirty percent or more savings in capital costs and to half the operating costs over the next few years. Such a culture change is only feasible through an extensive program of education and training. This is under way, helped in many organizations by CRINE 'champions' driving the courses and training aids

  6. The Initial Training of Geography Teachers at the University of Porto: Model and Training, Practices and Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Felisbela

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008, the initial training of Geography teachers in Portugal was combined with the initial training of History teachers. This forced union has led to implications in the practices and teaching of geography. This paper intends to explore the thoughts and actions of the student teachers at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of…

  7. Training a medical workforce to meet the needs of diverse minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopoaga, Faafetai; Zaharic, Tony; Kokaua, Jesse; Covello, Sahra

    2017-01-21

    The growing demand for a competent health workforce to meet the needs of increasingly diverse societies has been widely acknowledged. One medical school in New Zealand explored the integration of the commonly used patient-centred model approach, with an intersectional framework in the development of a cultural competency training programme. In the Pacific Immersion Programme, medical students in their fourth year of training are given the opportunity to learn about different factors that influence the health and health care of a minority community through immersion in that community. The programme objectives include enabling students to learn through experience living within the local community context, and supporting them to re-evaluate their own personal beliefs, assumptions and/or prior prejudices. This study evaluates the usefulness of this programme in the training of medical students to work in diverse communities. Two analytical approaches were used for evaluation. Deductive and inductive analyses were conducted on 235 reflective essays completed by three cohorts of students from 2011 to 2013 to ascertain the value of the programme for student learning. In addition, one cohort was invited to complete a pre and post-programme questionnaire. Overall, the students found the programme to be a valued learning environment. They found living within a Pacific family environment to be an eye opening experience. It increased students comfort level in cross cultural engagement and emphasised the importance of patient's perspectives in health care provision. Students' self-reported knowledge about Pacific cultural values, protocols, traditional beliefs and the main health challenges increased significantly after the programme. They appreciated learning directly from community members, and through observations about how culture, beliefs and the socio-economic environment influence peoples' health and wellbeing. Medical schools are required to train a competent health

  8. Diversity training for the community aged care workers: A conceptual framework for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appannah, Arti; Meyer, Claudia; Ogrin, Rajna; McMillan, Sally; Barrett, Elizabeth; Browning, Colette

    2017-08-01

    Older Australians are an increasingly diverse population, with variable characteristics such as culture, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and physical capabilities potentially influencing their participation in healthcare. In response, community aged care workers may need to increase skills and uptake of knowledge into practice regarding diversity through appropriate training interventions. Diversity training (DT) programs have traditionally existed in the realm of business, with little research attention devoted to scientifically evaluating the outcomes of training directed at community aged care workers. A DT workshop has been developed for community aged care workers, and this paper focuses on the construction of a formative evaluative framework for the workshop. Key evaluation concepts and measures relating to DT have been identified in the literature and integrated into the framework, focusing on five categories: Training needs analysis; Reactions; Learning outcomes, Behavioural outcomes and Results The use of a mixed methods approach in the framework provides an additional strength, by evaluating long-term behavioural change and improvements in service delivery. As little is known about the effectiveness of DT programs for community aged care workers, the proposed framework will provide an empirical and consistent method of evaluation, to assess their impact on enhancing older people's experience of healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Initial teacher training. His musical impact on children in terms of refuge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Castañeda-de Liendo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The initial teacher training was the cultivation of teacher preparation in order to be the executors of government projects drive enacted by social groups of power in the historical development of Venezuela This article analyzes the initial teacher training in Venezuela, with the help of the logical place to unveil what characterizes the initial training of teachers historical method, specifically the working conditions of temporary shelter, and develops the axiological dynamics through musical training, which determine the current and future behavior regarding the formation of these. There is insufficient number of documents that allow raising the methodological work in the preparation of teachers of children of preschool age who are in temporary shelter provided, this work contributes to the improvement of such problems.

  10. Surgical Safety Training of World Health Organization Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Toll, Edward C; Cole, Matthew; Smith, Frank C T; Stark, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate training in surgical safety is essential to maximize patient safety. This national review quantified undergraduate surgical safety training. Training of 2 international safety initiatives was quantified: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" and (2) Department of Health (DoH) "Principles of the Productive Operating Theatre." Also, 13 additional safety skills were quantified. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. In all, 23 universities entered the study (71.9% response). Safety skills from WHO and DoH documents were formally taught in 4 UK medical schools (17.4%). Individual components of the documents were taught more frequently (47.6%). Half (50.9%) of the additional safety skills identified were taught. Surgical societies supplemented safety training, although the total amount of training provided was less than that in university curricula (P < .0001). Surgical safety training is inadequate in UK medical schools. To protect patients and maximize safety, a national undergraduate safety curriculum is recommended. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  11. Managing cultural diversity in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, J

    1993-07-01

    Cultural diversity is a strength of the American work force. Due to the increasing cultural diversity in the workplace, organizations find it in their best interest to move beyond affirmative action to effective management to achieve higher employee retention and develops an employee cultural mix that better matches the mix of the available labor force and customer base. To manage a diverse work force, managers need to have the proper tools, training and evaluation and monitoring programs. Important initiatives to successful management of cultural diversity include eliciting support and commitment from the board of directors, the CEO and other top management; organizing subcommittees to research and monitor demographic changes to determine what the organization's goals should be and to decide what changes are to be made. Employees must be trained to be aware of prejudices and how to manage their own actions.

  12. Global teaching and training initiatives for emerging cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Paulus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A striking disparity exists across the globe, with essentially no large-scale longitudinal studies ongoing in regions that will be significantly affected by the oncoming non-communicable disease epidemic. The successful implementation of cohort studies in most low-resource research environments presents unique challenges that may be aided by coordinated training programs. Leaders of emerging cohort studies attending the First World Cohort Integration Workshop were surveyed about training priorities, unmet needs and potential cross-cohort solutions to these barriers through an electronic pre-workshop questionnaire and focus groups. Cohort studies representing India, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania and Uganda described similar training needs, including on-the-job training, data analysis software instruction, and database and bio-bank management. A lack of funding and protected time for training activities were commonly identified constraints. Proposed solutions include a collaborative cross-cohort teaching platform with web-based content and interactive teaching methods for a range of research personnel. An international network for research mentorship and idea exchange, and modifying the graduate thesis structure were also identified as key initiatives. Cross-cohort integrated educational initiatives will efficiently meet shared needs, catalyze the development of emerging cohorts, speed closure of the global disparity in cohort research, and may fortify scientific capacity development in low-resource settings.

  13. Contributions of a Science Museum for the Initial Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizi Manuel Tempesta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some results obtained in a master’s research which aimed to evaluate what are the contributions that the acting as Physical monitor in a Science Museum has for the initial training and the beginning of the teaching career. Basing our analysis, we have adopted as theoretical assumptions the Teachers Knowledge and the Training Needs. We interviewed a group of ten teachers who played the function of Physics mediator in the Interdisciplinary Dynamic Museum (MUDI of the State University of Maringá, and submit to the Textual Analysis Discursive process. The results allowed us to realize that the contributions go beyond the expected, revealing the great potential of the Science museums of as an aid to initial training, contributing to the development of competencies and abilities that today is required of the teacher, and them providing experiences load which otherwise would not be reached.

  14. Teaching personal initiative beats traditional training in boosting small business in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco; Frese, Michael; Goldstein, Markus; Iacovone, Leonardo; Johnson, Hillary C; McKenzie, David; Mensmann, Mona

    2017-09-22

    Standard business training programs aim to boost the incomes of the millions of self-employed business owners in developing countries by teaching basic financial and marketing practices, yet the impacts of such programs are mixed. We tested whether a psychology-based personal initiative training approach, which teaches a proactive mindset and focuses on entrepreneurial behaviors, could have more success. A randomized controlled trial in Togo assigned microenterprise owners to a control group ( n = 500), a leading business training program ( n = 500), or a personal initiative training program ( n = 500). Four follow-up surveys tracked outcomes for firms over 2 years and showed that personal initiative training increased firm profits by 30%, compared with a statistically insignificant 11% for traditional training. The training is cost-effective, paying for itself within 1 year. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Innovation technology in the initial training of children by the example of sport games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Sushko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the characteristics of innovative technologies and the current state of organizational work with children at the initial stage of training in sports. Material and Methods: to understand the application of innovative technologies used coaches poll and summarized expert assessment specialists in the field of sports. Results: the current state of the question concerning the possibility of the initial training of children in early specialization in sports for example basketball, volleyball and tennis. Clarified the importance and necessity of innovative activities for children at the initial stage of training in sports. Conclusions: the identified innovative approaches for constructing the process of initial training in tennis, which are not observed in other kinds of sports.

  16. Cultural diversity training for UK healthcare professionals: a comprehensive nationwide cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Jovanovic, Ana; Sharma, Pankaj

    2008-10-01

    Healthcare inequalities within the UK based on patients' ethnicity have been found over the last five years in a large number of medical specialties. One possible explanation for this lies in ignorance of ethnic minority healthcare needs among professionals. Cultural diversity programmes have been shown to improve patient outcomes including compliance, yet these are not as yet requirements for any UK healthcare professionals with the exception of psychiatrists. This paper documents the frequency, regional variation, characteristics and motivations for cultural diversity training through a questionnaire survey of the educational leads of every UK medical school, postgraduate deanery and schools of nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, and pharmacy. The results showed a wide variation in teaching practices between healthcare professions and geographical regions. This study provides evidence for the need for national guidelines to incorporate cultural competency training by all UK healthcare professional training bodies.

  17. Peer Mentoring for Undergraduates in a Research-Focused Diversity Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas E.; Logan, Kay; Lindwall, Jennifer; Beals, Caitlyn

    2017-01-01

    To provide multi-dimensional support for undergraduates from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds who aspire to careers in research, the BUILD EXITO project, part of a major NIH-funded diversity initiative, matches each scholar with three mentors: peer mentor (advanced student), career mentor (faculty adviser), and research mentor (research…

  18. Integrated initial training program for a CEGB operations engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompsett, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the overall training programs undertaken by a newly appointed Operations Engineer at one of the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) nuclear power stations. The training program is designed to equip him with the skills and knowledge necessary for him to discharge his duties safely and effectively. In order to assist the learning process and achieve and integrated program, aspects of reactor technology and operation, initially the subject of theoretical presentations at the CEGB's Nuclear Power Training Center (NPTC) are reinforced by either simulation and/or practical experience on site. In the later stages plant-specific simulators, operated by trained tutors, are incorporated into the training program to provide the trainee with practical experience of plant operation. The trainee's performance is assessed throughout the program to provide feedback to the trainee, the trainers and station management

  19. Evaluation of the "Foundations in Knowledge Translation" training initiative: preparing end users to practice KT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jamie S; Moore, Julia E; Sayal, Radha; Holmes, Bev J; Scarrow, Gayle; Graham, Ian D; Jeffs, Lianne; Timmings, Caitlyn; Rashid, Shusmita; Johnson, Alekhya Mascarenhas; Straus, Sharon E

    2018-04-25

    Current knowledge translation (KT) training initiatives are primarily focused on preparing researchers to conduct KT research rather than on teaching KT practice to end users. Furthermore, training initiatives that focus on KT practice have not been rigorously evaluated and have focused on assessing short-term outcomes and participant satisfaction only. Thus, there is a need for longitudinal training evaluations that assess the sustainability of training outcomes and contextual factors that may influence outcomes. We evaluated the KT training initiative "Foundations in KT" using a mixed-methods longitudinal design. "Foundations in KT" provided training in KT practice and included three tailored in-person workshops, coaching, and an online platform for training materials and knowledge exchange. Two cohorts were included in the study (62 participants, including 46 "Foundations in KT" participants from 16 project teams and 16 decision-maker partners). Participants completed self-report questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after the first workshop. Participant-level outcomes include survey results which indicated that participants' self-efficacy in evidence-based practice (F(1,8.9) = 23.7, p = 0.001, n = 45), KT activities (F(1,23.9) = 43.2, p training initiative helped participants achieve their KT project objectives, plan their projects, and solve problems over time. Contextual factors include teams with high self-reported organizational capacity and commitment to implement at the start of their project had buy-in from upper management that resulted in secured funding and resources for their project. Training initiative outcomes include participants who applied the KT knowledge and skills they learned to other projects by sharing their knowledge informally with coworkers. Sustained spread of KT practice was observed with five teams at 24 months. We completed a longitudinal evaluation of a KT

  20. Celebrating Musical Diversity: Training Culturally Responsive Music Educators in Multiracial Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article explores outcomes of research into the role and place of cultural diversity in primary music classes at five government schools in Singapore. The study highlights the ways in which a variety of factors such as specialist music training, government policy, curriculum documents, and professional development influence teacher practice.…

  1. GIONET (GMES Initial Operations Network for Earth Observation Research Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, V.; Balzter, H.

    2013-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. Copernicus (previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) is a joint undertaking of the European Space Agency and the European Commission. It develops fully operational Earth Observation monitoring services for a community of end users from the public and private sector. The first services that are considered fully operational are the land monitoring and emergency monitoring core services. In GIONET, 14 early stage researchers are being trained at PhD level in understanding the complex physical processes that determine how electromagnetic radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the land surface ultimately form the signal received by a satellite. In order to achieve this, the researchers are based in industry and universities across Europe, as well as receiving the best technical training and scientific education. The training programme through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics. Each topic is carried out by an Early Stage Researcher based in one of the partner organisations and is expected to lead to a PhD degree. The 14 topics are grouped in 5 research themes: Forest monitoring Land cover and change Coastal zone and freshwater monitoring Geohazards and emergency response Climate adaptation and emergency response The methods developed and used in GIONET are as diverse as its research topics. GIONET has already held two summer schools; one at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany), on 'New operational radar satellite applications: Introduction to SAR, Interferometry and Polarimetry for Land Surface Mapping'. The 2nd summer school took place last September at the University of Leicester (UK )on 'Remote sensing of land cover and forest in GMES'. The next Summer School in September 2013

  2. Increasing Organizational Performance through Diversity and Organizational Climate Initiatives: What works, what doesn't (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    TANIGUCHI Mami

    2014-01-01

    Globalization of business leads to environmental uncertainty for corporate organizations. To establish competitive advantage, organizations need continuous introduction of new products and services to markets and quick implementation of new strategies. This paper shows what kinds of initiatives are required for companies to leverage a diverse workforce. Study 1 explores diversity initiatives that are effective in terms of innovativeness by dividing companies into three groups based on gender ...

  3. Nitrogen addition, not initial phylogenetic diversity, increases litter decomposition by fungal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Stuart Amend

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungi play a critical role in the degradation of organic matter. Because different combinations of fungi result in different rates of decomposition, determining how climate change will affect microbial composition and function is fundamental to predicting future environments. Fungal response to global change is patterned by genetic relatedness, resulting in communities with comparatively low phylogenetic diversity. This may have important implications for the functional capacity of disturbed communities if lineages sensitive to disturbance also contain unique traits important for litter decomposition. Here we tested the relationship between phylogenetic diversity and decomposition rates. Leaf litter fungi were isolated from the field and deployed in microcosms as mock communities along a gradient of initial phylogenetic diversity, while species richness was held constant. Replicate communities were subject to nitrogen fertilization comparable to anthropogenic deposition levels. Carbon mineralization rates were measured over the course of sixty-six days. We found that nitrogen fertilization increased cumulative respiration by 24.8%, and that differences in respiration between fertilized and ambient communities diminished over the course of the experiment. Initial phylogenetic diversity failed to predict respiration rates or their change in response to nitrogen fertilization, and there was no correlation between community similarity and respiration rates. Last, we detected no phylogenetic signal in the contributions of individual isolates to respiration rates. Our results suggest that the degree to which phylogenetic diversity predicts ecosystem function will depend on environmental context.

  4. Increasing Mathematics and Science Achievement for Culturally Diverse Students through Teaching Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Lee

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal was to field test and evaluate a Teacher Training program that would prepare teachers to increase the motivation and achievement of culturally diverse students in the areas of science and mathematics. Designed as a three year program, this report covers the first two years of the training program at the Ronald McNair School in the Ravenswood School district, using the resources of the NASA Ames Research Center and the California Framework for Mathematics and Science.

  5. American College of Surgeons NSQIP: quality in-training initiative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Morgan M; Reinke, Caroline E; Kreider, Susan; Meise, Chelsey; Nelis, Kara; Volpe, Anita; Anzlovar, Nancy; Ko, Clifford; Kelz, Rachel R

    2013-11-01

    Clinical outcomes data are playing an increasingly important role in medical decision-making, reimbursement, and provider evaluation, but there are no documented programs that provide outcomes data to surgical residents as part of a structured curriculum. Our objectives were to develop a national collaborative of training programs to unify the efforts between quality and education personnel and demonstrate the feasibility of generating customized reports of patient outcomes for use in surgical education. The pool of potential hospitals was evaluated by comparing ACS NSQIP participants with the roster of clinical sites for general surgery residency programs maintained by FREIDA Online. A program and user guide was developed to generate custom reports based on institutional data, and a voluntary pilot was conducted, consisting of initial development, implementation, and feedback stages. Programs that successfully completed installation and report generation were queried for feedback on time and resources used. Of 245 general surgery residency programs, 47% had a NSQIP-affiliated sponsor institution, and an additional 31% had at least 1 NSQIP-affiliated participant institution. Sixty general surgery residency programs have expressed interest in collaboration. Seventeen pilot sites completed training and installation, and were able to independently generate custom reports. The response rate for the post-report survey was 50%. Participants reported that training and installation typically required one 2-hour phone call, and that total time devoted to the project was less than 8 hours. Collaboration between educators and quality improvement personnel from a diverse group of organizations to integrate outcomes data into surgical education is feasible. Obtaining resident and team reports from ACS NSQIP can be done with minimal effort. Future efforts will be aimed at developing a national data-centered curriculum for general surgery programs. Copyright © 2013 American

  6. SIMULA - C a simplified PC simulation training fool developed for the initial training of NPP operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuhl, R.

    1997-01-01

    During initial training of some 50 young reactor operators and shift supervisors in the last 5 years in Biblis it was found that it takes some time before trainees gain a food overview of the most important plant systems and develop a ''feeling'' of the dynamic plant behaviour which is an important prerequisite for the first full-scope simulator training courses. To enhance this, a PC software training tool was developed SIMULA - C. (author)

  7. The effectiveness of a diversity awareness training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Cavaleros

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a diversity awareness training programme. A sample of 382 employees from four different departments within a large accounting firm was used to form the groups of a simulated Solomon four-group design. The impact of a two-day workshop on diversity awareness was assessed using a 68-item questionnaire designed to measure awareness of self, impact of differences, performance management, career development, teamwork, work-family needs, participation, organisational culture, relationship building, and general satisfaction with the organisation. Opsomming Die doel met hierdie studie was om die effektiwiteit van ‘n bewustheid-van-diversiteit opleidingsprogram te bepaal. Werknemers uit vier departemente van ‘n groot ouditeursfirma het die groepe van ‘n gesimuleerde Solomon viergroepontwerp gevorm (N = 382. Die impak van ‘n tweedagwerkwinkel oor bewustheid-van-diversiteit is bepaal met ‘n 68-item vraelys wat ontwikkel is om bewustheid van die self, impak van verskille, prestasiebestuur, loopbaanontwikkeling, spanwerk, werk-gesinsbehoeftes, deelname, organisasiekultuur, ontwikkeling van verhoudings, en algemene tevredenheid met die organisasie te meet.

  8. Place of Diversity in the Current Ethiopian Education and Training Policy: Analysis of Cardinal Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Tariku; Latchanna, Gara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate to what extent the diversity dimensions are addressed in the current Education and Training Policy. To that end, document analysis was employed. The major diversity dimensions were analyzed based on their cardinal features. The study demonstrated that there is an ambitious need to address issues of…

  9. The Training of Epidemiologists and Diversity in Epidemiology: Findings from the 2006 Congress of Epidemiology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Pokras, Olivia D.; Spirtas, Robert; Bethune, Lisa; Mays, Vickie; Freeman, Vincent L.; Cozier, Yvette C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In the past decade, we have witnessed increasing numbers of individuals entering the field of epidemiology. With the increase also has come a diversity of training and paths by which individuals entered the field. The purpose of this survey was characterization of the epidemiology workforce, its job diversity, and continuing education needs. Methods The Minority Affairs and Membership committees of the American College of Epidemiology (ACE) prepared and administered a workforce survey to identify racial/ethnic diversity, demographic background, workplace type, credentials, income, subspecialties, and continuing education needs of epidemiologists. The survey was self-administered to attendees of the Second North American Congress of Epidemiology in June 2006. Results A sample of 397 respondents of the 1348 registered for the Congress was captured (29.5% response). Epidemiologists who participated were from 36 states and 18 countries; 54.6% were trained at the doctoral level; 19.1% earned $120,001 or more a year. A wide range of epidemiology subspecialties and continuing education needs were identified. Conclusions This preliminary snapshot of epidemiologists indicates a wide range of training mechanisms, workplace sites, and subspecialties. Results indicate a need for examination of the core graduate training needs of epidemiologist as well as responding to desired professional development needs through the provision of continuing educations efforts. PMID:19344867

  10. Education and Training for Entrepreneurs: A Consideration of Initiatives in Ireland and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Faoite, Diarmuid; Henry, Colette; Johnston, Kate; van der Sijde, Peter

    2003-01-01

    A growing body of academic research has examined the effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support initiatives, with recent studies focusing on the provision of training and other skills development opportunities. An important theme that has emerged from this work is the failure of many programmes and initiatives to take on board the…

  11. Feasibility of Early-Initiated Progressive Resistance Training after Total Hip Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    during the exercises were measured at each training session. Isometric muscle strength was measured before and 4 weeks after the THR. Findings / Results: Pain during exercises and resting pain before and after each training session was unchanged or decreased during the 4 weeks of training. Averaged...... across exercises pain during training decreased from 3.6 (sd: 2.8) at the first session to 1.52 (sd: 1.8) VAS-mm at the last session, ptraining load increased progressively for all 4 exercises during the 4 weeks of training. For example: 2nd, 5th and 8th training session. Hip......Background: Muscle atrophy, reduced hip muscle strength and function are documented within the first weeks after Total Hip Replacement (THR). Purpose / Aim of Study: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of early-initiated progressive resistance training (PRT) after THR...

  12. A Framework for Assessing and Managing Large Purchaser - Minority Supplier Relationships in Supplier Diversity Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicholas; Ram, Monder

    2008-01-01

    Supplier diversity initiatives can function as platforms for EMSs strategic learning (Theodorakopoulos et al., 2005; Theodorakopoulos & Ram, 2006) and the scant research in supplier diversity underscores the importance of relationship factors to the success of supplier diversity/development programmes (e.g. Pearson et al., 1993). However, purchaser-supplier relationship management as a vehicle for enhancing EMSs learning and supply capabilities has not been examined to any length within the c...

  13. Project management initiative local development through specialized training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neisy Ramos Acevedo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The local development should complete a group of basic principles, such as: the design for training and the tools information adapted to the particularity of each territory. This training facilitates, also, the articulation of the stocks deployed by the local leaders, and it increases the administration of the knowledge and the transfer of technologies, processes in those that the nexuses are enlarged between the structures and the population, and where the participation of different present actors is potentialized in the territory. During the year 2010 the Ministry of Economy and Planning begins to offer the possibility to finance projects for the local development, nevertheless these initiatives should be accompanied by a rigorous study of feasibility of the investments. The University of Sancti Spíritus, committed in this zeal, designs the Diplomate of Administration of Projects for Local Initiatives, which offers theoretical tools and it develops practical abilities in the different actors of the local development that facilitate the realization of these studies. The exercise of this graduate's culmination consists on the defence of the study of feasibility of those projects that each municipality identifies as priority for its development.

  14. Training a Green Workforce With Stem Initiatives at the Alamo Colleges District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Strybos, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Alamo Colleges District (ACD) includes minority serving institutions successfully incorporating climate science and sustainability-related projects to engage students in STEM courses. This network of five community colleges is based around San Antonio, Texas, and has a student population of approximately 60,000 that reflects the diversity of the community. San Antonio residents are familiar with recent extreme weather conditions, such as extreme droughts and intensified annual rainfalls, and the colleges understand the importance of education about climate science, climate change and sustainable solutions. This presentation will discuss initiatives to engage students in STEMS program while providing them with tools to solve climate change problems at a local level. ACD's innovative tools to train a green workforce is focused on engaging students in courses provided toward accredited certificates and degrees. Example of these courses include Wind Power Generation, Wind Turbine Troubleshooting, Solar Photovoltaics Systems, Wastewater Minimization and Waste Water Treatment. Students have access to a 400-kW PV system installed at the Center for Excellence that is used as a training tool in solar panel installation and maintenance. Also, solar panels on the rooftop of the Scobee Education Center and adjacent bus stops are connected to an eGauge system and used as simulation training about energy and space science. At Eco Centro, students have worked on solar hydroponic projects, the refurbishment of a shipping container for food production in a controlled atmosphere, and the installation of a shipping container home that will be used as a teaching facility about sustainable design and construction. Finally, a recent project to convert an old trailer into a Mobile Weather Station will be used as a STEM classroom to prepare students to understand weather data and its local applicability.

  15. Asclepius or Hippocrates? Differing Interpretations of Post-Compulsory Initial Teacher Training Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingleby, Ewan

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses qualitative research findings on mentoring within PCET ITT (post-compulsory education and training initial teacher training). The article complements the findings of Tedder and Lawy (2009) and Ingleby (2010). The article develops Downie and Randall's consideration of the merits or otherwise of mirroring either "Asclepius" or…

  16. Culturally Competent Palliative and Hospice Care Training for Ethnically Diverse Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; McFarlane, Sandra; Koijane, Jeannette; Li, Dongmei

    2017-05-01

    Between 2013 and 2030, older adults 65 years and older of racial/ethnic populations in the U.S. is projected to increase by 123% in comparison to the Whites (Non-Hispanics). To meet this demand, training of ethnically diverse health staff in long-term care facilities in palliative and hospice care is imperative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a palliative and hospice care training of staff in two nursing homes in Hawaii - (a) to evaluate knowledge and confidence over three time periods, and (b) to compare staff and family caregiver satisfaction at end of program. The educational frameworks were based on cultural and communication theories. Fifty-two ethnically diverse staff, a majority being Asian (89%), participated in a 10-week module training and one 4 hour communication skills workshop. Staff evaluation included knowledge and confidence surveys, pre- and post-test knowledge tests, and FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. There were nine Asian (89%) and Pacific Islander (11%) family caregivers who completed the FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. The overall staff knowledge and confidence results were promising. The staff rated overall satisfaction of palliative care services lower than the family caregivers. Implications for future research, practice, and education with palliative and hospice care training of ethnically diverse nursing home staff is to include patient and family caregiver satisfaction of palliative and hospice care services, evaluation of effectiveness of cross-cultural communication theories in palliative and hospice care staff training, and support from administration for mentorship and development of these services in long term care facilities.

  17. Cognitive training of self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies in schizophrenia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Synthia; Lepage, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Available cognitive remediation interventions have a significant but relatively small to moderate impact on episodic memory in schizophrenia. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a brief novel episodic memory training targeting the self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies. To select patients with such deficits, 28 participants with schizophrenia performed our Semantic Encoding Memory Task (SEMT) that provides a measure of self-initiated semantic encoding strategies. This task identified a deficit in 13 participants who were then offered two 60-minute training sessions one week apart. After the training, patients performed an alternate version of the SEMT. The CVLT-II (a standardised measure of semantic encoding strategies) and the BVMT-R (a control spatial memory task) were used to quantify memory pre- and post-training. After the training, participants were significantly better at self-initiating semantic encoding strategies in the SEMT (p = .004) and in the CVLT-II (p = .002). No significant differences were found in the BVMT-R. The current study demonstrates that a brief and specific training in memory strategies can help patients to improve a deficient memory process in schizophrenia. Future studies will need to test this intervention further using a randomised controlled trial, and to explore its functional impact.

  18. Mbarara University Research Training Initiative: a spin-off of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakida E

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Edith Wakida,1 Samuel Maling,2 Celestino Obua3 1Office of Research Administration, 2Department of Psychiatry, Office of the Dean, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacomology and Therapeutics, Office of the Vice Chancellor, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda Abstract: Scientific productivity in Africa is insignificant compared to that in the rest of the world. This has been attributed to the fact that, in spite of academic qualifications, junior ­faculty, who form the majority of academics in low- and middle-income countries lack experience in research. This calls for a need to put in place programs that provide hands-on training in research so that junior faculty can conduct relevant research. The Mbarara University Research ­Training Initiative, a Fogarty International Center-funded program, is one such program that was developed to provide research capacity training for junior faculty at the Mbarara University of Science and Technology. The program utilizes health priority areas to provide research training to junior faculty. During the training, they are given short-term-focused research training on particular knowledge and skills, which they apply while conducting the mentored research. Keywords: junior faculty, MURTI, short training, mentored research

  19. The effects of initial education and training of future foreign language teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ana B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects that initial education and training of future foreign language teachers have on their pedagogic convictions and practice have been of prime interest of numerous authors in the last three decades. In difference to previous pessimistic conclusions in which this type of intervention was assessed as weak and stressed the persistence of preconceived notions of the candidates based on personal experiences from earlier schooling, more recent studies, in the constructivistic spirit of the change of cognition of the students - future teachers is considered more widely, not only as a complete change of the contents of their convictions, i.e. a sudden turn in their attitudes on the group level, but also as a smaller or bigger level of idiosyncratic reconstruction of the existing pedagogic convictions which happens because of acquiring new information and experiences that can reflect significantly on their future work in classroom. The aim of our research was to explore, by reviewing scientific and professional literature, the effects of the initial education and training of foreign language teachers, and focusing on different aspects of the preparation for the teacher's profession (theoretical lecturing and practical training, to find out in which ways various programs can influence the cognition of foreign language teachers and to consider pedagogic implications that these information might have for the organization of initial education and training of students.

  20. 38 CFR 21.8072 - Authorizing training, services, and assistance beyond the initial individualized written plan of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Authorizing training, services, and assistance beyond the initial individualized written plan of vocational... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorizing training, services, and assistance beyond the initial individualized written plan of vocational rehabilitation. 21...

  1. Preparing Work-Ready Nurses: Reflexive Learning for Diverse Students in the Australian Vocational Education and Training Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Mary; Gwinner, Karleen; Mallan, Kerry; Livock, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    This paper highlights a disjuncture between training frameworks designed to meet work-based competencies, and educational flexibility desirable to prepare diverse learners for fluid workplaces and roles. We describe a pilot study that explored teaching and learning practices in a vocational education and training Diploma of Nursing program. The…

  2. Factors influencing career choice after initial training in surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, Seamus

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Irish general surgery faces a recruitment crisis with only 87 of 145 (60%) basic surgical training (BST) places filled in 2009. We assessed basic surgical trainees to identify objective, and potentially modifiable, factors that influence ultimate recruitment into a general surgical career. METHODS: Candidates commencing BST training during a 5-year period between 2004 and 2008 were included in a quantitative study. In addition a total of 2,536 candidates, representing all those who commenced surgical training in Ireland since 1960 were identified through the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) database and invited to complete an online survey. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 15, with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: During the 5-year quantitative study period there were 381 BST trainees. Gender was a significant predictor of career choice with women more likely to ultimately choose a nonsurgical career after initial surgical training (p = 0.049). Passing surgical membership examinations (MRCS) also was predictive of remaining in surgery (p = 0.005). Training region was not a significant predictor of ultimate career choice. There were 418 survey respondents. The influence of role models was most commonly cited as influencing candidates in choosing to commence surgical training. Candidates who rated "academic opportunity" (p = 0.023) and "intellectual challenge" (p = 0.047) as factors that influenced their decision to commence surgical training were more likely to ultimately continue their careers in a surgical speciality. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the career pathway of surgical trainees and confirms the importance of academic achievement in discriminating between candidates applying for surgical training schemes.

  3. Initial Entry Training: Reducing First Term Attrition Through Effective Organizational Socialization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayden, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines Initial Entry Training (IET) from an organizational behavior perspective to identify if the Army's socialization experience can be enhanced to have a positive impact on first term attrition within the Army...

  4. Changing hearts and minds: Results from a multi-country gender and sexual diversity training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, Tonia; Park, Chulwoo; Solares, Diego; Williams, John K; Wolf, R Cameron; Metheny, Noah; Vazzano, Andrea; Dent, Juan; Gibbs, Ashley; Nonyane, Bareng Aletta Sanny; Toiv, Nora

    2017-01-01

    Engaging key populations, including gender and sexual minorities, is essential to meeting global targets for reducing new HIV infections and improving the HIV continuum of care. Negative attitudes toward gender and sexual minorities serve as a barrier to political will and effective programming for HIV health services. The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), established in 2003, provided Gender and Sexual Diversity Trainings for 2,825 participants including PEPFAR staff and program implementers, U.S. government staff, and local stakeholders in 38 countries. The outcomes of these one-day trainings were evaluated among a subset of participants using a mixed methods pre- and post-training study design. Findings suggest that sustainable decreases in negative attitudes toward gender and sexual minorities are achievable with a one-day training.

  5. Changing hearts and minds: Results from a multi-country gender and sexual diversity training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia Poteat

    Full Text Available Engaging key populations, including gender and sexual minorities, is essential to meeting global targets for reducing new HIV infections and improving the HIV continuum of care. Negative attitudes toward gender and sexual minorities serve as a barrier to political will and effective programming for HIV health services. The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR, established in 2003, provided Gender and Sexual Diversity Trainings for 2,825 participants including PEPFAR staff and program implementers, U.S. government staff, and local stakeholders in 38 countries. The outcomes of these one-day trainings were evaluated among a subset of participants using a mixed methods pre- and post-training study design. Findings suggest that sustainable decreases in negative attitudes toward gender and sexual minorities are achievable with a one-day training.

  6. Tamper Indicating Device: Initial Training, Course 50112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, Stephen Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sandoval, Dana M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-29

    Tamper Indicating Device (TID): Initial Training, course #50112, covers Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) TID Program procedures for the application and removal of TIDs. LANL’s policy is to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for the use of TIDs consistent with the graded safeguards described in DOE Manual DOE O 474.2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability. When you have completed this course, you will: recognize standard practices and procedures of the LANL TID Program; have hands-on experience in the application and removal of LANL TIDs, and; verify the application and removal of LANL TIDs.

  7. The CPD Needs of Mentors in Post-Compulsory Initial Teacher Training in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingleby, Ewan; Hunt, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the compulsory professional development (CPD) needs of mentors within post-compulsory Initial Teacher Training (ITT) provision in England. The discussion applies the ideas of Weber, Foucault, Habermas and Bourdieu in interpreting the implications for post-compulsory ITT mentor CPD training. The paper's primary and secondary…

  8. Multi-Dimensional Assessment of Professional Competence during Initial Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Douglas Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A twenty-year forecast predicting significant increases in global air transportation portends a need to increase the capacity and effectiveness of initial pilot training. In addition to quantitative concerns related to the supply of new pilots, industry leaders have expressed dissatisfaction with the qualitative output of current aviation training…

  9. The DREAMS Team: Creating Community Partnerships through Research Advocacy Training for Diverse Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ariel R.; Dillard, Rebecca; Perkins, Molly M.; Vaughan, Camille P.; Kinlaw, Kathy; McKay, J. Lucas; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Hagen, Kimberley; Wincek, Ron C.; Hackney, Madeleine E.

    2017-01-01

    The DREAMS Team research advocacy training program helps clinical faculty and health students introduce basic clinical research concepts to diverse older adults to galvanize their active involvement in the research process. Older adults are frequently underrepresented in clinical research, due to barriers to participation including distrust,…

  10. Humanist ethics-training in energizing the content of teaching and learning in initial medical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Rojas-Baso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects on the revitalization of the ethical and humanistic education in the teaching-learning training general practitioner associated with the educational strategy training project medical ethical humanist on theoretical basis of the development of the doctoral research that addresses the same subject in which the authors are part of their coordination and membership. It is oriented objective: to reveal the ethical and humanistic relationship in the initial training medical professional, relationship with the teleological aspect guiding the culture of ethical and humanistic education and teaching as interdisciplinary integrative demands required by the Cuban medical partner model. The methods are specified in the theoretical systematization, modeling and systematic practice through a systematic project, all from a systemic integrated position supported by the general method dialectical materialism and guided by the principles of bioethics as a teaching tool that is modeled for teachers and students.

  11. Problematizing Diversity Initiatives: Japanese American Youth Identities and the Politics of Representation with/in School Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a case study that investigated how six Japanese American youth interpreted the effectiveness and relevance of extra-curricular diversity initiatives at their Midwestern middle and secondary public schools. These initiatives were intended to raise cultural awareness, but ultimately promoted cultural fetishism and racially…

  12. No problem! Avoidance of cultural diversity in teacher training | Le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research all over the world indicates that initial teacher training, as far as multicultural education is concerned, is grossly inadequate or, in many instances, non-existent. In many cases it is still regarded as a luxury which cannot be afforded in a time of scarcity of resources, or as a contentious politically sensitive area best ...

  13. Initiation of a European Radiation Protection Training and Education Plataforma (EUTERP Platform)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, J. van der; Fraaisma, F. S.; Marco Arboli, M.

    2004-01-01

    The European Commission, D.-G. Transport and Energy, has launched an initiative to establish a European Radiation Protection Training and Education Platform. To this end, a feasibility study is being carried out at the moment. The objective of this feasibility study is to initiate the necessary steps towards the creation of the Platform. It will make recommendations, based on the summary and conclusions obtained as a result of the exchange of information and experience between all involved radiation protection training and education bodies. The project will identify how the future Platform should be initiated and developed in order to achieve the expected results. This paper describes the objectives of the study and the objectives, composition and possible structure of the EUTERP Platform. A workshop will be held from 20-21 May at CIEMAT, Madrid, to identify the work programme and possibilities for the structure of the Platform. The preliminary results of the workshop will be presented in this presentation. (Author)

  14. The Social Benefits of Initial Vocational Education and Training for Individuals in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabates, Ricardo; Salter, Emma; Obolenskaya, Polina

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the social benefits of initial vocational education and training (VET) for individuals in different European contexts. Drawing on data from the European Community Household Panel, results show that initial VET is associated with positive changes in social outcomes for individuals across Europe. Health benefits were mainly…

  15. Enhancing Expectations of Cooperative Learning Use through Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran Gisbert, David; Corcelles Seuba, Mariona; Flores Coll, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Despite its relevance and evidence support, Cooperative Learning (CL) is a challenge for all educational systems due to the difficulties in its implementation. The objective of this study is to identify the effect of Primary Education initial teacher training in the prediction of future CL use. Two groups of 44 and 45 students were conceptually…

  16. Education and training for entrepreneurs: a consideration of initiatives in Ireland and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Faoite, Diarmuid; Henry, Colette; Johnston, Kate; van der Sijde, Peter

    2003-01-01

    A growing body of academic research has examined the effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support initiatives, with recent studies focusing on the provision of training and other skills development opportunities. An important theme that has emerged from this work is the failure of many

  17. GOOD PRACTICES REGARDING PRESCHOOL AND PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS` INITIAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela V. KELEMEN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The training of future preschool and primary school teachers at a high quality level is a main goal of our institution and all our efforts are channelled towards fulfilling it. Being a teacher is a science, a science based on competences acquired while attending well-structured lectures that mingle theoretical knowledge with practical assignments. Students acquire knowledge, abilities and develop field related competences during initial training but three years of study are not enough. The Law of Education regulates the following amendment: in order for a teacher to be well trained to meet the requirements of the third millennium it is necessary for him/her to continue the training in level II i.e. master degree, which provides additional competences. In this article we discuss a master programme developed within an European project that offers educational training according to the requirements of a high quality training both practical and theoretical. The components of the Master programme entitled Psychopedagogy of early education and young schooling containa curriculum adjusted to the requirements of a competitive higher education, the courses and seminars are the result of a thorough analysis of different educational models that have been implemented in other European countries. Currently, we are at the end of the first year and we want to share the good practices obtained so far.

  18. Assessing personal initiative among vocational training students: development and validation of a new measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluerka, Nekane; Gorostiaga, Arantxa; Ulacia, Imanol

    2014-11-14

    Personal initiative characterizes people who are proactive, persistent and self-starting when facing the difficulties that arise in achieving goals. Despite its importance in the educational field there is a scarcity of measures to assess students' personal initiative. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a questionnaire to assess this variable in the academic environment and to validate it for adolescents and young adults. The sample comprised 244 vocational training students. The questionnaire showed a factor structure including three factors (Proactivity-Prosocial behavior, Persistence and Self-Starting) with acceptable indices of internal consistency (ranging between α = .57 and α =.73) and good convergent validity with respect to the Self-Reported Initiative scale. Evidence of external validity was also obtained based on the relationships between personal initiative and variables such as self-efficacy, enterprising attitude, responsibility and control aspirations, conscientiousness, and academic achievement. The results indicate that this new measure is very useful for assessing personal initiative among vocational training students.

  19. TRAINING IN THE INSPECTORATE OF EDUCATION: LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Joseba Ozkoidi Pérez; Andoni Albeniz Bratos

    2014-01-01

    The diverse background of education inspectors in our ever-changing society outlines the necessity of a solid initial training followed by a continuing training programme adapted to new contexts. Only by these means can the tandem training-innovation become a reality. To our understanding, the following four methodologies are the most suitable for this purpose: 1. Virtual or face-to-face Professional Practice Communities: as organized human groups. 2. Promoting interconnectivity bet...

  20. Evaluation of mental health first aid training in a diverse community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; Fletcher, Renee; Pope, Susan; Heathwood, Ellen; Anderson, Emily; McAuliffe, Christine

    2013-02-01

    Mental health first aid (MHFA) training has been disseminated in the community and has yielded positive outcomes in terms of increasing help-seeking behaviour and mental health literacy. However, there has been limited research investigating the effectiveness of this programme in multicultural communities. Given the increasing levels of multiculturalism in many countries, as well as the large number of barriers presented to these groups when trying to seek help for mental illnesses, the present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of MHFA in these settings. A total of 458 participants, who were recruited from multicultural organizations, participated in a series of MHFA training courses. Participants completed questionnaires pre and post the training course, and 6-month follow-up interviews were conducted with a subsample of participants. Findings suggested that MHFA training increased participant recognition of mental illnesses, concordance with primary care physicians about treatments, confidence in providing first aid, actual help provided to others, and a reduction in stigmatizing attitudes. A 6-month follow up also yielded positive long-term effects of MHFA. The results have implications for further dissemination and the use of MHFA in diverse communities. In addition, the results highlight the need for mental health training in health-care service providers. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  1. Improvement of Early Antenatal Care Initiation: The Effects of Training Local Health Volunteers in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Oumudee, Nurlisa; Armeeroh, Masuenah; Nima, Niamina; Duerahing, Nurosanah

    2018-01-01

    Although antenatal care (ANC) coverage has been increasing in low- and middle-income countries, the adherence to the ANC initiation standards at gestational age ANC initiation by training the existing local health volunteers (LHVs) in 3 southernmost provinces of Thailand. A clustered nonrandomized intervention study was conducted from November 2012 to February 2014. One district of each province was selected to be the study intervention districts for that province. A total of 124 LHVs in the intervention districts participated in the knowledge-counseling intervention. It was organized as half-day workshop using 2 training modules each comprising a 30-minute lecture followed by counseling practice in pairs for 1 hour. Outcome was the rate of early ANC initiation among women giving birth, and its association with intervention, meeting an LHV, and months after training was analyzed. Of 6677 women, 3178 and 3499 women were in the control and intervention groups, respectively. Rates of early ANC were significantly improved after the intervention (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-1.43, P ANC. Training LHVs in communities by knowledge-counseling intervention significantly improved early ANC initiation, but the magnitude of change was still limited.

  2. Diversity in computerized reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.D.; Piel, L.

    1999-01-01

    Based on engineering judgement, the most important measures to increase the independency of redundant trains of a computerized safety instrumentation and control system (I and C) in a nuclear power plant are evaluated with respect to practical applications. This paper will contribute to an objective discussion on the necessary and justifiable arrangement of diversity in a computerized safety I and C system. Important conclusions are: - (i) diverse equipment may be used to control dependent failures only if measures necessary for designing, licensing, and operating a computerized safety I and C system homogeneous in equipment are neither technically nor economically feasible; - (ii) the considerable large operating experience in France with a non-diverse equipment digital reactor protection system does not call for equipment diversity. Although there are no generally accepted methods, the licensing authority is still required to take into account dependent failures in a probabilistic safety analysis; - (ii) the frequency of postulated initiating events implies which I and C functionality should be implemented on diverse equipment. Using non-safety I and C equipment in addition to safety I and C equipment is attractive because its necessary unavailability to control an initiating event in teamwork with the safety I and C equipment is estimated to range from 0.01 to 0.1. This can be achieved by operational experience

  3. Training Directors' Conceptualizations of the Intersections of Diversity and Trainee Competence Problems: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David S. Shen; Forrest, Linda; Elman, Nancy S.

    2009-01-01

    Counseling psychology has demonstrated leadership on multicultural issues through serious and committed attention to diversity in scholarship, conferences, and training and recruitment. Yet a survey of the literature on trainees with competence problems resulted in limited references to race/ethnicity and/or gender (REG). Using transcripts of…

  4. New program of initial training for staff of engineering ANAV The training required for a particular job in ANAV is divided into three sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Rabasa, D.

    2013-01-01

    - Common Primary Education - Initial training specific job - Training in the workplace For engineering has detected an area for improvement in the described model, consisting of providing the initial formation of a common engineering approach rather than the current operational approach. In preparing this plan takes into account the INPO standards, a functional analysis of the different jobs, the managers and supervisors of the observations and feedback from students, among others.

  5. 77 FR 5781 - Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina Final Environmental Impact Statement ACTION: Notice of... signed the ROD for the Airspace Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina Final...

  6. Training and Developing an Age Diverse Workforce in SMEs: The Need for a Strategic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Graham; Hutchings, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of strategic human resource development (HRD) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with specific reference to key issues around training, development and education as well as an emerging issue of significance, age diversity management. Design/Methodology/Approach: The approach…

  7. Managing Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1990-01-01

    Demographic trends imply that organizations must learn to manage a diverse work force. Ways to change organizational systems, structures, and practices to eliminate subtle barriers are awareness training, attitude change, and valuing diversity. (SK)

  8. Planning and assessing a cross-training initiative with multi-skilled employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermers, M A; Dagnillo, R; Glenn, R; Macfarlane, R; St Clair, V; Scott, D

    1996-06-01

    An improvement initiative begun by nurses at Parkview Episcopal Medical Center (Pueblo, Colo) to develop patient-focused care delivered by multiskilled workers followed a quality improvement methodology. Implementation of the new care delivery system on a model unit--2 South--provided the opportunity to plan, analyze data, and make changes as appropriate. Parkview's indoctrination of the teachings of W. Edwards Deming has helped leaders and staff realize the integral role of training in improvement activities. In his 14 points, Deming emphasizes the importance of employee education and of the employee having a clear understanding of his or her job. The time and money put into up-front education should help ensure the long-term success of this initiative. DEFINING THE CAREPARTNER: Three new multi-skilled positions were developed on 2 South--a Personal CarePartner, a Business CarePartner, and a Clinical CarePartner. By cross-training each of these roles to perform duties formerly done by centralized departments, 2 South was able to cut costs and time while ensuring quality care. TRAINING THE CAREPARTNER: An internally developed training program provided the new CarePartners with up-front education to prepare them to deliver patient-centered care. 2 South has experienced drops in patient falls and medication errors--areas that are often negatively affected when multi-skilled programs are instituted. Patient and physician surveys have shown increased satisfaction with care provided on the unit. The increased efficiency of the model unit has produced these outcomes while cutting costs substantially. The interdisciplinary team coordinating the improvement project learned many lessons in the process, including the importance of communication, education, and a sense of humor.

  9. Establishing and maintaining instructional skills through initial and continuing training: A common sense approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, J.A.; Hall, J.D.; Betz, T.L.; Stoupe, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Using this common sense approach to determining initial and continuing training for instructional staff members helped XYZ facility to develop a training program that will meet the specific needs of its staff. From the results of the analysis, XYZ can now provide the right training at the right time. THe competency-to-training matrix will assist XYZ in accomplishing this training. This matrix also groups the competencies into the five phases associated with the Systematic Approach to Training methodology. From this common sense approach, XYZ facility has a report detailing many solutions that go beyond training. Awareness of problems, causes, and solutions are the keys to successful facility management. Sharing these issues with the right facility personnel, XYZ will be able to meet and/or exceed the changing expectations placed on them due to ''downsizing'', ''rightsizing'', or ''reengineering''

  10. Experience in initial training required for the recognition of the qualified RP expert in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Suarez, M.; Marco Arboli, M.; Menarguez, J.

    2003-01-01

    An important point of the actions inside the European framework to achieve the harmonisation of the training programmes and recognition was included in the European directive 96/29/Euratom which includes definition and specific tasks of the European Qualified Expert on Radiation Protection (RP). Basic syllabus for training of those experts was developed in the communication 98/C 133/03 concerning BSS applications. Although, in the Spanish education system, the training and recognition requirements of the high level qualified experts on RP was defined since 1977, until 2001, the figure of the Technical Qualified Expert on RP does not appear in the legal framework. In December 2002, a new regulation of the Spanish Regulatory Body, CSN, about qualifications to obtain the recognition of RP Expert in Spain (both high qualified and technical RP experts) was published. Concerning the qualified expert on RP, (RP Officer), responsible of the RP Service, which takes charge of the effective protection and advise radioactive and nuclear facilities in Rp aspects,has to be authorised by the regulatory body. to obtain the RP officer diploma, conceded by the CSN, an initial training of 300 hours and a three-year minimum experience are required (for X-ray installation a 6-month experience is enough). The technical qualified expert on RP is the worker who carried out the tasks in the a RP Service under the supervision of the RP officer. A Technician Qualified Expert on RP does not need an specific accreditation of the Regulatory Body, but an initial RP training and a three-month minimum experience are required and has hold a certificate by the RP officer. Continuous training is also required and as well has to receive a certificate from the RP officer. Since 1977, The Institute for energy Studies has been implementing specific training courses for those professionals who want to obtain the diploma of RP officer (high degree qualified RP expert), conceded by the CSN. Since then

  11. Risk factors for lower limb injuries during initial naval training: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Daniel R; Munteanu, S E; Murley, G S; Landorf, K B; Menz, H B

    2018-04-06

    This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with the development of common lower limb injuries during initial defence training in naval recruits who were enrolled in a randomised trial. Three-hundred and six naval recruits were randomly allocated flat insoles (n=153) or foot orthoses (n=153) while undertaking 11 weeks of initial training. Participant characteristics (including anthropometrics, general health, physical activity, fitness and foot characteristics) were collected at the baseline assessment and injuries were documented prospectively. Injury was defined as the combined incidence of participants with medial tibial stress syndrome, patellofemoral pain, Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis/plantar heel pain throughout the 11 weeks of training. A discriminant function analysis was used to explore the ability of baseline measures to predict injury. Overall, 67 (21.9%) participants developed an injury. Discriminant function analysis revealed that participants who sustained an injury were slightly younger (mean 21.4±SD 4.1 vs 22.5±5.0 years) and were less likely to be allocated to the foot orthosis group (40% vs 53%) compared with those who remained uninjured. The accuracy of these baseline variables to predict injury was moderate (78.1%). Lower limb injury was not accurately predicted from health questionnaires, fitness results and clinical assessments in naval recruits undertaking initial defence training. However, although not reaching statistical significance, the use of foot orthoses may be protective against common lower limb injuries. ACTRN12615000024549; Post-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Trait emotional intelligence in initial teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Molero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the emotional intelligence (EI in teachers during their initial training following the trait EI model, namely the wellness model Bar-On (2002; 2006. 460 students participated (age in years M=22.57, SD=±3.39 of the University of Jaen (Spain who responded to the scale EQ-i Short Form Spanish version (López-Zafra, Pulido-Martos, & Berrios-Martos, 2014, that includes 4 factors (Interpersonal, Adaptability, Stress management and Intrapersonal. There are significant differences (p<.05 on various factors based on gender, age, degree of participants and the educational level of the same. The variables considered in the regression analysis that most predict global IE are Stress Management, Adaptability followed, Intrapersonal and Interpersonal. The results are consistent with those obtained in other studies in similar contexts.

  13. Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portraits In Courage Vol. VIII Portraits In Courage Vol. IX Portraits In Courage Vol. X AF Sites Social -Wide Initiative to Promote Diversity and Inclusion in the Federal Workforce Executive Order 13548 : Virtual Diversity Conference Air Force Diversity & Inclusion Air Force Diversity Graphic There is no

  14. Do educators in initial training have stereotypes about adult education?

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Crespo Pilar; Moreno-Fernández Olga

    2017-01-01

    The initial training that future educators receive must be prepared for the education of adults, which includes knowing the characteristics of the group and overcoming the stereotypes towards them. However, not always achieved. The purpose of this communication is to approximate the stereotypes that early educators (elementary school teachers and social educators) have about adult education. To this end, 110 students of teachers in the specialty of Primary Education and 151 of social educatio...

  15. AITI and GELATI - Initiatives to promote education and training for the next generation of educators and scientists during the IPY 2007/08 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, S. W.; Bouchard, M.; Das, S.; Gillermann, J.; Greve, R.; Matsuoka, K.; Pasotti, J.; Tweedie, C.

    2005-05-01

    The fourth International Polar Year (IPY) in 2007/08 provides a unique opportunity to enhance international collaboration in research and education. Here we present an IPY-teaching initiative (AITI), which proposes to develop an interdisciplinary international short course series promoting and fostering education and training of the next generation(s) of scientists and educators interested in natural and social sciences related to Polar Regions; a short course series (GELATI) focusing on the impact of the cryosphere on the Earth system. The main goals of the short course series are to: a) provide education and training for the next generation of graduate students, science teachers, researchers in science related to Polar Regions; b) provide training for junior faculty c) integrate research and education; d) create awareness for Polar Regions related questions in class-rooms and beyond; e) create international partnerships in education and training; f) promote multidisciplinary thinking; g) increase gender diversity in science and teaching; h) encourage minority participation. To achieve these goals it is intended to develop a curriculum of specialized and interdisciplinary courses considering various aspects of science and scientific activities, which study, or are concerned with processes/developments in Polar Regions. Due to the vast dimensions and distribution of Polar Regions across international boundaries as well as the complexity of environmental studies in Polar Regions these courses will internationally pool students and instructors. Pooling of experts and students internationally will not only ensure highest standards but also foster international partnership. To allow the integration of research and teaching and to provide the best possible study environment the up to two to three weeklong, courses will be held at international field stations or will be incorporated into large research projects. To ensure training of the next generation of

  16. Mass Medication Clinic (MMC) Patient Medical Assistant (PMA) System Training Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-2-0045 TITLE: Mass Medication Clinic (MMC) Patient ...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mass Medication Clinic (MMC) Patient Medical Assistant (PMA) System Training Initiative 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-2...sections will describe the events, results, and accomplishments of this study. With validation through this project the Patient Medical Assistant

  17. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Sharon E; Brouwers, Melissa; Johnson, David; Lavis, John N; Légaré, France; Majumdar, Sumit R; McKibbon, K Ann; Sales, Anne E; Stacey, Dawn; Klein, Gail; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-12-09

    Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT) and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  18. An Analysis of Costs and Cenefits Associated with Initial Contracting Technical Education and Training for Unrestricted Marine Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Distance learning education can be very valuable for working adults, especially for busy service members. The NPS DLP offers a defense-focused...COSTS AND BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH INITIAL CONTRACTING TECHNICAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR UNRESTRICTED MARINE OFFICERS by Lee A. White...WITH INITIAL CONTRACTING TECHNICAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR UNRESTRICTED MARINE OFFICERS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Lee A. White 7. PERFORMING

  19. Safety Training: "Habilitation électrique - Non-Electrician - Initial" course in September

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2016-01-01

    The next "Habilitation électrique - Non-Electrician - Initial" course will be given, in French, on 12 September 2016.    This course is designed for anyone required to safely perform simple non-electrical operations. Grade of authorisation: B0-H0-H0V. There are places available. If you are interested in following this course, please fill in your EDH training request via our catalogue.

  20. The development of the Teaching Professional Identity in the initial training of secondary teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío SERRANO RODRÍGUEZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a study that aims to know how the students of the Master’s Degree in Secondary Teacher Training begin to build their Teaching Professional Identity, as well as what the main implications of this identification process are, in order to improve their training. Through an open questionnaire, a total of 355 opinions of students from the University of Córdoba have been analysed. The conclusions obtained highlight: a the students show a professional identity that is significantly less developed than in other professional groups; b it is important to develop activities to reflect on the nature of the teaching profession by improving the identification of students with the characteristics of the teaching profession. Some of the implications from this research point to the need to take into consideration the results obtained when designing the process of initial training of future secondary teachers. Particularly, it would be necessary to include the issue of Teaching Professional Identity more specifically in the curriculum of the new model of initial training. This, moreover, should be linked to the pedagogical knowledge of the contents and the acquisition of real teaching skills according to the development of the educational curriculum for each subject. 

  1. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Sharon E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. Findings We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. Conclusions We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  2. Collaborative training program in coastal management in the Philippines: a local initiative with a global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Balgos, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    A collaborative project in developing a broad-based coastal management training program in the Philippines is being undertaken by a group of government and nongovernment agencies. It addresses the lack of expertise in planning an implementation for coastal management in the country. The process will be documented to serve as a guide in starting and maintaining the process of collaborative training in coastal management in the region. Other training initiatives are outlined including regional ...

  3. Five-year follow-up of Community Pediatrics Training Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Goldshore, Matt; Solomon, Barry S; Guyer, Bernard; Grason, Holly

    2014-07-01

    To compare community involvement of pediatricians exposed to enhanced residency training as part of the Dyson Community Pediatrics Training Initiative (CPTI) with involvement reported by a national sample of pediatricians. A cross-sectional analyses compared 2008-2010 mailed surveys of CPTI graduates 5 years after residency graduation with comparably aged respondents in a 2010 mailed national American Academy of Pediatrics survey of US pediatricians (CPTI: n = 234, response = 56.0%; national sample: n = 243; response = 59.9%). Respondents reported demographic characteristics, practice characteristics (setting, time spent in general pediatrics), involvement in community child health activities in past 12 months, use of ≥1 strategies to influence community child health (eg, educate legislators), and being moderately/very versus not at all/minimally skilled in 6 such activities (eg, identify community needs). χ(2) statistics assessed differences between groups; logistic regression modeled the independent association of CPTI with community involvement adjusting for personal and practice characteristics and perspectives regarding involvement. Compared with the national sample, more CPTI graduates reported involvement in community pediatrics (43.6% vs 31.1%, P .05). Differences in involvement remained in adjusted analyses with greater involvement by CPTI graduates (adjusted odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.5-3.7). Five years after residency, compared with their peers, more CPTI graduates report having skills and greater community pediatrics involvement. Enhanced residency training in community pediatrics may lead to a more engaged pediatrician workforce. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. 14 CFR 91.1095 - Initial and transition training and checking: Flight instructors (aircraft), flight instructors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instructor certificate— (i) The fundamental principles of the teaching-learning process; (ii) Teaching... Management § 91.1095 Initial and transition training and checking: Flight instructors (aircraft), flight...

  5. 76 FR 52845 - Establishing a Coordinated Government-Wide Initiative to Promote Diversity and Inclusion in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... focus on diversity and inclusion as a key component of their human resources strategies. This approach... agencies to implement programs for recruitment and career development of Hispanic employees and established... Initiative and Strategic Plan. The Director of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Deputy...

  6. Initial education and training pathways for danish adult educators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2008-01-01

    The contribution aims at mapping out initial education and training opportunities for Danish adult educators and to examine key structural features that characterise professionalisation processes in the field of adult education. The analysis draws on policy documents and available research...... three provides a detailed account of existing qualification pathways for individuals willing to enter the system as adult educators. Notwithstanding the range of opportunities to acquire pedagogical qualifications in teaching adults, the knowledge and skills provided may vary substantially. Consequently......, the author's main argument is that it is not possible to speak of tailored-made pathways of professionalisation in the field of adult education, at least in the Danish context....

  7. Selective pathology fellowships: diverse, innovative, and valuable subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzoni, Julia C; Ewton, April; Chévez-Barrios, Patricia; Moore, Stephen; Thorsen, Linda M; Naritoku, Wesley Y

    2014-04-01

    Although selective pathology fellowships have a long-standing history of developing trainees with advanced expertise in specific areas of pathology other than those of the American Board of Pathology-certified subspecialties, the widespread interest in this training continues to grow. To describe the historical background and current status of selective pathology fellowships, and to provide examples of 3 programs. In addition, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited programs and nonaccredited programs in Selective Pathology are compared. ACGME data banks and publicly available online materials were used. Program directors of the fellowships examples in this paper provided program-specific information. Additionally, an online survey of the program directors and program coordinators of ACGME-accredited programs and nonaccredited programs in selective pathology was performed. There are currently 76 ACGME-accredited selective pathology programs. The programs are distributed between 3 major categories: surgical pathology, focused anatomic pathology, and focused clinical pathology. Although the vast majority of programs are concerned that their funding source may be cut in the next 3 years, most programs will not change the number of fellowship positions in their programs. Program requirements devoted specifically and solely to selective pathology have been developed and are in effect. The value of this training is recognized not only by pathologists, but by clinicians as well, in both academia and private practice. Importantly, the diversity and innovation inherent in selective pathology allow these programs to adeptly address new subspecialty areas and technologic advances in the current and evolving practice of pathology.

  8. Flying Training Capacity Model: Initial Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lynch, Susan

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (1) Determine the flying training capacity for 6 bases: * Sheppard AFB * Randolph AFB * Moody AFB * Columbus AFB * Laughlin AFB * Vance AFB * (2) Develop versatile flying training capacity simulation model for AETC...

  9. Game method application efficiency for speed and power capability development of trampoline athletes at the initial training stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfia Deineko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to prove the effectiveness of using the game method for speed and power capability development of trampoline athletes at the initial training stage. Material & Methods: in the article the materials of the research that was carried out with the help of pedagogical testing of trampoliners of 7–8 years on the basis of the Children and Youth Sports School No. 7, Trampoline Department of Kharkov. Results: conducted pedagogical experiment showed the effectiveness of the developed methodology for the development of speed-strength abilities of trampoline athletes at the initial training stage using the game method. Conclusion: results of the experiment confirm the importance of the use of the game method for the development of speed-strength abilities in the initial training of young trampolines, which further affects the level of their technical preparedness and the effectiveness of competition activities.

  10. Beyond the Diversity Crisis Model: Decentralized Diversity Planning and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Damon A.

    2008-01-01

    This article critiques the diversity crises model of diversity planning in higher education and presents a decentralized diversity planning model. The model is based on interviews with the nation's leading diversity officers, a review of the literature and the authors own experiences leading diversity change initiatives in higher education. The…

  11. Development of a personalized training system using the Lung Image Database Consortium and Image Database resource Initiative Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongli; Wang, Weisheng; Luo, Jiawei; Yang, Xuedong

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a personalized training system using the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database resource Initiative (IDRI) Database, because collecting, annotating, and marking a large number of appropriate computed tomography (CT) scans, and providing the capability of dynamically selecting suitable training cases based on the performance levels of trainees and the characteristics of cases are critical for developing a efficient training system. A novel approach is proposed to develop a personalized radiology training system for the interpretation of lung nodules in CT scans using the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) database, which provides a Content-Boosted Collaborative Filtering (CBCF) algorithm for predicting the difficulty level of each case of each trainee when selecting suitable cases to meet individual needs, and a diagnostic simulation tool to enable trainees to analyze and diagnose lung nodules with the help of an image processing tool and a nodule retrieval tool. Preliminary evaluation of the system shows that developing a personalized training system for interpretation of lung nodules is needed and useful to enhance the professional skills of trainees. The approach of developing personalized training systems using the LIDC/IDRL database is a feasible solution to the challenges of constructing specific training program in terms of cost and training efficiency. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations.

  13. An interdisciplinary study in initial teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Larraz Rada

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This experiment of innovative university education shows the interdisciplinary work carried out in the studies of the Bachelor of Science in Education at the University of Andorra. The study was developed within two subjects: Communication Technology (TAC and Cultural Heritage Education in Andorra. The main objective of this experiment is to foster the use of technological resources and digital materials, with the aim of drawing cultural heritage closer to the classroom. Based on a previous study of documentation and an analysis of online educational materials, the students have to design an e-book, which is understood to be digital material in the curricular field of cultural heritage. This digital material is a didactic proposal that focuses on the construction of knowledge by primary school students. During the elaboration of the materials the instructors introduce follow-up activities. The results of the experiment show that, from an interdisciplinary approach, and a problem-solving, learning-centered methodology, specific and transferable abilities in initial teacher training can be studied and evaluated.

  14. Roche and IAEA announce joint initiative to train healthcare workers for Africa's fight against cancer. EDUCARE partnership to launch IAEA's VUCCnet training networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Roche and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) announced today the launch of the EDUCARE (EDUcation for Cancer in African REgions) project to provide concerted support to help combat the growing cancer epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The EDUCARE project is to be piloted in Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, and is linked with the IAEA's wider initiative to build regional training networks in cancer control and a Virtual University for Cancer Control (VUCCnet) in Africa. A core component for the successful fight against cancer in any country is the education and training of health care providers. The VUCCnet will allow for training to be provided in an integrated and sustainable way in Africa by taking advantage of low-cost online learning tools. The IAEA is working in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and other international partners to develop the VUCCnet across Africa. The EDCUARE project will facilitate a first-of-its-kind exchange of knowledge and skills, both at the healthcare provider and country-wide level. Training will be provided by an on-line training resource centre, known as the Virtual University for Cancer Control (VUCC), the first such platform for health workers across the continent. Maturin Tchoumi, General Manager Roche South Africa said: 'As a leader in oncology, Roche believes that its strengths, expertise and resources can be used to improve the quality of oncology training and education in the poorest countries in the world. There is a real lack of basic education in oncology in Africa. By contributing our skills and competencies on the ground, Roche can make a real and sustainable improvement.' This new public-private partnership reflects a shared concern over the increasing cancer burden in sub-Saharan Africa, a region of the world where cancer rates are growing rapidly. Cancer now accounts for 12.5% of all deaths worldwide, more than HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria combined. By 2020, there are expected to

  15. Initiation of bladder voiding with epidural stimulation in paralyzed, step trained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag N; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Lu, Daniel C; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2014-01-01

    The inability to control timely bladder emptying is one of the most serious challenges among the several functional deficits that occur after a complete spinal cord injury. Having demonstrated that electrodes placed epidurally on the dorsum of the spinal cord can be used in animals and humans to recover postural and locomotor function after complete paralysis, we hypothesized that a similar approach could be used to recover bladder function after paralysis. Also knowing that posture and locomotion can be initiated immediately with a specific frequency-dependent stimulation pattern and that with repeated stimulation-training sessions these functions can improve even further, we reasoned that the same two strategies could be used to regain bladder function. Recent evidence suggests that rats with severe paralysis can be rehabilitated with a multisystem neuroprosthetic training regime that counteracts the development of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. No data regarding the acute effects of locomotion on bladder function, however, were reported. In this study we show that enabling of locomotor-related spinal neuronal circuits by epidural stimulation also influences neural networks controlling bladder function and can play a vital role in recovering bladder function after complete paralysis. We have identified specific spinal cord stimulation parameters that initiate bladder emptying within seconds of the initiation of epidural stimulation. The clinical implications of these results are substantial in that this strategy could have a major impact in improving the quality of life and longevity of patients while simultaneously dramatically reducing ongoing health maintenance after a spinal cord injury.

  16. Initiation of bladder voiding with epidural stimulation in paralyzed, step trained rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag N Gad

    Full Text Available The inability to control timely bladder emptying is one of the most serious challenges among the several functional deficits that occur after a complete spinal cord injury. Having demonstrated that electrodes placed epidurally on the dorsum of the spinal cord can be used in animals and humans to recover postural and locomotor function after complete paralysis, we hypothesized that a similar approach could be used to recover bladder function after paralysis. Also knowing that posture and locomotion can be initiated immediately with a specific frequency-dependent stimulation pattern and that with repeated stimulation-training sessions these functions can improve even further, we reasoned that the same two strategies could be used to regain bladder function. Recent evidence suggests that rats with severe paralysis can be rehabilitated with a multisystem neuroprosthetic training regime that counteracts the development of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. No data regarding the acute effects of locomotion on bladder function, however, were reported. In this study we show that enabling of locomotor-related spinal neuronal circuits by epidural stimulation also influences neural networks controlling bladder function and can play a vital role in recovering bladder function after complete paralysis. We have identified specific spinal cord stimulation parameters that initiate bladder emptying within seconds of the initiation of epidural stimulation. The clinical implications of these results are substantial in that this strategy could have a major impact in improving the quality of life and longevity of patients while simultaneously dramatically reducing ongoing health maintenance after a spinal cord injury.

  17. Self-triggered assistive stimulus training improves step initiation in persons with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creath Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior studies demonstrated that hesitation-prone persons with Parkinson’s disease (PDs acutely improve step initiation using a novel self-triggered stimulus that enhances lateral weight shift prior to step onset. PDs showed reduced anticipatory postural adjustment (APA durations, earlier step onsets, and faster 1st step speed immediately following stimulus exposure. Objective This study investigated the effects of long-term stimulus exposure. Methods Two groups of hesitation-prone subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD participated in a 6-week step-initiation training program involving one of two stimulus conditions: 1 Drop. The stance-side support surface was lowered quickly (1.5 cm; 2 Vibration. A short vibration (100 ms was applied beneath the stance-side support surface. Stimuli were self-triggered by a 5% reduction in vertical force under the stance foot during the APA. Testing was at baseline, immediately post-training, and 6 weeks post-training. Measurements included timing and magnitude of ground reaction forces, and step speed and length. Results Both groups improved their APA force modulation after training. Contrary to previous results, neither group showed reduced APA durations or earlier step onset times. The vibration group showed 55% increase in step speed and a 39% increase in step length which were retained 6 weeks post-training. The drop group showed no stepping-performance improvements. Conclusions The acute sensitivity to the quickness-enhancing effects of stimulus exposure demonstrated in previous studies was supplanted by improved force modulation following prolonged stimulus exposure. The results suggest a potential approach to reduce the severity of start hesitation in PDs, but further study is needed to understand the relationship between short- and long-term effects of stimulus exposure.

  18. Oral surgery in the European Union: challenges of diversity in training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseripour, M N; Hervé, C; Meningaud, J-P

    2017-02-01

    At the crossroads of medicine and dentistry, oral surgery with orthodontics are the only recognised dental specialties by the European Union. The goal of our study is to evaluate the current state of oral surgery in Europe from its teaching to its practice, the hypothesis being that a notable diversity persists despite European Union harmonisation process. To understand the impact of this diversity applied to European Union freedom of movement and its ethical implications for the practice of oral surgery, English and French questionnaires were sent by email to universities and organisations delivering authorisation to practise in France, Germany, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom chosen based upon inclusion and exclusion criteria. An analysis of documents on these organisations' official websites was also conducted. Demographic information was obtained from the aforementioned organisations. The profile of practising oral surgeons is different dependent on the country. The university and hospital trainings conform to European recommendations and span 3-4 years. European Board certification is not required. Continuing education is mandatory only in France, Germany and United Kingdom. As for curricula and scope of practice, no consensus can be derived. There is potential conflict of interest between European Union principles of freedom of movement and protection of all citizens, as member countries do not uniformly apply Directives and recommendations. A new survey of all European Union oral surgery programmes as well as organisations delivering authorisation to practise is necessary to implement across the board harmonisation of training and practice to insure patient safety in light of the migration of European Union practitioners. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Out of the shadows and 6000 reasons to celebrate: An update from FIGO's fistula surgery training initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinger, Gillian; Trautvetter, Lilli; Browning, Andrew; Rane, Ajay

    2018-06-01

    Obstetric fistula is a devastating childbirth injury caused by unrelieved obstructed labor. Obstetric fistula leads to chronic incontinence and, in most cases, significant physical and emotional suffering. The condition continues to blight the lives of 1-2 million women in low-resource settings, with 50 000-100 000 new cases each year adding to the backlog. A trained, skilled fistula surgeon is essential to repair an obstetric fistula; however, owing to a global shortage of these surgeons, few women are able to receive life-restoring treatment. In 2011, to address the treatment gap, FIGO and partners released the Global Competency-Based Fistula Surgery Training Manual, the first standardized curriculum to train fistula surgeons. To increase the number of fistula surgeons, the FIGO Fistula Surgery Training Initiative was launched in 2012, and FIGO Fellows started to enter the program to train as fistula surgeons. Following a funding boost in 2014, the initiative has grown considerably. With 52 fellows involved and a new Expert Advisory Group in place, the program is achieving major milestones, with a record-breaking number of fistula repairs performed by FIGO Fellows in 2017, bringing the total number of repairs since the start of the project to more than 6000. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  20. GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Perea, V.; Balzter, H.

    2012-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. GIONET is a partnership of leading Universities, research institutes and private companies from across Europe aiming to cultivate a community of early stage researchers in the areas of optical and radar remote sensing skilled for the emerging GMES land monitoring services during the GMES Initial Operations period (2011-2013) and beyond. GIONET is expected to satisfy the demand for highly skilled researchers and provide personnel for operational phase of the GMES and monitoring and emergency services. It will achieve this by: -Providing postgraduate training in Earth Observation Science that exposes students to different research disciplines and complementary skills, providing work experiences in the private and academic sectors, and leading to a recognized qualification (Doctorate). -Enabling access to first class training in both fundamental and applied research skills to early-stage researchers at world-class academic centers and market leaders in the private sector. -Building on the experience from previous GMES research and development projects in the land monitoring and emergency information services. The training program through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics (each carried out by an Early Stage Researchers based in one of the partner organization) divided in 5 main areas: Forest monitoring: Global biomass information systems Forest Monitoring of the Congo Basin using Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) Multi-concept Earth Observation Capabilities for Biomass Mapping and Change Detection: Synergy of Multi-temporal and Multi-frequency Interferometric Radar and Optical Satellite Data Land cover and change: Multi-scale Remote Sensing Synergy for Land Process Studies: from field Spectrometry to Airborne Hyperspectral and

  1. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  2. A Framework to Support Global Corporate M-Learning: Learner Initiative and Technology Acceptance across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Corporations are growing more and more international and accordingly need to train and develop an increasingly diverse and dispersed employee based. M-learning seems like it may be the solution if it can cross cultures. Learner initiative has been shown to be a disadvantage of distant learning environments, which would include m-learning.…

  3. Diversity beyond the Golden Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Stone, Susan C.

    1994-01-01

    Diversity implies differences in people based on their identifications with various groups and is also a process of acknowledging differences through action. Those organizations that have welcomed diversity are more productive and have a competitive advantage. Diversity training can be awareness based (cognitive) or skill based (behavioral). (JOW)

  4. Professional Development: Designing Initiatives to Meet the Needs of Online Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquita Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of online courses mandates an examination of the similarities – and differences – in the faculty training and development needs of those teaching online. With institutions facing increasingly limited resources, there is a need to prioritize faculty development initiatives that will encourage faculty participation. An examination of interest, attendance and completion rates of faculty development initiatives targeting online faculty revealed no distinct preferences in relation to the focus or format of programs offered. The authors recommend offering flexibility and diversity in faculty development initiatives to accommodate the disparate needs of a remote, heterogeneous faculty population; as such, a sample needs assessment is offered to help guide faculty development programming to support online teaching.

  5. Organizational strategy and diversity management: diversity-sensitive orientation as a moderating influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansky, Kathryn H; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; De Souza, Gita; Dreachslin, Janice L

    2003-01-01

    Empirical studies on diversity suggest that health care organizations have been slow to embrace diversity management. We propose that sensitivity to diversity, at the corporate level, moderates strategic decision making, which influences human resource management practices such as diversity initiatives. This study of 203 hospitals explored the relationships among organizational strategy, organizational sensitivity to diversity, and diversity management practices.

  6. Structures of the Education and Initial Training Systems in the European Union. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Thessaloniki (Greece).

    This report provides information on the administration and structure of all levels of education and initial vocational training in 17 countries--the 15 Member States of the European Union and Iceland and Norway. Country reports are arranged in a similar way to facilitate comparison. Chapter 1 contains information on each country, the basic…

  7. Post-Affirmative Action: A Phenomenological Study of Admission Initiatives by Chief Diversity Officers to Support Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichuru, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experiences of chief diversity officers (CDOs) and how they enhanced admission of minority students in the post-affirmative action era. Six chief diversity officers, who played a pivotal leadership role in diversity of their respective campuses, described their experiences. Using…

  8. The Methodology of Foreign Language Integrative Teaching at the Initial Stage of Interpreter Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedishenkova, Marina V.; Mironina, Anna Y.

    2016-01-01

    The topicality of the research is connected with the modern requirements to the education of future interpreters who are to speak a foreign language within the professional context. For this purpose, it is necessary to focus their language training at the initial stage of learning on forming their professional thinking. This raises the need for…

  9. Fostering Diversity and Inclusion: A Summary of the 2017 Intersociety Summer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskal, Jonathan B; Patel, Amy K; Levine, Deborah; Canon, Cheri L; Macura, Katarzyna J; Allen, Brenda J; Meltzer, Carolyn

    2018-05-01

    The 39th radiology Intersociety Committee reviewed the current state of diversity among trainees and in our workplaces and addressed future strategies for fostering diversity through inclusion. The assembled participants addressed the imperatives and drivers for diversity and developed a road map to foster diversity. Themes included the need to be proactive in increasing awareness of our own biases and their potential impact on workplace decisions, overcoming blind spots, and being culturally sensitive. The need to identify and eliminate barriers to diversity was discussed at both the organizational and practice level and included efforts to break down structural and clinical barriers, such as training in multicultural awareness. Additional strategies that were addressed included building inclusive work environments; facilitating debate, conversations, and community building; and pipelining medical students through mentoring pathways. The conference ended with a call to action to develop toolkits with effective resources to support the necessary diversity and inclusion initiatives we must all undertake. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolution of radiation protection training programmes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monica, Rodriguez Suarez; Elvira, Hernando Velasco; Javier, Menarguez; Javier, Fernandez; Susana, Falcon; Mirian, Bravo

    2006-01-01

    Education and training are an important tool to promote safety culture and to upgrade competence. In this sense, Radiation Protection (R.P.) training programmes are a major challenge in order to achieve occupational, public and environmental radiation protection in all applied fields of ionising radiation.The Spanish R.P. Education and Training system provides a solid and integrated educational model. The needs for a specialized training on R.P. for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. Since then, a wide variety of R.P. initial, continuous and on the job training courses has been carried out, taking into account the diverse applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international trends. C.I.E.M.A.T., through the R.P. training Unit, has been organizing and developing most of the R.P. training in Spain since 1964, becoming a reference centre. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving in order to complete and adapt all R.P. training levels. Initial training, long-life training, updating or upgrading training, as well as other innovative courses related with R.P. are being offered by C.I.E.M.A.T. each year. Another important aspect of R.P. is the information and training to stake holders. C.I.E.M.A. T. is also working in this sense. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the evolution of R.P. training processes since 1964 in Spain, in order to conclude which are the future trends and the changes required to adapt the Spanish R.P. Education and Training system to the current needs and upcoming scene. (authors)

  11. Evolution of radiation protection training programmes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monica, Rodriguez Suarez; Elvira, Hernando Velasco; Javier, Menarguez; Javier, Fernandez; Susana, Falcon; Mirian, Bravo [CIEMAT - Radiation Protection Training Unit ( IEE), Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Education and training are an important tool to promote safety culture and to upgrade competence. In this sense, Radiation Protection (R.P.) training programmes are a major challenge in order to achieve occupational, public and environmental radiation protection in all applied fields of ionising radiation.The Spanish R.P. Education and Training system provides a solid and integrated educational model. The needs for a specialized training on R.P. for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. Since then, a wide variety of R.P. initial, continuous and on the job training courses has been carried out, taking into account the diverse applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international trends. C.I.E.M.A.T., through the R.P. training Unit, has been organizing and developing most of the R.P. training in Spain since 1964, becoming a reference centre. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving in order to complete and adapt all R.P. training levels. Initial training, long-life training, updating or upgrading training, as well as other innovative courses related with R.P. are being offered by C.I.E.M.A.T. each year. Another important aspect of R.P. is the information and training to stake holders. C.I.E.M.A. T. is also working in this sense. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the evolution of R.P. training processes since 1964 in Spain, in order to conclude which are the future trends and the changes required to adapt the Spanish R.P. Education and Training system to the current needs and upcoming scene. (authors)

  12. Peers, tobacco advertising, and secondhand smoke exposure influences smoking initiation in diverse adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Carolyn C; Ye, Cong; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; MacPherson, Laura; Kanamori, Mariano; Zhang, Guangyu; Chen, Lu; Fiedler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Identify demographic, social, and environmental factors associated with smoking initiation in a large, racially and ethnically diverse sample of underage youth participating in the 2006 Maryland Youth Tobacco Survey. Cross-sectional, multistage, probability sample survey. Schools (308 middle and high schools) in Maryland. Subjects were 12- to 17-year-old adolescents participating in a school-based survey. New smokers and nonsmokers were included in the analysis (n  =  57,072). Social and media influence, secondhand smoke exposure, tobacco product use, and demographic information including age, race/ethnicity, and geographic region. Chi-square and multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for clustering. Hispanic and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander youth were most likely and Asian and Black youth were least likely to be new smokers. Smoking initiation was positively associated with higher age, living with a current smoker, secondhand smoke exposure, exposure to advertisements for tobacco products, having more friends that smoke, tobacco products offered by friends, risk perceptions, and use of other tobacco products such as smokeless tobacco and cigars. Multivariate logistic regression results suggested that composite measures of peer influence, advertising exposure, and secondhand smoke exposure were independently associated with smoking initiation. Media, peer influence, and secondhand smoke exposure were the most important factors influencing smoking initiation and were common to all racial/ethnic groups in this study. Interventions combining targeted public awareness, education, and media campaigns directed at parents/guardians should be investigated.

  13. An Initial evaluation of law enforcement overdose training in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Cory D; Zaller, Nickolas; Macmadu, Alexandria; Green, Traci C

    2016-05-01

    To assess initial change in knowledge, self-efficacy, and anticipated behaviors among Rhode Island law enforcement officers on drug overdose response and prevention. Law enforcement officers (N=316) voluntarily completed a pre-post evaluation immediately before and after taking part in overdose prevention and response trainings. Assessment items included measures of knowledge (Brief Overdose Recognition and Response Assessment (BORRA)), self-efficacy, attitudes toward drugs and overdose prevention, awareness of the Good Samaritan Law, and open-ended items pertaining to overdose knowledge and response behaviors. Non-parametric tests measured within-group and between-group differences. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests evaluated changes in BORRA scores and self-efficacy items. McNemar's tests assessed changes regarding the Good Samaritan law and open-ended items. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests measured post-training change in attitudes. Law enforcement officers demonstrated statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy (identifying signs of opioid overdose, naloxone indication, counseling witnesses in overdose prevention, and referring witnesses for more information), overdose identification knowledge (BORRA mean increased from 7.00 to 10.39), naloxone administration knowledge (BORRA mean increased from 10.15 to 12.59), Good Samaritan Law awareness (17.9% increase after training), and anticipated behaviors in response to future observed overdose (65.7% changed from passive to active response post training). Harm reduction programs can provide law enforcement officers with the knowledge and skills necessary to intervene and reduce overdose mortality. Given the statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy, attitudinal changes, and Good Samaritan law awareness, law enforcement officers are more prepared to actively interact with drug users during a drug-involved emergency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Training Staff for Multicultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennison, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses guidelines for training staff in multicultural camp communities. Includes developing an awareness and acceptance of cultural differences, self-awareness, an understanding of the "dynamics of differences," knowledge of the camper's culture, and adaptation of skills. Addresses the importance of integrating multicultural education goals…

  15. Cultural diversity: blind spot in medical curriculum documents, a document analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternotte, Emma; Fokkema, Joanne P I; van Loon, Karsten A; van Dulmen, Sandra; Scheele, Fedde

    2014-08-22

    Cultural diversity among patients presents specific challenges to physicians. Therefore, cultural diversity training is needed in medical education. In cases where strategic curriculum documents form the basis of medical training it is expected that the topic of cultural diversity is included in these documents, especially if these have been recently updated. The aim of this study was to assess the current formal status of cultural diversity training in the Netherlands, which is a multi-ethnic country with recently updated medical curriculum documents. In February and March 2013, a document analysis was performed of strategic curriculum documents for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in the Netherlands. All text phrases that referred to cultural diversity were extracted from these documents. Subsequently, these phrases were sorted into objectives, training methods or evaluation tools to assess how they contributed to adequate curriculum design. Of a total of 52 documents, 33 documents contained phrases with information about cultural diversity training. Cultural diversity aspects were more prominently described in the curriculum documents for undergraduate education than in those for postgraduate education. The most specific information about cultural diversity was found in the blueprint for undergraduate medical education. In the postgraduate curriculum documents, attention to cultural diversity differed among specialties and was mainly superficial. Cultural diversity is an underrepresented topic in the Dutch documents that form the basis for actual medical training, although the documents have been updated recently. Attention to the topic is thus unwarranted. This situation does not fit the demand of a multi-ethnic society for doctors with cultural diversity competences. Multi-ethnic countries should be critical on the content of the bases for their medical educational curricula.

  16. Training physician investigators in medicine and public health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourevitch, Marc N; Jay, Melanie R; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard P; Foltin, George L; Lipkin, Mack; Schwartz, Mark D

    2012-07-01

    We have described and evaluated the impact of a unique fellowship program designed to train postdoctoral, physician fellows in research at the interface of medicine and public health. We developed a rigorous curriculum in public health content and research methods and fostered linkages with research mentors and local public health agencies. Didactic training provided the foundation for fellows' mentored research initiatives, which addressed real-world challenges in advancing the health status of vulnerable urban populations. Two multidisciplinary cohorts (6 per cohort) completed this 2-year degree-granting program and engaged in diverse public health research initiatives on topics such as improving pediatric care outcomes through health literacy interventions, reducing hospital readmission rates among urban poor with multiple comorbidities, increasing cancer screening uptake, and broadening the reach of addiction screening and intervention. The majority of fellows (10/12) published their fellowship work and currently have a career focused in public health-related research or practice (9/12). A fellowship training program can prepare physician investigators for research careers that bridge the divide between medicine and public health.

  17. Public Address, Cultural Diversity, and Tolerance: Teaching Cultural Diversity in Speech Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Marquita L.

    While speech instructors work to design appropriate diversity goals in the public speaking class, few have the training for such a task. A review of course objectives and assignments for the basic course may be helpful. Suggestions for instructors working to incorporate diversity in the basic course include: (1) recognize the dominance of the…

  18. Attitudes on En Route Air Traffic Control Training and Work: A Comparison of Recruits Initially Trained at the FAA Academy and Recruits Initially Trained at Assigned Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, John J.; And Others

    In the comparison, questionnaires concerning aspects of training-related and work-related attitudes were sent to 225 Air Traffic Control (ATC) trainees who represented groups of attritions and retentions in two En Route training programs; viz, programs that provided basic training at the FAA Academy and programs that provided basic training at the…

  19. Selecting, training and assessing new general practice community teachers in UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydes, Ciaran; Ajjawi, Rola

    2015-09-01

    Standards for undergraduate medical education in the UK, published in Tomorrow's Doctors, include the criterion 'everyone involved in educating medical students will be appropriately selected, trained, supported and appraised'. To establish how new general practice (GP) community teachers of medical students are selected, initially trained and assessed by UK medical schools and establish the extent to which Tomorrow's Doctors standards are being met. A mixed-methods study with questionnaire data collected from 24 lead GPs at UK medical schools, 23 new GP teachers from two medical schools plus a semi-structured telephone interview with two GP leads. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively and qualitative data were analysed informed by framework analysis. GP teachers' selection is non-standardised. One hundred per cent of GP leads provide initial training courses for new GP teachers; 50% are mandatory. The content and length of courses varies. All GP leads use student feedback to assess teaching, but other required methods (peer review and patient feedback) are not universally used. To meet General Medical Council standards, medical schools need to include equality and diversity in initial training and use more than one method to assess new GP teachers. Wider debate about the selection, training and assessment of new GP teachers is needed to agree minimum standards.

  20. Human Geography Trains Diverse Perspectives on Global Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Education for equity in global development and cultural diversity calls for professional capacity building to perceive diverse perspectives on complex procedures of globalisation. The discipline of human geography is such a "provider of perspectives". The purpose of this paper is to propose a historic series of how theories of geography…

  1. Feasible Initial Population with Genetic Diversity for a Population-Based Algorithm Applied to the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Cruz-Chávez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic algorithm for obtaining feasible initial populations to the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows is presented. The theoretical formulation for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows is explained. The proposed method is primarily divided into a clustering algorithm and a two-phase algorithm. The first step is the application of a modified k-means clustering algorithm which is proposed in this paper. The two-phase algorithm evaluates a partial solution to transform it into a feasible individual. The two-phase algorithm consists of a hybridization of four kinds of insertions which interact randomly to obtain feasible individuals. It has been proven that different kinds of insertions impact the diversity among individuals in initial populations, which is crucial for population-based algorithm behavior. A modification to the Hamming distance method is applied to the populations generated for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows to evaluate their diversity. Experimental tests were performed based on the Solomon benchmarking. Experimental results show that the proposed method facilitates generation of highly diverse populations, which vary according to the type and distribution of the instances.

  2. An Initiative for the Study and Use of Genetic Diversity of Domesticated Plants and Their Wild Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Acevedo Gasman, Francisca; Burgeff, Caroline; Cano Ramírez, Margarita; Piñero, Daniel; Sarukhán, José

    2018-01-01

    Domestication has been influenced by formal plant breeding since the onset of intensive agriculture and the Green Revolution. Despite providing food security for some regions, intensive agriculture has had substantial detrimental consequences for the environment and does not fulfill smallholder’s needs under most developing countries conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to look for alternative plant production techniques, effective for each environmental, socio-cultural, and economic conditions. This is particularly relevant for countries that are megadiverse and major centers of plant domestication and diversification. In this white paper, a Mexico-centered initiative is proposed, with two main objectives: (1) to study, understand, conserve, and sustainably use the genetic diversity of domesticated plants and their wild relatives, as well as the ongoing evolutionary processes that generate and maintain it; and (2) to strengthen food and forestry production in a socially fair and environmentally friendly way. To fulfill these objectives, the initiative focuses on the source of variability available for domestication (genetic diversity and functional genomics), the context in which domestication acts (breeding and production) and one of its main challenges (environmental change). Research on these components can be framed to target and connect both the theoretical understanding of the evolutionary processes, the practical aspects of conservation, and food and forestry production. The target, main challenges, problems to be faced and key research questions are presented for each component, followed by a roadmap for the consolidation of this proposal as a national initiative. PMID:29515612

  3. An Initiative for the Study and Use of Genetic Diversity of Domesticated Plants and Their Wild Relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Mastretta-Yanes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Domestication has been influenced by formal plant breeding since the onset of intensive agriculture and the Green Revolution. Despite providing food security for some regions, intensive agriculture has had substantial detrimental consequences for the environment and does not fulfill smallholder’s needs under most developing countries conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to look for alternative plant production techniques, effective for each environmental, socio-cultural, and economic conditions. This is particularly relevant for countries that are megadiverse and major centers of plant domestication and diversification. In this white paper, a Mexico-centered initiative is proposed, with two main objectives: (1 to study, understand, conserve, and sustainably use the genetic diversity of domesticated plants and their wild relatives, as well as the ongoing evolutionary processes that generate and maintain it; and (2 to strengthen food and forestry production in a socially fair and environmentally friendly way. To fulfill these objectives, the initiative focuses on the source of variability available for domestication (genetic diversity and functional genomics, the context in which domestication acts (breeding and production and one of its main challenges (environmental change. Research on these components can be framed to target and connect both the theoretical understanding of the evolutionary processes, the practical aspects of conservation, and food and forestry production. The target, main challenges, problems to be faced and key research questions are presented for each component, followed by a roadmap for the consolidation of this proposal as a national initiative.

  4. An Initiative for the Study and Use of Genetic Diversity of Domesticated Plants and Their Wild Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Acevedo Gasman, Francisca; Burgeff, Caroline; Cano Ramírez, Margarita; Piñero, Daniel; Sarukhán, José

    2018-01-01

    Domestication has been influenced by formal plant breeding since the onset of intensive agriculture and the Green Revolution. Despite providing food security for some regions, intensive agriculture has had substantial detrimental consequences for the environment and does not fulfill smallholder's needs under most developing countries conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to look for alternative plant production techniques, effective for each environmental, socio-cultural, and economic conditions. This is particularly relevant for countries that are megadiverse and major centers of plant domestication and diversification. In this white paper, a Mexico-centered initiative is proposed, with two main objectives: (1) to study, understand, conserve, and sustainably use the genetic diversity of domesticated plants and their wild relatives, as well as the ongoing evolutionary processes that generate and maintain it; and (2) to strengthen food and forestry production in a socially fair and environmentally friendly way. To fulfill these objectives, the initiative focuses on the source of variability available for domestication ( genetic diversity and functional genomics ), the context in which domestication acts ( breeding and production ) and one of its main challenges ( environmental change ). Research on these components can be framed to target and connect both the theoretical understanding of the evolutionary processes, the practical aspects of conservation, and food and forestry production. The target, main challenges, problems to be faced and key research questions are presented for each component, followed by a roadmap for the consolidation of this proposal as a national initiative.

  5. Preparing future teachers against racism: A training experience at the University of Almería

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Isabel Herrada Valverde

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of a large number of immigrants at Spanish schools has turned classrooms into multicultural spaces. This is the reason why prospective teachers must receive appropriate training in cultural diversity. This paper presents a detailed study of the concept of racism as perceived by a group of prospective teachers who took the course on “Education and Socio-cultural Diversity”, and this concept’s influence to promote a change in their views and attitudes in topics associated with racism. The results show how students dealt with this concept and acknowledged some of their main prejudices. This research demands the inclusion of subjects related to cultural diversity in tertiary education, particularly at the initial stage of teacher-training studies.

  6. Listen, live and learn: A review of the application process, aiming to enhance diversity within the Listen, Live and Learn senior student housing initiative, at Stellenbosch University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Smorenburg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Listen, Live and Learn (LLL initiative at Stellenbosch University (SU is a senior student housing model with the aim of providing an experiential opportunity for students to make contact with ‘the other’. It is posited on the social contact theory assumption that if people of different genders, races, ethnicities, and/or religion make contact and interact with one another on an equal level, then less stereotyping by them will occur.The initiative therefore aims to enhance interaction between diverse students and to enable social integration. However, as diversity is a core element of LLL, an application and selection process had to be developed in order to provide a holistic, transparent, unbiased and scaleable tool. The present results suggest that the application and selection process, specifically developed for the enhancement of diversity within the LLL initiative, maintained the distribution of race and gender, as constructs of diversity throughout the process. The conclusion can be drawn that the process is holistic, transparent, unbiased and scaleable while providing a practical example of a standardised alternative selection process for programmes seeking to increase diversity.

  7. GRAD-MAP: A Joint Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amy; Smith, Robyn; Wilkins, Ashlee; Jameson, Katie

    2018-01-01

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland’s Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP), builds connections between UMD and mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), and community colleges. We use seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community of undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, inclusion-minded graduate student mentors, and faculty versed in the experiences of students at MSIs and the need for changes in the fields of physics and astronomy. Now in its fifth year, GRAD-MAP remains a graduate-student-powered initiative with a three-pronged approach: 1) Fall Collaborative Seminars, 2) A Winter Workshop, and 3) A Summer Scholars Program. This coherent set of programming allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the numbers of minority students participating in astronomy and physics research (or worse, simply shuffle around students who already are or would be active in research). GRAD-MAP is committed to identifying students who are otherwise underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline, not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make substantial, sustainable efforts toward making the climate of academic physics and astronomy more inclusive to them and all other underrepresented minority students. We will describe the key elements of our program, highlight successes and lessons learned, and describe future directions for program elements. GRAD-MAP can serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion.

  8. The relationship between reproduction of the jump’s rhythm and technical score of their execution by gymnasts at the stage of initial training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zaplatynska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the interconnection between quality of performance of the jumps and reproduction of the rhythm of jumps by gymnasts at the stage of initial training. Material & Methods: to determine the relationship between reproduction of rhythm and evaluation by the quality of technique of the jumps we used expert assessment, check the accuracy of the reproduction of rhythm with the help of computer program "rhythmic", methods of mathematical statistics. Results: the study found the correlation between reproduction of rhythm and summing-up of quality the technique of jumps by the gymnasts at the stage of initial training. Conclusions: the ability to reproduce a predetermined rhythm influences the level of technical readiness of gymnasts at the stage of initial training.

  9. An entrepreneurial training model to enhance undergraduate training in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Farin; Silver, Gillian; Hohmann, Christine; Hughes-Darden, Cleo; Turner-Musa, Jocelyn; Haines, Robert Trent; Jackson, Avis; Aguila, Nelson; Sheikhattari, Payam

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students who are interested in biomedical research typically work on a faculty member's research project, conduct one distinct task (e.g., running gels), and, step by step, enhance their skills. This "apprenticeship" model has been helpful in training many distinguished scientists over the years, but it has several potential drawbacks. For example, the students have limited autonomy, and may not understand the big picture, which may result in students giving up on their goals for a research career. Also, the model is costly and may greatly depend on a single mentor. The NIH Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative has been established to fund innovative undergraduate research training programs and support institutional and faculty development of the recipient university. The training model at Morgan State University (MSU), namely " A S tudent- C entered En trepreneurship D evelopment training model" (ASCEND), is one of the 10 NIH BUILD-funded programs, and offers a novel, experimental "entrepreneurial" training approach. In the ASCEND training model, the students take the lead. They own the research, understand the big picture, and experience the entire scope of the research process, which we hypothesize will lead to a greater sense of self-efficacy and research competency, as well as an enhanced sense of science identity. They are also immersed in environments with substantial peer support, where they can exchange research ideas and share experiences. This is important for underrepresented minority students who might have fewer role models and less peer support in conducting research. In this article, we describe the MSU ASCEND entrepreneurial training model's components, rationale, and history, and how it may enhance undergraduate training in biomedical research that may be of benefit to other institutions. We also discuss evaluation methods, possible sustainability solutions, and programmatic challenges that can affect all

  10. Sexualities of Initial Teacher Education Applicants in the Republic of Ireland: Addressing the Hidden Dimension of Diversity in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Manuela; Keane, Elaine; Davison, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    While research and policy recommendations internationally have pointed to the need to diversify teaching populations with regard to ethnicity, social class background and, to a lesser extent, dis/ability, there is a paucity of research addressing sexualities as a diversity dimension in teaching. This article explores initial teacher education…

  11. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Summary: Enhancing Opportunities for Training and Retention of a Diverse Biomedical Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Lockett, Angelia; Villegas, Leah R; Almodovar, Sharilyn; Gomez, Jose L; Flores, Sonia C; Wilkes, David S; Tigno, Xenia T

    2016-04-01

    Committed to its mission of conducting and supporting research that addresses the health needs of all sectors of the nation's population, the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NHLBI/NIH) seeks to identify issues that impact the training and retention of underrepresented individuals in the biomedical research workforce. Early-stage investigators who received grant support through the NIH Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health Related Research Program were invited to a workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland in June, 2015, in order to (1) assess the effectiveness of the current NHLBI diversity program, (2) improve its strategies towards achieving its goal, and (3) provide guidance to assist the transition of diversity supplement recipients to independent NIH grant support. Workshop participants participated in five independent focus groups to discuss specific topics affecting underrepresented individuals in the biomedical sciences: (1) Socioeconomic barriers to success for diverse research scientists; (2) role of the academic research community in promoting diversity; (3) life beyond a research project grant: non-primary investigator career paths in research; (4) facilitating career development of diverse independent research scientists through NHLBI diversity programs; and (5) effectiveness of current NHLBI programs for promoting diversity of the biomedical workforce. Several key issues experienced by young, underrepresented biomedical scientists were identified, and solutions were proposed to improve on training and career development for diverse students, from the high school to postdoctoral trainee level, and address limitations of currently available diversity programs. Although some of the challenges mentioned, such as cost of living, limited parental leave, and insecure extramural funding, are also likely faced by nonminority scientists, these issues are magnified among diversity

  12. Acceptability of mental health stigma-reduction training and initial effects on awareness among military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Suzanne L; Simon-Arndt, Cynthia M; McAnany, Jennifer; Crain, Jenny A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a mental health stigma reduction toolkit and training, and the acceptability and level of stigma awareness following the stigma-reduction training for military personnel. The overall aims of the training were to provide discussion tools highlighting the experiences of Marines seeking help for stress concerns, improve communication between leaders and their Marines around the issue of help seeking, and familiarize Marines with behavioral health treatment. Senior enlisted leaders and officers (N = 52) from a Marine Corps battalion participated in a pretest, 2-h stigma-reduction training and immediate posttest. Acceptability of the training was measured by querying participants about the usefulness and helpfulness of the training among other factors, and stigma awareness was measured with 10 items about mental health stigma. The stigma-reduction training and materials were well accepted by participants. In addition, there was a significant improvement in four of ten stigma-reduction awareness concepts measured before and immediately after the training, which included an increase in agreement that mental health treatments are usually effective in reducing stress reactions [t(51) = -3.35, p = 0.002], and an increase in disagreement that seeking counseling after a deployment will jeopardize future deployments [t(51) = -3.05, p = 0.004]. Level of agreement with several statements including those regarding perceptions of invincibility, and malingering, among others, did not change significantly after the training. The stigma-reduction training containing educational and contact strategies was highly acceptable to the leaders and may have promise for initially dispelling myths associated with seeking help for stress concerns among military service members; however, results indicate that there is clearly more work to be done in combatting stigma.

  13. Training initiatives for essential obstetric care in developing countries: a 'state of the art' review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, S; Murray, S F

    2000-12-01

    Increased international awareness of the need to provide accessible essential or emergency obstetric and newborn care in developing countries has resulted in the recognition of new training needs and in a number of new initiatives to meet those needs. This paper reviews experience in this area so far. The first section deals with some of the different educational approaches and teaching methods that have now been employed, ranging from the traditional untheorized 'chalk and talk', to competency-based training, to theories of adult learning, problem solving and transferable skills. The second section describes a range of different types of indicators and data sources (learner assessments, user and community assessments, trainer assessments and institutional data) that have been used in the assessment of the effectiveness of such training. The final section of the paper draws together some of the lessons. It considers evaluation design issues such as the inclusion of medium and long term evaluation, the importance of methods that allow for the detection of iatrogenic effects of training, and the roles of community randomized trials and 'before, during and after' studies. Issues identified for the future include comparative work, how to keep training affordable, and where training ought to lie on the continuum between straightforward technical skills acquisition and the more complex learning processes required for demanding professional work.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Training Capabilities (Possible Applications in the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    The briefing provides an overview of the training capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that can be applied to nonproliferation/responsible science education at nuclear institutes in the Former Soviet Union, as part of the programmatic effort under the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program (GIPP).

  15. PERSPECTIVES OF TEACHER TRAINING AND INITIAL LITERACY IMPLIED IN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS OF MEXICO

    OpenAIRE

    Efrén Viramontes Anaya; Marivel Gutiérrez Fierro; y Luz Divina Núñez Si-fuentes

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The stage or phase of this research project is intended to perform an analysis of approaches for teacher ́s training and early literacy of current language programs in Mexico ́s teacher education. The central con-tent of the document contains the analysis of approaches of teachers ́ trai-ning and initial literacy that lie behind educational programs. The theoretical approach is supported by Pérez Gómez (1996) and in the field of literacy in Ferreiro and Teberobsky (2007) and...

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE DISCRIMINATION, EDUCATION, AND DIVERSITY TRAINING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY IN THE UNITED STATES AND THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Bahaudin G. M ujtaba; Frank J. Cavico; Albert A. Williams; Jatuporn Sungkhawan

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript explores age discrimination in employment and the challenges that managers confront in seeking to establish and maintain a legal, ethical, and productive workplace. The data regarding age and older workers comes from 218 respondents in the United States and 379 respondents in Thailand. A factor analysis was done ; and the results demonstrate that race, gender, education, country where you live the most, country where you presently live, and diversity training were statisticall...

  17. “Freedom from Jobs” or learning to love to labor? Diversity advocacy and working imaginaries in Open Technology Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Dunbar-Hester

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines imaginaries of work and labor in “open technology” projects (especially open source software and hackerspaces, based on ethnographic research in North America. It zeroes in on “diversity initiatives” within open technology projects. These initiatives are important because they expose many of the assumptions and tensions that surround participatory cultures. On the one hand, these projects and spaces are organized around voluntarism; in theory, everyone who wishes to participate is welcome to do so. On the other hand, diversity initiatives form in order to address the “problem” of imbalance in the ranks of participants. Technology is a unique domain for the discharge of political energies. In collective imagination, it has been vested with the power to initiate change (even as this belief obscures the role of social and economic relations. Multiple ideas circulate about the relationships between diversity in open technology projects and paid labor. This paper argues that in part due to the legacy of technical hobbies as training grounds for technical employment for much of the twentieth century, as documented by historians of radio (Douglas, 1987; Haring, 2006, voluntaristic technology projects are vexed sites for imagining political emancipation. To a large degree, diversity initiatives in open technology projects are consistent with corporate values of diversity as a marketplace value.  At the same time, collectivity formations around technology that incorporate feminist, antiracist, or social justice framings may begin to generate connections between diversity advocacy in tech fields and social justice movements or policy changes in order to effect deep social change. 

  18. Safety Training: "Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low Voltage - Initial" course in October

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2016-01-01

    The next session of the course "Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low Voltage - Initial" will be given, in French, from 03 to 05 October 2016.   This course is designed for anyone required to safely perform operations on electrical installations and equipment at low voltage to comply with the requirements of the NF C 18 510 standard. Grade of authorisation: B1-B1V-B2-B2V-BR-BC. There are places available. If you are interested in following this course, please fill in your EDH training request via our classroom course catalogue CTA.  

  19. Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Annex 2 To the Final Report to DG Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission. Case Study Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    "Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Annex 2 To the Final Report to DG Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission. Case Study Summaries" is designed as a companion document to the final report "Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Final…

  20. Reflective Practice and Competencies in Global Health Training: Lesson for Serving Diverse Patient Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jonathan; Goldenhar, Linda M.; Baker, Raymond C.; Kahn, Robert S.; DeWitt, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Resident interest in global health care training is growing and has been shown to have a positive effect on participants' clinical skills and cultural competency. In addition, it is associated with career choices in primary care, public health, and in the service of underserved populations. The purpose of this study was to explore, through reflective practice, how participation in a formal global health training program influences pediatric residents' perspectives when caring for diverse patient populations. Methods Thirteen pediatric and combined-program residents enrolled in a year-long Global Health Scholars Program at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center during the 2007–2008 academic year. Educational interventions included a written curriculum, a lecture series, one-on-one mentoring sessions, an experience abroad, and reflective journaling assignments. The American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene global health competencies were used as an a priori coding framework to qualitatively analyze the reflective journal entries of the residents. Results Four themes emerged from the coded journal passages from all 13 residents: (1) the burden of global disease, as a heightened awareness of the diseases that affect humans worldwide; (2) immigrant/underserved health, reflected in a desire to apply lessons learned abroad at home to provide more culturally effective care to immigrant patients in the United States; (3) parenting, or observed parental, longing to assure that their children receive health care; and (4) humanitarianism, expressed as the desire to volunteer in future humanitarian health efforts in the United States and abroad. Conclusions Our findings suggest that participating in a global health training program helped residents begin to acquire competence in the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene competency domains. Such training also may strengthen residents' acquisition of professional skills, including the

  1. USCG Diversity: Moving Beyond Training, Rules, and Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    understood meaning of the term “diversity” and suggests that true workplace diversity is not based on racial or gender representation alone...as well. It results in stereotypes and stigmatization” (Page, 2007, p. 364). When such attention is paid to race and gender as diversity markers...goal is to eliminate race inequality and gender inequality in the DfT. 88 The Gender Equality Scheme also lists departmental workforce targets

  2. Nitrogen addition, not initial phylogenetic diversity, increases litter decomposition by fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Anthony S; Matulich, Kristin L; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2015-01-01

    Fungi play a critical role in the degradation of organic matter. Because different combinations of fungi result in different rates of decomposition, determining how climate change will affect microbial composition and function is fundamental to predicting future environments. Fungal response to global change is patterned by genetic relatedness, resulting in communities with comparatively low phylogenetic diversity (PD). This may have important implications for the functional capacity of disturbed communities if lineages sensitive to disturbance also contain unique traits important for litter decomposition. Here we tested the relationship between PD and decomposition rates. Leaf litter fungi were isolated from the field and deployed in microcosms as mock communities along a gradient of initial PD, while species richness was held constant. Replicate communities were subject to nitrogen fertilization comparable to anthropogenic deposition levels. Carbon mineralization rates were measured over the course of 66 days. We found that nitrogen fertilization increased cumulative respiration by 24.8%, and that differences in respiration between fertilized and ambient communities diminished over the course of the experiment. Initial PD failed to predict respiration rates or their change in response to nitrogen fertilization, and there was no correlation between community similarity and respiration rates. Last, we detected no phylogenetic signal in the contributions of individual isolates to respiration rates. Our results suggest that the degree to which PD predicts ecosystem function will depend on environmental context.

  3. ELIXIR-UK role in bioinformatics training at the national level and across ELIXIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, L; Hendricusdottir, R; Attwood, T K; Bacall, F; Beard, N; Bellis, L J; Dunn, W B; Hancock, J M; Nenadic, A; Orengo, C; Overduin, B; Sansone, S-A; Thurston, M; Viant, M R; Winder, C L; Goble, C A; Ponting, C P; Rustici, G

    2017-01-01

    ELIXIR-UK is the UK node of ELIXIR, the European infrastructure for life science data. Since its foundation in 2014, ELIXIR-UK has played a leading role in training both within the UK and in the ELIXIR Training Platform, which coordinates and delivers training across all ELIXIR members. ELIXIR-UK contributes to the Training Platform's coordination and supports the development of training to address key skill gaps amongst UK scientists. As part of this work it acts as a conduit for nationally-important bioinformatics training resources to promote their activities to the ELIXIR community. ELIXIR-UK also leads ELIXIR's flagship Training Portal, TeSS, which collects information about a diverse range of training and makes it easily accessible to the community. ELIXIR-UK also works with others to provide key digital skills training, partnering with the Software Sustainability Institute to provide Software Carpentry training to the ELIXIR community and to establish the Data Carpentry initiative, and taking a lead role amongst national stakeholders to deliver the StaTS project - a coordinated effort to drive engagement with training in statistics.

  4. Asian network for education in nuclear technology: An initiative to promote education and training in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosilov, A.

    2006-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that there is a need to consolidate the efforts of academia and industry in education and training. Partnerships of operating organizations with educational institutions and universities that provide qualified professionals for the nuclear industry should be assessed based upon medium and long term needs and strengthened where needed. In this regard the IAEA is taking the necessary action to initiate this kind of partnership through continuous networking. The paper describes the IAEA approach to promoting education and training through the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). (author)

  5. Political Action Day: A Student-Led Initiative to Increase Health Advocacy Training Among Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbir Gill

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health advocacy is a critical aspect of the competent physician's role. It is identified as a core competency by several national physician regulatory organizations, yet few formal training programs exist. We developed an initiative to teach medical students health advocacy skills. Methods: At Political Action Day, students from Alberta medical schools lobbied the provincial government. A day of training seminars preceded Political Action Day that focused on teaching health advocacy and communication strategies. The following day, medical students met with elected representatives at the Legislative Assembly. An entry and exit survey was administered to students. Results: On October 26-27th, 2008, 40 students met with 38/83 (46% elected representatives including the Minister of Health and Wellness. Feedback from students and politicians suggests the event was effective in teaching advocacy skills. This initiative inspired students to be politically active in the future. Conclusions: Political Action Day helps fulfill the health advocacy competency objectives, and requires minimal curriculum time and resources for integration. It is an effective tool to begin teaching advocacy, and should be further expanded and replicated at other Canadian medical schools.

  6. Changes in cortisol release and heart rate and heart rate variability during the initial training of 3-year-old sport horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alice; Aurich, Jörg; Möstl, Erich; Müller, Jürgen; Aurich, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Based on cortisol release, a variety of situations to which domestic horses are exposed have been classified as stressors but studies on the stress during equestrian training are limited. In the present study, Warmblood stallions (n=9) and mares (n=7) were followed through a 9 respective 12-week initial training program in order to determine potentially stressful training steps. Salivary cortisol concentrations, beat-to-beat (RR) interval and heart rate variability (HRV) were determined. The HRV variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR), RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR differences) and the geometric means standard deviation 1 (SD1) and 2 (SD2) were calculated. Nearly each training unit was associated with an increase in salivary cortisol concentrations (pHRV variables SDRR, RMSSD and SD1 decreased in response to training and lowest values were reached during mounting of a rider (pHRV variables increased again. In contrast, SD2 increased with the beginning of lunging (p<0.05) and no changes in response to mounting were detectable. In conclusion, initial training is a stressor for horses. The most pronounced reaction occurred in response to mounting by a rider, a situation resembling a potentially lethal threat under natural conditions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoscopic Urinary Diversion As Initial Management of Symptomatic Obstructive Ectopic Ureter in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Ortiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AimDefinitive surgery of ectopic ureter in infants is challenging. We propose an endoscopic urinary diversion (EUD as a novel surgical technique in the initial management of symptomatic obstructive ectopic ureter.Patients and methodsSixteen obstructive ectopic ureters (14 patients were initially treated by EUD between 2006 and 2015. All patients had urinary tract dilatation worsening at preoperative US scans and at least two febrile urinary tract infection (UTI or urinary sepsis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Ectopic ureter was confirmed by cystoscopy. When ectopic meatus was not found, EUD consisted in the creation of a transurethral neo-orifice (TUNO performed by needle puncturing of the ureterovesical wall, under fluoroscopic and ultrasound control. If ectopic meatus was identified in the posterior urethra, “intravesicalization procedure” was done opening the urethral–ureteral wall to create a new ureteral outlet into the bladder.ResultsEUD was done at a median age of 3.5 months (0.5–7 with median follow-up of 48 months (24–136. TUNO was performed in six patients and “intravesicalization” in eight patients. Significant differences were observed in ureteral diameter and anteroposterior pelvis diameter before and after endoscopic treatment (p < 0.005. Initial renal function was preserved in all cases. Postoperative complications were UTI in four patients and TUNO stenosis in one patient, treated by endoscopic balloon dilation. Definitive treatment was further individualized in each patient after 1 year of life.ConclusionEUD is a feasible and safe less-invasive technique in the initial management of symptomatic obstructive ectopic ureter. It allows an adequate ureteral drainage preserving renal function until definitive repair if necessary and does not invalidate other surgical options in case of failure or future definitive treatments.

  8. The Philosophy humanist ethics training of the General Practitioner in the initial training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Rojas-Baso

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects on the role of Philosophy in the ethical and humanistic education in the teaching-learning process of the formation of the General Practitioner associated with the training project Educational Strategy medical ethical humanist on theoretical basis of the development of doctoral research addresses the same issue in which the authors are part of their coordination and membership. It is oriented objective: to reveal the fundamentals of Philosophy humanist ethics training in the training of the General Practitioner, their relationship with the general methodological guidance. Instrumentation methods as this work is specified in the method of theoretical systematization and logical historical. The reasoning is oriented to the determination of results in terms of theoretical basis of the ethical and humanistic training valid for use in improving vocational.

  9. Cultural diversity: do we need a new wake-up call for parent training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Camilo; Del Vecchio, Tamara

    2013-09-01

    In 1996, Forehand and Kotchick concluded that parent-training (PT) interventions largely ignored cultural influences on parenting behavior. They reasoned that the failure to integrate the influence of ethnicity into theories of parenting behavior could result in culturally biased and less effective interventions. The present article addresses whether their "wake-up call" went unheard. We review research on PT treatment studies and examine (a) the rate of inclusion of ethnic minority parents in PT research, (b) the effectiveness of PT across ethnic groups, and (c) the effectiveness of culturally adapted PT interventions. Results show that there has been an increase in the ethnic diversity of PT treatment studies over the past three decades, yet only one methodologically sound study directly examined ethnicity as a moderator of PT treatment outcome. Despite the paucity of evidence that ethnicity is a moderator of parent-training outcomes, a number of culturally adapted PT treatments have been developed. These adapted interventions have rarely been tested against the unadapted interventions on which they are based. The results fail to support the current emphasis on ethnicity in efforts to improve the effectiveness of PT. We present methodological and conceptual limitations in the existing literature and provide recommendations for researchers studying the effects of ethnicity on PT outcomes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Take action: influence diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Norma J

    2013-01-01

    Increased diversity brings strength to nursing and ANNA. Being a more diverse association will require all of us working together. There is an old proverb that says: "one hand cannot cover the sky; it takes many hands." ANNA needs every one of its members to be a part of the diversity initiative.

  11. Education and training initiatives for crisis management in the European Union: a web-based analysis of available programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Foletti, Marco; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Scarone, Piercarlo; Ragazzoni, Luca; Corte, Francesco Della; Kaptan, Kubilay; Lupescu, Olivera; Arculeo, Chris; von Arnim, Gotz; Friedl, Tom; Ashkenazi, Michael; Heselmann, Deike; Hreckovski, Boris; Khorram-Manesh, Amir; Khorrram-Manesh, Amir; Komadina, Radko; Lechner, Kostanze; Patru, Cristina; Burkle, Frederick M; Fisher, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Education and training are key elements of disaster management. Despite national and international educational programs in disaster management, there is no standardized curriculum available to guide the European Union (EU) member states. European- based Disaster Training Curriculum (DITAC), a multiple university-based project financially supported by the EU, is charged with developing a holistic and highly-structured curriculum and courses for responders and crisis managers at a strategic and tactical level. The purpose of this study is to qualitatively assess the prevailing preferences and characteristics of disaster management educational and training initiatives (ETIs) at a postgraduate level that currently exist in the EU countries. An Internet-based qualitative search was conducted in 2012 to identify and analyze the current training programs in disaster management. The course characteristics were evaluated for curriculum, teaching methods, modality of delivery, target groups, and funding. The literature search identified 140 ETIs, the majority (78%) located in United Kingdom, France, and Germany. Master level degrees were the primary certificates granted to graduates. Face-to-face education was the most common teaching method (84%). Approximately 80% of the training initiatives offered multi- and cross-disciplinary disaster management content. A competency-based approach to curriculum content was present in 61% of the programs. Emergency responders at the tactical level were the main target group. Almost all programs were self-funded. Although ETIs currently exist, they are not broadly available in all 27 EU countries. Also, the curricula do not cover all key elements of disaster management in a standardized and competency-based structure. This study has identified the need to develop a standardized competency-based educational and training program for all European countries that will ensure the practice and policies that meet both the standards of care and

  12. A mental health first aid training program for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: description and initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanowski, Len G; Jorm, Anthony F; Hart, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Background Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training was developed in Australia to teach members of the public how to give initial help to someone developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis situation. However, this type of training requires adaptation for specific cultural groups in the community. This paper describes the adaptation of the program to create an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health First Aid (AMHFA) course and presents an initial evaluation of its uptake and acceptability. Methods To evaluate the program, two types of data were collected: (1) quantitative data on uptake of the course (number of Instructors trained and courses subsequently run by these Instructors); (2) qualitative data on strengths, weaknesses and recommendations for the future derived from interviews with program staff and focus groups with Instructors and community participants. Results 199 Aboriginal people were trained as Instructors in a five day Instructor Training Course. With sufficient time following training, the majority of these Instructors subsequently ran 14-hour AMHFA courses for Aboriginal people in their community. Instructors were more likely to run courses if they had prior teaching experience and if there was post-course contact with one of the Trainers of Instructors. Analysis of qualitative data indicated that the Instructor Training Course and the AMHFA course are culturally appropriate, empowering for Aboriginal people, and provided information that was seen as highly relevant and important in assisting Aboriginal people with a mental illness. There were a number of recommendations for improvements. Conclusion The AMHFA program is culturally appropriate and acceptable to Aboriginal people. Further work is needed to refine the course and to evaluate its impact on help provided to Aboriginal people with mental health problems. PMID:19490648

  13. New program of initial training for staff of engineering ANAV The training required for a particular job in ANAV is divided into three sections; Nuevo programa de formacion inicial para el personal de ingenieria en ANAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Rabasa, D.

    2013-07-01

    - Common Primary Education - Initial training specific job - Training in the workplace For engineering has detected an area for improvement in the described model, consisting of providing the initial formation of a common engineering approach rather than the current operational approach. In preparing this plan takes into account the INPO standards, a functional analysis of the different jobs, the managers and supervisors of the observations and feedback from students, among others.

  14. Diversity Initiatives in Higher Education: Just How Important "Is" Diversity in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Diversity in educational settings is generally understood as the body of services and programs offered to students, faculty, and staff that seek to ensure compliance with non-discrimination and related policy and law, and to affirm social membership group differences (broadly considered) in curricular, co-curricular, and workplace contexts. Given…

  15. Initial Teacher Training: The French View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoake, John

    1993-01-01

    Discusses recent, radical reforms in France's preservice teacher education introduced by a socialist government within a changing political, economic, and educational climate. The paper examines the European context, history of France's teacher education, teacher training before recent reforms, current reforms, subject versus professional…

  16. Openness to diversity, trust and conflict in multicultural organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    with group trust. The findings of this study suggest that openness to diversity should be highly prioritized by human resource managers in demographically diverse organizations. Possible interventions include organizational culture change programs, diversity training at individual and team levels as well...

  17. Effects of perceptual training on the identification and production of word-Initial voiceless stops by argentinean learners of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubiratã Kickhöfel Alves

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the effectiveness of perceptual training, administered to Argentinean learners, in the perception and production of word-initial voiceless stops in English. 24 participants were divided into 3 groups: (i Group 1, which participated in 3 training sessions; (ii Group 2, which, besides performing the same training tasks, was explicitly informed about the target item; (iii Group 3 (control. All participants took part in a pre-test, a post-test and a delayed post-test. In all these phases, they participated in a consonant identification task and took part in a reading exercise. Our results show a significant increase of both experimental groups in identification. As for production, Group 2 exhibited a significant increase in /p/ and /t/ after training. These results are indicative of the effectiveness of perceptual training tasks in helping learners focus on Voice Onset Time.

  18. Self-initiated expatriates' cross-cultural training and adjustment: a closer look at norwegian engineers : what kind of cross cultural training does self-initiated expatriate engineers in Norway receive and does this affect their cross cultural adjustment? Are the theories related to company expatriates applicable?

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten, Mona Skogseid

    2014-01-01

    Masteroppgave i økonomi og administrasjon – Universitetet i Agder 2014 Today many people move on their own initiative to foreign countries to work as a result of increased globalization and human mobility. At arrival in the new culture the self-initiated expatriate m meet a culture that might be different from what they are used too. Cross-cultural training can provide the expatriates with tools and information that can enable the self-initiated expatriates to more easily adjust. This ...

  19. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were…

  20. Students' perceived importance of diversity exposure and training in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Karen F; Whitehead, Albert W; Close, John M; Kaplan, Alan L

    2004-03-01

    Intercultural competence is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship in the multicultural climate evolving in the United States. We hypothesized that 1) exposure to racial and ethnic diversity in the student body, faculty, staff, and patient population in dental school and 2) a dental school curriculum that includes presentations on issues concerning racial and ethnic diversity will contribute to students' feeling more competent and confident to enter the multicultural work environment that is rapidly developing in the United States. A Likert-type scale questionnaire was administered to 627 fourth-year dental students enrolled in seven dental schools representing geographically diverse regions of the United States. Of these, 376 questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 60 percent. Results indicated that both the perception of diversity in the school environment and the presentation of diversity-specific content in the curriculum had moderately positive and significant correlations with the students' perception of their competency or ability to serve and work with diverse populations. The respective Pearson correlation coefficients for diversity in the school environment and diversity curriculum were .497 (ptraining in the dental school environment are important for dental students entering a multicultural workplace.

  1. Educating and training industrial ecologists for the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxell, D E

    1992-02-01

    For industrial ecology to become a reality and flourish, many talents must be integrated into a single system. Basically, there are four types of technologists who must be brought together to create a system: (i) technical specialists-those that can take the state of knowledge to the state of the art and eventually to the state of practice; (ii) technical "generalists"-those that can integrate diverse technologies into a comprehensive solution; (iii) technical managers-those that can lead technical efforts to an optimal solution (these people must have management skills in their area); and (iv) program managers-those that can understand and merge the overall efforts of technology, business, schedule, and finance. The initial questions for industrial ecology in the 1990s are: Do these people presently exist in industry? What will be needed to bring new people (recent graduates) into the field of industrial ecology? For this decade, the people who will develop and lead the concept of industrial ecology are presently in industry. However, certainly few, if any, today understand the concept of industrial ecology as a system issue. Training will be needed for these practitioners of the 1990s so that the overall goal and the mechanism for achieving industrial ecology are understood. A three-tiered approach is presented to define the education/training needed, to conduct training on an industry basis, and then to initiate the training to be done within a corporation. The three tiers propose the use of universities, professional societies, and industry groups. Having universities participate in the training of the 1990s industrial ecologists will give universities insight to the development of industrial ecology, and access to industry needs so that curriculum can be initiated to educate the industrial ecologists of the future.

  2. Diversity as strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David A

    2004-09-01

    IBM's turnaround in the last decade is an impressive and well-documented business story. But behind that success is a less told people story, which explains how the corporation dramatically altered its already diverse composition and created millions of dollars in new business. By the time Lou Gerstner took the helm in 1993, IBM had a long history of progressive management when it came to civil rights and equal-opportunity employment. But Gerstner felt IBM wasn't taking full advantage of a diverse market for talent, nor was it maximizing the potential of its diverse customer and employee base. So in 1995, he launched a diversity task force initiative to uncover and understand differences among people within the organization and find ways to appeal to an even broader set of employees and customers. Gerstner established a task force for each of eight constituencies: Asians; blacks; the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered community; Hispanics; white men; Native Americans; people with disabilities; and women. He asked the task forces to research four questions: What does your constituency need to feel welcome and valued at IBM? What can the corporation do, in partnership with your group, to maximize your constituency's productivity? What can the corporation do to influence your constituency's buying decisions so that IBM is seen as a preferred solution provider? And with which external organizations should IBM form relationships to better understand the needs of your constituency? The answers to these questions became the basis for IBM's diversity strategy. Thomas stresses that four factors are key to implementing any major change initiative: strong support from company leaders, an employee base that is fully engaged with the initiative, management practices that are integrated and aligned with the effort, and a strong and well-articulated business case for action. All four elements have helped IBM make diversity a key corporate strategy tied to real growth.

  3. Relationship between Air Traffic Selection and Training (AT-SAT)) Battery Test Scores and Composite Scores in the Initial en Route Air Traffic Control Qualification Training Course at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ronald Scott

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study focused on the development and use of the AT-SAT test battery and the Initial En Route Qualification training course for the selection, training, and evaluation of air traffic controller candidates. The Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was used to measure the linear relationship between the…

  4. Chapter 5: Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 5 presents the 1) initial training; 2) periodic training, which includes: a) periodic training for employees at lower levels of the hierarchy than that of the operator; b) period training for operators; 3) operator training; 4) record of training; 5) safety culture.

  5. Making cultural differences matter? : Diversity perspectives in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Gürkan Çelik; Menno Vos; Sjiera de Vries

    2016-01-01

    The higher education sector has become increasingly aware of how the increasing diversity in society affects their institutions. The student population has become more diverse and future employers increasingly require trained students who are able to meet the demands of dealing with a more diverse

  6. The White House BRAIN Initiative has the potential to further strengthen multidisciplinary research and training in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flattau, Pamela

    2014-12-01

    Comments on the original article by Robiner et al. (see record 2014-07939-001) regarding psychologists in medical schools and academic medical center settings. The current authors also discuss how to advance training in psychology using the Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. NRC influences on nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    NRC influences on utility training programs through prescriptive requirements and evaluation of industry self-initiatives are discussed. NRC regulation and industry initiatives are complimentary and in some instances industry initiatives are replacing NRC requirements. Controls and feedback mechanisms designed to enhance positive NRC influences and minimize or eliminate negative influences are discussed. Industry and NRC efforts to reach an acceptable mix between regulator oversight and self-initiatives by the industry are recognized. Problem areas for continued cooperation to enhance training and minimize conflicting signals to industry are discussed. These areas include: requalification examination scope and content, depth of training and examination on emergency procedures; improved learning objectives as the basis for training and examination, and severe accident training

  8. The Relationship of a Pilot's Educational Background, Aeronautical Experience and Recency of Experience to Performance In Initial Training at a Regional Airline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Nancy R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a pilot's educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience relate to their performance during initial training at a regional airline. Results show that variables in pilots' educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience do predict performance in training. The most significant predictors include years since graduation from college, multi-engine time, total time and whether or not a pilot had military flying experience. Due to the pilot shortage, the pilots entering regional airline training classes since August 2013 have varied backgrounds, aeronautical experience and recency of experience. As explained by Edward Thorndike's law of exercise and the law of recency, pilots who are actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit strong performance in those areas and pilots who have not been actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit degraded performance in those areas. Through correlation, chi-square and multiple regression analysis, this study tests this theory as it relates to performance in initial training at a regional airline.

  9. Implementing guidelines and training initiatives to improve cross-cultural communication in primary care consultations: a qualitative participatory European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, E.; Gravenhorst, K.; Dowrick, C.; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Driessen Mareeuw, F.A. van den; Brun, T. de; Burns, N.; Lionis, C.; Mair, F.S.; O'Donnell, C.; O'Reilly-de Brún, M.P.; Papadakaki, M.; Saridaki, A.; Spiegel, W.; Weel, C. van; Muijsenbergh, M.E.T.C. van den; Macfarlane, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-cultural communication in primary care is often difficult, leading to unsatisfactory, substandard care. Supportive evidence-based guidelines and training initiatives (G/TIs) exist to enhance cross cultural communication but their use in practice is sporadic. The objective of this

  10. Innovative Educational Initiatives to Train Psychodynamic Psychiatrists in Underserved Areas of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, César A; Michael, Marco Christian; Elvira, Sylvia Detri; Zakaria, Hazli; Kalayasiri, Rasmon; Adlan, Aida Syarinaz A; Moinalghorabaei, Mahdieh; Lukman, Petrin Redayani; San'ati, Mohammad; Duchonova, Katerina; Sullivan, Timothy B

    2018-06-01

    Psychodynamic psychiatry remains a challenging subject to teach in underserved areas, where enthusiasm to learn is substantial. Besides logistical and psychiatric workforce shortcomings, sensible cultural adaptations to make psychodynamic psychiatry relevant outside of high-income countries require creative effort. Innovative pedagogical methods that include carefully crafted mentoring and incorporate videoconferencing in combination with site visits can be implemented through international collaborations. Emphasis on mentoring is essential to adequately train future psychodynamic psychotherapy supervisors. Examples of World Psychiatric Association initiatives in countries such as Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, and Thailand are presented as possible models to emulate elsewhere. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differentiation, context and teacher education: the changing profile of trainees on in-service initial teacher training programmes in the lifelong learning sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of initial teacher training (ITT student data relating to the University of Huddersfield part-time in-service Cert Ed/PGCE over a three-year period has revealed significant change in the make-up of trainee cohorts. There has been an increase in younger trainees and in trainees very new to teaching, although more experienced and older trainees do continue to enrol. There has also been a considerable shift in the balance of trainees away from further education (FE college staff. These changes have implications for those who manage and deliver teacher education for the sector. It remains of key importance that the curriculum is not experienced as overly ‘FE-college centric’ and that mentoring arrangements acknowledge the needs of trainees from diverse contexts. It is clear that in the delivery of ITT for the lifelong learning sector, increasingly, one size will not comfortably fit all. Within teacher education much emphasis is placed upon the role of differentiation in regard to trainee practice. The changing trainee profile identified requires that teacher education itself unambiguously models a differentiated approach – and, in relation to teacher education for the lifelong learning sector, differentiation must address workplace context.

  12. The influence of Tai Chi training on the center of pressure trajectory during gait initiation in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Chris J; Gregor, Robert J; Waddell, Dwight E; Oliver, Alanna; Smith, Dagan W; Fleming, Richard P; Wolf, Steven L

    2004-10-01

    To determine if a program of intense Tai Chi exercise that has been shown to reduce the risk of falling in older adults improves postural control by altering the center of pressure (COP) trajectory during gait initiation. Before-after trial. Biomechanics research laboratory. Twenty-eight older adults transitioning to frailty who participated in either a 48-week intervention of intense Tai Chi training or a wellness education (WE) program. Eight Tai Chi forms emphasizing trunk rotation, weight shifting, coordination, and narrowing of lower-extremity stance were taught twice weekly. WE program participants met once a week and received lectures focused on health. Main outcome measures The COP was recorded during gait initiation both before and after the 48-week intervention by using a forceplate sampling at 300 Hz. The COP trajectory was divided into 3 periods (S1, S2, S3) by identifying 2 landmark events. Displacement and average velocity of the COP trace in the anteroposterior (x) and mediolateral (y) directions, as well as smoothness, were calculated. Tai Chi training increased the posterior displacement of the COP during S1 and improved the smoothness of the COP during S2. Tai Chi improved the mechanism by which forward momentum is generated and improved coordination during gait initiation, suggesting improvements in postural control.

  13. Overcoming the Barriers of Distance: Using Mobile Technology to Facilitate Moderation and Best Practice in Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggatt, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes the development process of a model using readily-available technology to facilitate collaboration, moderation and the dissemination of best practice in initial teacher training in the UK. Students, mentors, tutors and external examiners from a number of educational institutions in a UK, higher education-led Lifelong…

  14. Diversity management: the treatment of HIV-positive employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Matthew H T; Ineson, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-01

    Socio-demographic dimensions such as age, gender, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity are commonly included in diversity studies. With a view to helping Asian hospitality managers to manage HIV-positive employees in their workplaces through diversity management (DM) theory, this research extends the boundaries of previous diversity studies by considering Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection as a diverse characteristic. Both quantitative and qualitative primary data were collected from purposively selected Asian hospitality managers through postal questionnaire and follow-up telephone interviews. Transformed raw data were analysed using summary statistics and template analysis. Asian hospitality managers agreed that DM would be appropriate in the management of HIV-positive employees and that it could generate substantial benefits for employees and employers. However, they believe that the successful adoption and implementation of DM is not easy; it requires training and, ideally, the recruitment of experienced directors. Nevertheless, Asian hospitality managers are confident that implementing DM to manage HIV-positive employees can enhance tolerance, improve understanding and promote equality. The purposive sampling technique and the small number of respondents have impacted the external validity of the study. However, this exploratory study initiates an equality discussion to include HIV-positive employees in DM discourse beyond antidiscrimination legislation. It also supplements the sparse literature addressing HIV-positive employees in the Asian hospitality workplace. Asian hospitality managers are advised to understand and employ DM to treat HIV-positive employees fairly to overcome hospitality workplace marginalisation, discrimination and stigmatisation.

  15. Addressing the challenge of diversity in the graduate ranks: good practices yield good outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy L; Campbell, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the impact of implementing three systemic practices on the diversity and institutional culture in biomedical and public health PhD training at Brown University. We hypothesized that these practices, designed as part of the National Institutes of Health-funded Initiative to Maximize Student Development (IMSD) program in the Division of Biology and Medicine, would have a positive effect on underrepresented minority (URM) recruitment and retention and objective measures of student success. These practices include: 1) develop strategic partnerships with selected undergraduate institutions; 2) provide a personalized education program of student support and skill-based modules to supplement discipline-based course work; and 3) transform institutional culture by engaging faculty in supporting diversity-related goals and practices. Data comparing URM numbers and key academic milestones before and after implementation of IMSD practices support the initial hypothesis and effectiveness of these practices at Brown. Program components are broadly applicable as best practices for others seeking to improve URM recruitment and achievements of graduate students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences.

  16. Diverse Portfolio of Scientific Instrumentation Initiatives of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffries, Craig; Hazen, Robert; Hemley, Russell; Mangum, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Advances in scientific instrumentation are important drivers of scientific discovery. The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) supports a diverse portfolio of scientific instrumentation initiatives worldwide as part of its ten-year quest to achieve a transformational understanding of the quantities, movements, origins, and forms of Earth's deep carbon. Substantial progress has been made in the development of a wide range of instruments, including: • Quantum cascade laser-infrared absorption spectrometer for clumped methane isotope thermometry (Shuhei Ono) • Large-radius high-mass-resolution multiple-collector isotope ratio mass spectrometer for analysis of rare isotopologues of methane and other gases (Edward Young, Douglas Rumble) • Volcanic field deployment of the laser isotope ratio-meter (Damien Weidmann) • Novel large-volume diamond anvil cell for neutron scattering (Malcolm Guthrie, Reinhard Boehler) • Novel synchrotron x-ray probes for deep carbon (Wendy Mao) • Ultrafast laser instrument for in situ measurements of elastic, electronic, and transport properties of carbon-bearing fluids and crystalline materials (Alexander Goncharov) • Combined instrument for molecular imaging in geochemistry (Andrew Steele) • Pressurized Underwater Sample Handler (Isabelle Daniel, Karyn Rogers) These and other DCO instrumentation projects are highly leveraged investments involving a large number of sponsors, partners, and collaborators.

  17. A summarization approach for Affymetrix GeneChip data using a reference training set from a large, biologically diverse database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripputi Mark

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the most popular pre-processing methods for Affymetrix expression arrays, such as RMA, gcRMA, and PLIER, simultaneously analyze data across a set of predetermined arrays to improve precision of the final measures of expression. One problem associated with these algorithms is that expression measurements for a particular sample are highly dependent on the set of samples used for normalization and results obtained by normalization with a different set may not be comparable. A related problem is that an organization producing and/or storing large amounts of data in a sequential fashion will need to either re-run the pre-processing algorithm every time an array is added or store them in batches that are pre-processed together. Furthermore, pre-processing of large numbers of arrays requires loading all the feature-level data into memory which is a difficult task even with modern computers. We utilize a scheme that produces all the information necessary for pre-processing using a very large training set that can be used for summarization of samples outside of the training set. All subsequent pre-processing tasks can be done on an individual array basis. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by defining a new version of the Robust Multi-chip Averaging (RMA algorithm which we refer to as refRMA. Results We assess performance based on multiple sets of samples processed over HG U133A Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays. We show that the refRMA workflow, when used in conjunction with a large, biologically diverse training set, results in the same general characteristics as that of RMA in its classic form when comparing overall data structure, sample-to-sample correlation, and variation. Further, we demonstrate that the refRMA workflow and reference set can be robustly applied to naïve organ types and to benchmark data where its performance indicates respectable results. Conclusion Our results indicate that a biologically diverse

  18. The Innovations on teachers’ initial training in relation to values education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Peiró i Gregòri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Educating in values is a means to achieve the students’ maturity (self-control. This is an unfinished process and it requires to progress in Educational Theory, namely: innovation. To explain and define this premise, the following aspects are addressed. First, situating ourselves in the sociocultural innovational context of educational system. Then, to inquire, from a comparative view, about the relevant model for innovation in teacher education, respect to enable them to address the educational values in their professional tasks. As here we are offering an experience, it displays the criteria underpinning our model with an innovative style. After, We turn to explain the mode of how the innovation fits in the course "Theory and history of education" for the initial training of teachers. Inserts in the 'Bologna model' development, this article explains how to establish the teaching relationship with University students. Finally we proposed pedagogical requirements.

  19. Trait variation and genetic diversity in a banana genomic selection training population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyine, Moses; Uwimana, Brigitte; Swennen, Rony; Batte, Michael; Brown, Allan; Christelová, Pavla; Hřibová, Eva; Lorenzen, Jim

    2017-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important crop in the African Great Lakes region in terms of income and food security, with the highest per capita consumption worldwide. Pests, diseases and climate change hamper sustainable production of bananas. New breeding tools with increased crossbreeding efficiency are being investigated to breed for resistant, high yielding hybrids of East African Highland banana (EAHB). These include genomic selection (GS), which will benefit breeding through increased genetic gain per unit time. Understanding trait variation and the correlation among economically important traits is an essential first step in the development and selection of suitable GS models for banana. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that trait variations in bananas are not affected by cross combination, cycle, field management and their interaction with genotype. A training population created using EAHB breeding material and its progeny was phenotyped in two contrasting conditions. A high level of correlation among vegetative and yield related traits was observed. Therefore, genomic selection models could be developed for traits that are easily measured. It is likely that the predictive ability of traits that are difficult to phenotype will be similar to less difficult traits they are highly correlated with. Genotype response to cycle and field management practices varied greatly with respect to traits. Yield related traits accounted for 31–35% of principal component variation under low and high input field management conditions. Resistance to Black Sigatoka was stable across cycles but varied under different field management depending on the genotype. The best cross combination was 1201K-1xSH3217 based on selection response (R) of hybrids. Genotyping using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers revealed that the training population was genetically diverse, reflecting a complex pedigree background, which was mostly influenced by the male parents. PMID:28586365

  20. Trait variation and genetic diversity in a banana genomic selection training population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Nyine

    Full Text Available Banana (Musa spp. is an important crop in the African Great Lakes region in terms of income and food security, with the highest per capita consumption worldwide. Pests, diseases and climate change hamper sustainable production of bananas. New breeding tools with increased crossbreeding efficiency are being investigated to breed for resistant, high yielding hybrids of East African Highland banana (EAHB. These include genomic selection (GS, which will benefit breeding through increased genetic gain per unit time. Understanding trait variation and the correlation among economically important traits is an essential first step in the development and selection of suitable GS models for banana. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that trait variations in bananas are not affected by cross combination, cycle, field management and their interaction with genotype. A training population created using EAHB breeding material and its progeny was phenotyped in two contrasting conditions. A high level of correlation among vegetative and yield related traits was observed. Therefore, genomic selection models could be developed for traits that are easily measured. It is likely that the predictive ability of traits that are difficult to phenotype will be similar to less difficult traits they are highly correlated with. Genotype response to cycle and field management practices varied greatly with respect to traits. Yield related traits accounted for 31-35% of principal component variation under low and high input field management conditions. Resistance to Black Sigatoka was stable across cycles but varied under different field management depending on the genotype. The best cross combination was 1201K-1xSH3217 based on selection response (R of hybrids. Genotyping using simple sequence repeat (SSR markers revealed that the training population was genetically diverse, reflecting a complex pedigree background, which was mostly influenced by the male parents.

  1. Trait variation and genetic diversity in a banana genomic selection training population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyine, Moses; Uwimana, Brigitte; Swennen, Rony; Batte, Michael; Brown, Allan; Christelová, Pavla; Hřibová, Eva; Lorenzen, Jim; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important crop in the African Great Lakes region in terms of income and food security, with the highest per capita consumption worldwide. Pests, diseases and climate change hamper sustainable production of bananas. New breeding tools with increased crossbreeding efficiency are being investigated to breed for resistant, high yielding hybrids of East African Highland banana (EAHB). These include genomic selection (GS), which will benefit breeding through increased genetic gain per unit time. Understanding trait variation and the correlation among economically important traits is an essential first step in the development and selection of suitable GS models for banana. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that trait variations in bananas are not affected by cross combination, cycle, field management and their interaction with genotype. A training population created using EAHB breeding material and its progeny was phenotyped in two contrasting conditions. A high level of correlation among vegetative and yield related traits was observed. Therefore, genomic selection models could be developed for traits that are easily measured. It is likely that the predictive ability of traits that are difficult to phenotype will be similar to less difficult traits they are highly correlated with. Genotype response to cycle and field management practices varied greatly with respect to traits. Yield related traits accounted for 31-35% of principal component variation under low and high input field management conditions. Resistance to Black Sigatoka was stable across cycles but varied under different field management depending on the genotype. The best cross combination was 1201K-1xSH3217 based on selection response (R) of hybrids. Genotyping using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers revealed that the training population was genetically diverse, reflecting a complex pedigree background, which was mostly influenced by the male parents.

  2. Lay Patient Navigators' Perspectives of Barriers, Facilitators and Training Needs in Initiating Advance Care Planning Conversations With Older Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Soumya J; Huang, Chao-Hui S; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Halilova, Karina I; Pisu, Maria; Drentea, Patricia; Kvale, Elizabeth A; Bevis, Kerri S; Butler, Thomas W; Partridge, Edward E; Rocque, Gabrielle B

    2018-04-01

    Respecting Choices is an evidence-based model of facilitating advance care planning (ACP) conversations between health-care professionals and patients. However, the effectiveness of whether lay patient navigators can successfully initiate Respecting Choices ACP conversations is unknown. As part of a large demonstration project (Patient Care Connect [PCC]), a cohort of lay patient navigators underwent Respecting Choices training and were tasked to initiate ACP conversations with Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with cancer. This article explores PCC lay navigators' perceived barriers and facilitators in initiating Respecting Choices ACP conversations with older patients with cancer in order to inform implementation enhancements to lay navigator-facilitated ACP. Twenty-six lay navigators from 11 PCC cancer centers in 4 states (Alabama, George, Tennessee, and Florida) completed in-depth, one-on-one semistructured interviews between June 2015 and August 2015. Data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. This evaluation identifies 3 levels-patient, lay navigator, and organizational factors in addition to training needs that influence ACP implementation. Key facilitators included physician buy-in, patient readiness, and navigators' prior experience with end-of-life decision-making. Lay navigators' perceived challenges to initiating ACP conversations included timing of the conversation and social and personal taboos about discussing dying. Our results suggest that further training and health system support are needed for lay navigators playing a vital role in improving the implementation of ACP among older patients with cancer. The lived expertise of lay navigators along with flexible longitudinal relationships with patients and caregivers may uniquely position this workforce to promote ACP.

  3. Managing Protean Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marfelt, Mikkel Mouritz; Muhr, Sara Louise

    2016-01-01

    Recently, global workforce diversity and its management have received criticism for not paying attention to the contextual influence stemming from socially constructed dialectics of power and politics. These contextual dynamics, however, tend to be viewed as external to the organization....... In this article, we follow the call for critically investigating the contexts influencing diversity management by analyzing the development of a global human resource management project initiated to promote a culturally diverse workforce. We find that despite good intentions, as well as support from the top...... management, the project dissolves through micropolitics and power dynamics. We contribute to the critical literature on workforce diversity by identifying how organizational contextual dynamics influence the way the concept of workforce diversity is constructed and understood at work. Based on these findings...

  4. Reduction in Blood Culture Contamination Through Use of Initial Specimen Diversion Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Mark E; Cavalieri, R Jennifer; Marolf, Cole; Lyden, Elizabeth

    2017-07-15

    Blood culture contamination is a clinically significant problem that results in patient harm and excess cost. In a prospective, controlled trial at an academic center Emergency Department, a device that diverts and sequesters the initial 1.5-2 mL portion of blood (which presumably carries contaminating skin cells and microbes) was tested against standard phlebotomy procedures in patients requiring blood cultures due to clinical suspicion of serious infection. In sum, 971 subjects granted informed consent and were enrolled resulting in 904 nonduplicative subjects with 1808 blood cultures. Blood culture contamination was significantly reduced through use of the initial specimen diversion device™ (ISDD) compared to standard procedure: (2/904 [0.22%] ISDD vs 16/904 [1.78%] standard practice, P = .001). Sensitivity was not compromised: true bacteremia was noted in 65/904 (7.2%) ISDD vs 69/904 (7.6%) standard procedure, P = .41. No needlestick injuries or potential bloodborne pathogen exposures were reported. The monthly rate of blood culture contamination for all nurse-drawn and phlebotomist-drawn blood cultures was modeled using Poisson regression to compare the 12-month intervention period to the 6 month before and after periods. Phlebotomists (used the ISDD) experienced a significant decrease in blood culture contamination while the nurses (did not use the ISDD) did not. In sum, 73% of phlebotomists completed a post-study anonymous survey and widespread user satisfaction was noted. Use of the ISDD was associated with a significant decrease in blood culture contamination in patients undergoing blood cultures in an Emergency Department setting. NCT02102087. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Reaching Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Young Learners with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Susanne D.; Ames, Margery E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes how cross-over training and a whole-school approach help preschool educators assist disabled students who have not yet acquired their native language, examining New York's English-as-a Second-Language/Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Training Program for Pre-K Special Education Personnel, which trains preschool personnel to meet…

  6. Psychiatry training in the United Kingdom--part 2: the training process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, N; Kasiakogia, K

    2015-01-01

    In the second part of this diptych, we shall deal with psychiatric training in the United Kingdom in detail, and we will compare it--wherever this is meaningful--with the equivalent system in Greece. As explained in the first part of the paper, due to the recently increased emigration of Greek psychiatrists and psychiatric trainees, and the fact that the United Kingdom is a popular destination, it has become necessary to inform those aspiring to train in the United Kingdom of the system and the circumstances they should expect to encounter. This paper principally describes the structure of the United Kingdom's psychiatric training system, including the different stages trainees progress through and their respective requirements and processes. Specifically, specialty and subspecialty options are described and explained, special paths in training are analysed, and the notions of "special interest day" and the optional "Out of programme experience" schemes are explained. Furthermore, detailed information is offered on the pivotal points of each of the stages of the training process, with special care to explain the important differences and similarities between the systems in Greece and the United Kingdom. Special attention is given to The Royal College of Psychiatrists' Membership Exams (MRCPsych) because they are the only exams towards completing specialisation in Psychiatry in the United Kingdom. Also, the educational culture of progressing according to a set curriculum, of utilising diverse means of professional development, of empowering the trainees' autonomy by allowing initiative-based development and of applying peer supervision as a tool for professional development is stressed. We conclude that psychiatric training in the United Kingdom differs substantially to that of Greece in both structure and process. Τhere are various differences such as pure psychiatric training in the United Kingdom versus neurological and medical modules in Greece, in-training

  7. Hanford Tanks Initiative AX tank farm cone penetrometer demonstration training plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatate, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    The HTI subsurface characterization task will use the Hanford Cone Penetrometer platform (CPP) to deploy soil sensor and sampling probes into the vadose zone/soils around AX-104 during FY-99. This training plan identifies training requirements in support of the HTI task, describes specific staff training needs, and identifies how the training will be provided and by whom. Documentation of training completion is also described

  8. Initial and further education: Substitutes or complements? Differences in continuing education and training over the life-course of European workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolbers, M.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation examines the place of initial and further education in continuing education and training over the life-course of workers across Europe. The evidence presented demonstrates that in countries with a strong orientation towards vocational education, participation in continuing

  9. Team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.; Carl, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous reports and articles have been written recently on the importance of team skills training for nuclear reactor operators, but little has appeared on the practical application of this theoretical guidance. This paper describes the activities of the Training and Education Department at GPU Nuclear (GPUN). In 1987, GPUN undertook a significant initiative in its licensed operator training programs to design and develop initial and requalification team skills training. Prior to that time, human interaction skills training (communication, stress management, supervisory skills, etc.) focused more on the individual rather than a group. Today, GPU Nuclear conducts team training at both its Three Mile Island (YMI), PA and Oyster Creek (OC), NJ generating stations. Videotaped feedback is sued extensively to critique and reinforce targeted behaviors. In fact, the TMI simulator trainer has a built-in, four camera system specifically designed for team training. Evaluations conducted on this training indicated these newly acquired skills are being carried over to the work environment. Team training is now an important and on-going part of GPUN operator training

  10. Critical race theory as a bridge in science training: the California State University, Northridge BUILD PODER program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetermoe, Carrie L; Chavira, Gabriela; Khachikian, Crist S; Boyns, David; Cabello, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    Unconscious bias and explicit forms of discrimination continue to pervade academic institutions. Multicultural and diversity training activities have not been sufficient in making structural and social changes leading to equity, therefore, a new form of critical consciousness is needed to train diverse scientists with new research questions, methods, and perspectives. The purpose of this paper is to describe Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD); Promoting Opportunities for Diversity in Education and Research (PODER), which is an undergraduate biomedical research training program based on transformative framework rooted in Critical Race Theory (CRT). By employing a CRT-informed curriculum and training in BUILD PODER, students are empowered not only to gain access but also to thrive in graduate programs and beyond. Poder means "power" or "to be able to" in Spanish. Essentially, we are "building power" using students' strengths and empowering them as learners. The new curriculum helps students understand institutional policies and practices that may prevent them from persisting in higher education, learn to become their own advocates, and successfully confront social barriers and instances of inequities and discrimination. To challenge these barriers and sustain campus changes in support of students, BUILD PODER works toward changing campus culture and research mentoring relationships. By joining with ongoing university structures such as the state university Graduation Initiative, we include CRT tenets into the campus dialogue and stimulate campus-wide discussions around institutional change. Strong ties with five community college partners also enrich BUILD PODER's student body and strengthen mentor diversity. Preliminary evaluation data suggest that BUILD PODER's program has enhanced the racial/ethnic consciousness of the campus community, is effective in encouraging more egalitarian and respectful faculty-student relationships, and is a rigorous

  11. Leadership in diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, P L

    1994-12-01

    As principal change agents, healthcare leaders are well positioned to integrate diversity into their institutions' organizational structure. Thus healthcare leaders must be competent in handling diversity issues. Diversity refers to any characteristic that helps shape a person's attitudes, behaviors, perspective, and interpretation of what is "normal." In the healthcare ministry, diversity encompasses the cultural differences that can be found across functions or among organizations when they merge or partner. Managers and supervisors will have to be familiar with the nuances of diversity if they are to be effective. Those managers who are not adept at incorporating diversity into human resource management may incorrectly evaluate subordinates' capabilities and provide inappropriate training or supervision. As a result, some employees may be underutilized. Others may resist needed direction, overlook instructions, or hide problems such as a language barrier. If executives, marketers, and strategic planners are to develop relevant healthcare services that take into account the needs of their constituencies, they will need to determine how different groups understand and access healthcare. Healthcare leaders who know how to uncover cultural dynamics and challenge cultural assumptions will go far in enabling their staff and managers to confront personal attitudes about community residents. Ultimately, quality of service delivery will be improved.

  12. Initial laparoscopic basic skills training shortens the learning curve of laparoscopic suturing and is cost-effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Hope, William W; Korndorffer, James R; Markley, Sarah; Scott, Daniel J

    2010-04-01

    Laparoscopic suturing is an advanced skill that is difficult to acquire. Simulator-based skills curricula have been developed that have been shown to transfer to the operating room. Currently available skills curricula need to be optimized. We hypothesized that mastering basic laparoscopic skills first would shorten the learning curve of a more complex laparoscopic task and reduce resource requirements for the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery suturing curriculum. Medical students (n = 20) with no previous simulator experience were enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol, pretested on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery suturing model, and randomized into 2 groups. Group I (n = 10) trained (unsupervised) until proficiency levels were achieved on 5 basic tasks; Group II (n = 10) received no basic training. Both groups then trained (supervised) on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery suturing model until previously reported proficiency levels were achieved. Two weeks later, they were retested to evaluate their retention scores, training parameters, instruction requirements, and cost between groups using t-test. Baseline characteristics and performance were similar for both groups, and 9 of 10 subjects in each group achieved the proficiency levels. The initial performance on the simulator was better for Group I after basic skills training, and their suturing learning curve was shorter compared with Group II. In addition, Group I required less active instruction. Overall time required to finish the curriculum was similar for both groups; but the Group I training strategy cost less, with a savings of $148 per trainee. Teaching novices basic laparoscopic skills before a more complex laparoscopic task produces substantial cost savings. Additional studies are needed to assess the impact of such integrated curricula on ultimate educational benefit. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Health Facility Staff Training for Improving Breastfeeding Outcome: A Systematic Review for Step 2 of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Olukunmi O; Dagvadorj, Amarjargal; Yourkavitch, Jennifer; da Silva Lopes, Katharina; Suto, Maiko; Takemoto, Yo; Mori, Rintaro; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Ota, Erika

    2017-11-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) implemented through the "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" has been widely promoted as an intervention that improves breastfeeding rates. Step 2 requires the training of all healthcare staff in skills that are necessary to implement the policy. This systematic review provides evidence about the effect of training healthcare staff in hospitals and birth centers on breastfeeding outcomes. Randomized controlled trials (RCT), quasi-RCT, and controlled before and after (CBA) studies comparing training of healthcare staff on breastfeeding and supportive feeding practices with no training were included in this review. We searched CENTRAL PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the British Nursing Index for studies. Studies were screened against predetermined criteria, and risk of bias of included studies was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-Randomized Studies for non-RCT studies and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for RCT studies. Of the six studies included in this review, three were RCT whereas three were CBA studies. The studies were conducted in 5 countries and involved 390 healthcare staff. Provision of educational interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and practice of BFHI and support was found to improve health worker's knowledge, attitude, and compliance with the BFHI practices. In one study, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding increased at the intervention site but no differences were found for breastfeeding initiation rates. All included studies had methodological limitations, and study designs and methodologies lacked comparability.

  14. Managing Diversity in India: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Workforce Diversity Initiatives of Three U.S. Based Multinational Corporations in India

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Ashima

    2007-01-01

    Managing diversity has emerged as a significant management practice, conceptualised to tackle the growing number of employee equality and equal opportunity related complexities. The changing nature of work practices due to globalisation has brought to the forefront workplace diversity issues. The origins and conception of diversity in the U.S. and India forms the basis for analysing an originally American concept in an Indian context. The two countries offer an exciting backdrop given the pol...

  15. Racial-ethnic relations and the question of disability in Brazilian children’s literature: an experiment in training of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Martins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the paradigm of the inclusive education, the regular school should organize itself to welcome and offer objective conditions of learning for all students. With an emphasis on how diversity is represented for children through children’s literature, this report presents the experience with the subject “Pedagogical Programmed Practices: Diversity and Literature - representations of blackness and disability for children” in the formation of first year academic students of Pedagogical Course of São Paulo Federal University, Guarulhos Campus. This study focused on the discipline of theoretical frameworks that deal with the diversity and, more specifically, ethnic-racial and disability in children’s literature. The experience points to the importance of initiatives aimed at developing activities focused on understanding the diversity in the formation of critical thinking in training of teachers.

  16. Initial Teacher Training to Promote Health and Well-Being in Schools--A Systematic Review of Effectiveness, Barriers and Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan; Pickett, Karen; Dewhirst, Sue; Byrne, Jenny; Speller, Viv; Grace, Marcus; Almond, Palo; Roderick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of effectiveness, and barriers and facilitators, of initial teacher training to promote health and well-being in schools. Design: Systematic review of the literature. Method: A total of 20 bibliographic databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Social Science Citation Index. Studies were…

  17. Contributions of large wood to the initial establishment and diversity of riparian vegetation in a bar-braided temperate river

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Futoshi; Fuke, Nao; Kubo, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of large wood (LW) on the physical environment and the initial establishment of vascular plant species in the Rekifune River, a large bar-braided monsoonal river in Japan. The physical environment and the diversity and composition of plant species were compared in relation to the orientation of LW pieces. We found that shading effects were more prevalent in the immediate vicinity of LW pieces than in quadrats distant from LW. The effect was...

  18. Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Even though the diversity found in European societies is not a new phenomenon, its nature is rapidly changing. Europe is becoming increasingly diverse due to intra-European mobility, international migration and globalisation. These societal changes affect the educational landscape and organisation, and create both new opportunities and challenges…

  19. Initiatives in training program evaluation outside the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Training literature is reviewed, and program evaluative practices outside the nuclear utility industry are reported. The findings indicate some innovations in philosophy and practice and program evaluation, although not necessarily in the context of evaluation as a route to assessing the impact of training. Program evaluation is described in the context of the impact of training, suggesting continued efforts to accept a multivariate concept of individual and organizational performance

  20. Race and diversity in U.S. Biological Anthropology: A decade of AAPA initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, Susan C; Malhi, Ripan S; Fuentes, Agustín

    2018-01-01

    Biological Anthropology studies the variation and evolution of living humans, non-human primates, and extinct ancestors and for this reason the field should be in an ideal position to attract scientists from a variety of backgrounds who have different views and experiences. However, the origin and history of the discipline, anecdotal observations, self-reports, and recent surveys suggest the field has significant barriers to attracting scholars of color. For a variety of reasons, including quantitative research that demonstrates that diverse groups do better science, the discipline should strive to achieve a more diverse composition. Here we discuss the background and underpinnings of the current and historical dearth of diversity in Biological Anthropology in the U.S. specifically as it relates to representation of minority and underrepresented minority (URM) (or racialized minority) scholars. We trace this lack of diversity to underlying issues of recruitment and retention in the STEM sciences generally, to the history of Anthropology particularly around questions of race-science, and to the absence of Anthropology at many minority-serving institutions, especially HBCUs, a situation that forestalls pathways to the discipline for many minority students. The AAPA Committee on Diversity (COD) was conceived as a means of assessing and improving diversity within the discipline, and we detail the history of the COD since its inception in 2006. Prior to the COD there were no systematic AAPA efforts to consider ethnoracial diversity in our ranks and no programming around questions of diversity and inclusion. Departmental survey data collected by the COD indicate that undergraduate majors in Biological Anthropology are remarkably diverse, but that the discipline loses these scholars between undergraduate and graduate school and systematically up rank. Our analysis of recent membership demographic survey data (2014 and 2017) shows Biological Anthropology to have less

  1. Science Granting Councils Initiative: Research uptake | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The initiative's activities include training, regional exchanges and forums, online training, on-site coaching, and collaborative research. The initiative was developed jointly by IDRC, the United Kingdom's Department for International Development, and South Africa's National Research Foundation. Its ultimate goal is ...

  2. Safety training news

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

      SELF-RESCUE MASK The "Self-Rescue Mask" face-to-face training course has been replaced by a revised version. This measure concerns both the initial and the refresher course. For personnel who have successfully attended the initial or refresher Self-Rescue Mask training within the last three years, their Self-Rescue Mask training will still be valid.  The course description and registration form can be found in the training catalogue on the Safety Training Service’s website or catalogue. The Self-Rescue Mask training course is a mandatory prerequisite for following the new "Portable ODH Detector" e-learning course.   PORTABLE ODH DETECTOR A new e-learning awareness course, "Portable ODH Detector", is available via the SIR application on CERN’s intranet. Personnel requiring a portable ODH detector of the DRÄGER x-am 5000 type to allowed access th...

  3. Modularisation of Vocational Education in Europe: NVQs and GNVQs as a Model for the Reform of Initial Training Provisions in Germany? Monographs in International Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Hubert

    This book examines modularization in the German system of initial vocational education and training. After examining the underlying concept of modularization (providing training through self-contained units that can be combined in different ways), the book presents an overview of modularization as it occurs in Spain, Scotland, France, and the…

  4. 14 CFR 121.424 - Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade flight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the certificate holder's approved low-altitude windshear flight training program and in appendix E to... holder's approved low-altitude windshear flight training program that are capable of being performed in... flight training. 121.424 Section 121.424 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION...

  5. The Early-Career Development of Science Teachers from Initial Training Onwards: The Advantages of a Multifaceted Five-Year Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julian; Howarth, Sue; King, Chris; Perry, John; Tas, Maarten; Twidle, John; Warhurst, Adrian; Garrett, Caro

    2014-01-01

    If a programme were to be devised for the early-career development of science teachers, what might such a programme look like? This was the focus of a meeting of science educators interested in developing such a structure, from the start of initial teacher training onwards. The contributions, modified and written up here, include a suggested…

  6. Welcome to cultural competency: surgery's efforts to acknowledge diversity in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L; Chun, Maria B J

    2013-01-01

    Although cultural competency is not a new concept in healthcare, it has only recently been formally embraced as important in the field of surgery. All physicians, including and especially surgeons, must acknowledge the potential influence of culture in order to provide effective and equitable care for patients of all backgrounds. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recognizes cultural competency as a component of "patient care," "professionalism," and "interpersonal and communication skills." A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. All publications focusing on surgical residents and the assessment of patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, or specifically cultural competency and/or were considered. This initial search resulted in 12 articles. To further refine the review, publications discussing curricula in residencies other than surgery, the assessment of technical, or clinical skills and/or without any explicit focus on cultural competency were excluded. Based on the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles were selected. These studies utilized various methods to improve surgical residents' cultural competency, including lectures, Objective Structural Clinical Examinations (OSCE), and written exercises and evaluations. A number of surgical residency programs have made promising strides in training culturally competent surgeons. Ultimately, in order to maximize our collective efforts to improve the quality of health care, the development of cultural competency curricula must be made a priority and such training should be a requirement for all trainees in surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hearing loss prevention for carpenters: Part 2 - Demonstration projects using individualized and group training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Stephenson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two demonstration projects were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive training program for carpenters. This training was paired with audiometry and counseling and a survey of attitudes and beliefs in hearing loss prevention. All participants received hearing tests, multimedia instruction on occupational noise exposure/hearing loss, and instruction and practice in using a diverse selection of hearing protection devices (HPDs. A total of 103 apprentice carpenters participated in the Year 1 training, were given a large supply of these HPDs, and instructions on how to get additional free supplies if they ran out during the 1-year interval between initial and follow-up training. Forty-two participants responded to the survey a second time a year later and completed the Year 2 training. Significant test-retest differences were found between the pre-training and the post-training survey scores. Both forms of instruction (individual versus group produced equivalent outcomes. The results indicated that training was able to bring all apprentice participants up to the same desired level with regard to attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions to use hearing protection properly. It was concluded that the health communication models used to develop the educational and training materials for this effort were extremely effective.

  8. 75 FR 34707 - Federal Advisory Committee; Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... amended), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Military Leadership Diversity... Leadership Diversity Commission to continue their efforts to address congressional concerns as outlined in... for diversity leadership and training. DFO recesses the meeting. 11:15 a.m.-12:15 a.m. DFO opens the...

  9. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  10. Promoting Multicultural Competence: Diversity Training for Transition Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, David; Lindstrom, Lauren; Povenmire-Kirk, Tiana

    2008-01-01

    As post-school outcomes for diverse students with disabilities continue to fall short of those of their majority-culture peers, there is an increasingly urgent need to increase multicultural competence among transition professionals. This study used a pre-/post-test measure to assess changes in multicultural competence for a statewide group of…

  11. Comparing interactive videodisc training effectiveness to traditional training methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenworthy, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    Videodisc skills training programs developed by Industrial Training Corporation are being used and evaluated by major industrial facilities. In one such study, interactive videodisc training programs were compared to videotape and instructor-based training to determine the effectiveness of videodisc in terms of performance, training time and trainee attitudes. Results showed that when initial training was done using the interactive videodisc system, trainee performance was superior to the performance of trainees using videotape, and approximately equal to the performance of those trained by an instructor. When each method was used in follow-up training, interactive videodisc was definitely the most effective. Results also indicate that training time can be reduced using interactive videodisc. Attitudes of both trainees and instructors toward the interactive videodisc training were positive

  12. Students with a foreign background in Italian Initial Vocational Education and Training (IVET and the access to Italian as Second Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Daniele

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the results of a 2014–2015 quantitative survey on a sample of 1,840 foreign students and 1,835 Italian students, of which, 41% of the Italians and 35% of those of foreign origins interviewed were female. The overall age was between 14 and 24, and these students attended courses in the Initial Vocational Education and Training (IVET system in six Italian Regions: Emilia-Romagna, Lazio, Lombardy, Sicily, Tuscany, and Veneto. Language is the central issue in the survey, both in relation to the construction of multicultural and transcultural identity, and as a bridge to combine localisms with the global dynamics of migration, in its "dialect" edition. Some conclusive reflections on the enhancement of multilingualism in the Initial Vocational Education and Training (IVET system are proposed for the development of national strategies in order to strengthen intercultural teaching and curricula.

  13. Understanding the Impact of Cultural Diversity on Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moon, Molly

    1997-01-01

    .... It is from this basic framework that tools such as empowerment, training, and mentoring are presented for leaders to consider when dealing with diversity in their organization. Finally, these tools are interrelated to a five-step continuous process developed by Ann M. Morrison that a leader can use in analyzing the diversity climate of their organization.

  14. Initiating Training Stations As Clusters of Learning in Fashion Merchandising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Jayne

    1974-01-01

    A Chicago business school offers fashion merchandising as one of several business curriculums that combines on-the-job training and classroom instruction. Instruction is organized around the occupational cluster concept which requires training stations that provide a wide variety of learning experiences. (EA)

  15. GLANAM (Glaciated North Atlantic Margins): A Marie Curie Initial Training Network between Norway, the UK & Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter Sejrup, Hans; Oline Hjelstuen, Berit

    2015-04-01

    GLANAM (Glaciated North Atlantic Margins) is an Initial Training Network (ITN) funded under the EU Marie Curie Programme. It comprises 10 research partners from Norway, UK and Denmark, including 7 University research teams, 1 industrial full partner and 2 industrial associate partners. The GLANAM network will employ and train 15 early career researchers (Fellows). The aim of GLANAM is to improve the career prospects and development of young researchers in both the public and private sector within the field of earth science, focusing on North Atlantic glaciated margins. The young scientists will perform multi-disciplinary research and receive training in geophysics, remote sensing, GIS, sedimentology, geomorphology, stratigraphy, geochemistry and numerical modeling through three interconnected work packages that collectively address knowledge gaps related to the large, glacial age, sedimentary depocentres on the North Atlantic margin. The 15 Fellows will work on projects that geographically extend from Ireland in the south to the High Arctic. Filling these gaps will not only result in major new insights regarding glacial age processes on continental margins in general, but will also provide paleoclimate information essential for understanding the role of marine-based ice sheets in the climate system and for the testing of climate models. GLANAM brings together leading European research groups working on glaciated margins in a coordinated and collaborative research and training project. Focusing on the North Atlantic margins, this coordinated approach will lead to a major advance in the understanding of glaciated margins more widely and will fundamentally strengthen European research and build capacity in this field.

  16. Stereotype Threat-Based Diversity Programming: Helping Students While Empowering and Respecting Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artze-Vega, Isis; Richardson, Leslie; Traxler, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    As college student populations grow increasingly diverse, centers for teaching and learning are often charged with promoting inclusive teaching practices. Yet faculty cite many affective barriers to diversity training, and we often preach to the choir. These challenges led us to seek alternate routes for diversity programming, and stereotype…

  17. Diversity Networking Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Join us at the APS Diversity Reception to relax, network with colleagues, and learn about programs and initiatives for women, underrepresented minorities, and LGBT physicists. You'll have a great time meeting friends in a supportive environment and making connections.

  18. Systematic Approach to Research Training: Benefits for Counseling Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Teri A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Synthesizes developments concerning research training in graduate counselor education and presents a systematic approach for training master's and doctoral students in mental health counseling to assimilate, use, and perform research. Suggests diversity of research training strategies for implementation in counselor preparation programs.…

  19. Web-enhanced Curricular Infusion of ESOL Competencies in Initial Teacher Certification Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Wolz Verkler

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available As the cultural and linguistic diversity continues to increase in Florida s K-12 public school population, the demand for teachers trained to address their unique needs becomes paramount. Previously a responsibility of Florida s school districts, ESOL(English for Speakers of Other Languages training has been delegated to colleges of education per state mandate. This mandate requires that graduates of initial teacher certification programs in the state s universities demonstrate competency in all of the 25 Florida Performance Standards for Teachers of English for Speakers of Other Languages. In order to satisfy this charge, colleges of education in Florida are following a variety of training models: stand-alone courses, curricular infusion, or a combination of the two. A large, metropolitan university in Central Florida has developed an integrated model consisting of two stand-alone courses, field experience integration of the standards, and curricular infusion of ESOL standards via on-lone modules in methods courses. The authors, who teach methods courses in which such infusion has been recently effected, surveyed their students to obtain feedback regarding the modules, the results of which are discussed in this paper.

  20. General employee training: Initial needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    US Department of Energy Orders, including those for Emergency Preparedness, require that DOE facility employees receive a preparatory course on certain basic work practices and employee responsibilities before receiving any job-specific training. Most of this general information is required for employees to either prevent or to handle emergency situations that may arise in the workplace. While the categories are general, the information should be given at both Laboratory and individual-site levels, if possible. A simple checklist developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory proved beneficial when assessing its general employee orientation compliance status. The checklist includes subject areas covered, organizational identities and responsibilities, and documentation needs

  1. Soil fauna and leaf species, but not species diversity, affect initial soil erosion in a subtropical forest plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Steffen; Goebes, Philipp; Assmann, Thorsten; Schuldt, Andreas; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In subtropical parts of China, high rainfall intensities cause continuous soil losses and thereby provoke severe harms to ecosystems. In woodlands, it is not the tree canopy, but mostly an intact forest floor that provides protection from soil erosion. Although the protective role of leaf litter covers against soil losses is known for a long time, little research has been conducted on the processes involved. For instance, the role of different leaf species and leaf species diversity has been widely disregarded. Furthermore, the impact of soil meso- and macrofauna within the litter layer on soil losses remains unclear. To investigate how leaf litter species and diversity as well as soil meso- and macrofauna affect sediment discharge in a subtropical forest ecosystem, a field experiment was carried out in Xingangshan, Jiangxi Province, PR China (BEF China). A full-factorial random design with 96 micro-scale runoff plots and seven domestic leaf species in three diversity levels and a bare ground feature were established. Erosion was initiated with a rainfall simulator. This study confirms that leaf litter cover generally protects forest soils from water erosion (-82 % sediment discharge on leaf covered plots compared to bare plots) and this protection is gradually removed as the litter layer decomposes. Different leaf species showed variable impacts on sediment discharge and thus erosion control. This effect can be related to different leaf habitus, leaf decomposition rates and food preferences of litter decomposing meso- and macrofauna. In our experiment, runoff plots with leaf litter from Machilus thunbergii in monoculture showed the highest sediment discharge (68.0 g m-2), whereas plots with Cyclobalanopsis glauca in monoculture showed the smallest rates (7.9 g m-2). At the same time, neither leaf species diversity, nor functional diversity showed any significant influence, only a negative trend could be observed. Nevertheless, the protective effect of the leaf

  2. Cross-cultural training of general practitioner registrars: how does it happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Kelly; Abbott, Penny; Reath, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    An equitable multicultural society requires general practitioners (GPs) to be proficient in providing health care to patients from diverse backgrounds. GPs are required to have a certain attitudes, knowledge and skills known as cultural competence. Given its importance to registrar training, the aim of this study was to explore ways in which GP registrars are currently developing cultural competence. This study employed a survey design for GP registrars in Western Sydney. Training approaches to cultural competence that are relevant to the Australian General Practice setting include exposure to diversity, attitudes, knowledge and skills development. The 43 GP registrar respondents in Western Sydney are exposed to a culturally diverse patient load during training. Registrars report a variety of teachings related to cross-cultural training, but there is little consistency, with the most common approach entailing listening to patients' personal stories. Exposure to cultural diversity appears to be an important way in which cultural competency is developed. However, guidance and facilitation of skills development throughout this exposure is required and currently may occur opportunistically rather than consistently.

  3. Sumatera Air Asia Training Center (Arsitektur Metafora)

    OpenAIRE

    Susanto, William

    2015-01-01

    Sumatera Air Asia Training Center as Air Asia training facility’s construction have a propose to train the Air Asia air craft crew who will be the employee of the Air Asia Airlines.Beside the main function;training facility for the Air Asia Crew; the other airline’s crew can be train by a cooperation with Air Asia.The aircraft crew that can be train in this facility is pilot initial, pilot type-rating, pilot recurrent, ATPL, Flight attendant initial and recurrent..This facility ha...

  4. Instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    A SAT-based Instructor Training Course was developed and implemented at NVTC. The duration of the initial course is 3 weeks and 2 weeks for annual refresher course. NVTC has had much experience with this Instructor Training Course generating the following lessons-learned: SAT implementation needs to be supported by plant management; age of instructors; developments of training materials and conducting training at the same time; knowledge and use of the PC; English language skills; social transitioning from the NPP to the TC; motivation; workplace environment and conditions

  5. Residents' Attitude, Knowledge, and Perceived Preparedness Toward Caring for Patients from Diverse Sociocultural Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jessie Kimbrough; Cooper, Lisa A; Green, Alexander R; Bertram, Amanda; Wright, Letitia; Matusko, Niki; McCullough, Wayne; Sisson, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Training residents to deliver care to increasingly diverse patients in the United States is an important strategy to help alleviate racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes. Cross-cultural care training of residents continues to present challenges. This study sought to explore the associations among residents' cross-cultural attitudes, preparedness, and knowledge about disparities to better elucidate possible training needs. Methods: This cross-sectional study used web-based questionnaires from 2013 to 2014. Eighty-four internal medicine residency programs with 954 residents across the United States participated. The main outcome was perceived preparedness to care for sociocultural diverse patients. Key Results: Regression analysis showed attitude toward cross-cultural care (beta coefficient [β]=0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.64, p attitude toward cross-cultural care and their level of exposure to patients from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. Future studies should examine the role of residents' cross-cultural care-related attitudes on their ability to care for diverse patients.

  6. The implementation of an AR (augmented reality) approach to support mammographic interpretation training: an initial feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiang; Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.

    2017-03-01

    Appropriate feedback plays an important role in optimising mammographic interpretation training whilst also ensuring good interpretation performance. The traditional keyboard, mouse and workstation technical approach has a critical limitation in providing supplementary image-related information and providing complex feedback in real time. Augmented Reality (AR) provides a possible superior approach in this situation, as feedback can be provided directly overlaying the displayed mammographic images so making a generic approach which can also be vendor neutral. In this study, radiological feedback was dynamically remapped virtually into the real world, using perspective transformation, in order to provide a richer user experience in mammographic interpretation training. This is an initial attempt of an AR approach to dynamically superimpose pre-defined feedback information of a DICOM image on top of a radiologist's view, whilst the radiologist is examining images on a clinical workstation. The study demonstrates the feasibility of the approach, although there are limitations on interactive operations which are due to the hardware used. The results of this fully functional approach provide appropriate feedback/image correspondence in a simulated mammographic interpretation environment. Thus, it is argued that employing AR is a feasible way to provide rich feedback in the delivery of mammographic interpretation training.

  7. NASA's Indigenous Capacity Building Initiative: Balancing Traditional Knowledge and Existing Remote Sensing Training to Inform Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullum, A. J. K.; Schmidt, C.; Palacios, S. L.; Ly, V.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Indigenous Capacity Building Initiative is aimed to provide remote sensing training, mentoring, and research opportunities to the indigenous community. A key programmatic goal is the co-production of place-based trainings where participants have the opportunity to address specific natural resource research and management issues facing their tribal lands. Three primary strategies have been adopted to engage with our tribal partners, these include: (1) the use of existing tribal networks and conferences such as the National Tribal GIS Conference, (2) coordination with other federal agencies such as the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and tribal liaisons at regional Climate Science Centers, and (3) connecting with tribes directly. Regional partner visits with tribes, such as meetings with the Samish Indian Nation, are integral to cultivate trusting, collaborative, and sustained partnerships and an understanding of how Earth Observations can be applied to the unique set of challenges and goals each tribe faces. As the program continues to grow, we aim to increase our incorporation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) into technical methods and to develop trainings tailored to thematic areas of interest to specific tribes. Engagement and feedback are encouraged to refine our approaches to increase capacity within the indigenous community to utilize NASA Earth Observations.

  8. Resident cross-cultural training, satisfaction, and preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frintner, Mary Pat; Mendoza, Fernando S; Dreyer, Benard P; Cull, William L; Laraque, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    To describe the diversity of pediatric residents and examine relationships of cross-cultural training experiences with training satisfaction, perceived preparedness for providing culturally effective care, and attitudes surrounding care for underserved populations. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of a national random sample of graduating pediatric residents and an additional sample of minority residents. Using weighted analysis, we used multivariate regression to test for differences in satisfaction, preparedness, and attitudes between residents with more and less cross-cultural experiences during residency, controlling for residents' characteristics and experiences before training. The survey response rate was 57%. Eleven percent were Hispanic, 61% white, 21% Asian, 9% African American, 9% other racial/ethnic groups; 34% grew up in a bi- or multilingual family. Ninety-three percent of residents were satisfied with their residency training, 81% with the instruction they received on health and health care disparities, and 54% on global health issues. Ninety-six percent of residents felt they were prepared to care for patients from diverse backgrounds, but fewer felt prepared to care for families with beliefs at odds with Western medicine (49%) and families who receive alternative or complementary care (37%). Residents with more cross-cultural experiences during residency reported being better prepared than those with less experience to care for families with limited English proficiency (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.40-3.17), new immigrants (aOR 1.91; 95% CI 1.32-2.75), and with religious beliefs that might affect clinical care (aOR 1.62; 95% CI 1.13-2.32). Pediatric residents begin their training with diverse cross-cultural backgrounds and experiences. Residency experiences in cross-cultural care contribute to feelings of preparedness to care for diverse US children. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published

  9. Exploring diversity in ensemble classification: Applications in large area land cover mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Andrew; Boukir, Samia

    2017-07-01

    Ensemble classifiers, such as random forests, are now commonly applied in the field of remote sensing, and have been shown to perform better than single classifier systems, resulting in reduced generalisation error. Diversity across the members of ensemble classifiers is known to have a strong influence on classification performance - whereby classifier errors are uncorrelated and more uniformly distributed across ensemble members. The relationship between ensemble diversity and classification performance has not yet been fully explored in the fields of information science and machine learning and has never been examined in the field of remote sensing. This study is a novel exploration of ensemble diversity and its link to classification performance, applied to a multi-class canopy cover classification problem using random forests and multisource remote sensing and ancillary GIS data, across seven million hectares of diverse dry-sclerophyll dominated public forests in Victoria Australia. A particular emphasis is placed on analysing the relationship between ensemble diversity and ensemble margin - two key concepts in ensemble learning. The main novelty of our work is on boosting diversity by emphasizing the contribution of lower margin instances used in the learning process. Exploring the influence of tree pruning on diversity is also a new empirical analysis that contributes to a better understanding of ensemble performance. Results reveal insights into the trade-off between ensemble classification accuracy and diversity, and through the ensemble margin, demonstrate how inducing diversity by targeting lower margin training samples is a means of achieving better classifier performance for more difficult or rarer classes and reducing information redundancy in classification problems. Our findings inform strategies for collecting training data and designing and parameterising ensemble classifiers, such as random forests. This is particularly important in large area

  10. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola; Schwartz, Russell; Brazas, Michelle D; Brooksbank, Cath; Gaeta, Bruno; Morgan, Sarah L; Pauley, Mark A; Rosenwald, Anne; Rustici, Gabriella; Sierk, Michael; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-02-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans.

  11. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksbank, Cath; Morgan, Sarah L.; Rosenwald, Anne; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-01-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans. PMID:29390004

  12. Managing the culturally diverse medical practice team: twenty-five strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A common misconception is that the phrase workplace diversity means meeting certain quotas in employee race or gender categories. In fact, diversity is much more than that. This article explores the unique benefits and challenges of managing a culturally diverse medical practice team and offers practice managers 25 practical strategies. It describes the two types of diversity training that are beneficial to practice managers and the kinds of policies, practices, and procedures that foster and promote diversity. This article also explores ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, sexism, stereotyping, and other potentially divisive issues among a diverse medical practice team. It provides an assessment instrument practice managers can use to evaluate their own diversity management skills. Finally, this article defines specifically what is meant by the term diversity and explores the top 10 diversity issues in workplaces today.

  13. Situational Leadership And Diversity Management Coaching Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Bahaudin G. Mujtaba; Jatuporn Sungkhawan

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and diversity management have been part of the work life since the beginning of formal organizations and a critical element of globalization. The authors provide an overview of situational leadership and link it to diversity management so the focus can remain on productivity rather than personalities and biases which are part of each society and individual. Based on personal training experiences of the authors, this conceptual and practical paper provides a model to link situationa...

  14. Cross-Cultural Communication in Oncology: Challenges and Training Interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Orest; Sulstarova, Brikela; Singy, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    To survey oncology nurses and oncologists about difficulties in taking care of culturally and linguistically diverse patients and about interests in cross-cultural training.
. Descriptive, cross-sectional.
. Web-based survey.
. 108 oncology nurses and 44 oncologists. 
. 31-item questionnaire derived from preexisting surveys in the United States and Switzerland.
. Self-rated difficulties in taking care of culturally and linguistically diverse patients and self-rated interests in cross-cultural training.
. All respondents reported communication difficulties in encounters with culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Respondents considered the absence of written materials in other languages, absence of a shared common language with patients, and sensitive subjects (e.g., end of life, sexuality) to be particularly problematic. Respondents also expressed a high level of interest in all aspects of cross-cultural training (task-oriented skills, background knowledge, reflexivity, and attitudes). Nurses perceived several difficulties related to care of migrants as more problematic than physicians did and were more interested in all aspects of cross-cultural training. 
. The need for cross-cultural training is high among oncology clinicians, particularly among nurses.
. The results reported in the current study may help nurses in decision-making positions and educators in introducing elements of cross-cultural education into oncology curricula for nurses. Cross-cultural training should be offered to oncology nurses.

  15. Evaluating community-based public health leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraso, Marion; Gruebling, Kirsten; Layde, Peter; Remington, Patrick; Hill, Barbara; Morzinski, Jeffrey; Ore, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the nation's increasingly complex public health challenges will require more effective multisector collaboration and stronger public health leadership. In 2005, the Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute launched an annual, year-long intensive "community teams" program. The goal of this program is to develop collaborative leadership and public health skills among Wisconsin-based multisectoral teams mobilizing their communities to improve public health. To measure the scope of participation and program impacts on individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge and collective achievements of teams on coalition and short-term community outcomes. End-of-year participant program evaluations and follow-up telephone interviews with participants 20 months after program completion. Community-based public health leadership training program. Sixty-eight participants in the Community Teams Program during the years 2006 to 2007 and 2007 to 2008. Professional diversity of program participants; individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge; and collective achievements of teams, including coalition and short-term community outcomes. Participants in the Community Teams Program represent a diversity of sectors, including nonprofit, governmental, academic, business, and local public health. Participation increased knowledge across all public health and leadership competency areas covered in the program. Participating teams reported outcomes, including increased engagement of community leadership, expansion of preventive services, increased media coverage, strengthened community coalitions, and increased grant funding. Evaluation of this community-based approach to public health leadership training has shown it to be a promising model for building collaborative and public health leadership skills and initiating sustained community change for health improvement.

  16. Decolonising medical curricula through diversity education: lessons from students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Mahdi; Kendall, Kathleen; Day, Lawrence; Nazar, Hamde

    2015-04-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) expects that medical students graduate with an awareness of how the diversity of the patient population may affect health outcomes and behaviours. However, little guidance has been provided on how to incorporate diversity teaching into medical school curricula. Research highlights the existence of two different models within medical education: cultural competency and cultural humility. The Southampton medical curriculum includes both models in its diversity teaching, but little was known about which model was dominant or about the students' experience. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were carried out with medical students at the University of Southampton. Data were analysed thematically using elements of grounded theory and constant comparison. Students identified early examples of diversity teaching consistent with a cultural humility approach. In later years, the limited diversity teaching recognised by students generally adopted a cultural competency approach. Students tended to perceive diversity as something that creates problems for healthcare professionals due to patients' perceived differences. They also reported witnessing a number of questionable practices related to diversity issues that they felt unable to challenge. The dissonance created by differences in the largely lecture based and the clinical environments left students confused and doubting the value of cultural humility in a clinical context. Staff training on diversity issues is required to encourage institutional buy-in and establish consistent educational and clinical environments. By tackling cultural diversity within the context of patient-centred care, cultural humility, the approach students valued most, would become the default model. Reflective practice and the development of a critical consciousness are crucial in the improvement of cultural diversity training and thus should be facilitated and encouraged. Educators can adopt a

  17. Diversity spurs diversification in ecological communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Vincent; Jarne, Philippe; Loreau, Michel; Mouquet, Nicolas; David, Patrice

    2017-06-01

    Diversity is a fundamental, yet threatened, property of ecological systems. The idea that diversity can itself favour diversification, in an autocatalytic process, is very appealing but remains controversial. Here, we study a generalized model of ecological communities and investigate how the level of initial diversity influences the possibility of evolutionary diversification. We show that even simple models of intra- and inter-specific ecological interactions can predict a positive effect of diversity on diversification: adaptive radiations may require a threshold number of species before kicking-off. We call this phenomenon DDAR (diversity-dependent adaptive radiations) and identify mathematically two distinct pathways connecting diversity to diversification, involving character displacement and the positive diversity-productivity relationship. Our results may explain observed delays in adaptive radiations at the macroscale and diversification patterns reported in experimental microbial communities, and shed new light on the dynamics of ecological diversity, the diversity-dependence of diversification rates, and the consequences of biodiversity loss.

  18. Diversity spurs diversification in ecological communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Vincent; Jarne, Philippe; Loreau, Michel; Mouquet, Nicolas; David, Patrice

    2017-06-09

    Diversity is a fundamental, yet threatened, property of ecological systems. The idea that diversity can itself favour diversification, in an autocatalytic process, is very appealing but remains controversial. Here, we study a generalized model of ecological communities and investigate how the level of initial diversity influences the possibility of evolutionary diversification. We show that even simple models of intra- and inter-specific ecological interactions can predict a positive effect of diversity on diversification: adaptive radiations may require a threshold number of species before kicking-off. We call this phenomenon DDAR (diversity-dependent adaptive radiations) and identify mathematically two distinct pathways connecting diversity to diversification, involving character displacement and the positive diversity-productivity relationship. Our results may explain observed delays in adaptive radiations at the macroscale and diversification patterns reported in experimental microbial communities, and shed new light on the dynamics of ecological diversity, the diversity-dependence of diversification rates, and the consequences of biodiversity loss.

  19. Using Simpson's diversity index to examine multidimensional models of diversity in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; McLaughlin, Gerald W; McLaughlin, Josetta S; White, Carla Y

    2016-01-03

    This study explored new models of diversity for health professions education that incorporate multiple attributes and examined differences in diversity based on urbanicity, geographic region, and institutional structure. Simpson's Diversity Index was used to develop race, gender, and interprofessional diversity indices for health professions schools in the United States (N = 318). Sullivan's extension was used to develop a composite diversity index that incorporated multiple individual attributes for each school. Pearson's r was used to investigate correlations between continuous variables. ANOVA and independent t-tests were used to compare groups based on urbanicity, geographic region, and Basic Carnegie Classification. Mean (SD) for race, gender, and interprofessional diversity indices were 0.36(0.17), 0.45(0.07), and 0.22(0.27) respectively. All correlations between the three indices were weak. The composite diversity index for this sample was 0.34(0.13). Significant differences in diversity were found between institutions based on urbanicity, Basic Carnegie Classification, and geographic region. Multidimensional models provide support for expanding measures of diversity to include multiple characteristics and attributes. The approach demonstrated in this study enables institutions to complement and extend traditional measures of diversity as a means of providing evidence for decision-making and progress towards institutional initiatives.

  20. Initiation and preliminary evaluation of an oncology pharmacy training course for staff pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Matthew S; Blanchette, Lisa M; Smith, Morgan B; Cambron, Katie; Andricopulos, Katie; Brown, M Jay

    2016-08-01

    There is currently a disparity between oncology pharmacy job openings and PGY2 trained pharmacists completing residency training each year. As a result, pharmacists without specialized training in oncology are filling much needed oncology positions and may need on-the-job oncology training. To improve oncology knowledge among non-PGY2 trained pharmacists working in oncology positions, Novant Health coordinated an Oncology Pharmacy Training Course (OPTC). The primary objective was to assess efficacy of the OPTC through evaluation of post-intervention oncology knowledge. Secondary objectives included efficacy of each lecture, assessment of knowledge improvement in those with and without residency or chemotherapy training, and assessment of satisfaction with the OPTC. This was a prospective, cohort study. All pharmacists expressing interest in the OPTC were included unless PGY2 oncology residency trained or Board-Certified in Oncology Pharmacy (BCOP). Participants were invited to attend twice monthly lectures and were evaluated using questionnaires at baseline, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. At the 3-month evaluation, 29 pharmacists completed the per-protocol evaluation. Knowledge scores increased from a mean of 29.6% to 52.2% (p trained. Baseline knowledge scores were slightly higher in the chemotherapy-trained than training naïve participants (mean 42.5% vs. 27.4%). Both groups experienced significantly improved knowledge scores at 3 months (mean 59% and 48.1% respectively, p staff pharmacists in a community hospital system. This improvement in knowledge is consistent regardless of baseline chemotherapy training. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Simulation-Based Training for Thoracoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurström, Johanna Margareta; Konge, Lars; Lehnert, Per

    2013-01-01

    An increasing proportion of thoracic procedures are performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery. This minimally invasive technique places special demands on the surgeons. Using simulation-based training on artificial models or animals has been proposed to overcome the initial part of the lear......An increasing proportion of thoracic procedures are performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery. This minimally invasive technique places special demands on the surgeons. Using simulation-based training on artificial models or animals has been proposed to overcome the initial part...... of the learning curve. This study aimed to investigate the effect of simulation-based training and to compare self-guided and educator-guided training....

  2. Training of maintenance personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabouhams, J.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture precises the method and means developed by EDF to ensure the training of maintenance personnel according to their initial educational background and their experience. The following points are treated: General organization of the training for maintenance personnel in PWR and GCR nuclear power stations and in Creys Malville fast breeder reactor; Basic nuclear training and pedagogical aids developed for this purpose; Specific training and training provided by contractors; complementary training taking into account the operation experience and feedback; Improvement of velocity, competence and safety during shut-down operations by adapted training. (orig.)

  3. ICT integration in mathematics initial teacher training and its impact on visualization: the case of GeoGebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockendorff, Monika; Solar, Horacio

    2018-01-01

    This case study investigates the impact of the integration of information and communications technology (ICT) in mathematics visualization skills and initial teacher education programmes. It reports on the influence GeoGebra dynamic software use has on promoting mathematical learning at secondary school and on its impact on teachers' conceptions about teaching and learning mathematics. This paper describes how GeoGebra-based dynamic applets - designed and used in an exploratory manner - promote mathematical processes such as conjectures. It also refers to the changes prospective teachers experience regarding the relevance visual dynamic representations acquire in teaching mathematics. This study observes a shift in school routines when incorporating technology into the mathematics classroom. Visualization appears as a basic competence associated to key mathematical processes. Implications of an early integration of ICT in mathematics initial teacher training and its impact on developing technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) are drawn.

  4. PERSPECTIVES OF TEACHER TRAINING AND INITIAL LITERACY IMPLIED IN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS OF MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrén Viramontes Anaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The stage or phase of this research project is intended to perform an analysis of approaches for teacher ́s training and early literacy of current language programs in Mexico ́s teacher education. The central con-tent of the document contains the analysis of approaches of teachers ́ trai-ning and initial literacy that lie behind educational programs. The theoretical approach is supported by Pérez Gómez (1996 and in the field of literacy in Ferreiro and Teberobsky (2007 and Lerner (2001. The research methodology is projected into the reconstructive critical pa-radigm as a diagnostic part of a future participative action research that will be conducted in two remaining stages. The perspective of analysis is established by the methodological contributions of Habermas (2008, in the hermeneutic reconstruction of implicit in the analyzed documents approaches. The results and discussion of them that provide lines of analysis of educa-tional programs, the relationship between theory and practice in curriculum approaches and a proposal of teachers profile requirements of language courses for teaching training as well as suggestions for future restructuring of curricula for teacher ́s colleges. In the conclusion, it is established that the perspective and the teacher training approach identified in the curriculum of Primary Education Degree (1997 and 2012 Preschool Education Degree (1999 and 2012 is mainly a model technical decision-making. This explains that the formative processes in teaching students of Tea-chers colleges , there is a tendency to engage in activities that are based on the theory, performing analytical processes that lead to understand the di-dactical principles of approaches for teaching reading instruction and writing, which will be applied in decision-making processes in situ of teaching practi-ce. Initial literacy approaches identified in the curriculum of Elementary and Preschool Degrees 1997 and 1999 plans

  5. Are Graduates Preferred to Those Completing Initial Vocational Education and Training? Case Studies on Company Recruitment Strategies in Germany, England and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippach-Schneider, Ute; Weigel, Tanja; Brown, Alan; Gonon, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The German and Swiss economies value skilled work highly and initial vocational education and training (IVET) has been the predominant traditional pathway into such work. However, concerns about a more "knowledge-based society" and the "academic shift in the labour market" are starting to undermine the status associated with…

  6. IBFAN Africa training initiatives: code implementation and lactation management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuli, A

    1994-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to halt the decline of breast feeding rates in Africa, 35 representatives of 12 different African countries met in Mangochi, Malawi, in February 1994. The Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes was scrutinized. National codes were drafted based on the "Model Law" of the IBFAN Code Documentation Centre (ICDC), Penang. Mechanisms of implementation, specific to each country, were developed. Strategies for the promotion, protection, and support of breast feeding, which is very important to child survival in Africa, were discussed. The training course was organized by ICDC, in conjunction with IBFAN Africa, and with the support of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Countries in eastern, central, and southern Africa were invited to send participants, who included professors, pediatricians, nutritionists, MCH personnel, nurses, and lawyers. IBFAN Africa has also been conducting lactation management workshops for a number of years in African countries. 26 health personnel (pediatricians, nutritionists, senior nursing personnel, and MCH workers), representing 7 countries in the southern African region, attended a training of trainers lactation management workshop in Swaziland in August, 1993 with the support of their UNICEF country offices. The workshop included lectures, working sessions, discussions, and slide and video presentations. Topics covered included national nutrition statuses, the importance of breast feeding, the anatomy and physiology of breast feeding, breast feeding problems, the International Code of Marketing, counseling skills, and training methods. The field trip to a training course covering primary health care that was run by the Traditional Healers Organization (THO) in Swaziland was of particular interest because of the strong traditional medicine sector in many African countries. IBFAN Africa encourages use of community workers (traditional healers, Rural Health

  7. Nuclear safety education and training network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.; Ulfkjaer, L.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2001, the Secretariat convened an Advisory Group on Education and Training in nuclear safety. The Advisory Group considered structure, scope and means related to the implementation of an IAEA Programme on Education and Training . A strategic plan was agreed and the following outputs were envisaged: 1. A Training Support Programme in nuclear safety, including a standardized and harmonized approach for training developed by the IAEA and in use by Member States. 2. National and regional training centres, established to support sustainable national nuclear safety infrastructures. 3. Training material for use by lecturers and students developed by the IAEA in English and translated to other languages. The implementation of the plan was initiated in 2002 emphasizing the preparation of training materials. In 2003 a pilot project for a network on Education and Training in Asia was initiated

  8. Diversity, Geosciences, and Societal Impact: Perspectives From a Geoscientist, Workforce Development Specialist, and Former Congressional Science Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    In order for the United States to remain competitive in the STEM fields, all available interested citizens must be engaged, prepared, and retained in the geoscience workforce. The misperception that the geosciences do little to support the local community and give back to fellow citizens contributes to the lack of diversity in the field. Another challenge is that the assumptions of career paths for someone trained in geosciences are often limited to field work, perpetuated by visuals found in media, popular culture and recruiting materials and university websites. In order to combat these views it is critical that geoscientists make visible both the diverse career opportunities for those trained in geoscience and the relevance of the field to societal issues. In order to make a substantive change in the number of underrepresented minorities pursuing and working in geosciences we must rethink how we describe our work, its impacts and its relevance to society. At UNAVCO, we have undertaken this charge to change they way the future generation of geoscientists views opportunities in our field. This presentation will include reflections of a trained geoscientist taking a non-field/research career path and the opportunities it has afforded as well as the challenges encountered. The presentation will also highlight how experience managing a STEM program for middle school girls, serving as a Congressional Science Fellow, and managing an undergraduate research internship program is aiding in shaping the Geoscience Workforce Initiative at UNAVCO.

  9. Innovative training strategy for higher education: the photonics training platform at University of Bordeaux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieules, Marie Bénédicte; Oberlé, Jean; Cormier, Eric

    2017-08-01

    The Photonics training platform of University of Bordeaux aims at renewing higher education offer by structuring training (initial and continuing) on a "sector-specific" approach. The initiative is organized around key professional sectors identified in collaboration with regional socio-economic partners as well as research and teaching teams from Bordeaux's higher education facilities. The training platform intends to improve the hiring potential of students through a better match between the initial training courses and the labor market needs and to develop lifelong training courses in the University of Bordeaux. It aims at organizing these courses according to an approach by field and to establish their position at national and international levels. The platform acts on three priority axes: training provision, national and international partnerships, pedagogical innovation as well as lifelong learning improvement. Its strategy is based on the latter priorities and consists in the development of the training offer on the application sectors in close connection with industrials and a significant involvement in internationalization. The Photonics training platform strives to become a collaborative lab of ideas to design innovative learning tools by revisiting teaching methods in relation with technological developments; create a community of education experts in the field of photonics to spread this key enabling technology around scientific thematic taught in university. This project provides resources available to all stakeholders for better efficiency in the design and management of training projects and will be engaged in a continuous improvement process to establish the continuity of projects and quality enhancement.

  10. Teacher training: the quick fix that stuck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldevin, G

    1988-01-01

    Of all the strategies for coping with teacher shortages that have been attempted, the effort that has gained the most ground in the past 20 years involves recruiting untrained or unqualified teachers pressing them into service, and then bringing them up to pedagogical or academic certification through distance education. The benefits of this approach include: for teachers, home-based study means attaining professional certification or academic upgrading without interrupting earnings; in-service training obviates the problem of finding substitute teachers who may have poorer qualifications than the teachers they are replacing; in-situ training reduces the possibility of urban migration that may result when college-based trainees do not want to return to their rural posts; and larger numbers of teachers can be served at 1 time and at lower costs than with campus-based instruction. According to the available studies, training costs for distance education students are typically 1/4 to 1/2 as expensive as conventional instruction. At least 50 3rd world countries are estimated to be involved in some form of distance teacher training. Mostly, countries combine correspondence with broadcasting and other support media, correspondence with occasional face-to-face sessions, and the 3-way combination of print/broadcasting/occasional residential teaching approaches. The broadcast medium typically is radio, but some programs, particularly programs offered by distance education universities, use television also. Tutorial counseling and local resource center support vary considerably and represent the most pressing challenges to the bulk of operations. 4 systems initiated during the 1980s in Pakistan, Burma, Zimbabwe, and Kenya are presented to illustrate the need for distance education training and the diversity of distance education methods.

  11. Videotutoring, Non-Verbal Communication and Initial Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Jon; Watson, Kate

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of video tutoring for distance education within the context of a post-graduate teacher training course at the University of Exeter. Analysis of the tapes used a protocol based on non-verbal communication research, and findings suggest that the interaction of participants was significantly different from face-to-face…

  12. #FramingFragmentsofThought - Exploring the Role of\\ud Social Media, in Developing Emergent Reflective\\ud Practitioners in Initial Teacher Training

    OpenAIRE

    Warnock, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    #framingfragmentsofthought considers the changing dynamic of teacher education and the relevance of digital pedagogical changes in course instruction. It explores Initial Teacher Training (ITT) undergraduates’ propensity to reflect upon professional practice through utilising social media networks [specifically Twitter] as a professional learning and/or teaching tool. It explores whether collaboration in the social network [acting as a community of practice] enables reflective discourse and a...

  13. High-intensity exercise training increases the diversity and metabolic capacity of the mouse distal gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denou, Emmanuel; Marcinko, Katarina; Surette, Michael G; Steinberg, Gregory R; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    Diet and exercise underpin the risk of obesity-related metabolic disease. Diet alters the gut microbiota, which contributes to aspects of metabolic disease during obesity. Repeated exercise provides metabolic benefits during obesity. We assessed whether exercise could oppose changes in the taxonomic and predicted metagenomic characteristics of the gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would counteract high-fat diet (HFD)-induced changes in the microbiota without altering obesity in mice. Compared with chow-fed mice, an obesity-causing HFD decreased the Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio and decreased the genetic capacity in the fecal microbiota for metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. After HFD-induced obesity was established, a subset of mice were HIIT for 6 wk, which increased host aerobic capacity but did not alter body or adipose tissue mass. The effects of exercise training on the microbiota were gut segment dependent and more extensive in the distal gut. HIIT increased the alpha diversity and Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio of the distal gut and fecal microbiota during diet-induced obesity. Exercise training increased the predicted genetic capacity related to the TCA cycle among other aspects of metabolism. Strikingly, the same microbial metabolism indexes that were increased by exercise were all decreased in HFD-fed vs. chow diet-fed mice. Therefore, exercise training directly opposed some of the obesity-related changes in gut microbiota, including lower metagenomic indexes of metabolism. Some host and microbial pathways appeared similarly affected by exercise. These exercise- and diet-induced microbiota interactions can be captured in feces. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Professional Training of Economists in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitska, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of American professional undergraduate and graduate training in economics. The analysis of documents, scientific and educational literature demonstrates the diversity of the US training courses and combinations of disciplines in economics. It has been defined that leading position of the USA in the world…

  15. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In recent years increased attention has been given to all aspects of the operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Contributing to this is the finding that the severity of the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 has, in large part, been attributed to personnel training deficiencies. Initially the impact of the Three Mile Island accident and the lessons learned were directed at DOE Category A reactor facilities. This resulted in numerous initiatives to upgrade the safety of operations and to improve the training of personnel responsible for operating these facilities

  16. Waste-management QA training and motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Early in the development of a QA Program for the Waste Management and Geotechnical Projects Directorate, thought was given to establishing a QA Training Program commensurate with the needs and appropriate to the motivation of a staff of more than 130 scientists and project leaders. These individuals, i.e., researchers rather than hardware designers, had no prior experience with QA programs, and from their perception generally did not believe that such controls had any merit. Therefore, historically proven approaches to QA training had to be quickly modified or totally discarded. For instance, due to the mobility and diversity of backgrounds of personnel at SNL, the QA training program had to accommodate many different levels of QA maturity at any given time. Furthermore, since the application of QA to R and D was continuing to profit from project-specific lessons learned, these improvements in the QA program had to be easily and quickly imparted in the general staff's evolving awareness of QA. A somewhat novel approach to QA training has been developed that draws heavily upon SNL's existing In-Hours Technical Education Courses (INTEC) studio capabilities. This training attempts to accommodate individual staff needs and to ensure the required QA skills and awareness for the diverse types of programs addressed

  17. A 12-year comparison of students' perspectives on diversity at a Jesuit Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujawar, Imran; Sabatino, Matt; Ray Mitchell, Stephen; Walker, Benjamin; Weissinger, Peggy; Plankey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have assessed perspectives of medical students toward institutional diversity, but few of them have attempted to map changes in diversity climate over time. This study aims to investigate changes in diversity climate at a Jesuit medical institution over a 12-year period. In 1999, 334 medical students completed an anonymous self-administered online survey, and 12 years later, 406 students completed a comparable survey in 2011. Chi-square tests assessed the differences in percent responses to questions of the two surveys, related to three identities: gender, race, and sexual orientation. The 1999 versus 2011 samples were 46% versus 49% female, 61% versus 61% Caucasian, and 41% vs. 39% aged 25 years or older. Findings suggested improvements in medical students' perceptions surrounding equality 'in general' across the three identities (pequality and diversity over the past 12 years may have been influenced by a generational acceptance of cultural diversity and, the inclusion of diversity training courses within the medical curriculum. Diversity training related to race and sexual orientation should be expanded, including a follow-up survey to assess the effectiveness of any intervention.

  18. ELIXIR-UK role in bioinformatics training at the national level and across ELIXIR [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Larcombe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ELIXIR-UK is the UK node of ELIXIR, the European infrastructure for life science data. Since its foundation in 2014, ELIXIR-UK has played a leading role in training both within the UK and in the ELIXIR Training Platform, which coordinates and delivers training across all ELIXIR members. ELIXIR-UK contributes to the Training Platform’s coordination and supports the development of training to address key skill gaps amongst UK scientists. As part of this work it acts as a conduit for nationally-important bioinformatics training resources to promote their activities to the ELIXIR community. ELIXIR-UK also leads ELIXIR’s flagship Training Portal, TeSS, which collects information about a diverse range of training and makes it easily accessible to the community. ELIXIR-UK also works with others to provide key digital skills training, partnering with the Software Sustainability Institute to provide Software Carpentry training to the ELIXIR community and to establish the Data Carpentry initiative, and taking a lead role amongst national stakeholders to deliver the StaTS project – a coordinated effort to drive engagement with training in statistics.

  19. Reconsideration for conservation units of wild Primula sieboldii in Japan based on adaptive diversity and molecular genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuko; Honjo, Masanori; Kitamoto, Naoko; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2009-08-01

    Primula sieboldii E. Morren is a perennial clonal herb that is widely distributed in Japan, but in danger of extinction in the wild. In a previous study, we revealed the genetic diversity of the species using chloroplast and nuclear DNA and used this information to define conservation units. However, we lacked information on adaptive genetic diversity, which is important for long-term survival and, thus, for the definition of conservation units. In order to identify adaptive traits that showed adaptive differentiation among populations, we studied the genetic variation in six quantitative traits within and among populations for 3 years in a common garden using 110 genets from five natural populations from three regions of Japan. The number of days to bud initiation was adaptive quantitative trait for which the degree of genetic differentiation among populations (QST) was considerably larger than that in eight microsatellite markers (FST). The relationship between this trait and environmental factors revealed that the number of days to bud initiation was negatively correlated, with the mean temperature during the growing period at each habitat. This suggests that adaptive differentiation in the delay before bud initiation was caused by selective pressure resulting from temperature differences among habitats. Our results suggest that based on adaptive diversity and neutral genetic diversity, the Saitama population represents a new conservation unit.

  20. The Integration of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Initiatives into Business Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jette Steen

    While proponents of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) have suggested that CSR initiatives should be integrated into mainstream business activities as ‘strategic CSR’ or ‘shared value’, research is lacking that explores how CSR initiatives are integrated in companies. This article compares CSR...... initiatives to human resource management (HRM) initiatives, which have a longer tradition of being integrated into company strategy. The focus is on gender diversity and CSR initiatives in a US multinational corporation (MNC). The MNC sees gender diversity as an integral part of business activities...

  1. Science Communication Training: What Are We Trying to Teach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Lewenstein, Bruce V.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth in public communication of science and technology has led to many diverse training programs. We ask: What are learning goals of science communication training? A comprehensive set of learning goals for future trainings will draw fully from the range of fields that contribute to science communication. Learning goals help decide what to…

  2. Using Simpson’s diversity index to examine multidimensional models of diversity in health professions education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gerald W.; McLaughlin, Josetta S.; White, Carla Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study explored new models of diversity for health professions education that incorporate multiple attributes and examined differences in diversity based on urbanicity, geographic region, and institutional structure. Methods Simpson’s Diversity Index was used to develop race, gender, and interprofessional diversity indices for health professions schools in the United States (N = 318). Sullivan’s extension was used to develop a composite diversity index that incorporated multiple individual attributes for each school. Pearson’s r was used to investigate correlations between continuous variables. ANOVA and independent t-tests were used to compare groups based on urbanicity, geographic region, and Basic Carnegie Classification. Results Mean (SD) for race, gender, and interprofessional  diversity indices were 0.36(0.17), 0.45(0.07), and 0.22(0.27) respectively. All correlations between the three indices were weak. The composite diversity index for this sample was 0.34(0.13). Significant differences in diversity were found between institutions based on urbanicity, Basic Carnegie Classification, and geographic region. Conclusions Multidimensional models provide support for expanding measures of diversity to include multiple characteristics and attributes. The approach demonstrated in this study enables institutions to complement and extend traditional measures of diversity as a means of providing evidence for decision-making and progress towards institutional initiatives. PMID:26724917

  3. Managing equality and cultural diversity in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Beverley

    2007-12-01

    This article offers practical strategies to managers and others for supporting overseas trained nurses and managing cultural diversity in the health workforce. Widespread nursing shortages have led managers to recruit nurses from overseas, mainly from developing countries. This paper draws on evidence from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study reported elsewhere in this issue, which indicates that overseas trained nurses encountered widespread discriminatory practices including an overuse of complaints and grievances against them. The researchers also found that the overseas trained nurses responded to their experiences by using various personal strategies to resist or re-negotiate and overcome such discriminatory practices. A research workshop was held in June 2005 at the midpoint of the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study. Twenty-five participants attended the workshop. They were the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study researchers, advisory group members, including the author of this paper and other researchers in the field of migration. The overall aim of the workshop was to share emerging research data from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals and related studies. The final session of the workshop on which this paper is based, was facilitated by the author, with the specific aim of asking the participants to discuss and determine the challenges to managers when managing a culturally diverse workforce. The discussion yielded four main themes collated by the author from which a framework of strategies to facilitate equality and cultural diversity management of the healthcare workers may be developed. The four themes are: assumptions and expectations; education and training to include

  4. Diversity and inclusion as indicators of sustainable human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and good service. Changes in ... that organises good working conditions and perspective for employees. ..... training to raise awareness for diversity and inclusion at an early stage ... its product/service offers as well as marketing and customer.

  5. EDA-EMERGE : An FP7 initial training network to equip the next generation of young scientists with the skills to address the complexity of environmental contamination with emerging pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brack, Werner; Govender, Selvan; Schulze, Tobias; Krauss, Martin; Hu, Meng; Muz, Melis; Hollender, Juliane; Schirmer, Kristin; Schollee, Jennifer; Hidasi, Anita; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Rabova, Zuzana; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Sonavane, Manoj; Carere, Mario; Lamoree, Marja; Leonards, Pim; Tufi, Sara; Ouyang, Xiyu; Schriks, Merijn; Thomas, Kevin; De Almeida, Ana Catarina; Froment, Jean; Hammers-Wirtz, Monika; Ahel, Marijan; Koprivica, Sanja; Hollert, Henner; Seiler, Thomas Benjamin; Di Paolo, Carolina; Tindall, Andrew; Spirhanzlova, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The initial training network consortium novel tools in effect-directed analysis to support the identification and monitoring of emerging toxicants on a European scale (EDA-EMERGE) was formed in response to the seventh EU framework program call to train a new generation of young scientists (13 PhD

  6. Acute Effects of Online Mind-Body Skills Training on Resilience, Mindfulness, and Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Khirallah, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Some studies have begun to show benefits of brief in-person mind-body skills training. We evaluated the effects of 1-hour online elective mind-body skills training for health professionals on mindfulness, resilience, and empathy. Between May and November, 2014, we described enrollees for the most popular 1-hour modules in a new online mind-body skills training program; compared enrollees' baseline stress and burnout to normative samples; and assessed acute changes in mindfulness, resilience, and empathy. The 513 enrollees included dietitians, nurses, physicians, social workers, clinical trainees, and health researchers; about 1/4 were trainees. The most popular modules were the following: Introduction to Stress, Resilience, and the Relaxation Response (n = 261); Autogenic Training (n = 250); Guided Imagery and Hypnosis for Pain, Insomnia, and Changing Habits (n = 112); Introduction to Mindfulness (n = 112); and Mindfulness in Daily Life (n = 102). Initially, most enrollees met threshold criteria for burnout and reported moderate to high stress levels. Completing 1-hour modules was associated with significant acute improvements in stress (P training reaches diverse, stressed health professionals and is associated with acute improvements in stress, mindfulness, empathy, and resilience. Additional research is warranted to compare the long-term cost-effectiveness of different doses of online and in-person mind-body skills training for health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Hygiene and didactic criteria of adaptation to the initial stage of training in higher education establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grebnyak N.P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reform of higher education in the conditions of deep social and economic transformations determines both optimization of professional training and development of functional capacity of the organism for future work. The initial stage of training is of particular importance due to incorporation into a complex new system of educational environment. The aim of the work - to study the characteristics of adaptation process in the first-year students. Functional state of students’ organism was studied by visual-motor response, function of attention, speed, of information processing, tepping-test. This cross-sectional study included 179 first-year medical students. Students with a history of hearing or visual disorder, smoking, alcoholism, cardiovascular and respiratory disease and on medication which affects cognitive performance were excluded from the study. Participation in the test was voluntary and informed written consent was taken from each participant. Academic performance was analyzed. Pearson correlation has been used to find the significance of relationship between the speed of thought processes, function of attention, factor of motometria, volume of visual memory and academic performance. Adaptation of students to training is based on the functional system of the body. Expressed correlation between the speed of thought processes (r=0,63, р<0,01, function of attention (r=0,47, р<0,05, ratio of motometry (r=0,45, р<0,05, volume of visual memory (r=0,43, р<0,05 and academic performance was established. The distribution of these indicators demonstrates the feasibility of using Standard deviation to assess the degree of adaptation.

  8. ENEN's approaches and initiatives for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safieh, Joseph; De Regge, Peter; Kusumi, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), established in 2003 through the EU Fifth Framework Programme (FP) project, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the ENEN Association, a legal nonprofit-making body pursuing an instructive and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear fields by higher education and training. This objective is realized through the cooperation between EU universities involved in education and research in nuclear disciplines, nuclear research centers and the nuclear industry. As of May 2009, the ENEN has 47 members in 17 EU countries. Since 2007 the ENEN Association has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with partners beyond Europe for further cooperation, such as South Africa, Russian Federation and Japan. The ENEN has good collaboration with national networks and international organizations, like Belgian Nuclear Education Network (BNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The ENEN has provided support to its Members for the organization of and participation to selected E and T courses in nuclear fields. Based on the mutual recognition of those courses, the ENEN developed a reference curriculum in nuclear engineering, consisting of a core package of courses and optional substitute courses in nuclear disciplines, to be realized as the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE). From the experience gained through the EMSNE, a European Master of Science in Nuclear Disciplines will be delivered in the near future, extending ENEN's certification to other disciplines such as radiation protection and waste management and disposal. The ENEN-II Coordination Action consolidated and expanded the achievements of the ENEN and the NEPTUNO projects attained by the ENEN in respectively the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes. The objective of the ENEN-II project was to develop the ENEN Association in a sustainable way in the areas

  9. Training 1983 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Quality training is necessary to assure competent, safe, efficient, and economical operation of a Nuclear Power Plant thereby providing the best insurance for our investors, customers and employees. By providing quality training programs to meet our needs, we can also meet the requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Programs designed and administered to meet the utility needs will assure the rapid integration of new employees into the Nuclear Mission staff and operating units. The task of providing quality training for such diverse groups of employees, each with differing needs, is a challenge to the utility both financially and in manpower availability to perform training. A review of current training needs and resources is discussed. A new approach to training is presented to identify possible resources available and cooperative units which could be developed to increase the manpower available for operations, utilize the manpower available for training more effectively, provide more efficient use of classroom facilities, and to be more cost effective providing the funds that will be necessary to support the new needs of the total Nuclear organization

  10. 5' diversity of human hepatic PXR (NR1I2) transcripts and identification of the major transcription initiation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurose, Kouichi; Koyano, Satoru; Ikeda, Shinobu; Tohkin, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Ryuichi; Sawada, Jun-Ichi

    2005-05-01

    The human pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a crucial regulator of the genes encoding several major cytochrome P450 enzymes and transporters, such as CYP3A4 and MDR1, but its own transcriptional regulation remains unclear. To elucidate the transcriptional mechanisms of human PXR gene, we first endeavored to identify the transcription initiation site of human PXR using 5'-RACE. Five types of 5'-variable transcripts (a, b, c, d, and e) with common exon 2 sequence were found, and comparison of these sequences with the genomic sequence suggested that their 5' diversity is derived from initiation by alternative promoters and alternative splicing. None of the exons found in our study contain any new in-frame coding regions. Newly identified introns IVS-a and IVS-b were found to have CT-AC splice sites that do not follow the GT-AG rule of conventional donor and acceptor splice sites. Of the five types of 5' variable transcripts identified, RT-PCR showed that type-a was the major transcript type. Four transcription initiation sites (A-D) for type-a transcript were identified by 5'-RACE using GeneRacer RACE Ready cDNA (human liver) constructed by the oligo-capping method. Putative TATA boxes were located approximately 30 bp upstream from the transcriptional start sites of the major transcript (C) and the longest minor transcript (A) expressed in the human liver. These results indicate that the initiation of transcription of human PXR is more complex than previously reported.

  11. Developing a Critical Consciousness for Diversity and Equity among Preservice Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nicole R.

    2017-01-01

    For approximately 50 years, music education scholars have purported the need for more diversity training among preservice music teachers. This call has become increasingly urgent as contemporary preservice music teachers encounter the most ethnically and culturally diverse classrooms in public school history. Although preservice music teachers may…

  12. [Simulation as possible training for palliative emergencies: prospective initial data analysis of participants from two simulation training sessions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, C H R; Bosse, G; Schröder, T; Lassen, C L; Bundscherer, A C; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2015-01-01

    Palliative emergencies describe an acute situation in patients with a life-limiting illness. At present defined curricula for prehospital emergency physician training for palliative emergencies are limited. Simulation-based training (SBT) for such palliative emergency situations is an exception both nationally and internationally. This article presents the preparation of recommendations in the training and development of palliative care emergency situations. A selected literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Medline and the Cochrane database (1990-2013). Reference lists of included articles were checked by two reviewers. Data of the included articles were extracted, evaluated und summarized. In the second phase the participants of two simulated scenarios of palliative emergencies were asked to complete an anonymous 15-item questionnaire. The results of the literature search and the questionnaire-based investigation were compared and recommendations were formulated based on the results. Altogether 30 eligible national and international articles were included. Overall, training curricula in palliative emergencies are currently being developed nationally and internationally but are not yet widely integrated into emergency medical training and education. In the second part of the investigation, 25 participants (9 male, 16 female, 20 physicians and 5 nurses) were included in 4 multiprofessional emergency medical simulation training sessions. The most important interests of the participants were the problems for training and further education concerning palliative emergencies described in the national and international literature. The literature review and the expectations of the participants underlined that the development and characteristics of palliative emergencies will become increasingly more important in outpatient emergency medicine. All participants considered palliative care to be very important concerning the competency for end-of-life decisions

  13. SAGA advances in ShApes, Geometry, and Algebra : results from the Marie Curie initial training network

    CERN Document Server

    Muntingh, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This book summarizes research carried out in workshops of the SAGA project, an Initial Training Network exploring the interplay of Shapes, Algebra, Geometry and Algorithms. Written by a combination of young and experienced researchers, the book introduces new ideas in an established context. Among the central topics are approximate and sparse implicitization and surface parametrization; algebraic tools for geometric computing; algebraic geometry for computer aided design applications and problems with industrial applications. Readers will encounter new methods for the (approximate) transition between the implicit and parametric representation; new algebraic tools for geometric computing; new applications of isogeometric analysis, and will gain insight into the emerging research field situated between algebraic geometry and computer aided geometric design.

  14. Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Annex 1 to the Final Report to DG Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This document, "Annex 1 to the Final Report to DG Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission" is intended as a companion piece to European Commission report "Preparing Teachers for Diversity: The Role of Initial Teacher Education. Final Report". It contains country fiches which are overviews of available…

  15. Close-up on safeguards training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, D.; Kashirsky, A.

    1985-01-01

    Continuous training is provided to IAEA inspector personnel to assure their proficiency in carrying out the mission of the Agency in prohibiting the potential diversion of nuclear material. The number and complexity of nuclear facilities under safeguards have increased since the Agency's founding, resulting in an ever increasing number of inspectors and, concurrently, in the need for higher quality of technical training. Basic training for newly recruited inspectors and inspection assistants is provided by the Department of Safeguards and training is programmed throughout the working experience of an inspector. Over the years, it has been proven beneficial to utilize the capability and facilities of Member States to provide specialized training at operating nuclear facilities. The training exercise described here is one of those funded by the USSR and conducted at an operating nuclear facility in the USSR. These support training courses are an effective way of providing the specialized training needed to maintain the proficiency of the inspectorate staff and supplement the training that is offered by the Agency in Vienna

  16. Building research capacity in Botswana: a randomized trial comparing training methodologies in the Botswana ethics training initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Little empirical data are available on the extent to which capacity-building programs in research ethics prepare trainees to apply ethical reasoning skills to the design, conduct, or review of research. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in Botswana in 2010 to assess the effectiveness of a case-based intervention using email to augment in-person seminars. Methods University faculty and current and prospective IRB/REC members took part in a semester-long training program in research ethics. Participants attended two 2-day seminars and were assigned at random to one of two on-line arms of the trial. Participants in both arms completed on-line international modules from the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative. Between seminars, intervention-arm participants were also emailed a weekly case to analyze in response to set questions; responses and individualized faculty feedback were exchanged via email. Tests assessing ethics knowledge were administered at the start of each seminar. The post-test included an additional section in which participants were asked to identify the ethical issues highlighted in five case studies from a list of multiple-choice responses. Results were analyzed using regression and ANOVA. Results Of the 71 participants (36 control, 35 intervention) enrolled at the first seminar, 41 (57.7%) attended the second seminar (19 control, 22 intervention). In the intervention arm, 19 (54.3%) participants fully completed and 8 (22.9%) partially completed all six weekly cases. The mean score was higher on the post-test (30.3/40) than on the pre-test (28.0/40), and individual post- and pre-test scores were highly correlated (r = 0.65, p  0.84), but intervention-arm subjects who completed all assigned cases answered an average of 3.2 more questions correctly on the post-test than others, controlling for pre-test scores (p = 0.003). Conclusions Completion of the case-based intervention improved respondents’ test

  17. Building research capacity in Botswana: a randomized trial comparing training methodologies in the Botswana ethics training initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchi, Francis H; Kasimatis-Singleton, Megan; Kasule, Mary; Khulumani, Pilate; Merz, Jon F

    2013-02-01

    Little empirical data are available on the extent to which capacity-building programs in research ethics prepare trainees to apply ethical reasoning skills to the design, conduct, or review of research. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in Botswana in 2010 to assess the effectiveness of a case-based intervention using email to augment in-person seminars. University faculty and current and prospective IRB/REC members took part in a semester-long training program in research ethics. Participants attended two 2-day seminars and were assigned at random to one of two on-line arms of the trial. Participants in both arms completed on-line international modules from the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative. Between seminars, intervention-arm participants were also emailed a weekly case to analyze in response to set questions; responses and individualized faculty feedback were exchanged via email. Tests assessing ethics knowledge were administered at the start of each seminar. The post-test included an additional section in which participants were asked to identify the ethical issues highlighted in five case studies from a list of multiple-choice responses. Results were analyzed using regression and ANOVA. Of the 71 participants (36 control, 35 intervention) enrolled at the first seminar, 41 (57.7%) attended the second seminar (19 control, 22 intervention). In the intervention arm, 19 (54.3%) participants fully completed and 8 (22.9%) partially completed all six weekly cases. The mean score was higher on the post-test (30.3/40) than on the pre-test (28.0/40), and individual post- and pre-test scores were highly correlated (r = 0.65, p  0.84), but intervention-arm subjects who completed all assigned cases answered an average of 3.2 more questions correctly on the post-test than others, controlling for pre-test scores (p = 0.003). Completion of the case-based intervention improved respondents' test scores, with those who completed all six

  18. The Imperative for Diversity: ARL's Progress and Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Barbara I.

    2009-01-01

    The Association of Research Libraries' diversity initiatives, under the leadership of Duane Webster and member libraries, have had a visible and long-lasting influence on the makeup of academic librarianship. ARL's accomplishments and progress in advancing diversity comprise important milestones for librarianship and did not come without…

  19. Policing Diversity: Examining Police Resistance to Training Reforms for Transgender People in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Johnson, Toby

    2016-01-01

    Using field notes collected from participant observation of Australian police officers training to work with the transgender community, the current research builds on previous work examining social identity theory (Tajfel, 2010) to explain how one training program implemented to educate police about transgender people challenges police culture. This research determines that police culture, training procedures, and stereotypes of gender are equally influential on police perceptions of all transgender people. Overall, the results indicate that negative police perceptions toward police training reforms strengthen in-group identity of police, and negative out-group perceptions of transgender people.

  20. QUALITY OF INITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION: REFLECTIONS ON WHAT IS BEING RESEARCHED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimar de Aparecido Vieira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is discussed, in general, the state of knowledge on research dealing with the quality of the initial training of teachers. Presents an analytical and critical reading of the situation of the quality of the initial training of teachers from the analysis of the theoretical bases produced in the last decade. For this, initially, are presented some considerations on the development of this process, followed by an analysis on the issue of training. Following are considered some of the dilemmas or problems that have been addressed in the study area, suggesting mechanisms or alternative solutions. The main source of data used is the Bank of the CAPES Theses which is available on the home page http://servicos.capes.gov.br/capesdw/, for the period from 2004 until 2006. Was used to search by typing the words "initial teacher training" in the "subject", which in 2004 were examined 33 abstracts were selected and these 15, in 2005 were examined 42 abstracts, of which 07 were deployed in 2006 and were seen 44 abstracts of which 21 have been considered because they relate to the quality of initial teacher education. Involved in this analysis, this study points out some principles and data that can help with the process of initial teacher training, pointing to possible review some indicators of pedagogical projects of degree courses. Emphasizes that the specificity and multidimensionality of the performance of the teacher raises the formulation of a set of information relevant to the qualification of objectives and practices of the initial key step in the process of learning to teach. Key words: Quality of education, initial training, university education, state of knowledge; indicators.

  1. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittlebank, Andrew; Hermans, Marc; Bhugra, Dinesh; Pinto da Costa, Mariana; Rojnic-Kuzman, Martina; Fiorillo, Andrea; Kurimay, Tamas; Hanon, Cecile; Wasserman, Danuta; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an additional European Framework for Competencies in Psychiatry in 2009. Yet these have not been implemented throughout Europe. In this paper, the diversity in training throughout Europe is approached from different angles: the cultural differences between countries with regards to how mental health care is considered and founded on, the cultural differences between people throughout Europe in all states. The position of psychotherapy is emphasised. What once was the cornerstone of psychiatry as medical specialty seems to have become a neglected area. Seeing the patient with mental health problems within his cultural context is important, but considering him within his family context. The purpose of any training is enabling the trainee to gain the knowledge and acquire the competencies necessary to become a well-equipped professional is the subject of the last paragraph in which trainees consider their position and early career psychiatrists look back to see whether what they were trained in matches with what they need in the working situation. Common standard for training and certification are a necessity within Europe, for the benefit of the profession of psychiatrist but also for patient safety. UEMS is advised to join forces with the Council of National Psychiatric Associations (NPAs) within the EPA and trainings and early career psychiatrist, to discuss with the users what standards should be implemented in all European countries and how a European board examination could ensure professional quality of psychiatrists throughout the continent.

  3. A 12-year comparison of students’ perspectives on diversity at a Jesuit Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujawar, Imran; Sabatino, Matt; Mitchell, Stephen Ray; Walker, Benjamin; Weissinger, Peggy; Plankey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have assessed perspectives of medical students toward institutional diversity, but few of them have attempted to map changes in diversity climate over time. Objective This study aims to investigate changes in diversity climate at a Jesuit medical institution over a 12-year period. Methods In 1999, 334 medical students completed an anonymous self-administered online survey, and 12 years later, 406 students completed a comparable survey in 2011. Chi-square tests assessed the differences in percent responses to questions of the two surveys, related to three identities: gender, race, and sexual orientation. Results The 1999 versus 2011 samples were 46% versus 49% female, 61% versus 61% Caucasian, and 41% vs. 39% aged 25 years or older. Findings suggested improvements in medical students’ perceptions surrounding equality ‘in general’ across the three identities (pequality and diversity over the past 12 years may have been influenced by a generational acceptance of cultural diversity and, the inclusion of diversity training courses within the medical curriculum. Diversity training related to race and sexual orientation should be expanded, including a follow-up survey to assess the effectiveness of any intervention. PMID:24581334

  4. New IAEA training initiatives in the field of radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormai, P.; Kinker, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Waste Technology Section

    2014-03-15

    More than 50 Member States have requested assistance from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to help them develop the necessary competencies and skills that will allow them to implement technically viable, safe, secure and cost-effective radioactive waste management (RWM) solutions. At the present time the IAEA provides numerous opportunities for the training of managers and experts representing national programmes, regulatory bodies, and organizations related to RWM, and staff of national regulatory bodies responsible for licensing and inspection of such facilities, either through bilateral agreements or through the mechanism of thematic networks. The training events may be lecture based or comprise hands-on training, or may be a combination of the two. However, it is recognised that there are some limitations in the current approach. In order to overcome these limitations, the IAEA is committed to identify and utilise alternative and more cost effective avenues for the delivery of its training. To this end a decision has been made to develop a comprehensive RWM curriculum that jointly covers aspects of both safety and technology with an appropriate balance and that ensures that the two dimensions are delivered in a complimentary and consistent manner, including integration where appropriate. The training materials that will result from the development of the curriculum will be delivered through the medium of the internet and personal computers (eLearning) and also through extended face-face courses to be delivered in Regional Centres of Learning (which are still to be established). The curriculum will be developed collaboratively between the IAEA, international experts and the learning centres. (orig.)

  5. New IAEA training initiatives in the field of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormai, P.; Kinker, J.

    2014-01-01

    More than 50 Member States have requested assistance from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to help them develop the necessary competencies and skills that will allow them to implement technically viable, safe, secure and cost-effective radioactive waste management (RWM) solutions. At the present time the IAEA provides numerous opportunities for the training of managers and experts representing national programmes, regulatory bodies, and organizations related to RWM, and staff of national regulatory bodies responsible for licensing and inspection of such facilities, either through bilateral agreements or through the mechanism of thematic networks. The training events may be lecture based or comprise hands-on training, or may be a combination of the two. However, it is recognised that there are some limitations in the current approach. In order to overcome these limitations, the IAEA is committed to identify and utilise alternative and more cost effective avenues for the delivery of its training. To this end a decision has been made to develop a comprehensive RWM curriculum that jointly covers aspects of both safety and technology with an appropriate balance and that ensures that the two dimensions are delivered in a complimentary and consistent manner, including integration where appropriate. The training materials that will result from the development of the curriculum will be delivered through the medium of the internet and personal computers (eLearning) and also through extended face-face courses to be delivered in Regional Centres of Learning (which are still to be established). The curriculum will be developed collaboratively between the IAEA, international experts and the learning centres. (orig.)

  6. Virtual physiological human: training challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, Patricia V; Narracott, Andrew V; McCormack, Keith; Bisbal, Jesus; Martin, Carlos; Bijnens, Bart; Brook, Bindi; Zachariou, Margarita; Freixa, Jordi Villà I; Kohl, Peter; Fletcher, Katherine; Diaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2010-06-28

    The virtual physiological human (VPH) initiative encompasses a wide range of activities, including structural and functional imaging, data mining, knowledge discovery tool and database development, biomedical modelling, simulation and visualization. The VPH community is developing from a multitude of relatively focused, but disparate, research endeavours into an integrated effort to bring together, develop and translate emerging technologies for application, from academia to industry and medicine. This process initially builds on the evolution of multi-disciplinary interactions and abilities, but addressing the challenges associated with the implementation of the VPH will require, in the very near future, a translation of quantitative changes into a new quality of highly trained multi-disciplinary personnel. Current strategies for undergraduate and on-the-job training may soon prove insufficient for this. The European Commission seventh framework VPH network of excellence is exploring this emerging need, and is developing a framework of novel training initiatives to address the predicted shortfall in suitably skilled VPH-aware professionals. This paper reports first steps in the implementation of a coherent VPH training portfolio.

  7. Source modelling of train noise - Literature review and some initial measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xuetao; Jonasson, Hans; Holmberg, Kjell

    2000-07-01

    A literature review of source modelling of railway noise is reported. Measurements on a special test rig at Surahammar and on the new railway line between Arlanda and Stockholm City are reported and analyzed. In the analysis the train is modelled as a number of point sources with or without directivity and each source is combined with analytical sound propagation theory to predict the sound propagation pattern best fitting the measured data. Wheel/rail rolling noise is considered to be the most important noise source. The rolling noise can be modelled as an array of moving point sources, which have a dipole-like horizontal directivity and some kind of vertical directivity. In general it is necessary to distribute the point sources on several heights. Based on our model analysis the source heights for the rolling noise should be below the wheel axles and the most important height is about a quarter of wheel diameter above the railheads. When train speeds are greater than 250 km/h aerodynamic noise will become important and even dominant. It may be important for low frequency components only if the train speed is less than 220 km/h. Little data are available for these cases. It is believed that aerodynamic noise has dipole-like directivity. Its spectrum depends on many factors: speed, railway system, type of train, bogies, wheels, pantograph, presence of barriers and even weather conditions. Other sources such as fans, engine, transmission and carriage bodies are at most second order noise sources, but for trains with a diesel locomotive engine the engine noise will be dominant if train speeds are less than about 100 km/h. The Nord 2000 comprehensive model for sound propagation outdoors, together with the source model that is based on the understandings above, can suitably handle the problems of railway noise propagation in one-third octave bands although there are still problems left to be solved.

  8. Factors influencing career choice after initial training in surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, Seamus

    2011-03-01

    Irish general surgery faces a recruitment crisis with only 87 of 145 (60%) basic surgical training (BST) places filled in 2009. We assessed basic surgical trainees to identify objective, and potentially modifiable, factors that influence ultimate recruitment into a general surgical career.

  9. The Scope and Impact of Workplace Diversity in the United Arab Emirates – An Initial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badreya Al-Jenaibi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Managing workplace diversity has become a priority concern among organizations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE today. The UAE has one of the world's largest net migration rates, and the number of workers from India, the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia, the USA, among other countries, has increased significantly in recent decades (Burns, 2005. The UAE's cross-border mobility has resulted in the interaction of people with diverse language, customs and ethnic backgrounds. Although diversity has been shown to have a number of benefits, including enhanced employee creativity and competence, this recognition is often found more in theory than actual practice. Diversity can also lead to miscommunication, dysfunctional adaptation behaviors and the creation of barriers that reduce the benefits diversity can bring to the organization. Due to the nature of the UAE workplace, which is dominated by a foreign workforce, this study critically analyzes the benefits and challenges organizations face in the diverse workplaces of the United Arab Emirates. The study used a multi-method approach combining survey data from 450 surveys of foreign workers with qualitative data from interviews with native officials of organizations. It is an attempt to compare the views of UAE workplace experience from two different groups—non-native workers and native officials. The research found a generally favorable view toward workplace diversity from the perspective of surveyed employees. However, when asked more detailed questions about company policy, a significant segment of respondents expressed reservations about their employer’s ability to implement successful intercultural communication and diversity practices.

  10. Impact of two policy interventions on dietary diversity in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Juan; Ramos-Martin, Jesus

    2017-06-01

    To differentiate the effects of food vouchers and training in health and nutrition on consumption and dietary diversity in Ecuador by using an experimental design. Interventions involved enrolling three groups of approximately 200 randomly selected households per group in three provinces in Ecuador. Power estimates and sample size were computed using the Optimal Design software, with a power of 80 %, at 5 % of significance and with a minimum detectable effect of 0·25 (sd). The first group was assigned to receive a monthly food voucher of $US 40. The second group was assigned to receive the same $US 40 voucher, plus training on health and nutrition issues. The third group served as the control. Weekly household values of food consumption were converted into energy intake per person per day. A simple proxy indicator was constructed for dietary diversity, based on the Food Consumption Score. Finally, an econometric model with three specifications was used for analysing the differential effect of the interventions. Three provinces in Ecuador, two from the Sierra region (Carchi and Chimborazo) and one from the Coastal region (Santa Elena). Members of 773 households randomly selected (n 4343). No significant impact on consumption for any of the interventions was found. However, there was evidence that voucher systems had a positive impact on dietary diversity. No differentiated effects were found for the training intervention. The most cost-effective intervention to improve dietary diversity in Ecuador is the use of vouchers to support family choice in food options.

  11. Cultural values and diversity management perspectives : Testing the impact of cultural values on the diversity management perspectives in Sierra Leone, Germany and Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cultural values impact the attitudes towards diversity management perspectives. Therefore they convey critical opportunities and challenges that a country encounters, and which need to be identified for the successful implementation of diversity management initiatives. This thesis discusses the different diversity management perspectives and their motivations and rationales to diversify and the process in which the national culture influences the organizational culture practices. The ...

  12. Challenges in the transition to clinical training in dentistry: An ADEE special interest group initial report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, C M; Botelho, M G; Wesselink, P R; Vervoorn, J M

    2018-02-03

    Curricular integration in higher education has been widely supported in the educational literature. As a result, several health care and specifically dental curricula have evolved from compartmentalised disciplinary training to integrated modalities; however, in many courses, a pre-clinical-clinical watershed remains a barrier to integration in dental education. This article introduces a general description of the pre-clinical-clinical transition in dentistry according to the outcomes of the discussion held during the first working group session of the "Transition to Clinical Training" Special Interest Group during the 2016 annual meeting of the Association for Dental Education in Europe. An online questionnaire was made available before the meeting to survey the curricular characteristics of the participants' schools. During the meeting, a working session related to the pre-clinical-clinical transition occurred. Conclusions from the discussion are summarised in this article. Fourteen dental schools from 12 countries participated in the online survey. The included programmes had an average duration of 5.3 years (SD = 0.48), with high school or the local equivalent as the required entrance level for dentistry. The hybrid curriculum was the leading curriculum design (n = 9) followed by competence-based curricula (n = 3), with patient treatment as the core of clinical training in every included programme. The pre-clinical-clinical transition in dentistry is a recognisable matter in dental education that requires assessment and research to ease the management of a stage with relevant influence on educational outcomes. This article presents an initial framework for further research and educational intervention. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Can Competency-Based Training Fly?: An Overview of Key Issues for "Ab Initio" Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter; Hay, Stephen; Mavin, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based training (CBT) for pilots was formally introduced in 1999 by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for training leading to the issue of aeroplane private and commercial pilot licences. This initiative followed the Australian government's introduction of CBT policy for vocational and workplace training in the late 1980's.…

  14. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Learning and Training. Occasional Paper--InTER/2/88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Geoff

    This report summarizes and interprets the discussions at a seminar on artificial intelligence (AI) training domains and knowledge representations which was sponsored by the United Kingdom Training Commission. The following broad areas are addressed: (1) the context, process, and diversity of requirements of training and training needs; (2)…

  15. Tagging like Humans: Diverse and Distinct Image Annotation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2018-03-31

    In this work we propose a new automatic image annotation model, dubbed {\\\\bf diverse and distinct image annotation} (D2IA). The generative model D2IA is inspired by the ensemble of human annotations, which create semantically relevant, yet distinct and diverse tags. In D2IA, we generate a relevant and distinct tag subset, in which the tags are relevant to the image contents and semantically distinct to each other, using sequential sampling from a determinantal point process (DPP) model. Multiple such tag subsets that cover diverse semantic aspects or diverse semantic levels of the image contents are generated by randomly perturbing the DPP sampling process. We leverage a generative adversarial network (GAN) model to train D2IA. Extensive experiments including quantitative and qualitative comparisons, as well as human subject studies, on two benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed model can produce more diverse and distinct tags than the state-of-the-arts.

  16. Multicultural training in the United States: a survey of occupational therapy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elena Verdine Donoso; Muñoz, Jaime Phillip; Powell, Janet M

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to describe multicultural training practices in occupational therapy programs. A survey was sent to occupational therapy programs in the United States to gather information on multicultural content, skills, and teaching methods as well as diversity context and challenges. The response rate was 54%. The most frequently covered multicultural content was related to cultural background and sociopolitical factors. Multicultural skills covered most often were practice oriented and interpersonal skills. Teaching methods reported as used most often differed from the methods thought by the respondents to be most effective. Programs reported multiple challenges to multicultural training including lack of time and lack of diversity in the student body, faculty, and environment. Results suggest that educators may need to expand multicultural content and skills to prepare occupational therapy students for providing care in increasingly diverse practice settings. In addition, increased use of teaching methods that focus on exposure to diverse populations and reflection may be needed to improve the effectiveness of multicultural training in occupational therapy programs.

  17. Predictors of cognitive enhancement after training in preschoolers from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad eSegretin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The association between socioeconomic status and child cognitive development, and the positive impact of interventions aimed at optimizing cognitive performance, are well documented. However, few studies have examined how specific socio-environmental factors may moderate the impact of cognitive interventions among poor children. In the present study, we examined how such factors predicted cognitive trajectories during the preschool years, in two samples of children from Argentina, who participated in two cognitive training programs between the years 2002 and 2005: the School Intervention Program (SIP; N=745 and the Cognitive Training Program (CTP; N=333. In both programs children were trained weekly for 16 weeks and tested before and after the intervention using a battery of tasks assessing several cognitive control processes (attention, inhibitory control, working memory, flexibility and planning. After applying mixed model analyses, we identified sets of socio-environmental predictors that were associated with higher levels of pre-intervention cognitive control performance and with increased improvement in cognitive control from pre- to post-intervention. Child age, housing conditions, social resources, parental occupation and family composition were associated with performance in specific cognitive domains at baseline. Housing conditions, social resources, parental occupation, family composition, maternal physical health, age, group (intervention/control and the number of training sessions were related to improvements in specific cognitive skills from pre- to post-training.

  18. SAT for instructor training. An experience in implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioujakov, A.Yu.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the main approaches for Instructor Training are presented been verified and approved by practice within Russian NPP Training organisations during last 5 years. The instructor selection, recruitment and followed training activities are an essential strategy plan for any NPP training organisation if the latter wants to provide effective training of NPP personnel. The strategy how to reach and maintain the competencies of instructors (or trainers) is explained; key points of instructor training programmes, both initial and continuing, are also discussed. The approaches concerned Instructor Training Programs being in compliance with the best of the Russian and international practice are defined and presented; these approaches in the field of instructor training. Initial and continuous training parts of whole program are discussed including specific modules/parts and principles to be used. Some examples extracted from verified and implemented training courses are presented and discussed. (author)

  19. The muscular flexibility training and the range of movement improvement: a critical literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Coelho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The muscular flexibility training put in evidence a train of neurophysiological principals and an intricate amount of muscular and viscous-elastic properties. There are a lot of stretching methods, used on the clinical and sport contexts. Despite its common utilization, it isn’t usual the health and educational professionals reflect about the compounds and efficacy of the diverse stretching methods. In this article, we realize a critical review about the diverse methods used on the flexibility training, as the principles and parameters related with that. We will done special emphasis to the principles of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and the diverse local relaxation methods, like warming. We will also have in count the revealing data relating to the Elasticity Coefficient paradox, witch can help to conceive an intervention philosophy of the flexibility training different from what it have being defended and practiced.

  20. Training induces cognitive bias: the case of a simulation-based emergency airway curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Christine S; Stojiljkovic, Ljuba; Milicic, Biljana; Lin, Brian F; Dror, Itiel E

    2014-04-01

    Training-induced cognitive bias may affect performance. Using a simulation-based emergency airway curriculum, we tested the hypothesis that curriculum design would induce bias and affect decision making. Twenty-three novice anesthesiology residents were randomized into 2 groups. The primary outcome measure was the initiation of supraglottic airway and cricothyroidotomy techniques in a simulated cannot-ventilate, cannot-intubate scenario during 3 evaluation sessions. Secondary outcomes were response times for device initiation. After a baseline evaluation and didactic lecture, residents received an initial practical training in either surgical cricothyroidotomy (CRIC group) or supraglottic airway (SGA group). After the midtest, the groups switched to receive the alternate training. From baseline to midtest, the SGA group increased initiation of supraglottic airway but not cricothyroidotomy. The CRIC group increased initiation of cricothyroidotomy but not supraglottic airway. After completion of training in both techniques, the SGA group increased initiation of both supraglottic airway and cricothyroidotomy. In contrast, the CRIC group increased initiation of cricothyroidotomy but failed to change practice in supraglottic airway. Final test response times showed that the CRIC group was slower to initiate supraglottic airway and faster to initiate cricothyroidotomy. Practical training in only 1 technique caused bias in both groups despite a preceding didactic lecture. The chief finding was an asymmetrical effect of training sequence even after training in both techniques. Initial training in cricothyroidotomy caused bias that did not correct despite subsequent supraglottic airway training. Educators must be alert to the risk of inducing cognitive bias when designing curricula.

  1. Advancing research opportunities and promoting pathways in graduate education: a systemic approach to BUILD training at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urizar, Guido G; Henriques, Laura; Chun, Chi-Ah; Buonora, Paul; Vu, Kim-Phuong L; Galvez, Gino; Kingsford, Laura

    2017-01-01

    First-generation college graduates, racial and ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and those from disadvantaged backgrounds are gravely underrepresented in the health research workforce representing behavioral health sciences and biomedical sciences and engineering (BHS/BSE). Furthermore, relative to their peers, very few students from these underrepresented groups (URGs) earn scientific bachelor's degrees with even fewer earning doctorate degrees. Therefore, programs that engage and retain URGs in health-related research careers early on in their career path are imperative to promote the diversity of well-trained research scientists who have the ability to address the nation's complex health challenges in an interdisciplinary way. The purpose of this paper is to describe the challenges, lessons learned, and sustainability of implementing a large-scale, multidisciplinary research infrastructure at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) - a minority-serving institution - through federal funding received by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative. The CSULB BUILD initiative consists of developing a research infrastructure designed to engage and retain URGs on the research career path by providing them with the research training and skills needed to make them highly competitive for doctoral programs and entry into the research workforce. This initiative unites many research disciplines using basic, applied, and translational approaches to offer insights and develop technologies addressing prominent community and national health issues from a multidisciplinary perspective. Additionally, this initiative brings together local (e.g., high school, community college, doctoral research institutions) and national (e.g., National Research Mentoring Network) collaborative partners to alter how we identify, develop, and implement resources to enhance student and faculty research. Finally, this

  2. Initial evaluation of the training programme for health care professionals on the use of Malaysian clinical practice guidelines for management of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, S; Koh, C T; Mohd Aminuddin, M Y; Krishnasamy, M; Suhaila, M Z

    2013-09-01

    The Malaysian Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) for Management of Dementia (second edition) was launched in April 2010 by the Ministry of Health Malaysia. A training programme for the management of dementia, involving all categories of staff working at primary and secondary centres, was implemented to ensure that care delivery for people with dementia was in accordance with the guidelines. The study aimed to look into improving knowledge and understanding of dementia following training, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the training programme using a clinical audit indicator recommended in the guidelines. The study entailed 2 phases (at national and state levels). The first phase involved the CPG training programme run as a 1.5-day workshop, in which participants filled up pre- and post-workshop questionnaires. A second phase involved analysing all the referral letters to the memory clinic at the Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru 1 year before and after the training programme. There was a significant improvement in knowledge about dementia and its management among the health care professionals following training. The mean percentage score for the pre-workshop test was 63% while for the post-workshop test it was 78%, giving a difference of 15%. Although there was an overall improvement in knowledge gain following training in both specialist and non-specialist groups, these differences were not statistically significant (t = 1.32; 95% confidence interval, -2.61 to 9.61; p = 0.25). The proportion of referrals with a possible diagnosis of dementia from primary clinic referrals to the memory clinic also increased from 18% to 44% after training. There was an overall improvement in the knowledge about dementia among the health care professionals following the training, which was reflected in the increase in referrals to the memory clinic. Although the initial results appeared to be promising, a multicentre study is warranted to conclude that the training had been

  3. Training and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavitz, J.

    1997-12-31

    The lack of formal education and the lack of skills in the oil and gas industry among Northerners were substantial barriers to their employment in the exploration projects. Eventually, training programs were created to ensure that Northern residents had an opportunity to acquire the skills necessary for them to benefit from Northern employment opportunities. Initially, Northern employees were sent to Southern training schools located in Edmonton, Calgary and Victoria, where besides training in operating machinery on the oil rigs and drill ships, they also received instruction on how to manage money, deal with financial institutions, and generally to cope in a wage-based economy. This program proved to be only marginally successful since, according to several people interviewed, going south frequently developed into simply taking advantage of the opportunity to have a good time. According to the same people, learning and productivity levels among the trainees were consistently low, making the program uneconomical. In due course, a hands-on, on-the-job training system was adopted. This, too, proved to be less than effective, because Northern trainees still lacked the formal education to progress beyond entry level menial jobs, and it was still expensive, as well as dangerous. Eventually, an off-season training program - Tuk Tech - was started with government help. This initiative was the most successful in training people to work in many capacities, `everything from radio operators to chefs to nurses` as well as instilling fundamental life skills. Although exploration has ceased for the immediate future, training remains vital for the Northern population to take advantage of any future opportunities.

  4. Training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavitz, J.

    1997-01-01

    The lack of formal education and the lack of skills in the oil and gas industry among Northerners were substantial barriers to their employment in the exploration projects. Eventually, training programs were created to ensure that Northern residents had an opportunity to acquire the skills necessary for them to benefit from Northern employment opportunities. Initially, Northern employees were sent to Southern training schools located in Edmonton, Calgary and Victoria, where besides training in operating machinery on the oil rigs and drill ships, they also received instruction on how to manage money, deal with financial institutions, and generally to cope in a wage-based economy. This program proved to be only marginally successful since, according to several people interviewed, going south frequently developed into simply taking advantage of the opportunity to have a good time. According to the same people, learning and productivity levels among the trainees were consistently low, making the program uneconomical. In due course, a hands-on, on-the-job training system was adopted. This, too, proved to be less than effective, because Northern trainees still lacked the formal education to progress beyond entry level menial jobs, and it was still expensive, as well as dangerous. Eventually, an off-season training program - Tuk Tech - was started with government help. This initiative was the most successful in training people to work in many capacities, 'everything from radio operators to chefs to nurses' as well as instilling fundamental life skills. Although exploration has ceased for the immediate future, training remains vital for the Northern population to take advantage of any future opportunities

  5. Radar Training Facility Local Area Network -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The RTF LAN system provides a progressive training environment for initial and refresher radar training qualification for new and re-hired FAA employees. Its purpose...

  6. 14 CFR 121.433 - Training required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures set forth in a certificate holder's approved low-altitude windshear flight training program when... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training required. 121.433 Section 121.433..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Crewmember Qualifications § 121.433 Training required. (a) Initial...

  7. A road map for compliance training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.

    1995-01-01

    On April 6, 1990, the American Petroleum Institute (API) amended its bylaws to incorporate an environmental mission statement and 11 guiding environmental principles. The action renewed and reemphasized the industry's commitment to safe and environmentally sound operations. One of these principles deals specifically with safe plant operations: To operate their plants and facilities, and to handle their raw materials and products in a manner that protects the environment, and the safety and health of their employees and the public. This principle has particular relevance in the area of employee training and information transfer, where assurance of safe and environmentally sound operations start with a properly trained and informed workforce. Similarly, in 1988, the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA) adopted an initiative called Responsible Care reg-sign: A Public Commitment. The initiative commits member companies to improve performance in response to public concerns about the impact of chemicals on health, safety and environmental quality. The implementation of sound training programs will help achieve compliance with both API's and CMAs initiatives. Besides operations and maintenance skills training, however, Federally Mandated Training is an important issue facing the petroleum and chemical industry

  8. Weaving latino cultural concepts into Preparedness Core Competency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Jacome, Mary; Parker, Blanca Angelica Gonzalez; Waltz, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    The New York • New Jersey Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (NY•NJ PERLC) is one of 14 Centers funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designed to address the preparedness and response training and education needs of the public health workforce. One of the important niches, or focus areas for the Center, is training to improve the capacity of public health workers to respond with competence to the needs of vulnerable populations. During every phase of a disaster, racial and ethnic minorities, including Latinos, suffer worse outcomes than the general population. Communities with diverse cultural origins and limited English speakers often present more complex issues during public health emergencies. Training that incorporates cultural concepts into the Preparedness Core Competencies may improve the ability of public health workers to engage the Latino community in preparedness activities and ultimately improve outcomes during disasters. This article describes initiatives undertaken by the NY•NJ PERLC to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to respond competently to the needs of Latino populations. In 2012, the Center collaborated with national, state, and local partners to develop a nationwide broadcast founded on the Preparedness Core Competencies, Latinos During Emergencies: Cultural Considerations Impacting Disaster Preparedness. The widely viewed broadcast (497 sites in 47 states and 13 nations) highlighted the commonalities and differences within Latino culture that can impact emergency preparedness and response and outlined practical strategies to enhance participation. The success of the broadcast spurred a number of partner requests for training and technical assistance. Lessons learned from these experiences, including our "undercover" work at local Points of Dispensing, are incorporated into subsequent interactive trainings to improve the competency of public health workers. Participants recommended

  9. Interrelations between Prospective Teachers’ Experiences of Artistic Creativity and Diversity and Individuality as Professional Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briška Ilze

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate the possibilities of artistic creativity to foster the development of prospective teachers’ professional values to enable an appreciation of the diversity and individuality. The central idea of the article is on the development of the student’s values and its relation to a person’s direct emotional experience of a particular value and reflective arrangement of its emotional trend and subjective sense. One of the modes of experience of artistic creativity - experience of the creative process - is analysed as a source for emotions, necessary for the initiation of the process of development of values. The analysis of qualitative and quantitative data reveals significant interconnections between prospective teachers’ experience of creative process in art classes and their attitudes towards diversity and individuality as personally and professionally significant values. The results of the research enable us to provide suggestions about the content of visual art studies in teacher training curriculum, recommendable for facilitating the development of prospective teachers’ professional competence.

  10. Human diversity in images

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A photo contest is being jointly organized by the CERN Equal Opportunities team and the CERN Photo Club. All you need to do is submit a photo or quotation. The contest is open to everyone.   Diversity at CERN You don’t need to be a photographer or to have sophisticated photographic equipment to capture CERN’s diversity of working styles, gender, age, ethnic, origin and physical ability. Its many facets are all around you! The emphasis of the initiative is on capturing this diversity in an image using creativity, intuition and cultural empathy. You can also contribute with a quotation (whether or not you specify who said it is optional) telling the organizers what strikes you about diversity at CERN. The photo entries and a collection of the quotations will be displayed in an exhibition to be held in May in the Main Building, as well as on the CERN Photo Club website. The best photos will be awarded prizes. So over to you: dig deep inside human nature, explore individual tal...

  11. Catalyzing Interdisciplinary Research and Training: Initial Outcomes and Evolution of the Affinity Research Collaboratives Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravid, Katya; Seta, Francesca; Center, David; Waters, Gloria; Coleman, David

    2017-10-01

    Team science has been recognized as critical to solving increasingly complex biomedical problems and advancing discoveries in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. In 2009, the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) was established in the Department of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine as a new organizational paradigm to promote interdisciplinary team science. The ECIBR is made up of affinity research collaboratives (ARCs), consisting of investigators from different departments and disciplines who come together to study biomedical problems that are relevant to human disease and not under interdisciplinary investigation at the university. Importantly, research areas are identified by investigators according to their shared interests. ARC proposals are evaluated by a peer review process, and collaboratives are funded annually for up to three years.Initial outcomes of the first 12 ARCs show the value of this model in fostering successful biomedical collaborations that lead to publications, extramural grants, research networking, and training. The most successful ARCs have been developed into more sustainable organizational entities, including centers, research cores, translational research projects, and training programs.To further expand team science at Boston University, the Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Office was established in 2015 to more fully engage the entire university, not just the medical campus, in interdisciplinary research using the ARC mechanism. This approach to promoting team science may be useful to other academic organizations seeking to expand interdisciplinary research at their institutions.

  12. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitz, Patricia A.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18

    In the twentieth century, ecologists and agriculturists developed an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the value of biological diversity, specifically the resilience and adaptability it brings to ecosystems. In the twenty-first century, the ecosystem model has been applied to human systems, particularly to understanding how organizations are structured and how they operate. Twenty-first century organizations are challenged by diversity in many arenas. Demographic changes in workforce composition and customer populations, combined with globalized markets and international competition are increasing the amount of diversity organizations must manage, both internally and externally. Many diversity specialists and business leaders argue that businesses and organizations interested in surviving and thriving in the twenty-first century need to take competitive advantage of a diverse workplace (Soutar, 2004; Yang, 2005). But to do so successfully, leaders and human resources (HR) managers must redefine management and leadership (Jones, 1989). Just as mono-cropping destroys biological diversity, and, in extreme cases, such as the Irish potato famine--human as well as natural ecosystems (Keohane, n.d.), so does mono-managing similarly destroy diversity within organizations. Leaders wanting to build strong, diverse organizations will not be successful if they rely on one approach or solution. Single-threaded diversity solutions, such as focusing only on recruitment or single-approach management techniques, such as requiring every employee to take diversity training, do not create lasting change (Kossek & Lobel, 1996; McMahon, 2006; Thomas, 1990). Bringing about the changes needed to build and sustain diversity requires commitment, strategy, communication, and concrete changes in organizational structure and processes. How, then, can managers and leaders develop diverse organizations and ensure that they are managed to take optimum advantage of diversity? What role

  13. Controls on shallow landslide initiation: Diverse hydrologic pathways, 3D failure geometries, and unsaturated soil suctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mark; Iverson, Richard; Brien, Dianne; Iverson, Neal; LaHusen, Richard; Logan, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Shallow landslides and ensuing debris flows are a common hazard worldwide, yet forecasting their initiation at a specific site is challenging. These challenges arise, in part, from diverse near-surface hydrologic pathways under different wetting conditions, 3D failure geometries, and the effects of suction in partially saturated soils. Simplistic hydrologic models typically used for regional hazard assessment disregard these complexities. As an alterative to field studies where the effects of these governing factors can be difficult to isolate, we used the USGS debris-flow flume to conduct controlled, field-scale landslide initiation experiments. Using overhead sprinklers or groundwater injectors on the flume bed, we triggered failures using three different wetting conditions: groundwater inflow from below, prolonged moderate-intensity precipitation, and bursts of high-intensity precipitation. Failures occurred in 6 m3 (0.65-m thick and 2-m wide) prisms of loamy sand on a 31° slope; these field-scale failures enabled realistic incorporation of nonlinear scale-dependent effects such as soil suction. During the experiments, we monitored soil deformation, variably saturated pore pressures, and moisture changes using ˜50 sensors sampling at 20 Hz. From ancillary laboratory tests, we determined shear strength, saturated hydraulic conductivities, and unsaturated moisture retention characteristics. The three different wetting conditions noted above led to different hydrologic pathways and influenced instrumental responses and failure timing. During groundwater injection, pore-water pressures increased from the bed of the flume upwards into the sediment, whereas prolonged moderate infiltration wet the sediment from the ground surface downward. In both cases, pore pressures acting on the impending failure surface slowly rose until abrupt failure. In contrast, a burst of intense sprinkling caused rapid failure without precursory development of widespread positive pore

  14. Development of a new bioprocess scheme using frozen seed train intermediates to initiate CHO cell culture manufacturing campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Gargi; Hamilton, Robert W; Stapp, Thomas R; Zheng, Lisa; Meier, Angela; Petty, Krista; Leung, Stephenie; Chary, Srikanth

    2013-05-01

    Agility to schedule and execute cell culture manufacturing campaigns quickly in a multi-product facility will play a key role in meeting the growing demand for therapeutic proteins. In an effort to shorten campaign timelines, maximize plant flexibility and resource utilization, we investigated the initiation of cell culture manufacturing campaigns using CHO cells cryopreserved in large volume bags in place of the seed train process flows that are conventionally used in cell culture manufacturing. This approach, termed FASTEC (Frozen Accelerated Seed Train for Execution of a Campaign), involves cultivating cells to high density in a perfusion bioreactor, and cryopreserving cells in multiple disposable bags. Each run for a manufacturing campaign would then come from a thaw of one or more of these cryopreserved bags. This article reviews the development and optimization of individual steps of the FASTEC bioprocess scheme: scaling up cells to greater than 70 × 10(6) cells/mL and freezing in bags with an optimized controlled rate freezing protocol and using a customized rack configuration. Flow cytometry analysis was also employed to understand the recovery of CHO cells following cryopreservation. Extensive development data were gathered to ensure that the quantity and quality of the drug manufactured using the FASTEC bioprocess scheme was acceptable compared to the conventional seed train process flow. The result of offering comparable manufacturing options offers flexibility to the cell culture manufacturing network. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Who would benefit from memory training? A pilot study examining the ceiling effect of concurrent cognitive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok TCY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Timothy CY Kwok1,2, Wai Wang Chau1, Kenneth SL Yuen1,3, Anita YM Wong4, Jessie CY Li1, Rebecca YY Shiu4, Florence KY Ho11Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 3Laboratory of Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong; 4The Hong Kong Chinese Women's Club Madam Wong Chan Sook Ying Memorial Care and Attention Home for the Aged, Hong KongAbstract: Diverse effects of memory training were observed in the literature. One possible factor is the amount of concurrent cognitive training received during the training program. In this pilot study, we recruited 24 elderly adults with or without concurrent cognitive stimulations to attend a memory-training program. Findings suggested that elderly people without concurrent cognitive stimulation could benefit from a memory-training program in the form of improved initiation and memory functioning. Self-rated quality of life measure also showed improvements alongside the cognitive benefits. Elderly people with regular concurrent cognitive stimulation, on the other hand, seemed to plateau in their level of performance and did not show any significant change. Our preliminary findings suggested nonlinear concurrent cognitive stimulation in the elderly.Keywords: memory training, cognitive training, dementia, Chinese, elderly 

  16. Assessment of field training for nuclear operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.

    1995-08-01

    Training of station personnel is an important component of the safe operation of the nuclear generating station. On-the-job training (OJT) is an important component of training. The AECB initiated this project to develop a process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, and perform an initial trial of the developed process. This report describes the recommended process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, as well as the results of the initial assessment at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The assessment's conclusions included: (1) Ontario Hydro policies and procedures are generally consistent with industry guidelines requiring a systematic approach to training; (2) Pickering NGS field operator performance is not always consistent with documented station requirements and standards, nor industry guidelines and practices; and (3) The Pickering NGS field operator on-the-job training is not consistent with a systematic approach to training, a requirement recognized in Ontario Hydro's Policy NGD 113, and does not contribute to a high level of performance in field operator tasks. Recommendations are made regarding the use of the developed process for future assessments of on-the-job training at nuclear power plants. (author). 36 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Speech-Language Pathologists' Preparation, Practices, and Perspectives on Serving Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark; Atkins, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the backgrounds, diversity training, and professional perspectives reported by 154 Colorado speech-language pathologists in serving children from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds. The authors compare the results of the current survey to those of a similar survey collected in 1996. Respondents reported…

  18. Augmented Reality to Enhance Crew Medical Training

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Due to the large and diverse set of possible medical conditions, crew medical training focuses on the most likely medical scenarios that may occur in the current...

  19. Overview of Cernavoda NPP training programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents a general assessment of Cernavoda NPP personnel training programme, highlighting the role of training in human performance improvement. Cernavoda NPP Personnel Training and Authorization Department (PTAD) is the one responsible for the training of Unit 1 and 2 staff. PTAD is structured in such a manner as to support and respond to all Cernavoda NPP training, qualification and authorization requirements. The training of personnel is continuously adapted based on IAEA Guides and INPO/WANO recommendations, to keep with world standards, based on the internal and external reviews. At Cernavoda NPP the Training Concept and the Training Programmes are based on SAT - Systematic Approach to Training. The Training Concept is established on a set of training documents (RD's, SI's, IDP's), which address all the SAT phases: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation. The Training Programmes are structured on the initial and continuing personnel training. Their content and goals respond to the training specific needs for each plant major job family. In order to successfully support NPP training programmes, CNPP training center has upgraded classrooms with new presentation facilities and there are plans to expand the space of the building, to develop additional operator and maintenance skills facilities. There are also a number of general areas for improvement of PTAD activity, such as operators and maintenance training, initial and continuing training of both Unit 1 and 2 staff. By responding in a timely and completely manner to all plant training requirements PTAD will help in rising human performance of Cernavoda NPP personnel, supporting the safe, efficient and cost effective production of power. (author)

  20. Supporting diverse data providers in the open water data initiative: Communicating water data quality and fitness of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sara; Hamilton, Stuart; Lucido, Jessica M.; Garner, Bradley D.; Young, Dwane

    2016-01-01

    Shared, trusted, timely data are essential elements for the cooperation needed to optimize economic, ecologic, and public safety concerns related to water. The Open Water Data Initiative (OWDI) will provide a fully scalable platform that can support a wide variety of data from many diverse providers. Many of these will be larger, well-established, and trusted agencies with a history of providing well-documented, standardized, and archive-ready products. However, some potential partners may be smaller, distributed, and relatively unknown or untested as data providers. The data these partners will provide are valuable and can be used to fill in many data gaps, but can also be variable in quality or supplied in nonstandardized formats. They may also reflect the smaller partners' variable budgets and missions, be intermittent, or of unknown provenance. A challenge for the OWDI will be to convey the quality and the contextual “fitness” of data from providers other than the most trusted brands. This article reviews past and current methods for documenting data quality. Three case studies are provided that describe processes and pathways for effective data-sharing and publication initiatives. They also illustrate how partners may work together to find a metadata reporting threshold that encourages participation while maintaining high data integrity. And lastly, potential governance is proposed that may assist smaller partners with short- and long-term participation in the OWDI.

  1. B-WEST Regional Workforce Training Center. Building Workers Entering Skilled Trades. Employer Training Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portland Community Coll., OR.

    This guide, which was developed during the B-WEST (Building Workers Entering Skilled Trades) project, includes materials for use in training and providing on-site consultations to contractors, managers, supervisors, office/technical staff, and others in two areas: diversity in the workplace and sexual harassment in the workplace. Part 1, which…

  2. Geoscience Training for NASA Astronaut Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Evans, C. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Graff, T. G.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-01-01

    After being selected to the astronaut office, crewmembers go through an initial two year training flow, astronaut candidacy, where they learn the basic skills necessary for spaceflight. While the bulk of astronaut candidate training currently centers on the multiple subjects required for ISS operations (EVA skills, Russian language, ISS systems, etc.), training also includes geoscience training designed to train crewmembers in Earth observations, teach astronauts about other planetary systems, and provide field training designed to investigate field operations and boost team skills. This training goes back to Apollo training and has evolved to support ISS operations and future exploration missions.

  3. A Call for Diversity: The Need to Recruit and Retain Ethnic Minority Students in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Yasmine J.; Yali, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need for greater diversity in the field of art therapy with particular attention to increasing the representation of students of color in art therapy training programs. However, little to no data exists on how art therapy programs are actively recruiting for diversity. Diversity in the classroom can offer novel perspectives on…

  4. Gaining Through Training: Pilot Proficiency in Modern Combat Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    training philosophy in their initial qualification unit. Later, when they implemented the same training philosophy at the operational combat units, crew...flying “the matrix,” referencing the Hollywood film portraying an extremely complex reality.6 The MQ-9’s cockpit design does not contribute to...training philosophy at the initial qualification course and operational squadrons in an attempt to improve situational awareness and decision- making

  5. Managing biological diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Fred B.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1993-01-01

    viewing issues across biological, spatial, and temporal scales (Knopf and Smith 1992), natural resource managers find much conflicting information in the literature on strategies and programs for the conservation of biological diversity (Ehrlich 1992). Moreover, recommendations provided in much of the published information available for planning or decisions not only can be debated but may prove counterproductive if implemented. Current operational efforts beg for clearer focus on fundamental concepts central to daily decisions that impact native biological diversity. Recognizing that many biologists would provide different council and at the risk of oversimplification, we offer the following 4 topical issues as fundamental guidance to wise conservation action. These recommendations are based on our collective experiences working within conservation agencies since our original, collaborative essay (Samson and Knopf 1982). They are offered as initial, rather than authoritative, steps to better align research and management decisions with what we perceive as the critical issues in conserving biological diversity at the landscape and ecosystem levels of resolution.

  6. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Training Accreditation Program establishes the objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine its readiness for accreditation. Training programs are evaluated against the accreditation objectives and criteria by facility personnel during the initial self-evaluation process. From this self-evaluation, action plans are made by the contractor to address the scope of work necessary in order to upgrade any deficiencies noted. This scope of work must be formally documented in the Training Program Accreditation Plan. When reviewed and approved by the responsible Head of the Field Organization and cognizant Program Secretarial Office, EH-1 concurrence is obtained. This plan then becomes the document which guides accreditation efforts for the contractor

  7. Allied-General operator training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, A.L.; Ebel, P.E.

    1975-01-01

    All operators at Allied-General Nuclear Services are initially trained in the basic concepts of radiation and radiation protection, they are drilled in the basic technical tools needed for further training, they are instructed in the design and operation of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, and they are introduced to the actual operations via operating procedures. This all occurs during the Before-the-Baseline training phase and then the operators move on Beyond-the-Baseline. There they physically learn how to do their job at their own pace using checklists as a guide. All operators are then internally certified. Progression is based on demonstrated ability and those that qualify go on to jobs requiring NRC licenses. Upon internal certification, retraining commences immediately and will continue in its four month, one year, and two year cycles. Current feedback from the various classes that have completed the courses and are now in the retraining program indicates that this combination of initial technical training, on-the-job training, and retraining will produce and maintain effective, safe, and efficient operators

  8. Diversity in the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Professions (DMMM2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Amy Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-07

    Slide presentation includes background data on diversity in employed persons in metallurgical and materials and other engineering disciplines by ethnicity and gender, and it includes TMS strategic goals for 2018, diversity and inclusion goals, outputs, programming details, as well as supporting initiatives.

  9. Evaluating efforts to diversify the biomedical workforce: the role and function of the Coordination and Evaluation Center of the Diversity Program Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreath, Heather E; Norris, Keith C; Calderόn, Nancy E; Purnell, Dawn L; Maccalla, Nicole M G; Seeman, Teresa E

    2017-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Diversity Program Consortium (DPC) includes a Coordination and Evaluation Center (CEC) to conduct a longitudinal evaluation of the two signature, national NIH initiatives - the Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) and the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) programs - designed to promote diversity in the NIH-funded biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences research workforce. Evaluation is central to understanding the impact of the consortium activities. This article reviews the role and function of the CEC and the collaborative processes and achievements critical to establishing empirical evidence regarding the efficacy of federally-funded, quasi-experimental interventions across multiple sites. The integrated DPC evaluation is particularly significant because it is a collaboratively developed Consortium Wide Evaluation Plan and the first hypothesis-driven, large-scale systemic national longitudinal evaluation of training programs in the history of NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences. To guide the longitudinal evaluation, the CEC-led literature review defined key indicators at critical training and career transition points - or Hallmarks of Success. The multidimensional, comprehensive evaluation of the impact of the DPC framed by these Hallmarks is described. This evaluation uses both established and newly developed common measures across sites, and rigorous quasi-experimental designs within novel multi-methods (qualitative and quantitative). The CEC also promotes shared learning among Consortium partners through working groups and provides technical assistance to support high-quality process and outcome evaluation internally of each program. Finally, the CEC is responsible for developing high-impact dissemination channels for best practices to inform peer institutions, NIH, and other key national and international stakeholders. A strong longitudinal evaluation across

  10. Disability as diversity in Fortune 100 companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Phoebe; Monaco, Gregory; Schmeling, James; Schartz, Helen; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the inclusion of people with disabilities in the diversity policies of the most successful businesses in the United States, we examined the publicly available workforce and supplier diversity policies of the top 100 companies on Fortune Magazine's 2003 list of the 500 most profitable companies in the nation. The majority of these companies have extensive information about their diversity policies and practices available on their corporate website. The information was used to categorize the policies into those that include people with disabilities, do not define diversity, and enumerate what is meant by diversity (e.g. in terms of race or gender) but do not expressly mention disability. In addition, we looked beyond the diversity policies to information available on corporate websites relating to a variety of diversity initiatives. Findings suggest that the majority of the companies that top the Fortune 500 list have developed and implemented diversity policies. Of these, 42% have diversity policies that include people with disabilities in the definition of a diverse workforce. Furthermore, 47% of companies with workplace diversity policies discuss diversity in a way that neither expressly includes nor excludes people with disabilities. Far fewer (15%) supplier diversity policies include disability in the definition of diversity, but a significant number of companies use criteria that allow a business owner with a disability to benefit from the company's supplier diversity program. 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Institutional initiatives in professional scientific ethics: three case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickless, Edmund; Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Learned and professional scientific bodies can play a vital role in promoting ethical behaviours, giving practical substance to theoretical consideration of geoethical principles and complementing the efforts of individual scientists and practitioners to behave in a professional and ethical manner. Institutions may do this through mandatory professional codes of conduct, by developing guidelines and initiatives to codify and stimulate the uptake of best practice, and through wider initiatives to engender a culture conducive to such behaviours. This presentation will outline three current institutional initiatives which directly or indirectly address scientific ethics: i. The UK Science Council's Declaration on Diversity, Equality and Inclusion. ii. Development and promulgation of the American Geosciences Institute's (AGI) Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct. iii. The American Geophysical Union's (AGU) Scientific Code of Conduct and Professional Ethics. The focus of the Science Council and its member bodies (including the Geological Society of London) on diversity is of central importance when considering ethical behaviours in science. First, improving equality and diversity in the science workforce is at the heart of ethical practice, as well as being essential to meeting current and future skills needs. Second, in addition to demographic diversity (whether in terms of gender, race, economic status, sexuality or gender identity, etc), an important dimension of diversity in science is to allow space for a plurality of scientific views, and to nurture dissenting voices - essential both to the development of scientific knowledge and to its effective communication to non-technical audiences.

  12. Constructing Agent Model for Virtual Training Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yohei; Sugimoto, Yuki; Ishida, Toru

    Constructing highly realistic agents is essential if agents are to be employed in virtual training systems. In training for collaboration based on face-to-face interaction, the generation of emotional expressions is one key. In training for guidance based on one-to-many interaction such as direction giving for evacuations, emotional expressions must be supplemented by diverse agent behaviors to make the training realistic. To reproduce diverse behavior, we characterize agents by using a various combinations of operation rules instantiated by the user operating the agent. To accomplish this goal, we introduce a user modeling method based on participatory simulations. These simulations enable us to acquire information observed by each user in the simulation and the operating history. Using these data and the domain knowledge including known operation rules, we can generate an explanation for each behavior. Moreover, the application of hypothetical reasoning, which offers consistent selection of hypotheses, to the generation of explanations allows us to use otherwise incompatible operation rules as domain knowledge. In order to validate the proposed modeling method, we apply it to the acquisition of an evacuee's model in a fire-drill experiment. We successfully acquire a subject's model corresponding to the results of an interview with the subject.

  13. "Can we talk?" Using critical self-reflection and dialogue to build diversity and change organizational culture in nursing schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Carol Parker

    2006-01-01

    Nursing is often cited as a homogenous profession composed of a predominance of white females. It is sometimes posited that this homogeneity might be a contributor to the disparity of nursing care available to minority populations (Blakeney, 2002; Leininger, 1991). Today's nursing students do not mirror the nation's population as only 12.3% of RNs represent racial or ethnic minority groups (AACN, 2001). The absence of sufficiently diverse students in nursing schools, may have led to a dearth of qualified providers in underrepresented neighborhoods. Building diversity in nursing schools prepared specifically to reduce health disparities is, and will continue to be a challenge. While, some schools are beginning to yield successful returns, many are still searching for answers. The answer is not as simple as "increasing the numbers" or sending people to training seminars or conferences. This article focuses on what the author believes to be a preliminary and critical step to begin an effective and successful diversity initiative--critical self-reflection and dialogue. This involves the examination and deconstruction of old paradigms, assumptions, and prejudices, individually and collectively held and the construction of space, respect, and humility to discuss self in relation to "other."

  14. VOCATIONAL TRAINING FOR ADULTS IN THE NETHERLANDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Social Affairs and Public Health, Amsterdam (Netherlands).

    THE NETHERLANDS GOVERNMENT HAS TAKEN OVER ADULT VOCATIONAL TRAINING TO MAKE UP FOR THE ARREARS IN VOCATIONAL TRAINING CAUSED DURING WORLD WAR II AND TO ACHIEVE A SWITCHOVER OF WORKERS FROM TRADES WITH A LABOR SURPLUS TO TRADES WITH A LABOR SHORTAGE. IT HAS ESTABLISHED A NUMBER OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING CENTERS FOR THE INITIAL TRAINING OF PERSONS FOR…

  15. Basic ultrasound training assessment in the initial abdominal trauma screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUAN GERALDO OCAÑA OLIVEIRA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to verify the efficiency and usefulness of basic ultrasound training in trauma (FAST - Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma for emergency physicians in the primary evaluation of abdominal trauma. Methods: a longitudinal and observational study was carried out from 2015 to 2017, with 11 emergency physicians from Hospital Universitário do Oeste do Paraná, submitted to ultrasound training in emergency and trauma (USET® - SBAIT. FAST results started to be collected two months after the course. These were compared with a composite score of complementary exams and surgical findings. Information was stored in a Microsoft Excel program database and submitted to statistical analysis. Results: FAST was performed in 120 patients. In the study, 38.4% of the assessed patients had a shock index ≥0.9. The composite score detected 40 patients with free peritoneal fluid, whereas FAST detected 27 cases. The method sensitivity was 67.5%, specificity was 98.7%, the positive predictive value was 96.4%, the negative predictive value was 85.39% and accuracy was 88%. All those with a positive FAST had a shock index ≥0.9. Fifteen patients with positive FAST and signs of instability were immediately submitted to surgery. Conclusions: the basic training of emergency physicians in FAST showed efficiency and usefulness in abdominal trauma assessment. Due to its low cost and easy implementation, this modality should be considered as a screening strategy for patients with abdominal trauma in health systems.

  16. Resilience training with soldiers during basic combat training: randomisation by platoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amy B; Williams, Jason; McGurk, Dennis; Moss, Andrew; Bliese, Paul D

    2015-03-01

    Resilience Training has the potential to mitigate mental health symptoms when provided during initial military training. The present study examined the impact of Resilience Training on US soldier well-being and attitudes during Basic Combat Training. Platoons were randomly assigned to Resilience Training or Military History provided during the first few days of Basic Combat Training. Surveys were conducted at baseline, post-intervention, and 3, 6, and 9 weeks. The sample resulted in a total of 1,939 soldiers who completed at least the baseline and one follow-up survey. There were no significant differences between conditions in terms of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, or sleep problems. However, while anxiety decreased in both conditions, the rate of decrease was faster in the Resilience Training condition. In contrast, Resilience Training had a slower rate of increase in group cohesion over time than the Military History condition. In addition, Resilience Training was associated with greater confidence in helping others and received more positive ratings than Military History. Findings demonstrate that the brief Resilience Training studied here may have some utility in supporting mental health and peer support but may not benefit unit climate. © 2014 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  17. Competency-based education and training in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Steven E; Pereira, Anne G; Iobst, William F; Mechaber, Alex J; Bronze, Michael S

    2010-12-07

    Recent efforts to improve medical education include adopting a new framework based on 6 broad competencies defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. In this article, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Education Redesign Task Force II examines the advantages and challenges of a competency-based educational framework for medical residents. Efforts to refine specific competencies by developing detailed milestones are described, and examples of training program initiatives using a competency-based approach are presented. Meeting the challenges of a competency-based framework and supporting these educational innovations require a robust faculty development program. Challenges to competency-based education include teaching and evaluating the competencies related to practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice, as well as implementing a flexible time frame to achieve competencies. However, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Education Redesign Task Force II does not favor reducing internal medicine training to less than 36 months as part of competency-based education. Rather, the 36-month time frame should allow for remediation to address deficiencies in achieving competencies and for diverse enrichment experiences in such areas as quality of care and practice improvement for residents who have demonstrated skills in all required competencies.

  18. Multicultural Competence: A Literature Review Supporting Focused Training for Preservice Teachers Teaching Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Cheryl L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on an in depth literature review based on preservice teachers perceptions of their multicultural competence in teaching diverse students. More specifically, the literature review was framed around findings from a study looking at the gap between increased diversity of students and the level of multicultural competence of…

  19. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  20. Individualism-Collectivism and the Role of Goal Orientation in Organizational Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Altovise; Spitzmueller, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    This research examines how individualism-collectivism and goal orientation impact training effectiveness through study of an internationally diverse sample of engineers who were undergoing technical training. In light of contemporary views of individualism-collectivism, we argue that collectivism will moderate the influence of learning and…

  1. High Intensity Interval Training Leads to Greater Improvements in Acute Heart Rate Recovery and Anaerobic Power as High Volume Low Intensity Training

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas L. Stöggl; Glenn Björklund; Glenn Björklund

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore if training regimes utilizing diverse training intensity distributions result in different responses on neuromuscular status, anaerobic capacity/power and acute heart rate recovery (HRR) in well-trained endurance athletes.Methods: Thirty-six male (n = 33) and female (n = 3) runners, cyclists, triathletes and cross-country skiers [peak oxygen uptake: (VO2peak): 61.9 ± 8.0 mL·kg−1·min−1] were randomly assigned to one of three groups (blocked high ...

  2. Assessment of field training for nuclear operations personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M [Safety Management Services, Inc. (Canada)

    1995-08-01

    Training of station personnel is an important component of the safe operation of the nuclear generating station. On-the-job training (OJT) is an important component of training. The AECB initiated this project to develop a process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, and perform an initial trial of the developed process. This report describes the recommended process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, as well as the results of the initial assessment at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The assessment`s conclusions included: (1) Ontario Hydro policies and procedures are generally consistent with industry guidelines requiring a systematic approach to training; (2) Pickering NGS field operator performance is not always consistent with documented station requirements and standards, nor industry guidelines and practices; and (3) The Pickering NGS field operator on-the-job training is not consistent with a systematic approach to training, a requirement recognized in Ontario Hydro`s Policy NGD 113, and does not contribute to a high level of performance in field operator tasks. Recommendations are made regarding the use of the developed process for future assessments of on-the-job training at nuclear power plants. (author). 36 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  3. Acquisition Management: Agencies Can Improve Training on New Initiatives. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Technology and Procurement Policy, Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    A study assessed strategies agencies use to ensure that their workforces are receiving the training necessary to implement acquisition initiatives. Focus was on the General Services Administration (GSA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD). Findings indicated that the critical elements important to…

  4. Process Evaluation of a Diversity Training Program: The Value of a Mixed Method Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Halime; Abma, Tineke A.; Klinge, Ineke; Widdershoven, Guy A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients' health and health needs are influenced by categories of difference like sex, gender, ethnic origin and socioeconomic status (SES). To enhance awareness of this diversity among patients and to provide holistic care for them, health professionals should first be aware of the relation between dimensions of diversity and patients' health and…

  5. Entrepreneurs' attitudes to training and support initiatives: evidence from Ireland and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Faoite, D.; Henry, C.; Johnston, K.; van der Sijde, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, academics, practitioners and governments recognise the need to examine the role and effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support. Studies to date have examined the importance of training and other skil development opportunities in promoting entrepreneurship in the context of

  6. Contribution of Nuclear Training Centre in Ljubljana to Training and Information in the Area of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Training Centre in Ljubljana ia a part of the Jozef Stefan Institute. The paper presents its main activities, which consist of training for NPP Krsko staff, training in the area of radiation protection, organization of international training courses and public information. NPP Krsko personnel obtains initial technical training at our training centre. We are also offering training courses and licensing for people working with radioactive substances in medicine, industry and science. We are internationally recognized training centre for organization of regional and interregional courses and meeting. Our fourth activity is public information. We are visited by around 7000 students per year and answer to every question about nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Analysis and training of cognitive skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumaw, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cognitive skills (e.g., decision making, problem solving) are critical to many jobs in the nuclear power industry, and yet the standard approach to training development does not always train these skills most effectively. In most cases, these skills are not described in sufficient detail, and training programs fail to address them explicitly. Cognitive psychologists have developed a set of techniques, based on analysis of expertise, for describing cognitive skills in more detail. These techniques incorporate a diverse set of human performance measures. An example is given to illustrate a method for determining how experts represent problems mentally. Cognitive psychologists have also established a set of empirical findings concerning skill acquisition. These findings can be used to provide some general rules for structuring the training of cognitive skills

  8. Towards Chemical Engineering Student Diversity: The Case of International Student Experiences at Tuskegee University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baah, David; Floyd-Smith, Tamara; Begum, Shamim Ara; Smith, Allen; Kwon, K. C.; Vahdat, Nader

    2018-01-01

    Cultural integration of students and student population diversity play an important role in training college students, due to growing demand for diversity to solutions to human needs, the advancement of global economy and cultural understanding. This type of cultural integration has resulted in the new normal known as the multicultural classroom.…

  9. Joint Training of Deep Boltzmann Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Goodfellow, Ian; Courville, Aaron; Bengio, Yoshua

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new method for training deep Boltzmann machines jointly. Prior methods require an initial learning pass that trains the deep Boltzmann machine greedily, one layer at a time, or do not perform well on classifi- cation tasks.

  10. Evaluation of an Implementation Initiative for Embedding Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Community Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschell, Amy D.; Lindhiem, Oliver J.; Kogan, Jane N.; Celedonia, Karen L.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) training in community-based agencies. Data were gathered at four time points over a two-year period from front-line mental health therapists (N = 64) from 10 community-based agencies that participated in a DBT implementation initiative. We examined change on therapist attitudes towards consumers with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), confidence in the effectiveness of DBT, and use of DBT model components. All measures were self-report. Participating in DBT training resulted in positive changes over time, including improved therapist attitudes toward consumers with BPD, improved confidence in the effectiveness of DBT, and increased use of DBT components. Therapists who had the lowest baseline scores on the study outcomes had the greatest self-reported positive change in outcomes over time. Moreover, there were notable positive correlations in therapist characteristics; therapists who had the lowest baseline attitudes towards individuals with BPD, confidence in the effectiveness of DBT, or who were least likely to use DBT modes and components were the therapists who had the greatest reported increase over time in each respective area. DBT training with ongoing support resulted in changes not commonly observed in standard training approaches typically used in community settings. It is encouraging to observe positive outcomes in therapist self-reported skill, perceived self-efficacy and DBT component use, all of which are important to evidence-based treatment (EBT) implementation. Our results underscore the importance to recognize and target therapist diversity of learning levels, experience, and expertise in EBT implementation. PMID:24333657

  11. The Training Resource Unit--An Outreach Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Meredith A.

    1991-01-01

    The Training Resource Unit is a New South Wales (Australia) community services initiative that provides services such as direct client training, career training, and consultation to individuals with severe intellectual disability and severe challenging behaviors. The service is provided in the person's place of residence, workplace, or school…

  12. Environment, Training and the Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    companies. Therefore, a research project has been initiated aimed at identifying general trends in the introduction of environmental management in leading European companies and the educational and training needs this will require in future. Similarly, initiatives related to environmental issues carried out...

  13. The LHCb Starterkit initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of high-energy physicists use and produce software every day. Software skills are usually acquired on the go and dedicated training courses are rare. The LHCb Starterkit is a new training format for getting LHCb collaborators started in effectively using software to perform their research. The initiative, combining courses and online tutorials, focuses on teaching basic skills for research computing, as well as LHCb software specifics. Unlike traditional tutorials we focus on starting with basics, performing all the material live, with a high degree of interactivity, giving priority to understanding the tools as opposed to handing out recipes that work “as if by magic”. The LHCb Starterkit was started by young members of the collaboration inspired by the principles of Software Carpentry, and the material is created in a collaborative fashion using the tools we teach. Three successful entry-level workshops, as well as two advanced ones, have taken place since the start of the initiative i...

  14. CSCL in teacher training: what learning tasks lead to collaboration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockhorst, D.; Admiraal, W.F.; Pilot, A.

    2010-01-01

    Professional teacher communities appear to be positively related to student learning, teacher learning, teacher practice and school culture. Teacher collaboration is a significant element of these communities. In initial teacher training as well as in-service training and other initiatives for

  15. Development and Implementation of a Workshop to Enhance the Effectiveness of Mentors Working with Diverse Mentees in HIV Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Stoff, David M.; Narahari, Swathi; Blank, Michael; Fuchs, Jonathan; Evans, Clyde H.; Kahn, James S.; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of competent mentoring in academic research in the field of HIV, particularly for early stage investigators from diverse, underrepresented backgrounds. We describe the development and implementation of a 2-day intensive workshop to train mid-level and senior-level investigators conducting HIV-related clinical and translational research across multiple academic institutions on more effective mentoring, with an emphasis on techniques to foster mentees of diversity. The workshop was focused on training mentors in techniques designed to improve the effectiveness of the mentor–mentee relationship, and included didactic presentations, interactive discussions, and small-group problem-based learning activities. Mid-level or senior-level faculty involved or planning to be involved in significant mentorship activities related to HIV research were eligible. Surveys and formal actions plans allowed for workshop evaluation and laid the groundwork for subsequent workshops. Twenty-six faculty from 16 U.S.-based institutions participated, with good representation across discipline, gender, and race/ethnicity. The sessions were highly rated and discussions and evaluations revealed important barriers and facilitators to mentoring, challenges and solutions related to mentoring mentees from diverse backgrounds, and specific tools to enhance mentoring effectiveness. The Mentoring the Mentors training program for HIV researchers focusing on early career investigators of diversity was the first of its kind and was well attended, was rated highly, and provided guidance for improving the program in the future. This training program fills an important gap in the HIV researcher community and offers guidance for training mentors interested in diversity issues in settings outside of HIV. PMID:24735004

  16. Big Five Personality Factors and Facets as Predictors of Openness to Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suejung; Pistole, M Carole

    2017-11-17

    Openness to diversity is a crucial component of cultural competence needed in the increasingly diversified modern society and a necessary condition for benefitting from diversity contacts and interventions (e.g., diversity training, cultural courses). Responding to the recent call for more research on personality and its relation to diversity outcomes, we examined the associations between Big Five personality (i.e., Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Conscientiousness) higher order factors and lower order facets and universal-diverse orientation (i.e., open attitude of appreciating human universality and diversity; Miville et al., 1999 ). In the Study 1 (N = 338) web survey on Big Five factors, Openness to Experience and Agreeableness were associated with universal-diverse orientation significantly. In the Study 2 (N = 176) paper survey on both Big Five factors and facets, Openness to Experience, low Neuroticism, and Conscientiousness, and various lower-order facets of all the Big Five personality were associated with universal-diverse orientation significantly. Practical implications were suggested on how personality facets could be incorporated into current diversity interventions to enhance their effectiveness of promoting openness to diversity.

  17. GRAD-MAP: A Joint Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Jameson, Katherine; Taylor, Corbin James; Anderson, Neil; Megson, Peter; Roberg-Clark, Gareth; Sheppard, Kyle; Uher, Tim; Hammer, Donna; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland's Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP), builds connections between UMD and mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions, and community colleges, and uses seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community of undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, and is now in its third year. GRAD-MAP launched with a three-pronged approach: 1) Collaborative Seminars, 2) A Winter Workshop, and 3) A Spring Symposium. This program allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the numbers of minority students participating in astronomy and physics research (or, worse, simply shuffle around students who already are or would be); it is committed to identifying students who are otherwise underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline, not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make the climate of academic physics and astronomy more inclusive to them and all other underrepresented minority students. Our poster describes the key elements of our program, and highlights successes and lessons learned; GRAD-MAP can serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion.

  18. How Organisations Are Using Blended E-Learning to Deliver More Flexible Approaches to Trade Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Victor James; Johnston, Margaret Alison; Poulsen, Alison Louise

    2015-01-01

    Training organisations are being asked to respond to the growing levels of diversity around the contexts for training and to examine a wider range of training solutions than in the past. This research investigates how training organisations in Australia are using blended forms of e-learning to provide more responsive, flexible and innovative…

  19. NPP Krsko simulator training for operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribozic, F.; Krajnc, J.

    2000-01-01

    Acquisition of a full scope replica simulator represents an important achievement for Nuclear power Plant Krsko. Operating nuclear power plant systems is definitely a set of demanding and complex tasks. The most important element in the goal of assuring capabilities for handling such tasks is efficient training of operations personnel who manipulate controls in the main control room. Use of a simulator during the training process is essential and can not be substituted by other techniques. This article gives an overview of NPP Krsko licensed personnel training historical background, current experience and plans for future training activities. Reactor operator initial training lasts approximately two and a half years. Training is divided into several phases, consisting of theoretical and practical segments, including simulator training. In the past, simulator initial training and annual simulator retraining was contracted, thus operators were trained on non-specific full scope simulators. Use of our own plant specific simulator and associated infrastructure will have a significant effect on the operations personnel training process and, in addition, will also support secondary uses, with the common goal to improve safe and reliable plant operation. A regular annual retraining program has successfully started. Use of the plant specific simulator assures consistent training and good management oversight, enhances conformity of operational practices and supports optimization of operating procedures. (author)

  20. The Challenge of Fostering Cross-Cultural Interactions: A Case Study of International Graduate Students' Perceptions of Diversity Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Redwood, CindyAnn R.

    2010-01-01

    During the post-World War II era, most U.S. colleges and universities began to promote diversity and internationalization ideals. However, the extent to which U.S. higher education institutions have been successful in achieving diversity, especially in relation to stimulating diverse social interactions between the international and American…

  1. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The cornerstone of safe operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is personnel performing the day-to-day functions which accomplish the facility mission. Training that is conducted efficiently and effectively and is directly related to the needs of the job (i.e. performance-based training) is fundamental to safe operation. Responsibility for the safe operation of these facilities is a line management function. Therefore, achieving performance-based training requires commitment from the organization for which training is provided. This commitment includes making subject matter experts available for participation in and review of the products of the performance-based training process. It also includes budgeting and scheduling the time required for both initial and continuing training. This commitment must be made by corporate and facility senior management from the beginning. Management must get involved at the start to ensure that they are not only cognizant of ongoing activities, but are also involved to the degree necessary to thoroughly understand the process. Policies implemented and support demonstrated by senior management provide the driving force to ensure that training programs receive the attention that is imperative if facility training programs are to be successful

  2. Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: Managing a Multicultural Work Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Larry G.; Ross-Gordon, Jovita M.

    1990-01-01

    The influx of minorities into the workplace requires attention to their participation in workplace training, to race relations and organizational culture, and to potential communication difficulties. Human resource professionals must address cultural diversity issues as they affect the attainment of organizational goals. (SK)

  3. Bioinformatics Training: A Review of Challenges, Actions and Support Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.V.; Watson, J.; Attwood, T.

    2010-01-01

    As bioinformatics becomes increasingly central to research in the molecular life sciences, the need to train non-bioinformaticians to make the most of bioinformatics resources is growing. Here, we review the key challenges and pitfalls to providing effective training for users of bioinformatics...... services, and discuss successful training strategies shared by a diverse set of bioinformatics trainers. We also identify steps that trainers in bioinformatics could take together to advance the state of the art in current training practices. The ideas presented in this article derive from the first...

  4. Institutionalizing Blended Learning into Joint Training: A Case Study and Ten Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    mail.mil pbockelman@mesh.dsci.com ABSTRACT In 2011, the Joint Staff J7 (Joint Training) directorate initiated the Continuum of eLearning project in...Orlando, FL. 14. ABSTRACT In 2011, the Joint Staff J7 (Joint Training) directorate initiated the Continuum of eLearning project in order to integrate...dispersed organizations still poses significant challenges. The Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director for Joint Training initiated the Continuum of eLearning

  5. Do species conservation assessments capture genetic diversity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin C. Rivers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The best known system for classifying threat status of species, the IUCN Red List, currently lacks explicit considerations of genetic diversity, and consequently may not account for potential adaptation of species to future environmental change. To address this gap, we integrate range-wide genetic analysis with IUCN Red List assessments.We calculated the loss of genetic diversity under simulated range loss for species of Delonix (Leguminosae. Simulated range loss involved random loss of populations and was intended to model ongoing habitat destruction. We found a strong relationship between loss of genetic diversity and range. Moreover, we found correspondence between levels of genetic diversity and thresholds for ‘non-threatened’ versus ‘threatened’ IUCN Red List categories.Our results support the view that current threat thresholds of the IUCN Red List criteria reflect genetic diversity, and hence evolutionary potential; although the genetic diversity distinction between threatened categories was less evident. Thus, by supplementing conventional conservation assessments with genetic data, new insights into the biological robustness of IUCN Red List assessments for targeted conservation initiatives can be achieved. Keywords: Conservation assessment, Conservation genetics, Extinction risk, Genetic diversity, IUCN Red List, Range

  6. Diversity management in the Canadian workplace: Towards an anti-racism approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2012-01-01

    Most diversity management programs in Canada maintain that enhancing workforce diversity is of tremendous significance for business organizations in today’s competitive global urban markets. Since well-meaning diversity management initiatives have been largely ineffective thus far in dealing...... with workplace discrimination and racism in the Canadian workplace, this paper underscores the need to decenter the focus of diversity management from a business imperative to an antidiscrimination and social justice imperative. Within this latter perspective, the paper examines the strengths and limitations...

  7. Health activity in the context of the sense of coherence and self-esteem of participants of specialised training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Dębska

    2016-12-01

    Results: Training participants more frequently declared taking up diverse health behaviours. Comparing the group of training participants with non-training persons we found statistically significant differences in the general level of intensification of health behaviours (t-Student 3,06*** and in sub-scales: Active relaxation in the open (2,69* and Improvement of fitness by sport (4,23**. The persons with higher self-esteem declared using a significantly higher number of diverse health behaviours (0,62***. The training participants with higher sense of meaningfulnessand sense of comprehensibilitysignificantly more frequently declared taking up health activity (r=0,32*.

  8. Education and vocational training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fair, M.F.; Turner, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Institute in Applied Health Physics started in the summer of 1974 in response to the nation's needs for persons trained at the bachelor's level in health physics technology. Surveys indicate that between 3300 and 6000 new trained technologists will be needed by 1985. They will be required for nuclear power reactors, fuel-cycle operations, nuclear medicine, regulatory activities, and as replacements for currently employed workers. The Faculty Institute program provides support for contacting college officials to make them aware of these forecasts and interest them in instituting undergraduate health physics course work at their institutions. In addition, the program provides support for ten faculty participants from different universities to spend ten weeks during the summer in the Health Physics Division. These participants have access to the staff and the diverse research and field facilities of the Division. They also utilize the facilities of the Special Training Division at ORAU

  9. Computerized system controls Canadian training facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingwall, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Petroleum Industry Training Service (PITS), a non-profit organization headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, has earned a reputation as the most sophisticated training organization of its kind. Backed by such resources as the $25-million Nisku Training Center, located on a 38-acre site near Edmonton, PITS provides present and future petroleum engineers/operators/administrators with on-the-job experience in every facet of oil/gas processing. Nearly 3,000 students attend the Nisku training facility each year. Courses range in length from one day to six months, on topics as diverse as petroleum engineering, field production, drilling and well service, safety, environmental impact and management. Designed to teach skills needed at all levels, the courses fulfill an important educational need for firms with both new hires and seasoned personnel. PITS certificates are well-recognized by industry and government agencies

  10. PSA in operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nos, V.; Faig, J.; Plesa, P.; Delgado, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The systematic approach to training is internationally accepted as the best method to achieve and maintain the qualification and competence of power plant personnel and to guarantee the quality of their training. Following the recommendations and guidelines of international organisations competent in the field, TECNATOM SA has developed projects based on the systematic approach to training for all Spanish nuclear power plants. One of the latest projects was the systematic approach to training developed for the operation personnel of ASCO Nuclear Power Plant. In this case, certain results of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) which complement the systematic safety and reliability criteria of the systematic approach to training process have been incorporated in the traditional processes of work and task analysis and training plan design. This incorporation provides the training manager with additional criteria based not only on safety aspects obtained through the statistical treatment of considerations of skilled technical personnel (operators, operation chief supervisors, etc), but also on the independent criterion of the PSA. The inclusion of this approach basically affects all systematics in two of its stages: During the selection process of operating practices in SMR or SGI, the possible scenarios have been associated with all those situations where human actions which lead to an initiating event or human actions to mitigate an initiating event, may take place, as defined in the PSA. During the scenario development process, the instruments involved in the performance of human actions which originate or mitigate an event taking place have been identified. This pakes it possible to reconcile the scenario event sequence with the sequence considered in the PSA study, as the most likely to provoke a more serious accident. The incorporation of these PSA results contributes to the strengthening of safety aspects in training in an objective way, and confirms that

  11. Initial Results of the Master's Degree Programme in "Leadership in Medicine" – Impact on hospital-based follow-on training of doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulfert, Chris-Henrik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This pilot project, which was jointly conducted by a hospital and a university, describes the development of the Master's Degree Programme in Leadership in Medicine, a course designed to supplement medical specialty training. The aim of the pilot project is to demonstrate how hospital-based projects on personnel and organisational development undertaken under academic supervision can be used to increase leadership responsibility among doctors whose duties include providing initial and follow-on training and to professionalise medical specialty training as a leadership task. This need arose from the nationwide requirements and an internal audit regarding follow-on training. The version of the degree programme described below aims to further the personnel development of the participants in the field of didactics. Method: Each of the nine modules is made up of two classroom-based phases and one distance learning phase. The distance learning phase involves undertaking hospital-based projects on personnel and organisational development under academic supervision. The pilot phase participants were hospital doctors who, as part of their duties, hold leadership responsibility or are involved in the follow-on training of doctors.Results: The 17 participants successfully implemented more than 30 hospital-based projects during the distance learning phases of the nine modules. These projects included the development of medical specialty curricula, relevant didactic methods and evaluation design and were subsequently presented and subjected to reflection in interdisciplinary groups. The project presentation together with the project report were regarded as proof of competency. Conclusion: In addition to enhancing participant competency, the degree model described, which interlinks theory and practice, promotes organisational development through the implementation of projects undertaken under academic supervision. This has a double impact on the

  12. Commentary: reflections on diversity and inclusion in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisa, Joel A; Lindenthal, Jacob Jay

    2012-11-01

    The authors discuss how the strategy of fostering greater diversity and inclusion regarding minorities can help decrease health disparities and improve health outcomes. They propose that examining admission to medical school of qualified individuals with physical disabilities and fostering better communication with these individuals should be part of that strategy. Whereas people with disabilities constitute about 20% of the population, only between 2% and 10% are practicing physicians. The two major barriers to having more persons with disabilities as medical students are the cost of accommodating these persons and medical schools' technical standards. The authors offer suggestions for overcoming these barriers, and the additional barrier of communication with persons with various disabilities, such as deafness or visual impairment.The authors also discuss some of the issues involved in having greater representation of minorities in medicine. In addition, they stress the need for more training in cultural awareness for students and residents and for physicians well along in their careers. Medical educators will be increasingly called on to create new models designed to sensitize students and faculty to racial, ethnic, and other types of diversity, while documenting the efficacy and costs of extant ones, from the standpoint of both practitioner and consumer.The authors hope that the moves toward greater diversity and more training in cultural awareness will increase the efficacy of health care while reducing its cost. The demands of these efforts will require the commitment of diverse, intellectually capable, and compassionate people at many levels of academic medicine.

  13. Reliance on Simulation in Initial Entry Rifle Marksmanship Training and Future Directions for Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    drills has direct and valuable application to training marksmanship skills, for the novice firers in the assessment, more attention was needed to insure... training in a simulator at real time, actual flight seemed to take place at a much faster time frame. However, pilots reported that after practicing in...who used the EST 2000 (Scholtes & Stapp, 1994), where a concern was raised about less attention paid to weapon safety during EST training than on

  14. Multicultural Initiatives across Educational Contexts in Psychology: Becoming Diverse in Our Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adames, Hector Y.; Fuentes, Milton A.; Rosa, Dinelia; Chavez-Dueñas, Nayeli Y.

    2013-01-01

    Educational context plays a role in promoting and maintaining multicultural competence. Whereas in the past decade psychology has considered the impact of multiculturalism in educational training; however, less attention has been paid to the institutional contexts that house these efforts. In this paper, four professional psychologists with…

  15. The Implementation of an Innovative High School Mentoring Program Designed to Enhance Diversity and Provide a Pathway for Future Careers in Healthcare Related Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Salma I; Rodríguez, Patricia; Gonzales, Rayna J

    2015-09-01

    Although the population of diverse applicants applying to medical school has increased over recent years (AAMC Diversity in Medical Education: Facts and Figures 2012); efforts persist to ensure the continuance of this increasing trend. Mentoring students at an early age may be an effective method by which to accomplish diversity within the applicant pool. Having a diverse physician population is more likely able to adequately address the healthcare needs of our diverse population. The purpose of this study is to initiate a pipeline program, called the Medical Student Mentorship Program (MSMP), designed to specifically target high school students from lower economic status, ethnic, or racial underrepresented populations. High school students were paired with medical students, who served as primary mentors to facilitate exposure to processes involved in preparing and training for careers in medicine and other healthcare-related fields as well as research. Mentors were solicited from first and second year medical students at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix (UACOM-P). Two separate cohorts of mentees were selected based on an application process from a local high school for the school years 2010-2011 and 2011-2012. Anonymous mentee and mentor surveys were used to evaluate the success of the MSMP. A total of 16 pairs of mentees and mentors in the 2010-2011 (Group 1) and 2011-2012 (Group 2) studies participated in MSMP. High school students reported that they were more likely to apply to medical school after participating in the program. Mentees also reported that they received a significant amount of support, helpful information, and guidance from their medical student mentors. Overall, feedback from mentees and mentors was positive and they reported that their participation was rewarding. Mentees were contacted 2 to 3 years post MSMP participation as sophomores or juniors in college, and all reported that they were on a pre-healthcare career track

  16. Environmental Education meanings mobilized in discourses of school teachers who are involved in biology teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bozoti Pasin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite current Brazilian educational legislation highlights Environmental Education (EE, schools usually address this issue in a fragmented manner, poorly consolidated. The initial and continuing training of teachers have much to do with this situation. Our aim was to reveal the meanings about Environmental Education, about teacher training for EE and about the actions in EE in schools in the discourses of teachers who acted on basic education institutions where Science and Biology pre-service teachers made internship. We applied semi-structured questionnaires and we adopted the theoretical and methodological framework of the French Discourse Analysis. As a result, we found little diversity of meanings in relation to EE, with a pronounced hegemony of those related to change habits to conserve resources, EE for conservation and EE restricted to biological aspects. Some participants also showed a hybridization between EE and teaching Ecology. In their discourses, actions and discussions related to the subject in schools are punctual and unsystematic, lacking interdisciplinary approaches, as occurred in the initial and continuing education of the majority. We propose the establishment of an organic relationship between schools and universities with more interactions, including collective reflections and research to foster the comprehension of elaboration and mobilization of meanings about EE and its influences on teacher actions.

  17. A leadership challenge: staff nurse perceptions after an organizational TeamSTEPPS initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Jessica; Foltz-Ramos, Kelly; Schwartz, Diane G; Ceravolo, Diane J

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure RNs' perceptions of teamwork skills and behaviors in their work environment during a multiphase multisite nursing organizational teamwork development initiative. Teamwork is essential for patient safety in healthcare organizations and nursing teams. Organizational development supporting effective teamwork should include a just culture, engaged leadership, and teamwork training. A cross-sectional survey study of bedside RNs was conducted in one 5-hospital healthcare system after a TeamSTEPPS teamwork training initiative. TeamSTEPPS teamwork training related to improved RN perceptions of leadership. Initiatives to align the perspectives and teamwork efforts of leaders and bedside nurses are indicated and should involve charge nurses in the design.

  18. Mentoring, training and support to global health innovators: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dan-Bi; Cole, Donald; Simiyu, Ken; Luong, Winnie; Neufeld, Vic

    2013-06-28

    Global health innovators must navigate substantial complexities to successfully develop, implement and sustain global health innovations with impact through application of an Integrated InnovationTM approach. We sought to examine the nature of the literature and evidence around mentoring, training and support of global health innovators. We conducted a scoping review searching eight databases with terms capturing different kinds of innovation and support. Assessment of relevance and mapping was completed by two reviewers, with interpretation by the review team. Twenty-eight relevant papers provided perspectives on fostering global health innovators and innovation. Fifteen included empirical data on supports to global health innovators involving a wide range of innovators. Eight included documentation of outcomes but without designs to determine effectiveness. The diverse mentoring, training and support activities included: business incubators, support organizations and centres for entrepreneurship, technology transfer and intellectual property management, internship programs for business skill development, initiatives to bridge industry and researchers, and platforms for South-led innovation for global health. We propose the cultivation of a pipeline of global health innovators to increase the number of appropriate, sustainable innovations with impact in global health. Further empirical work on how to effectively support global health innovators is needed.

  19. The Implications of Talent Management for Diversity Training: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jim; Harte, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to explore the proposition that there is a need for research to address the connections between talent management (TM) and managing diversity as one example of achieving better integration and less separation in academic work on human resource (HR). Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory study of one organisation at a…

  20. Early constipation and toilet training in children with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Laurie; Rappaport, Leonard; Cousineau, Dominique; Nurko, Samuel

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the frequency of predisposing factors for encopresis before and during toilet training, comparing children with primary and secondary encopresis. In this retrospective study, questionnaires from the initial evaluation at an encopresis clinic at a tertiary care pediatric hospital were reviewed for the presence or absence of factors in the first 2 years of life, for toilet training practices, and for disruptive events during the training process. Children younger than 48 months or those with organic defecation disorders were excluded. In 411 children with encopresis, the reported frequency of predisposing factors included constipation in 35%, and previous treatment for constipation in 24%. Toilet training was initiated before age 2 years in 26% and after age 3 years in 14%. Interruption of toilet training and punishment were seen more in primary encopresis than in secondary encopresis (50% versus 23%; P encopresis as was fear of the toilet (47% versus 10%; P encopresis, early difficult defecation, previous treatment for constipation, and early initiation of toilet training were less common than expected. Children with primary encopresis did not have an increased incidence of early constipation or invasive treatments compared with those with secondary encopresis. However, children with primary encopresis did have more difficult and disruptive toilet training experiences.

  1. Infusing Diversity and Equity Into Clinical Teaching: Training the Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Mitchell, Karline; Handa, Manavi

    2016-11-01

    Clinical instructors in health care disciplines are charged with engaging students in experiential learning wherein respect and cultural sensitivity is applied. This article reports on the results of 3 diversity workshops conducted for clinical preceptors and field instructors from various disciplines. The workshops were developed in response to students' growing concerns that their academic learning experiences were negatively affected by dissatisfying management of differences between students, faculty, and preceptors with respect to ethno-racial group membership, socioeconomic level, and degree of privilege and power. The workshops included a didactic session that presented basic principles of social and health equity followed by small-group reflection about various ethical and moral dilemmas that were presented in clinical education scenarios. Examples of discrimination on a variety of levels were addressed in these workshops, including race, ethnicity, immigration status, sexual orientation, religion, body size and appearance, ability, age, socioeconomic class, religious faith, and gender. The group exercises and discussion from these sessions provided valuable insight and approaches to difficult but common areas of discomfiture encountered in the clinical teaching setting. This article presents the findings from participants of these diversity workshops in order to encourage the application of equity principles into clinical teaching in midwifery and other health care education contexts. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  2. Certification of the instructional competence of nuclear training specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollert, T.N.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the qualification requirements and the means to assess the unique knowledge and skills necessary to perform the instructional activities needed by nuclear training specialist at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. A survey questionnaire with 233 task statements categorized into eleven duty areas was distributed to twenty-three nuclear training specialists at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. On the basis of the data accumulated for this study, the researcher identified the following findings. A list of 158 task statements were identified as being relevant; this list was considered a core knowledge, skills, and abilities needed as a nuclear training specialist. The list consisted of ten duty areas which were relevant to the effective performance of a nuclear training specialist. Thirty-three task statements were identified as being relevant for the duty area Conductive Training. These were considered the core of knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in the development of the initial test instrument and the instructor classroom skills observation checklist. The significant correlation between the results of these two instruments, using a rank-order correlation coefficient, was interpreted by the researcher as indicating that the initial test instrument possessed concurrent validity. The researcher interpreted the reliability value as a positive indicator that the initial test instrument demonstrated internal consistency. It was concluded that it could be determined whether personnel possessed the level of competence needed to perform the instructional duties of a nuclear training specialist by using a written test. Data from this research supported the use of the initial test developed for this study as a valid means to certify nuclear training specialists for the duty area Conducting Training

  3. Dehydration treatment practices among pediatrics-trained and non-pediatrics trained emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jeranil; Liu, Deborah R; Nager, Alan L

    2012-04-01

    We sought to survey emergency physicians in the United States regarding the management of pediatric dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis. We hypothesized that responses from physicians with dedicated pediatric training (PT), that is, board certification in pediatrics or pediatric emergency medicine, would differ from responses of physicians with no dedicated pediatric training (non-PT). An anonymous survey was mailed to randomly selected members of the American College of Emergency Physicians and sent electronically to enrollees of Brown University pediatric emergency medicine listserv. The survey consisted of 17 multiple-choice questions based on a clinical scenario depicting a 2-year-old with acute gastroenteritis and moderate dehydration. Questions asked related to treatment preferences, practice setting, and training information. One thousand sixty-nine surveys were received: 997 surveys were used for data analysis, including 269 PT physicians and 721 non-PT physicians. Seventy-nine percent of PT physicians correctly classified the scenario patient as moderately dehydrated versus 71% of non-PT physicians (P = 0.063). Among those who correctly classified the patient, 121 PT physicians (58%) and 350 non-PT physicians (68%) would initially hydrate the patient with intravenous fluids. Pediatrics-trained physicians were more likely to initially choose oral or nasogastric hydration compared with non-PT physicians (P = 0.0127). Pediatrics-trained physicians were less likely to perform laboratory testing compared with the non-PT group (n = 92, 45%, vs n = 337, 66%; P dehydrated children, significantly more PT physicians, compared with non-PT physicians, follow established guidelines.

  4. Impact of the draft DOE Training and Qualification Standard on an established training and qualification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the provisions of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2 was that the US Department of Energy (DOE) hor e llipsis Develop and institute ahor e llipsiscourse in criticality and criticality safety hor e llipsis to serve as the foundation for a program of formal qualification of criticality engineers. In response, a draft DOE standard establishing requirements for a formal qualification program for nuclear criticality safety (NCS) engineers has been prepared and is currently in review. The Oak Ridge Y-12 plant implemented a formal training and qualification program for NCS engineers in 1995. The program complies with existing DOE requirements. The program was developed using a performance-based systematic approach to training and is accomplished through structured mentoring where experienced personnel interact with candidates through various learning exercises. Self-study, exercises, and work under instruction are all utilized. The candidate's performance is evaluated by mentors and oral boards. Competency gained through experience at other sites can also be credited. Technical portions of the program are primarily contained in an initial Engineer-in-Training segment and in subsequent task-specific qualifications. The Engineer-in-Training segment exposes the candidate to fundamental NCS concepts through example problems; ensures the initial compliance training requirements are met; and includes readings from applicable procedures, technical documents, and standards. Upon completion of this initial training, candidates proceed to task qualifications. Tasks are defined NCS activities such as operational reviews, criticality safety evaluations, criticality safety computations, criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) evaluations, support for emergency management, etc. Qualification on a task basis serves to break up training into manageable pieces and expedites qualification of candidates to perform specific production activities. The

  5. Radiographer-led plan selection for bladder cancer radiotherapy: initiating a training programme and maintaining competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, H A; Hafeez, S; Taylor, H; Lalondrelle, S; McDonald, F; Hansen, V N; Huddart, R

    2015-04-01

    The implementation of plan of the day selection for patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) for bladder cancer requires efficient and confident decision-making. This article describes the development of a training programme and maintenance of competency. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired on patients receiving RT for bladder cancer were assessed to establish baseline competency and training needs. A training programme was implemented, and observers were asked to select planning target volumes (PTVs) on two groups of 20 patients' images. After clinical implementation, the PTVs chosen were reviewed offline, and an audit performed after 3 years. A mean of 73% (range, 53-93%) concordance rate was achieved prior to training. Subsequent to training, the mean score decreased to 66% (Round 1), then increased to 76% (Round 2). Six radiographers and two clinicians successfully completed the training programme. An independent observer reviewed the images offline after clinical implementation, and a 91% (126/139) concordance rate was achieved. During the audit, 125 CBCT images from 13 patients were reviewed by a single observer and concordance was 92%. Radiographer-led selection of plan of the day was implemented successfully with the use of a training programme and continual assessment. Quality has been maintained over a period of 3 years. The training programme was successful in achieving and maintaining competency for a plan of the day technique.

  6. Vision training methods for sports concussion mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph F; Colosimo, Angelo; Ellis, James K; Mangine, Robert; Bixenmann, Benjamin; Hasselfeld, Kimberly; Graman, Patricia; Elgendy, Hagar; Myer, Gregory; Divine, Jon

    2015-05-05

    There is emerging evidence supporting the use vision training, including light board training tools, as a concussion baseline and neuro-diagnostic tool and potentially as a supportive component to concussion prevention strategies. This paper is focused on providing detailed methods for select vision training tools and reporting normative data for comparison when vision training is a part of a sports management program. The overall program includes standard vision training methods including tachistoscope, Brock's string, and strobe glasses, as well as specialized light board training algorithms. Stereopsis is measured as a means to monitor vision training affects. In addition, quantitative results for vision training methods as well as baseline and post-testing *A and Reaction Test measures with progressive scores are reported. Collegiate athletes consistently improve after six weeks of training in their stereopsis, *A and Reaction Test scores. When vision training is initiated as a team wide exercise, the incidence of concussion decreases in players who participate in training compared to players who do not receive the vision training. Vision training produces functional and performance changes that, when monitored, can be used to assess the success of the vision training and can be initiated as part of a sports medical intervention for concussion prevention.

  7. Training strategy for convolutional neural networks in pedestrian gender classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Choon-Boon; Tay, Yong-Haur; Goi, Bok-Min

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we studied a strategy for training a convolutional neural network in pedestrian gender classification with limited amount of labeled training data. Unsupervised learning by k-means clustering on pedestrian images was used to learn the filters to initialize the first layer of the network. As a form of pre-training, supervised learning for the related task of pedestrian classification was performed. Finally, the network was fine-tuned for gender classification. We found that this strategy improved the network's generalization ability in gender classification, achieving better test results when compared to random weights initialization and slightly more beneficial than merely initializing the first layer filters by unsupervised learning. This shows that unsupervised learning followed by pre-training with pedestrian images is an effective strategy to learn useful features for pedestrian gender classification.

  8. Managing the training process: contracting for training services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The need for using consultants and contracting for training services should be based on one or more of these three major reasons: the need to expand capability on a crash basis, the need for specialized expertise, and the need for objectivity, and independence. When the need for using a consultant exists, the training manager must first define the scope of work or services the consultant is to provide and how the consultant will interface with the training staff. The next step will be to develop a Request for Proposal which involves management, training staff, and contract services organizations. The critical parts of an RFP are scope and schedule. Consideration would be given to determining which consultant organizations should receive the RFP, and specifying who is on the bidders list. The third step will consist of evaluating the proposals and awarding the work. This step needs to be objective, defendable, and repeatable. The final phase will be the performance of the work. The activities included are project initiation, monitoring contractor performance, and formal conclusion

  9. Effects of obligatory training and prior training experience on attitudes towards performing basic life support: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Enami, Miki; Hirose, Keiko; Kamikura, Takahisa; Nishi, Taiki; Takei, Yutaka; Inaba, Hideo

    2015-04-01

    To determine the effect of Japanese obligatory basic life support training for new driver's license applicants on their willingness to carry out basic life support. We distributed a questionnaire to 9,807 participants of basic life support courses in authorized driving schools from May 2007 to April 2008 after the release of the 2006 Japanese guidelines. The questionnaire explored the participants' willingness to perform basic life support in four hypothetical scenarios: cardiopulmonary resuscitation on one's own initiative; compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation following telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation; early emergency call; and use of an automated external defibrillator. The questionnaire was given at the beginning of the basic life support course in the first 6-month term and at the end in the second 6-month term. The 9,011 fully completed answer sheets were analyzed. The training significantly increased the proportion of respondents willing to use an automated external defibrillator and to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on their own initiative in those with and without prior basic life support training experience. It significantly increased the proportion of respondents willing to carry out favorable actions in all four scenarios. In multiple logistic regression analysis, basic life support training and prior training experiences within 3 years were associated with the attitude. The analysis of reasons for unwillingness suggested that the training reduced the lack of confidence in their skill but did not attenuate the lack of confidence in detection of arrest or clinical judgment to initiate a basic life support action. Obligatory basic life support training should be carried out periodically and modified to ensure that participants gain confidence in judging and detecting cardiac arrest.

  10. Gender and teacher training in Early Childhood Education studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Romero Díaz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a research study funded by the European Union that aims to improve early childhood teacher training in gender-related topics. Spain has made considerable headway with the inclusion of gender mainstreaming in the political agenda. However, as we point out in this paper, this issue is still not a priority in vocational training for early childhood education. A series of qualitative interviews and a quantitative questionnaire revealed a lack of training, materials and sensitivity, all needed for the introduction of gender and sexual diversity issues.

  11. Contingent Diversity on Anthropic Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Balée

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Behaviorally modern human beings have lived in Amazonia for thousands of years. Significant dynamics in species turnovers due to human-mediated disturbance were associated with the ultimate emergence and expansion of agrarian technologies in prehistory. Such disturbances initiated primary and secondary landscape transformations in various locales of the Amazon region. Diversity in these locales can be understood by accepting the initial premise of contingency, expressed as unprecedented human agency and human history. These effects can be accessed through the archaeological record and in the study of living languages. In addition, landscape transformation can be demonstrated in the study of traditional knowledge (TK. One way of elucidating TK distinctions between anthropic and nonanthropic landscapes concerns elicitation of differential labeling of these landscapes and more significantly, elicitation of the specific contents, such as trees, occurring in these landscapes. Freelisting is a method which can be used to distinguish the differential species compositions of landscapes resulting from human-mediated disturbance vs. those which do not evince records of human agency and history. The TK of the Ka’apor Indians of Amazonian Brazil as revealed in freelisting exercises shows differentiation of anthropogenic from high forests as well as a recognition of diversity in the anthropogenic forests. This suggests that the agents of human-mediated disturbance and landscape transformation in traditional Amazonia encode diversity and contingency into their TK, which encoding reflects past cultural influence on landscape and society over time.

  12. A Diversity 3.0 Update: Are We Moving the Needle Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Five years ago, in a previous Academic Medicine Commentary, the author asserted that the move toward health reform and a more equitable health system required a transformation of more than how we finance, deliver, and evaluate health care. It also required a new role for diversity and inclusion as a solution to our problems, rather than continuing to see it as just another problem to be fixed. In this update, the author assesses the collective progress made by the nation's medical schools and teaching hospitals in integrating diversity into their core strategic activities, as well as highlighting areas for continued improvement.The author identifies five new trends in diversity and inclusion within academic medicine: broader definitions of diversity to include lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and those who have disabilities; elevated roles for diversity leaders in medical school administration; growing use of a holistic approach to evaluating medical school applicants; recognition of diversity and inclusion as a core marker of excellence; and appreciation of the significance of subpopulations within minority and underrepresented groups.More work remains to be done, but institutional initiatives to foster and prioritize diversity and inclusion coupled with national efforts by organizations such as the Association of American Medical Colleges are working to build the capacity of U.S. medical schools and teaching hospitals to move diversity from a peripheral initiative to a core strategy for improving the education of medical students and, ultimately, the care delivered to all of our nation's people.

  13. Ayurgenomics for stratified medicine: TRISUTRA consortium initiative across ethnically and geographically diverse Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, Bhavana; Varma, Binuja; Kumar, Arvind; Khuntia, Bharat Krushna; Pandey, Rajesh; Narang, Ankita; Tiwari, Pradeep; Kutum, Rintu; Guin, Debleena; Kukreti, Ritushree; Dash, Debasis; Mukerji, Mitali

    2017-02-02

    Genetic differences in the target proteins, metabolizing enzymes and transporters that contribute to inter-individual differences in drug response are not integrated in contemporary drug development programs. Ayurveda, that has propelled many drug discovery programs albeit for the search of new chemical entities incorporates inter-individual variability "Prakriti" in development and administration of drug in an individualized manner. Prakriti of an individual largely determines responsiveness to external environment including drugs as well as susceptibility to diseases. Prakriti has also been shown to have molecular and genomic correlates. We highlight how integration of Prakriti concepts can augment the efficiency of drug discovery and development programs through a unique initiative of Ayurgenomics TRISUTRA consortium. Five aspects that have been carried out are (1) analysis of variability in FDA approved pharmacogenomics genes/SNPs in exomes of 72 healthy individuals including predominant Prakriti types and matched controls from a North Indian Indo-European cohort (2) establishment of a consortium network and development of five genetically homogeneous cohorts from diverse ethnic and geo-climatic background (3) identification of parameters and development of uniform standard protocols for objective assessment of Prakriti types (4) development of protocols for Prakriti evaluation and its application in more than 7500 individuals in the five cohorts (5) Development of data and sample repository and integrative omics pipelines for identification of genomic correlates. Highlight of the study are (1) Exome sequencing revealed significant differences between Prakriti types in 28 SNPs of 11 FDA approved genes of pharmacogenomics relevance viz. CYP2C19, CYP2B6, ESR1, F2, PGR, HLA-B, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DRB1, LDLR, CFTR, CPS1. These variations are polymorphic in diverse Indian and world populations included in 1000 genomes project. (2) Based on the phenotypic attributes of

  14. Geoscience Diversity Experiential Simulations (GeoDES) Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, H. R.; Chen, J.; Brown, B.; Samuels, D.; Brinkworth, C.

    2017-12-01

    The geosciences have to solve increasingly complex problems relating to earth and society, as resources become limited, natural hazards and changes in climate impact larger communities, and as people interacting with Earth become more interconnected. However, the profession has dismally low representation from geoscientists who are from diverse racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as women in leadership roles. This underrepresentation also includes individuals whose gender identity/expression is non-binary or gender-conforming, or those who have physical, cognitive, or emotional disabilities. This lack of diversity ultimately impacts our profession's ability to produce our best science and work with the communities that we strive to protect and serve as stewards of the earth. As part of the NSF GOLD solicitation, we developed a project (Geoscience Diversity Experiential Simulations) to train 30 faculty and administrators to be "champions for diversity" and combat the hostile climates in geoscience departments. We hosted a 3-day workshop in November that used virtual simulations to give participants experience in building the skills to react to situations regarding bias, discrimination, microaggressions, or bullying often cited in geoscience culture. Participants interacted with avatars on screen, who responded to participants' actions and choices, given certain scenarios. The scenarios are framed within a geoscience perspective; we integrated qualitative interview data from informants who experienced inequitable judgement, bias, discrimination, or harassment during their geoscience careers. The simulations gave learners a safe environment to practice and build self-efficacy in how to professionally and productively engage peers in difficult conversations. In addition, we obtained pre-workshop survey data about participants' understanding regarding Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion practices, as well as observation data of participants' responses

  15. Flexibility in Postgraduate Medical Training in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoff, Reinier G; Frenkel, Joost; Imhof, Saskia M; Ten Cate, Olle

    2018-01-01

    Postgraduate medical training in the Netherlands has become increasingly individualized. In this article, the authors describe current practices for three residency programs at the University Medical Center Utrecht: anesthesiology, pediatrics, and ophthalmology. These programs are diverse yet share

  16. Mental skills training with basic combat training soldiers: A group-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amy B; Bliese, Paul D; Pickering, Michael A; Hammermeister, Jon; Williams, Jason; Harada, Coreen; Csoka, Louis; Holliday, Bernie; Ohlson, Carl

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive skills training has been linked to greater skills, self-efficacy, and performance. Although research in a variety of organizational settings has demonstrated training efficacy, few studies have assessed cognitive skills training using rigorous, longitudinal, randomized trials with active controls. The present study examined cognitive skills training in a high-risk occupation by randomizing 48 platoons (N = 2,432 soldiers) in basic combat training to either (a) mental skills training or (b) an active comparison condition (military history). Surveys were conducted at baseline and 3 times across the 10-week course. Multilevel mixed-effects models revealed that soldiers in the mental skills training condition reported greater use of a range of cognitive skills and increased confidence relative to those in the control condition. Soldiers in the mental skills training condition also performed better on obstacle course events, rappelling, physical fitness, and initial weapons qualification scores, although effects were generally moderated by gender and previous experience. Overall, effects were small; however, given the rigor of the design, the findings clearly contribute to the broader literature by providing supporting evidence that cognitive training skills can enhance performance in occupational and sports settings. Future research should address gender and experience to determine the need for targeting such training appropriately. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Air Force and Diversity: The Awkward Embrace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    people of color into their training films .60 The Air Force will stagnate in its diversity efforts without an in-depth review and overhaul of...December 2012 to ensure workspaces reflected a professional workspace. These were depicted as a “ witch hunt” against the fighter pilot culture; General...Welsh countered vehemently, stating certain traditions had no place in today’s Air Force. Nevertheless, discussions regarding witch hunts are still

  18. A Simulation-Based Approach to Training Operational Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Cultural knowledge and skills are critically important for military operations, emergency response, or any job that involves interaction with a culturally diverse population. However, it is not obvious what cultural knowledge and skills need to be trained, and how to integrate that training with the other training that trainees must undergo. Cultural training needs to be broad enough to encompass both regional (culture-specific) and cross-cultural (culture-general) competencies, yet be focused enough to result in targeted improvements in on-the-job performance. This paper describes a comprehensive instructional development methodology and training technology framework that focuses cultural training on operational needs. It supports knowledge acquisition, skill acquisition, and skill transfer. It supports both training and assessment, and integrates with other aspects of operational skills training. Two training systems will be used to illustrate this approach: the Virtual Cultural Awareness Trainer (VCAT) and the Tactical Dari language and culture training system. The paper also discusses new and emerging capabilities that are integrating cultural competence training more strongly with other aspects of training and mission rehearsal.

  19. Firm-Provided Training in Europe and the Limits of National Skills Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitsch, Jorg; Kapplinger, Bernd; Hefler, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses cross-country and cross-period differences in average levels of training activity from an institutional perspective. Firm-provided training in Europe between 1999 and 2010 is scrutinized in order to explore whether diverse institutional arrangements that can be linked to welfare state regimes can yield discernible…

  20. The Effect of Asymmetrical Sample Training on Retention Functions for Hedonic Samples in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sabrina; Santi, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Rats were trained in a symbolic delayed matching-to-sample task to discriminate sample stimuli that consisted of the presence of food or the absence of food. Asymmetrical sample training was provided in which one group was initially trained with only the food sample and the other group was initially trained with only the no-food sample. In…

  1. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  2. TEACH (Train to Enable/Achieve Culturally Sensitive Healthcare)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulitz, Russell; Santarelli, Thomas; Barnieu, Joanne; Rosenzweig, Larry; Yi, Na Yi; Zachary, Wayne; OConnor, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Personnel from diverse ethnic and demographic backgrounds come together in both civilian and military healthcare systems, facing diagnoses that at one level are equalizers: coronary disease is coronary disease, breast cancer is breast cancer. Yet the expression of disease in individuals from different backgrounds, individual patient experience of disease as a particular illness, and interactions between patients and providers occurring in any given disease scenario, all vary enormously depending on the fortuity of the equation of "which patient happens to arrive in whose exam room." Previously, providers' absorption of lessons-learned depended on learning as an apprentice would when exposed over time to multiple populations. As a result, and because providers are often thrown into situations where communications falter through inadequate direct patient experience, diversity in medicine remains a training challenge. The questions then become: Can simulation and virtual training environments (VTEs) be deployed to short-track and standardize this sort of random-walk problem? Can we overcome the unevenness of training caused by some providers obtaining the valuable exposure to diverse populations, whereas others are left to "sink or swim"? This paper summarizes developing a computer-based VTE called TEACH (Training to Enable/Achieve Culturally Sensitive Healthcare). TEACH was developed to enhance healthcare providers' skills in delivering culturally sensitive care to African-American women with breast cancer. With an authoring system under development to ensure extensibility, TEACH allows users to role-play in clinical oncology settings with virtual characters who interact on the basis of different combinations of African American sub-cultural beliefs regarding breast cancer. The paper reports on the roll-out and evaluation of the degree to which these interactions allow providers to acquire, practice, and refine culturally appropriate communication skills and to

  3. Radioprotection and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolibe, D [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN), Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zackova, H

    1994-12-31

    In a country where 75% of its electric power production is nuclear-based and where the health industry is making more and more use of ionizing radiation, Radioprotection education in France is necessarily characterized by a wide diversity in the trainings delivered and a significant increase in the number of actors providing these training programs. From the isolated worker using an industrial gammagraphy device to the thousands of persons working in major nuclear installations, it is estimated that more than 100,000 workers are exposed to ionizing radiation. Due to the seriousness of the pathological consequences resulting from overexposure to ionizing radiation, the volume of population concerned ant the media impact generated by the problem, one of the basic requirements formulated at the very early stages of the legislation is the obligation of informing workers of the hazards of exposure and the preventive measures to be taken. Employers are legally required to inform their personnel of the risks taken when handling equipment generating ionizing radiation of when using radio-nuclides. This obligation translates concretely by the need for the employer to name a qualified Radioprotection Department. The Qualified Officer or the Radioprotection Department are responsible for, among other tasks, ensuring training of workers. Two training orientations can be distinguished, each having different goals: - the first consists in training a body of highly-skilled Radioprotection professionals or managers (Qualified Officers), - the second consists in training all workers having any contact with ionizing radiation; each person should be capable of ensuring his own Radioprotection regardless of the presence of Qualified Officers. (authors).

  4. Radioprotection and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Zackova, H.

    1994-01-01

    In a country where 75% of its electric power production is nuclear-based and where the health industry is making more and more use of ionizing radiation, Radioprotection education in France is necessarily characterized by a wide diversity in the trainings delivered and a significant increase in the number of actors providing these training programs. From the isolated worker using an industrial gammagraphy device to the thousands of persons working in major nuclear installations, it is estimated that more than 100,000 workers are exposed to ionizing radiation. Due to the seriousness of the pathological consequences resulting from overexposure to ionizing radiation, the volume of population concerned ant the media impact generated by the problem, one of the basic requirements formulated at the very early stages of the legislation is the obligation of informing workers of the hazards of exposure and the preventive measures to be taken. Employers are legally required to inform their personnel of the risks taken when handling equipment generating ionizing radiation of when using radio-nuclides. This obligation translates concretely by the need for the employer to name a qualified Radioprotection Department. The Qualified Officer or the Radioprotection Department are responsible for, among other tasks, ensuring training of workers. Two training orientations can be distinguished, each having different goals: - the first consists in training a body of highly-skilled Radioprotection professionals or managers (Qualified Officers), - the second consists in training all workers having any contact with ionizing radiation; each person should be capable of ensuring his own Radioprotection regardless of the presence of Qualified Officers. (authors)

  5. The criminal justice outcomes of jail diversion programs for persons with mental illness: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotich, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Diversion programs are initiatives in which persons with serious mental illness who are involved with the criminal justice system are redirected from traditional criminal justice pathways to the mental health and substance abuse treatment systems. This article is a review of the research literature conducted to determine whether the current evidence supports the use of diversion initiatives to reduce recidivism and to reduce incarceration among adults with serious mental illness with justice involvement. A structured literature search identified 21 publications or research papers for review that examined the criminal justice outcomes of various diversion models. The review revealed little evidence of the effectiveness of jail diversion in reducing recidivism among persons with serious mental illness. However, evidence was found that jail diversion initiatives can reduce the amount of jail time that persons with mental illness serve. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  6. Association of HIV diversity and virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Palumbo

    Full Text Available Higher HIV diversity has been associated with virologic outcomes in children on antiretroviral treatment (ART. We examined the association of HIV diversity with virologic outcomes in adults from the HPTN 052 trial who initiated ART at CD4 cell counts of 350-550 cells/mm3. A high resolution melting (HRM assay was used to analyze baseline (pre-treatment HIV diversity in six regions in the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, and three in env from 95 participants who failed ART. We analyzed the association of HIV diversity in each genomic region with baseline (pre-treatment factors and three clinical outcomes: time to virologic suppression after ART initiation, time to ART failure, and emergence of HIV drug resistance at ART failure. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we did not find any association of baseline HIV diversity with demographic, laboratory, or clinical characteristics. For the 18 analyses performed for clinical outcomes evaluated, there was only one significant association: higher baseline HIV diversity in one of the three HIV env regions was associated with longer time to ART failure (p = 0.008. The HRM diversity assay may be useful in future studies exploring the relationship between HIV diversity and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV infection.

  7. Association of HIV diversity and virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Philip J; Wilson, Ethan A; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Kumwenda, Newton; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James G; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Melo, Marineide G; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H; Fogel, Jessica M

    2017-01-01

    Higher HIV diversity has been associated with virologic outcomes in children on antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the association of HIV diversity with virologic outcomes in adults from the HPTN 052 trial who initiated ART at CD4 cell counts of 350-550 cells/mm3. A high resolution melting (HRM) assay was used to analyze baseline (pre-treatment) HIV diversity in six regions in the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, and three in env) from 95 participants who failed ART. We analyzed the association of HIV diversity in each genomic region with baseline (pre-treatment) factors and three clinical outcomes: time to virologic suppression after ART initiation, time to ART failure, and emergence of HIV drug resistance at ART failure. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we did not find any association of baseline HIV diversity with demographic, laboratory, or clinical characteristics. For the 18 analyses performed for clinical outcomes evaluated, there was only one significant association: higher baseline HIV diversity in one of the three HIV env regions was associated with longer time to ART failure (p = 0.008). The HRM diversity assay may be useful in future studies exploring the relationship between HIV diversity and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV infection.

  8. Training practices of cell processing laboratory staff: analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonization of Cellular Therapy Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Celluzzi, Christina; Loper, Kathy; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Schwartz, Joseph; Mcgrath, Eoin; Eldridge, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Methods for processing products used for hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation must ensure their safety and efficacy. Personnel training and ongoing competency assessment is critical to this goal. Here we present results from a global survey of methods used by a diverse array of cell processing facilities for the initial training and ongoing competency assessment of key personnel. The Alliance for Harmonisation of Cellular Therapy Accreditation (AHCTA) created a survey to identify facility type, location, activity, personnel, and methods used for training and competency. A survey link was disseminated through organizations represented in AHCTA to processing facilities worldwide. Responses were tabulated and analyzed as a percentage of total responses and as a percentage of response by region group. Most facilities were based at academic medical centers or hospitals. Facilities with a broad range of activity, product sources and processing procedures were represented. Facilities reported using a combination of training and competency methods. However, some methods predominated. Cellular sources for training differed for training versus competency and also differed based on frequency of procedures performed. Most facilities had responsibilities for procedures in addition to processing for which training and competency methods differed. Although regional variation was observed, training and competency requirements were generally consistent. Survey data showed the use of a variety of training and competency methods but some methods predominated, suggesting their utility. These results could help new and established facilities in making decisions for their own training and competency programs. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The simulator Neck-Mfgs and its training status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setnikar, T.; Pribozic, F.; Srebotnjak, E.; Gortnar, O.; Kovacic, J.; Stritar, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the status and training possibilities on Krsko NPP Multi-Functional Simulator (NEK-MFS). Since spring 1997 it serves as a training facility in Nuclear Training Center. During first year of operation the simulator NEK-MFS was found to be a very useful Krsko NPP specific tool which is capable to support both the initial operator training program and licensed operator retraining activities.(author)

  10. TQM Training; The Library Service Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney, Tim; Bellefontaine, Arnie

    1993-01-01

    Addresses training in the context of organizing and implementing a Total Quality Management (TQM) initiative. The customer service implications and relevant training or skill implications for the following phases are described: (1) exploration and commitment; (2) organizing for quality; (3) start up; and (4) expansion and integration. (Contains 18…

  11. Q methodology, risk training and quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, M; Hinks, M; Stowell-Smith, M; Mercer, D; Forster, J

    1999-01-01

    The results of a Q methodological study of professional understandings of the notion of risk in mental health services within the UK are discussed in relation to the relevance for staff training and quality assurance. The study attempted to access the diversity of understandings of risk issues amongst a multi-professional group of staff (n = 60) attending inter-agency risk training workshops in 1998. Q methodology is presented as both an appropriate means for such inquiry and as a novel experiential technique for training purposes. A tentative argument is advanced that the qualitative accounts generated by Q research could assist in systematic reviews of quality, complementing the singularly quantitative approaches typically represented in the audit process.

  12. Initial training of Portuguese teachers and didactic elaboration of teaching contents: the case of a university in the itajaí valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Kuczmynda Silveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the didactic elaboration of the notion of speech genres for learning and teaching practices involving reading/listening, writing and linguistics analysis,  which emerged from supervised training projects and reports produced by undergraduate students in the end of their initial training within the context of an English/Portuguese Undergraduate Course of Modern Languages from an university located in the region of Itajaí Valley (Santa Catarina, Brazil. This research comprised the analysis of 40 training documents produced from the first semester of 2002 until the second semester of 2008. This period covers the transition between two curricular frameworks of the researched course. Within the first curricularframework, there was a remarkable concern about classifying texts according to the genre they belonged to and work was frequently guided by the classic school typology of texts (narration, description and dissertation. Within the second curricular framework, although speech genres are not often object of didactic elaboration in efect, we observed a perspective of change that may be verified in the concern about researching the speech genre with which the undergraduate student will work, and about trying to enable the student to acquire a procedimental knowledge about the genre in the articulation between reading and writing practices

  13. Beyond the Melting Pot and Salad Bowl Views of Cultural Diversity: Advancing Cultural Diversity Education of Nutrition Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiloane, Kelebogile Tsametse

    2016-10-01

    This article outlines how the melting pot and salad bowl views of cultural diversity have influenced the cultural training of nutrition educators and other health professionals. It explores how these views are changing in reaction to the changing demographics and health disparities seen in the US today and how the cultural training of nutrition educators has not kept up with these changing views. Suggestions for how this cultural education could be modified include placing a greater emphasis on both the cultural self-awareness of nutrition educators and the sociopolitical historical factors that influence the cultural orientation of nutrition educators and their clients. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diversity at work the practice of inclusion

    CERN Document Server

    Deane, Barbara R

    2014-01-01

    This book outlines the key issues involved in framing, designing, and implementing inclusion initiatives for organizations and groups. It offers ideas for helping individuals develop competencies for inclusion. It shows how to apply the practices of inclusion and provides a unified model by employing diverse voices to address a range of related topics in multiple contexts. It also contains examples of how diversity and inclusion has worked in a variety of settings. The book is includes information from topic experts, including internal and external change agents and academics.

  15. Educating Immigrant Hispanic Foodservice Workers about Food Safety Using Visual-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Lakshman

    2013-01-01

    Providing food safety training to a diverse workforce brings with it opportunities and challenges that must be addressed. The study reported here provides evidence for benefits of using visual-based tools for food safety training when educating immigrant, Hispanic foodservice workers with no or minimal English language skills. Using visual tools…

  16. The integration of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives into business activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jette Steen

    2013-01-01

    While proponents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have suggested that CSR initiatives should be integrated into mainstream business activities as 'strategic CSR' or 'shared value', research is lacking that explores how CSR programmes are integrated in companies. This paper compares CSR...... initiatives with human resource management (HRM) activities, which have a longer tradition of being integrated into company strategy. The focus is on gender diversity and CSR in a US multinational corporation (MNC). The MNC sees gender diversity as an integral part of business activities. In contrast, the MNC...

  17. Hydroponic training visit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van Erik; Waked, Laith; Blok, Chris

    2016-01-01

    From January 25-29 2016 Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture organized a Hydroponic Training for Jordan researcher and consultants. The order was supplied by Ecoconsult (Hydroponic Green Farming Initiative) from Jordan and funded by USAID. Presentations were delivered in the field of growing

  18. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Institutions and Organisations that take training seriously and devote time, effort and resources, etc, to their own teams are more likely to succeed, since both initial teacher training and continuous improvement, studies, hours of group discussion, works on innovation and educational research, talks and permanent meetings, etc, will all serve to enhance teaching and its quality. Teachers will be able to introduce new components from previously taught classes into their university teaching which will contribute to improving their work and developing a suitable academic environment to include shared objectives, teachers and students. Moreover, this training will serve to enhance pedagogic innovation, new teaching-learning methodologies and contribute to getting teaching staff involved in respect of the guidelines set out by the EHEA. Bearing in mind that training and motivation can be key factors in any teacher's "performance", their productivity and the quality of their teaching, Teacher Training for a specific post inside the University Organisation is standard practice of so-called Human Resources management and an integral part of a teacher's work; it is a way of professionalising the teaching of the different branches of Engineering. At Madrid Polytechnic University, in the Institute of Educational Sciences (ICE), since it was founded in 1972, we have been working hard with university teaching staff. But it was not until 1992 after carrying out various studies on training needs that we planned and programmed different training actions, offering a wide range of possibilities. Thus, we designed and taught an "Initial Teacher Training Course", as it was first called in 1992, a programme basically aimed to train young Engineering teachers just setting out on their teaching career. In 2006, the name was changed to "Advanced University Teacher Training Course". Subsequently, with the appearance of the Bologna Declaration and the creation of the European Higher

  19. Does difference matter? Diversity and human rights in a hospital workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, Joanne; Kanee, Marylin; Stewart, Paulette; Savage, Diane

    2007-01-01

    The urban hospital workplace is a dynamic environment that mirrors the cultural and social diversity of the modern city. This paper explores the literature relating to diversity in the workplace and then describes an urban Canadian teaching hospital's comprehensive approach to the promotion of an equitable and inclusive diverse environment. With this goal, four years ago the hospital established an office of Diversity and Human Rights staffed by a social worker. The office provides education, training, policy development and complaints management. The administration also convened a hospital-wide committee to advise on the outcomes, and to plan a process for diversity and human rights organizational change. The committee worked with a social work research consultant to design a qualitative focus group study, currently ongoing, to explore the perspectives of hospital staff. The lessons learned from the process have the potential to increase overall cultural competency of staff that can translate into more sensitive work with patients.

  20. Use of simplifier scenarios for CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, D.

    1984-01-01

    Cockpit resource management (CRM) at Metro Airlines is discussed. The process by which the program of CRM training was initiated is mentioned. Management aspects of various flying scenarios are considered. The transfer of training from the classroom to the field is assessed.

  1. Irisin and exercise training in humans - results from a randomized controlled training trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecksteden, Anne; Wegmann, Melissa; Steffen, Anke; Kraushaar, Jochen; Morsch, Arne; Ruppenthal, Sandra; Kaestner, Lars; Meyer, Tim

    2013-11-05

    The recent discovery of a new myokine (irisin) potentially involved in health-related training effects has gained great attention, but evidence for a training-induced increase in irisin remains preliminary. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether irisin concentration is increased after regular exercise training in humans. In a randomized controlled design, two guideline conforming training interventions were studied. Inclusion criteria were age 30 to 60 years, Physical performance provided positive control for the overall efficacy of training. Differences between groups were tested for significance using analysis of variance. For post hoc comparisons with the control group, Dunnett's test was used. Maximum performance increased significantly in the training groups compared with controls (controls: ±0.0 ± 0.7 km/h; AET: 1.1 ± 0.6 km/h, P error probability = 0.7). The general upward trend was mainly accounted for by a negative association of irisin concentration with the storage duration of frozen serum samples (P storage of samples from initial tests.

  2. Using computer-based training to facilitate radiation protection review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    In a national laboratory setting, it is necessary to provide radiation protection overview and training to diverse parts of the laboratory population. This includes employees at research reactors, accelerators, waste facilities, radiochemical isotope processing, and analytical laboratories, among others. In addition, our own radiation protection and monitoring staffs must be trained. To assist in the implementation of this full range of training, ORNL has purchased prepackaged computer-based training in health physics and technical mathematics with training modules that can be selected from many topics. By selection of specific modules, appropriate radiation protection review packages can be determined to meet many individual program needs. Because our radiation protection personnel must have some previous radiation protection experience or the equivalent of an associate's degree in radiation protection for entry level, the computer-based training will serve primarily as review of major principles. Others may need very specific prior training to make the computer-based training effective in their work situations. 4 refs

  3. Research Workforce Diversity: The Case of Balancing National versus International Postdocs in US Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Hawley, Joshua; Desai, Anand

    2014-03-01

    The US government has been increasingly supporting postdoctoral training in biomedical sciences to develop the domestic research workforce. However, current trends suggest that mostly international researchers benefit from the funding, many of whom might leave the USA after training. In this paper, we describe a model used to analyse the flow of national versus international researchers into and out of postdoctoral training. We calibrate our model in the case of the USA and successfully replicate the data. We use the model to conduct simulation-based analyses of effects of different policies on the diversity of postdoctoral researchers. Our model shows that capping the duration of postdoctoral careers, a policy proposed previously, favours international postdoctoral researchers. The analysis suggests that the leverage point to help the growth of domestic research workforce is in the pregraduate education area, and many policies implemented at the postgraduate level have minimal or unintended effects on diversity.

  4. Implementing diversity dozens of practical tips for leading the change effort, 12 classic mistakes most organizations make and how to avoid them

    CERN Document Server

    Loden, Marilyn

    1996-01-01

    This practical and provocative guide provides the strategies and tactics used by organizations committed to implementing diversity from the top down. Focusing on the necessity for a strategic change initiative, Loden discusses: how to position diversity initiatives for maximum buy-in and support; proven strategies for managing resistance to this important change; the 12 classic mistakes made when implementing diversity initiatives - and how to avoid them.

  5. Diversity in research projects - A key to success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton; Taubner, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    According to demographers, psychologists, sociologists and economists diverse groups, which are groups of different race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, are more innovative than homogeneous groups. This is also true for groups working together in research collaborations and international cooperation involving a culturally and functionally diverse mix of individuals who have to be integrated into an effective unit - a project team. If the goal is scientific excellence, diversity should be an essential ingredient to conduct science on high level productivity, quality and innovation. Effective teamwork is a key to project success and prime responsibilities of the project manager. Therefore, the project manager has to take into consideration different characteristics such as cultures, languages, and different values related to individual project partners. Here we show how diversity can affect the performance of a research project. Furthermore, the presentation indicates skills and abilities which are required for the management in order to deal also with the challenges of diversity in research projects. The presentation is based on insights experienced in the context of an Innovative Training Network (ITN) project within Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions of the European HORIZON 2020 program and TRION a Collaborative Research Project in the Framework of the Trilateral Program of the German Research Foundation.

  6. Integrating Diversity Education and Service Learning: A 15+ Year Journey Continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Myra N.; Adams, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the 15+ year journey undertaken by university faculty to integrate service learning with diversity education. It has taken the faculty from its initial integration of academic community learning and diversity education in 1999 to its current course offering in 2015. The purpose of this integration has remained the same, to…

  7. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Lee, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear Training Center (NTC) has concentrated its efforts on the systemisation and specialization of education and training and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new education courses based on the experience accumulated so far. The systematic and comprehensive education systems have been set up by streamlining the education systems for internal employees conducted sporadically over the past years and expansion and diversification of education and training has been built through a study on Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology for the development of efficient education courses and a survey of manpower development in on-site industry. The 6 education programs have been developed and 15 courses were newly developed and improved. Especially to be noted in relation to education program development is that NTC has compiled and published a book titled 'current status of research ethics of science and technology and cases' and has also conducted a survey targeted at the 30 electric power/electricity industries related to nuclear power. The total number of people who receive education for the year of 2006 was 4,186 and a total of 130 training courses were established and 125 times operated. Among them, the number of collective education was 64 courses, 104 times operated and 3,190 persons participated while as for cyber education(on-line language education), 39 courses in 3 foreign language areas established, 21 times operated and 996 persons participated

  8. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Lee, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    Nuclear Training Center (NTC) has concentrated its efforts on the systemisation and specialization of education and training and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new education courses based on the experience accumulated so far. The systematic and comprehensive education system(KAERI-ACE) has been set up by streamlining the education systems for internal employees conducted sporadically over the past year and expansion and diversification of education and training has been built through a study on Systematic Approach Training (SAT) methodology for the development of efficient education courses and a survey of manpower development in on-site industry. The 6 education programs have been developed and 18 courses were newly developed and improved. Especially to be noted in relation to education program development is that NTC has compiled and published a book titled 'Practical Research Ethics'. NTC has played a leading role in providing a research ethics education, in helping to promote the importance of research ethics by publishing a research ethics book and distributing them to government, research institutes, universities, etc. The total number of people who receive education for the year of 2007 was 2,998 and a total of 65 training courses were established and 106 times operated. The number of industry courses was 31, 56 times operated, and 1,309 persons participated and that nuclear R and D personnel education areas (internal employees' education) was 34 courses, 50 times operated, 2,689 persons participated

  9. Identity, Diversity and Diversity Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Lotte; Muhr, Sara Louise; Villeseche, Florence

    2016-01-01

    – The work can encourage policy makers, diversity and HR managers to question their own practices and assumptions leading to more theoretical informed diversity management practices. Originality/value – The theoretical connections between identity and diversity literature have so far not been reviewed......The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the identity and diversity literatures and discuss how a better understanding of the theoretical connections between the two informs both diversity research and diversity management practices. Design/methodology/approach – Literature...... and limitations – is crucial for successful diversity management research and practice. Research limitations/implications – The authors argue for a better understanding of differences, overlaps and limits of different identity perspectives, and for a stronger engagement with practice. Practical implications...

  10. Depression training in nursing homes: lessons learned from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marianne; Stolder, Mary Ellen; Jaggers, Benjamin; Liu, Megan Fang; Haedtke, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Late-life depression is common among nursing home residents, but often is not addressed by nurses. Using a self-directed CD-based depression training program, this pilot study used mixed methods to assess feasibility issues, determine nurse perceptions of training, and evaluate depression-related outcomes among residents in usual care and training conditions. Of 58 nurses enrolled, 24 completed the training and gave it high ratings. Outcomes for 50 residents include statistically significant reductions in depression severity over time (p Depression training is an important vehicle to improve depression recognition and daily nursing care, but diverse factors must be addressed to assure optimal outcomes.

  11. The initiative on Model Organism Proteomes (iMOP) Session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrimpf, Sabine P; Mering, Christian von; Bendixen, Emøke

    2012-01-01

    iMOP – the Initiative on Model Organism Proteomes – was accepted as a new HUPO initiative at the Ninth HUPO meeting in Sydney in 2010. A goal of iMOP is to integrate research groups working on a great diversity of species into a model organism community. At the Tenth HUPO meeting in Geneva...

  12. Microbial Diversity: A Summer Course at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harwood, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    .... The value of the course lies in its historical success in training scientists to recognize and take advantage of the incredible metabolic diversity of microbes as a means of generating fundamental and applied knowledge...

  13. Promoting Diversity Through Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (Polar ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J. D.; Hotaling, L. A.; Garza, C.; Van Dyk, P. B.; Hunter-thomson, K. I.; Middendorf, J.; Daniel, A.; Matsumoto, G. I.; Schofield, O.

    2017-12-01

    Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) is an education and outreach program designed to provide public access to the Antarctic and Arctic regions through polar data and interactions with the scientists. The program provides multi-faceted science communication training for early career scientists that consist of a face-to face workshop and opportunities to apply these skills. The key components of the scientist training workshop include cultural competency training, deconstructing/decoding science for non-expert audiences, the art of telling science stories, and networking with members of the education and outreach community and reflecting on communication skills. Scientists partner with educators to provide professional development for K-12 educators and support for student research symposia. Polar ICE has initiated a Polar Literacy initiative that provides both a grounding in big ideas in polar science and science communication training designed to underscore the importance of the Polar Regions to the public while promoting interdisciplinary collaborations between scientists and educators. Our ultimate objective is to promote STEM identity through professional development of scientists and educators while developing career awareness of STEM pathways in Polar science.

  14. Language Interpretation for Diverse Families: Considerations for Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Cori M.; Hart, Juliet E.; Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    The special education field is challenged by a lack of attention to and recruitment of well-trained language interpreters in schools. As such, special education teachers need to take a leadership role in working with interpreters to ensure diverse families are collaborative members of individualized education program (IEP) teams. Using the…

  15. Singapore International Schools: Best Practice in Culturally Diverse Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Melissa Anne

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the preliminary outcomes of research into the place and role of cultural diversity in primary music classes at five International Schools in Singapore. It highlights the ways in which school philosophy, policy, curriculum and in-service training influence teacher practice. The research provides insights into the challenges…

  16. Collaborations and partnerships for public service training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noluthando S Matsiliza

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article notes significant collaborations and partnerships adopted as training strategies applied for improving national skill development. The discourse followed here critically different roles and functions of structures such as public agencies, academic institutions, private sector and non-governmental training providers regulated by law. Scholars in various fields noted benefits and challenges of collaborative management and partnerships in training and skills development that enhance effective resources management, facilitation and participation of stakeholders in various organisations. Using a qualitative approach, this theoretical article argues that academics played a significant role in collaborating with policy-makers to up-skill the civil force. Even though, there are numerous actors at multi-level governance with diverse training needs and interests, there are still gabs in the model adopted by government to provide training of public officials in South Africa. Therefore it is recommended that the Government through the National School of Government should monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of these collaborations and partnerships to provide continuous improvement

  17. Multisensory attention training for treatment of tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, D P; Linford, T; Thompson, B; Petoe, M A; Kobayashi, K; Stinear, C M; Searchfield, G D

    2015-05-28

    Tinnitus is the conscious perception of sound with no physical sound source. Some models of tinnitus pathophysiology suggest that networks associated with attention, memory, distress and multisensory experience are involved in tinnitus perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a multisensory attention training paradigm which used audio, visual, and somatosensory stimulation would reduce tinnitus. Eighteen participants with predominantly unilateral chronic tinnitus were randomized between two groups receiving 20 daily sessions of either integration (attempting to reduce salience to tinnitus by binding with multisensory stimuli) or attention diversion (multisensory stimuli opposite side to tinnitus) training. The training resulted in small but statistically significant reductions in Tinnitus Functional Index and Tinnitus Severity Numeric Scale scores and improved attentional abilities. No statistically significant improvements in tinnitus were found between the training groups. This study demonstrated that a short period of multisensory attention training reduced unilateral tinnitus, but directing attention toward or away from the tinnitus side did not differentiate this effect.

  18. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  19. New methodologic conception of attention to the diversity from desarrol the one of professional abilities in the Physical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalia Clejel-Toirac

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article supports the process of initial training of students in Physical Culture on the basis of the development of professional skills in the educational process of the Theory discipline and Practice of Physical Education, with educational and scientific character to address diversity from configuration of the key features of the curriculum of Bachelor of Physical Culture that its essential mission is “Educating for four areas of action”; it relies on linking the process of teaching and learning with professional practice, taking into account internal and external factors that make up each content as well as their interrelation in promoting different practical situations for each student, according to their physical needs, and according to the content in which they work.

  20. Training in nuclear engineering companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perezagua, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of training is growing in all business areas and fields and especially in hi-tech companies like engineering firms. Nuclear projects are highly multidisciplinary and, even in the initial awarding and pre-construction phases, need to be staffed with personnel that is well-prepared and highly-qualified in areas that, in most cases, are not covered by university studies. This article examines the variables that influence the design of specific training for nuclear projects in engineering firms, along with new training technologies (e-learning) and new regulatory aspects (IS-12). (Author)

  1. Diversity of Eukaryotic Translational Initiation Factor eIF4E in Protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagus, Rosemary; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Joshi, Bhavesh; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    The greatest diversity of eukaryotic species is within the microbial eukaryotes, the protists, with plants and fungi/metazoa representing just two of the estimated seventy five lineages of eukaryotes. Protists are a diverse group characterized by unusual genome features and a wide range of genome sizes from 8.2 Mb in the apicomplexan parasite Babesia bovis to 112,000-220,050 Mb in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. Protists possess numerous cellular, molecular and biochemical traits not observed in "text-book" model organisms. These features challenge some of the concepts and assumptions about the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Like multicellular eukaryotes, many protists encode multiple eIF4Es, but few functional studies have been undertaken except in parasitic species. An earlier phylogenetic analysis of protist eIF4Es indicated that they cannot be grouped within the three classes that describe eIF4E family members from multicellular organisms. Many more protist sequences are now available from which three clades can be recognized that are distinct from the plant/fungi/metazoan classes. Understanding of the protist eIF4Es will be facilitated as more sequences become available particularly for the under-represented opisthokonts and amoebozoa. Similarly, a better understanding of eIF4Es within each clade will develop as more functional studies of protist eIF4Es are completed.

  2. Training young horses to social separation: Effect of a companion horse on training efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, E.; Christensen, Janne Winther; Keeling, LJ

    2011-01-01

    : To investigate whether the initial presence of a familiar companion horse modifies responses to separation from the group, lowers stress levels (as measured by heart rate) and increases training efficiency. Hypothesis: Habituation to separation proceeds more quickly if the horse is first trained with a companion......Reasons for performing study: The intensity with which a horse responds to separation from its group and subsequently to being alone is relevant for both horse and handler safety. Identification of training methods that may reduce responses to separation would be useful in practice. Objectives......, and heart rate is lower when the horse is subsequently trained alone, compared to control horses trained individually from the start. Methods: Young mares (n = 32), kept in groups of 4 were exposed to social separation: 2 horses of the group were trained singly (S1, n = 16) and the remaining 2 horses (n...

  3. Strategic National HRD Initiatives: Lessons from the Management Training Program of Japan. [and] Invited Reaction: The Little-Known Impact of U.S. Training Programs on the Japanese Quality Movement. [and] Invited Reaction: Comments on Strategic National Initiatives: Lessons from the Management Training Program of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Robinson and Stern describe the Management Training Program introduced by the U.S. Air Force in postwar Japan and its effect on Japanese industry. Roberts compares it with U.S. Training within Industries. Umetani comments that the discussion would have been more convincing had its relationship with other Japanese training programs been addressed.…

  4. Towards a renewable energy training strategy in Canada : NRCan's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omboli, E.

    2004-01-01

    This abstract outlines the importance of education and training as a marketing tool for the solar industry, as well as the importance of developing strategic alliances with educational institutions. The constructive collaboration between the Renewable Energy Deployment Initiative (REDI) and the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC) is discussed as a leading example in promoting renewable energy systems in community colleges as well as supporting the development of a national renewable energy training strategy. Future goals of NRCan (Natural Resources Canada) are outlined, with 4 pilot projects emerging as a result of a Request for Proposals initiative. A Train-the-trainer seminar has helped to create a foundation for a national renewable energy training strategy. Future goals include new training partners and more funding

  5. Training change control process at Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, Cornelia Mariana

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the process of 'Training Change Control' at Cernavoda NPP. This process is a systematic approach that allows determination of the most effective training and/or non-training solutions for challenges that may influence the content and conditions for a training program or course. Changes may be the result of: - response to station systems or equipment modifications; - new or revised procedures; - regulatory requirements; - external organizations requirements; - internal evaluations meaning feedback from trainees, trainers, management or post-training evaluations; - self-assessments; - station condition reports; - operating experience (OPEX); - modifications of job scope; - management input. The Training Change Control Process at Cernavoda NPP includes the following aspects. The first step is the identification of all the initiating factors for a potential training change. Then, retain only those, which could have an impact on training and classify them in two categories: as deficiencies or as enhancement suggestions. The process is different for the two categories. The deficiency category supposes the application of the Training Needs Analysis (TNA) process. This is a performance-oriented process, resulting in more competent employees, solving existing and potential performance problems. By using needs analysis to systematically determine what people or courses and programs are expected to do and gathering data to reveal what they are really doing, we can receive a clear picture of the problem and then we can establish corrective action plans to fix it. The process is supported by plant subjects matter and by training specialists. On the other hand, enhancements suggestions are assessed by designated experienced persons and then are implemented in the training process. Regarding these two types of initiating factors for the training change control process, the final result consists of a training improvement, raising the effectiveness, efficiency or

  6. Building capacity in implementation science research training at the University of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanjo, George O; Oyugi, Julius O; Kibwage, Isaac O; Mwanda, Walter O; Ngugi, Elizabeth N; Otieno, Fredrick C; Ndege, Wycliffe; Child, Mara; Farquhar, Carey; Penner, Jeremy; Talib, Zohray; Kiarie, James N

    2016-03-08

    Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa, and globally, grapple with the problem of closing the gap between evidence-based health interventions and actual practice in health service settings. It is essential for health care systems, especially in low-resource settings, to increase capacity to implement evidence-based practices, by training professionals in implementation science. With support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative, the University of Nairobi has developed a training program to build local capacity for implementation science. This paper describes how the University of Nairobi leveraged resources from the Medical Education Partnership to develop an institutional program that provides training and mentoring in implementation science, builds relationships between researchers and implementers, and identifies local research priorities for implementation science. The curriculum content includes core material in implementation science theory, methods, and experiences. The program adopts a team mentoring and supervision approach, in which fellows are matched with mentors at the University of Nairobi and partnering institutions: University of Washington, Seattle, and University of Maryland, Baltimore. A survey of program participants showed a high degree satisfaction with most aspects of the program, including the content, duration, and attachment sites. A key strength of the fellowship program is the partnership approach, which leverages innovative use of information technology to offer diverse perspectives, and a team model for mentorship and supervision. As health care systems and training institutions seek new approaches to increase capacity in implementation science, the University of Nairobi Implementation Science Fellowship program can be a model for health educators and administrators who wish to develop their program and curricula.

  7. Examining the Relationship Between Mental, Physical, and Organizational Factors Associated With Attrition During Maritime Forces Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsch, Olaf; Banko, Katherine M; Veenstra, Bertil J; Valk, Pierre J L

    2015-11-01

    For infantry units of the Dutch Ministry of Defence, high attrition rates (varying from 42 to 68%) during initial training are a persisting problem. The reasons for this attrition are diverse. Having better insight into the causes of attrition is a prerequisite for implementing preventive measures. To achieve this, a monitoring assessment system was developed that integrated the effects of physical, mental, and organizational determinants on operational readiness. The aim of this study was to implement the monitoring tools and to establish the set of determinants that best predicted attrition during infantry training of new recruits. Eighty-five recruits were monitored over a 24-week infantry training course. Before the training, recruits were screened for medical, psychological, and physical wellness. During the monitoring phase, mental, physiological, and organizational indicants were obtained using an array of tools such as questionnaires, chest belt monitors (for heart rate, acceleration, and skin temperature measurements), and computerized tests (e.g., vigilance, long-term memory). Survival analyses were used to tease out the determinants of individual and grouped predictors of attrition. Nearly half the recruits (47%) failed the training. Attrition was predicted by both physiological and mental determinants. However, the organizational determinant "trainers' judgment" on the "recruits' military quality" dominated the physiological and mental determinants. It was concluded that the monitoring system was successfully implemented during infantry training, and that the survival analysis method emphasized on single effects and interactions between the different determinants. Based on the current findings, we recommend several steps to successfully implement a monitoring method in settings with high demands.

  8. When Diversity Training Isn’t Enough: The Case for Inclusive Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    O’Reilly, 1992). Furthermore, demographic diversity (e.g., sex , gender, and age) has been associated with increased turnover, increased conflict...in the workplace. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Research, 35, 469–487. Markus, H. R., Steele, C. M., & Steele, D. M. (2000). Colorblindness as a

  9. Paving the road for a European postgraduate training curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Goverde, Angelique J; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    The 'Project for Achieving Consensus in Training' has been initiated by the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology to harmonise training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology throughout Europe. In this project called the EBCOG-PACT, a state of the art pan-European training curriculum will be

  10. Corporate Diversity Programs and Gender Inequality in the Oil and Gas Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L; Kilanski, Kristine; Muller, Chandra

    2014-11-01

    Since the 1980s, major U.S. corporations have embraced diversity as a management strategy to increase the number of women in top jobs. Diversity management programs include targeted recruitment, hiring, and promotions policies; mentoring programs; affinity groups; and diversity training. Few of these programs have proven effective in achieving gender diversity in the corporate world, despite their widespread popularity. To explore the reasons for this, the authors investigate the experiences of women scientists in the oil and gas industry who are targeted by these programs. In-depth interviews reveal possible reasons why these programs fail to achieve their intended goals. The authors find that these programs can paradoxically reinforce gender inequality and male dominance in the industry. The authors discuss alternative approaches for addressing gender inequality in work organizations and conclude with implications of their findings for corporate approaches to promoting diversity and for future research.

  11. Safeguards training at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1986-10-01

    Safeguarding our country's nuclear materials against theft or diversion is extremely important due to their significantly strategic value. In addition, nuclear materials also have an extremely high monetary value. The term ''safeguards'' is defined as an integrated system of physical protection, accountability, and material control measures designed to deter, prevent, detect, and respond to unauthorized possession and use of special nuclear materials. An aggressive Safeguards program, therefore, employs both good security measures and a strong material control and accountability system. For effective internal control of nuclear materials, having people qualified in the many aspects of safeguards and accountability is essential. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), this goal is accomplished through a Laboratory-wide Safeguards Awareness Program. All PNL staff members receive a level of Safeguards training appropriate to their particular function within the Laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the unique training opportunities this topic provides and how the training goals are accomplished through the various training courses given to the staff members

  12. A differently imagined margin: Initial Teacher Training and Black and Minority Ethnic groups in the Lifelong Learning Sector in the north of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rennie, Sandra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We look at how marginal education spaces are differently imagined and (reproduced. We trace aspects of learners’ journeys and the different pathways into Initial Teacher Training (ITT made available through a university and an Adult Education-based networking organisation in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS in England. We focus on urban localities and the venues used to offer and run PTLLS courses aimed at attracting Black and Minority Ethnic (BME recruits to teaching careers. We compare the profiles of these trainee groups and the effect of the different approaches taken by these organisations. We look at organisational and spatial aspects of training ‘offers’ and provision, the impacts of this on the recruitment of learners and how teaching careers are differently imagined within this marginal space. We conclude with suggestions for altering the discourse used to review and plan the recruitment of BME teacher trainees.

  13. Understanding Approaches for Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to enhance understanding of how companies actually implement diversity management, and of factors that may explain their approach. It does this by framing a tripartite model that articulates a combination of indicators, and by using this model to investigate the prevalent...... approach for managing diversity in Italy and the contingent factors at play. Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents data from a survey conducted among 90 Italian companies, and two focus groups consisting of experts and managers. Findings – The most common approach among Italian companies...... in Italy, where interest in diversity is growing due to the increased participation of women and immigrants in the labor market and the initiatives inspired by the EU and multinational companies. In addition, the research model used in this study integrates existing typologies of diversity management...

  14. Microsurgery simulation training system and set up: An essential system to complement every training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, Dhalia; Haram, Nadine; Moustaki, Margarita; Chow, Whitney; Saour, Samer; Mohanna, Pari Naz

    2017-07-01

    Microsurgical techniques are essential in plastic surgery; however, inconsistent training practices, acquiring these skills can be difficult. To address this, we designed a standardised laboratory-based microsurgical training programme, which allows trainees to develop their dexterity, visuospatial ability, operative flow and judgement as separate components. Thirty trainees completed an initial microsurgical anastomosis on a chicken femoral artery, assessed using the structured assessment of microsurgical skills (SAMS) method. The study group (n = 18) then completed a 3-month training programme, while the control group (n = 19) did not. A final anastomosis was completed by all trainees (n = 30). The study group had a significant improvement in the microsurgical technique, assessed using the SAMS score, when the initial and final scores were compared (Mean: 24 SAMS initial versus 49 SAMS final) (p group had a significantly lower rate of improvement (Mean: 23 SAMS initial versus 25 SAMS final). There was a significant difference between the final SAMS score of the study group and that of senior surgeons (Mean: 49 study final SAMS versus 58 senior SAMS). This validated programme is a safe, cost-effective and flexible method of allowing trainees to develop microsurgical skills in a non-pressurized environment. In addition, the objectified skills allow trainers to assess the trainees' level of proficiency before operating on patients. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CHANGES IN MOTOR SKILLS OF CHILDREN WHO TRAIN SPORTS SWIMMING AT THE INITIAL STAGE OF SCHOOL EDUCATION (IN ANNUAL TRAINING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Eider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This is an empirical article aiming at defining the changes of motor fitness in children practicing swimming at early stage of training in year-long training cycle. Proper selection of candidates to practice certain sports is a very complex process. One needs to select from the very large population of children, girls and boys, characterized by certain features, including somatic and motor features, which developed in a longstanding process of training, will lead them to become champions. The purpose of the research: The purpose of the research was to define the changes of motor fitness in girls’ practicing swimming at early stage of training in year-long training cycle. Material and Methods: The subjects to the research were 85 girls aged 7 (1st year of primary school, including 36 girls in swimming group and 49 girls in control group. 36 of them belonged to swimmers’ group- all girls were members of the Municipal Swimming Club in Szczecin. Control group consisted of 49 girls, who attended the same elementary schools. The examinations were carried out twice in the 2009-2010 academic year. The most reliable and accurate indirect test- EUROFIT Test Battery-was used. Results : The research revealed changes in both groups (Sw, C in terms of all eight tests. Examination II proved statistically significant improvement of results in both groups (Sw, C in comparison to Examination I. The dynamics of changes in general balance, flexibility, static force, functional force, running agility, was bigger in the girls who practiced swimming. As the speed of movement of upper limb, explosive force and thorax force are concerned; the differences of results in both examinations were similar in both groups (swimming group and control group. Progressive changes in motor fitness of the examined groups are a positive phenomenon in the development of child’s young organism. Conclusions: Swimming training significantly affected the dynamics of

  16. Assessment of Native Languages for Food Safety Training Programs for Meat Industry Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sherrlyn S.; Cordray, Joseph C.; Sapp, Stephen; Sebranek, Joseph G.; Anderson, Barbara; Wenger, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Challenges arise when teaching food safety to culturally diverse employees working in meatpacking and food manufacturing industries. A food safety training program was developed in English, translated into Spanish, and administered to 1,265 adult learners. Assessments were conducted by comparing scores before and immediately following training.…

  17. Initiatives and evaluation of teaching-learning process in translation training

    OpenAIRE

    Olvera Lobo, Mar??a Dolores; Guti??rrez-Artacho, Juncal

    2010-01-01

    The ability to manage information and communication technologies (ICT) is a professional prerequisite for translators. The translation discipline is aware of this trend because ICTs have changed and developed the translation profession. Translation training is more than just learning a proficient command of languages, and translators must also develop other important skills ??? such as accessing and managing information resources. A group of teachers from various departments of the Univers...

  18. Staff training program of CANDU projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When AECL opened a project office Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training programs were initiated, general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions, and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (author)

  19. Providing Transthoracic Echocardiography Training for Intensive Care Unit Trainees: An Educational Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuza, Catherine M; Hanifi, M Tariq; Koç, Melissa; Stopfkuchen-Evans, Matthias

    2018-04-09

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is important in the management of critically ill patients, yet it has not been incorporated into many residency programs' curricula. Our objective is to determine if trainees undergoing a 60-minute training session on TTE have improved knowledge, ultrasound skills, and increases the utilization of TTE during their rotation in the intensive care unit (ICU). We will also compare the results of participants with prior TTE exposure to TTE-naïve trainees. Our hypothesis is that after the training, participants' will have improved knowledge and ultrasound skills compared to before training. Our secondary hypotheses are that TTE-naïve trainees will have greater improvements in knowledge scores compared to those who have had prior TTE experience and trainees will increase their use of TTE in the ICU. Single-center, prospective trial. Brigham and Women's Hospital (academic hospital). Residents and fellows rotating through the ICU, at any level of postgraduate training. Forty-two trainees participated in the study. Statistically significant improvement after training was observed for all multiple choice questions (MCQ) and practical assessments (p < 0.001). When assessing the differences in score improvement between TTE-experienced versus TTE-naïve users, mean score improvements were notably higher for TTE-naïve participants (MCQ: 28.2 ± 11.6; echo clinical: 48.6 ± 23.4) compared to TTE-experienced users (MCQ: 18.6 ± 13.5, p = 0.01; echo clinical: 38.3 ± 30.2, p = 0.04). A short didactic presentation on TTE use may be useful in teaching ICU trainees basic TTE skills and encouraging the use of bedside TTE in the ICU. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Moving science into state child and adolescent mental health systems: Illinois' evidence-informed practice initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Amy C; Atkins, Marc S; Wehrmann, Kathryn C; Mehta, Tara; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S; Marinez-Lora, A; Mehlinger, Renee

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the Illinois State Mental Health Authority embarked on an initiative to close the gap between research and practice in the children's mental health system. A stakeholder advisory council developed a plan to advance evidence informed practice through policy and program initiatives. A multilevel approach was developed to achieve this objective, which included policy change, stakeholder education, and clinician training. This article focuses on the evidence-informed training process designed following review of implementation research. The training involved in-person didactic sessions and twice-monthly telephone supervision across 6 cohorts of community based clinicians, each receiving 12 months of training. Training content initially included cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral parent training and was adapted over the years to a practice model based on common element concepts. Evaluation based on provider and parent report indicated children treated by training clinicians generally showed superior outcomes versus both a treatment-as-usual comparison group for Cohorts 1 to 4 and the statewide child population as a whole after 90 days of care for Cohorts 5 to 6. The results indicated primarily moderate to strong effects for the evidence-based training groups. Moving a large public statewide child mental health system toward more effective services is a complex and lengthy process. These results indicate training of community mental health providers in Illinois in evidence-informed practice was moderately successful in positively impacting child-level functional outcomes. These findings also influenced state policy in committing resources to continuing the initiative, even in difficult economic times.