WorldWideScience

Sample records for distributed parallel computing

  1. Distributed Memory Parallel Computing with SEAWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, J.; Huizer, S.; van Engelen, J.; Oude Essink, G.; Ram, R.; Vuik, K.

    2017-12-01

    Fresh groundwater reserves in coastal aquifers are threatened by sea-level rise, extreme weather conditions, increasing urbanization and associated groundwater extraction rates. To counteract these threats, accurate high-resolution numerical models are required to optimize the management of these precious reserves. The major model drawbacks are long run times and large memory requirements, limiting the predictive power of these models. Distributed memory parallel computing is an efficient technique for reducing run times and memory requirements, where the problem is divided over multiple processor cores. A new Parallel Krylov Solver (PKS) for SEAWAT is presented. PKS has recently been applied to MODFLOW and includes Conjugate Gradient (CG) and Biconjugate Gradient Stabilized (BiCGSTAB) linear accelerators. Both accelerators are preconditioned by an overlapping additive Schwarz preconditioner in a way that: a) subdomains are partitioned using Recursive Coordinate Bisection (RCB) load balancing, b) each subdomain uses local memory only and communicates with other subdomains by Message Passing Interface (MPI) within the linear accelerator, c) it is fully integrated in SEAWAT. Within SEAWAT, the PKS-CG solver replaces the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) solver for solving the variable-density groundwater flow equation and the PKS-BiCGSTAB solver replaces the Generalized Conjugate Gradient (GCG) solver for solving the advection-diffusion equation. PKS supports the third-order Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme for computing advection. Benchmarks were performed on the Dutch national supercomputer (https://userinfo.surfsara.nl/systems/cartesius) using up to 128 cores, for a synthetic 3D Henry model (100 million cells) and the real-life Sand Engine model ( 10 million cells). The Sand Engine model was used to investigate the potential effect of the long-term morphological evolution of a large sand replenishment and climate change on fresh groundwater resources

  2. From parallel to distributed computing for reactive scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, A.; Gervasi, O.; Baraglia, R.

    1994-01-01

    Some reactive scattering codes have been ported on different innovative computer architectures ranging from massively parallel machines to clustered workstations. The porting has required a drastic restructuring of the codes to single out computationally decoupled cpu intensive subsections. The suitability of different theoretical approaches for parallel and distributed computing restructuring is discussed and the efficiency of related algorithms evaluated

  3. Prototyping and Simulating Parallel, Distributed Computations with VISA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demeure, Isabelle M; Nutt, Gary J

    1989-01-01

    ...] to support the design, prototyping, and simulation of parallel, distributed computations. In particular, VISA is meant to guide the choice of partitioning and communication strategies for such computations, based on their performance...

  4. A compositional reservoir simulator on distributed memory parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rame, M.; Delshad, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the application of distributed memory parallel computes to field scale reservoir simulations using a parallel version of UTCHEM, The University of Texas Chemical Flooding Simulator. The model is a general purpose highly vectorized chemical compositional simulator that can simulate a wide range of displacement processes at both field and laboratory scales. The original simulator was modified to run on both distributed memory parallel machines (Intel iPSC/960 and Delta, Connection Machine 5, Kendall Square 1 and 2, and CRAY T3D) and a cluster of workstations. A domain decomposition approach has been taken towards parallelization of the code. A portion of the discrete reservoir model is assigned to each processor by a set-up routine that attempts a data layout as even as possible from the load-balance standpoint. Each of these subdomains is extended so that data can be shared between adjacent processors for stencil computation. The added routines that make parallel execution possible are written in a modular fashion that makes the porting to new parallel platforms straight forward. Results of the distributed memory computing performance of Parallel simulator are presented for field scale applications such as tracer flood and polymer flood. A comparison of the wall-clock times for same problems on a vector supercomputer is also presented

  5. Distributed parallel computing in stochastic modeling of groundwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin; Xu, Haizhen

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic modeling is a rapidly evolving, popular approach to the study of the uncertainty and heterogeneity of groundwater systems. However, the use of Monte Carlo-type simulations to solve practical groundwater problems often encounters computational bottlenecks that hinder the acquisition of meaningful results. To improve the computational efficiency, a system that combines stochastic model generation with MODFLOW-related programs and distributed parallel processing is investigated. The distributed computing framework, called the Java Parallel Processing Framework, is integrated into the system to allow the batch processing of stochastic models in distributed and parallel systems. As an example, the system is applied to the stochastic delineation of well capture zones in the Pinggu Basin in Beijing. Through the use of 50 processing threads on a cluster with 10 multicore nodes, the execution times of 500 realizations are reduced to 3% compared with those of a serial execution. Through this application, the system demonstrates its potential in solving difficult computational problems in practical stochastic modeling. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  6. Parallel computations

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    Parallel Computations focuses on parallel computation, with emphasis on algorithms used in a variety of numerical and physical applications and for many different types of parallel computers. Topics covered range from vectorization of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient (ICCG) algorithm on the Cray-1 to calculation of table lookups and piecewise functions. Single tridiagonal linear systems and vectorized computation of reactive flow are also discussed.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins by classifying parallel computers and describing techn

  7. Adaptive Dynamic Process Scheduling on Distributed Memory Parallel Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shu

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges in programming distributed memory parallel machines is deciding how to allocate work to processors. This problem is particularly important for computations with unpredictable dynamic behaviors or irregular structures. We present a scheme for dynamic scheduling of medium-grained processes that is useful in this context. The adaptive contracting within neighborhood (ACWN is a dynamic, distributed, load-dependent, and scalable scheme. It deals with dynamic and unpredictable creation of processes and adapts to different systems. The scheme is described and contrasted with two other schemes that have been proposed in this context, namely the randomized allocation and the gradient model. The performance of the three schemes on an Intel iPSC/2 hypercube is presented and analyzed. The experimental results show that even though the ACWN algorithm incurs somewhat larger overhead than the randomized allocation, it achieves better performance in most cases due to its adaptiveness. Its feature of quickly spreading the work helps it outperform the gradient model in performance and scalability.

  8. Parallel grid generation algorithm for distributed memory computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Stuti; Moitra, Anutosh

    1994-01-01

    A parallel grid-generation algorithm and its implementation on the Intel iPSC/860 computer are described. The grid-generation scheme is based on an algebraic formulation of homotopic relations. Methods for utilizing the inherent parallelism of the grid-generation scheme are described, and implementation of multiple levELs of parallelism on multiple instruction multiple data machines are indicated. The algorithm is capable of providing near orthogonality and spacing control at solid boundaries while requiring minimal interprocessor communications. Results obtained on the Intel hypercube for a blended wing-body configuration are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. Fortran implementations bAsed on the native programming model of the iPSC/860 computer and the Express system of software tools are reported. Computational gains in execution time speed-up ratios are given.

  9. Event parallelism: Distributed memory parallel computing for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.

    1989-05-01

    This paper describes the present and expected future development of distributed memory parallel computers for high energy physics experiments. It covers the use of event parallel microprocessor farms, particularly at Fermilab, including both ACP multiprocessors and farms of MicroVAXES. These systems have proven very cost effective in the past. A case is made for moving to the more open environment of UNIX and RISC processors. The 2nd Generation ACP Multiprocessor System, which is based on powerful RISC systems, is described. Given the promise of still more extraordinary increases in processor performance, a new emphasis on point to point, rather than bussed, communication will be required. Developments in this direction are described. 6 figs

  10. Event parallelism: Distributed memory parallel computing for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the present and expected future development of distributed memory parallel computers for high energy physics experiments. It covers the use of event parallel microprocessor farms, particularly at Fermilab, including both ACP multiprocessors and farms of MicroVAXES. These systems have proven very cost effective in the past. A case is made for moving to the more open environment of UNIX and RISC processors. The 2nd Generation ACP Multiprocessor System, which is based on powerful RISC systems, is described. Given the promise of still more extraordinary increases in processor performance, a new emphasis on point to point, rather than bussed, communication will be required. Developments in this direction are described. (orig.)

  11. Event parallelism: Distributed memory parallel computing for high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Thomas

    1989-12-01

    This paper describes the present and expected future development of distributed memory parallel computers for high energy physics experiments. It covers the use of event parallel microprocessor farms, particularly at Fermilab, including both ACP multiprocessors and farms of MicroVAXES. These systems have proven very cost effective in the past. A case is made for moving to the more open environment of UNIX and RISC processors. The 2nd Generation ACP Multiprocessor System, which is based on powerful RISC system, is described. Given the promise of still more extraordinary increases in processor performance, a new emphasis on point to point, rather than bussed, communication will be required. Developments in this direction are described.

  12. A parallelization study of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4 on a distributed memory highly parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Fujisaki, Masahide; Okuda, Motoi; Takano, Makoto; Masukawa, Fumihiro; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1993-01-01

    The general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4 has been implemented on the Fujitsu AP1000 distributed memory highly parallel computer. Parallelization techniques developed and studied are reported. A shielding analysis function of the MCNP4 code is parallelized in this study. A technique to map a history to each processor dynamically and to map control process to a certain processor was applied. The efficiency of parallelized code is up to 80% for a typical practical problem with 512 processors. These results demonstrate the advantages of a highly parallel computer to the conventional computers in the field of shielding analysis by Monte Carlo method. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of DEC`s GIGAswitch for distributed parallel computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Hutchins, J.; Brandt, J.

    1993-10-01

    One of Sandia`s research efforts is to reduce the end-to-end communication delay in a parallel-distributed computing environment. GIGAswitch is DEC`s implementation of a gigabit local area network based on switched FDDI technology. Using the GIGAswitch, the authors intend to minimize the medium access latency suffered by shared-medium FDDI technology. Experimental results show that the GIGAswitch adds 16.5 microseconds of switching and bridging delay to an end-to-end communication. Although the added latency causes a 1.8% throughput degradation and a 5% line efficiency degradation, the availability of dedicated bandwidth is much more than what is available to a workstation on a shared medium. For example, ten directly connected workstations each would have a dedicated bandwidth of 95 Mbps, but if they were sharing the FDDI bandwidth, each would have 10% of the total bandwidth, i.e., less than 10 Mbps. In addition, they have found that when there is no output port contention, the switch`s aggregate bandwidth will scale up to multiples of its port bandwidth. However, with output port contention, the throughput and latency performance suffered significantly. Their mathematical and simulation models indicate that the GIGAswitch line efficiency could be as low as 63% when there are nine input ports contending for the same output port. The data indicate that the delay introduced by contention at the server workstation is 50 times that introduced by the GIGAswitch. The authors conclude that the GIGAswitch meets the performance requirements of today`s high-end workstations and that the switched FDDI technology provides an alternative that utilizes existing workstation interfaces while increasing the aggregate bandwidth. However, because the speed of workstations is increasing by a factor of 2 every 1.5 years, the switched FDDI technology is only good as an interim solution.

  14. Parallel computation for distributed parameter system-from vector processors to Adena computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogi, T

    1983-04-01

    Research on advanced parallel hardware and software architectures for very high-speed computation deserves and needs more support and attention to fulfil its promise. Novel architectures for parallel processing are being made ready. Architectures for parallel processing can be roughly divided into two groups. One is a vector processor in which a single central processing unit involves multiple vector-arithmetic registers. The other is a processor array in which slave processors are connected to a host processor to perform parallel computation. In this review, the concept and data structure of the Adena (alternating-direction edition nexus array) architecture, which is conformable to distributed-parameter simulation algorithms, are described. 5 references.

  15. A Parallel and Distributed Surrogate Model Implementation for Computational Steering

    KAUST Repository

    Butnaru, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the influence of multiple parameters in a complex simulation setting is a difficult task. In the ideal case, the scientist can freely steer such a simulation and is immediately presented with the results for a certain configuration of the input parameters. Such an exploration process is however not possible if the simulation is computationally too expensive. For these cases we present in this paper a scalable computational steering approach utilizing a fast surrogate model as substitute for the time-consuming simulation. The surrogate model we propose is based on the sparse grid technique, and we identify the main computational tasks associated with its evaluation and its extension. We further show how distributed data management combined with the specific use of accelerators allows us to approximate and deliver simulation results to a high-resolution visualization system in real-time. This significantly enhances the steering workflow and facilitates the interactive exploration of large datasets. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Parallel paving: An algorithm for generating distributed, adaptive, all-quadrilateral meshes on parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lober, R.R.; Tautges, T.J.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    Paving is an automated mesh generation algorithm which produces all-quadrilateral elements. It can additionally generate these elements in varying sizes such that the resulting mesh adapts to a function distribution, such as an error function. While powerful, conventional paving is a very serial algorithm in its operation. Parallel paving is the extension of serial paving into parallel environments to perform the same meshing functions as conventional paving only on distributed, discretized models. This extension allows large, adaptive, parallel finite element simulations to take advantage of paving`s meshing capabilities for h-remap remeshing. A significantly modified version of the CUBIT mesh generation code has been developed to host the parallel paving algorithm and demonstrate its capabilities on both two dimensional and three dimensional surface geometries and compare the resulting parallel produced meshes to conventionally paved meshes for mesh quality and algorithm performance. Sandia`s {open_quotes}tiling{close_quotes} dynamic load balancing code has also been extended to work with the paving algorithm to retain parallel efficiency as subdomains undergo iterative mesh refinement.

  17. Distributed and cloud computing from parallel processing to the Internet of Things

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Kai; Fox, Geoffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Distributed and Cloud Computing, named a 2012 Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association's Choice publication, explains how to create high-performance, scalable, reliable systems, exposing the design principles, architecture, and innovative applications of parallel, distributed, and cloud computing systems. Starting with an overview of modern distributed models, the book provides comprehensive coverage of distributed and cloud computing, including: Facilitating management, debugging, migration, and disaster recovery through virtualization Clustered systems for resear

  18. Computational cost of isogeometric multi-frontal solvers on parallel distributed memory machines

    KAUST Repository

    Woźniak, Maciej; Paszyński, Maciej R.; Pardo, D.; Dalcin, Lisandro; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper derives theoretical estimates of the computational cost for isogeometric multi-frontal direct solver executed on parallel distributed memory machines. We show theoretically that for the Cp-1 global continuity of the isogeometric solution

  19. The specification of Stampi, a message passing library for distributed parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Toshiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Koide, Hiroshi

    2000-03-01

    At CCSE, Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, a new message passing library for heterogeneous and distributed parallel computing has been developed, and it is called as Stampi. Stampi enables us to communicate between any combination of parallel computers as well as workstations. Currently, a Stampi system is constructed from Stampi library and Stampi/Java. It provides functions to connect a Stampi application with not only those on COMPACS, COMplex Parallel Computer System, but also applets which work on WWW browsers. This report summarizes the specifications of Stampi and details the development of its system. (author)

  20. Stampi: a message passing library for distributed parallel computing. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Toshiyuki; Koide, Hiroshi; Takemiya, Hiroshi

    1998-11-01

    A new message passing library, Stampi, has been developed to realize a computation with different kind of parallel computers arbitrarily and making MPI (Message Passing Interface) as an unique interface for communication. Stampi is based on MPI2 specification. It realizes dynamic process creation to different machines and communication between spawned one within the scope of MPI semantics. Vender implemented MPI as a closed system in one parallel machine and did not support both functions; process creation and communication to external machines. Stampi supports both functions and enables us distributed parallel computing. Currently Stampi has been implemented on COMPACS (COMplex PArallel Computer System) introduced in CCSE, five parallel computers and one graphic workstation, and any communication on them can be processed on. (author)

  1. A Parallel and Distributed Surrogate Model Implementation for Computational Steering

    KAUST Repository

    Butnaru, Daniel; Buse, Gerrit; Pfluger, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    of the input parameters. Such an exploration process is however not possible if the simulation is computationally too expensive. For these cases we present in this paper a scalable computational steering approach utilizing a fast surrogate model as substitute

  2. Issues in developing parallel iterative algorithms for solving partial differential equations on a (transputer-based) distributed parallel computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Jethra, A.; Khare, A.N.; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.; Srivenkateshan, R.; Menon, S.V.G.

    1990-01-01

    Issues relating to implementing iterative procedures, for numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations, on a distributed parallel computing system are discussed. Preliminary investigations show that a speed-up of about 3.85 is achievable on a four transputer pipeline network. (author). 2 figs., 3 a ppendixes., 7 refs

  3. TME (Task Mapping Editor): tool for executing distributed parallel computing. TME user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemiya, Hiroshi; Yamagishi, Nobuhiro; Imamura, Toshiyuki

    2000-03-01

    At the Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, a software environment PPExe has been developed to support scientific computing on a parallel computer cluster (distributed parallel scientific computing). TME (Task Mapping Editor) is one of components of the PPExe and provides a visual programming environment for distributed parallel scientific computing. Users can specify data dependence among tasks (programs) visually as a data flow diagram and map these tasks onto computers interactively through GUI of TME. The specified tasks are processed by other components of PPExe such as Meta-scheduler, RIM (Resource Information Monitor), and EMS (Execution Management System) according to the execution order of these tasks determined by TME. In this report, we describe the usage of TME. (author)

  4. Parallel distributed computing in modeling of the nanomaterials production technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Korkhov, V.V.; Zatevakhin, M.A.; Gorbachev, Y.E.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of physical and chemical processes occurring in the nanomaterial production technologies is a computationally challenging problem, due to the great number of coupled processes, time and length scales to be taken into account. To solve such complex problems with a good level of detail in a

  5. Parallelization of MCNP 4, a Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system, in highly parallel distributed memory type computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro; Takano, Makoto; Naito, Yoshitaka; Yamazaki, Takao; Fujisaki, Masahide; Suzuki, Koichiro; Okuda, Motoi.

    1993-11-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and calculating speed of shielding analyses, MCNP 4, a Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system, has been parallelized and measured of its efficiency in the highly parallel distributed memory type computer, AP1000. The code has been analyzed statically and dynamically, then the suitable algorithm for parallelization has been determined for the shielding analysis functions of MCNP 4. This includes a strategy where a new history is assigned to the idling processor element dynamically during the execution. Furthermore, to avoid the congestion of communicative processing, the batch concept, processing multi-histories by a unit, has been introduced. By analyzing a sample cask problem with 2,000,000 histories by the AP1000 with 512 processor elements, the 82 % of parallelization efficiency is achieved, and the calculational speed has been estimated to be around 50 times as fast as that of FACOM M-780. (author)

  6. Parallel computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejcic, A.; Maillard, J.; Maurel, G.; Silva, J.; Wolff-Bacha, F.

    1997-01-01

    The work in the field of parallel processing has developed as research activities using several numerical Monte Carlo simulations related to basic or applied current problems of nuclear and particle physics. For the applications utilizing the GEANT code development or improvement works were done on parts simulating low energy physical phenomena like radiation, transport and interaction. The problem of actinide burning by means of accelerators was approached using a simulation with the GEANT code. A program of neutron tracking in the range of low energies up to the thermal region has been developed. It is coupled to the GEANT code and permits in a single pass the simulation of a hybrid reactor core receiving a proton burst. Other works in this field refers to simulations for nuclear medicine applications like, for instance, development of biological probes, evaluation and characterization of the gamma cameras (collimators, crystal thickness) as well as the method for dosimetric calculations. Particularly, these calculations are suited for a geometrical parallelization approach especially adapted to parallel machines of the TN310 type. Other works mentioned in the same field refer to simulation of the electron channelling in crystals and simulation of the beam-beam interaction effect in colliders. The GEANT code was also used to simulate the operation of germanium detectors designed for natural and artificial radioactivity monitoring of environment

  7. Stampi: a message passing library for distributed parallel computing. User's guide, second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Toshiyuki; Koide, Hiroshi; Takemiya, Hiroshi

    2000-02-01

    A new message passing library, Stampi, has been developed to realize a computation with different kind of parallel computers arbitrarily and making MPI (Message Passing Interface) as an unique interface for communication. Stampi is based on the MPI2 specification, and it realizes dynamic process creation to different machines and communication between spawned one within the scope of MPI semantics. Main features of Stampi are summarized as follows: (i) an automatic switch function between external- and internal communications, (ii) a message routing/relaying with a routing module, (iii) a dynamic process creation, (iv) a support of two types of connection, Master/Slave and Client/Server, (v) a support of a communication with Java applets. Indeed vendors implemented MPI libraries as a closed system in one parallel machine or their systems, and did not support both functions; process creation and communication to external machines. Stampi supports both functions and enables us distributed parallel computing. Currently Stampi has been implemented on COMPACS (COMplex PArallel Computer System) introduced in CCSE, five parallel computers and one graphic workstation, moreover on eight kinds of parallel machines, totally fourteen systems. Stampi provides us MPI communication functionality on them. This report describes mainly the usage of Stampi. (author)

  8. Time complexity analysis for distributed memory computers: implementation of parallel conjugate gradient method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Haan, M.J.; Hertzberger, L.O.; van Leeuwen, J.

    1991-01-01

    New developments in Computer Science, both hardware and software, offer researchers, such as physicists, unprecedented possibilities to solve their computational intensive problems.However, full exploitation of e.g. new massively parallel computers, parallel languages or runtime environments

  9. PAPIRUS, a parallel computing framework for sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation, and estimation of parameter distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Jaeseok; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed an interface between an engineering simulation code and statistical analysis software. • Multiple packages of the sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation algorithms are implemented in the framework. • Parallel computing algorithms are also implemented in the framework to solve multiple computational problems simultaneously. - Abstract: This paper introduces a statistical data analysis toolkit, PAPIRUS, designed to perform the model calibration, uncertainty propagation, Chi-square linearity test, and sensitivity analysis for both linear and nonlinear problems. The PAPIRUS was developed by implementing multiple packages of methodologies, and building an interface between an engineering simulation code and the statistical analysis algorithms. A parallel computing framework is implemented in the PAPIRUS with multiple computing resources and proper communications between the server and the clients of each processor. It was shown that even though a large amount of data is considered for the engineering calculation, the distributions of the model parameters and the calculation results can be quantified accurately with significant reductions in computational effort. A general description about the PAPIRUS with a graphical user interface is presented in Section 2. Sections 2.1–2.5 present the methodologies of data assimilation, uncertainty propagation, Chi-square linearity test, and sensitivity analysis implemented in the toolkit with some results obtained by each module of the software. Parallel computing algorithms adopted in the framework to solve multiple computational problems simultaneously are also summarized in the paper

  10. PAPIRUS, a parallel computing framework for sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation, and estimation of parameter distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jaeseok, E-mail: jheo@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Kyung Doo, E-mail: kdkim@kaeri.re.kr

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We developed an interface between an engineering simulation code and statistical analysis software. • Multiple packages of the sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation algorithms are implemented in the framework. • Parallel computing algorithms are also implemented in the framework to solve multiple computational problems simultaneously. - Abstract: This paper introduces a statistical data analysis toolkit, PAPIRUS, designed to perform the model calibration, uncertainty propagation, Chi-square linearity test, and sensitivity analysis for both linear and nonlinear problems. The PAPIRUS was developed by implementing multiple packages of methodologies, and building an interface between an engineering simulation code and the statistical analysis algorithms. A parallel computing framework is implemented in the PAPIRUS with multiple computing resources and proper communications between the server and the clients of each processor. It was shown that even though a large amount of data is considered for the engineering calculation, the distributions of the model parameters and the calculation results can be quantified accurately with significant reductions in computational effort. A general description about the PAPIRUS with a graphical user interface is presented in Section 2. Sections 2.1–2.5 present the methodologies of data assimilation, uncertainty propagation, Chi-square linearity test, and sensitivity analysis implemented in the toolkit with some results obtained by each module of the software. Parallel computing algorithms adopted in the framework to solve multiple computational problems simultaneously are also summarized in the paper.

  11. Three-dimensional magnetic field computation on a distributed memory parallel processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barion, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of three-dimensional magnetic fields by finite element methods frequently proves too onerous a task for the computing resource on which it is attempted. When non-linear and transient effects are included, it may become impossible to calculate the field distribution to sufficient resolution. One approach to this problem is to exploit the natural parallelism in the finite element method via parallel processing. This paper reports on an implementation of a finite element code for non-linear three-dimensional low-frequency magnetic field calculation on Intel's iPSC/2

  12. Studies of electron collisions with polyatomic molecules using distributed-memory parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstead, C.; Hipes, P.G.; Lima, M.A.P.; McKoy, V.

    1991-01-01

    Elastic electron scattering cross sections from 5--30 eV are reported for the molecules C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 , Si 2 H 6 , and GeH 4 , obtained using an implementation of the Schwinger multichannel method for distributed-memory parallel computer architectures. These results, obtained within the static-exchange approximation, are in generally good agreement with the available experimental data. These calculations demonstrate the potential of highly parallel computation in the study of collisions between low-energy electrons and polyatomic gases. The computational methodology discussed is also directly applicable to the calculation of elastic cross sections at higher levels of approximation (target polarization) and of electronic excitation cross sections

  13. Computational cost of isogeometric multi-frontal solvers on parallel distributed memory machines

    KAUST Repository

    Woźniak, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    This paper derives theoretical estimates of the computational cost for isogeometric multi-frontal direct solver executed on parallel distributed memory machines. We show theoretically that for the Cp-1 global continuity of the isogeometric solution, both the computational cost and the communication cost of a direct solver are of order O(log(N)p2) for the one dimensional (1D) case, O(Np2) for the two dimensional (2D) case, and O(N4/3p2) for the three dimensional (3D) case, where N is the number of degrees of freedom and p is the polynomial order of the B-spline basis functions. The theoretical estimates are verified by numerical experiments performed with three parallel multi-frontal direct solvers: MUMPS, PaStiX and SuperLU, available through PETIGA toolkit built on top of PETSc. Numerical results confirm these theoretical estimates both in terms of p and N. For a given problem size, the strong efficiency rapidly decreases as the number of processors increases, becoming about 20% for 256 processors for a 3D example with 1283 unknowns and linear B-splines with C0 global continuity, and 15% for a 3D example with 643 unknowns and quartic B-splines with C3 global continuity. At the same time, one cannot arbitrarily increase the problem size, since the memory required by higher order continuity spaces is large, quickly consuming all the available memory resources even in the parallel distributed memory version. Numerical results also suggest that the use of distributed parallel machines is highly beneficial when solving higher order continuity spaces, although the number of processors that one can efficiently employ is somehow limited.

  14. Parallel computing works!

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Geoffrey C; Messina, Guiseppe C

    2014-01-01

    A clear illustration of how parallel computers can be successfully appliedto large-scale scientific computations. This book demonstrates how avariety of applications in physics, biology, mathematics and other scienceswere implemented on real parallel computers to produce new scientificresults. It investigates issues of fine-grained parallelism relevant forfuture supercomputers with particular emphasis on hypercube architecture. The authors describe how they used an experimental approach to configuredifferent massively parallel machines, design and implement basic systemsoftware, and develop

  15. Parallel computing works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-23

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  16. Parallelism in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallopoulos, Efstratios; Sameh, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended as a research monograph that could also be used in graduate courses for the design of parallel algorithms in matrix computations. It assumes general but not extensive knowledge of numerical linear algebra, parallel architectures, and parallel programming paradigms. The book consists of four parts: (I) Basics; (II) Dense and Special Matrix Computations; (III) Sparse Matrix Computations; and (IV) Matrix functions and characteristics. Part I deals with parallel programming paradigms and fundamental kernels, including reordering schemes for sparse matrices. Part II is devoted to dense matrix computations such as parallel algorithms for solving linear systems, linear least squares, the symmetric algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the singular-value decomposition. It also deals with the development of parallel algorithms for special linear systems such as banded ,Vandermonde ,Toeplitz ,and block Toeplitz systems. Part III addresses sparse matrix computations: (a) the development of pa...

  17. Practical parallel computing

    CERN Document Server

    Morse, H Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Practical Parallel Computing provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of high-performance parallel processing. This book discusses the development of parallel applications on a variety of equipment.Organized into three parts encompassing 12 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the technology trends that converge to favor massively parallel hardware over traditional mainframes and vector machines. This text then gives a tutorial introduction to parallel hardware architectures. Other chapters provide worked-out examples of programs using several parallel languages. Thi

  18. Parallel computing: numerics, applications, and trends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trobec, Roman; Vajteršic, Marián; Zinterhof, Peter

    2009-01-01

    ... and/or distributed systems. The contributions to this book are focused on topics most concerned in the trends of today's parallel computing. These range from parallel algorithmics, programming, tools, network computing to future parallel computing. Particular attention is paid to parallel numerics: linear algebra, differential equations, numerica...

  19. Communication complexity of distributed computing and a parallel algorithm for polynomial roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, P.

    1986-01-01

    The first part of this thesis begins with a discussion of the minimum communication requirements in some distributed networks. The main result is a general technique for determining lower bounds on the communication complexity of problems on various distributed computer networks. This general technique is derived by simulating the general network by a linear array and then using a lower bound on the communication complexity of the problem on the linear array. Applications of this technique yield nontrivial optimal or near-optimal lower bounds on the communication complexity of distinctness, ranking, uniqueness, merging, and triangle detection on a ring, a mesh, and a complete binary tree of processors. A technique similar to the one used in proving the above results, yields interesting graph theoretic results concerning decomposition of a graph into complete bipartite subgraphs. The second part of the this is devoted to the design of a fast parallel algorithm for determining all roots of a polynomial. Given a polynomial rho(z) of degree n with m bit integer coefficients and an integer μ, the author considers the problem of determining all its roots with error less than 2/sup -μ/. It is shown that this problem is in the class NC if rho(z) has all real roots

  20. The parallel processing of EGS4 code on distributed memory scalar parallel computer:Intel Paragon XP/S15-256

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemiya, Hiroshi; Ohta, Hirofumi; Honma, Ichirou

    1996-03-01

    The parallelization of Electro-Magnetic Cascade Monte Carlo Simulation Code, EGS4 on distributed memory scalar parallel computer: Intel Paragon XP/S15-256 is described. EGS4 has the feature that calculation time for one incident particle is quite different from each other because of the dynamic generation of secondary particles and different behavior of each particle. Granularity for parallel processing, parallel programming model and the algorithm of parallel random number generation are discussed and two kinds of method, each of which allocates particles dynamically or statically, are used for the purpose of realizing high speed parallel processing of this code. Among four problems chosen for performance evaluation, the speedup factors for three problems have been attained to nearly 100 times with 128 processor. It has been found that when both the calculation time for each incident particles and its dispersion are large, it is preferable to use dynamic particle allocation method which can average the load for each processor. And it has also been found that when they are small, it is preferable to use static particle allocation method which reduces the communication overhead. Moreover, it is pointed out that to get the result accurately, it is necessary to use double precision variables in EGS4 code. Finally, the workflow of program parallelization is analyzed and tools for program parallelization through the experience of the EGS4 parallelization are discussed. (author).

  1. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-07-01

    Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of today's technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined.

  2. Algorithmically specialized parallel computers

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Lawrence; Gannon, Dennis B

    1985-01-01

    Algorithmically Specialized Parallel Computers focuses on the concept and characteristics of an algorithmically specialized computer.This book discusses the algorithmically specialized computers, algorithmic specialization using VLSI, and innovative architectures. The architectures and algorithms for digital signal, speech, and image processing and specialized architectures for numerical computations are also elaborated. Other topics include the model for analyzing generalized inter-processor, pipelined architecture for search tree maintenance, and specialized computer organization for raster

  3. Parallel reservoir simulator computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemanth-Kumar, K.; Young, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The adaptation of a reservoir simulator for parallel computations is described. The simulator was originally designed for vector processors. It performs approximately 99% of its calculations in vector/parallel mode and relative to scalar calculations it achieves speedups of 65 and 81 for black oil and EOS simulations, respectively on the CRAY C-90

  4. Discovery of resources using MADM approaches for parallel and distributed computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Kaur

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grid, a form of parallel and distributed computing, allows the sharing of data and computational resources among its users from various geographical locations. The grid resources are diverse in terms of their underlying attributes. The majority of the state-of-the-art resource discovery techniques rely on the static resource attributes during resource selection. However, the matching resources based on the static resource attributes may not be the most appropriate resources for the execution of user applications because they may have heavy job loads, less storage space or less working memory (RAM. Hence, there is a need to consider the current state of the resources in order to find the most suitable resources. In this paper, we have proposed a two-phased multi-attribute decision making (MADM approach for discovery of grid resources by using P2P formalism. The proposed approach considers multiple resource attributes for decision making of resource selection and provides the best suitable resource(s to grid users. The first phase describes a mechanism to discover all matching resources and applies SAW method to shortlist the top ranked resources, which are communicated to the requesting super-peer. The second phase of our proposed methodology applies integrated MADM approach (AHP enriched PROMETHEE-II on the list of selected resources received from different super-peers. The pairwise comparison of the resources with respect to their attributes is made and the rank of each resource is determined. The top ranked resource is then communicated to the grid user by the grid scheduler. Our proposed methodology enables the grid scheduler to allocate the most suitable resource to the user application and also reduces the search complexity by filtering out the less suitable resources during resource discovery.

  5. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C.; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to the current paradigm shift towards concurrency in software. Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of today’s technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined

  6. Algorithms for parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchhouse, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Until relatively recently almost all the algorithms for use on computers had been designed on the (usually unstated) assumption that they were to be run on single processor, serial machines. With the introduction of vector processors, array processors and interconnected systems of mainframes, minis and micros, however, various forms of parallelism have become available. The advantage of parallelism is that it offers increased overall processing speed but it also raises some fundamental questions, including: (i) which, if any, of the existing 'serial' algorithms can be adapted for use in the parallel mode. (ii) How close to optimal can such adapted algorithms be and, where relevant, what are the convergence criteria. (iii) How can we design new algorithms specifically for parallel systems. (iv) For multi-processor systems how can we handle the software aspects of the interprocessor communications. Aspects of these questions illustrated by examples are considered in these lectures. (orig.)

  7. The numerical parallel computing of photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qingnan; Liang Xiaoguang; Zhang Lifa

    1998-12-01

    The parallel computing of photon transport is investigated, the parallel algorithm and the parallelization of programs on parallel computers both with shared memory and with distributed memory are discussed. By analyzing the inherent law of the mathematics and physics model of photon transport according to the structure feature of parallel computers, using the strategy of 'to divide and conquer', adjusting the algorithm structure of the program, dissolving the data relationship, finding parallel liable ingredients and creating large grain parallel subtasks, the sequential computing of photon transport into is efficiently transformed into parallel and vector computing. The program was run on various HP parallel computers such as the HY-1 (PVP), the Challenge (SMP) and the YH-3 (MPP) and very good parallel speedup has been gotten

  8. 14th ACIS/IEEE International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Studies in Computational Intelligence : Volume 492

    2013-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of the 14th ACIS/IEEE International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing (SNPD 2013), held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA on July 1-3, 2013. The aim of this conference was to bring together scientists, engineers, computer users, and students to share their experiences and exchange new ideas, research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them. The conference organizers selected the 17 outstanding papers from those papers accepted for presentation at the conference.  

  9. 15th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of 15th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing (SNPD 2014) held on June 30 – July 2, 2014 in Las Vegas Nevada, USA. The aim of this conference was to bring together scientists, engineers, computer users, and students to share their experiences and exchange new ideas, research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them. The conference organizers selected the 13 outstanding papers from those papers accepted for presentation at the conference.

  10. Parallel Computing in SCALE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, Mark D.; Williams, Mark L.; Bowman, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement

  11. Efficient implementation of multidimensional fast fourier transform on a distributed-memory parallel multi-node computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan V [Princeton, NJ; Chen, Dong [Croton-On-Hudson, NY; Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D [Mount Kisco, NY; Vranas, Pavlos M [Bedford Hills, NY

    2012-01-10

    The present in invention is directed to a method, system and program storage device for efficiently implementing a multidimensional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a multidimensional array comprising a plurality of elements initially distributed in a multi-node computer system comprising a plurality of nodes in communication over a network, comprising: distributing the plurality of elements of the array in a first dimension across the plurality of nodes of the computer system over the network to facilitate a first one-dimensional FFT; performing the first one-dimensional FFT on the elements of the array distributed at each node in the first dimension; re-distributing the one-dimensional FFT-transformed elements at each node in a second dimension via "all-to-all" distribution in random order across other nodes of the computer system over the network; and performing a second one-dimensional FFT on elements of the array re-distributed at each node in the second dimension, wherein the random order facilitates efficient utilization of the network thereby efficiently implementing the multidimensional FFT. The "all-to-all" re-distribution of array elements is further efficiently implemented in applications other than the multidimensional FFT on the distributed-memory parallel supercomputer.

  12. Efficient implementation of a multidimensional fast fourier transform on a distributed-memory parallel multi-node computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan V [Princeton, NJ; Chen, Dong [Croton-On-Hudson, NY; Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D [Mount Kisco, NY; Vranas, Pavlos M [Bedford Hills, NY

    2008-01-01

    The present in invention is directed to a method, system and program storage device for efficiently implementing a multidimensional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a multidimensional array comprising a plurality of elements initially distributed in a multi-node computer system comprising a plurality of nodes in communication over a network, comprising: distributing the plurality of elements of the array in a first dimension across the plurality of nodes of the computer system over the network to facilitate a first one-dimensional FFT; performing the first one-dimensional FFT on the elements of the array distributed at each node in the first dimension; re-distributing the one-dimensional FFT-transformed elements at each node in a second dimension via "all-to-all" distribution in random order across other nodes of the computer system over the network; and performing a second one-dimensional FFT on elements of the array re-distributed at each node in the second dimension, wherein the random order facilitates efficient utilization of the network thereby efficiently implementing the multidimensional FFT. The "all-to-all" re-distribution of array elements is further efficiently implemented in applications other than the multidimensional FFT on the distributed-memory parallel supercomputer.

  13. 6th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of the 16th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing (SNPD 2015) which was held on June 1 – 3, 2015 in Takamatsu, Japan. The aim of this conference was to bring together researchers and scientists, businessmen and entrepreneurs, teachers, engineers, computer users, and students to discuss the numerous fields of computer science and to share their experiences and exchange new ideas and information in a meaningful way. Research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them.

  14. 17th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    SNPD 2016

    2016-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of the 17th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing (SNPD 2016) which was held on May 30 - June 1, 2016 in Shanghai, China. The aim of this conference was to bring together researchers and scientists, businessmen and entrepreneurs, teachers, engineers, computer users, and students to discuss the numerous fields of computer science and to share their experiences and exchange new ideas and information in a meaningful way. Research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them.

  15. Molecular simulation workflows as parallel algorithms: the execution engine of Copernicus, a distributed high-performance computing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Sander; Pouya, Iman; Lundborg, Magnus; Rotskoff, Grant; Wesén, Björn; Kasson, Peter M; Lindahl, Erik

    2015-06-09

    Computational chemistry and other simulation fields are critically dependent on computing resources, but few problems scale efficiently to the hundreds of thousands of processors available in current supercomputers-particularly for molecular dynamics. This has turned into a bottleneck as new hardware generations primarily provide more processing units rather than making individual units much faster, which simulation applications are addressing by increasingly focusing on sampling with algorithms such as free-energy perturbation, Markov state modeling, metadynamics, or milestoning. All these rely on combining results from multiple simulations into a single observation. They are potentially powerful approaches that aim to predict experimental observables directly, but this comes at the expense of added complexity in selecting sampling strategies and keeping track of dozens to thousands of simulations and their dependencies. Here, we describe how the distributed execution framework Copernicus allows the expression of such algorithms in generic workflows: dataflow programs. Because dataflow algorithms explicitly state dependencies of each constituent part, algorithms only need to be described on conceptual level, after which the execution is maximally parallel. The fully automated execution facilitates the optimization of these algorithms with adaptive sampling, where undersampled regions are automatically detected and targeted without user intervention. We show how several such algorithms can be formulated for computational chemistry problems, and how they are executed efficiently with many loosely coupled simulations using either distributed or parallel resources with Copernicus.

  16. Applied Parallel Computing Industrial Computation and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; NA NA NA Olesen, Dorte

    Proceedings and the Third International Workshop on Applied Parallel Computing in Industrial Problems and Optimization (PARA96)......Proceedings and the Third International Workshop on Applied Parallel Computing in Industrial Problems and Optimization (PARA96)...

  17. HAlign-II: efficient ultra-large multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree reconstruction with distributed and parallel computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shixiang; Zou, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) plays a key role in biological sequence analyses, especially in phylogenetic tree construction. Extreme increase in next-generation sequencing results in shortage of efficient ultra-large biological sequence alignment approaches for coping with different sequence types. Distributed and parallel computing represents a crucial technique for accelerating ultra-large (e.g. files more than 1 GB) sequence analyses. Based on HAlign and Spark distributed computing system, we implement a highly cost-efficient and time-efficient HAlign-II tool to address ultra-large multiple biological sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction. The experiments in the DNA and protein large scale data sets, which are more than 1GB files, showed that HAlign II could save time and space. It outperformed the current software tools. HAlign-II can efficiently carry out MSA and construct phylogenetic trees with ultra-large numbers of biological sequences. HAlign-II shows extremely high memory efficiency and scales well with increases in computing resource. THAlign-II provides a user-friendly web server based on our distributed computing infrastructure. HAlign-II with open-source codes and datasets was established at http://lab.malab.cn/soft/halign.

  18. runjags: An R Package Providing Interface Utilities, Model Templates, Parallel Computing Methods and Additional Distributions for MCMC Models in JAGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Denwood

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The runjags package provides a set of interface functions to facilitate running Markov chain Monte Carlo models in JAGS from within R. Automated calculation of appropriate convergence and sample length diagnostics, user-friendly access to commonly used graphical outputs and summary statistics, and parallelized methods of running JAGS are provided. Template model specifications can be generated using a standard lme4-style formula interface to assist users less familiar with the BUGS syntax. Automated simulation study functions are implemented to facilitate model performance assessment, as well as drop-k type cross-validation studies, using high performance computing clusters such as those provided by parallel. A module extension for JAGS is also included within runjags, providing the Pareto family of distributions and a series of minimally-informative priors including the DuMouchel and half-Cauchy priors. This paper outlines the primary functions of this package, and gives an illustration of a simulation study to assess the sensitivity of two equivalent model formulations to different prior distributions.

  19. Event monitoring of parallel computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruzlikov Alexander M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the monitoring of parallel computations for detection of abnormal events. It is assumed that computations are organized according to an event model, and monitoring is based on specific test sequences

  20. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel Computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray

  1. Differences Between Distributed and Parallel Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brightwell, R.; Maccabe, A.B.; Rissen, R.

    1998-10-01

    Distributed systems have been studied for twenty years and are now coming into wider use as fast networks and powerful workstations become more readily available. In many respects a massively parallel computer resembles a network of workstations and it is tempting to port a distributed operating system to such a machine. However, there are significant differences between these two environments and a parallel operating system is needed to get the best performance out of a massively parallel system. This report characterizes the differences between distributed systems, networks of workstations, and massively parallel systems and analyzes the impact of these differences on operating system design. In the second part of the report, we introduce Puma, an operating system specifically developed for massively parallel systems. We describe Puma portals, the basic building blocks for message passing paradigms implemented on top of Puma, and show how the differences observed in the first part of the report have influenced the design and implementation of Puma.

  2. libstable: Fast, Parallel, and High-Precision Computation of α-Stable Distributions in R, C/C++, and MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Royuela-del-Val

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available α-stable distributions are a family of well-known probability distributions. However, the lack of closed analytical expressions hinders their application. Currently, several tools have been developed to numerically evaluate their density and distribution functions or to estimate their parameters, but available solutions either do not reach sufficient precision on their evaluations or are excessively slow for practical purposes. Moreover, they do not take full advantage of the parallel processing capabilities of current multi-core machines. Other solutions work only on a subset of the α-stable parameter space. In this paper we present an R package and a C/C++ library with a MATLAB front-end that permit parallelized, fast and high precision evaluation of density, distribution and quantile functions, as well as random variable generation and parameter estimation of α-stable distributions in their whole parameter space. The described library can be easily integrated into third party developments.

  3. Parallel algorithms and cluster computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2007-01-01

    This book presents major advances in high performance computing as well as major advances due to high performance computing. It contains a collection of papers in which results achieved in the collaboration of scientists from computer science, mathematics, physics, and mechanical engineering are presented. From the science problems to the mathematical algorithms and on to the effective implementation of these algorithms on massively parallel and cluster computers we present state-of-the-art methods and technology as well as exemplary results in these fields. This book shows that problems which seem superficially distinct become intimately connected on a computational level.

  4. Distributed parallel messaging for multiprocessor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Salapura, Valentina; Senger, Robert M; Steinmacher-Burrow, Burhard; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-06-04

    A method and apparatus for distributed parallel messaging in a parallel computing system. The apparatus includes, at each node of a multiprocessor network, multiple injection messaging engine units and reception messaging engine units, each implementing a DMA engine and each supporting both multiple packet injection into and multiple reception from a network, in parallel. The reception side of the messaging unit (MU) includes a switch interface enabling writing of data of a packet received from the network to the memory system. The transmission side of the messaging unit, includes switch interface for reading from the memory system when injecting packets into the network.

  5. Implementations of BLAST for parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jülich, A

    1995-02-01

    The BLAST sequence comparison programs have been ported to a variety of parallel computers-the shared memory machine Cray Y-MP 8/864 and the distributed memory architectures Intel iPSC/860 and nCUBE. Additionally, the programs were ported to run on workstation clusters. We explain the parallelization techniques and consider the pros and cons of these methods. The BLAST programs are very well suited for parallelization for a moderate number of processors. We illustrate our results using the program blastp as an example. As input data for blastp, a 799 residue protein query sequence and the protein database PIR were used.

  6. Wakefield calculations on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of parallelism in the solution of wakefield problems is illustrated for two different computer architectures (SIMD and MIMD). Results are given for finite difference codes which have been implemented on a Connection Machine and an Alliant FX/8 and which are used to compute wakefields in dielectric loaded structures. Benchmarks on code performance are presented for both cases. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Parallel R-matrix computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggarty, J.W.

    1999-06-01

    For almost thirty years, sequential R-matrix computation has been used by atomic physics research groups, from around the world, to model collision phenomena involving the scattering of electrons or positrons with atomic or molecular targets. As considerable progress has been made in the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, new data, obtained from more complex calculations, is of current interest to experimentalists. Performing such calculations, however, places considerable demands on the computational resources to be provided by the target machine, in terms of both processor speed and memory requirement. Indeed, in some instances the computational requirements are so great that the proposed R-matrix calculations are intractable, even when utilising contemporary classic supercomputers. Historically, increases in the computational requirements of R-matrix computation were accommodated by porting the problem codes to a more powerful classic supercomputer. Although this approach has been successful in the past, it is no longer considered to be a satisfactory solution due to the limitations of current (and future) Von Neumann machines. As a consequence, there has been considerable interest in the high performance multicomputers, that have emerged over the last decade which appear to offer the computational resources required by contemporary R-matrix research. Unfortunately, developing codes for these machines is not as simple a task as it was to develop codes for successive classic supercomputers. The difficulty arises from the considerable differences in the computing models that exist between the two types of machine and results in the programming of multicomputers to be widely acknowledged as a difficult, time consuming and error-prone task. Nevertheless, unless parallel R-matrix computation is realised, important theoretical and experimental atomic physics research will continue to be hindered. This thesis describes work that was undertaken in

  8. Application of the distributed genetic algorithm for in-core fuel optimization problems under parallel computational environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    The distributed genetic algorithm (DGA) is applied for loading pattern optimization problems of the pressurized water reactors. A basic concept of DGA follows that of the conventional genetic algorithm (GA). However, DGA equally distributes candidates of solutions (i.e. loading patterns) to several independent ''islands'' and evolves them in each island. Communications between islands, i.e. migrations of some candidates between islands are performed with a certain period. Since candidates of solutions independently evolve in each island while accepting different genes of migrants, premature convergence in the conventional GA can be prevented. Because many candidate loading patterns should be evaluated in GA or DGA, the parallelization is efficient to reduce turn around time. Parallel efficiency of DGA was measured using our optimization code and good efficiency was attained even in a heterogeneous cluster environment due to dynamic distribution of the calculation load. The optimization code is based on the client/server architecture with the TCP/IP native socket and a client (optimization) module and calculation server modules communicate the objects of loading patterns each other. Throughout the sensitivity study on optimization parameters of DGA, a suitable set of the parameters for a test problem was identified. Finally, optimization capability of DGA and the conventional GA was compared in the test problem and DGA provided better optimization results than the conventional GA. (author)

  9. Frontiers of massively parallel scientific computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.R.

    1987-07-01

    Practical applications using massively parallel computer hardware first appeared during the 1980s. Their development was motivated by the need for computing power orders of magnitude beyond that available today for tasks such as numerical simulation of complex physical and biological processes, generation of interactive visual displays, satellite image analysis, and knowledge based systems. Representative of the first generation of this new class of computers is the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP). A team of scientists was provided the opportunity to test and implement their algorithms on the MPP. The first results are presented. The research spans a broad variety of applications including Earth sciences, physics, signal and image processing, computer science, and graphics. The performance of the MPP was very good. Results obtained using the Connection Machine and the Distributed Array Processor (DAP) are presented

  10. Parallel computation of rotating flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Lars Kristian; Barker, Vincent A.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of 3‐D rotating flows based on the velocity‐vorticity formulation of the Navier‐Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates. The governing equations are discretized by a finite difference method. The solution is advanced to a new time level by a two‐step process...... is that of solving a singular, large, sparse, over‐determined linear system of equations, and the iterative method CGLS is applied for this purpose. We discuss some of the mathematical and numerical aspects of this procedure and report on the performance of our software on a wide range of parallel computers. Darbe...

  11. Parallel computing in enterprise modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Shneider, Max S.; Vanderveen, Keith; Ray, Jaideep; Heath, Zach; Allan, Benjamin A.

    2008-08-01

    This report presents the results of our efforts to apply high-performance computing to entity-based simulations with a multi-use plugin for parallel computing. We use the term 'Entity-based simulation' to describe a class of simulation which includes both discrete event simulation and agent based simulation. What simulations of this class share, and what differs from more traditional models, is that the result sought is emergent from a large number of contributing entities. Logistic, economic and social simulations are members of this class where things or people are organized or self-organize to produce a solution. Entity-based problems never have an a priori ergodic principle that will greatly simplify calculations. Because the results of entity-based simulations can only be realized at scale, scalable computing is de rigueur for large problems. Having said that, the absence of a spatial organizing principal makes the decomposition of the problem onto processors problematic. In addition, practitioners in this domain commonly use the Java programming language which presents its own problems in a high-performance setting. The plugin we have developed, called the Parallel Particle Data Model, overcomes both of these obstacles and is now being used by two Sandia frameworks: the Decision Analysis Center, and the Seldon social simulation facility. While the ability to engage U.S.-sized problems is now available to the Decision Analysis Center, this plugin is central to the success of Seldon. Because Seldon relies on computationally intensive cognitive sub-models, this work is necessary to achieve the scale necessary for realistic results. With the recent upheavals in the financial markets, and the inscrutability of terrorist activity, this simulation domain will likely need a capability with ever greater fidelity. High-performance computing will play an important part in enabling that greater fidelity.

  12. An Introduction to Parallel Computation R

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How are they programmed? This article provides an introduction. A parallel computer is a network of processors built for ... and have been used to solve problems much faster than a single ... in parallel computer design is to select an organization which ..... The most ambitious approach to parallel computing is to develop.

  13. Advances in randomized parallel computing

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    1999-01-01

    The technique of randomization has been employed to solve numerous prob­ lems of computing both sequentially and in parallel. Examples of randomized algorithms that are asymptotically better than their deterministic counterparts in solving various fundamental problems abound. Randomized algorithms have the advantages of simplicity and better performance both in theory and often in practice. This book is a collection of articles written by renowned experts in the area of randomized parallel computing. A brief introduction to randomized algorithms In the aflalysis of algorithms, at least three different measures of performance can be used: the best case, the worst case, and the average case. Often, the average case run time of an algorithm is much smaller than the worst case. 2 For instance, the worst case run time of Hoare's quicksort is O(n ), whereas its average case run time is only O( n log n). The average case analysis is conducted with an assumption on the input space. The assumption made to arrive at t...

  14. Parallel Computing for Brain Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastur-Romay, L A; Porto-Pazos, A B; Cedron, F; Pazos, A

    2017-01-01

    The human brain is the most complex system in the known universe, it is therefore one of the greatest mysteries. It provides human beings with extraordinary abilities. However, until now it has not been understood yet how and why most of these abilities are produced. For decades, researchers have been trying to make computers reproduce these abilities, focusing on both understanding the nervous system and, on processing data in a more efficient way than before. Their aim is to make computers process information similarly to the brain. Important technological developments and vast multidisciplinary projects have allowed creating the first simulation with a number of neurons similar to that of a human brain. This paper presents an up-to-date review about the main research projects that are trying to simulate and/or emulate the human brain. They employ different types of computational models using parallel computing: digital models, analog models and hybrid models. This review includes the current applications of these works, as well as future trends. It is focused on various works that look for advanced progress in Neuroscience and still others which seek new discoveries in Computer Science (neuromorphic hardware, machine learning techniques). Their most outstanding characteristics are summarized and the latest advances and future plans are presented. In addition, this review points out the importance of considering not only neurons: Computational models of the brain should also include glial cells, given the proven importance of astrocytes in information processing. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Embodied and Distributed Parallel DJing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelen, Birgitta; Andersson, Anders-Petter

    2016-01-01

    Everyone has a right to take part in cultural events and activities, such as music performances and music making. Enforcing that right, within Universal Design, is often limited to a focus on physical access to public areas, hearing aids etc., or groups of persons with special needs performing in traditional ways. The latter might be people with disabilities, being musicians playing traditional instruments, or actors playing theatre. In this paper we focus on the innovative potential of including people with special needs, when creating new cultural activities. In our project RHYME our goal was to create health promoting activities for children with severe disabilities, by developing new musical and multimedia technologies. Because of the users' extreme demands and rich contribution, we ended up creating both a new genre of musical instruments and a new art form. We call this new art form Embodied and Distributed Parallel DJing, and the new genre of instruments for Empowering Multi-Sensorial Things.

  16. Aspects of computation on asynchronous parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, M.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing availability of asynchronous parallel processors has provided opportunities for original and useful work in scientific computing. However, the field of parallel computing is still in a highly volatile state, and researchers display a wide range of opinion about many fundamental questions such as models of parallelism, approaches for detecting and analyzing parallelism of algorithms, and tools that allow software developers and users to make effective use of diverse forms of complex hardware. This volume collects the work of researchers specializing in different aspects of parallel computing, who met to discuss the framework and the mechanics of numerical computing. The far-reaching impact of high-performance asynchronous systems is reflected in the wide variety of topics, which include scientific applications (e.g. linear algebra, lattice gauge simulation, ordinary and partial differential equations), models of parallelism, parallel language features, task scheduling, automatic parallelization techniques, tools for algorithm development in parallel environments, and system design issues

  17. Parallel Computing Using Web Servers and "Servlets".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Alfred; Bloor, Chris; Choi, Y. K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes parallel computing and presents inexpensive ways to implement a virtual parallel computer with multiple Web servers. Highlights include performance measurement of parallel systems; models for using Java and intranet technology including single server, multiple clients and multiple servers, single client; and a comparison of CGI (common…

  18. The Research of the Parallel Computing Development from the Angle of Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhensheng; Gong, Qingge; Duan, Yanyu; Wang, Yun

    2017-10-01

    Cloud computing is the development of parallel computing, distributed computing and grid computing. The development of cloud computing makes parallel computing come into people’s lives. Firstly, this paper expounds the concept of cloud computing and introduces two several traditional parallel programming model. Secondly, it analyzes and studies the principles, advantages and disadvantages of OpenMP, MPI and Map Reduce respectively. Finally, it takes MPI, OpenMP models compared to Map Reduce from the angle of cloud computing. The results of this paper are intended to provide a reference for the development of parallel computing.

  19. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jeremy E [Rochester, MN; Faraj, Ahmad A [Rochester, MN

    2011-08-02

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting a message in a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together using a data communications network. The data communications network optimized for point to point data communications and is characterized by at least two dimensions. The compute nodes are organized into at least one operational group of compute nodes for collective parallel operations of the parallel computer. One compute node of the operational group assigned to be a logical root. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer includes: establishing a Hamiltonian path along all of the compute nodes in at least one plane of the data communications network and in the operational group; and broadcasting, by the logical root to the remaining compute nodes, the logical root's message along the established Hamiltonian path.

  20. Distributed-memory matrix computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Susanne Mølleskov

    1995-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to investigate, develop, and implement algorithms for numerical linear algebra on parallel computers in order to acquire expertise in methods for parallel computations. An important motivation for analyzaing and investigating the potential for parallelism in these......The main goal of this project is to investigate, develop, and implement algorithms for numerical linear algebra on parallel computers in order to acquire expertise in methods for parallel computations. An important motivation for analyzaing and investigating the potential for parallelism...... in these algorithms is that many scientific applications rely heavily on the performance of the involved dense linear algebra building blocks. Even though we consider the distributed-memory as well as the shared-memory programming paradigm, the major part of the thesis is dedicated to distributed-memory architectures....... We emphasize distributed-memory massively parallel computers - such as the Connection Machines model CM-200 and model CM-5/CM-5E - available to us at UNI-C and at Thinking Machines Corporation. The CM-200 was at the time this project started one of the few existing massively parallel computers...

  1. Solving the Stokes problem on a massively parallel computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Owe; Barker, Vincent A.; Neytcheva, Maya

    2001-01-01

    boundary value problem for each velocity component, are solved by the conjugate gradient method with a preconditioning based on the algebraic multi‐level iteration (AMLI) technique. The velocity is found from the computed pressure. The method is optimal in the sense that the computational work...... is proportional to the number of unknowns. Further, it is designed to exploit a massively parallel computer with distributed memory architecture. Numerical experiments on a Cray T3E computer illustrate the parallel performance of the method....

  2. Template based parallel checkpointing in a massively parallel computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Inglett, Todd Alan [Rochester, MN

    2009-01-13

    A method and apparatus for a template based parallel checkpoint save for a massively parallel super computer system using a parallel variation of the rsync protocol, and network broadcast. In preferred embodiments, the checkpoint data for each node is compared to a template checkpoint file that resides in the storage and that was previously produced. Embodiments herein greatly decrease the amount of data that must be transmitted and stored for faster checkpointing and increased efficiency of the computer system. Embodiments are directed to a parallel computer system with nodes arranged in a cluster with a high speed interconnect that can perform broadcast communication. The checkpoint contains a set of actual small data blocks with their corresponding checksums from all nodes in the system. The data blocks may be compressed using conventional non-lossy data compression algorithms to further reduce the overall checkpoint size.

  3. Parallel and distributed processing in two SGBDS: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Javier Moreno; Nataly Castrillón Charari; Camilo Taborda Zuluaga

    2017-01-01

    Context: One of the strategies for managing large volumes of data is distributed and parallel computing. Among the tools that allow applying these characteristics are some Data Base Management Systems (DBMS), such as Oracle, DB2, and SQL Server. Method: In this paper we present a case study where we evaluate the performance of an SQL query in two of these DBMS. The evaluation is done through various forms of data distribution in a computer network with different degrees of parallelism. ...

  4. Compiler Technology for Parallel Scientific Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Özturan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for compiler technology that, given the source program, will generate efficient parallel codes for different architectures with minimal user involvement. Parallel computation is becoming indispensable in solving large-scale problems in science and engineering. Yet, the use of parallel computation is limited by the high costs of developing the needed software. To overcome this difficulty we advocate a comprehensive approach to the development of scalable architecture-independent software for scientific computation based on our experience with equational programming language (EPL. Our approach is based on a program decomposition, parallel code synthesis, and run-time support for parallel scientific computation. The program decomposition is guided by the source program annotations provided by the user. The synthesis of parallel code is based on configurations that describe the overall computation as a set of interacting components. Run-time support is provided by the compiler-generated code that redistributes computation and data during object program execution. The generated parallel code is optimized using techniques of data alignment, operator placement, wavefront determination, and memory optimization. In this article we discuss annotations, configurations, parallel code generation, and run-time support suitable for parallel programs written in the functional parallel programming language EPL and in Fortran.

  5. Parallel computing techniques for rotorcraft aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Kivanc

    The modification of unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes for application on massively parallel and distributed computing environments is investigated. The Euler/Navier-Stokes code TURNS (Transonic Unsteady Rotor Navier-Stokes) was chosen as a test bed because of its wide use by universities and industry. For the efficient implementation of TURNS on parallel computing systems, two algorithmic changes are developed. First, main modifications to the implicit operator, Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss Seidel (LU-SGS) originally used in TURNS, is performed. Second, application of an inexact Newton method, coupled with a Krylov subspace iterative method (Newton-Krylov method) is carried out. Both techniques have been tried previously for the Euler equations mode of the code. In this work, we have extended the methods to the Navier-Stokes mode. Several new implicit operators were tried because of convergence problems of traditional operators with the high cell aspect ratio (CAR) grids needed for viscous calculations on structured grids. Promising results for both Euler and Navier-Stokes cases are presented for these operators. For the efficient implementation of Newton-Krylov methods to the Navier-Stokes mode of TURNS, efficient preconditioners must be used. The parallel implicit operators used in the previous step are employed as preconditioners and the results are compared. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocol has been used because of its portability to various parallel architectures. It should be noted that the proposed methodology is general and can be applied to several other CFD codes (e.g. OVERFLOW).

  6. Parallel and distributed processing: applications to power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Felix; Murphy, Liam [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1994-12-31

    Applications of parallel and distributed processing to power systems problems are still in the early stages. Rapid progress in computing and communications promises a revolutionary increase in the capacity of distributed processing systems. In this paper, the state-of-the art in distributed processing technology and applications is reviewed and future trends are discussed. (author) 14 refs.,1 tab.

  7. Parallel computing by Monte Carlo codes MVP/GMVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Mori, Takamasa

    2001-01-01

    General-purpose Monte Carlo codes MVP/GMVP are well-vectorized and thus enable us to perform high-speed Monte Carlo calculations. In order to achieve more speedups, we parallelized the codes on the different types of parallel computing platforms or by using a standard parallelization library MPI. The platforms used for benchmark calculations are a distributed-memory vector-parallel computer Fujitsu VPP500, a distributed-memory massively parallel computer Intel paragon and a distributed-memory scalar-parallel computer Hitachi SR2201, IBM SP2. As mentioned generally, linear speedup could be obtained for large-scale problems but parallelization efficiency decreased as the batch size per a processing element(PE) was smaller. It was also found that the statistical uncertainty for assembly powers was less than 0.1% by the PWR full-core calculation with more than 10 million histories and it took about 1.5 hours by massively parallel computing. (author)

  8. Parallel algorithms for mapping pipelined and parallel computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Many computational problems in image processing, signal processing, and scientific computing are naturally structured for either pipelined or parallel computation. When mapping such problems onto a parallel architecture it is often necessary to aggregate an obvious problem decomposition. Even in this context the general mapping problem is known to be computationally intractable, but recent advances have been made in identifying classes of problems and architectures for which optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. Among these, the mapping of pipelined or parallel computations onto linear array, shared memory, and host-satellite systems figures prominently. This paper extends that work first by showing how to improve existing serial mapping algorithms. These improvements have significantly lower time and space complexities: in one case a published O(nm sup 3) time algorithm for mapping m modules onto n processors is reduced to an O(nm log m) time complexity, and its space requirements reduced from O(nm sup 2) to O(m). Run time complexity is further reduced with parallel mapping algorithms based on these improvements, which run on the architecture for which they create the mappings.

  9. Parallel and distributed processing in power system simulation and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Djalma M [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in computer technology will certainly have a great impact in the methodologies used in power system expansion and operational planning as well as in real-time control. Parallel and distributed processing are among the new technologies that present great potential for application in these areas. Parallel computers use multiple functional or processing units to speed up computation while distributed processing computer systems are collection of computers joined together by high speed communication networks having many objectives and advantages. The paper presents some ideas for the use of parallel and distributed processing in power system simulation and control. It also comments on some of the current research work in these topics and presents a summary of the work presently being developed at COPPE. (author) 53 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Massively parallel evolutionary computation on GPGPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsutsui, Shigeyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are metaheuristics that learn from natural collective behavior and are applied to solve optimization problems in domains such as scheduling, engineering, bioinformatics, and finance. Such applications demand acceptable solutions with high-speed execution using finite computational resources. Therefore, there have been many attempts to develop platforms for running parallel EAs using multicore machines, massively parallel cluster machines, or grid computing environments. Recent advances in general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) have opened u

  11. Collectively loading an application in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Michael E.; Attinella, John E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Miller, Samuel J.; Mundy, Michael B.

    2016-01-05

    Collectively loading an application in a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes, including: identifying, by a parallel computer control system, a subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer to execute a job; selecting, by the parallel computer control system, one of the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer as a job leader compute node; retrieving, by the job leader compute node from computer memory, an application for executing the job; and broadcasting, by the job leader to the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer, the application for executing the job.

  12. Parallel Computing Strategies for Irregular Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Shan, Hongzhang; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Parallel computing promises several orders of magnitude increase in our ability to solve realistic computationally-intensive problems, but relies on their efficient mapping and execution on large-scale multiprocessor architectures. Unfortunately, many important applications are irregular and dynamic in nature, making their effective parallel implementation a daunting task. Moreover, with the proliferation of parallel architectures and programming paradigms, the typical scientist is faced with a plethora of questions that must be answered in order to obtain an acceptable parallel implementation of the solution algorithm. In this paper, we consider three representative irregular applications: unstructured remeshing, sparse matrix computations, and N-body problems, and parallelize them using various popular programming paradigms on a wide spectrum of computer platforms ranging from state-of-the-art supercomputers to PC clusters. We present the underlying problems, the solution algorithms, and the parallel implementation strategies. Smart load-balancing, partitioning, and ordering techniques are used to enhance parallel performance. Overall results demonstrate the complexity of efficiently parallelizing irregular algorithms.

  13. Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

    1999-05-06

    The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

  14. Domain decomposition methods and parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurant, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we show how to efficiently solve large linear systems on parallel computers. These linear systems arise from discretization of scientific computing problems described by systems of partial differential equations. We show how to get a discrete finite dimensional system from the continuous problem and the chosen conjugate gradient iterative algorithm is briefly described. Then, the different kinds of parallel architectures are reviewed and their advantages and deficiencies are emphasized. We sketch the problems found in programming the conjugate gradient method on parallel computers. For this algorithm to be efficient on parallel machines, domain decomposition techniques are introduced. We give results of numerical experiments showing that these techniques allow a good rate of convergence for the conjugate gradient algorithm as well as computational speeds in excess of a billion of floating point operations per second. (author). 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs., 1 inset

  15. Distributed Parallel Endmember Extraction of Hyperspectral Data Based on Spark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zebin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing dimensionality and volume of remotely sensed hyperspectral data, the development of acceleration techniques for massive hyperspectral image analysis approaches is a very important challenge. Cloud computing offers many possibilities of distributed processing of hyperspectral datasets. This paper proposes a novel distributed parallel endmember extraction method based on iterative error analysis that utilizes cloud computing principles to efficiently process massive hyperspectral data. The proposed method takes advantage of technologies including MapReduce programming model, Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS, and Apache Spark to realize distributed parallel implementation for hyperspectral endmember extraction, which significantly accelerates the computation of hyperspectral processing and provides high throughput access to large hyperspectral data. The experimental results, which are obtained by extracting endmembers of hyperspectral datasets on a cloud computing platform built on a cluster, demonstrate the effectiveness and computational efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Parallel quantum computing in a single ensemble quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Guilu; Xiao, L.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a parallel quantum computing mode for ensemble quantum computer. In this mode, some qubits are in pure states while other qubits are in mixed states. It enables a single ensemble quantum computer to perform 'single-instruction-multidata' type of parallel computation. Parallel quantum computing can provide additional speedup in Grover's algorithm and Shor's algorithm. In addition, it also makes a fuller use of qubit resources in an ensemble quantum computer. As a result, some qubits discarded in the preparation of an effective pure state in the Schulman-Varizani and the Cleve-DiVincenzo algorithms can be reutilized

  17. Computer program MCAP-TOSS calculates steady-state fluid dynamics of coolant in parallel channels and temperature distribution in surrounding heat-generating solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. Y.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates the steady state fluid distribution, temperature rise, and pressure drop of a coolant, the material temperature distribution of a heat generating solid, and the heat flux distributions at the fluid-solid interfaces. It performs the necessary iterations automatically within the computer, in one machine run.

  18. Research in Parallel Algorithms and Software for Computational Aerosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domel, Neal D.

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 is complete for the development of a computational fluid dynamics CFD) parallel code with automatic grid generation and adaptation for the Euler analysis of flow over complex geometries. SPLITFLOW, an unstructured Cartesian grid code developed at Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, has been modified for a distributed memory/massively parallel computing environment. The parallel code is operational on an SGI network, Cray J90 and C90 vector machines, SGI Power Challenge, and Cray T3D and IBM SP2 massively parallel machines. Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) is the message passing protocol for portability to various architectures. A domain decomposition technique was developed which enforces dynamic load balancing to improve solution speed and memory requirements. A host/node algorithm distributes the tasks. The solver parallelizes very well, and scales with the number of processors. Partially parallelized and non-parallelized tasks consume most of the wall clock time in a very fine grain environment. Timing comparisons on a Cray C90 demonstrate that Parallel SPLITFLOW runs 2.4 times faster on 8 processors than its non-parallel counterpart autotasked over 8 processors.

  19. Structured Parallel Programming Patterns for Efficient Computation

    CERN Document Server

    McCool, Michael; Robison, Arch

    2012-01-01

    Programming is now parallel programming. Much as structured programming revolutionized traditional serial programming decades ago, a new kind of structured programming, based on patterns, is relevant to parallel programming today. Parallel computing experts and industry insiders Michael McCool, Arch Robison, and James Reinders describe how to design and implement maintainable and efficient parallel algorithms using a pattern-based approach. They present both theory and practice, and give detailed concrete examples using multiple programming models. Examples are primarily given using two of th

  20. Parallel and Distributed System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongarra, Jack

    1998-01-01

    This exploratory study initiated our research into the software infrastructure necessary to support the modeling and simulation techniques that are most appropriate for the Information Power Grid. Such computational power grids will use high-performance networking to connect hardware, software, instruments, databases, and people into a seamless web that supports a new generation of computation-rich problem solving environments for scientists and engineers. In this context we looked at evaluating the NetSolve software environment for network computing that leverages the potential of such systems while addressing their complexities. NetSolve's main purpose is to enable the creation of complex applications that harness the immense power of the grid, yet are simple to use and easy to deploy. NetSolve uses a modular, client-agent-server architecture to create a system that is very easy to use. Moreover, it is designed to be highly composable in that it readily permits new resources to be added by anyone willing to do so. In these respects NetSolve is to the Grid what the World Wide Web is to the Internet. But like the Web, the design that makes these wonderful features possible can also impose significant limitations on the performance and robustness of a NetSolve system. This project explored the design innovations that push the performance and robustness of the NetSolve paradigm as far as possible without sacrificing the Web-like ease of use and composability that make it so powerful.

  1. Distributed multiscale computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models combine knowledge, data, and hypotheses from different scales. Simulating a multiscale model often requires extensive computation. This thesis evaluates distributing these computations, an approach termed distributed multiscale computing (DMC). First, the process of multiscale

  2. Parallel computation of rotating flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Lars Kristian; Barker, Vincent A.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of 3‐D rotating flows based on the velocity‐vorticity formulation of the Navier‐Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates. The governing equations are discretized by a finite difference method. The solution is advanced to a new time level by a two‐step process....... In the first step, the vorticity at the new time level is computed using the velocity at the previous time level. In the second step, the velocity at the new time level is computed using the new vorticity. We discuss here the second part which is by far the most time‐consuming. The numerical problem...

  3. Distributed Parallel Architecture for "Big Data"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin BOJA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension to the "Distributed Parallel Architecture for Storing and Processing Large Datasets" paper presented at the WSEAS SEPADS’12 conference in Cambridge. In its original version the paper went over the benefits of using a distributed parallel architecture to store and process large datasets. This paper analyzes the problem of storing, processing and retrieving meaningful insight from petabytes of data. It provides a survey on current distributed and parallel data processing technologies and, based on them, will propose an architecture that can be used to solve the analyzed problem. In this version there is more emphasis put on distributed files systems and the ETL processes involved in a distributed environment.

  4. Computer-Aided Parallelizer and Optimizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoqiang

    2011-01-01

    The Computer-Aided Parallelizer and Optimizer (CAPO) automates the insertion of compiler directives (see figure) to facilitate parallel processing on Shared Memory Parallel (SMP) machines. While CAPO currently is integrated seamlessly into CAPTools (developed at the University of Greenwich, now marketed as ParaWise), CAPO was independently developed at Ames Research Center as one of the components for the Legacy Code Modernization (LCM) project. The current version takes serial FORTRAN programs, performs interprocedural data dependence analysis, and generates OpenMP directives. Due to the widely supported OpenMP standard, the generated OpenMP codes have the potential to run on a wide range of SMP machines. CAPO relies on accurate interprocedural data dependence information currently provided by CAPTools. Compiler directives are generated through identification of parallel loops in the outermost level, construction of parallel regions around parallel loops and optimization of parallel regions, and insertion of directives with automatic identification of private, reduction, induction, and shared variables. Attempts also have been made to identify potential pipeline parallelism (implemented with point-to-point synchronization). Although directives are generated automatically, user interaction with the tool is still important for producing good parallel codes. A comprehensive graphical user interface is included for users to interact with the parallelization process.

  5. High performance parallel computers for science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Edel, M.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 Mflops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction

  6. Parallel Harmony Search Based Distributed Energy Resource Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a harmony search based parallel optimization algorithm to minimize voltage deviations in three phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems and to maximize active power outputs of distributed energy resources (DR). The main contribution is to reduce the adverse impacts on voltage profile during a day as photovoltaics (PVs) output or electrical vehicles (EVs) charging changes throughout a day. The IEEE 123- bus distribution test system is modified by adding DRs and EVs under different load profiles. The simulation results show that by using parallel computing techniques, heuristic methods may be used as an alternative optimization tool in electrical power distribution systems operation.

  7. Parallel Distributed Processing theory in the age of deep networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP) models in psychology are the precursors of deep networks used in computer science. However, only PDP models are associated with two core psychological claims, namely, that all knowledge is coded in a distributed format, and cognition is mediated by non-symbolic computations. These claims have long been debated within cognitive science, and recent work with deep networks speaks to this debate. Specifically, single-unit recordings show that deep networks le...

  8. Parallel computational in nuclear group constant calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Rustandi, Yaddi K.; Kurniadi, Rizal

    2002-01-01

    In this paper parallel computational method in nuclear group constant calculation using collision probability method will be discuss. The main focus is on the calculation of collision matrix which need large amount of computational time. The geometry treated here is concentric cylinder. The calculation of collision probability matrix is carried out using semi analytic method using Beckley Naylor Function. To accelerate computation speed some computer parallel used to solve the problem. We used LINUX based parallelization using PVM software with C or fortran language. While in windows based we used socket programming using DELPHI or C builder. The calculation results shows the important of optimal weight for each processor in case there area many type of processor speed

  9. HPDC ´12 : proceedings of the 21st ACM symposium on high-performance parallel and distributed computing, June 18-22, 2012, Delft, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epema, D.H.J.; Kielmann, T.; Ripeanu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to ACM HPDC 2012! This is the twenty-first year of HPDC and we are pleased to report that our community continues to grow in size, quality and reputation. The program consists of three days packed with presentations on the latest developments in high-performance parallel and distributed

  10. Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-04-13

    Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer, including defining within a tree network of the parallel computer two or more sets of non-overlapping test levels of compute nodes of the network that together include all the data communications links of the network, each non-overlapping test level comprising two or more adjacent tiers of the tree; defining test cells within each non-overlapping test level, each test cell comprising a subtree of the tree including a subtree root compute node and all descendant compute nodes of the subtree root compute node within a non-overlapping test level; performing, separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, an uplink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels; and performing, separately from the uplink tests and separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, a downlink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels.

  11. Impact analysis on a massively parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharia, T.; Aramayo, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced mathematical techniques and computer simulation play a major role in evaluating and enhancing the design of beverage cans, industrial, and transportation containers for improved performance. Numerical models are used to evaluate the impact requirements of containers used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for transporting radioactive materials. Many of these models are highly compute-intensive. An analysis may require several hours of computational time on current supercomputers despite the simplicity of the models being studied. As computer simulations and materials databases grow in complexity, massively parallel computers have become important tools. Massively parallel computational research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and its application to the impact analysis of shipping containers is briefly described in this paper

  12. Internode data communications in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Miller, Douglas R.; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2013-09-03

    Internode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that each include main memory and a messaging unit, the messaging unit including computer memory and coupling compute nodes for data communications, in which, for each compute node at compute node boot time: a messaging unit allocates, in the messaging unit's computer memory, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; receives, prior to initialization of a particular process on the compute node, a data communications message intended for the particular process; and stores the data communications message in the message buffer associated with the particular process. Upon initialization of the particular process, the process establishes a messaging buffer in main memory of the compute node and copies the data communications message from the message buffer of the messaging unit into the message buffer of main memory.

  13. Link failure detection in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Megerian, Mark G.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-11-09

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for link failure detection in a parallel computer including compute nodes connected in a rectangular mesh network, each pair of adjacent compute nodes in the rectangular mesh network connected together using a pair of links, that includes: assigning each compute node to either a first group or a second group such that adjacent compute nodes in the rectangular mesh network are assigned to different groups; sending, by each of the compute nodes assigned to the first group, a first test message to each adjacent compute node assigned to the second group; determining, by each of the compute nodes assigned to the second group, whether the first test message was received from each adjacent compute node assigned to the first group; and notifying a user, by each of the compute nodes assigned to the second group, whether the first test message was received.

  14. Current distribution characteristics of superconducting parallel circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Hara, N.; Kitamura, M.; Tominaka, T.

    1994-01-01

    In order to increase the current carrying capacity of the current path of the superconducting magnet system, the portion of parallel circuits such as insulated multi-strand cables or parallel persistent current switches (PCS) are made. In superconducting parallel circuits of an insulated multi-strand cable or a parallel persistent current switch (PCS), the current distribution during the current sweep, the persistent mode, and the quench process were investigated. In order to measure the current distribution, two methods were used. (1) Each strand was surrounded with a pure iron core with the air gap. In the air gap, a Hall probe was located. The accuracy of this method was deteriorated by the magnetic hysteresis of iron. (2) The Rogowski coil without iron was used for the current measurement of each path in a 4-parallel PCS. As a result, it was shown that the current distribution characteristics of a parallel PCS is very similar to that of an insulated multi-strand cable for the quench process

  15. Parallel visualization on leadership computing resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterka, T; Ross, R B [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Shen, H-W [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ma, K-L [Department of Computer Science, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Kendall, W [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Yu, H, E-mail: tpeterka@mcs.anl.go [Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Changes are needed in the way that visualization is performed, if we expect the analysis of scientific data to be effective at the petascale and beyond. By using similar techniques as those used to parallelize simulations, such as parallel I/O, load balancing, and effective use of interprocess communication, the supercomputers that compute these datasets can also serve as analysis and visualization engines for them. Our team is assessing the feasibility of performing parallel scientific visualization on some of the most powerful computational resources of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories in order to pave the way for analyzing the next generation of computational results. This paper highlights some of the conclusions of that research.

  16. Parallel visualization on leadership computing resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterka, T; Ross, R B; Shen, H-W; Ma, K-L; Kendall, W; Yu, H

    2009-01-01

    Changes are needed in the way that visualization is performed, if we expect the analysis of scientific data to be effective at the petascale and beyond. By using similar techniques as those used to parallelize simulations, such as parallel I/O, load balancing, and effective use of interprocess communication, the supercomputers that compute these datasets can also serve as analysis and visualization engines for them. Our team is assessing the feasibility of performing parallel scientific visualization on some of the most powerful computational resources of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories in order to pave the way for analyzing the next generation of computational results. This paper highlights some of the conclusions of that research.

  17. The new landscape of parallel computer architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalf, John [NERSC Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley California, 94720 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The past few years has seen a sea change in computer architecture that will impact every facet of our society as every electronic device from cell phone to supercomputer will need to confront parallelism of unprecedented scale. Whereas the conventional multicore approach (2, 4, and even 8 cores) adopted by the computing industry will eventually hit a performance plateau, the highest performance per watt and per chip area is achieved using manycore technology (hundreds or even thousands of cores). However, fully unleashing the potential of the manycore approach to ensure future advances in sustained computational performance will require fundamental advances in computer architecture and programming models that are nothing short of reinventing computing. In this paper we examine the reasons behind the movement to exponentially increasing parallelism, and its ramifications for system design, applications and programming models.

  18. The new landscape of parallel computer architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalf, John

    2007-01-01

    The past few years has seen a sea change in computer architecture that will impact every facet of our society as every electronic device from cell phone to supercomputer will need to confront parallelism of unprecedented scale. Whereas the conventional multicore approach (2, 4, and even 8 cores) adopted by the computing industry will eventually hit a performance plateau, the highest performance per watt and per chip area is achieved using manycore technology (hundreds or even thousands of cores). However, fully unleashing the potential of the manycore approach to ensure future advances in sustained computational performance will require fundamental advances in computer architecture and programming models that are nothing short of reinventing computing. In this paper we examine the reasons behind the movement to exponentially increasing parallelism, and its ramifications for system design, applications and programming models

  19. Temporal fringe pattern analysis with parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuck Wah Ng; Kar Tien Ang; Argentini, Gianluca

    2005-01-01

    Temporal fringe pattern analysis is invaluable in transient phenomena studies but necessitates long processing times. Here we describe a parallel computing strategy based on the single-program multiple-data model and hyperthreading processor technology to reduce the execution time. In a two-node cluster workstation configuration we found that execution periods were reduced by 1.6 times when four virtual processors were used. To allow even lower execution times with an increasing number of processors, the time allocated for data transfer, data read, and waiting should be minimized. Parallel computing is found here to present a feasible approach to reduce execution times in temporal fringe pattern analysis

  20. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-08-12

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective operation through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  1. Systematic approach for deriving feasible mappings of parallel algorithms to parallel computing platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkin, Ethem; Tekinerdogan, Bedir; Imre, Kayhan M.

    2017-01-01

    The need for high-performance computing together with the increasing trend from single processor to parallel computer architectures has leveraged the adoption of parallel computing. To benefit from parallel computing power, usually parallel algorithms are defined that can be mapped and executed

  2. Parallel computation of nondeterministic algorithms in VLSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hortensius, P D

    1987-01-01

    This work examines parallel VLSI implementations of nondeterministic algorithms. It is demonstrated that conventional pseudorandom number generators are unsuitable for highly parallel applications. Efficient parallel pseudorandom sequence generation can be accomplished using certain classes of elementary one-dimensional cellular automata. The pseudorandom numbers appear in parallel on each clock cycle. Extensive study of the properties of these new pseudorandom number generators is made using standard empirical random number tests, cycle length tests, and implementation considerations. Furthermore, it is shown these particular cellular automata can form the basis of efficient VLSI architectures for computations involved in the Monte Carlo simulation of both the percolation and Ising models from statistical mechanics. Finally, a variation on a Built-In Self-Test technique based upon cellular automata is presented. These Cellular Automata-Logic-Block-Observation (CALBO) circuits improve upon conventional design for testability circuitry.

  3. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebrock, L.M. [Liebrock-Hicks Research, Calumet, MI (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed.

  4. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebrock, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed

  5. Analysis of parallel computing performance of the code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lei; Wang Kan; Yu Ganglin

    2006-01-01

    Parallel computing can reduce the running time of the code MCNP effectively. With the MPI message transmitting software, MCNP5 can achieve its parallel computing on PC cluster with Windows operating system. Parallel computing performance of MCNP is influenced by factors such as the type, the complexity level and the parameter configuration of the computing problem. This paper analyzes the parallel computing performance of MCNP regarding with these factors and gives measures to improve the MCNP parallel computing performance. (authors)

  6. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  7. Vector and parallel processors in computational science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, I.S.; Reid, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named conference. These concern hardware and software for vector and parallel processors, numerical methods and algorithms for the computation on such processors, as well as applications of such methods to different fields of physics and related sciences. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  8. Contributions to computational stereology and parallel programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan

    rotator, even without the need for isotropic sections. To meet the need for computational power to perform image restoration of virtual tissue sections, parallel programming on GPUs has also been part of the project. This has lead to a significant change in paradigm for a previously developed surgical...

  9. Parallel and distributed processing in two SGBDS: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Moreno

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: One of the strategies for managing large volumes of data is distributed and parallel computing. Among the tools that allow applying these characteristics are some Data Base Management Systems (DBMS, such as Oracle, DB2, and SQL Server. Method: In this paper we present a case study where we evaluate the performance of an SQL query in two of these DBMS. The evaluation is done through various forms of data distribution in a computer network with different degrees of parallelism. Results: The tests of the SQL query evidenced the performance differences between the two DBMS analyzed. However, more thorough testing and a wider variety of queries are needed. Conclusions: The differences in performance between the two DBMSs analyzed show that when evaluating this aspect, it is necessary to consider the particularities of each DBMS and the degree of parallelism of the queries.

  10. Modeling and optimization of parallel and distributed embedded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Munir, Arslan; Ranka, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the state-of-the-art in research in parallel and distributed embedded systems, which have been enabled by developments in silicon technology, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), wireless communications, computer networking, and digital electronics. These systems have diverse applications in domains including military and defense, medical, automotive, and unmanned autonomous vehicles. The emphasis of the book is on the modeling and optimization of emerging parallel and distributed embedded systems in relation to the three key design metrics of performance, power and dependability.

  11. Java parallel secure stream for grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Akers, W.; Chen, Y.; Watson, W.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of high speed wide area networks makes grid computing a reality. However grid applications that need reliable data transfer still have difficulties to achieve optimal TCP performance due to network tuning of TCP window size to improve the bandwidth and to reduce latency on a high speed wide area network. The authors present a pure Java package called JPARSS (Java Parallel Secure Stream) that divides data into partitions that are sent over several parallel Java streams simultaneously and allows Java or Web applications to achieve optimal TCP performance in a gird environment without the necessity of tuning the TCP window size. Several experimental results are provided to show that using parallel stream is more effective than tuning TCP window size. In addition X.509 certificate based single sign-on mechanism and SSL based connection establishment are integrated into this package. Finally a few applications using this package will be discussed

  12. Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry in parallel PDF calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Liuyan; Lantz, Steven R.; Ren Zhuyin; Pope, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    In parallel calculations of combustion processes with realistic chemistry, the serial in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm [S.B. Pope, Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry using in situ adaptive tabulation, Combustion Theory and Modelling, 1 (1997) 41-63; L. Lu, S.B. Pope, An improved algorithm for in situ adaptive tabulation, Journal of Computational Physics 228 (2009) 361-386] substantially speeds up the chemistry calculations on each processor. To improve the parallel efficiency of large ensembles of such calculations in parallel computations, in this work, the ISAT algorithm is extended to the multi-processor environment, with the aim of minimizing the wall clock time required for the whole ensemble. Parallel ISAT strategies are developed by combining the existing serial ISAT algorithm with different distribution strategies, namely purely local processing (PLP), uniformly random distribution (URAN), and preferential distribution (PREF). The distribution strategies enable the queued load redistribution of chemistry calculations among processors using message passing. They are implemented in the software x2f m pi, which is a Fortran 95 library for facilitating many parallel evaluations of a general vector function. The relative performance of the parallel ISAT strategies is investigated in different computational regimes via the PDF calculations of multiple partially stirred reactors burning methane/air mixtures. The results show that the performance of ISAT with a fixed distribution strategy strongly depends on certain computational regimes, based on how much memory is available and how much overlap exists between tabulated information on different processors. No one fixed strategy consistently achieves good performance in all the regimes. Therefore, an adaptive distribution strategy, which blends PLP, URAN and PREF, is devised and implemented. It yields consistently good performance in all regimes. In the adaptive parallel

  13. Intranode data communications in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-01-07

    Intranode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes configured to execute processes, where the data communications include: allocating, upon initialization of a first process of a computer node, a region of shared memory; establishing, by the first process, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; sending, to a second process on the same compute node, a data communications message without determining whether the second process has been initialized, including storing the data communications message in the message buffer of the second process; and upon initialization of the second process: retrieving, by the second process, a pointer to the second process's message buffer; and retrieving, by the second process from the second process's message buffer in dependence upon the pointer, the data communications message sent by the first process.

  14. Intranode data communications in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-07-23

    Intranode data communications in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes configured to execute processes, where the data communications include: allocating, upon initialization of a first process of a compute node, a region of shared memory; establishing, by the first process, a predefined number of message buffers, each message buffer associated with a process to be initialized on the compute node; sending, to a second process on the same compute node, a data communications message without determining whether the second process has been initialized, including storing the data communications message in the message buffer of the second process; and upon initialization of the second process: retrieving, by the second process, a pointer to the second process's message buffer; and retrieving, by the second process from the second process's message buffer in dependence upon the pointer, the data communications message sent by the first process.

  15. Parallel evolutionary computation in bioinformatics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Jorge; Sobral, João Luis; Rocha, Miguel

    2013-05-01

    A large number of optimization problems within the field of Bioinformatics require methods able to handle its inherent complexity (e.g. NP-hard problems) and also demand increased computational efforts. In this context, the use of parallel architectures is a necessity. In this work, we propose ParJECoLi, a Java based library that offers a large set of metaheuristic methods (such as Evolutionary Algorithms) and also addresses the issue of its efficient execution on a wide range of parallel architectures. The proposed approach focuses on the easiness of use, making the adaptation to distinct parallel environments (multicore, cluster, grid) transparent to the user. Indeed, this work shows how the development of the optimization library can proceed independently of its adaptation for several architectures, making use of Aspect-Oriented Programming. The pluggable nature of parallelism related modules allows the user to easily configure its environment, adding parallelism modules to the base source code when needed. The performance of the platform is validated with two case studies within biological model optimization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parallel computers and three-dimensional computational electromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, N.K.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have continued to enhance their ability to use new massively parallel processing computers to solve time-domain electromagnetic problems. New vectorization techniques have improved the performance of their code DSI3D by factors of 5 to 15, depending on the computer used. New radiation boundary conditions and far-field transformations now allow the computation of radar cross-section values for complex objects. A new parallel-data extraction code has been developed that allows the extraction of data subsets from large problems, which have been run on parallel computers, for subsequent post-processing on workstations with enhanced graphics capabilities. A new charged-particle-pushing version of DSI3D is under development. Finally, DSI3D has become a focal point for several new Cooperative Research and Development Agreement activities with industrial companies such as Lockheed Advanced Development Company, Varian, Hughes Electron Dynamics Division, General Atomic, and Cray

  17. On synchronous parallel computations with independent probabilistic choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper introduces probabilistic choice to synchronous parallel machine models; in particular parallel RAMs. The power of probabilistic choice in parallel computations is illustrate by parallelizing some known probabilistic sequential algorithms. The authors characterize the computational complexity of time, space, and processor bounded probabilistic parallel RAMs in terms of the computational complexity of probabilistic sequential RAMs. They show that parallelism uniformly speeds up time bounded probabilistic sequential RAM computations by nearly a quadratic factor. They also show that probabilistic choice can be eliminated from parallel computations by introducing nonuniformity

  18. Efficient Parallel Engineering Computing on Linux Workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    A C software module has been developed that creates lightweight processes (LWPs) dynamically to achieve parallel computing performance in a variety of engineering simulation and analysis applications to support NASA and DoD project tasks. The required interface between the module and the application it supports is simple, minimal and almost completely transparent to the user applications, and it can achieve nearly ideal computing speed-up on multi-CPU engineering workstations of all operating system platforms. The module can be integrated into an existing application (C, C++, Fortran and others) either as part of a compiled module or as a dynamically linked library (DLL).

  19. Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.B.; Derstine, K.L.; Blomquist, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations

  20. Intelligent distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Thampi, Sabu

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a selection of refereed and revised papers of the Intelligent Distributed Computing Track originally presented at the third International Symposium on Intelligent Informatics (ISI-2014), September 24-27, 2014, Delhi, India.  The papers selected for this Track cover several Distributed Computing and related topics including Peer-to-Peer Networks, Cloud Computing, Mobile Clouds, Wireless Sensor Networks, and their applications.

  1. Parallel Breadth-First Search on Distributed Memory Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Computational Research Division; Buluc, Aydin; Madduri, Kamesh

    2011-04-15

    Data-intensive, graph-based computations are pervasive in several scientific applications, and are known to to be quite challenging to implement on distributed memory systems. In this work, we explore the design space of parallel algorithms for Breadth-First Search (BFS), a key subroutine in several graph algorithms. We present two highly-tuned par- allel approaches for BFS on large parallel systems: a level-synchronous strategy that relies on a simple vertex-based partitioning of the graph, and a two-dimensional sparse matrix- partitioning-based approach that mitigates parallel commu- nication overhead. For both approaches, we also present hybrid versions with intra-node multithreading. Our novel hybrid two-dimensional algorithm reduces communication times by up to a factor of 3.5, relative to a common vertex based approach. Our experimental study identifies execu- tion regimes in which these approaches will be competitive, and we demonstrate extremely high performance on lead- ing distributed-memory parallel systems. For instance, for a 40,000-core parallel execution on Hopper, an AMD Magny- Cours based system, we achieve a BFS performance rate of 17.8 billion edge visits per second on an undirected graph of 4.3 billion vertices and 68.7 billion edges with skewed degree distribution.

  2. Computational chaos in massively parallel neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep

    1989-01-01

    A fundamental issue which directly impacts the scalability of current theoretical neural network models to massively parallel embodiments, in both software as well as hardware, is the inherent and unavoidable concurrent asynchronicity of emerging fine-grained computational ensembles and the possible emergence of chaotic manifestations. Previous analyses attributed dynamical instability to the topology of the interconnection matrix, to parasitic components or to propagation delays. However, researchers have observed the existence of emergent computational chaos in a concurrently asynchronous framework, independent of the network topology. Researcher present a methodology enabling the effective asynchronous operation of large-scale neural networks. Necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing concurrent asynchronous convergence are established in terms of contracting operators. Lyapunov exponents are computed formally to characterize the underlying nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are presented to illustrate network convergence to the correct results, even in the presence of large delays.

  3. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadio, G; Bianchini, C; Iope, R; Ananya, A; Apostolakis, J; Aurora, A; Bandieramonte, M; Brun, R; Carminati, F; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Goulas, I; Nikitina, T; Bhattacharyya, A; Mohanty, A; Canal, P; Elvira, D; Jun, S Y; Lima, G; Duhem, L

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well. (paper)

  4. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  5. (Nearly) portable PIC code for parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decyk, V.K.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the Numerical Tokamak Project, the author has developed a (nearly) portable, one dimensional version of the GCPIC algorithm for particle-in-cell codes on parallel computers. This algorithm uses a spatial domain decomposition for the fields, and passes particles from one domain to another as the particles move spatially. With only minor changes, the code has been run in parallel on the Intel Delta, the Cray C-90, the IBM ES/9000 and a cluster of workstations. After a line by line translation into cmfortran, the code was also run on the CM-200. Impressive speeds have been achieved, both on the Intel Delta and the Cray C-90, around 30 nanoseconds per particle per time step. In addition, the author was able to isolate the data management modules, so that the physics modules were not changed much from their sequential version, and the data management modules can be used as open-quotes black boxes.close quotes

  6. Computation and parallel implementation for early vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, J. Anthony

    1990-01-01

    The problem of early vision is to transform one or more retinal illuminance images-pixel arrays-to image representations built out of such primitive visual features such as edges, regions, disparities, and clusters. These transformed representations form the input to later vision stages that perform higher level vision tasks including matching and recognition. Researchers developed algorithms for: (1) edge finding in the scale space formulation; (2) correlation methods for computing matches between pairs of images; and (3) clustering of data by neural networks. These algorithms are formulated for parallel implementation of SIMD machines, such as the Massively Parallel Processor, a 128 x 128 array processor with 1024 bits of local memory per processor. For some cases, researchers can show speedups of three orders of magnitude over serial implementations.

  7. Parallel computing for homogeneous diffusion and transport equations in neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchedez, K.

    1999-06-01

    Parallel computing meets the ever-increasing requirements for neutronic computer code speed and accuracy. In this work, two different approaches have been considered. We first parallelized the sequential algorithm used by the neutronics code CRONOS developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission. The algorithm computes the dominant eigenvalue associated with PN simplified transport equations by a mixed finite element method. Several parallel algorithms have been developed on distributed memory machines. The performances of the parallel algorithms have been studied experimentally by implementation on a T3D Cray and theoretically by complexity models. A comparison of various parallel algorithms has confirmed the chosen implementations. We next applied a domain sub-division technique to the two-group diffusion Eigen problem. In the modal synthesis-based method, the global spectrum is determined from the partial spectra associated with sub-domains. Then the Eigen problem is expanded on a family composed, on the one hand, from eigenfunctions associated with the sub-domains and, on the other hand, from functions corresponding to the contribution from the interface between the sub-domains. For a 2-D homogeneous core, this modal method has been validated and its accuracy has been measured. (author)

  8. Parallelism in computations in quantum and statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clementi, E.; Corongiu, G.; Detrich, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Often very fundamental biochemical and biophysical problems defy simulations because of limitations in today's computers. We present and discuss a distributed system composed of two IBM 4341 s and/or an IBM 4381 as front-end processors and ten FPS-164 attached array processors. This parallel system - called LCAP - has presently a peak performance of about 110 Mflops; extensions to higher performance are discussed. Presently, the system applications use a modified version of VM/SP as the operating system: description of the modifications is given. Three applications programs have been migrated from sequential to parallel: a molecular quantum mechanical, a Metropolis-Monte Carlo and a molecular dynamics program. Descriptions of the parallel codes are briefly outlined. Use of these parallel codes has already opened up new capabilities for our research. The very positive performance comparisons with today's supercomputers allow us to conclude that parallel computers and programming, of the type we have considered, represent a pragmatic answer to many computationally intensive problems. (orig.)

  9. Parallel peak pruning for scalable SMP contour tree computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Hamish A. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Weber, Gunther H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Sewell, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahrens, James P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-09

    As data sets grow to exascale, automated data analysis and visualisation are increasingly important, to intermediate human understanding and to reduce demands on disk storage via in situ analysis. Trends in architecture of high performance computing systems necessitate analysis algorithms to make effective use of combinations of massively multicore and distributed systems. One of the principal analytic tools is the contour tree, which analyses relationships between contours to identify features of more than local importance. Unfortunately, the predominant algorithms for computing the contour tree are explicitly serial, and founded on serial metaphors, which has limited the scalability of this form of analysis. While there is some work on distributed contour tree computation, and separately on hybrid GPU-CPU computation, there is no efficient algorithm with strong formal guarantees on performance allied with fast practical performance. Here in this paper, we report the first shared SMP algorithm for fully parallel contour tree computation, withfor-mal guarantees of O(lgnlgt) parallel steps and O(n lgn) work, and implementations with up to 10x parallel speed up in OpenMP and up to 50x speed up in NVIDIA Thrust.

  10. Parallel computing in plasma physics: Nonlinear instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohn, E.; Kamelander, G.; Shoucri, M.

    2000-01-01

    A Vlasov-Poisson-system is used for studying the time evolution of the charge-separation at a spatial one- as well as a two-dimensional plasma-edge. Ions are advanced in time using the Vlasov-equation. The whole three-dimensional velocity-space is considered leading to very time-consuming four-resp. five-dimensional fully kinetic simulations. In the 1D simulations electrons are assumed to behave adiabatic, i.e. they are Boltzmann-distributed, leading to a nonlinear Poisson-equation. In the 2D simulations a gyro-kinetic approximation is used for the electrons. The plasma is assumed to be initially neutral. The simulations are performed at an equidistant grid. A constant time-step is used for advancing the density-distribution function in time. The time-evolution of the distribution function is performed using a splitting scheme. Each dimension (x, y, υ x , υ y , υ z ) of the phase-space is advanced in time separately. The value of the distribution function for the next time is calculated from the value of an - in general - interstitial point at the present time (fractional shift). One-dimensional cubic-spline interpolation is used for calculating the interstitial function values. After the fractional shifts are performed for each dimension of the phase-space, a whole time-step for advancing the distribution function is finished. Afterwards the charge density is calculated, the Poisson-equation is solved and the electric field is calculated before the next time-step is performed. The fractional shift method sketched above was parallelized for p processors as follows. Considering first the shifts in y-direction, a proper parallelization strategy is to split the grid into p disjoint υ z -slices, which are sub-grids, each containing a different 1/p-th part of the υ z range but the whole range of all other dimensions. Each processor is responsible for performing the y-shifts on a different slice, which can be done in parallel without any communication between

  11. Computational fluid dynamics on a massively parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    A finite difference code was implemented for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer. The code is based on the ARC2D/ARC3D program and uses the implicit factored algorithm of Beam and Warming. The codes uses odd-even elimination to solve linear systems. Timings and computation rates are given for the code, and a comparison is made with a Cray XMP.

  12. Parallel computing of physical maps--a comparative study in SIMD and MIMD parallelism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandarkar, S M; Chirravuri, S; Arnold, J

    1996-01-01

    Ordering clones from a genomic library into physical maps of whole chromosomes presents a central computational problem in genetics. Chromosome reconstruction via clone ordering is usually isomorphic to the NP-complete Optimal Linear Arrangement problem. Parallel SIMD and MIMD algorithms for simulated annealing based on Markov chain distribution are proposed and applied to the problem of chromosome reconstruction via clone ordering. Perturbation methods and problem-specific annealing heuristics are proposed and described. The SIMD algorithms are implemented on a 2048 processor MasPar MP-2 system which is an SIMD 2-D toroidal mesh architecture whereas the MIMD algorithms are implemented on an 8 processor Intel iPSC/860 which is an MIMD hypercube architecture. A comparative analysis of the various SIMD and MIMD algorithms is presented in which the convergence, speedup, and scalability characteristics of the various algorithms are analyzed and discussed. On a fine-grained, massively parallel SIMD architecture with a low synchronization overhead such as the MasPar MP-2, a parallel simulated annealing algorithm based on multiple periodically interacting searches performs the best. For a coarse-grained MIMD architecture with high synchronization overhead such as the Intel iPSC/860, a parallel simulated annealing algorithm based on multiple independent searches yields the best results. In either case, distribution of clonal data across multiple processors is shown to exacerbate the tendency of the parallel simulated annealing algorithm to get trapped in a local optimum.

  13. Climate models on massively parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitart, F.; Rouvillois, P.

    1993-01-01

    First results got on massively parallel computers (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data and Simple Instruction Multiple Data) allow to consider building of coupled models with high resolutions. This would make possible simulation of thermoaline circulation and other interaction phenomena between atmosphere and ocean. The increasing of computers powers, and then the improvement of resolution will go us to revise our approximations. Then hydrostatic approximation (in ocean circulation) will not be valid when the grid mesh will be of a dimension lower than a few kilometers: We shall have to find other models. The expert appraisement got in numerical analysis at the Center of Limeil-Valenton (CEL-V) will be used again to imagine global models taking in account atmosphere, ocean, ice floe and biosphere, allowing climate simulation until a regional scale

  14. Massively parallel computation of conservation laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbey, M [Univ. Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France); Levine, D [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a new method for computing solutions of conservation laws based on the use of cellular automata with the method of characteristics. The method exploits the high degree of parallelism available with cellular automata and retains important features of the method of characteristics. It yields high numerical accuracy and extends naturally to adaptive meshes and domain decomposition methods for perturbed conservation laws. They describe the method and its implementation for a Dirichlet problem with a single conservation law for the one-dimensional case. Numerical results for the one-dimensional law with the classical Burgers nonlinearity or the Buckley-Leverett equation show good numerical accuracy outside the neighborhood of the shocks. The error in the area of the shocks is of the order of the mesh size. The algorithm is well suited for execution on both massively parallel computers and vector machines. They present timing results for an Alliant FX/8, Connection Machine Model 2, and CRAY X-MP.

  15. Distributed GPU Computing in GIScience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Yang, C.; Huang, Q.; Li, J.; Sun, M.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscientists strived to discover potential principles and patterns hidden inside ever-growing Big Data for scientific discoveries. To better achieve this objective, more capable computing resources are required to process, analyze and visualize Big Data (Ferreira et al., 2003; Li et al., 2013). Current CPU-based computing techniques cannot promptly meet the computing challenges caused by increasing amount of datasets from different domains, such as social media, earth observation, environmental sensing (Li et al., 2013). Meanwhile CPU-based computing resources structured as cluster or supercomputer is costly. In the past several years with GPU-based technology matured in both the capability and performance, GPU-based computing has emerged as a new computing paradigm. Compare to traditional computing microprocessor, the modern GPU, as a compelling alternative microprocessor, has outstanding high parallel processing capability with cost-effectiveness and efficiency(Owens et al., 2008), although it is initially designed for graphical rendering in visualization pipe. This presentation reports a distributed GPU computing framework for integrating GPU-based computing within distributed environment. Within this framework, 1) for each single computer, computing resources of both GPU-based and CPU-based can be fully utilized to improve the performance of visualizing and processing Big Data; 2) within a network environment, a variety of computers can be used to build up a virtual super computer to support CPU-based and GPU-based computing in distributed computing environment; 3) GPUs, as a specific graphic targeted device, are used to greatly improve the rendering efficiency in distributed geo-visualization, especially for 3D/4D visualization. Key words: Geovisualization, GIScience, Spatiotemporal Studies Reference : 1. Ferreira de Oliveira, M. C., & Levkowitz, H. (2003). From visual data exploration to visual data mining: A survey. Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE

  16. Adaptive Distributed Data Structure Management for Parallel CFD Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Frisch, Jerome

    2013-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations require a lot of computing resources in terms of CPU time and memory in order to compute with a reasonable physical accuracy. If only uniformly refined domains are applied, the amount of computing cells is growing rather fast if a certain small resolution is physically required. This can be remedied by applying adaptively refined grids. Unfortunately, due to the adaptive refinement procedures, errors are introduced which have to be taken into account. This paper is focussing on implementation details of the applied adaptive data structure management and a qualitative analysis of the introduced errors by analysing a Poisson problem on the given data structure, which has to be solved in every time step of a CFD analysis. Furthermore an adaptive CFD benchmark example is computed, showing the benefits of an adaptive refinement as well as measurements of parallel data distribution and performance. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. Parallel Molecular Distributed Detection With Brownian Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Uri; Koh, Min-Sung

    2016-12-01

    This paper explores the in vivo distributed detection of an undesired biological agent's (BAs) biomarkers by a group of biological sized nanomachines in an aqueous medium under drift. The term distributed, indicates that the system information relative to the BAs presence is dispersed across the collection of nanomachines, where each nanomachine possesses limited communication, computation, and movement capabilities. Using Brownian motion with drift, a probabilistic detection and optimal data fusion framework, coined molecular distributed detection, will be introduced that combines theory from both molecular communication and distributed detection. Using the optimal data fusion framework as a guide, simulation indicates that a sub-optimal fusion method exists, allowing for a significant reduction in implementation complexity while retaining BA detection accuracy.

  18. Emerging Nanophotonic Applications Explored with Advanced Scientific Parallel Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang

    The domain of nanoscale optical science and technology is a combination of the classical world of electromagnetics and the quantum mechanical regime of atoms and molecules. Recent advancements in fabrication technology allows the optical structures to be scaled down to nanoscale size or even to the atomic level, which are far smaller than the wavelength they are designed for. These nanostructures can have unique, controllable, and tunable optical properties and their interactions with quantum materials can have important near-field and far-field optical response. Undoubtedly, these optical properties can have many important applications, ranging from the efficient and tunable light sources, detectors, filters, modulators, high-speed all-optical switches; to the next-generation classical and quantum computation, and biophotonic medical sensors. This emerging research of nanoscience, known as nanophotonics, is a highly interdisciplinary field requiring expertise in materials science, physics, electrical engineering, and scientific computing, modeling and simulation. It has also become an important research field for investigating the science and engineering of light-matter interactions that take place on wavelength and subwavelength scales where the nature of the nanostructured matter controls the interactions. In addition, the fast advancements in the computing capabilities, such as parallel computing, also become as a critical element for investigating advanced nanophotonic devices. This role has taken on even greater urgency with the scale-down of device dimensions, and the design for these devices require extensive memory and extremely long core hours. Thus distributed computing platforms associated with parallel computing are required for faster designs processes. Scientific parallel computing constructs mathematical models and quantitative analysis techniques, and uses the computing machines to analyze and solve otherwise intractable scientific challenges. In

  19. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  20. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  1. External parallel sorting with multiprocessor computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comanceau, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    This article describes methods of external sorting in which the entire main computer memory is used for the internal sorting of entries, forming out of them sorted segments of the greatest possible size, and outputting them to external memories. The obtained segments are merged into larger segments until all entries form one ordered segment. The described methods are suitable for sequential files stored on magnetic tape. The needs of the sorting algorithm can be met by using the relatively slow peripheral storage devices (e.g., tapes, disks, drums). The efficiency of the external sorting methods is determined by calculating the total sorting time as a function of the number of entries to be sorted and the number of parallel processors participating in the sorting process

  2. Contact-impact algorithms on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhihua; Nilsson, Larsgunnar

    1994-01-01

    Contact-impact algorithms on parallel computers are discussed within the context of explicit finite element analysis. The algorithms concerned include a contact searching algorithm and an algorithm for contact force calculations. The contact searching algorithm is based on the territory concept of the general HITA algorithm. However, no distinction is made between different contact bodies, or between different contact surfaces. All contact segments from contact boundaries are taken as a single set. Hierarchy territories and contact territories are expanded. A three-dimensional bucket sort algorithm is used to sort contact nodes. The defence node algorithm is used in the calculation of contact forces. Both the contact searching algorithm and the defence node algorithm are implemented on the connection machine CM-200. The performance of the algorithms is examined under different circumstances, and numerical results are presented. ((orig.))

  3. Automatic Parallelization Tool: Classification of Program Code for Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Basthikodi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Performance growth of single-core processors has come to a halt in the past decade, but was re-enabled by the introduction of parallelism in processors. Multicore frameworks along with Graphical Processing Units empowered to enhance parallelism broadly. Couples of compilers are updated to developing challenges forsynchronization and threading issues. Appropriate program and algorithm classifications will have advantage to a great extent to the group of software engineers to get opportunities for effective parallelization. In present work we investigated current species for classification of algorithms, in that related work on classification is discussed along with the comparison of issues that challenges the classification. The set of algorithms are chosen which matches the structure with different issues and perform given task. We have tested these algorithms utilizing existing automatic species extraction toolsalong with Bones compiler. We have added functionalities to existing tool, providing a more detailed characterization. The contributions of our work include support for pointer arithmetic, conditional and incremental statements, user defined types, constants and mathematical functions. With this, we can retain significant data which is not captured by original speciesof algorithms. We executed new theories into the device, empowering automatic characterization of program code.

  4. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Ahmad [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-21

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together through a data communications network. Each compute node has a plurality of processors for use in collective parallel operations on the parallel computer. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention includes: transmitting, by each processor on each compute node, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on that compute node using intra-node communications; and transmitting on a designated network link, by each processor on each compute node according to a serial processor transmission sequence, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on the other compute nodes using inter-node communications.

  5. ATLAS Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The poster details the different aspects of the ATLAS Distributed Computing experience after the first year of LHC data taking. We describe the performance of the ATLAS distributed computing system and the lessons learned during the 2010 run, pointing out parts of the system which were in a good shape, and also spotting areas which required improvements. Improvements ranged from hardware upgrade on the ATLAS Tier-0 computing pools to improve data distribution rates, tuning of FTS channels between CERN and Tier-1s, and studying data access patterns for Grid analysis to improve the global processing rate. We show recent software development driven by operational needs with emphasis on data management and job execution in the ATLAS production system.

  6. Coping with distributed computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormell, L.

    1992-09-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of high performance, cost-effective RISC/UNIX workstations has been both a blessing and a curse. The blessing of having extremely powerful computing engines available on the desk top is well-known to many users. The user has tremendous freedom, flexibility, and control of his environment. That freedom can, however, become the curse of distributed computing. The user must become a system manager to some extent, he must worry about backups, maintenance, upgrades, etc. Traditionally these activities have been the responsibility of a central computing group. The central computing group, however, may find that it can no longer provide all of the traditional services. With the plethora of workstations now found on so many desktops throughout the entire campus or lab, the central computing group may be swamped by support requests. This talk will address several of these computer support and management issues by providing some examples of the approaches taken at various HEP institutions. In addition, a brief review of commercial directions or products for distributed computing and management will be given

  7. Applications of the parallel computing system using network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, Shunji; Hasebe, Hiroki

    1994-01-01

    Parallel programming is applied to multiple processors connected in Ethernet. Data exchanges between tasks located in each processing element are realized by two ways. One is socket which is standard library on recent UNIX operating systems. Another is a network connecting software, named as Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) which is a free software developed by ORNL, to use many workstations connected to network as a parallel computer. This paper discusses the availability of parallel computing using network and UNIX workstations and comparison between specialized parallel systems (Transputer and iPSC/860) in a Monte Carlo simulation which generally shows high parallelization ratio. (author)

  8. Parallel Distributed Processing Theory in the Age of Deep Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Jeffrey S

    2017-12-01

    Parallel distributed processing (PDP) models in psychology are the precursors of deep networks used in computer science. However, only PDP models are associated with two core psychological claims, namely that all knowledge is coded in a distributed format and cognition is mediated by non-symbolic computations. These claims have long been debated in cognitive science, and recent work with deep networks speaks to this debate. Specifically, single-unit recordings show that deep networks learn units that respond selectively to meaningful categories, and researchers are finding that deep networks need to be supplemented with symbolic systems to perform some tasks. Given the close links between PDP and deep networks, it is surprising that research with deep networks is challenging PDP theory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. DIRAC distributed computing services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2014-01-01

    DIRAC Project provides a general-purpose framework for building distributed computing systems. It is used now in several HEP and astrophysics experiments as well as for user communities in other scientific domains. There is a large interest from smaller user communities to have a simple tool like DIRAC for accessing grid and other types of distributed computing resources. However, small experiments cannot afford to install and maintain dedicated services. Therefore, several grid infrastructure projects are providing DIRAC services for their respective user communities. These services are used for user tutorials as well as to help porting the applications to the grid for a practical day-to-day work. The services are giving access typically to several grid infrastructures as well as to standalone computing clusters accessible by the target user communities. In the paper we will present the experience of running DIRAC services provided by the France-Grilles NGI and other national grid infrastructure projects.

  10. Parallel computing and networking; Heiretsu keisanki to network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, E; Tsuru, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T [Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the trend of parallel computers used in geophysical exploration. Around 1993 was the early days when the parallel computers began to be used for geophysical exploration. Classification of these computers those days was mainly MIMD (multiple instruction stream, multiple data stream), SIMD (single instruction stream, multiple data stream) and the like. Parallel computers were publicized in the 1994 meeting of the Geophysical Exploration Society as a `high precision imaging technology`. Concerning the library of parallel computers, there was a shift to PVM (parallel virtual machine) in 1993 and to MPI (message passing interface) in 1995. In addition, the compiler of FORTRAN90 was released with support implemented for data parallel and vector computers. In 1993, networks used were Ethernet, FDDI, CDDI and HIPPI. In 1995, the OC-3 products under ATM began to propagate. However, ATM remains to be an interoffice high speed network because the ATM service has not spread yet for the public network. 1 ref.

  11. From evolution theory to parallel and distributed genetic

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Lecture #1: From Evolution Theory to Evolutionary Computation. Evolutionary computation is a subfield of artificial intelligence (more particularly computational intelligence) involving combinatorial optimization problems, which are based to some degree on the evolution of biological life in the natural world. In this tutorial we will review the source of inspiration for this metaheuristic and its capability for solving problems. We will show the main flavours within the field, and different problems that have been successfully solved employing this kind of techniques. Lecture #2: Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming. The successful application of Genetic Programming (GP, one of the available Evolutionary Algorithms) to optimization problems has encouraged an increasing number of researchers to apply these techniques to a large set of problems. Given the difficulty of some problems, much effort has been applied to improving the efficiency of GP during the last few years. Among the available proposals,...

  12. Model-driven product line engineering for mapping parallel algorithms to parallel computing platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkin, Ethem; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2016-01-01

    Mapping parallel algorithms to parallel computing platforms requires several activities such as the analysis of the parallel algorithm, the definition of the logical configuration of the platform, the mapping of the algorithm to the logical configuration platform and the implementation of the

  13. History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Bryant; Sanjay Srinivasan; Alvaro Barrera; Sharad Yadav

    2005-10-01

    A novel methodology for delineating multiple reservoir domains for the purpose of history matching in a distributed computing environment has been proposed. A fully probabilistic approach to perturb permeability within the delineated zones is implemented. The combination of robust schemes for identifying reservoir zones and distributed computing significantly increase the accuracy and efficiency of the probabilistic approach. The information pertaining to the permeability variations in the reservoir that is contained in dynamic data is calibrated in terms of a deformation parameter rD. This information is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, well configuration, flow constrains etc. The probabilistic approach then has to account for multiple r{sub D} values in different regions of the reservoir. In order to delineate reservoir domains that can be characterized with different rD parameters, principal component analysis (PCA) of the Hessian matrix has been done. The Hessian matrix summarizes the sensitivity of the objective function at a given step of the history matching to model parameters. It also measures the interaction of the parameters in affecting the objective function. The basic premise of PC analysis is to isolate the most sensitive and least correlated regions. The eigenvectors obtained during the PCA are suitably scaled and appropriate grid block volume cut-offs are defined such that the resultant domains are neither too large (which increases interactions between domains) nor too small (implying ineffective history matching). The delineation of domains requires calculation of Hessian, which could be computationally costly and as well as restricts the current approach to

  14. Particle orbit tracking on a parallel computer: Hypertrack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, B.; Bourianoff, G.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.

    1991-05-01

    A program has been written which performs particle orbit tracking on the Intel iPSC/860 distributed memory parallel computer. The tracking is performed using a thin element approach. A brief description of the structure and performance of the code is presented, along with applications of the code to the analysis of accelerator lattices for the SSC. The concept of ''ensemble tracking'', i.e. the tracking of ensemble averages of noninteracting particles, such as the emittance, is presented. Preliminary results of such studies will be presented. 2 refs., 6 figs

  15. A finite element solution method for quadrics parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, A.

    1996-08-01

    A distributed preconditioned conjugate gradient method for finite element analysis has been developed and implemented on a parallel SIMD Quadrics computer. The main characteristic of the method is that it does not require any actual assembling of all element equations in a global system. The physical domain of the problem is partitioned in cells of n p finite elements and each cell element is assigned to a different node of an n p -processors machine. Element stiffness matrices are stored in the data memory of the assigned processing node and the solution process is completely executed in parallel at element level. Inter-element and therefore inter-processor communications are required once per iteration to perform local sums of vector quantities between neighbouring elements. A prototype implementation has been tested on an 8-nodes Quadrics machine in a simple 2D benchmark problem

  16. A scalable implementation of RI-SCF on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruechtl, H.A.; Kendall, R.A.; Harrison, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to avoid the integral bottleneck of conventional SCF calculations, the Resolution of the Identity (RI) method is used to obtain an approximate solution to the Hartree-Fock equations. In this approximation only three-center integrals are needed to build the Fock matrix. It has been implemented as part of the NWChem package of portable and scalable ab initio programs for parallel computers. Utilizing the V-approximation, both the Coulomb and exchange contribution to the Fock matrix can be calculated from a transformed set of three-center integrals which have to be precalculated and stored. A distributed in-core method as well as a disk based implementation have been programmed. Details of the implementation as well as the parallel programming tools used are described. We also give results and timings from benchmark calculations

  17. Automatic Management of Parallel and Distributed System Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jerry; Ngai, Tin Fook; Lundstrom, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on automatic management of parallel and distributed system resources are presented. Topics covered include: parallel applications; intelligent management of multiprocessing systems; performance evaluation of parallel architecture; dynamic concurrent programs; compiler-directed system approach; lattice gaseous cellular automata; and sparse matrix Cholesky factorization.

  18. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-11-12

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer composed of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, each compute node including application processors that execute the parallel application and at least one management processor dedicated to gathering information regarding data communications. The PAMI is composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint composed of a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources. Embodiments function by gathering call site statistics describing data communications resulting from execution of data communications instructions and identifying in dependence upon the call cite statistics a data communications algorithm for use in executing a data communications instruction at a call site in the parallel application.

  19. Parallel Computing for Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dali; Post, Wilfred M.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Berry, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are a primary component of research on global environmental change. Observational and modeling research on terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, however, has lagged behind their counterparts for oceanic and atmospheric systems, largely because the unique challenges associated with the tremendous diversity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems. There are 8 major types of terrestrial ecosystem: tropical rain forest, savannas, deserts, temperate grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, tundra, and chaparral. The carbon cycle is an important mechanism in the coupling of terrestrial ecosystems with climate through biological fluxes of CO 2 . The influence of terrestrial ecosystems on atmospheric CO 2 can be modeled via several means at different timescales. Important processes include plant dynamics, change in land use, as well as ecosystem biogeography. Over the past several decades, many terrestrial ecosystem models (see the 'Model developments' section) have been developed to understand the interactions between terrestrial carbon storage and CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere, as well as the consequences of these interactions. Early TECMs generally adapted simple box-flow exchange models, in which photosynthetic CO 2 uptake and respiratory CO 2 release are simulated in an empirical manner with a small number of vegetation and soil carbon pools. Demands on kinds and amount of information required from global TECMs have grown. Recently, along with the rapid development of parallel computing, spatially explicit TECMs with detailed process based representations of carbon dynamics become attractive, because those models can readily incorporate a variety of additional ecosystem processes (such as dispersal, establishment, growth, mortality etc.) and environmental factors (such as landscape position, pest populations, disturbances, resource manipulations, etc.), and provide information to frame policy options for climate change

  20. Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

  1. Fast parallel computation of polynomials using few processors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiant, Leslie; Skyum, Sven

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that any multivariate polynomial that can be computed sequentially in C steps and has degree d can be computed in parallel in 0((log d) (log C + log d)) steps using only (Cd)0(1) processors....

  2. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  3. A general purpose subroutine for fast fourier transform on a distributed memory parallel machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, A.; Zubair, M.; Grosch, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    One issue which is central in developing a general purpose Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) subroutine on a distributed memory parallel machine is the data distribution. It is possible that different users would like to use the FFT routine with different data distributions. Thus, there is a need to design FFT schemes on distributed memory parallel machines which can support a variety of data distributions. An FFT implementation on a distributed memory parallel machine which works for a number of data distributions commonly encountered in scientific applications is presented. The problem of rearranging the data after computing the FFT is also addressed. The performance of the implementation on a distributed memory parallel machine Intel iPSC/860 is evaluated.

  4. Intelligent Distributed Computing VI : Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Intelligent Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Badica, Costin; Malgeri, Michele; Unland, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the combined peer-reviewed proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Intelligent Distributed Computing -- IDC~2012, of the International Workshop on Agents for Cloud -- A4C~2012 and of the Fourth International Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems Technology and Semantics -- MASTS~2012. All the events were held in Calabria, Italy during September 24-26, 2012. The 37 contributions published in this book address many topics related to theory and applications of intelligent distributed computing and multi-agent systems, including: adaptive and autonomous distributed systems, agent programming, ambient assisted living systems, business process modeling and verification, cloud computing, coalition formation, decision support systems, distributed optimization and constraint satisfaction, gesture recognition, intelligent energy management in WSNs, intelligent logistics, machine learning, mobile agents, parallel and distributed computational intelligence, parallel evolutionary computing, trus...

  5. Numerical discrepancy between serial and MPI parallel computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Bong Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of 1D Burgers equation and 2D sloshing problem were carried out to study numerical discrepancy between serial and parallel computations. The numerical domain was decomposed into 2 and 4 subdomains for parallel computations with message passing interface. The numerical solution of Burgers equation disclosed that fully explicit boundary conditions used on subdomains of parallel computation was responsible for the numerical discrepancy of transient solution between serial and parallel computations. Two dimensional sloshing problems in a rectangular domain were solved using OpenFOAM. After a lapse of initial transient time sloshing patterns of water were significantly different in serial and parallel computations although the same numerical conditions were given. Based on the histograms of pressure measured at two points near the wall the statistical characteristics of numerical solution was not affected by the number of subdomains as much as the transient solution was dependent on the number of subdomains.

  6. Parallel computation for solving the tridiagonal linear system of equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Misako; Harada, Hiroo; Fujii, Minoru; Fujimura, Toichiro; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Nanba, Katsumi.

    1981-09-01

    Recently, applications of parallel computation for scientific calculations have increased from the need of the high speed calculation of large scale programs. At the JAERI computing center, an array processor FACOM 230-75 APU has installed to study the applicability of parallel computation for nuclear codes. We made some numerical experiments by using the APU on the methods of solution of tridiagonal linear equation which is an important problem in scientific calculations. Referring to the recent papers with parallel methods, we investigate eight ones. These are Gauss elimination method, Parallel Gauss method, Accelerated parallel Gauss method, Jacobi method, Recursive doubling method, Cyclic reduction method, Chebyshev iteration method, and Conjugate gradient method. The computing time and accuracy were compared among the methods on the basis of the numerical experiments. As the result, it is found that the Cyclic reduction method is best both in computing time and accuracy and the Gauss elimination method is the second one. (author)

  7. CX: A Scalable, Robust Network for Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cappello

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CX, a network-based computational exchange, is presented. The system's design integrates variations of ideas from other researchers, such as work stealing, non-blocking tasks, eager scheduling, and space-based coordination. The object-oriented API is simple, compact, and cleanly separates application logic from the logic that supports interprocess communication and fault tolerance. Computations, of course, run to completion in the presence of computational hosts that join and leave the ongoing computation. Such hosts, or producers, use task caching and prefetching to overlap computation with interprocessor communication. To break a potential task server bottleneck, a network of task servers is presented. Even though task servers are envisioned as reliable, the self-organizing, scalable network of n- servers, described as a sibling-connected height-balanced fat tree, tolerates a sequence of n-1 server failures. Tasks are distributed throughout the server network via a simple "diffusion" process. CX is intended as a test bed for research on automated silent auctions, reputation services, authentication services, and bonding services. CX also provides a test bed for algorithm research into network-based parallel computation.

  8. Parallel and Distributed Systems for Probabilistic Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Ranganathan "et"al...typically a random permutation over the vertices. Advances by Elidan et al. [2006] and Ranganathan et al. [2007] have focused on dynamic asynchronous...Wildfire algorithm shown in Alg. 3.6 is a direct parallelization of the algorithm proposed by [ Ranganathan et al., 2007]. The Wildfire algorithm

  9. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-29

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the parallel computer including a plurality of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources, including receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction characterized by an instruction type, the instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint and transmitting, in accordance with the instruction type, the transfer data from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint.

  10. The ongoing investigation of high performance parallel computing in HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Peach, Kenneth J; Böck, R K; Dobinson, Robert W; Hansroul, M; Norton, Alan Robert; Willers, Ian Malcolm; Baud, J P; Carminati, F; Gagliardi, F; McIntosh, E; Metcalf, M; Robertson, L; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1993-01-01

    Past and current exploitation of parallel computing in High Energy Physics is summarized and a list of R & D projects in this area is presented. The applicability of new parallel hardware and software to physics problems is investigated, in the light of the requirements for computing power of LHC experiments and the current trends in the computer industry. Four main themes are discussed (possibilities for a finer grain of parallelism; fine-grain communication mechanism; usable parallel programming environment; different programming models and architectures, using standard commercial products). Parallel computing technology is potentially of interest for offline and vital for real time applications in LHC. A substantial investment in applications development and evaluation of state of the art hardware and software products is needed. A solid development environment is required at an early stage, before mainline LHC program development begins.

  11. Hypergraph partitioning implementation for parallelizing matrix-vector multiplication using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murni, Bustamam, A.; Ernastuti, Handhika, T.; Kerami, D.

    2017-07-01

    Calculation of the matrix-vector multiplication in the real-world problems often involves large matrix with arbitrary size. Therefore, parallelization is needed to speed up the calculation process that usually takes a long time. Graph partitioning techniques that have been discussed in the previous studies cannot be used to complete the parallelized calculation of matrix-vector multiplication with arbitrary size. This is due to the assumption of graph partitioning techniques that can only solve the square and symmetric matrix. Hypergraph partitioning techniques will overcome the shortcomings of the graph partitioning technique. This paper addresses the efficient parallelization of matrix-vector multiplication through hypergraph partitioning techniques using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing. CUDA (compute unified device architecture) is a parallel computing platform and programming model that was created by NVIDIA and implemented by the GPU (graphics processing unit).

  12. Advances in the spatially distributed ages-w model: parallel computation, java connection framework (JCF) integration, and streamflow/nitrogen dynamics assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) is a modular, Java-based spatially distributed model which implements hydrologic and water quality (H/WQ) simulation components under the Java Connection Framework (JCF) and the Object Modeling System (OMS) environmental modeling framework. AgES-W is implicitly scala...

  13. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirrokni, Vahab (Google Research, New York, NY); Andersen, Reid (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA); Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  14. Vector and parallel processors in computational science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, I.S.; Reid, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which reviewed the new developments in parallel and vector processing. Topics considered at the conference included hardware (array processors, supercomputers), programming languages, software aids, numerical methods (e.g., Monte Carlo algorithms, iterative methods, finite elements, optimization), and applications (e.g., neutron transport theory, meteorology, image processing)

  15. Partitions in languages and parallel computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgin, M S; Burgina, E S

    1982-05-01

    Partitions of entries (linguistic structures) are studied that are intended for parallel data processing. The representations of formal languages with the aid of such structures is examined, and the relationships are considered between partitions of entries and abstract families of languages and automata. 18 references.

  16. Heuristic framework for parallel sorting computations | Nwanze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parallel sorting techniques have become of practical interest with the advent of new multiprocessor architectures. The decreasing cost of these processors will probably in the future, make the solutions that are derived thereof to be more appealing. Efficient algorithms for sorting scheme that are encountered in a number of ...

  17. Algorithms for parallel and vector computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, James M.

    1995-01-01

    This is a final report on work performed under NASA grant NAG-1-1112-FOP during the period March, 1990 through February 1995. Four major topics are covered: (1) solution of nonlinear poisson-type equations; (2) parallel reduced system conjugate gradient method; (3) orderings for conjugate gradient preconditioners, and (4) SOR as a preconditioner.

  18. Parallel computing, failure recovery, and extreme values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nørvang; Asmussen, Søren

    A task of random size T is split into M subtasks of lengths T1, . . . , TM, each of which is sent to one out of M parallel processors. Each processor may fail at a random time before completing its allocated task, and then has to restart it from the beginning. If X1, . . . ,XM are the total task ...

  19. Distributed simulation of large computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzolla, M.

    2001-01-01

    Sequential simulation of large complex physical systems is often regarded as a computationally expensive task. In order to speed-up complex discrete-event simulations, the paradigm of Parallel and Distributed Discrete Event Simulation (PDES) has been introduced since the late 70s. The authors analyze the applicability of PDES to the modeling and analysis of large computer system; such systems are increasingly common in the area of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, because many modern experiments make use of large 'compute farms'. Some feasibility tests have been performed on a prototype distributed simulator

  20. Parallel algorithms and architecture for computation of manipulator forward dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel computation of manipulator forward dynamics is investigated. Considering three classes of algorithms for the solution of the problem, that is, the O(n), the O(n exp 2), and the O(n exp 3) algorithms, parallelism in the problem is analyzed. It is shown that the problem belongs to the class of NC and that the time and processors bounds are of O(log2/2n) and O(n exp 4), respectively. However, the fastest stable parallel algorithms achieve the computation time of O(n) and can be derived by parallelization of the O(n exp 3) serial algorithms. Parallel computation of the O(n exp 3) algorithms requires the development of parallel algorithms for a set of fundamentally different problems, that is, the Newton-Euler formulation, the computation of the inertia matrix, decomposition of the symmetric, positive definite matrix, and the solution of triangular systems. Parallel algorithms for this set of problems are developed which can be efficiently implemented on a unique architecture, a triangular array of n(n+2)/2 processors with a simple nearest-neighbor interconnection. This architecture is particularly suitable for VLSI and WSI implementations. The developed parallel algorithm, compared to the best serial O(n) algorithm, achieves an asymptotic speedup of more than two orders-of-magnitude in the computation the forward dynamics.

  1. Distributed system for parallel data processing of ECT signals for electromagnetic flaw detection in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliashki, Vassil; Marinova, Galia

    2002-01-01

    The paper proposes a distributed system for parallel data processing of ECT signals for flaw detection in materials. The measured data are stored in files on a host computer, where a JAVA server is located. The host computer is connected through Internet to a set of client computers, distributed geographically. The data are distributed from the host computer by means of the JAVA server to the client computers according their requests. The software necessary for the data processing is installed on each client computer in advance. The organization of the data processing on many computers, working simultaneously in parallel, leads to great time reducing, especially in cases when huge amount of data should be processed in very short time. (Author)

  2. Event Based Simulator for Parallel Computing over the Wide Area Network for Real Time Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Elankovan; Harwood, Aaron; Kotagiri, Ramamohanarao; Satria Prabuwono, Anton

    As the computational requirement of applications in computational science continues to grow tremendously, the use of computational resources distributed across the Wide Area Network (WAN) becomes advantageous. However, not all applications can be executed over the WAN due to communication overhead that can drastically slowdown the computation. In this paper, we introduce an event based simulator to investigate the performance of parallel algorithms executed over the WAN. The event based simulator known as SIMPAR (SIMulator for PARallel computation), simulates the actual computations and communications involved in parallel computation over the WAN using time stamps. Visualization of real time applications require steady stream of processed data flow for visualization purposes. Hence, SIMPAR may prove to be a valuable tool to investigate types of applications and computing resource requirements to provide uninterrupted flow of processed data for real time visualization purposes. The results obtained from the simulation show concurrence with the expected performance using the L-BSP model.

  3. Highly parallel machines and future of scientific computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    Computing requirement of large scale scientific computing has always been ahead of what state of the art hardware could supply in the form of supercomputers of the day. And for any single processor system the limit to increase in the computing power was realized a few years back itself. Now with the advent of parallel computing systems the availability of machines with the required computing power seems a reality. In this paper the author tries to visualize the future large scale scientific computing in the penultimate decade of the present century. The author summarized trends in parallel computers and emphasize the need for a better programming environment and software tools for optimal performance. The author concludes this paper with critique on parallel architectures, software tools and algorithms. (author). 10 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Parallel and Distributed Data Processing Using Autonomous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Looking at the distributed nature of these networks, data is processed by remote login or Remote Procedure Calls (RPC), this causes congestion in the network bandwidth. This paper proposes a framework where software agents are assigned duties to be processing the distributed data concurrently and assembling the ...

  5. Parallel computing in genomic research: advances and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocaña K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Kary Ocaña,1 Daniel de Oliveira2 1National Laboratory of Scientific Computing, Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, 2Institute of Computing, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil Abstract: Today's genomic experiments have to process the so-called "biological big data" that is now reaching the size of Terabytes and Petabytes. To process this huge amount of data, scientists may require weeks or months if they use their own workstations. Parallelism techniques and high-performance computing (HPC environments can be applied for reducing the total processing time and to ease the management, treatment, and analyses of this data. However, running bioinformatics experiments in HPC environments such as clouds, grids, clusters, and graphics processing unit requires the expertise from scientists to integrate computational, biological, and mathematical techniques and technologies. Several solutions have already been proposed to allow scientists for processing their genomic experiments using HPC capabilities and parallelism techniques. This article brings a systematic review of literature that surveys the most recently published research involving genomics and parallel computing. Our objective is to gather the main characteristics, benefits, and challenges that can be considered by scientists when running their genomic experiments to benefit from parallelism techniques and HPC capabilities. Keywords: high-performance computing, genomic research, cloud computing, grid computing, cluster computing, parallel computing

  6. Basic design of parallel computational program for probabilistic structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Taketoshi; Gu, Wenwei; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    1999-06-01

    In our laboratory, for 'development of damage evaluation method of structural brittle materials by microscopic fracture mechanics and probabilistic theory' (nuclear computational science cross-over research) we examine computational method related to super parallel computation system which is coupled with material strength theory based on microscopic fracture mechanics for latent cracks and continuum structural model to develop new structural reliability evaluation methods for ceramic structures. This technical report is the review results regarding probabilistic structural mechanics theory, basic terms of formula and program methods of parallel computation which are related to principal terms in basic design of computational mechanics program. (author)

  7. Basic design of parallel computational program for probabilistic structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Taketoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Gu, Wenwei; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    1999-06-01

    In our laboratory, for `development of damage evaluation method of structural brittle materials by microscopic fracture mechanics and probabilistic theory` (nuclear computational science cross-over research) we examine computational method related to super parallel computation system which is coupled with material strength theory based on microscopic fracture mechanics for latent cracks and continuum structural model to develop new structural reliability evaluation methods for ceramic structures. This technical report is the review results regarding probabilistic structural mechanics theory, basic terms of formula and program methods of parallel computation which are related to principal terms in basic design of computational mechanics program. (author)

  8. Implementation of Parallel Dynamic Simulation on Shared-Memory vs. Distributed-Memory Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Wu, Di; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-09

    Power system dynamic simulation computes the system response to a sequence of large disturbance, such as sudden changes in generation or load, or a network short circuit followed by protective branch switching operation. It consists of a large set of differential and algebraic equations, which is computational intensive and challenging to solve using single-processor based dynamic simulation solution. High-performance computing (HPC) based parallel computing is a very promising technology to speed up the computation and facilitate the simulation process. This paper presents two different parallel implementations of power grid dynamic simulation using Open Multi-processing (OpenMP) on shared-memory platform, and Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed-memory clusters, respectively. The difference of the parallel simulation algorithms and architectures of the two HPC technologies are illustrated, and their performances for running parallel dynamic simulation are compared and demonstrated.

  9. Performance of Air Pollution Models on Massively Parallel Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, John; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, Jerzy

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on the computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gain detailed insight about the performance of the three computers when used to solve large-scale scientific problems...

  10. Parallel computing solution of Boltzmann neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansah-Narh, T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of the research was on developing parallel computing algorithm for solving Eigen-values of the Boltzmam Neutron Transport Equation (BNTE) in a slab geometry using multi-grid approach. In response to the problem of slow execution of serial computing when solving large problems, such as BNTE, the study was focused on the design of parallel computing systems which was an evolution of serial computing that used multiple processing elements simultaneously to solve complex physical and mathematical problems. Finite element method (FEM) was used for the spatial discretization scheme, while angular discretization was accomplished by expanding the angular dependence in terms of Legendre polynomials. The eigenvalues representing the multiplication factors in the BNTE were determined by the power method. MATLAB Compiler Version 4.1 (R2009a) was used to compile the MATLAB codes of BNTE. The implemented parallel algorithms were enabled with matlabpool, a Parallel Computing Toolbox function. The option UseParallel was set to 'always' and the default value of the option was 'never'. When those conditions held, the solvers computed estimated gradients in parallel. The parallel computing system was used to handle all the bottlenecks in the matrix generated from the finite element scheme and each domain of the power method generated. The parallel algorithm was implemented on a Symmetric Multi Processor (SMP) cluster machine, which had Intel 32 bit quad-core x 86 processors. Convergence rates and timings for the algorithm on the SMP cluster machine were obtained. Numerical experiments indicated the designed parallel algorithm could reach perfect speedup and had good stability and scalability. (au)

  11. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  12. Climate Ocean Modeling on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Cheng, B. N.; Chao, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean modeling plays an important role in both understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting future climate change. However, modeling the ocean circulation at various spatial and temporal scales is a very challenging computational task.

  13. History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Bryant; Sanjay Srinivasan; Alvaro Barrera; Sharad Yadav

    2004-08-31

    In the probabilistic approach for history matching, the information from the dynamic data is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, fluid properties, well configuration, flow constrains on wells etc. This implies probabilistic approach should then update different regions of the reservoir in different ways. This necessitates delineation of multiple reservoir domains in order to increase the accuracy of the approach. The research focuses on a probabilistic approach to integrate dynamic data that ensures consistency between reservoir models developed from one stage to the next. The algorithm relies on efficient parameterization of the dynamic data integration problem and permits rapid assessment of the updated reservoir model at each stage. The report also outlines various domain decomposition schemes from the perspective of increasing the accuracy of probabilistic approach of history matching. Research progress in three important areas of the project are discussed: {lg_bullet}Validation and testing the probabilistic approach to incorporating production data in reservoir models. {lg_bullet}Development of a robust scheme for identifying reservoir regions that will result in a more robust parameterization of the history matching process. {lg_bullet}Testing commercial simulators for parallel capability and development of a parallel algorithm for history matching.

  14. Parallel computing for event reconstruction in high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolbers, S.

    1993-01-01

    Parallel computing has been recognized as a solution to large computing problems. In High Energy Physics offline event reconstruction of detector data is a very large computing problem that has been solved with parallel computing techniques. A review of the parallel programming package CPS (Cooperative Processes Software) developed and used at Fermilab for offline reconstruction of Terabytes of data requiring the delivery of hundreds of Vax-Years per experiment is given. The Fermilab UNIX farms, consisting of 180 Silicon Graphics workstations and 144 IBM RS6000 workstations, are used to provide the computing power for the experiments. Fermilab has had a long history of providing production parallel computing starting with the ACP (Advanced Computer Project) Farms in 1986. The Fermilab UNIX Farms have been in production for over 2 years with 24 hour/day service to experimental user groups. Additional tools for management, control and monitoring these large systems will be described. Possible future directions for parallel computing in High Energy Physics will be given

  15. MEDUSA - An overset grid flow solver for network-based parallel computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merritt H.; Pallis, Jani M.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing improvement in processing speed has made it feasible to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations for simple three-dimensional flows on advanced workstations. Combining multiple workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows the application of programming principles learned on MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) distributed memory parallel computers to the solution of larger problems. An overset-grid flow solution code has been developed which uses a cluster of workstations as a network-based parallel computer. Inter-process communication is provided by the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software. Solution speed equivalent to one-third of a Cray-YMP processor has been achieved from a cluster of nine commonly used engineering workstation processors. Load imbalance and communication overhead are the principal impediments to parallel efficiency in this application.

  16. Parallelism, fractal geometry and other aspects of computational mathematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchhouse, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    In some fields such as meteorology, theoretical physics, quantum chemistry and hydrodynamics there are problems which involve so much computation that computers of the power of a thousand times a Cray 2 could be fully utilised if they were available. Since it is unlikely that uniprocessors of such power will be available, such large scale problems could be solved by using systems of computers running in parallel. This approach, of course, requires to find appropriate algorithms for the solution of such problems which can efficiently make use of a large number of computers working in parallel. 11 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  17. Parallel Computing:. Some Activities in High Energy Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willers, Ian

    This paper examines some activities in High Energy Physics that utilise parallel computing. The topic includes all computing from the proposed SIMD front end detectors, the farming applications, high-powered RISC processors and the large machines in the computer centers. We start by looking at the motivation behind using parallelism for general purpose computing. The developments around farming are then described from its simplest form to the more complex system in Fermilab. Finally, there is a list of some developments that are happening close to the experiments.

  18. Cloud identification using genetic algorithms and massively parallel computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Bill P.; Petry, Frederick E.

    1996-01-01

    As a Guest Computational Investigator under the NASA administered component of the High Performance Computing and Communication Program, we implemented a massively parallel genetic algorithm on the MasPar SIMD computer. Experiments were conducted using Earth Science data in the domains of meteorology and oceanography. Results obtained in these domains are competitive with, and in most cases better than, similar problems solved using other methods. In the meteorological domain, we chose to identify clouds using AVHRR spectral data. Four cloud speciations were used although most researchers settle for three. Results were remarkedly consistent across all tests (91% accuracy). Refinements of this method may lead to more timely and complete information for Global Circulation Models (GCMS) that are prevalent in weather forecasting and global environment studies. In the oceanographic domain, we chose to identify ocean currents from a spectrometer having similar characteristics to AVHRR. Here the results were mixed (60% to 80% accuracy). Given that one is willing to run the experiment several times (say 10), then it is acceptable to claim the higher accuracy rating. This problem has never been successfully automated. Therefore, these results are encouraging even though less impressive than the cloud experiment. Successful conclusion of an automated ocean current detection system would impact coastal fishing, naval tactics, and the study of micro-climates. Finally we contributed to the basic knowledge of GA (genetic algorithm) behavior in parallel environments. We developed better knowledge of the use of subpopulations in the context of shared breeding pools and the migration of individuals. Rigorous experiments were conducted based on quantifiable performance criteria. While much of the work confirmed current wisdom, for the first time we were able to submit conclusive evidence. The software developed under this grant was placed in the public domain. An extensive user

  19. Parallel ray tracing for one-dimensional discrete ordinate computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.D.; Nelson, P.

    1996-01-01

    The ray-tracing sweep in discrete-ordinates, spatially discrete numerical approximation methods applied to the linear, steady-state, plane-parallel, mono-energetic, azimuthally symmetric, neutral-particle transport equation can be reduced to a parallel prefix computation. In so doing, the often severe penalty in convergence rate of the source iteration, suffered by most current parallel algorithms using spatial domain decomposition, can be avoided while attaining parallelism in the spatial domain to whatever extent desired. In addition, the reduction implies parallel algorithm complexity limits for the ray-tracing sweep. The reduction applies to all closed, linear, one-cell functional (CLOF) spatial approximation methods, which encompasses most in current popular use. Scalability test results of an implementation of the algorithm on a 64-node nCube-2S hypercube-connected, message-passing, multi-computer are described. (author)

  20. Parallel computer calculation of quantum spin lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarcq, J.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation allows the theorists to convince themselves about the validity of the models they use. Particularly by simulating the spin lattices one can judge about the validity of a conjecture. Simulating a system defined by a large number of degrees of freedom requires highly sophisticated machines. This study deals with modelling the magnetic interactions between the ions of a crystal. Many exact results have been found for spin 1/2 systems but not for systems of other spins for which many simulation have been carried out. The interest for simulations has been renewed by the Haldane's conjecture stipulating the existence of a energy gap between the ground state and the first excited states of a spin 1 lattice. The existence of this gap has been experimentally demonstrated. This report contains the following four chapters: 1. Spin systems; 2. Calculation of eigenvalues; 3. Programming; 4. Parallel calculation

  1. Parallel structures in human and computer memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1986-08-01

    If we think of our experiences as being recorded continuously on film, then human memory can be compared to a film library that is indexed by the contents of the film strips stored in it. Moreover, approximate retrieval cues suffice to retrieve information stored in this library: We recognize a familiar person in a fuzzy photograph or a familiar tune played on a strange instrument. This paper is about how to construct a computer memory that would allow a computer to recognize patterns and to recall sequences the way humans do. Such a memory is remarkably similar in structure to a conventional computer memory and also to the neural circuits in the cortex of the cerebellum of the human brain. The paper concludes that the frame problem of artificial intelligence could be solved by the use of such a memory if we were able to encode information about the world properly.

  2. Misleading Performance Claims in Parallel Computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-05-29

    In a previous humorous note entitled 'Twelve Ways to Fool the Masses,' I outlined twelve common ways in which performance figures for technical computer systems can be distorted. In this paper and accompanying conference talk, I give a reprise of these twelve 'methods' and give some actual examples that have appeared in peer-reviewed literature in years past. I then propose guidelines for reporting performance, the adoption of which would raise the level of professionalism and reduce the level of confusion, not only in the world of device simulation but also in the larger arena of technical computing.

  3. Global seismic tomography and modern parallel computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Piersanti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A fast technological progress is providing seismic tomographers with computers of rapidly increasing speed and RAM, that are not always properly taken advantage of. Large computers with both shared-memory and distributedmemory architectures have made it possible to approach the tomographic inverse problem more accurately. For example, resolution can be quantified from the resolution matrix rather than checkerboard tests; the covariance matrix can be calculated to evaluate the propagation of errors from data to model parameters; the L-curve method can be applied to determine a range of acceptable regularization schemes. We show how these exercises can be implemented efficiently on different hardware architectures.

  4. Parallel Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rahul; Miller, Carl A.; Shi, Yaoyun

    2017-01-01

    A prominent application of quantum cryptography is the distribution of cryptographic keys with unconditional security. Recently, such security was extended by Vazirani and Vidick (Physical Review Letters, 113, 140501, 2014) to the device-independent (DI) scenario, where the users do not need to trust the integrity of the underlying quantum devices. The protocols analyzed by them and by subsequent authors all require a sequential execution of N multiplayer games, where N is the security parame...

  5. Integrated computer network high-speed parallel interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, R.B.

    1979-03-01

    As the number and variety of computers within Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Central Computer Facility grows, the need for a standard, high-speed intercomputer interface has become more apparent. This report details the development of a High-Speed Parallel Interface from conceptual through implementation stages to meet current and future needs for large-scle network computing within the Integrated Computer Network. 4 figures

  6. Parallel algorithms and archtectures for computational structural mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Merrell; Ma, Shing; Mahajan, Umesh

    1989-01-01

    The determination of the fundamental (lowest) natural vibration frequencies and associated mode shapes is a key step used to uncover and correct potential failures or problem areas in most complex structures. However, the computation time taken by finite element codes to evaluate these natural frequencies is significant, often the most computationally intensive part of structural analysis calculations. There is continuing need to reduce this computation time. This study addresses this need by developing methods for parallel computation.

  7. Parallel diffusion calculation for the PHAETON on-line multiprocessor computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collart, J.M.; Fedon-Magnaud, C.; Lautard, J.J.

    1987-04-01

    The aim of the PHAETON project is the design of an on-line computer in order to increase the immediate knowledge of the main operating and safety parameters in power plants. A significant stage is the computation of the three dimensional flux distribution. For cost and safety reason a computer based on a parallel microprocessor architecture has been studied. This paper presents a first approach to parallelized three dimensional diffusion calculation. A computing software has been written and built in a four processors demonstrator. We present the realization in progress, concerning the final equipment. 8 refs

  8. Finite element electromagnetic field computation on the Sequent Symmetry 81 parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnajeevan, S.; Hoole, H.

    1990-01-01

    Finite element field analysis algorithms lend themselves to parallelization and this fact is exploited in this paper to implement a finite element analysis program for electromagnetic field computation on the Sequent Symmetry 81 parallel computer with three processors. In terms of waiting time, the maximum gains are to be made in matrix solution and therefore this paper concentrates on the gains in parallelizing the solution part of finite element analysis. An outline of how parallelization could be exploited in most finite element operations is given in this paper although the actual implemention of parallelism on the Sequent Symmetry 81 parallel computer was in sparsity computation, matrix assembly and the matrix solution areas. In all cases, the algorithms were modified suit the parallel programming application rather than allowing the compiler to parallelize on existing algorithms

  9. A microeconomic scheduler for parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Ion; Abdel-Wahab, Hussein; Pothen, Alex

    1995-01-01

    We describe a scheduler based on the microeconomic paradigm for scheduling on-line a set of parallel jobs in a multiprocessor system. In addition to the classical objectives of increasing the system throughput and reducing the response time, we consider fairness in allocating system resources among the users, and providing the user with control over the relative performances of his jobs. We associate with every user a savings account in which he receives money at a constant rate. When a user wants to run a job, he creates an expense account for that job to which he transfers money from his savings account. The job uses the funds in its expense account to obtain the system resources it needs for execution. The share of the system resources allocated to the user is directly related to the rate at which the user receives money; the rate at which the user transfers money into a job expense account controls the job's performance. We prove that starvation is not possible in our model. Simulation results show that our scheduler improves both system and user performances in comparison with two different variable partitioning policies. It is also shown to be effective in guaranteeing fairness and providing control over the performance of jobs.

  10. Models of parallel computation :a survey and classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yunquan; CHEN Guoliang; SUN Guangzhong; MIAO Qiankun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the state-of-the-art parallel computational model research is reviewed.We will introduce various models that were developed during the past decades.According to their targeting architecture features,especially memory organization,we classify these parallel computational models into three generations.These models and their characteristics are discussed based on three generations classification.We believe that with the ever increasing speed gap between the CPU and memory systems,incorporating non-uniform memory hierarchy into computational models will become unavoidable.With the emergence of multi-core CPUs,the parallelism hierarchy of current computing platforms becomes more and more complicated.Describing this complicated parallelism hierarchy in future computational models becomes more and more important.A semi-automatic toolkit that can extract model parameters and their values on real computers can reduce the model analysis complexity,thus allowing more complicated models with more parameters to be adopted.Hierarchical memory and hierarchical parallelism will be two very important features that should be considered in future model design and research.

  11. Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Pinnow, Kurt W.; Wallenfelt, Brian P.

    2010-08-24

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

  12. Reconfigurable Parallel Computer Architectures for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    63 B-1. Dependency diagram of the hardware blocks implemented with VHDL .................. 64 C-1. The...distribution is unlimited. The CU has been fully implemented in a FPGA using VHDL . The CU hardware design is depicted in Figure 12. It consists of a main...the hardware design implemented in the FPGA using VHDL . The block diagram shows the dependency of all the VHDL blocks included in the design. Each

  13. Fast Parallel Computation of Polynomials Using Few Processors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiant, Leslie G.; Skyum, Sven; Berkowitz, S.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that any multivariate polynomial of degree $d$ that can be computed sequentially in $C$ steps can be computed in parallel in $O((\\log d)(\\log C + \\log d))$ steps using only $(Cd)^{O(1)} $ processors....

  14. Tutorial: Parallel Computing of Simulation Models for Risk Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Allison C; Staid, Andrea; Gao, Michael; Guikema, Seth D

    2016-10-01

    Simulation models are widely used in risk analysis to study the effects of uncertainties on outcomes of interest in complex problems. Often, these models are computationally complex and time consuming to run. This latter point may be at odds with time-sensitive evaluations or may limit the number of parameters that are considered. In this article, we give an introductory tutorial focused on parallelizing simulation code to better leverage modern computing hardware, enabling risk analysts to better utilize simulation-based methods for quantifying uncertainty in practice. This article is aimed primarily at risk analysts who use simulation methods but do not yet utilize parallelization to decrease the computational burden of these models. The discussion is focused on conceptual aspects of embarrassingly parallel computer code and software considerations. Two complementary examples are shown using the languages MATLAB and R. A brief discussion of hardware considerations is located in the Appendix. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Rocket measurement of auroral partial parallel distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.-A.

    1980-01-01

    The auroral partial parallel distribution functions are obtained by using the observed energy spectra of electrons. The experiment package was launched by a Nike-Tomahawk rocket from Poker Flat, Alaska over a bright auroral band and covered an altitude range of up to 180 km. Calculated partial distribution functions are presented with emphasis on their slopes. The implications of the slopes are discussed. It should be pointed out that the slope of the partial parallel distribution function obtained from one energy spectra will be changed by superposing another energy spectra on it.

  16. Designing a parallel evolutionary algorithm for inferring gene networks on the cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Po; Hsiao, Yu-Ting; Hwang, Wei-Che

    2014-01-16

    To improve the tedious task of reconstructing gene networks through testing experimentally the possible interactions between genes, it becomes a trend to adopt the automated reverse engineering procedure instead. Some evolutionary algorithms have been suggested for deriving network parameters. However, to infer large networks by the evolutionary algorithm, it is necessary to address two important issues: premature convergence and high computational cost. To tackle the former problem and to enhance the performance of traditional evolutionary algorithms, it is advisable to use parallel model evolutionary algorithms. To overcome the latter and to speed up the computation, it is advocated to adopt the mechanism of cloud computing as a promising solution: most popular is the method of MapReduce programming model, a fault-tolerant framework to implement parallel algorithms for inferring large gene networks. This work presents a practical framework to infer large gene networks, by developing and parallelizing a hybrid GA-PSO optimization method. Our parallel method is extended to work with the Hadoop MapReduce programming model and is executed in different cloud computing environments. To evaluate the proposed approach, we use a well-known open-source software GeneNetWeaver to create several yeast S. cerevisiae sub-networks and use them to produce gene profiles. Experiments have been conducted and the results have been analyzed. They show that our parallel approach can be successfully used to infer networks with desired behaviors and the computation time can be largely reduced. Parallel population-based algorithms can effectively determine network parameters and they perform better than the widely-used sequential algorithms in gene network inference. These parallel algorithms can be distributed to the cloud computing environment to speed up the computation. By coupling the parallel model population-based optimization method and the parallel computational framework, high

  17. Fel simulations using distributed computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, J.; Biedron, S.G.; Freund, H.P.; Milton, S.V.; Van Der Slot, P. J M; Bernabeu, G.

    2016-01-01

    While simulation tools are available and have been used regularly for simulating light sources, including Free-Electron Lasers, the increasing availability and lower cost of accelerated computing opens up new opportunities. This paper highlights a method of how accelerating and parallelizing code

  18. Dynamic grid refinement for partial differential equations on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. An asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, that completely eliminates the bottleneck to parallelism is presented. This paper describes the advantage that this algorithm has in adaptive refinement for moving singularities on multiprocessor computers. This work is applicable to the parallel solution of two- and three-dimensional shock tracking problems. 6 refs

  19. RAMA: A file system for massively parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ethan L.; Katz, Randy H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a file system design for massively parallel computers which makes very efficient use of a few disks per processor. This overcomes the traditional I/O bottleneck of massively parallel machines by storing the data on disks within the high-speed interconnection network. In addition, the file system, called RAMA, requires little inter-node synchronization, removing another common bottleneck in parallel processor file systems. Support for a large tertiary storage system can easily be integrated in lo the file system; in fact, RAMA runs most efficiently when tertiary storage is used.

  20. Lattice gauge theory on a parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flower, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The results of several numerical simulations of QCD by Monte Carlo lattice gauge theory are presented. Studying the mesonic potential on a 20 4 lattice, we conclude that asymptotic scaling does not hold over the range 6.1 ≤ β ≤ 6.7, although we are not able to quantify the discrepancies. The effect of discrete rotational symmetry on physical parameters is examined and seems to modify the string tension by 15% at β = 6.1, while at β = 6.3 the change was less than 1%. The potential between three charges is studied and yields a string tension of .18 GeV 2 , consistent with mesonic calculations and relativized potential models. Contributions to the potential from low-energy string vibrations appear small in the range x ≤ .5 fm. We perform energy density measurements in the color fields surrounding both mesons and baryons, which provide strong evidence in favor of the dual superconductor picture of confinement. It is also suggested that the confining strings in the baryon meet at a central point rather than joining the quarks pairwise. Several algorithms are explored in an attempt to develop simulation methods which are able to directly account for the currents generated by color sources. The extension of the Langevin equation to complex degrees of freedom is derived leading to a Fokker-Planck equation for a complex 'Probability distribution'. Using this technique we are then able to calculate energy densities in U(1) gauge theory at large charge separations. The extension of the method to non-Abelian theories comes up against an unresolved problem in segregation for certain types of observable. 145 refs., 36 figs

  1. CUBESIM, Hypercube and Denelcor Hep Parallel Computer Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunigan, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CUBESIM is a set of subroutine libraries and programs for the simulation of message-passing parallel computers and shared-memory parallel computers. Subroutines are supplied to simulate the Intel hypercube and the Denelcor HEP parallel computers. The system permits a user to develop and test parallel programs written in C or FORTRAN on a single processor. The user may alter such hypercube parameters as message startup times, packet size, and the computation-to-communication ratio. The simulation generates a trace file that can be used for debugging, performance analysis, or graphical display. 2 - Method of solution: The CUBESIM simulator is linked with the user's parallel application routines to run as a single UNIX process. The simulator library provides a small operating system to perform process and message management. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Up to 128 processors can be simulated with a virtual memory limit of 6 million bytes. Up to 1000 processes can be simulated

  2. Processing data communications events by awakening threads in parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2016-03-15

    Processing data communications events in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that execute a parallel application, with the PAMI including data communications endpoints, and the endpoints are coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through other data communications resources, including determining by an advance function that there are no actionable data communications events pending for its context, placing by the advance function its thread of execution into a wait state, waiting for a subsequent data communications event for the context; responsive to occurrence of a subsequent data communications event for the context, awakening by the thread from the wait state; and processing by the advance function the subsequent data communications event now pending for the context.

  3. IPython: components for interactive and parallel computing across disciplines. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F.; Bussonnier, M.; Frederic, J. D.; Froehle, B. M.; Granger, B. E.; Ivanov, P.; Kluyver, T.; Patterson, E.; Ragan-Kelley, B.; Sailer, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Scientific computing is an inherently exploratory activity that requires constantly cycling between code, data and results, each time adjusting the computations as new insights and questions arise. To support such a workflow, good interactive environments are critical. The IPython project (http://ipython.org) provides a rich architecture for interactive computing with: 1. Terminal-based and graphical interactive consoles. 2. A web-based Notebook system with support for code, text, mathematical expressions, inline plots and other rich media. 3. Easy to use, high performance tools for parallel computing. Despite its roots in Python, the IPython architecture is designed in a language-agnostic way to facilitate interactive computing in any language. This allows users to mix Python with Julia, R, Octave, Ruby, Perl, Bash and more, as well as to develop native clients in other languages that reuse the IPython clients. In this talk, I will show how IPython supports all stages in the lifecycle of a scientific idea: 1. Individual exploration. 2. Collaborative development. 3. Production runs with parallel resources. 4. Publication. 5. Education. In particular, the IPython Notebook provides an environment for "literate computing" with a tight integration of narrative and computation (including parallel computing). These Notebooks are stored in a JSON-based document format that provides an "executable paper": notebooks can be version controlled, exported to HTML or PDF for publication, and used for teaching.

  4. Small file aggregation in a parallel computing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Zhang, Jingwang

    2014-09-02

    Techniques are provided for small file aggregation in a parallel computing system. An exemplary method for storing a plurality of files generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system comprises aggregating the plurality of files into a single aggregated file; and generating metadata for the single aggregated file. The metadata comprises an offset and a length of each of the plurality of files in the single aggregated file. The metadata can be used to unpack one or more of the files from the single aggregated file.

  5. Computational acceleration for MR image reconstruction in partially parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Chen, Yunmei; Huang, Feng

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we present a fast numerical algorithm for solving total variation and l(1) (TVL1) based image reconstruction with application in partially parallel magnetic resonance imaging. Our algorithm uses variable splitting method to reduce computational cost. Moreover, the Barzilai-Borwein step size selection method is adopted in our algorithm for much faster convergence. Experimental results on clinical partially parallel imaging data demonstrate that the proposed algorithm requires much fewer iterations and/or less computational cost than recently developed operator splitting and Bregman operator splitting methods, which can deal with a general sensing matrix in reconstruction framework, to get similar or even better quality of reconstructed images.

  6. Influence of Paralleling Dies and Paralleling Half-Bridges on Transient Current Distribution in Multichip Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiongfei

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the transient current distribution in the multichip half-bridge power modules, where two types of paralleling connections with different current commutation mechanisms are considered: paralleling dies and paralleling half-bridges. It reveals that with paralleling dies, both t...

  7. Distributed computing for global health

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Schwede, Torsten; Moore, Celia; Smith, Thomas E; Williams, Brian; Grey, François

    2005-01-01

    Distributed computing harnesses the power of thousands of computers within organisations or over the Internet. In order to tackle global health problems, several groups of researchers have begun to use this approach to exceed by far the computing power of a single lab. This event illustrates how companies, research institutes and the general public are contributing their computing power to these efforts, and what impact this may have on a range of world health issues. Grids for neglected diseases Vincent Breton, CNRS/EGEE This talk introduces the topic of distributed computing, explaining the similarities and differences between Grid computing, volunteer computing and supercomputing, and outlines the potential of Grid computing for tackling neglected diseases where there is little economic incentive for private R&D efforts. Recent results on malaria drug design using the Grid infrastructure of the EU-funded EGEE project, which is coordinated by CERN and involves 70 partners in Europe, the US and Russi...

  8. Storing files in a parallel computing system based on user-specified parser function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Manzanares, Adam; Torres, Aaron

    2014-10-21

    Techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system based on a user-specified parser function. A plurality of files generated by a distributed application in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining a parser from the distributed application for processing the plurality of files prior to storage; and storing one or more of the plurality of files in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system based on the processing by the parser. The plurality of files comprise one or more of a plurality of complete files and a plurality of sub-files. The parser can optionally store only those files that satisfy one or more semantic requirements of the parser. The parser can also extract metadata from one or more of the files and the extracted metadata can be stored with one or more of the plurality of files and used for searching for files.

  9. Algorithms for computational fluid dynamics n parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    A study of parallel algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations arising in computational fluid dynamics is presented. The actual implementation on parallel processors of shared and nonshared memory design is discussed. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of machine efficiency, communication time, bottlenecks and software development costs. For elliptic equations, a parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient method is described, which has been used to solve pressure equations discretized with high order finite elements on irregular grids. A parallel full multigrid method and a parallel fast Poisson solver are also presented. Hyperbolic conservation laws were discretized with parallel versions of finite difference methods like the Lax-Wendroff scheme and with the Random Choice method. Techniques are developed for comparing the behavior of an algorithm on different architectures as a function of problem size and local computational effort. Effective use of these advanced architecture machines requires the use of machine dependent programming. It is shown that the portability problems can be minimized by introducing high level operations on vectors and matrices structured into program libraries

  10. Hybrid parallel computing architecture for multiview phase shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kai; Li, Zhongwei; Zhou, Xiaohui; Shi, Yusheng; Wang, Congjun

    2014-11-01

    The multiview phase-shifting method shows its powerful capability in achieving high resolution three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement. Unfortunately, this ability results in very high computation costs and 3-D computations have to be processed offline. To realize real-time 3-D shape measurement, a hybrid parallel computing architecture is proposed for multiview phase shifting. In this architecture, the central processing unit can co-operate with the graphic processing unit (GPU) to achieve hybrid parallel computing. The high computation cost procedures, including lens distortion rectification, phase computation, correspondence, and 3-D reconstruction, are implemented in GPU, and a three-layer kernel function model is designed to simultaneously realize coarse-grained and fine-grained paralleling computing. Experimental results verify that the developed system can perform 50 fps (frame per second) real-time 3-D measurement with 260 K 3-D points per frame. A speedup of up to 180 times is obtained for the performance of the proposed technique using a NVIDIA GT560Ti graphics card rather than a sequential C in a 3.4 GHZ Inter Core i7 3770.

  11. A Novel Parallel Algorithm for Edit Distance Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Murtaza Yousaf

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The edit distance between two sequences is the minimum number of weighted transformation-operations that are required to transform one string into the other. The weighted transformation-operations are insert, remove, and substitute. Dynamic programming solution to find edit distance exists but it becomes computationally intensive when the lengths of strings become very large. This work presents a novel parallel algorithm to solve edit distance problem of string matching. The algorithm is based on resolving dependencies in the dynamic programming solution of the problem and it is able to compute each row of edit distance table in parallel. In this way, it becomes possible to compute the complete table in min(m,n iterations for strings of size m and n whereas state-of-the-art parallel algorithm solves the problem in max(m,n iterations. The proposed algorithm also increases the amount of parallelism in each of its iteration. The algorithm is also capable of exploiting spatial locality while its implementation. Additionally, the algorithm works in a load balanced way that further improves its performance. The algorithm is implemented for multicore systems having shared memory. Implementation of the algorithm in OpenMP shows linear speedup and better execution time as compared to state-of-the-art parallel approach. Efficiency of the algorithm is also proven better in comparison to its competitor.

  12. Analysis of multigrid methods on massively parallel computers: Architectural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Lesley R.; Tarjan, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    We study the potential performance of multigrid algorithms running on massively parallel computers with the intent of discovering whether presently envisioned machines will provide an efficient platform for such algorithms. We consider the domain parallel version of the standard V cycle algorithm on model problems, discretized using finite difference techniques in two and three dimensions on block structured grids of size 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 9), respectively. Our models of parallel computation were developed to reflect the computing characteristics of the current generation of massively parallel multicomputers. These models are based on an interconnection network of 256 to 16,384 message passing, 'workstation size' processors executing in an SPMD mode. The first model accomplishes interprocessor communications through a multistage permutation network. The communication cost is a logarithmic function which is similar to the costs in a variety of different topologies. The second model allows single stage communication costs only. Both models were designed with information provided by machine developers and utilize implementation derived parameters. With the medium grain parallelism of the current generation and the high fixed cost of an interprocessor communication, our analysis suggests an efficient implementation requires the machine to support the efficient transmission of long messages, (up to 1000 words) or the high initiation cost of a communication must be significantly reduced through an alternative optimization technique. Furthermore, with variable length message capability, our analysis suggests the low diameter multistage networks provide little or no advantage over a simple single stage communications network.

  13. An educational tool for interactive parallel and distributed processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2012-01-01

    In this article we try to describe how the modular interactive tiles system (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing a handson educational tool that allows a change in the representation...... of abstract problems related to designing interactive parallel and distributed systems. Indeed, the MITS seems to bring a series of goals into education, such as parallel programming, distributedness, communication protocols, master dependency, software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback......, connectivity, topology, island modeling, and user and multi-user interaction which can rarely be found in other tools. Finally, we introduce the system of modular interactive tiles as a tool for easy, fast, and flexible hands-on exploration of these issues, and through examples we show how to implement...

  14. General-purpose parallel simulator for quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Jumpei; Matsumoto, Keiji; Imai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    With current technologies, it seems to be very difficult to implement quantum computers with many qubits. It is therefore of importance to simulate quantum algorithms and circuits on the existing computers. However, for a large-size problem, the simulation often requires more computational power than is available from sequential processing. Therefore, simulation methods for parallel processors are required. We have developed a general-purpose simulator for quantum algorithms/circuits on the parallel computer (Sun Enterprise4500). It can simulate algorithms/circuits with up to 30 qubits. In order to test efficiency of our proposed methods, we have simulated Shor's factorization algorithm and Grover's database search, and we have analyzed robustness of the corresponding quantum circuits in the presence of both decoherence and operational errors. The corresponding results, statistics, and analyses are presented in this paper

  15. Parallel algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Javaheri, Masoud; Orin, David E.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an O(log2N) parallel algorithm for the manipulator inertia matrix is presented. It is based on the most efficient serial algorithm which uses the composite rigid body method. Recursive doubling is used to reformulate the linear recurrence equations which are required to compute the diagonal elements of the matrix. It results in O(log2N) levels of computation. Computation of the off-diagonal elements involves N linear recurrences of varying-size and a new method, which avoids redundant computation of position and orientation transforms for the manipulator, is developed. The O(log2N) algorithm is presented in both equation and graphic forms which clearly show the parallelism inherent in the algorithm.

  16. Preliminary Study on the Enhancement of Reconstruction Speed for Emission Computed Tomography Using Parallel Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Soo Mee; Kang, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong Soo; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-01-01

    Conventional image reconstruction uses simplified physical models of projection. However, real physics, for example 3D reconstruction, takes too long time to process all the data in clinic and is unable in a common reconstruction machine because of the large memory for complex physical models. We suggest the realistic distributed memory model of fast-reconstruction using parallel processing on personal computers to enable large-scale technologies. The preliminary tests for the possibility on virtual machines and various performance test on commercial super computer, Tachyon were performed. Expectation maximization algorithm with common 2D projection and realistic 3D line of response were tested. Since the process time was getting slower (max 6 times) after a certain iteration, optimization for compiler was performed to maximize the efficiency of parallelization. Parallel processing of a program on multiple computers was available on Linux with MPICH and NFS. We verified that differences between parallel processed image and single processed image at the same iterations were under the significant digits of floating point number, about 6 bit. Double processors showed good efficiency (1.96 times) of parallel computing. Delay phenomenon was solved by vectorization method using SSE. Through the study, realistic parallel computing system in clinic was established to be able to reconstruct by plenty of memory using the realistic physical models which was impossible to simplify

  17. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-02

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task; the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including at least one segment of shared random access memory; including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers through a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  18. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  19. Image processing with massively parallel computer Quadrics Q1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Rocca, A.B.; La Porta, L.; Ferriani, S.

    1995-05-01

    Aimed to evaluate the image processing capabilities of the massively parallel computer Quadrics Q1, a convolution algorithm that has been implemented is described in this report. At first the discrete convolution mathematical definition is recalled together with the main Q1 h/w and s/w features. Then the different codification forms of the algorythm are described and the Q1 performances are compared with those obtained by different computers. Finally, the conclusions report on main results and suggestions

  20. WEKA-G: Parallel data mining on computational grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PIMENTA, A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is a technology that can extract useful information from large amounts of data. However, mining a database often requires a high computational power. To resolve this problem, this paper presents a tool (Weka-G, which runs in parallel algorithms used in the mining process data. As the environment for doing so, we use a computational grid by adding several features within a WAN.

  1. Efficient multi-objective calibration of a computationally intensive hydrologic model with parallel computing software in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    With enhanced data availability, distributed watershed models for large areas with high spatial and temporal resolution are increasingly used to understand water budgets and examine effects of human activities and climate change/variability on water resources. Developing parallel computing software...

  2. Resonance analysis in parallel voltage-controlled Distributed Generation inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to the fast responses of the inner voltage and current control loops, the dynamic behaviors of parallel voltage-controlled Distributed Generation (DG) inverters not only relies on the stability of load sharing among them, but subjects to the interactions between the voltage control loops...

  3. Dynamic overset grid communication on distributed memory parallel processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszcz, Eric; Weeratunga, Sisira K.; Meakin, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    A parallel distributed memory implementation of intergrid communication for dynamic overset grids is presented. Included are discussions of various options considered during development. Results are presented comparing an Intel iPSC/860 to a single processor Cray Y-MP. Results for grids in relative motion show the iPSC/860 implementation to be faster than the Cray implementation.

  4. Hardware packet pacing using a DMA in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Phillip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2013-08-13

    Method and system for hardware packet pacing using a direct memory access controller in a parallel computer which, in one aspect, keeps track of a total number of bytes put on the network as a result of a remote get operation, using a hardware token counter.

  5. On the efficient parallel computation of Legendre transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inda, M.A.; Bisseling, R.H.; Maslen, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a parallel implementation of efficient algorithms for computation of Legendre polynomial transforms and other orthogonal polynomial transforms. We develop an approach to the Driscoll-Healy algorithm using polynomial arithmetic and present experimental results on the

  6. On the efficient parallel computation of Legendre transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inda, M.A.; Bisseling, R.H.; Maslen, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    In this article we discuss a parallel implementation of efficient algorithms for computation of Legendre polynomial transforms and other orthogonal polynomial transforms. We develop an approach to the Driscoll-Healy algorithm using polynomial arithmetic and present experimental results on the

  7. An Educational Tool for Interactive Parallel and Distributed Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we try to describe how the Modular Interactive Tiles System (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing an educational hands-on tool that allows a change of representation of the abs......In this paper we try to describe how the Modular Interactive Tiles System (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing an educational hands-on tool that allows a change of representation...... of the abstract problems related to designing interactive parallel and distributed systems. Indeed, MITS seems to bring a series of goals into the education, such as parallel programming, distributedness, communication protocols, master dependency, software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback......, connectivity, topology, island modeling, user and multiuser interaction, which can hardly be found in other tools. Finally, we introduce the system of modular interactive tiles as a tool for easy, fast, and flexible hands-on exploration of these issues, and through examples show how to implement interactive...

  8. A hybrid method for the parallel computation of Green's functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dan Erik; Li, Song; Stokbro, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    of the large number of times this calculation needs to be performed, this is computationally very expensive even on supercomputers. The classical approach is based on recurrence formulas which cannot be efficiently parallelized. This practically prevents the solution of large problems with hundreds...... of thousands of atoms. We propose new recurrences for a general class of sparse matrices to calculate Green's and lesser Green's function matrices which extend formulas derived by Takahashi and others. We show that these recurrences may lead to a dramatically reduced computational cost because they only...... require computing a small number of entries of the inverse matrix. Then. we propose a parallelization strategy for block tridiagonal matrices which involves a combination of Schur complement calculations and cyclic reduction. It achieves good scalability even on problems of modest size....

  9. Parallel computing in genomic research: advances and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Kary; de Oliveira, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Today's genomic experiments have to process the so-called "biological big data" that is now reaching the size of Terabytes and Petabytes. To process this huge amount of data, scientists may require weeks or months if they use their own workstations. Parallelism techniques and high-performance computing (HPC) environments can be applied for reducing the total processing time and to ease the management, treatment, and analyses of this data. However, running bioinformatics experiments in HPC environments such as clouds, grids, clusters, and graphics processing unit requires the expertise from scientists to integrate computational, biological, and mathematical techniques and technologies. Several solutions have already been proposed to allow scientists for processing their genomic experiments using HPC capabilities and parallelism techniques. This article brings a systematic review of literature that surveys the most recently published research involving genomics and parallel computing. Our objective is to gather the main characteristics, benefits, and challenges that can be considered by scientists when running their genomic experiments to benefit from parallelism techniques and HPC capabilities.

  10. Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Michael E.; Attinella, John E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Mundy, Michael B.

    2015-07-21

    Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application, including: identifying a subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer to execute the parallel application; selecting one compute node in the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer as a job leader compute node; initiating execution of the parallel application on the subset of compute nodes; receiving an exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes, where the exit status for each compute node includes information describing execution of some portion of the parallel application by the compute node; aggregating each exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes; and sending an aggregated exit status for the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer.

  11. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  12. High spatial resolution CT image reconstruction using parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yin; Liu Li; Sun Gongxing

    2003-01-01

    Using the PC cluster system with 16 dual CPU nodes, we accelerate the FBP and OR-OSEM reconstruction of high spatial resolution image (2048 x 2048). Based on the number of projections, we rewrite the reconstruction algorithms into parallel format and dispatch the tasks to each CPU. By parallel computing, the speedup factor is roughly equal to the number of CPUs, which can be up to about 25 times when 25 CPUs used. This technique is very suitable for real-time high spatial resolution CT image reconstruction. (authors)

  13. P3T+: A Performance Estimator for Distributed and Parallel Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fahringer

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing distributed and parallel programs on today's multiprocessor architectures is still a challenging task. Particular distressing is the lack of effective performance tools that support the programmer in evaluating changes in code, problem and machine sizes, and target architectures. In this paper we introduce P3T+ which is a performance estimator for mostly regular HPF (High Performance Fortran programs but partially covers also message passing programs (MPI. P3T+ is unique by modeling programs, compiler code transformations, and parallel and distributed architectures. It computes at compile-time a variety of performance parameters including work distribution, number of transfers, amount of data transferred, transfer times, computation times, and number of cache misses. Several novel technologies are employed to compute these parameters: loop iteration spaces, array access patterns, and data distributions are modeled by employing highly effective symbolic analysis. Communication is estimated by simulating the behavior of a communication library used by the underlying compiler. Computation times are predicted through pre-measured kernels on every target architecture of interest. We carefully model most critical architecture specific factors such as cache lines sizes, number of cache lines available, startup times, message transfer time per byte, etc. P3T+ has been implemented and is closely integrated with the Vienna High Performance Compiler (VFC to support programmers develop parallel and distributed applications. Experimental results for realistic kernel codes taken from real-world applications are presented to demonstrate both accuracy and usefulness of P3T+.

  14. Energy efficient distributed computing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Young-Choon

    2012-01-01

    The energy consumption issue in distributed computing systems raises various monetary, environmental and system performance concerns. Electricity consumption in the US doubled from 2000 to 2005.  From a financial and environmental standpoint, reducing the consumption of electricity is important, yet these reforms must not lead to performance degradation of the computing systems.  These contradicting constraints create a suite of complex problems that need to be resolved in order to lead to 'greener' distributed computing systems.  This book brings together a group of outsta

  15. Distributed and parallel approach for handle and perform huge datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Big Data refers to the dynamic, large and disparate volumes of data comes from many different sources (tools, machines, sensors, mobile devices) uncorrelated with each others. It requires new, innovative and scalable technology to collect, host and analytically process the vast amount of data. Proper architecture of the system that perform huge data sets is needed. In this paper, the comparison of distributed and parallel system architecture is presented on the example of MapReduce (MR) Hadoop platform and parallel database platform (DBMS). This paper also analyzes the problem of performing and handling valuable information from petabytes of data. The both paradigms: MapReduce and parallel DBMS are described and compared. The hybrid architecture approach is also proposed and could be used to solve the analyzed problem of storing and processing Big Data.

  16. Parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the application of parallel computing techniques to large-scale modeling of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this study, parallel computing techniques, as implemented into the TOUGH2 code, are applied in large-scale numerical simulations on a distributed-memory parallel computer. The modeling study has been conducted using an over-one-million-cell three-dimensional numerical model, which incorporates a wide variety of field data for the highly heterogeneous fractured formation at Yucca Mountain. The objective of this study is to analyze the impact of various surface infiltration scenarios (under current and possible future climates) on flow through the UZ system, using various hydrogeological conceptual models with refined grids. The results indicate that the one-million-cell models produce better resolution results and reveal some flow patterns that cannot be obtained using coarse-grid modeling models

  17. A discrete ordinate response matrix method for massively parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanebutte, U.R.; Lewis, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    A discrete ordinate response matrix method is formulated for the solution of neutron transport problems on massively parallel computers. The response matrix formulation eliminates iteration on the scattering source. The nodal matrices which result from the diamond-differenced equations are utilized in a factored form which minimizes memory requirements and significantly reduces the required number of algorithm utilizes massive parallelism by assigning each spatial node to a processor. The algorithm is accelerated effectively by a synthetic method in which the low-order diffusion equations are also solved by massively parallel red/black iterations. The method has been implemented on a 16k Connection Machine-2, and S 8 and S 16 solutions have been obtained for fixed-source benchmark problems in X--Y geometry

  18. Implementation of PHENIX trigger algorithms on massively parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petridis, A.N.; Wohn, F.K.

    1995-01-01

    The event selection requirements of contemporary high energy and nuclear physics experiments are met by the introduction of on-line trigger algorithms which identify potentially interesting events and reduce the data acquisition rate to levels that are manageable by the electronics. Such algorithms being parallel in nature can be simulated off-line using massively parallel computers. The PHENIX experiment intends to investigate the possible existence of a new phase of matter called the quark gluon plasma which has been theorized to have existed in very early stages of the evolution of the universe by studying collisions of heavy nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies. Such interactions can also reveal important information regarding the structure of the nucleus and mandate a thorough investigation of the simpler proton-nucleus collisions at the same energies. The complexity of PHENIX events and the need to analyze and also simulate them at rates similar to the data collection ones imposes enormous computation demands. This work is a first effort to implement PHENIX trigger algorithms on parallel computers and to study the feasibility of using such machines to run the complex programs necessary for the simulation of the PHENIX detector response. Fine and coarse grain approaches have been studied and evaluated. Depending on the application the performance of a massively parallel computer can be much better or much worse than that of a serial workstation. A comparison between single instruction and multiple instruction computers is also made and possible applications of the single instruction machines to high energy and nuclear physics experiments are outlined. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  19. A Distributed Computational Infrastructure for Science and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustam K. Bazarov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have lately been paying increasingly more attention to parallel and distributed algorithms for solving high-dimensionality problems. In this regard, the issue of acquiring or renting computational resources becomes a topical one for employees of scientific and educational institutions. This article examines technology and methods for organizing a distributed computational infrastructure. The author addresses the experience of creating a high-performance system powered by existing clusterization and grid computing technology. The approach examined in the article helps minimize financial costs, aggregate territorially distributed computational resources and ensures a more rational use of available computer equipment, eliminating its downtimes.

  20. The 2nd Symposium on the Frontiers of Massively Parallel Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ronnie (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Programming languages, computer graphics, neural networks, massively parallel computers, SIMD architecture, algorithms, digital terrain models, sort computation, simulation of charged particle transport on the massively parallel processor and image processing are among the topics discussed.

  1. A Parallel Computational Model for Multichannel Phase Unwrapping Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatore, Pasquale; Pepe, Antonio; Lanari, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a parallel model for the solution of the computationally intensive multichannel phase unwrapping (MCh-PhU) problem is proposed. Firstly, the Extended Minimum Cost Flow (EMCF) algorithm for solving MCh-PhU problem is revised within the rigorous mathematical framework of the discrete calculus ; thus permitting to capture its topological structure in terms of meaningful discrete differential operators. Secondly, emphasis is placed on those methodological and practical aspects, which lead to a parallel reformulation of the EMCF algorithm. Thus, a novel dual-level parallel computational model, in which the parallelism is hierarchically implemented at two different (i.e., process and thread) levels, is presented. The validity of our approach has been demonstrated through a series of experiments that have revealed a significant speedup. Therefore, the attained high-performance prototype is suitable for the solution of large-scale phase unwrapping problems in reasonable time frames, with a significant impact on the systematic exploitation of the existing, and rapidly growing, large archives of SAR data.

  2. Executing a gather operation on a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN

    2012-03-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for executing a gather operation on a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention. Embodiments include configuring, by the logical root, a result buffer or the logical root, the result buffer having positions, each position corresponding to a ranked node in the operational group and for storing contribution data gathered from that ranked node. Embodiments also include repeatedly for each position in the result buffer: determining, by each compute node of an operational group, whether the current position in the result buffer corresponds with the rank of the compute node, if the current position in the result buffer corresponds with the rank of the compute node, contributing, by that compute node, the compute node's contribution data, if the current position in the result buffer does not correspond with the rank of the compute node, contributing, by that compute node, a value of zero for the contribution data, and storing, by the logical root in the current position in the result buffer, results of a bitwise OR operation of all the contribution data by all compute nodes of the operational group for the current position, the results received through the global combining network.

  3. Academic training: From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 15, 16 March From 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming F. FERNANDEZ DE VEGA / Univ. of Extremadura, SP Lecture No. 1: From Evolution Theory to Evolutionary Computation Evolutionary computation is a subfield of artificial intelligence (more particularly computational intelligence) involving combinatorial optimization problems, which are based to some degree on the evolution of biological life in the natural world. In this tutorial we will review the source of inspiration for this metaheuristic and its capability for solving problems. We will show the main flavours within the field, and different problems that have been successfully solved employing this kind of techniques. Lecture No. 2: Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming The successful application of Genetic Programming (GP, one of the available Evolutionary Algorithms) to optimization problems has encouraged an ...

  4. Efficiency Analysis of the Parallel Implementation of the SIMPLE Algorithm on Multiprocessor Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkin, S. V.; Kozelkov, A. S.; Yalozo, A. V.; Gerasimov, V. Yu.; Zelensky, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the details of the parallel implementation of the SIMPLE algorithm for numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes system of equations on arbitrary unstructured grids. The iteration schemes for the serial and parallel versions of the SIMPLE algorithm are implemented. In the description of the parallel implementation, special attention is paid to computational data exchange among processors under the condition of the grid model decomposition using fictitious cells. We discuss the specific features for the storage of distributed matrices and implementation of vector-matrix operations in parallel mode. It is shown that the proposed way of matrix storage reduces the number of interprocessor exchanges. A series of numerical experiments illustrates the effect of the multigrid SLAE solver tuning on the general efficiency of the algorithm; the tuning involves the types of the cycles used (V, W, and F), the number of iterations of a smoothing operator, and the number of cells for coarsening. Two ways (direct and indirect) of efficiency evaluation for parallelization of the numerical algorithm are demonstrated. The paper presents the results of solving some internal and external flow problems with the evaluation of parallelization efficiency by two algorithms. It is shown that the proposed parallel implementation enables efficient computations for the problems on a thousand processors. Based on the results obtained, some general recommendations are made for the optimal tuning of the multigrid solver, as well as for selecting the optimal number of cells per processor.

  5. Fast Evaluation of Segmentation Quality with Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In digital image processing and computer vision, a fairly frequent task is the performance comparison of different algorithms on enormous image databases. This task is usually time-consuming and tedious, such that any kind of tool to simplify this work is welcome. To achieve an efficient and more practical handling of a normally tedious evaluation, we implemented the automatic detection system, with the help of MATLAB®’s Parallel Computing Toolbox™. The key parts of the system have been parallelized to achieve simultaneous execution and analysis of segmentation algorithms on the one hand and the evaluation of detection accuracy for the nonforested regions, such as a study case, on the other hand. As a positive side effect, CPU usage was reduced and processing time was significantly decreased by 68.54% compared to sequential processing (i.e., executing the system with each algorithm one by one.

  6. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  7. Performing a local reduction operation on a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Faraj, Daniel A.

    2012-12-11

    A parallel computer including compute nodes, each including two reduction processing cores, a network write processing core, and a network read processing core, each processing core assigned an input buffer. Copying, in interleaved chunks by the reduction processing cores, contents of the reduction processing cores' input buffers to an interleaved buffer in shared memory; copying, by one of the reduction processing cores, contents of the network write processing core's input buffer to shared memory; copying, by another of the reduction processing cores, contents of the network read processing core's input buffer to shared memory; and locally reducing in parallel by the reduction processing cores: the contents of the reduction processing core's input buffer; every other interleaved chunk of the interleaved buffer; the copied contents of the network write processing core's input buffer; and the copied contents of the network read processing core's input buffer.

  8. Establishing a group of endpoints in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanhong

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  9. Mechatronic Model Based Computed Torque Control of a Parallel Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Yang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available With high speed and accuracy the parallel manipulators have wide application in the industry, but there still exist many difficulties in the actual control process because of the time-varying and coupling. Unfortunately, the present-day commercial controlles cannot provide satisfying performance for its single axis linear control only. Therefore, aimed at a novel 2-DOF (Degree of Freedom parallel manipulator called Diamond 600, a motor-mechanism coupling dynamic model based control scheme employing the computed torque control algorithm are presented in this paper. First, the integrated dynamic coupling model is deduced, according to equivalent torques between the mechanical structure and the PM (Permanent Magnetism servomotor. Second, computed torque controller is described in detail for the above proposed model. At last, a series of numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to test the effectiveness of the system, and the results verify the favourable tracking ability and robustness.

  10. Mechatronic Model Based Computed Torque Control of a Parallel Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Yang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available With high speed and accuracy the parallel manipulators have wide application in the industry, but there still exist many difficulties in the actual control process because of the time-varying and coupling. Unfortunately, the present-day commercial controlles cannot provide satisfying performance for its single axis linear control only. Therefore, aimed at a novel 2-DOF (Degree of Freedom parallel manipulator called Diamond 600, a motor-mechanism coupling dynamic model based control scheme employing the computed torque control algorithm are presented in this paper. First, the integrated dynamic coupling model is deduced, according to equivalent torques between the mechanical structure and the PM (Permanent Magnetism servomotor. Second, computed torque controller is described in detail for the above proposed model. At last, a series of numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to test the effectiveness of the system, and the results verify the favourable tracking ability and robustness.

  11. A portable implementation of ARPACK for distributed memory parallel architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschhoff, K.J.; Sorensen, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    ARPACK is a package of Fortran 77 subroutines which implement the Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method used for solving large sparse eigenvalue problems. A parallel implementation of ARPACK is presented which is portable across a wide range of distributed memory platforms and requires minimal changes to the serial code. The communication layers used for message passing are the Basic Linear Algebra Communication Subprograms (BLACS) developed for the ScaLAPACK project and Message Passing Interface(MPI).

  12. Distributed computing feasibility in a non-dedicated homogeneous distributed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Scott T.; Sun, Xian-He

    1993-01-01

    The low cost and availability of clusters of workstations have lead researchers to re-explore distributed computing using independent workstations. This approach may provide better cost/performance than tightly coupled multiprocessors. In practice, this approach often utilizes wasted cycles to run parallel jobs. The feasibility of such a non-dedicated parallel processing environment assuming workstation processes have preemptive priority over parallel tasks is addressed. An analytical model is developed to predict parallel job response times. Our model provides insight into how significantly workstation owner interference degrades parallel program performance. A new term task ratio, which relates the parallel task demand to the mean service demand of nonparallel workstation processes, is introduced. It was proposed that task ratio is a useful metric for determining how large the demand of a parallel applications must be in order to make efficient use of a non-dedicated distributed system.

  13. A scalable PC-based parallel computer for lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.; Katz, S.D.; Pappa, G.

    2003-01-01

    A PC-based parallel computer for medium/large scale lattice QCD simulations is suggested. The Eoetvoes Univ., Inst. Theor. Phys. cluster consists of 137 Intel P4-1.7GHz nodes. Gigabit Ethernet cards are used for nearest neighbor communication in a two-dimensional mesh. The sustained performance for dynamical staggered (wilson) quarks on large lattices is around 70(110) GFlops. The exceptional price/performance ratio is below $1/Mflop

  14. A scalable PC-based parallel computer for lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.; Papp, G.

    2002-09-01

    A PC-based parallel computer for medium/large scale lattice QCD simulations is suggested. The Eoetvoes Univ., Inst. Theor. Phys. cluster consists of 137 Intel P4-1.7 GHz nodes. Gigabit Ethernet cards are used for nearest neighbor communication in a two-dimensional mesh. The sustained performance for dynamical staggered(wilson) quarks on large lattices is around 70(110) GFlops. The exceptional price/performance ratio is below $1/Mflop. (orig.)

  15. Domain Decomposition: A Bridge between Nature and Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    B., "Domain Decomposition Algorithms for Indefinite Elliptic Problems," S"IAM Journal of S; cientific and Statistical (’omputing, Vol. 13, 1992, pp...AD-A256 575 NASA Contractor Report 189709 ICASE Report No. 92-44 ICASE DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION: A BRIDGE BETWEEN NATURE AND PARALLEL COMPUTERS DTIC dE...effectively implemented on dis- tributed memory multiprocessors. In 1990 (as reported in Ref. 38 using the tile algo- rithm), a 103,201-unknown 2D elliptic

  16. Noise simulation in cone beam CT imaging with parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, S.-J.; Shaw, Chris C; Chen, Lingyun

    2006-01-01

    We developed a computer noise simulation model for cone beam computed tomography imaging using a general purpose PC cluster. This model uses a mono-energetic x-ray approximation and allows us to investigate three primary performance components, specifically quantum noise, detector blurring and additive system noise. A parallel random number generator based on the Weyl sequence was implemented in the noise simulation and a visualization technique was accordingly developed to validate the quality of the parallel random number generator. In our computer simulation model, three-dimensional (3D) phantoms were mathematically modelled and used to create 450 analytical projections, which were then sampled into digital image data. Quantum noise was simulated and added to the analytical projection image data, which were then filtered to incorporate flat panel detector blurring. Additive system noise was generated and added to form the final projection images. The Feldkamp algorithm was implemented and used to reconstruct the 3D images of the phantoms. A 24 dual-Xeon PC cluster was used to compute the projections and reconstructed images in parallel with each CPU processing 10 projection views for a total of 450 views. Based on this computer simulation system, simulated cone beam CT images were generated for various phantoms and technique settings. Noise power spectra for the flat panel x-ray detector and reconstructed images were then computed to characterize the noise properties. As an example among the potential applications of our noise simulation model, we showed that images of low contrast objects can be produced and used for image quality evaluation

  17. Local rollback for fault-tolerance in parallel computing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A [Yorktown Heights, NY; Chen, Dong [Yorktown Heights, NY; Gara, Alan [Yorktown Heights, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Yorktown Heights, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Yorktown Heights, NY; Ohmacht, Martin [Yorktown Heights, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard [Boeblingen, DE; Sugavanam, Krishnan [Yorktown Heights, NY

    2012-01-24

    A control logic device performs a local rollback in a parallel super computing system. The super computing system includes at least one cache memory device. The control logic device determines a local rollback interval. The control logic device runs at least one instruction in the local rollback interval. The control logic device evaluates whether an unrecoverable condition occurs while running the at least one instruction during the local rollback interval. The control logic device checks whether an error occurs during the local rollback. The control logic device restarts the local rollback interval if the error occurs and the unrecoverable condition does not occur during the local rollback interval.

  18. Distributed computing for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krissinel, Evgeny; Uski, Ville; Lebedev, Andrey; Winn, Martyn; Ballard, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Modern crystallographic computing is characterized by the growing role of automated structure-solution pipelines, which represent complex expert systems utilizing a number of program components, decision makers and databases. They also require considerable computational resources and regular database maintenance, which is increasingly more difficult to provide at the level of individual desktop-based CCP4 setups. On the other hand, there is a significant growth in data processed in the field, which brings up the issue of centralized facilities for keeping both the data collected and structure-solution projects. The paradigm of distributed computing and data management offers a convenient approach to tackling these problems, which has become more attractive in recent years owing to the popularity of mobile devices such as tablets and ultra-portable laptops. In this article, an overview is given of developments by CCP4 aimed at bringing distributed crystallographic computations to a wide crystallographic community.

  19. An Alternative Algorithm for Computing Watersheds on Shared Memory Parallel Computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, A.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper a parallel implementation of a watershed algorithm is proposed. The algorithm can easily be implemented on shared memory parallel computers. The watershed transform is generally considered to be inherently sequential since the discrete watershed of an image is defined using recursion.

  20. Parallel computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients for aeroelastic analysis on a transputer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzke, D. C.; Murthy, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Aeroelastic analysis is mult-disciplinary and computationally expensive. Hence, it can greatly benefit from parallel processing. As part of an effort to develop an aeroelastic analysis capability on a distributed-memory transputer network, a parallel algorithm for the computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients is implemented on a network of 32 transputers. The aerodynamic influence coefficients are calculated using a three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic model and a panel discretization. Efficiencies up to 85 percent are demonstrated using 32 processors. The effects of subtask ordering, problem size and network topology are presented. A comparison to results on a shared-memory computer indicates that higher speedup is achieved on the distributed-memory system.

  1. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  2. Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Daniel A

    2013-07-16

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  3. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristan D; Faraj, Daniel A

    2013-07-09

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and ranges of message sizes so that each algorithm is associated with a separate range of message sizes; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint, the data communications message characterized by a message size; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and ranges, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the message size; and transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  4. Performing an allreduce operation on a plurality of compute nodes of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Ahmad [Rochester, MN

    2012-04-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for performing an allreduce operation on a plurality of compute nodes of a parallel computer. Each compute node includes at least two processing cores. Each processing core has contribution data for the allreduce operation. Performing an allreduce operation on a plurality of compute nodes of a parallel computer includes: establishing one or more logical rings among the compute nodes, each logical ring including at least one processing core from each compute node; performing, for each logical ring, a global allreduce operation using the contribution data for the processing cores included in that logical ring, yielding a global allreduce result for each processing core included in that logical ring; and performing, for each compute node, a local allreduce operation using the global allreduce results for each processing core on that compute node.

  5. Geospatial Applications on Different Parallel and Distributed Systems in enviroGRIDS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodila, D.; Bacu, V.; Gorgan, D.

    2012-04-01

    focus is to integrate in the proposed platform the Cloud infrastructure, which is still a paradigm with critical problems to be solved despite the great efforts and investments. Cloud computing comes as a new way of delivering resources while using a large set of old as well as new technologies and tools for providing the necessary functionalities. The main challenges in the Cloud computing, most of them identified also in the Open Cloud Manifesto 2009, address resource management and monitoring, data and application interoperability and portability, security, scalability, software licensing, etc. We propose a platform able to execute different Geospatial applications on different parallel and distributed architectures such as Grid, Cloud, Multicore, etc. with the possibility of choosing among these architectures based on application characteristics and complexity, user requirements, necessary performances, cost support, etc. The execution redirection on a selected architecture is realized through a specialized component and has the purpose of offering a flexible way in achieving the best performances considering the existing restrictions.

  6. Distributed computing at the SSCL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormell, L.; White, R.

    1993-05-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of high performance, cost- effective RISC/UNIX workstations has been both a blessing and a curse. The blessing of having extremely powerful computing engines available on the desk top is well-known to many users. The user has tremendous freedom, flexibility, and control of his environment. That freedom can, however, become the curse of distributed computing. The user must become a system manager to some extent, he must worry about backups, maintenance, upgrades, etc. Traditionally these activities have been the responsibility of a central computing group. The central computing group, however, may find that it can no linger provide all of the traditional services. With the plethora of workstations now found on so many desktops throughout the entire campus or lab, the central computing group may be swamped by support requests. This talk will address several of these computer support and management issues by discussing the approach taken at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. In addition, a brief review of the future directions of commercial products for distributed computing and management will be given

  7. Distributed computing at the SSCL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormell, L.R.; White, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of high performance, cost-effective RISC/UNIX workstations has been both a blessing and a curse. The blessing of having extremely powerful computing engines available on the desk top is well-known to many users. The user has tremendous freedom, flexibility, and control of his environment. That freedom can, however, become the curse of distributed computing. The user must become a system manager to some extent, he must worry about backups, maintenance, upgrades, etc. Traditionally these activities have been the responsibility of central computing group. The central computing group, however, may find that it can no longer provide all of the traditional services. With the plethora of workstations now found on so many desktops throughout the entire campus or lab, the central computing group may be swamped by support requests. This talk will address several of these computer support and management issues by discussing the approach taken at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). In addition, a brief review of the future directions of commercial products for distributed computing and management will be given

  8. Centaure: an heterogeneous parallel architecture for computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peythieux, Marc

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the architecture of parallel computers dedicated to computer vision. In the first chapter, the problem to be solved is presented, as well as the architecture of the Sympati and Symphonie computers, on which this work is based. The second chapter is about the state of the art of computers and integrated processors that can execute computer vision and image processing codes. The third chapter contains a description of the architecture of Centaure. It has an heterogeneous structure: it is composed of a multiprocessor system based on Analog Devices ADSP21060 Sharc digital signal processor, and of a set of Symphonie computers working in a multi-SIMD fashion. Centaure also has a modular structure. Its basic node is composed of one Symphonie computer, tightly coupled to a Sharc thanks to a dual ported memory. The nodes of Centaure are linked together by the Sharc communication links. The last chapter deals with a performance validation of Centaure. The execution times on Symphonie and on Centaure of a benchmark which is typical of industrial vision, are presented and compared. In the first place, these results show that the basic node of Centaure allows a faster execution than Symphonie, and that increasing the size of the tested computer leads to a better speed-up with Centaure than with Symphonie. In the second place, these results validate the choice of running the low level structure of Centaure in a multi- SIMD fashion. (author) [fr

  9. Portable programming on parallel/networked computers using the Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quealy, Angela; Cole, Gary L.; Blech, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    The Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL) is a subroutine-based library of communication primitives that is callable from applications written in FORTRAN or C. APPL provides a consistent programmer interface to a variety of distributed and shared-memory multiprocessor MIMD machines. The objective of APPL is to minimize the effort required to move parallel applications from one machine to another, or to a network of homogeneous machines. APPL encompasses many of the message-passing primitives that are currently available on commercial multiprocessor systems. This paper describes APPL (version 2.3.1) and its usage, reports the status of the APPL project, and indicates possible directions for the future. Several applications using APPL are discussed, as well as performance and overhead results.

  10. Development of real-time visualization system for Computational Fluid Dynamics on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Otani, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Hideki; Takei, Toshifumi; Doi, Shun

    1998-03-01

    A real-time visualization system for computational fluid dynamics in a network connecting between a parallel computing server and the client terminal was developed. Using the system, a user can visualize the results of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation on the parallel computer as a client terminal during the actual computation on a server. Using GUI (Graphical User Interface) on the client terminal, to user is also able to change parameters of the analysis and visualization during the real-time of the calculation. The system carries out both of CFD simulation and generation of a pixel image data on the parallel computer, and compresses the data. Therefore, the amount of data from the parallel computer to the client is so small in comparison with no compression that the user can enjoy the swift image appearance comfortably. Parallelization of image data generation is based on Owner Computation Rule. GUI on the client is built on Java applet. A real-time visualization is thus possible on the client PC only if Web browser is implemented on it. (author)

  11. Semi-coarsening multigrid methods for parallel computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic coefficients which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched to resolve a boundary layer. There are several different modifications of the standard multigrid algorithm that yield efficient methods for anisotropic problems. In the paper, we investigate the parallel performance of these multigrid algorithms. Multigrid algorithms which work well for anisotropic problems are based on line relaxation and/or semi-coarsening. In semi-coarsening multigrid algorithms a grid is coarsened in only one of the coordinate directions unlike standard or full-coarsening multigrid algorithms where a grid is coarsened in each of the coordinate directions. When both semi-coarsening and line relaxation are used, the resulting multigrid algorithm is robust and automatic in that it requires no knowledge of the nature of the anisotropy. This is the basic multigrid algorithm whose parallel performance we investigate in the paper. The algorithm is currently being implemented on an IBM SP2 and its performance is being analyzed. In addition to looking at the parallel performance of the basic semi-coarsening algorithm, we present algorithmic modifications with potentially better parallel efficiency. One modification reduces the amount of computational work done in relaxation at the expense of using multiple coarse grids. This modification is also being implemented with the aim of comparing its performance to that of the basic semi-coarsening algorithm.

  12. Dynamic stability calculations for power grids employing a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, K

    1982-06-01

    The aim of dynamic contingency calculations in power systems is to estimate the effects of assumed disturbances, such as loss of generation. Due to the large dimensions of the problem these simulations require considerable computing time and costs, to the effect that they are at present only used in a planning state but not for routine checks in power control stations. In view of the homogeneity of the problem, where a multitude of equal generator models, having different parameters, are to be integrated simultaneously, the use of a parallel computer looks very attractive. The results of this study employing a prototype parallel computer (SMS 201) are presented. It consists of up to 128 equal microcomputers bus-connected to a control computer. Each of the modules is programmed to simulate a node of the power grid. Generators with their associated control are represented by models of 13 states each. Passive nodes are complemented by 'phantom'-generators, so that the whole power grid is homogenous, thus removing the need for load-flow-iterations. Programming of microcomputers is essentially performed in FORTRAN.

  13. Connected analysis nuclear-thermo-hydraulic of parallel channels of a BWR reactor using distributed computation; Analisis acoplado nuclear-termohidraulico de canales paralelos de un reactor BWR empleando computacion distribuida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Gonzalez, Rina Margarita

    2007-07-15

    This work consists of the integration of three models previously developed which are described widely in Literature: model of the thermo-hydraulic channel, model of the modal neutronic and the model of the recirculation bows. The tool used for this connection of models is the PVM system, Parallel Virtual Machine that allowed paralleling the model by means of the concept of distributed computation. The purpose of making this connection of models is the one of obtaining a more complete tool than better represents the real configuration and the phenomenology of the nucleus of a BWR reactor, thus obtaining better results. In addition to maintaining the flexibility to improve the resulting model at any time, since the very complex or sophisticated models are difficult to improve being impossible to modify the equations they use and can include variables that are not of primary importance in the tackled problem or that mask relations among variables due to the excess of results. Also maintaining the flexibility for adding component of models or systems of the BWR reactor, all of this following the modeling needs. The Swedish Ringhals power plant was chosen to characterize the resulting connected model for counting on a Stability Benchmark that offers the opportunity to count on real plant data. Besides that in case 9 of cycle 14 of this Benchamark oscillations outside phase appeared, which are from great interest because the detection systems that register the average of the power of the nucleus do not detect them. Additionally in this work the model of the recirculation bows as an independent module is obtained in an individual way, since this model belongs to another work and works connected to the reactor vessel. The model of the recirculation bows is able to model several transients of interest, as it is shown in the Appendix A of this work, among which are found the tripping of recirculation pumps or the transference at low or high velocity of them. The scope of the

  14. Fast electrostatic force calculation on parallel computer clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kia, Amirali; Kim, Daejoong; Darve, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The fast multipole method (FMM) and smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) are well known fast algorithms to evaluate long range electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics and other fields. FMM is a multi-scale method which reduces the computation cost by approximating the potential due to a group of particles at a large distance using few multipole functions. This algorithm scales like O(N) for N particles. SPME algorithm is an O(NlnN) method which is based on an interpolation of the Fourier space part of the Ewald sum and evaluating the resulting convolutions using fast Fourier transform (FFT). Those algorithms suffer from relatively poor efficiency on large parallel machines especially for mid-size problems around hundreds of thousands of atoms. A variation of the FMM, called PWA, based on plane wave expansions is presented in this paper. A new parallelization strategy for PWA, which takes advantage of the specific form of this expansion, is described. Its parallel efficiency is compared with SPME through detail time measurements on two different computer clusters

  15. Particle simulation on a distributed memory highly parallel processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Ikesaka, Morio

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes parallel molecular dynamics simulation of atoms governed by local force interaction. The space in the model is divided into cubic subspaces and mapped to the processor array of the CAP-256, a distributed memory, highly parallel processor developed at Fujitsu Labs. We developed a new technique to avoid redundant calculation of forces between atoms in different processors. Experiments showed the communication overhead was less than 5%, and the idle time due to load imbalance was less than 11% for two model problems which contain 11,532 and 46,128 argon atoms. From the software simulation, the CAP-II which is under development is estimated to be about 45 times faster than CAP-256 and will be able to run the same problem about 40 times faster than Fujitsu's M-380 mainframe when 256 processors are used. (author)

  16. Performance evaluation for compressible flow calculations on five parallel computers of different architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Toshiya.

    1997-03-01

    A two-dimensional explicit Euler solver has been implemented for five MIMD parallel computers of different machine architectures in Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These parallel computers are Fujitsu VPP300, NEC SX-4, CRAY T94, IBM SP2, and Hitachi SR2201. The code was parallelized by several parallelization methods, and a typical compressible flow problem has been calculated for different grid sizes changing the number of processors. Their effective performances for parallel calculations, such as calculation speed, speed-up ratio and parallel efficiency, have been investigated and evaluated. The communication time among processors has been also measured and evaluated. As a result, the differences on the performance and the characteristics between vector-parallel and scalar-parallel computers can be pointed, and it will present the basic data for efficient use of parallel computers and for large scale CFD simulations on parallel computers. (author)

  17. An Introduction to Parallel Cluster Computing Using PVM for Computer Modeling and Simulation of Engineering Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, VN

    2001-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted regarding the ability of clustered personal computers to improve the performance of executing software simulations for solving engineering problems. The power and utility of personal computers continues to grow exponentially through advances in computing capabilities such as newer microprocessors, advances in microchip technologies, electronic packaging, and cost effective gigabyte-size hard drive capacity. Many engineering problems require significant computing power. Therefore, the computation has to be done by high-performance computer systems that cost millions of dollars and need gigabytes of memory to complete the task. Alternately, it is feasible to provide adequate computing in the form of clustered personal computers. This method cuts the cost and size by linking (clustering) personal computers together across a network. Clusters also have the advantage that they can be used as stand-alone computers when they are not operating as a parallel computer. Parallel computing software to exploit clusters is available for computer operating systems like Unix, Windows NT, or Linux. This project concentrates on the use of Windows NT, and the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) system to solve an engineering dynamics problem in Fortran

  18. Overview of Parallel Platforms for Common High Performance Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fryza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with various parallel platforms used for high performance computing in the signal processing domain. More precisely, the methods exploiting the multicores central processing units such as message passing interface and OpenMP are taken into account. The properties of the programming methods are experimentally proved in the application of a fast Fourier transform and a discrete cosine transform and they are compared with the possibilities of MATLAB's built-in functions and Texas Instruments digital signal processors with very long instruction word architectures. New FFT and DCT implementations were proposed and tested. The implementation phase was compared with CPU based computing methods and with possibilities of the Texas Instruments digital signal processing library on C6747 floating-point DSPs. The optimal combination of computing methods in the signal processing domain and new, fast routines' implementation is proposed as well.

  19. Parallel computation of automatic differentiation applied to magnetic field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkins, R.L.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1994-09-01

    The author presents a parallelization of an accelerator physics application to simulate magnetic field in three dimensions. The problem involves the evaluation of high order derivatives with respect to two variables of a multivariate function. Automatic differentiation software had been used with some success, but the computation time was prohibitive. The implementation runs on several platforms, including a network of workstations using PVM, a MasPar using MPFortran, and a CM-5 using CMFortran. A careful examination of the code led to several optimizations that improved its serial performance by a factor of 8.7. The parallelization produced further improvements, especially on the MasPar with a speedup factor of 620. As a result a problem that took six days on a SPARC 10/41 now runs in minutes on the MasPar, making it feasible for physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to simulate larger magnets

  20. Parallel computation of transverse wakes in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Xiaowei; Ko, Kwok.

    1996-11-01

    SLAC has proposed the detuned structure (DS) as one possible design to control the emittance growth of long bunch trains due to transverse wakefields in the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The DS consists of 206 cells with tapering from cell to cell of the order of few microns to provide Gaussian detuning of the dipole modes. The decoherence of these modes leads to two orders of magnitude reduction in wakefield experienced by the trailing bunch. To model such a large heterogeneous structure realistically is impractical with finite-difference codes using structured grids. The authors have calculated the wakefield in the DS on a parallel computer with a finite-element code using an unstructured grid. The parallel implementation issues are presented along with simulation results that include contributions from higher dipole bands and wall dissipation

  1. Eighth SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing: Final program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This SIAM conference is the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Themes for this conference were: combinatorial optimization; data-parallel languages; large-scale parallel applications; message-passing; molecular modeling; parallel I/O; parallel libraries; parallel software tools; parallel compilers; particle simulations; problem-solving environments; and sparse matrix computations.

  2. High performance parallel computers for science: New developments at the Fermilab advanced computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.

    1988-08-01

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing highly cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 MFlops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction. 10 refs., 7 figs

  3. Simulation of partially coherent light propagation using parallel computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Tiago C.; Rebordão, José M.

    2017-08-01

    Light acquires or loses coherence and coherence is one of the few optical observables. Spectra can be derived from coherence functions and understanding any interferometric experiment is also relying upon coherence functions. Beyond the two limiting cases (full coherence or incoherence) the coherence of light is always partial and it changes with propagation. We have implemented a code to compute the propagation of partially coherent light from the source plane to the observation plane using parallel computing devices (PCDs). In this paper, we restrict the propagation in free space only. To this end, we used the Open Computing Language (OpenCL) and the open-source toolkit PyOpenCL, which gives access to OpenCL parallel computation through Python. To test our code, we chose two coherence source models: an incoherent source and a Gaussian Schell-model source. In the former case, we divided into two different source shapes: circular and rectangular. The results were compared to the theoretical values. Our implemented code allows one to choose between the PyOpenCL implementation and a standard one, i.e using the CPU only. To test the computation time for each implementation (PyOpenCL and standard), we used several computer systems with different CPUs and GPUs. We used powers of two for the dimensions of the cross-spectral density matrix (e.g. 324, 644) and a significant speed increase is observed in the PyOpenCL implementation when compared to the standard one. This can be an important tool for studying new source models.

  4. Cluster implementation for parallel computation within MATLAB software environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Antonio O. de; Dantas, Carlos C.; Charamba, Luiz G. da R.; Souza Neto, Wilson F. de; Melo, Silvio B. Melo; Lima, Emerson A. de O.

    2013-01-01

    A cluster for parallel computation with MATLAB software the COCGT - Cluster for Optimizing Computing in Gamma ray Transmission methods, is implemented. The implementation correspond to creation of a local net of computers, facilities and configurations of software, as well as the accomplishment of cluster tests for determine and optimizing of performance in the data processing. The COCGT implementation was required by data computation from gamma transmission measurements applied to fluid dynamic and tomography reconstruction in a FCC-Fluid Catalytic Cracking cold pilot unity, and simulation data as well. As an initial test the determination of SVD - Singular Values Decomposition - of random matrix with dimension (n , n), n=1000, using the Girco's law modified, revealed that COCGT was faster in comparison to the literature [1] cluster, which is similar and operates at the same conditions. Solution of a system of linear equations provided a new test for the COCGT performance by processing a square matrix with n=10000, computing time was 27 s and for square matrix with n=12000, computation time was 45 s. For determination of the cluster behavior in relation to 'parfor' (parallel for-loop) and 'spmd' (single program multiple data), two codes were used containing those two commands and the same problem: determination of SVD of a square matrix with n= 1000. The execution of codes by means of COCGT proved: 1) for the code with 'parfor', the performance improved with the labs number from 1 to 8 labs; 2) for the code 'spmd', just 1 lab (core) was enough to process and give results in less than 1 s. In similar situation, with the difference that now the SVD will be determined from square matrix with n1500, for code with 'parfor', and n=7000, for code with 'spmd'. That results take to conclusions: 1) for the code with 'parfor', the behavior was the same already described above; 2) for code with 'spmd', the same besides having produced a larger performance, it supports a

  5. Parallel computation of multigroup reactivity coefficient using iterative method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Dewayatna, Winter

    2013-09-01

    One of the research activities to support the commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research target irradiation FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum). FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel in which the nuclear degrees of superimposed high-enriched uranium. FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission. The fission material widely used in the form of kits in the world of nuclear medicine. Irradiation FPM tube reactor core would interfere with performance. One of the disorders comes from changes in flux or reactivity. It is necessary to study a method for calculating safety terrace ongoing configuration changes during the life of the reactor, making the code faster became an absolute necessity. Neutron safety margin for the research reactor can be reused without modification to the calculation of the reactivity of the reactor, so that is an advantage of using perturbation method. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculate at various irradiation positions in some uranium content. This model has a complex computation. Several parallel algorithms with iterative method have been developed for the sparse and big matrix solution. The Black-Red Gauss Seidel Iteration and the power iteration parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculated the criticality and reactivity coeficient. This research was developed code for reactivity calculation which used one of safety analysis with parallel processing. It can be done more quickly and efficiently by utilizing the parallel processing in the multicore computer. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated targets FPM with increment Uranium.

  6. Parallel computations of molecular dynamics trajectories using the stochastic path approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloj, Veaceslav; Elber, Ron

    2000-06-01

    A novel protocol to parallelize molecular dynamics trajectories is discussed and tested on a cluster of PCs running the NT operating system. The new technique does not propagate the solution in small time steps, but uses instead a global optimization of a functional of the whole trajectory. The new approach is especially attractive for parallel and distributed computing and its advantages (and disadvantages) are presented. Two numerical examples are discussed: (a) A conformational transition in a solvated dipeptide, and (b) The R→T conformational transition in solvated hemoglobin.

  7. SPINET: A Parallel Computing Approach to Spine Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Kropf

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in scientitic programming enables us to realize more and more complex applications, and on the other hand, application-driven demands on computing methods and power are continuously growing. Therefore, interdisciplinary approaches become more widely used. The interdisciplinary SPINET project presented in this article applies modern scientific computing tools to biomechanical simulations: parallel computing and symbolic and modern functional programming. The target application is the human spine. Simulations of the spine help us to investigate and better understand the mechanisms of back pain and spinal injury. Two approaches have been used: the first uses the finite element method for high-performance simulations of static biomechanical models, and the second generates a simulation developmenttool for experimenting with different dynamic models. A finite element program for static analysis has been parallelized for the MUSIC machine. To solve the sparse system of linear equations, a conjugate gradient solver (iterative method and a frontal solver (direct method have been implemented. The preprocessor required for the frontal solver is written in the modern functional programming language SML, the solver itself in C, thus exploiting the characteristic advantages of both functional and imperative programming. The speedup analysis of both solvers show very satisfactory results for this irregular problem. A mixed symbolic-numeric environment for rigid body system simulations is presented. It automatically generates C code from a problem specification expressed by the Lagrange formalism using Maple.

  8. A hybrid method for the parallel computation of Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Dan Erik; Li Song; Stokbro, Kurt; Sorensen, Hans Henrik B.; Hansen, Per Christian; Skelboe, Stig; Darve, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Quantum transport models for nanodevices using the non-equilibrium Green's function method require the repeated calculation of the block tridiagonal part of the Green's and lesser Green's function matrices. This problem is related to the calculation of the inverse of a sparse matrix. Because of the large number of times this calculation needs to be performed, this is computationally very expensive even on supercomputers. The classical approach is based on recurrence formulas which cannot be efficiently parallelized. This practically prevents the solution of large problems with hundreds of thousands of atoms. We propose new recurrences for a general class of sparse matrices to calculate Green's and lesser Green's function matrices which extend formulas derived by Takahashi and others. We show that these recurrences may lead to a dramatically reduced computational cost because they only require computing a small number of entries of the inverse matrix. Then, we propose a parallelization strategy for block tridiagonal matrices which involves a combination of Schur complement calculations and cyclic reduction. It achieves good scalability even on problems of modest size.

  9. Large-scale parallel genome assembler over cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arghya Kusum; Koppa, Praveen Kumar; Goswami, Sayan; Platania, Richard; Park, Seung-Jong

    2017-06-01

    The size of high throughput DNA sequencing data has already reached the terabyte scale. To manage this huge volume of data, many downstream sequencing applications started using locality-based computing over different cloud infrastructures to take advantage of elastic (pay as you go) resources at a lower cost. However, the locality-based programming model (e.g. MapReduce) is relatively new. Consequently, developing scalable data-intensive bioinformatics applications using this model and understanding the hardware environment that these applications require for good performance, both require further research. In this paper, we present a de Bruijn graph oriented Parallel Giraph-based Genome Assembler (GiGA), as well as the hardware platform required for its optimal performance. GiGA uses the power of Hadoop (MapReduce) and Giraph (large-scale graph analysis) to achieve high scalability over hundreds of compute nodes by collocating the computation and data. GiGA achieves significantly higher scalability with competitive assembly quality compared to contemporary parallel assemblers (e.g. ABySS and Contrail) over traditional HPC cluster. Moreover, we show that the performance of GiGA is significantly improved by using an SSD-based private cloud infrastructure over traditional HPC cluster. We observe that the performance of GiGA on 256 cores of this SSD-based cloud infrastructure closely matches that of 512 cores of traditional HPC cluster.

  10. A Screen Space GPGPU Surface LIC Algorithm for Distributed Memory Data Parallel Sort Last Rendering Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, Burlen; Karimabadi, Homa; Rortershteyn, Vadim

    2014-07-01

    The surface line integral convolution(LIC) visualization technique produces dense visualization of vector fields on arbitrary surfaces. We present a screen space surface LIC algorithm for use in distributed memory data parallel sort last rendering infrastructures. The motivations for our work are to support analysis of datasets that are too large to fit in the main memory of a single computer and compatibility with prevalent parallel scientific visualization tools such as ParaView and VisIt. By working in screen space using OpenGL we can leverage the computational power of GPUs when they are available and run without them when they are not. We address efficiency and performance issues that arise from the transformation of data from physical to screen space by selecting an alternate screen space domain decomposition. We analyze the algorithm's scaling behavior with and without GPUs on two high performance computing systems using data from turbulent plasma simulations.

  11. Routing performance analysis and optimization within a massively parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen

    2013-04-16

    An apparatus, program product and method optimize the operation of a massively parallel computer system by, in part, receiving actual performance data concerning an application executed by the plurality of interconnected nodes, and analyzing the actual performance data to identify an actual performance pattern. A desired performance pattern may be determined for the application, and an algorithm may be selected from among a plurality of algorithms stored within a memory, the algorithm being configured to achieve the desired performance pattern based on the actual performance data.

  12. Work-Efficient Parallel Skyline Computation for the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden; Chester, Sean; Assent, Ira

    2015-01-01

    offers the potential for parallelizing skyline computation across thousands of cores. However, attempts to port skyline algorithms to the GPU have prioritized throughput and failed to outperform sequential algorithms. In this paper, we introduce a new skyline algorithm, designed for the GPU, that uses...... a global, static partitioning scheme. With the partitioning, we can permit controlled branching to exploit transitive relationships and avoid most point-to-point comparisons. The result is a non-traditional GPU algorithm, SkyAlign, that prioritizes work-effciency and respectable throughput, rather than...

  13. Parameters that affect parallel processing for computational electromagnetic simulation codes on high performance computing clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hongsik

    What is the impact of multicore and associated advanced technologies on computational software for science? Most researchers and students have multicore laptops or desktops for their research and they need computing power to run computational software packages. Computing power was initially derived from Central Processing Unit (CPU) clock speed. That changed when increases in clock speed became constrained by power requirements. Chip manufacturers turned to multicore CPU architectures and associated technological advancements to create the CPUs for the future. Most software applications benefited by the increased computing power the same way that increases in clock speed helped applications run faster. However, for Computational ElectroMagnetics (CEM) software developers, this change was not an obvious benefit - it appeared to be a detriment. Developers were challenged to find a way to correctly utilize the advancements in hardware so that their codes could benefit. The solution was parallelization and this dissertation details the investigation to address these challenges. Prior to multicore CPUs, advanced computer technologies were compared with the performance using benchmark software and the metric was FLoting-point Operations Per Seconds (FLOPS) which indicates system performance for scientific applications that make heavy use of floating-point calculations. Is FLOPS an effective metric for parallelized CEM simulation tools on new multicore system? Parallel CEM software needs to be benchmarked not only by FLOPS but also by the performance of other parameters related to type and utilization of the hardware, such as CPU, Random Access Memory (RAM), hard disk, network, etc. The codes need to be optimized for more than just FLOPs and new parameters must be included in benchmarking. In this dissertation, the parallel CEM software named High Order Basis Based Integral Equation Solver (HOBBIES) is introduced. This code was developed to address the needs of the

  14. Parallel Implementation of Triangular Cellular Automata for Computing Two-Dimensional Elastodynamic Response on Arbitrary Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leamy, Michael J.; Springer, Adam C.

    In this research we report parallel implementation of a Cellular Automata-based simulation tool for computing elastodynamic response on complex, two-dimensional domains. Elastodynamic simulation using Cellular Automata (CA) has recently been presented as an alternative, inherently object-oriented technique for accurately and efficiently computing linear and nonlinear wave propagation in arbitrarily-shaped geometries. The local, autonomous nature of the method should lead to straight-forward and efficient parallelization. We address this notion on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) hardware using a Java-based object-oriented CA code implementing triangular state machines (i.e., automata) and the MPI bindings written in Java (MPJ Express). We use MPJ Express to reconfigure our existing CA code to distribute a domain's automata to cores present on a dual quad-core shared-memory system (eight total processors). We note that this message passing parallelization strategy is directly applicable to computer clustered computing, which will be the focus of follow-on research. Results on the shared memory platform indicate nearly-ideal, linear speed-up. We conclude that the CA-based elastodynamic simulator is easily configured to run in parallel, and yields excellent speed-up on SMP hardware.

  15. Representing and computing regular languages on massively parallel networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.I.; O' Sullivan, J.A. (Electronic Systems and Research Lab., of Electrical Engineering, Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (US)); Boysam, B. (Dept. of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (US)); Smith, K.R. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (US))

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a general method for incorporating rule-based constraints corresponding to regular languages into stochastic inference problems, thereby allowing for a unified representation of stochastic and syntactic pattern constraints. The authors' approach first established the formal connection of rules to Chomsky grammars, and generalizes the original work of Shannon on the encoding of rule-based channel sequences to Markov chains of maximum entropy. This maximum entropy probabilistic view leads to Gibb's representations with potentials which have their number of minima growing at precisely the exponential rate that the language of deterministically constrained sequences grow. These representations are coupled to stochastic diffusion algorithms, which sample the language-constrained sequences by visiting the energy minima according to the underlying Gibbs' probability law. The coupling to stochastic search methods yields the all-important practical result that fully parallel stochastic cellular automata may be derived to generate samples from the rule-based constraint sets. The production rules and neighborhood state structure of the language of sequences directly determines the necessary connection structures of the required parallel computing surface. Representations of this type have been mapped to the DAP-510 massively-parallel processor consisting of 1024 mesh-connected bit-serial processing elements for performing automated segmentation of electron-micrograph images.

  16. Design and simulation of parallel and distributed architectures for images processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirson, Alain

    1990-01-01

    The exploitation of visual information requires special computers. The diversity of operations and the Computing power involved bring about structures founded on the concepts of concurrency and distributed processing. This work identifies a vision computer with an association of dedicated intelligent entities, exchanging messages according to the model of parallelism introduced by the language Occam. It puts forward an architecture of the 'enriched processor network' type. It consists of a classical multiprocessor structure where each node is provided with specific devices. These devices perform processing tasks as well as inter-nodes dialogues. Such an architecture benefits from the homogeneity of multiprocessor networks and the power of dedicated resources. Its implementation corresponds to that of a distributed structure, tasks being allocated to each Computing element. This approach culminates in an original architecture called ATILA. This modular structure is based on a transputer network supplied with vision dedicated co-processors and powerful communication devices. (author) [fr

  17. A 3D gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of fusion plasma microturbulence on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    One of the grand challenge problems now supported by HPCC is the Numerical Tokamak Project. A goal of this project is the study of low-frequency micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas, which are believed to cause energy loss via turbulent thermal transport across the magnetic field lines. An important tool in this study is gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. Gyrokinetic, as opposed to fully-kinetic, methods are particularly well suited to the task because they are optimized to study the frequency and wavelength domain of the microinstabilities. Furthermore, many researchers now employ low-noise delta(f) methods to greatly reduce statistical noise by modelling only the perturbation of the gyrokinetic distribution function from a fixed background, not the entire distribution function. In spite of the increased efficiency of these improved algorithms over conventional PIC algorithms, gyrokinetic PIC simulations of tokamak micro-turbulence are still highly demanding of computer power--even fully-vectorized codes on vector supercomputers. For this reason, we have worked for several years to redevelop these codes on massively parallel computers. We have developed 3D gyrokinetic PIC simulation codes for SIMD and MIMD parallel processors, using control-parallel, data-parallel, and domain-decomposition message-passing (DDMP) programming paradigms. This poster summarizes our earlier work on codes for the Connection Machine and BBN TC2000 and our development of a generic DDMP code for distributed-memory parallel machines. We discuss the memory-access issues which are of key importance in writing parallel PIC codes, with special emphasis on issues peculiar to gyrokinetic PIC. We outline the domain decompositions in our new DDMP code and discuss the interplay of different domain decompositions suited for the particle-pushing and field-solution components of the PIC algorithm.

  18. Parallel Computer System for 3D Visualization Stereo on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oraiqat, Anas M.; Zori, Sergii A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes the organization of a parallel computer system based on Graphic Processors Unit (GPU) for 3D stereo image synthesis. The development is based on the modified ray tracing method developed by the authors for fast search of tracing rays intersections with scene objects. The system allows significant increase in the productivity for the 3D stereo synthesis of photorealistic quality. The generalized procedure of 3D stereo image synthesis on the Graphics Processing Unit/Graphics Processing Clusters (GPU/GPC) is proposed. The efficiency of the proposed solutions by GPU implementation is compared with single-threaded and multithreaded implementations on the CPU. The achieved average acceleration in multi-thread implementation on the test GPU and CPU is about 7.5 and 1.6 times, respectively. Studying the influence of choosing the size and configuration of the computational Compute Unified Device Archi-tecture (CUDA) network on the computational speed shows the importance of their correct selection. The obtained experimental estimations can be significantly improved by new GPUs with a large number of processing cores and multiprocessors, as well as optimized configuration of the computing CUDA network.

  19. Parallel computing and molecular dynamics of biological membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Penna, G.; Letardi, S.; Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.; Rossi, G.C.; Salina, G.

    1998-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the general question of the portability of molecular dynamics codes for diffusive systems on parallel computers of the APE family. The intrinsic single precision of the today available platforms does not seem to affect the numerical accuracy of the simulations, while the absence of integer addressing from CPU to individual nodes puts strong constraints on possible programming strategies. Liquids can be satisfactorily simulated using the ''systolic'' method. For more complex systems, like the biological ones at which we are ultimately interested in, the ''domain decomposition'' approach is best suited to beat the quadratic growth of the inter-molecular computational time with the number of atoms of the system. The promising perspectives of using this strategy for extensive simulations of lipid bilayers are briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Concurrent computation of attribute filters on shared memory parallel machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.; Gao, Hui; Hesselink, Wim H.; Jonker, Jan-Eppo; Meijster, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Morphological attribute filters have not previously been parallelized mainly because they are both global and nonseparable. We propose a parallel algorithm that achieves efficient parallelism for a large class of attribute filters, including attribute openings, closings, thinnings, and thickenings,

  1. A parallel simulated annealing algorithm for standard cell placement on a hypercube computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark Howard

    1987-01-01

    A parallel version of a simulated annealing algorithm is presented which is targeted to run on a hypercube computer. A strategy for mapping the cells in a two dimensional area of a chip onto processors in an n-dimensional hypercube is proposed such that both small and large distance moves can be applied. Two types of moves are allowed: cell exchanges and cell displacements. The computation of the cost function in parallel among all the processors in the hypercube is described along with a distributed data structure that needs to be stored in the hypercube to support parallel cost evaluation. A novel tree broadcasting strategy is used extensively in the algorithm for updating cell locations in the parallel environment. Studies on the performance of the algorithm on example industrial circuits show that it is faster and gives better final placement results than the uniprocessor simulated annealing algorithms. An improved uniprocessor algorithm is proposed which is based on the improved results obtained from parallelization of the simulated annealing algorithm.

  2. Simple, parallel, high-performance virtual machines for extreme computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokoufe Nejad, Bijan; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Jurgen

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a high-performance virtual machine (VM) written in a numerically fast language like Fortran or C to evaluate very large expressions. We discuss the general concept of how to perform computations in terms of a VM and present specifically a VM that is able to compute tree-level cross sections for any number of external legs, given the corresponding byte code from the optimal matrix element generator, O'Mega. Furthermore, this approach allows to formulate the parallel computation of a single phase space point in a simple and obvious way. We analyze hereby the scaling behaviour with multiple threads as well as the benefits and drawbacks that are introduced with this method. Our implementation of a VM can run faster than the corresponding native, compiled code for certain processes and compilers, especially for very high multiplicities, and has in general runtimes in the same order of magnitude. By avoiding the tedious compile and link steps, which may fail for source code files of gigabyte sizes, new processes or complex higher order corrections that are currently out of reach could be evaluated with a VM given enough computing power.

  3. Multiscale Methods, Parallel Computation, and Neural Networks for Real-Time Computer Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiti, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents new algorithms for low and intermediate level computer vision. The guiding ideas in the presented approach are those of hierarchical and adaptive processing, concurrent computation, and supervised learning. Processing of the visual data at different resolutions is used not only to reduce the amount of computation necessary to reach the fixed point, but also to produce a more accurate estimation of the desired parameters. The presented adaptive multiple scale technique is applied to the problem of motion field estimation. Different parts of the image are analyzed at a resolution that is chosen in order to minimize the error in the coefficients of the differential equations to be solved. Tests with video-acquired images show that velocity estimation is more accurate over a wide range of motion with respect to the homogeneous scheme. In some cases introduction of explicit discontinuities coupled to the continuous variables can be used to avoid propagation of visual information from areas corresponding to objects with different physical and/or kinematic properties. The human visual system uses concurrent computation in order to process the vast amount of visual data in "real -time." Although with different technological constraints, parallel computation can be used efficiently for computer vision. All the presented algorithms have been implemented on medium grain distributed memory multicomputers with a speed-up approximately proportional to the number of processors used. A simple two-dimensional domain decomposition assigns regions of the multiresolution pyramid to the different processors. The inter-processor communication needed during the solution process is proportional to the linear dimension of the assigned domain, so that efficiency is close to 100% if a large region is assigned to each processor. Finally, learning algorithms are shown to be a viable technique to engineer computer vision systems for different applications starting from

  4. Concurrent particle-in-cell plasma simulation on a multi-transputer parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, A.N.; Jethra, A.; Patel, Kartik

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the parallelization of a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) plasma simulation code on a multi-transputer parallel computer. The algorithm used in the parallelization of the PIC method is described. The decomposition schemes related to the distribution of the particles among the processors are discussed. The implementation of the algorithm on a transputer network connected as a torus is presented. The solutions of the problems related to global communication of data are presented in the form of a set of generalized communication functions. The performance of the program as a function of data size and the number of transputers show that the implementation is scalable and represents an effective way of achieving high performance at acceptable cost. (author). 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs., appendices

  5. High performance statistical computing with parallel R: applications to biology and climate modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samatova, Nagiza F; Branstetter, Marcia; Ganguly, Auroop R; Hettich, Robert; Khan, Shiraj; Kora, Guruprasad; Li, Jiangtian; Ma, Xiaosong; Pan, Chongle; Shoshani, Arie; Yoginath, Srikanth

    2006-01-01

    Ultrascale computing and high-throughput experimental technologies have enabled the production of scientific data about complex natural phenomena. With this opportunity, comes a new problem - the massive quantities of data so produced. Answers to fundamental questions about the nature of those phenomena remain largely hidden in the produced data. The goal of this work is to provide a scalable high performance statistical data analysis framework to help scientists perform interactive analyses of these raw data to extract knowledge. Towards this goal we have been developing an open source parallel statistical analysis package, called Parallel R, that lets scientists employ a wide range of statistical analysis routines on high performance shared and distributed memory architectures without having to deal with the intricacies of parallelizing these routines

  6. Parallel processing using an optical delay-based reservoir computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Delay systems subject to delayed optical feedback have recently shown great potential in solving computationally hard tasks. By implementing a neuro-inspired computational scheme relying on the transient response to optical data injection, high processing speeds have been demonstrated. However, reservoir computing systems based on delay dynamics discussed in the literature are designed by coupling many different stand-alone components which lead to bulky, lack of long-term stability, non-monolithic systems. Here we numerically investigate the possibility of implementing reservoir computing schemes based on semiconductor ring lasers. Semiconductor ring lasers are semiconductor lasers where the laser cavity consists of a ring-shaped waveguide. SRLs are highly integrable and scalable, making them ideal candidates for key components in photonic integrated circuits. SRLs can generate light in two counterpropagating directions between which bistability has been demonstrated. We demonstrate that two independent machine learning tasks , even with different nature of inputs with different input data signals can be simultaneously computed using a single photonic nonlinear node relying on the parallelism offered by photonics. We illustrate the performance on simultaneous chaotic time series prediction and a classification of the Nonlinear Channel Equalization. We take advantage of different directional modes to process individual tasks. Each directional mode processes one individual task to mitigate possible crosstalk between the tasks. Our results indicate that prediction/classification with errors comparable to the state-of-the-art performance can be obtained even with noise despite the two tasks being computed simultaneously. We also find that a good performance is obtained for both tasks for a broad range of the parameters. The results are discussed in detail in [Nguimdo et al., IEEE Trans. Neural Netw. Learn. Syst. 26, pp. 3301-3307, 2015

  7. Computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for shared-memory parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2015-09-01

    The computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation is investigated for three types of current shared-memory parallel computer devices: many integrated core (MIC) processors, graphics processing units (GPUs), and multi-core CPUs. We are especially interested in efficient shared-memory allocation methods for each chipset, because the efficient data access patterns differ between compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming for GPUs and OpenMP programming for MIC processors and multi-core CPUs. We first introduce several parallel implementation techniques for the SPH code, and then examine these on our target computer architectures to determine the most effective algorithms for each processor unit. In addition, we evaluate the effective computing performance and power efficiency of the SPH simulation on each architecture, as these are critical metrics for overall performance in a multi-device environment. In our benchmark test, the GPU is found to produce the best arithmetic performance as a standalone device unit, and gives the most efficient power consumption. The multi-core CPU obtains the most effective computing performance. The computational speed of the MIC processor on Xeon Phi approached that of two Xeon CPUs. This indicates that using MICs is an attractive choice for existing SPH codes on multi-core CPUs parallelized by OpenMP, as it gains computational acceleration without the need for significant changes to the source code.

  8. Modelling distribution of evaporating CO2 in parallel minichannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Wiebke; Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Elmegaard, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The effects of airflow non-uniformity and uneven inlet qualities on the performance of a minichannel evaporator with parallel channels, using CO2 as refrigerant, are investigated numerically. For this purpose a one-dimensional discretised steady-state model was developed, applying well-known empi......The effects of airflow non-uniformity and uneven inlet qualities on the performance of a minichannel evaporator with parallel channels, using CO2 as refrigerant, are investigated numerically. For this purpose a one-dimensional discretised steady-state model was developed, applying well...... to maldistribution of the refrigerant and considerable capacity reduction of the evaporator. Uneven inlet ualities to the different channels show only minor effects on the refrigerant distribution and evaporator capacity as long as the channels are vertically oriented with CO2 flowing upwards. For horizontal...... channels capacity reductions are found for both non-uniform airflow and uneven inlet qualities. For horizontal minichannels the results are very similar to those obtained using R134a as refrigerant....

  9. 11th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud and Internet Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Barolli, Leonard; Amato, Flora

    2017-01-01

    P2P, Grid, Cloud and Internet computing technologies have been very fast established as breakthrough paradigms for solving complex problems by enabling aggregation and sharing of an increasing variety of distributed computational resources at large scale. The aim of this volume is to provide latest research findings, innovative research results, methods and development techniques from both theoretical and practical perspectives related to P2P, Grid, Cloud and Internet computing as well as to reveal synergies among such large scale computing paradigms. This proceedings volume presents the results of the 11th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud And Internet Computing (3PGCIC-2016), held November 5-7, 2016, at Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea.

  10. In-cylinder diesel spray combustion simulations using parallel computation: A performance benchmarking study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A performance benchmarking exercise is conducted for diesel combustion simulations. ► The reduced chemical mechanism shows its advantages over base and skeletal models. ► High efficiency and great reduction of CPU runtime are achieved through 4-node solver. ► Increasing ISAT memory from 0.1 to 2 GB reduces the CPU runtime by almost 35%. ► Combustion and soot processes are predicted well with minimal computational cost. - Abstract: In the present study, in-cylinder diesel combustion simulation was performed with parallel processing on an Intel Xeon Quad-Core platform to allow both fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics of the surrogate diesel fuel model to be solved simultaneously on multiple processors. Here, Cartesian Z-Coordinate was selected as the most appropriate partitioning algorithm since it computationally bisects the domain such that the dynamic load associated with fuel particle tracking was evenly distributed during parallel computations. Other variables examined included number of compute nodes, chemistry sizes and in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) parameters. Based on the performance benchmarking test conducted, parallel configuration of 4-compute node was found to reduce the computational runtime most efficiently whereby a parallel efficiency of up to 75.4% was achieved. The simulation results also indicated that accuracy level was insensitive to the number of partitions or the partitioning algorithms. The effect of reducing the number of species on computational runtime was observed to be more significant than reducing the number of reactions. Besides, the study showed that an increase in the ISAT maximum storage of up to 2 GB reduced the computational runtime by 50%. Also, the ISAT error tolerance of 10 −3 was chosen to strike a balance between results accuracy and computational runtime. The optimised parameters in parallel processing and ISAT, as well as the use of the in-house reduced chemistry model allowed accurate

  11. Parallel SN algorithms in shared- and distributed-memory environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighat, Alireza; Hunter, Melissa A.; Mattis, Ronald E.

    1995-01-01

    Different 2-D spatial domain partitioning Sn transport theory algorithms have been developed on the basis of the Block-Jacobi iterative scheme. These algorithms have been incorporated into TWOTRAN-II, and tested on a shared-memory CRAY Y-MP C90 and a distributed-memory IBM SP1. For a series of fixed source r-z geometry homogeneous problems, parallel efficiencies in a range of 50-90% are achieved on the C90 with 6 processors, and lower values (20-60%) are obtained on the SP1. It is demonstrated that better performance is attainable if one addresses issues such as convergence rate, load-balancing, and granularity for both architectures, as well as message passing (network bandwidth and latency) for SP1. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs

  12. Pacing a data transfer operation between compute nodes on a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN

    2011-09-13

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for pacing a data transfer between compute nodes on a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin compute node, a chunk of an application message to a target compute node; sending, by the origin compute node, a pacing request to a target direct memory access (`DMA`) engine on the target compute node using a remote get DMA operation; determining, by the origin compute node, whether a pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine; and transferring, by the origin compute node, a next chunk of the application message if the pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine.

  13. Nordic Summer School on Parallel Computing in Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Pardalos, Panos; Storøy, Sverre

    1997-01-01

    During the last three decades, breakthroughs in computer technology have made a tremendous impact on optimization. In particular, parallel computing has made it possible to solve larger and computationally more difficult prob­ lems. This volume contains mainly lecture notes from a Nordic Summer School held at the Linkoping Institute of Technology, Sweden in August 1995. In order to make the book more complete, a few authors were invited to contribute chapters that were not part of the course on this first occasion. The purpose of this Nordic course in advanced studies was three-fold. One goal was to introduce the students to the new achievements in a new and very active field, bring them close to world leading researchers, and strengthen their competence in an area with internationally explosive rate of growth. A second goal was to strengthen the bonds between students from different Nordic countries, and to encourage collaboration and joint research ventures over the borders. In this respect, the course bui...

  14. Efficient relaxed-Jacobi smoothers for multigrid on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-03-01

    In this Technical Note, we present a family of Jacobi-based multigrid smoothers suitable for the solution of discretized elliptic equations. These smoothers are based on the idea of scheduled-relaxation Jacobi proposed recently by Yang & Mittal (2014) [18] and employ two or three successive relaxed Jacobi iterations with relaxation factors derived so as to maximize the smoothing property of these iterations. The performance of these new smoothers measured in terms of convergence acceleration and computational workload, is assessed for multi-domain implementations typical of parallelized solvers, and compared to the lexicographic point Gauss-Seidel smoother. The tests include the geometric multigrid method on structured grids as well as the algebraic grid method on unstructured grids. The tests demonstrate that unlike Gauss-Seidel, the convergence of these Jacobi-based smoothers is unaffected by domain decomposition, and furthermore, they outperform the lexicographic Gauss-Seidel by factors that increase with domain partition count.

  15. Optimized collectives using a DMA on a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong [Croton On Hudson, NY; Gabor, Dozsa [Ardsley, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger,; Phillip, [Cortlandt Manor, NY

    2011-02-08

    Optimizing collective operations using direct memory access controller on a parallel computer, in one aspect, may comprise establishing a byte counter associated with a direct memory access controller for each submessage in a message. The byte counter includes at least a base address of memory and a byte count associated with a submessage. A byte counter associated with a submessage is monitored to determine whether at least a block of data of the submessage has been received. The block of data has a predetermined size, for example, a number of bytes. The block is processed when the block has been fully received, for example, when the byte count indicates all bytes of the block have been received. The monitoring and processing may continue for all blocks in all submessages in the message.

  16. Application of parallel computing techniques to a large-scale reservoir simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Ding, Chris; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    Even with the continual advances made in both computational algorithms and computer hardware used in reservoir modeling studies, large-scale simulation of fluid and heat flow in heterogeneous reservoirs remains a challenge. The problem commonly arises from intensive computational requirement for detailed modeling investigations of real-world reservoirs. This paper presents the application of a massive parallel-computing version of the TOUGH2 code developed for performing large-scale field simulations. As an application example, the parallelized TOUGH2 code is applied to develop a three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model simulating flow of moisture, gas, and heat in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach employs refined spatial discretization to represent the heterogeneous fractured tuffs of the system, using more than a million 3-D gridblocks. The problem of two-phase flow and heat transfer within the model domain leads to a total of 3,226,566 linear equations to be solved per Newton iteration. The simulation is conducted on a Cray T3E-900, a distributed-memory massively parallel computer. Simulation results indicate that the parallel computing technique, as implemented in the TOUGH2 code, is very efficient. The reliability and accuracy of the model results have been demonstrated by comparing them to those of small-scale (coarse-grid) models. These comparisons show that simulation results obtained with the refined grid provide more detailed predictions of the future flow conditions at the site, aiding in the assessment of proposed repository performance

  17. Accelerating Astronomy & Astrophysics in the New Era of Parallel Computing: GPUs, Phi and Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric B.; Dindar, Saleh; Peters, Jorg

    2015-08-01

    The realism of astrophysical simulations and statistical analyses of astronomical data are set by the available computational resources. Thus, astronomers and astrophysicists are constantly pushing the limits of computational capabilities. For decades, astronomers benefited from massive improvements in computational power that were driven primarily by increasing clock speeds and required relatively little attention to details of the computational hardware. For nearly a decade, increases in computational capabilities have come primarily from increasing the degree of parallelism, rather than increasing clock speeds. Further increases in computational capabilities will likely be led by many-core architectures such as Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and Intel Xeon Phi. Successfully harnessing these new architectures, requires significantly more understanding of the hardware architecture, cache hierarchy, compiler capabilities and network network characteristics.I will provide an astronomer's overview of the opportunities and challenges provided by modern many-core architectures and elastic cloud computing. The primary goal is to help an astronomical audience understand what types of problems are likely to yield more than order of magnitude speed-ups and which problems are unlikely to parallelize sufficiently efficiently to be worth the development time and/or costs.I will draw on my experience leading a team in developing the Swarm-NG library for parallel integration of large ensembles of small n-body systems on GPUs, as well as several smaller software projects. I will share lessons learned from collaborating with computer scientists, including both technical and soft skills. Finally, I will discuss the challenges of training the next generation of astronomers to be proficient in this new era of high-performance computing, drawing on experience teaching a graduate class on High-Performance Scientific Computing for Astrophysics and organizing a 2014 advanced summer

  18. An Accurate liver segmentation method using parallel computing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbasher, Eiman Mohammed Khalied

    2014-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones muscles, fat and organs CT scans are more detailed than standard x-rays. CT scans may be done with or without "contrast Contrast refers to a substance taken by mouth and/ or injected into an intravenous (IV) line that causes the particular organ or tissue under study to be seen more clearly. CT scan of the liver and biliary tract are used in the diagnosis of many diseases in the abdomen structures, particularly when another type of examination, such as X-rays, physical examination, and ultra sound is not conclusive. Unfortunately, the presence of noise and artifact in the edges and fine details in the CT images limit the contrast resolution and make diagnostic procedure more difficult. This experimental study was conducted at the College of Medical Radiological Science, Sudan University of Science and Technology and Fidel Specialist Hospital. The sample of study was included 50 patients. The main objective of this research was to study an accurate liver segmentation method using a parallel computing algorithm, and to segment liver and adjacent organs using image processing technique. The main technique of segmentation used in this study was watershed transform. The scope of image processing and analysis applied to medical application is to improve the quality of the acquired image and extract quantitative information from medical image data in an efficient and accurate way. The results of this technique agreed wit the results of Jarritt et al, (2010), Kratchwil et al, (2010), Jover et al, (2011), Yomamoto et al, (1996), Cai et al (1999), Saudha and Jayashree (2010) who used different segmentation filtering based on the methods of enhancing the computed tomography images. Anther

  19. Parallel discrete ordinates algorithms on distributed and common memory systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienke, B.R.; Hiromoto, R.E.; Brickner, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The S/sub n/ algorithm employs iterative techniques in solving the linear Boltzmann equation. These methods, both ordered and chaotic, were compared on both the Denelcor HEP and the Intel hypercube. Strategies are linked to the organization and accessibility of memory (common memory versus distributed memory architectures), with common concern for acquisition of global information. Apart from this, the inherent parallelism of the algorithm maps directly onto the two architectures. Results comparing execution times, speedup, and efficiency are based on a representative 16-group (full upscatter and downscatter) sample problem. Calculations were performed on both the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Denelcor HEP and the LANL Intel hypercube. The Denelcor HEP is a 64-bit multi-instruction, multidate MIMD machine consisting of up to 16 process execution modules (PEMs), each capable of executing 64 processes concurrently. Each PEM can cooperate on a job, or run several unrelated jobs, and share a common global memory through a crossbar switch. The Intel hypercube, on the other hand, is a distributed memory system composed of 128 processing elements, each with its own local memory. Processing elements are connected in a nearest-neighbor hypercube configuration and sharing of data among processors requires execution of explicit message-passing constructs

  20. Hybrid shared/distributed parallelism for 3D characteristics transport solvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, M.; Roy, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a new hybrid parallel model for solving large-scale 3-dimensional neutron transport problems used in nuclear reactor simulations. Large heterogeneous reactor problems, like the ones that occurs when simulating Candu cores, have remained computationally intensive and impractical for routine applications on single-node or even vector computers. Based on the characteristics method, this new model is designed to solve the transport equation after distributing the calculation load on a network of shared memory multi-processors. The tracks are either generated on the fly at each characteristics sweep or stored in sequential files. The load balancing is taken into account by estimating the calculation load of tracks and by distributing batches of uniform load on each node of the network. Moreover, the communication overhead can be predicted after benchmarking the latency and bandwidth using appropriate network test suite. These models are useful for predicting the performance of the parallel applications and to analyze the scalability of the parallel systems. (authors)

  1. Design of multiple sequence alignment algorithms on parallel, distributed memory supercomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Philip C; Goscinski, Andrzej; Holt, Kathryn; Inouye, Michael; Ghoting, Amol; Makarychev, Konstantin; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of comparing two or more genomes that have undergone recombination and substantial amounts of segmental loss and gain has recently been addressed for small numbers of genomes. However, datasets of hundreds of genomes are now common and their sizes will only increase in the future. Multiple sequence alignment of hundreds of genomes remains an intractable problem due to quadratic increases in compute time and memory footprint. To date, most alignment algorithms are designed for commodity clusters without parallelism. Hence, we propose the design of a multiple sequence alignment algorithm on massively parallel, distributed memory supercomputers to enable research into comparative genomics on large data sets. Following the methodology of the sequential progressiveMauve algorithm, we design data structures including sequences and sorted k-mer lists on the IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer (BG/P). Preliminary results show that we can reduce the memory footprint so that we can potentially align over 250 bacterial genomes on a single BG/P compute node. We verify our results on a dataset of E.coli, Shigella and S.pneumoniae genomes. Our implementation returns results matching those of the original algorithm but in 1/2 the time and with 1/4 the memory footprint for scaffold building. In this study, we have laid the basis for multiple sequence alignment of large-scale datasets on a massively parallel, distributed memory supercomputer, thus enabling comparison of hundreds instead of a few genome sequences within reasonable time.

  2. Computationally intensive econometrics using a distributed matrix-programming language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornik, Jurgen A; Hendry, David F; Shephard, Neil

    2002-06-15

    This paper reviews the need for powerful computing facilities in econometrics, focusing on concrete problems which arise in financial economics and in macroeconomics. We argue that the profession is being held back by the lack of easy-to-use generic software which is able to exploit the availability of cheap clusters of distributed computers. Our response is to extend, in a number of directions, the well-known matrix-programming interpreted language Ox developed by the first author. We note three possible levels of extensions: (i) Ox with parallelization explicit in the Ox code; (ii) Ox with a parallelized run-time library; and (iii) Ox with a parallelized interpreter. This paper studies and implements the first case, emphasizing the need for deterministic computing in science. We give examples in the context of financial economics and time-series modelling.

  3. Towards distributed multiscale computing for the VPH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Coveney, P.

    2010-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is fundamental to the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) initiative. Most detailed three-dimensional multiscale models lead to prohibitive computational demands. As a possible solution we present MAPPER, a computational science infrastructure for Distributed Multiscale Computing

  4. Parallelized computation for computer simulation of electrocardiograms using personal computers with multi-core CPU and general-purpose GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenfeng; Wei, Daming; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Xin; Yuan, Shizhong

    2010-10-01

    Biological computations like electrocardiological modelling and simulation usually require high-performance computing environments. This paper introduces an implementation of parallel computation for computer simulation of electrocardiograms (ECGs) in a personal computer environment with an Intel CPU of Core (TM) 2 Quad Q6600 and a GPU of Geforce 8800GT, with software support by OpenMP and CUDA. It was tested in three parallelization device setups: (a) a four-core CPU without a general-purpose GPU, (b) a general-purpose GPU plus 1 core of CPU, and (c) a four-core CPU plus a general-purpose GPU. To effectively take advantage of a multi-core CPU and a general-purpose GPU, an algorithm based on load-prediction dynamic scheduling was developed and applied to setting (c). In the simulation with 1600 time steps, the speedup of the parallel computation as compared to the serial computation was 3.9 in setting (a), 16.8 in setting (b), and 20.0 in setting (c). This study demonstrates that a current PC with a multi-core CPU and a general-purpose GPU provides a good environment for parallel computations in biological modelling and simulation studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid optimization of tension distribution for cable-driven parallel manipulators with redundant cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Bo; Shang, Weiwei

    2016-03-01

    The solution of tension distributions is infinite for cable-driven parallel manipulators(CDPMs) with redundant cables. A rapid optimization method for determining the optimal tension distribution is presented. The new optimization method is primarily based on the geometry properties of a polyhedron and convex analysis. The computational efficiency of the optimization method is improved by the designed projection algorithm, and a fast algorithm is proposed to determine which two of the lines are intersected at the optimal point. Moreover, a method for avoiding the operating point on the lower tension limit is developed. Simulation experiments are implemented on a six degree-of-freedom(6-DOF) CDPM with eight cables, and the results indicate that the new method is one order of magnitude faster than the standard simplex method. The optimal distribution of tension distribution is thus rapidly established on real-time by the proposed method.

  6. Parallel computing for homogeneous diffusion and transport equations in neutronics; Calcul parallele pour les equations de diffusion et de transport homogenes en neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinchedez, K

    1999-06-01

    Parallel computing meets the ever-increasing requirements for neutronic computer code speed and accuracy. In this work, two different approaches have been considered. We first parallelized the sequential algorithm used by the neutronics code CRONOS developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission. The algorithm computes the dominant eigenvalue associated with PN simplified transport equations by a mixed finite element method. Several parallel algorithms have been developed on distributed memory machines. The performances of the parallel algorithms have been studied experimentally by implementation on a T3D Cray and theoretically by complexity models. A comparison of various parallel algorithms has confirmed the chosen implementations. We next applied a domain sub-division technique to the two-group diffusion Eigen problem. In the modal synthesis-based method, the global spectrum is determined from the partial spectra associated with sub-domains. Then the Eigen problem is expanded on a family composed, on the one hand, from eigenfunctions associated with the sub-domains and, on the other hand, from functions corresponding to the contribution from the interface between the sub-domains. For a 2-D homogeneous core, this modal method has been validated and its accuracy has been measured. (author)

  7. Iterative algorithms for large sparse linear systems on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Algorithms for assembling in parallel the sparse system of linear equations that result from finite difference or finite element discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations, such as those that arise in structural engineering are developed. Parallel linear stationary iterative algorithms and parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithms are developed for solving these systems. In addition, a model for comparing parallel algorithms on array architectures is developed and results of this model for the algorithms are given.

  8. III - Template Metaprogramming for massively parallel scientific computing - Templates for Iteration; Thread-level Parallelism

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Large scale scientific computing raises questions on different levels ranging from the fomulation of the problems to the choice of the best algorithms and their implementation for a specific platform. There are similarities in these different topics that can be exploited by modern-style C++ template metaprogramming techniques to produce readable, maintainable and generic code. Traditional low-level code tend to be fast but platform-dependent, and it obfuscates the meaning of the algorithm. On the other hand, object-oriented approach is nice to read, but may come with an inherent performance penalty. These lectures aim to present he basics of the Expression Template (ET) idiom which allows us to keep the object-oriented approach without sacrificing performance. We will in particular show to to enhance ET to include SIMD vectorization. We will then introduce techniques for abstracting iteration, and introduce thread-level parallelism for use in heavy data-centric loads. We will show to to apply these methods i...

  9. Distributed control system for parallel-connected DC boost converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven

    2017-08-15

    The disclosed invention is a distributed control system for operating a DC bus fed by disparate DC power sources that service a known or unknown load. The voltage sources vary in v-i characteristics and have time-varying, maximum supply capacities. Each source is connected to the bus via a boost converter, which may have different dynamic characteristics and power transfer capacities, but are controlled through PWM. The invention tracks the time-varying power sources and apportions their power contribution while maintaining the DC bus voltage within the specifications. A central digital controller solves the steady-state system for the optimal duty cycle settings that achieve a desired power supply apportionment scheme for a known or predictable DC load. A distributed networked control system is derived from the central system that utilizes communications among controllers to compute a shared estimate of the unknown time-varying load through shared bus current measurements and bus voltage measurements.

  10. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  11. Investigation and experimental validation of the contribution of optical interconnects in the SYMPHONIE massively parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Progress in microelectronics lead to electronic circuits which are increasingly integrated, with an operating frequency and an inputs/outputs count larger than the ones supported by printed circuit board and back-plane technologies. As a result, distributed systems with several boards cannot fully exploit the performance of integrated circuits. In synchronous parallel computers, the situation is worsen since the overall system performances rely on the efficiency of electrical interconnects between the integrated circuits which include the processing elements (PE). The study of a real parallel computer named SYMPHONIE shows for instance that the system operating frequency is far smaller than the capabilities of the microelectronics technology used for the PE implementation. Optical interconnections may cancel these limitations by providing more efficient connections between the PE. Especially, free-space optical interconnections based on vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL), micro-lens and PIN photodiodes are compatible with the required features of the PE communications. Zero bias modulation of VCSEL with CMOS-compatible digital signals is studied and experimentally demonstrated. A model of the propagation of truncated gaussian beams through micro-lenses is developed. It is then used to optimise the geometry of the detection areas. A dedicated mechanical system is also proposed and implemented for integrating free-space optical interconnects in a standard electronic environment, representative of the one of parallel computer systems. A specially designed demonstrator provides the experimental validation of the above physical concepts. (author) [fr

  12. A brief summary on formalizing parallel tensor distributions redistributions and algorithm derivations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, Martin D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kolda, Tamara G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van de Geijn, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale datasets in computational chemistry typically require distributed-memory parallel methods to perform a special operation known as tensor contraction. Tensors are multidimensional arrays, and a tensor contraction is akin to matrix multiplication with special types of permutations. Creating an efficient algorithm and optimized im- plementation in this domain is complex, tedious, and error-prone. To address this, we develop a notation to express data distributions so that we can apply use automated methods to find optimized implementations for tensor contractions. We consider the spin-adapted coupled cluster singles and doubles method from computational chemistry and use our methodology to produce an efficient implementation. Experiments per- formed on the IBM Blue Gene/Q and Cray XC30 demonstrate impact both improved performance and reduced memory consumption.

  13. A class of parallel algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel and parallel/pipeline algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix are presented. An algorithm based on composite rigid-body spatial inertia method, which provides better features for parallelization, is used for the computation of the inertia matrix. Two parallel algorithms are developed which achieve the time lower bound in computation. Also described is the mapping of these algorithms with topological variation on a two-dimensional processor array, with nearest-neighbor connection, and with cardinality variation on a linear processor array. An efficient parallel/pipeline algorithm for the linear array was also developed, but at significantly higher efficiency.

  14. Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

    2011-09-09

    As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

  15. A lightweight, flow-based toolkit for parallel and distributed bioinformatics pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieślik Marcin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic analyses typically proceed as chains of data-processing tasks. A pipeline, or 'workflow', is a well-defined protocol, with a specific structure defined by the topology of data-flow interdependencies, and a particular functionality arising from the data transformations applied at each step. In computer science, the dataflow programming (DFP paradigm defines software systems constructed in this manner, as networks of message-passing components. Thus, bioinformatic workflows can be naturally mapped onto DFP concepts. Results To enable the flexible creation and execution of bioinformatics dataflows, we have written a modular framework for parallel pipelines in Python ('PaPy'. A PaPy workflow is created from re-usable components connected by data-pipes into a directed acyclic graph, which together define nested higher-order map functions. The successive functional transformations of input data are evaluated on flexibly pooled compute resources, either local or remote. Input items are processed in batches of adjustable size, all flowing one to tune the trade-off between parallelism and lazy-evaluation (memory consumption. An add-on module ('NuBio' facilitates the creation of bioinformatics workflows by providing domain specific data-containers (e.g., for biomolecular sequences, alignments, structures and functionality (e.g., to parse/write standard file formats. Conclusions PaPy offers a modular framework for the creation and deployment of parallel and distributed data-processing workflows. Pipelines derive their functionality from user-written, data-coupled components, so PaPy also can be viewed as a lightweight toolkit for extensible, flow-based bioinformatics data-processing. The simplicity and flexibility of distributed PaPy pipelines may help users bridge the gap between traditional desktop/workstation and grid computing. PaPy is freely distributed as open-source Python code at http://muralab.org/PaPy, and

  16. Massively Parallel Polar Decomposition on Distributed-Memory Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ltaief, Hatem

    2018-01-01

    We present a high-performance implementation of the Polar Decomposition (PD) on distributed-memory systems. Building upon on the QR-based Dynamically Weighted Halley (QDWH) algorithm, the key idea lies in finding the best rational approximation for the scalar sign function, which also corresponds to the polar factor for symmetric matrices, to further accelerate the QDWH convergence. Based on the Zolotarev rational functions—introduced by Zolotarev (ZOLO) in 1877— this new PD algorithm ZOLO-PD converges within two iterations even for ill-conditioned matrices, instead of the original six iterations needed for QDWH. ZOLO-PD uses the property of Zolotarev functions that optimality is maintained when two functions are composed in an appropriate manner. The resulting ZOLO-PD has a convergence rate up to seventeen, in contrast to the cubic convergence rate for QDWH. This comes at the price of higher arithmetic costs and memory footprint. These extra floating-point operations can, however, be processed in an embarrassingly parallel fashion. We demonstrate performance using up to 102, 400 cores on two supercomputers. We demonstrate that, in the presence of a large number of processing units, ZOLO-PD is able to outperform QDWH by up to 2.3X speedup, especially in situations where QDWH runs out of work, for instance, in the strong scaling mode of operation.

  17. Accelerating Dust Storm Simulation by Balancing Task Allocation in Parallel Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Z.; Yang, C.; XIA, J.; Huang, Q.; YU, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storm has serious negative impacts on environment, human health, and assets. The continuing global climate change has increased the frequency and intensity of dust storm in the past decades. To better understand and predict the distribution, intensity and structure of dust storm, a series of dust storm models have been developed, such as Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM), the NMM meteorological module (NMM-dust) and Chinese Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment for Dust (CUACE/Dust). The developments and applications of these models have contributed significantly to both scientific research and our daily life. However, dust storm simulation is a data and computing intensive process. Normally, a simulation for a single dust storm event may take several days or hours to run. It seriously impacts the timeliness of prediction and potential applications. To speed up the process, high performance computing is widely adopted. By partitioning a large study area into small subdomains according to their geographic location and executing them on different computing nodes in a parallel fashion, the computing performance can be significantly improved. Since spatiotemporal correlations exist in the geophysical process of dust storm simulation, each subdomain allocated to a node need to communicate with other geographically adjacent subdomains to exchange data. Inappropriate allocations may introduce imbalance task loads and unnecessary communications among computing nodes. Therefore, task allocation method is the key factor, which may impact the feasibility of the paralleling. The allocation algorithm needs to carefully leverage the computing cost and communication cost for each computing node to minimize total execution time and reduce overall communication cost for the entire system. This presentation introduces two algorithms for such allocation and compares them with evenly distributed allocation method. Specifically, 1) In order to get optimized solutions, a

  18. Continuous development of schemes for parallel computing of the electrostatics in biological systems: implementation in DelPhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Petukh, Marharyta; Li, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2013-08-15

    Due to the enormous importance of electrostatics in molecular biology, calculating the electrostatic potential and corresponding energies has become a standard computational approach for the study of biomolecules and nano-objects immersed in water and salt phase or other media. However, the electrostatics of large macromolecules and macromolecular complexes, including nano-objects, may not be obtainable via explicit methods and even the standard continuum electrostatics methods may not be applicable due to high computational time and memory requirements. Here, we report further development of the parallelization scheme reported in our previous work (Li, et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2012, 33, 1960) to include parallelization of the molecular surface and energy calculations components of the algorithm. The parallelization scheme utilizes different approaches such as space domain parallelization, algorithmic parallelization, multithreading, and task scheduling, depending on the quantity being calculated. This allows for efficient use of the computing resources of the corresponding computer cluster. The parallelization scheme is implemented in the popular software DelPhi and results in speedup of several folds. As a demonstration of the efficiency and capability of this methodology, the electrostatic potential, and electric field distributions are calculated for the bovine mitochondrial supercomplex illustrating their complex topology, which cannot be obtained by modeling the supercomplex components alone. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Identifying logical planes formed of compute nodes of a subcommunicator in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristan D.; Faraj, Daniel A.

    2016-03-01

    In a parallel computer, a plurality of logical planes formed of compute nodes of a subcommunicator may be identified by: for each compute node of the subcommunicator and for a number of dimensions beginning with a first dimension: establishing, by a plane building node, in a positive direction of the first dimension, all logical planes that include the plane building node and compute nodes of the subcommunicator in a positive direction of a second dimension, where the second dimension is orthogonal to the first dimension; and establishing, by the plane building node, in a negative direction of the first dimension, all logical planes that include the plane building node and compute nodes of the subcommunicator in the positive direction of the second dimension.

  20. I - Template Metaprogramming for Massively Parallel Scientific Computing - Expression Templates

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Large scale scientific computing raises questions on different levels ranging from the fomulation of the problems to the choice of the best algorithms and their implementation for a specific platform. There are similarities in these different topics that can be exploited by modern-style C++ template metaprogramming techniques to produce readable, maintainable and generic code. Traditional low-level code tend to be fast but platform-dependent, and it obfuscates the meaning of the algorithm. On the other hand, object-oriented approach is nice to read, but may come with an inherent performance penalty. These lectures aim to present he basics of the Expression Template (ET) idiom which allows us to keep the object-oriented approach without sacrificing performance. We will in particular show to to enhance ET to include SIMD vectorization. We will then introduce techniques for abstracting iteration, and introduce thread-level parallelism for use in heavy data-centric loads. We will show to to apply these methods i...

  1. Parallel multiphysics algorithms and software for computational nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaston, D; Hansen, G; Kadioglu, S; Knoll, D A; Newman, C; Park, H; Permann, C; Taitano, W

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing trend in nuclear reactor simulation to consider multiphysics problems. This can be seen in reactor analysis where analysts are interested in coupled flow, heat transfer and neutronics, and in fuel performance simulation where analysts are interested in thermomechanics with contact coupled to species transport and chemistry. These more ambitious simulations usually motivate some level of parallel computing. Many of the coupling efforts to date utilize simple code coupling or first-order operator splitting, often referred to as loose coupling. While these approaches can produce answers, they usually leave questions of accuracy and stability unanswered. Additionally, the different physics often reside on separate grids which are coupled via simple interpolation, again leaving open questions of stability and accuracy. Utilizing state of the art mathematics and software development techniques we are deploying next generation tools for nuclear engineering applications. The Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method combined with physics-based preconditioning provide the underlying mathematical structure for our tools. JFNK is understood to be a modern multiphysics algorithm, but we are also utilizing its unique properties as a scale bridging algorithm. To facilitate rapid development of multiphysics applications we have developed the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE). Examples from two MOOSE-based applications: PRONGHORN, our multiphysics gas cooled reactor simulation tool and BISON, our multiphysics, multiscale fuel performance simulation tool will be presented.

  2. Parallel computing of a climate model on the dawn 1000 by domain decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xunqiang

    1997-12-01

    In this paper the parallel computing of a grid-point nine-level atmospheric general circulation model on the Dawn 1000 is introduced. The model was developed by the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The Dawn 1000 is a MIMD massive parallel computer made by National Research Center for Intelligent Computer (NCIC), CAS. A two-dimensional domain decomposition method is adopted to perform the parallel computing. The potential ways to increase the speed-up ratio and exploit more resources of future massively parallel supercomputation are also discussed.

  3. Parallel computing for data science with examples in R, C++ and CUDA

    CERN Document Server

    Matloff, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Parallel Computing for Data Science: With Examples in R, C++ and CUDA is one of the first parallel computing books to concentrate exclusively on parallel data structures, algorithms, software tools, and applications in data science. It includes examples not only from the classic ""n observations, p variables"" matrix format but also from time series, network graph models, and numerous other structures common in data science. The examples illustrate the range of issues encountered in parallel programming.With the main focus on computation, the book shows how to compute on three types of platfor

  4. High performance computing of density matrix renormalization group method for 2-dimensional model. Parallelization strategy toward peta computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Igarashi, Ryo; Machida, Masahiko; Imamura, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    We parallelize the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method, which is a ground-state solver for one-dimensional quantum lattice systems. The parallelization allows us to extend the applicable range of the DMRG to n-leg ladders i.e., quasi two-dimension cases. Such an extension is regarded to bring about several breakthroughs in e.g., quantum-physics, chemistry, and nano-engineering. However, the straightforward parallelization requires all-to-all communications between all processes which are unsuitable for multi-core systems, which is a mainstream of current parallel computers. Therefore, we optimize the all-to-all communications by the following two steps. The first one is the elimination of the communications between all processes by only rearranging data distribution with the communication data amount kept. The second one is the avoidance of the communication conflict by rescheduling the calculation and the communication. We evaluate the performance of the DMRG method on multi-core supercomputers and confirm that our two-steps tuning is quite effective. (author)

  5. Endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Cernohous, Bob R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-11-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a PAMI of a parallel computer is disclosed. The PAMI is composed of data communications endpoints, each including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications through the PAMI. The parallel application establishes a data communications geometry specifying a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI by associating with the geometry a list of collective algorithms valid for use with the endpoints of the geometry; registering in each endpoint in the geometry a dispatch callback function for a collective operation; and executing without blocking, through a single one of the endpoints in the geometry, an instruction for the collective operation.

  6. Computer Graphics Simulations of Sampling Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer graphics simulations to enhance student understanding of sampling distributions that arise in introductory statistics. Highlights include the distribution of sample proportions, the distribution of the difference of sample means, the distribution of the difference of sample proportions, and the distribution of sample…

  7. Introduction to massively-parallel computing in high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083520

    1993-01-01

    Ever since computers were first used for scientific and numerical work, there has existed an "arms race" between the technical development of faster computing hardware, and the desires of scientists to solve larger problems in shorter time-scales. However, the vast leaps in processor performance achieved through advances in semi-conductor science have reached a hiatus as the technology comes up against the physical limits of the speed of light and quantum effects. This has lead all high performance computer manufacturers to turn towards a parallel architecture for their new machines. In these lectures we will introduce the history and concepts behind parallel computing, and review the various parallel architectures and software environments currently available. We will then introduce programming methodologies that allow efficient exploitation of parallel machines, and present case studies of the parallelization of typical High Energy Physics codes for the two main classes of parallel computing architecture (S...

  8. Parallel Computation of the Jacobian Matrix for Nonlinear Equation Solvers Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Geoffrey K.; Nguyen, Duc T.; Newman, Brett A.

    2017-01-01

    Demonstrating speedup for parallel code on a multicore shared memory PC can be challenging in MATLAB due to underlying parallel operations that are often opaque to the user. This can limit potential for improvement of serial code even for the so-called embarrassingly parallel applications. One such application is the computation of the Jacobian matrix inherent to most nonlinear equation solvers. Computation of this matrix represents the primary bottleneck in nonlinear solver speed such that commercial finite element (FE) and multi-body-dynamic (MBD) codes attempt to minimize computations. A timing study using MATLAB's Parallel Computing Toolbox was performed for numerical computation of the Jacobian. Several approaches for implementing parallel code were investigated while only the single program multiple data (spmd) method using composite objects provided positive results. Parallel code speedup is demonstrated but the goal of linear speedup through the addition of processors was not achieved due to PC architecture.

  9. Study on parallel and distributed management of RS data based on spatial database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingbiao; Qian, Qinglan; Wu, Hongqiao; Liu, Shijin

    2009-10-01

    With the rapid development of current earth-observing technology, RS image data storage, management and information publication become a bottle-neck for its appliance and popularization. There are two prominent problems in RS image data storage and management system. First, background server hardly handle the heavy process of great capacity of RS data which stored at different nodes in a distributing environment. A tough burden has put on the background server. Second, there is no unique, standard and rational organization of Multi-sensor RS data for its storage and management. And lots of information is lost or not included at storage. Faced at the above two problems, the paper has put forward a framework for RS image data parallel and distributed management and storage system. This system aims at RS data information system based on parallel background server and a distributed data management system. Aiming at the above two goals, this paper has studied the following key techniques and elicited some revelatory conclusions. The paper has put forward a solid index of "Pyramid, Block, Layer, Epoch" according to the properties of RS image data. With the solid index mechanism, a rational organization for different resolution, different area, different band and different period of Multi-sensor RS image data is completed. In data storage, RS data is not divided into binary large objects to be stored at current relational database system, while it is reconstructed through the above solid index mechanism. A logical image database for the RS image data file is constructed. In system architecture, this paper has set up a framework based on a parallel server of several common computers. Under the framework, the background process is divided into two parts, the common WEB process and parallel process.

  10. A multipurpose computing center with distributed resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudoba, J.; Adam, M.; Adamová, D.; Kouba, T.; Mikula, A.; Říkal, V.; Švec, J.; Uhlířová, J.; Vokáč, P.; Svatoš, M.

    2017-10-01

    The Computing Center of the Institute of Physics (CC IoP) of the Czech Academy of Sciences serves a broad spectrum of users with various computing needs. It runs WLCG Tier-2 center for the ALICE and the ATLAS experiments; the same group of services is used by astroparticle physics projects the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). OSG stack is installed for the NOvA experiment. Other groups of users use directly local batch system. Storage capacity is distributed to several locations. DPM servers used by the ATLAS and the PAO are all in the same server room, but several xrootd servers for the ALICE experiment are operated in the Nuclear Physics Institute in Řež, about 10 km away. The storage capacity for the ATLAS and the PAO is extended by resources of the CESNET - the Czech National Grid Initiative representative. Those resources are in Plzen and Jihlava, more than 100 km away from the CC IoP. Both distant sites use a hierarchical storage solution based on disks and tapes. They installed one common dCache instance, which is published in the CC IoP BDII. ATLAS users can use these resources using the standard ATLAS tools in the same way as the local storage without noticing this geographical distribution. Computing clusters LUNA and EXMAG dedicated to users mostly from the Solid State Physics departments offer resources for parallel computing. They are part of the Czech NGI infrastructure MetaCentrum with distributed batch system based on torque with a custom scheduler. Clusters are installed remotely by the MetaCentrum team and a local contact helps only when needed. Users from IoP have exclusive access only to a part of these two clusters and take advantage of higher priorities on the rest (1500 cores in total), which can also be used by any user of the MetaCentrum. IoP researchers can also use distant resources located in several towns of the Czech Republic with a capacity of more than 12000 cores in total.

  11. An object-oriented programming paradigm for parallelization of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takashi.

    1997-03-01

    We propose an object-oriented programming paradigm for parallelization of scientific computing programs, and show that the approach can be a very useful strategy. Generally, parallelization of scientific programs tends to be complicated and unportable due to the specific requirements of each parallel computer or compiler. In this paper, we show that the object-oriented programming design, which separates the parallel processing parts from the solver of the applications, can achieve the large improvement in the maintenance of the codes, as well as the high portability. We design the program for the two-dimensional Euler equations according to the paradigm, and evaluate the parallel performance on IBM SP2. (author)

  12. Hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelization of the explicit Volterra integral equation solver for multi-core computer architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Al Jarro, Ahmed

    2011-08-01

    A hybrid MPI/OpenMP scheme for efficiently parallelizing the explicit marching-on-in-time (MOT)-based solution of the time-domain volume (Volterra) integral equation (TD-VIE) is presented. The proposed scheme equally distributes tested field values and operations pertinent to the computation of tested fields among the nodes using the MPI standard; while the source field values are stored in all nodes. Within each node, OpenMP standard is used to further accelerate the computation of the tested fields. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed parallelization scheme scales well for problems involving three million or more spatial discretization elements. © 2011 IEEE.

  13. Parallel Processing and Applied Mathematics. 10th International Conference, PPAM 2013. Revised Selected Papers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The following topics are dealt with: parallel scientific computing; numerical algorithms; parallel nonnumerical algorithms; cloud computing; evolutionary computing; metaheuristics; applied mathematics; GPU computing; multicore systems; hybrid architectures; hierarchical parallelism; HPC systems......; power monitoring; energy monitoring; and distributed computing....

  14. Scaling up machine learning: parallel and distributed approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bekkerman, Ron; Bilenko, Mikhail; Langford, John

    2012-01-01

    .... Demand for parallelizing learning algorithms is highly task-specific: in some settings it is driven by the enormous dataset sizes, in others by model complexity or by real-time performance requirements...

  15. A Web-based Distributed Voluntary Computing Platform for Large Scale Hydrological Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.; Agliamzanov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed volunteer computing can enable researchers and scientist to form large parallel computing environments to utilize the computing power of the millions of computers on the Internet, and use them towards running large scale environmental simulations and models to serve the common good of local communities and the world. Recent developments in web technologies and standards allow client-side scripting languages to run at speeds close to native application, and utilize the power of Graphics Processing Units (GPU). Using a client-side scripting language like JavaScript, we have developed an open distributed computing framework that makes it easy for researchers to write their own hydrologic models, and run them on volunteer computers. Users will easily enable their websites for visitors to volunteer sharing their computer resources to contribute running advanced hydrological models and simulations. Using a web-based system allows users to start volunteering their computational resources within seconds without installing any software. The framework distributes the model simulation to thousands of nodes in small spatial and computational sizes. A relational database system is utilized for managing data connections and queue management for the distributed computing nodes. In this paper, we present a web-based distributed volunteer computing platform to enable large scale hydrological simulations and model runs in an open and integrated environment.

  16. Support system for ATLAS distributed computing operations

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, Tomoe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS distributed computing system has allowed the experiment to successfully meet the challenges of LHC Run 2. In order for distributed computing to operate smoothly and efficiently, several support teams are organized in the ATLAS experiment. The ADCoS (ATLAS Distributed Computing Operation Shifts) is a dedicated group of shifters who follow and report failing jobs, failing data transfers between sites, degradation of ATLAS central computing services, and more. The DAST (Distributed Analysis Support Team) provides user support to resolve issues related to running distributed analysis on the grid. The CRC (Computing Run Coordinator) maintains a global view of the day-to-day operations. In this presentation, the status and operational experience of the support system for ATLAS distributed computing in LHC Run 2 will be reported. This report also includes operations experience from the grid site point of view, and an analysis of the errors that create the biggest waste of wallclock time. The report of oper...

  17. A distributed computer system for digitising machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.; Barlow, J.; Waters, M.; Watson, J.

    1977-07-01

    This paper describes a Distributed Computing System, based on micro computers, for the monitoring and control of digitising tables used by the Rutherford Laboratory Bubble Chamber Research Group in the measurement of bubble chamber photographs. (author)

  18. Parallel Hyperspectral Image Processing on Distributed Multi-Cluster Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Seinstra, F.J.; Plaza, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Computationally efficient processing of hyperspectral image cubes can be greatly beneficial in many application domains, including environmental modeling, risk/hazard prevention and response, and defense/security. As individual cluster computers often cannot satisfy the computational demands of

  19. How to Build an AppleSeed: A Parallel Macintosh Cluster for Numerically Intensive Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decyk, V. K.; Dauger, D. E.

    We have constructed a parallel cluster consisting of a mixture of Apple Macintosh G3 and G4 computers running the Mac OS, and have achieved very good performance on numerically intensive, parallel plasma particle-incell simulations. A subset of the MPI message-passing library was implemented in Fortran77 and C. This library enabled us to port code, without modification, from other parallel processors to the Macintosh cluster. Unlike Unix-based clusters, no special expertise in operating systems is required to build and run the cluster. This enables us to move parallel computing from the realm of experts to the main stream of computing.

  20. Methods and apparatus for multi-resolution replication of files in a parallel computing system using semantic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Torres, Aaron

    2015-10-20

    Techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system using different resolutions. A method is provided for storing at least one file generated by a distributed application in a parallel computing system. The file comprises one or more of a complete file and a sub-file. The method comprises the steps of obtaining semantic information related to the file; generating a plurality of replicas of the file with different resolutions based on the semantic information; and storing the file and the plurality of replicas of the file in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system. The different resolutions comprise, for example, a variable number of bits and/or a different sub-set of data elements from the file. A plurality of the sub-files can be merged to reproduce the file.

  1. Methods and apparatus for capture and storage of semantic information with sub-files in a parallel computing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Torres, Aaron

    2015-02-03

    Techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system using sub-files with semantically meaningful boundaries. A method is provided for storing at least one file generated by a distributed application in a parallel computing system. The file comprises one or more of a complete file and a plurality of sub-files. The method comprises the steps of obtaining a user specification of semantic information related to the file; providing the semantic information as a data structure description to a data formatting library write function; and storing the semantic information related to the file with one or more of the sub-files in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system. The semantic information provides a description of data in the file. The sub-files can be replicated based on semantically meaningful boundaries.

  2. A highly efficient parallel algorithm for solving the neutron diffusion nodal equations on shared-memory computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Kirk, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Modern parallel computer architectures offer an enormous potential for reducing CPU and wall-clock execution times of large-scale computations commonly performed in various applications in science and engineering. Recently, several authors have reported their efforts in developing and implementing parallel algorithms for solving the neutron diffusion equation on a variety of shared- and distributed-memory parallel computers. Testing of these algorithms for a variety of two- and three-dimensional meshes showed significant speedup of the computation. Even for very large problems (i.e., three-dimensional fine meshes) executed concurrently on a few nodes in serial (nonvector) mode, however, the measured computational efficiency is very low (40 to 86%). In this paper, the authors present a highly efficient (∼85 to 99.9%) algorithm for solving the two-dimensional nodal diffusion equations on the Sequent Balance 8000 parallel computer. Also presented is a model for the performance, represented by the efficiency, as a function of problem size and the number of participating processors. The model is validated through several tests and then extrapolated to larger problems and more processors to predict the performance of the algorithm in more computationally demanding situations

  3. Some computational challenges of developing efficient parallel algorithms for data-dependent computations in thermal-hydraulics supercomputer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC), which features a two-fluid treatment of thermal-hydraulics, is designed to model transients in water reactors and related facilities. One of the major computational costs associated with TRAC and similar codes is calculating constitutive coefficients. Although the formulations for these coefficients are local, the costs are flow-regime- or data-dependent; i.e., the computations needed for a given spatial node often vary widely as a function of time. Consequently, a fixed, uniform assignment of nodes to prallel processors will result in degraded computational efficiency due to the poor load balancing. A standard method for treating data-dependent models on vector architectures has been to use gather operations (or indirect adressing) to sort the nodes into subsets that (temporarily) share a common computational model. However, this method is not effective on distributed memory data parallel architectures, where indirect adressing involves expensive communication overhead. Another serious problem with this method involves software engineering challenges in the areas of maintainability and extensibility. For example, an implementation that was hand-tuned to achieve good computational efficiency would have to be rewritten whenever the decision tree governing the sorting was modified. Using an example based on the calculation of the wall-to-liquid and wall-to-vapor heat-transfer coefficients for three nonboiling flow regimes, we describe how the use of the Fortran 90 WHERE construct and automatic inlining of functions can be used to ameliorate this problem while improving both efficiency and software engineering. Unfortunately, a general automatic solution to the load-balancing problem associated with data-dependent computations is not yet available for massively parallel architectures. We discuss why developers should either wait for such solutions or consider alternative numerical algorithms, such as a neural network

  4. Application of the parallel processing computer to a nuclear disaster prevention support system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigehiro, Nukatsuka; Osami, Watanabe [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    At the time of nuclear emergency, it is important to identify the type and the cause of the accident. Besides with these, it is also important to provide adequate information for the emergency response organization to support decision making by predicting and evaluating the development of the event and the influence of the release of radioactivity for the environment. Recently, a new type of nuclear disaster prevention support system called MEASURES (Multiple Radiological Emergency Assistance System for Urgent Response) was developed which provides not only the current state of the nuclear power plant and the influence of the radioactivity for the environment, but also the future prediction of the accident development. In order to provide the accurate results of these analyses quickly, MEASURES utilizes various techniques, such as multiple nesting method which narrows down the calculation area gradually, and parallel processing computer for three dimensional analyses, such as air current distribution analysis. In this paper, the outline and the feature of MEASURES are presented, especially focused on the usage of parallel processing computer for the three dimensional air current distribution analysis. (authors)

  5. A study on optimal task decomposition of networked parallel computing using PVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Kwan Jae; Kim, Han Gyoo

    1998-01-01

    A numerical study is performed to investigate the effect of task decomposition on networked parallel processes using Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM). In our study, a PVM program distributed over a network of workstations is used in solving a finite difference version of a one dimensional heat equation, where natural choice of PVM programming structure would be the master-slave paradigm, with the aim of finding an optimal configuration resulting in least computing time including communication overhead among machines. Given a set of PVM tasks comprised of one master and five slave programs, it is found that there exists a pseudo-optimal number of machines, which does not necessarily coincide with the number of tasks, that yields the best performance when the network is under a light usage. Increasing the number of machines beyond this optimal one does not improve computing performance since increase in communication overhead among the excess number of machines offsets the decrease in CPU time obtained by distributing the PVM tasks among these machines. However, when the network traffic is heavy, the results exhibit a more random characteristic that is explained by the random nature of data transfer time

  6. Application of the parallel processing computer to a nuclear disaster prevention support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigehiro, Nukatsuka; Osami, Watanabe

    2003-01-01

    At the time of nuclear emergency, it is important to identify the type and the cause of the accident. Besides with these, it is also important to provide adequate information for the emergency response organization to support decision making by predicting and evaluating the development of the event and the influence of the release of radioactivity for the environment. Recently, a new type of nuclear disaster prevention support system called MEASURES (Multiple Radiological Emergency Assistance System for Urgent Response) was developed which provides not only the current state of the nuclear power plant and the influence of the radioactivity for the environment, but also the future prediction of the accident development. In order to provide the accurate results of these analyses quickly, MEASURES utilizes various techniques, such as multiple nesting method which narrows down the calculation area gradually, and parallel processing computer for three dimensional analyses, such as air current distribution analysis. In this paper, the outline and the feature of MEASURES are presented, especially focused on the usage of parallel processing computer for the three dimensional air current distribution analysis. (authors)

  7. Embedding Topical Elements of Parallel Programming, Computer Graphics, and Artificial Intelligence across the Undergraduate CS Required Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wolfer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, topics such as parallel computing, computer graphics, and artificial intelligence have been taught as stand-alone courses in the computing curriculum. Often these are elective courses, limiting the material to the subset of students choosing to take the course. Recently there has been movement to distribute topics across the curriculum in order to ensure that all graduates have been exposed to concepts such as parallel computing. Previous work described an attempt to systematically weave a tapestry of topics into the undergraduate computing curriculum. This paper reviews that work and expands it with representative examples of assignments, demonstrations, and results as well as describing how the tools and examples deployed for these classes have a residual effect on classes such as Comptuer Literacy.

  8. Distributed Processing in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Mavridis, Ilias; Karatza, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Proceedings of the First PhD Symposium on Sustainable Ultrascale Computing Systems (NESUS PhD 2016) Timisoara, Romania. February 8-11, 2016. Cloud computing offers a wide range of resources and services through the Internet that can been used for various purposes. The rapid growth of cloud computing has exempted many companies and institutions from the burden of maintaining expensive hardware and software infrastructure. With characteristics like high scalability, availability ...

  9. DIMACS Workshop on Interconnection Networks and Mapping, and Scheduling Parallel Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Arnold L; Sotteau, Dominique; NSF Science and Technology Center in Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science; Interconnection networks and mapping and scheduling parallel computations

    1995-01-01

    The interconnection network is one of the most basic components of a massively parallel computer system. Such systems consist of hundreds or thousands of processors interconnected to work cooperatively on computations. One of the central problems in parallel computing is the task of mapping a collection of processes onto the processors and routing network of a parallel machine. Once this mapping is done, it is critical to schedule computations within and communication among processor from universities and laboratories, as well as practitioners involved in the design, implementation, and application of massively parallel systems. Focusing on interconnection networks of parallel architectures of today and of the near future , the book includes topics such as network topologies,network properties, message routing, network embeddings, network emulation, mappings, and efficient scheduling. inputs for a process are available where and when the process is scheduled to be computed. This book contains the refereed pro...

  10. Lempel–Ziv Data Compression on Parallel and Distributed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio De Agostino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a survey of results concerning Lempel–Ziv data compression on parallel and distributed systems, starting from the theoretical approach to parallel time complexity to conclude with the practical goal of designing distributed algorithms with low communication cost. Storer’s extension for image compression is also discussed.

  11. A method of paralleling computer calculation for two-dimensional kinetic plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhnik, V.A.; Demchenko, V.V.; Dem'yanov, V.G.; D'yakov, V.E.; Ol'shanskij, V.V.; Panchenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    A method for parallel computer calculation and OSIRIS program complex realizing it and designed for numerical plasma simulation by the macroparticle method are described. The calculation can be carried out either with one or simultaneously with two computers BESM-6, that is provided by some package of interacting programs functioning in every computer. Program interaction in every computer is based on event techniques realized in OS DISPAK. Parallel computer calculation with two BESM-6 computers allows to accelerate the computation 1.5 times

  12. Homemade Buckeye-Pi: A Learning Many-Node Platform for High-Performance Parallel Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amooie, M. A.; Moortgat, J.

    2017-12-01

    We report on the "Buckeye-Pi" cluster, the supercomputer developed in The Ohio State University School of Earth Sciences from 128 inexpensive Raspberry Pi (RPi) 3 Model B single-board computers. Each RPi is equipped with fast Quad Core 1.2GHz ARMv8 64bit processor, 1GB of RAM, and 32GB microSD card for local storage. Therefore, the cluster has a total RAM of 128GB that is distributed on the individual nodes and a flash capacity of 4TB with 512 processors, while it benefits from low power consumption, easy portability, and low total cost. The cluster uses the Message Passing Interface protocol to manage the communications between each node. These features render our platform the most powerful RPi supercomputer to date and suitable for educational applications in high-performance-computing (HPC) and handling of large datasets. In particular, we use the Buckeye-Pi to implement optimized parallel codes in our in-house simulator for subsurface media flows with the goal of achieving a massively-parallelized scalable code. We present benchmarking results for the computational performance across various number of RPi nodes. We believe our project could inspire scientists and students to consider the proposed unconventional cluster architecture as a mainstream and a feasible learning platform for challenging engineering and scientific problems.

  13. Distribution of Evaporating CO2 in Parallel Microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Wiebke; Elmegaard, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The impact on the heat exchanger performance due to maldistribution of evaporating CO2 in parallel channels is investigated numerically. A 1D steady state simulation model of a microchannel evaporator is built using correlations from the literature to calculate frictional pressure drop and heat...... transfer coefficients. For two channels in parallel two different cases of maldistribution are studied. Firstly, the impact of a non-uniform air flow is considered, and secondly the impact of maldistribution of the two phases in the inlet manifold is investigated. The results for both cases are compared...

  14. Cooperative storage of shared files in a parallel computing system with dynamic block size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2015-11-10

    Improved techniques are provided for parallel writing of data to a shared object in a parallel computing system. A method is provided for storing data generated by a plurality of parallel processes to a shared object in a parallel computing system. The method is performed by at least one of the processes and comprises: dynamically determining a block size for storing the data; exchanging a determined amount of the data with at least one additional process to achieve a block of the data having the dynamically determined block size; and writing the block of the data having the dynamically determined block size to a file system. The determined block size comprises, e.g., a total amount of the data to be stored divided by the number of parallel processes. The file system comprises, for example, a log structured virtual parallel file system, such as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS).

  15. Scaling up machine learning: parallel and distributed approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bekkerman, Ron; Bilenko, Mikhail; Langford, John

    2012-01-01

    ... presented in the book cover a range of parallelization platforms from FPGAs and GPUs to multi-core systems and commodity clusters; concurrent programming frameworks that include CUDA, MPI, MapReduce, and DryadLINQ; and various learning settings: supervised, unsupervised, semi-supervised, and online learning. Extensive coverage of parallelizat...

  16. Distributed and multi-core computation of 2-loop integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Doncker, E; Yuasa, F

    2014-01-01

    For an automatic computation of Feynman loop integrals in the physical region we rely on an extrapolation technique where the integrals of the sequence are obtained with iterated/repeated adaptive methods from the QUADPACK 1D quadrature package. The integration rule evaluations in the outer level, corresponding to independent inner integral approximations, are assigned to threads dynamically via the OpenMP runtime in the parallel implementation. Furthermore, multi-level (nested) parallelism enables an efficient utilization of hyperthreading or larger numbers of cores. For a class of loop integrals in the unphysical region, which do not suffer from singularities in the interior of the integration domain, we find that the distributed adaptive integration methods in the multivariate PARINT package are highly efficient and accurate. We apply these techniques without resorting to integral transformations and report on the capabilities of the algorithms and the parallel performance for a test set including various types of two-loop integrals

  17. Migrating to a real-time distributed parallel simulator architecture

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A legacy non-distributed logical time simulator is migrated to a distributed architecture to parallelise execution. The existing Discrete Time System Specification (DTSS) modelling formalism is retained to simplify the reuse of existing models...

  18. Using parallel computing in modeling and optimization of mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Then to solve ultimate pit limit problem it is required to find such a sub graph in a graph whose sum of weights will be maximal. One of the possible solutions of this problem is using genetic algorithms. We use a ... Details of implementation parallel genetic algorithm for searching open pit limits are provided. Comparison with ...

  19. Computation of watersheds based on parallel graph algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, A.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Maragos, P; Schafer, RW; Butt, MA

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the implementation of a parallel watershed algorithm is described. The algorithm has been implemented on a Cray J932, which is a shared memory architecture with 32 processors. The watershed transform has generally been considered to be inherently sequential, but recently a few research

  20. Bayesian optimization for computationally extensive probability distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ryo; Hukushima, Koji

    2018-01-01

    An efficient method for finding a better maximizer of computationally extensive probability distributions is proposed on the basis of a Bayesian optimization technique. A key idea of the proposed method is to use extreme values of acquisition functions by Gaussian processes for the next training phase, which should be located near a local maximum or a global maximum of the probability distribution. Our Bayesian optimization technique is applied to the posterior distribution in the effective physical model estimation, which is a computationally extensive probability distribution. Even when the number of sampling points on the posterior distributions is fixed to be small, the Bayesian optimization provides a better maximizer of the posterior distributions in comparison to those by the random search method, the steepest descent method, or the Monte Carlo method. Furthermore, the Bayesian optimization improves the results efficiently by combining the steepest descent method and thus it is a powerful tool to search for a better maximizer of computationally extensive probability distributions.

  1. Locating hardware faults in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-01-12

    Hardware faults location in a data communications network of a parallel computer. Such a parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes and a data communications network that couples the compute nodes for data communications and organizes the compute node as a tree. Locating hardware faults includes identifying a next compute node as a parent node and a root of a parent test tree, identifying for each child compute node of the parent node a child test tree having the child compute node as root, running a same test suite on the parent test tree and each child test tree, and identifying the parent compute node as having a defective link connected from the parent compute node to a child compute node if the test suite fails on the parent test tree and succeeds on all the child test trees.

  2. Multi Scale Finite Element Analyses By Using SEM-EBSD Crystallographic Modeling and Parallel Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamachi, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    A crystallographic homogenization procedure is introduced to the conventional static-explicit and dynamic-explicit finite element formulation to develop a multi scale - double scale - analysis code to predict the plastic strain induced texture evolution, yield loci and formability of sheet metal. The double-scale structure consists of a crystal aggregation - micro-structure - and a macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. At first, we measure crystal morphologies by using SEM-EBSD apparatus, and define a unit cell of micro structure, which satisfy the periodicity condition in the real scale of polycrystal. Next, this crystallographic homogenization FE code is applied to 3N pure-iron and 'Benchmark' aluminum A6022 polycrystal sheets. It reveals that the initial crystal orientation distribution - the texture - affects very much to a plastic strain induced texture and anisotropic hardening evolutions and sheet deformation. Since, the multi-scale finite element analysis requires a large computation time, a parallel computing technique by using PC cluster is developed for a quick calculation. In this parallelization scheme, a dynamic workload balancing technique is introduced for quick and efficient calculations

  3. Incorporating Parallel Computing into the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jay W.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric data assimilation is a method of combining actual observations with model forecasts to produce a more accurate description of the earth system than the observations or forecast alone can provide. The output of data assimilation, sometimes called the analysis, are regular, gridded datasets of observed and unobserved variables. Analysis plays a key role in numerical weather prediction and is becoming increasingly important for climate research. These applications, and the need for timely validation of scientific enhancements to the data assimilation system pose computational demands that are best met by distributed parallel software. The mission of the NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) is to provide datasets for climate research and to support NASA satellite and aircraft missions. The system used to create these datasets is the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The core components of the the GEOS DAS are: the GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM), the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS), the Observer, the on-line Quality Control (QC) system, the Coupler (which feeds analysis increments back to the GCM), and an I/O package for processing the large amounts of data the system produces (which will be described in another presentation in this session). The discussion will center on the following issues: the computational complexity for the whole GEOS DAS, assessment of the performance of the individual elements of GEOS DAS, and parallelization strategy for some of the components of the system.

  4. A new communication scheme for the neutron diffusion nodal method in a distributed computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.L.; Azmy, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A modified scheme is developed for solving the two-dimensional nodal diffusion equations on distributed memory computers. The scheme is aimed at minimizing the volume of communication among processors while maximizing the tasks in parallel. Results show a significant improvement in parallel efficiency on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube compared to previous algorithms

  5. Radar data processing using a distributed computational system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Gilberto F.

    1992-06-01

    This research specifies and validates a new concurrent decomposition scheme, called Confined Space Search Decomposition (CSSD), to exploit parallelism of Radar Data Processing algorithms using a Distributed Computational System. To formalize the specification, we propose and apply an object-oriented methodology called Decomposition Cost Evaluation Model (DCEM). To reduce the penalties of load imbalance, we propose a distributed dynamic load balance heuristic called Object Reincarnation (OR). To validate the research, we first compare our decomposition with an identified alternative using the proposed DCEM model and then develop a theoretical prediction of selected parameters. We also develop a simulation to check the Object Reincarnation Concept.

  6. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisshelm, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed. 14 refs

  7. Parallel Computational Intelligence-Based Multi-Camera Surveillance System

    OpenAIRE

    Orts-Escolano, Sergio; Garcia-Rodriguez, Jose; Morell, Vicente; Cazorla, Miguel; Azorin-Lopez, Jorge; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a multi-camera surveillance system based on the use of self-organizing neural networks to represent events on video. The system processes several tasks in parallel using GPUs (graphic processor units). It addresses multiple vision tasks at various levels, such as segmentation, representation or characterization, analysis and monitoring of the movement. These features allow the construction of a robust representation of the environment and interpret the behavior of mob...

  8. Depth-Averaged Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamic Model Using a New Multithreading Parallel Computing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the hydrostatic hydrodynamic model, the non-hydrostatic hydrodynamic model can accurately simulate flows that feature vertical accelerations. The model’s low computational efficiency severely restricts its wider application. This paper proposes a non-hydrostatic hydrodynamic model based on a multithreading parallel computing method. The horizontal momentum equation is obtained by integrating the Navier–Stokes equations from the bottom to the free surface. The vertical momentum equation is approximated by the Keller-box scheme. A two-step method is used to solve the model equations. A parallel strategy based on block decomposition computation is utilized. The original computational domain is subdivided into two subdomains that are physically connected via a virtual boundary technique. Two sub-threads are created and tasked with the computation of the two subdomains. The producer–consumer model and the thread lock technique are used to achieve synchronous communication between sub-threads. The validity of the model was verified by solitary wave propagation experiments over a flat bottom and slope, followed by two sinusoidal wave propagation experiments over submerged breakwater. The parallel computing method proposed here was found to effectively enhance computational efficiency and save 20%–40% computation time compared to serial computing. The parallel acceleration rate and acceleration efficiency are approximately 1.45% and 72%, respectively. The parallel computing method makes a contribution to the popularization of non-hydrostatic models.

  9. Parallel computation of Euler and Navier-Stokes flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisshelm, J.M.; Johnson, G.M.; Kumar, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    A multigrid technique useful for accelerating the convergence of Euler and Navier-Stokes flow computations has been restructured to improve its performance on both SIMD and MIMD computers. The new algorithm allows both the construction of longer coarse-grid vectors and the multitasking of entire grids. Computational results are presented for the CDC Cyber 205, Cray X-MP, and Denelcor HEP I. 15 references

  10. COMPSs-Mobile: parallel programming for mobile-cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Lordan Gomis, Francesc-Josep; Badia Sala, Rosa Maria

    2016-01-01

    The advent of Cloud and the popularization of mobile devices have led us to a shift in computing access. Computing users will have an interaction display while the real computation will be performed remotely, in the Cloud. COMPSs-Mobile is a framework that aims to ease the development of energy-efficient and high-performing applications for this environment. The framework provides an infrastructure-unaware programming model that allows developers to code regular Android applications that, ...

  11. From experiment to design -- Fault characterization and detection in parallel computer systems using computational accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Keun Soo

    This dissertation summarizes experimental validation and co-design studies conducted to optimize the fault detection capabilities and overheads in hybrid computer systems (e.g., using CPUs and Graphics Processing Units, or GPUs), and consequently to improve the scalability of parallel computer systems using computational accelerators. The experimental validation studies were conducted to help us understand the failure characteristics of CPU-GPU hybrid computer systems under various types of hardware faults. The main characterization targets were faults that are difficult to detect and/or recover from, e.g., faults that cause long latency failures (Ch. 3), faults in dynamically allocated resources (Ch. 4), faults in GPUs (Ch. 5), faults in MPI programs (Ch. 6), and microarchitecture-level faults with specific timing features (Ch. 7). The co-design studies were based on the characterization results. One of the co-designed systems has a set of source-to-source translators that customize and strategically place error detectors in the source code of target GPU programs (Ch. 5). Another co-designed system uses an extension card to learn the normal behavioral and semantic execution patterns of message-passing processes executing on CPUs, and to detect abnormal behaviors of those parallel processes (Ch. 6). The third co-designed system is a co-processor that has a set of new instructions in order to support software-implemented fault detection techniques (Ch. 7). The work described in this dissertation gains more importance because heterogeneous processors have become an essential component of state-of-the-art supercomputers. GPUs were used in three of the five fastest supercomputers that were operating in 2011. Our work included comprehensive fault characterization studies in CPU-GPU hybrid computers. In CPUs, we monitored the target systems for a long period of time after injecting faults (a temporally comprehensive experiment), and injected faults into various types of

  12. Parallel computer calculation of quantum spin lattices; Calcul de chaines de spins quantiques sur ordinateur parallele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamarcq, J. [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1998-07-10

    Numerical simulation allows the theorists to convince themselves about the validity of the models they use. Particularly by simulating the spin lattices one can judge about the validity of a conjecture. Simulating a system defined by a large number of degrees of freedom requires highly sophisticated machines. This study deals with modelling the magnetic interactions between the ions of a crystal. Many exact results have been found for spin 1/2 systems but not for systems of other spins for which many simulation have been carried out. The interest for simulations has been renewed by the Haldane`s conjecture stipulating the existence of a energy gap between the ground state and the first excited states of a spin 1 lattice. The existence of this gap has been experimentally demonstrated. This report contains the following four chapters: 1. Spin systems; 2. Calculation of eigenvalues; 3. Programming; 4. Parallel calculation 14 refs., 6 figs.

  13. A kind of video image digitizing circuit based on computer parallel port

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yi; Tang Le; Cheng Jianping; Li Yuanjing; Zhang Binquan

    2003-01-01

    A kind of video images digitizing circuit based on parallel port was developed to digitize the flash x ray images in our Multi-Channel Digital Flash X ray Imaging System. The circuit can digitize the video images and store in static memory. The digital images can be transferred to computer through parallel port and can be displayed, processed and stored. (authors)

  14. Mathematical Methods and Algorithms of Mobile Parallel Computing on the Base of Multi-core Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Bakulev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with mathematical models and algorithms, providing mobility of sequential programs parallel representation on the high-level language, presents formal model of operation environment processes management, based on the proposed model of programs parallel representation, presenting computation process on the base of multi-core processors.

  15. Web based parallel/distributed medical data mining using software agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kargupta, H.; Stafford, B.; Hamzaoglu, I.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes an experimental parallel/distributed data mining system PADMA (PArallel Data Mining Agents) that uses software agents for local data accessing and analysis and a web based interface for interactive data visualization. It also presents the results of applying PADMA for detecting patterns in unstructured texts of postmortem reports and laboratory test data for Hepatitis C patients.

  16. Impossibility results for distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Attiya, Hagit

    2014-01-01

    To understand the power of distributed systems, it is necessary to understand their inherent limitations: what problems cannot be solved in particular systems, or without sufficient resources (such as time or space). This book presents key techniques for proving such impossibility results and applies them to a variety of different problems in a variety of different system models. Insights gained from these results are highlighted, aspects of a problem that make it difficult are isolated, features of an architecture that make it inadequate for solving certain problems efficiently are identified

  17. Massively Parallel Polar Decomposition on Distributed-Memory Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ltaief, Hatem; Sukkari, Dalal E.; Esposito, Aniello; Nakatsukasa, Yuji; Keyes, David E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a high-performance implementation of the Polar Decomposition (PD) on distributed-memory systems. Building upon on the QR-based Dynamically Weighted Halley (QDWH) algorithm, the key idea lies in finding the best rational approximation

  18. Performance of a Sequential and Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Solver on a Missile Body Configuration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hisley, Dixie

    1999-01-01

    .... The goals of this report are: (1) to investigate the performance of message passing and loop level parallelization techniques, as they were implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD...

  19. Massively Parallel Computing at Sandia and Its Application to National Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dosanjh, Sudip

    1991-01-01

    Two years ago, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories showed that a massively parallel computer with 1024 processors could solve scientific problems more than 1000 times faster than a single processor...

  20. Computer model of a reverberant and parallel circuit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Camila de Andrade; de Castro, Maria Clícia Stelling; Cortez, Célia Martins

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to deepen the knowledge about the functioning of the neural circuits by implementing a signal transmission model using the Graph Theory in a small network of neurons composed of an interconnected reverberant and parallel circuit, in order to investigate the processing of the signals in each of them and the effects on the output of the network. For this, a program was developed in C language and simulations were done using neurophysiological data obtained in the literature.

  1. Paging memory from random access memory to backing storage in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Inglett, Todd A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-05-21

    Paging memory from random access memory (`RAM`) to backing storage in a parallel computer that includes a plurality of compute nodes, including: executing a data processing application on a virtual machine operating system in a virtual machine on a first compute node; providing, by a second compute node, backing storage for the contents of RAM on the first compute node; and swapping, by the virtual machine operating system in the virtual machine on the first compute node, a page of memory from RAM on the first compute node to the backing storage on the second compute node.

  2. Applications of parallel computer architectures to the real-time simulation of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doster, J.M.; Sills, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the authors report on efforts to utilize parallel computer architectures for the thermal-hydraulic simulation of nuclear power systems and current research efforts toward the development of advanced reactor operator aids and control systems based on this new technology. Many aspects of reactor thermal-hydraulic calculations are inherently parallel, and the computationally intensive portions of these calculations can be effectively implemented on modern computers. Timing studies indicate faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity physics models can be developed when the computational algorithms are designed to take advantage of the computer's architecture. These capabilities allow for the development of novel control systems and advanced reactor operator aids. Coupled with an integral real-time data acquisition system, evolving parallel computer architectures can provide operators and control room designers improved control and protection capabilities. Current research efforts are currently under way in this area

  3. LHCb: LHCb Distributed Computing Operations

    CERN Multimedia

    Stagni, F

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation of tools for monitoring both activities and infrastructure, together with the pressing need for prompt reaction in case of problems impacting data taking, data reconstruction, data reprocessing and user analysis brought to the need of better organizing the huge amount of information available. The monitoring system for the LHCb Grid Computing relies on many heterogeneous and independent sources of information offering different views for a better understanding of problems while an operations team and defined procedures have been put in place to handle them. This work summarizes the state-of-the-art of LHCb Grid operations emphasizing the reasons that brought to various choices and what are the tools currently in use to run our daily activities. We highlight the most common problems experienced across years of activities on the WLCG infrastructure, the services with their criticality, the procedures in place, the relevant metrics and the tools available and the ones still missing.

  4. Distributed computing by oblivious mobile robots

    CERN Document Server

    Flocchini, Paola; Santoro, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The study of what can be computed by a team of autonomous mobile robots, originally started in robotics and AI, has become increasingly popular in theoretical computer science (especially in distributed computing), where it is now an integral part of the investigations on computability by mobile entities. The robots are identical computational entities located and able to move in a spatial universe; they operate without explicit communication and are usually unable to remember the past; they are extremely simple, with limited resources, and individually quite weak. However, collectively the ro

  5. Distributed computer systems theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zedan, H S M

    2014-01-01

    Distributed Computer Systems: Theory and Practice is a collection of papers dealing with the design and implementation of operating systems, including distributed systems, such as the amoeba system, argus, Andrew, and grapevine. One paper discusses the concepts and notations for concurrent programming, particularly language notation used in computer programming, synchronization methods, and also compares three classes of languages. Another paper explains load balancing or load redistribution to improve system performance, namely, static balancing and adaptive load balancing. For program effici

  6. Visualization of biomedical image data and irradiation planning using a parallel computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrig, R.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution explains the development of a novel, low-cost workstation for the processing of biomedical tomographic data sequences. The workstation was to allow both graphical display of the data and implementation of modelling software for irradiation planning, especially for calculation of dose distributions on the basis of the measured tomogram data. The system developed according to these criteria is a parallel computing system which performs secondary, two-dimensional image reconstructions irrespective of the imaging direction of the original tomographic scans. Three-dimensional image reconstructions can be generated from any direction of view, with random selection of sections of the scanned object. (orig./MM) With 69 figs., 2 tabs [de

  7. CMS distributed computing workflow experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer; Gutsche, Oliver; Haas, Jeffrey D.; Prosper, Harrison B.; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Hahn, Kristian; Klute, Markus; Mohapatra, Ajit; Spinoso, Vincenzo; Kcira, Dorian; Caudron, Julien; Liao, Junhui; Pin, Arnaud; Schul, Nicolas; De Lentdecker, Gilles; McCartin, Joseph; Vanelderen, Lukas; Janssen, Xavier; Tsyganov, Andrey; Barge, Derek; Lahiff, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The vast majority of the CMS Computing capacity, which is organized in a tiered hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-proton collision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recorded and simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All central data processing workflows are executed at the Tier-1 level, which contain re-reconstruction and skimming workflows of collision data as well as reprocessing of simulated data to adapt to changing detector conditions. This paper describes the operation of the CMS processing infrastructure at the Tier-1 level. The Tier-1 workflows are described in detail. The operational optimization of resource usage is described. In particular, the variation of different workflows during the data taking period of 2010, their efficiencies and latencies as well as their impact on the delivery of physics results is discussed and lessons are drawn from this experience. The simulation of proton-proton collisions for the CMS experiment is primarily carried out at the second tier of the CMS computing infrastructure. Half of the Tier-2 sites of CMS are reserved for central Monte Carlo (MC) production while the other half is available for user analysis. This paper summarizes the large throughput of the MC production operation during the data taking period of 2010 and discusses the latencies and efficiencies of the various types of MC production workflows. We present the operational procedures to optimize the usage of available resources and we the operational model of CMS for including opportunistic resources, such as the larger Tier-3 sites, into the central production operation.

  8. CMS distributed computing workflow experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer; Gutsche, Oliver; Haas, Jeffrey D; Prosper, Harrison B; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Hahn, Kristian; Klute, Markus; Mohapatra, Ajit; Spinoso, Vincenzo; Kcira, Dorian; Caudron, Julien; Liao Junhui; Pin, Arnaud; Schul, Nicolas; Lentdecker, Gilles De; McCartin, Joseph; Vanelderen, Lukas; Janssen, Xavier; Tsyganov, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of the CMS Computing capacity, which is organized in a tiered hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-proton collision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recorded and simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All central data processing workflows are executed at the Tier-1 level, which contain re-reconstruction and skimming workflows of collision data as well as reprocessing of simulated data to adapt to changing detector conditions. This paper describes the operation of the CMS processing infrastructure at the Tier-1 level. The Tier-1 workflows are described in detail. The operational optimization of resource usage is described. In particular, the variation of different workflows during the data taking period of 2010, their efficiencies and latencies as well as their impact on the delivery of physics results is discussed and lessons are drawn from this experience. The simulation of proton-proton collisions for the CMS experiment is primarily carried out at the second tier of the CMS computing infrastructure. Half of the Tier-2 sites of CMS are reserved for central Monte Carlo (MC) production while the other half is available for user analysis. This paper summarizes the large throughput of the MC production operation during the data taking period of 2010 and discusses the latencies and efficiencies of the various types of MC production workflows. We present the operational procedures to optimize the usage of available resources and we the operational model of CMS for including opportunistic resources, such as the larger Tier-3 sites, into the central production operation.

  9. Reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN; Peters, Amanda E [Cambridge, MA; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian E [Rochester, MN

    2012-04-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application that include: beginning, by each compute node, performance of a blocking operation specified by the parallel application, each compute node beginning the blocking operation asynchronously with respect to the other compute nodes; reducing, for each compute node, power to one or more hardware components of that compute node in response to that compute node beginning the performance of the blocking operation; and restoring, for each compute node, the power to the hardware components having power reduced in response to all of the compute nodes beginning the performance of the blocking operation.

  10. Reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN; Peters, Amanda A [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian E [Rochester, MN

    2012-01-10

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application that include: beginning, by each compute node, performance of a blocking operation specified by the parallel application, each compute node beginning the blocking operation asynchronously with respect to the other compute nodes; reducing, for each compute node, power to one or more hardware components of that compute node in response to that compute node beginning the performance of the blocking operation; and restoring, for each compute node, the power to the hardware components having power reduced in response to all of the compute nodes beginning the performance of the blocking operation.

  11. Line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Berg, Jeremy E.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-06-08

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes connected together through the network, the network optimized for point to point data communications and characterized by at least a first dimension, a second dimension, and a third dimension, that include: initiating, by a broadcasting compute node, a broadcast operation, including sending a message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the first dimension for the network; sending, by each compute node along the axis of the first dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the second dimension for the network; and sending, by each compute node along the axis of the second dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the third dimension for the network.

  12. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, Simone; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run2. An increased data rate and computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (ProdSys2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward the flexible computing model. The flexible computing utilization exploring the opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model, the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover a new data management strategy, based on defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defin...

  13. Ocean Modeling and Visualization on Massively Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yi; Li, P. Peggy; Wang, Ping; Katz, Daniel S.; Cheng, Benny N.

    1997-01-01

    Climate modeling is one of the grand challenges of computational science, and ocean modeling plays an important role in both understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting future climate change.

  14. Parallel Computational Intelligence-Based Multi-Camera Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orts-Escolano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a multi-camera surveillance system based on the use of self-organizing neural networks to represent events on video. The system processes several tasks in parallel using GPUs (graphic processor units. It addresses multiple vision tasks at various levels, such as segmentation, representation or characterization, analysis and monitoring of the movement. These features allow the construction of a robust representation of the environment and interpret the behavior of mobile agents in the scene. It is also necessary to integrate the vision module into a global system that operates in a complex environment by receiving images from multiple acquisition devices at video frequency. Offering relevant information to higher level systems, monitoring and making decisions in real time, it must accomplish a set of requirements, such as: time constraints, high availability, robustness, high processing speed and re-configurability. We have built a system able to represent and analyze the motion in video acquired by a multi-camera network and to process multi-source data in parallel on a multi-GPU architecture.

  15. Mobile Agents in Networking and Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jiannong

    2012-01-01

    The book focuses on mobile agents, which are computer programs that can autonomously migrate between network sites. This text introduces the concepts and principles of mobile agents, provides an overview of mobile agent technology, and focuses on applications in networking and distributed computing.

  16. A Software Rejuvenation Framework for Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Savio

    2009-01-01

    A performability-oriented conceptual framework for software rejuvenation has been constructed as a means of increasing levels of reliability and performance in distributed stateful computing. As used here, performability-oriented signifies that the construction of the framework is guided by the concept of analyzing the ability of a given computing system to deliver services with gracefully degradable performance. The framework is especially intended to support applications that involve stateful replicas of server computers.

  17. Current distribution in parallel paths of the coils of a 50 Hz prototype dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, A.J.

    1995-06-01

    The prototype dipole made for TRIUMF's Kaon Factory proposal used coils with 12 parallel paths to reduce eddy current losses in the conductors. The ac current distribution in these paths was non-uniform due to different self and mutual inductances. Small differences in inductance can cause large circulating currents in the parallel windings. This paper describes the measurement of the inductances and shows an attempt to predict the current distribution for two alternative connection schemes. (author). 4 refs., 8 figs

  18. An Efficient MapReduce-Based Parallel Clustering Algorithm for Distributed Traffic Subarea Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawen Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic subarea division is vital for traffic system management and traffic network analysis in intelligent transportation systems (ITSs. Since existing methods may not be suitable for big traffic data processing, this paper presents a MapReduce-based Parallel Three-Phase K-Means (Par3PKM algorithm for solving traffic subarea division problem on a widely adopted Hadoop distributed computing platform. Specifically, we first modify the distance metric and initialization strategy of K-Means and then employ a MapReduce paradigm to redesign the optimized K-Means algorithm for parallel clustering of large-scale taxi trajectories. Moreover, we propose a boundary identifying method to connect the borders of clustering results for each cluster. Finally, we divide traffic subarea of Beijing based on real-world trajectory data sets generated by 12,000 taxis in a period of one month using the proposed approach. Experimental evaluation results indicate that when compared with K-Means, Par2PK-Means, and ParCLARA, Par3PKM achieves higher efficiency, more accuracy, and better scalability and can effectively divide traffic subarea with big taxi trajectory data.

  19. CMS Distributed Computing Workflow Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Jeffrey David

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of the CMS Computing capacity, which is organized in a tiered hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-proton collision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recorded and simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All central data processing workflows are executed at the Tier-1 level, which contain re-reconstruction and skimming workflows of collision data as well as reprocessing of simulated data to adapt to changing detector conditions. This paper describes the operation of the CMS processing infrastructure at the Tier-1 level. The Tier-1 workflows are described in detail. The operational optimization of resource usage is described. In particular, the variation of different workflows during the data taking period of 2010, their efficiencies and latencies as well as their impact on the delivery of physics results is discussed and lessons are drawn from this experience. The simul...

  20. On efficiency of fire simulation realization: parallelization with greater number of computational meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasek, Lukas; Glasa, Jan

    2017-12-01

    Current fire simulation systems are capable to utilize advantages of high-performance computer (HPC) platforms available and to model fires efficiently in parallel. In this paper, efficiency of a corridor fire simulation on a HPC computer cluster is discussed. The parallel MPI version of Fire Dynamics Simulator is used for testing efficiency of selected strategies of allocation of computational resources of the cluster using a greater number of computational cores. Simulation results indicate that if the number of cores used is not equal to a multiple of the total number of cluster node cores there are allocation strategies which provide more efficient calculations.

  1. Fencing network direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-07-07

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to a deterministic data communications network through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and the deterministic data communications network; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamic Pressure Drop Estimation of Flow between Parallel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min; Yang, Soo Hyung; Park, Jong Hark [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Many pool type reactors have forced downward flows inside the core during normal operation; there is a chance of flow inversion when transients occur. During this phase, the flow undergo transition between turbulent and laminar regions where drastic changes take place in terms of momentum and heat transfer, and the decrease in safety margin is usually observed. Additionally, for high Prandtl number fluids such as water, an effect of the velocity profile inside the channel on the temperature distribution is more pronounced over the low Prandtl number ones. This makes the checking of its pressure drop estimation accuracy less important, assuming the code verification is complete. With an advent of powerful computer hardware, engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have become quite common these days. Especially for a fully-turbulent and single phase convective heat transfer, the predictability of the commercial codes has matured enough so that many well-known companies adopt those to accelerate a product development cycle and to realize an increased profitability. In contrast to the above, the transition models for the CFD code are still under development, and the most of the models show limited generality and prediction accuracy. Unlike the system codes, the CFD codes estimate the pressure drop from the velocity profile which is obtained by solving momentum conservation equations, and the resulting friction factor can be a representative parameter for a constant cross section channel flow. In addition, the flow inside a rectangular channel with a high span to gap ratio can be approximated by flow inside parallel plates. The computational fluid dynamics simulation on the flow between parallel plates showed reasonable prediction capability for the laminar and the turbulent regime.

  3. Digital tomosynthesis parallel imaging computational analysis with shift and add and back projection reconstruction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Balla, Apuroop; Rayford II, Cleveland E; Zhou, Weihua; Fang, Jian; Cong, Linlin

    2010-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a novel technology that has been developed for various clinical applications. Parallel imaging configuration is utilised in a few tomosynthesis imaging areas such as digital chest tomosynthesis. Recently, parallel imaging configuration for breast tomosynthesis began to appear too. In this paper, we present the investigation on computational analysis of impulse response characterisation as the start point of our important research efforts to optimise the parallel imaging configurations. Results suggest that impulse response computational analysis is an effective method to compare and optimise imaging configurations.

  4. A homotopy method for solving Riccati equations on a shared memory parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigic, D.; Watson, L.T.; Collins, E.G. Jr.; Davis, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    Although there are numerous algorithms for solving Riccati equations, there still remains a need for algorithms which can operate efficiently on large problems and on parallel machines. This paper gives a new homotopy-based algorithm for solving Riccati equations on a shared memory parallel computer. The central part of the algorithm is the computation of the kernel of the Jacobian matrix, which is essential for the corrector iterations along the homotopy zero curve. Using a Schur decomposition the tensor product structure of various matrices can be efficiently exploited. The algorithm allows for efficient parallelization on shared memory machines

  5. Parallel computation for blood cell classification in medical hyperspectral imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wei; Wu, Lucheng; Qiu, Xianbo; Ran, Qiong; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    With the advantage of fine spectral resolution, hyperspectral imagery provides great potential for cell classification. This paper provides a promising classification system including the following three stages: (1) band selection for a subset of spectral bands with distinctive and informative features, (2) spectral-spatial feature extraction, such as local binary patterns (LBP), and (3) followed by an effective classifier. Moreover, these three steps are further implemented on graphics processing units (GPU) respectively, which makes the system real-time and more practical. The GPU parallel implementation is compared with the serial implementation on central processing units (CPU). Experimental results based on real medical hyperspectral data demonstrate that the proposed system is able to offer high accuracy and fast speed, which are appealing for cell classification in medical hyperspectral imagery. (paper)

  6. Vector and parallel processors in computational science. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, I S; Reid, J K

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains papers from most of the invited talks and from several of the contributed talks and poster sessions presented at VAPP II. The contents present an extensive coverage of all important aspects of vector and parallel processors, including hardware, languages, numerical algorithms and applications. The topics covered include descriptions of new machines (both research and commercial machines), languages and software aids, and general discussions of whole classes of machines and their uses. Numerical methods papers include Monte Carlo algorithms, iterative and direct methods for solving large systems, finite elements, optimization, random number generation and mathematical software. The specific applications covered include neutron diffusion calculations, molecular dynamics, weather forecasting, lattice gauge calculations, fluid dynamics, flight simulation, cartography, image processing and cryptography. Most machines and architecture types are being used for these applications. many refs.

  7. GPU-Accelerated Parallel FDTD on Distributed Heterogeneous Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronglin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a (finite difference time domain FDTD code written in Fortran and CUDA for realistic electromagnetic calculations with parallelization methods of Message Passing Interface (MPI and Open Multiprocessing (OpenMP. Since both Central Processing Unit (CPU and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU resources are utilized, a faster execution speed can be reached compared to a traditional pure GPU code. In our experiments, 64 NVIDIA TESLA K20m GPUs and 64 INTEL XEON E5-2670 CPUs are used to carry out the pure CPU, pure GPU, and CPU + GPU tests. Relative to the pure CPU calculations for the same problems, the speedup ratio achieved by CPU + GPU calculations is around 14. Compared to the pure GPU calculations for the same problems, the CPU + GPU calculations have 7.6%–13.2% performance improvement. Because of the small memory size of GPUs, the FDTD problem size is usually very small. However, this code can enlarge the maximum problem size by 25% without reducing the performance of traditional pure GPU code. Finally, using this code, a microstrip antenna array with 16×18 elements is calculated and the radiation patterns are compared with the ones of MoM. Results show that there is a well agreement between them.

  8. Managing internode data communications for an uninitialized process in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Parker, Jeffrey J; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-05-20

    A parallel computer includes nodes, each having main memory and a messaging unit (MU). Each MU includes computer memory, which in turn includes, MU message buffers. Each MU message buffer is associated with an uninitialized process on the compute node. In the parallel computer, managing internode data communications for an uninitialized process includes: receiving, by an MU of a compute node, one or more data communications messages in an MU message buffer associated with an uninitialized process on the compute node; determining, by an application agent, that the MU message buffer associated with the uninitialized process is full prior to initialization of the uninitialized process; establishing, by the application agent, a temporary message buffer for the uninitialized process in main computer memory; and moving, by the application agent, data communications messages from the MU message buffer associated with the uninitialized process to the temporary message buffer in main computer memory.

  9. Scalable Parallelization of Skyline Computation for Multi-core Processors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chester, Sean; Sidlauskas, Darius; Assent, Ira

    2015-01-01

    The skyline is an important query operator for multi-criteria decision making. It reduces a dataset to only those points that offer optimal trade-offs of dimensions. In general, it is very expensive to compute. Recently, multi-core CPU algorithms have been proposed to accelerate the computation...... of the skyline. However, they do not sufficiently minimize dominance tests and so are not competitive with state-of-the-art sequential algorithms. In this paper, we introduce a novel multi-core skyline algorithm, Hybrid, which processes points in blocks. It maintains a shared, global skyline among all threads...

  10. GISpark: A Geospatial Distributed Computing Platform for Spatiotemporal Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhong, E.; Wang, E.; Zhong, Y.; Cai, W.; Li, S.; Gao, S.

    2016-12-01

    Geospatial data are growing exponentially because of the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies such as global remote-sensing satellites and location-based devices. Analyzing large amounts of geospatial data can provide great value for both industrial and scientific applications. Data- and compute- intensive characteristics inherent in geospatial big data increasingly pose great challenges to technologies of data storing, computing and analyzing. Such challenges require a scalable and efficient architecture that can store, query, analyze, and visualize large-scale spatiotemporal data. Therefore, we developed GISpark - a geospatial distributed computing platform for processing large-scale vector, raster and stream data. GISpark is constructed based on the latest virtualized computing infrastructures and distributed computing architecture. OpenStack and Docker are used to build multi-user hosting cloud computing infrastructure for GISpark. The virtual storage systems such as HDFS, Ceph, MongoDB are combined and adopted for spatiotemporal data storage management. Spark-based algorithm framework is developed for efficient parallel computing. Within this framework, SuperMap GIScript and various open-source GIS libraries can be integrated into GISpark. GISpark can also integrated with scientific computing environment (e.g., Anaconda), interactive computing web applications (e.g., Jupyter notebook), and machine learning tools (e.g., TensorFlow/Orange). The associated geospatial facilities of GISpark in conjunction with the scientific computing environment, exploratory spatial data analysis tools, temporal data management and analysis systems make up a powerful geospatial computing tool. GISpark not only provides spatiotemporal big data processing capacity in the geospatial field, but also provides spatiotemporal computational model and advanced geospatial visualization tools that deals with other domains related with spatial property. We

  11. Monte Carlo calculations on a parallel computer using MORSE-C.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.

    1995-01-01

    The general purpose particle transport Monte Carlo code, MORSE-C.G., is implemented on a parallel computing transputer-based system having MIMD architecture. Example problems are solved which are representative of the 3-principal types of problem that can be solved by the original serial code, namely, fixed source, eigenvalue (k-eff) and time-dependent. The results from the parallelized version of the code are compared in tables with the serial code run on a mainframe serial computer, and with an independent, deterministic transport code. The performance of the parallel computer as the number of processors is varied is shown graphically. For the parallel strategy used, the loss of efficiency as the number of processors is increased, is investigated. (author)

  12. ATLAS Distributed Computing: Experience and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb-1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centers around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics program including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2014 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  13. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25/fb of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100~PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  14. Parallel processing algorithms for hydrocodes on a computer with MIMD architecture (DENELCOR's HEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.L.

    1983-11-01

    In real time simulation/prediction of complex systems such as water-cooled nuclear reactors, if reactor operators had fast simulator/predictors to check the consequences of their operations before implementing them, events such as the incident at Three Mile Island might be avoided. However, existing simulator/predictors such as RELAP run slower than real time on serial computers. It appears that the only way to overcome the barrier to higher computing rates is to use computers with architectures that allow concurrent computations or parallel processing. The computer architecture with the greatest degree of parallelism is labeled Multiple Instruction Stream, Multiple Data Stream (MIMD). An example of a machine of this type is the HEP computer by DENELCOR. It appears that hydrocodes are very well suited for parallelization on the HEP. It is a straightforward exercise to parallelize explicit, one-dimensional Lagrangean hydrocodes in a zone-by-zone parallelization. Similarly, implicit schemes can be parallelized in a zone-by-zone fashion via an a priori, symbolic inversion of the tridiagonal matrix that arises in an implicit scheme. These techniques are extended to Eulerian hydrocodes by using Harlow's rezone technique. The extension from single-phase Eulerian to two-phase Eulerian is straightforward. This step-by-step extension leads to hydrocodes with zone-by-zone parallelization that are capable of two-phase flow simulation. Extensions to two and three spatial dimensions can be achieved by operator splitting. It appears that a zone-by-zone parallelization is the best way to utilize the capabilities of an MIMD machine. 40 references

  15. Analysis of flow distribution instability in parallel thin rectangular multi-channel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G.L. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an City 710049 (China); Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin City 150001 (China); Su, G.H., E-mail: ghsu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an City 710049 (China); Peng, M.J. [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin City 150001 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Flow distribution instability in parallel thin rectangular multi-channel system is studied using RELAP5 codes. • Flow excursion may bring parallel heating channel into the density wave oscillations region. • Flow distribution instability is more likely to happen at low power/flow ratio conditions. • The increase of channel number will not affect the flow distribution instability boundary. • Asymmetry inlet throttling and heating will make system more unstable. - Abstract: The flow distribution instability in parallel thin rectangular multi-channel system has been researched in the present study. The research model of parallel channel system is established by using RELAP5/MOD3.4 codes. The transient process of flow distribution instability is studied at imposed inlet mass flow rate and imposed pressure drop conditions. The influence of heating power, mass flow rate, system pressure and channel number on flow distribution instability are analyzed. Furthermore, the flow distribution instability of parallel two-channel system under asymmetric inlet throttling and heating power is studied. The results show that, if multi-channel system operates at the negative slope region of channel ΔP–G curve, small disturbance in pressure drop will lead to flow redistribution between parallel channels. Flow excursion may bring the operating point of heating channel into the density-wave oscillations region, this will result in out-phase or in-phase flow oscillations. Flow distribution instability is more likely to happen at low power/flow ratio conditions, the stability of parallel channel system increases with system pressure, the channel number has a little effect on system stability, but the asymmetry inlet throttling or heating power will make the system more unstable.

  16. Parallel performances of three 3D reconstruction methods on MIMD computers: Feldkamp, block ART and SIRT algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, C.; Chassery, J.M.; Peyrin, F.; Girerd, C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the parallel implementations of reconstruction methods in 3D tomography. 3D tomography requires voluminous data and long computation times. Parallel computing, on MIMD computers, seems to be a good approach to manage this problem. In this study, we present the different steps of the parallelization on an abstract parallel computer. Depending on the method, we use two main approaches to parallelize the algorithms: the local approach and the global approach. Experimental results on MIMD computers are presented. Two 3D images reconstructed from realistic data are showed

  17. The BaBar experiment's distributed computing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutigny, D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to face the expected increase in statistics between now and 2005, the BaBar experiment at SLAC is evolving its computing model toward a distributed multitier system. It is foreseen that data will be spread among Tier-A centers and deleted from the SLAC center. A uniform computing environment is being deployed in the centers, the network bandwidth is continuously increased and data distribution tools has been designed in order to reach a transfer rate of ∼100 TB of data per year. In parallel, smaller Tier-B and C sites receive subsets of data, presently in Kanga-ROOT format and later in Objectivity format. GRID tools will be used for remote job submission

  18. The BaBar Experiment's Distributed Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowdy, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    In order to face the expected increase in statistics between now and 2005, the BaBar experiment at SLAC is evolving its computing model toward a distributed multi-tier system. It is foreseen that data will be spread among Tier-A centers and deleted from the SLAC center. A uniform computing environment is being deployed in the centers, the network bandwidth is continuously increased and data distribution tools has been designed in order to reach a transfer rate of ∼100 TB of data per year. In parallel, smaller Tier-B and C sites receive subsets of data, presently in Kanga-ROOT[1] format and later in Objectivity[2] format. GRID tools will be used for remote job submission

  19. A simple multiprocessor management system for event-parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracker, S.; Gounder, K.; Hendrix, K.; Summers, D.

    1996-01-01

    Offline software using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) sockets to distribute particle physics events to multiple UNIX/RISC workstations is described. A modular, building block approach was taken that allowed tailoring to solve specific tasks efficiently and simply as they arose. The modest, initial cost was having to learn about sockets for interprocess communication. This multiprocessor management software has been used to control the reconstruction of eight billion raw data events from Fermilab Experiment E791

  20. Implementation of QR up- and downdating on a massively parallel |computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus; Hansen, Per Christian; Madsen, Kaj

    1995-01-01

    We describe an implementation of QR up- and downdating on a massively parallel computer (the Connection Machine CM-200) and show that the algorithm maps well onto the computer. In particular, we show how the use of corrected semi-normal equations for downdating can be efficiently implemented. We...... also illustrate the use of our algorithms in a new LP algorithm....

  1. Software Alchemy: Turning Complex Statistical Computations into Embarrassingly-Parallel Ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Matloff

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth in the use of computationally intensive statistical procedures, especially with big data, has necessitated the usage of parallel computation on diverse platforms such as multicore, GPUs, clusters and clouds. However, slowdown due to interprocess communication costs typically limits such methods to "embarrassingly parallel" (EP algorithms, especially on non-shared memory platforms. This paper develops a broadlyapplicable method for converting many non-EP algorithms into statistically equivalent EP ones. The method is shown to yield excellent levels of speedup for a variety of statistical computations. It also overcomes certain problems of memory limitations.

  2. Accelerating Neuroimage Registration through Parallel Computation of Similarity Metric.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Gang Luo

    Full Text Available Neuroimage registration is crucial for brain morphometric analysis and treatment efficacy evaluation. However, existing advanced registration algorithms such as FLIRT and ANTs are not efficient enough for clinical use. In this paper, a GPU implementation of FLIRT with the correlation ratio (CR as the similarity metric and a GPU accelerated correlation coefficient (CC calculation for the symmetric diffeomorphic registration of ANTs have been developed. The comparison with their corresponding original tools shows that our accelerated algorithms can greatly outperform the original algorithm in terms of computational efficiency. This paper demonstrates the great potential of applying these registration tools in clinical applications.

  3. Digi-Clima Grid: image processing and distributed computing for recovering historical climate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Nesmachnow

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the Digi-Clima Grid project, whose main goals are to design and implement semi-automatic techniques for digitalizing and recovering historical climate records applying parallel computing techniques over distributed computing infrastructures. The specific tool developed for image processing is described, and the implementation over grid and cloud infrastructures is reported. A experimental analysis over institutional and volunteer-based grid/cloud distributed systems demonstrate that the proposed approach is an efficient tool for recovering historical climate data. The parallel implementations allow to distribute the processing load, achieving accurate speedup values.

  4. Operational mesoscale atmospheric dispersion prediction using high performance parallel computing cluster for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, C.V.; Venkatesan, R.; Muralidharan, N.V.; Das, Someshwar; Dass, Hari; Eswara Kumar, P.

    2005-08-01

    An operational atmospheric dispersion prediction system is implemented on a cluster super computer for 'Online Emergency Response' for Kalpakkam nuclear site. The numerical system constitutes a parallel version of a nested grid meso-scale meteorological model MM5 coupled to a random walk particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The system provides 48 hour forecast of the local weather and radioactive plume dispersion due to hypothetical air borne releases in a range of 100 km around the site. The parallel code was implemented on different cluster configurations like distributed and shared memory systems. Results of MM5 run time performance for 1-day prediction are reported on all the machines available for testing. A reduction of 5 times in runtime is achieved using 9 dual Xeon nodes (18 physical/36 logical processors) compared to a single node sequential run. Based on the above run time results a cluster computer facility with 9-node Dual Xeon is commissioned at IGCAR for model operation. The run time of a triple nested domain MM5 is about 4 h for 24 h forecast. The system has been operated continuously for a few months and results were ported on the IMSc home page. Initial and periodic boundary condition data for MM5 are provided by NCMRWF, New Delhi. An alternative source is found to be NCEP, USA. These two sources provide the input data to the operational models at different spatial and temporal resolutions and using different assimilation methods. A comparative study on the results of forecast is presented using these two data sources for present operational use. Slight improvement is noticed in rainfall, winds, geopotential heights and the vertical atmospheric structure while using NCEP data probably because of its high spatial and temporal resolution. (author)

  5. 3D streamers simulation in a pin to plane configuration using massively parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, J.-M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Dessante, P.; Jacobs, C.; Renon, N.; Yousfi, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns the 3D simulation of corona discharge using high performance computing (HPC) managed with the message passing interface (MPI) library. In the field of finite volume methods applied on non-adaptive mesh grids and in the case of a specific 3D dynamic benchmark test devoted to streamer studies, the great efficiency of the iterative R&B SOR and BiCGSTAB methods versus the direct MUMPS method was clearly demonstrated in solving the Poisson equation using HPC resources. The optimization of the parallelization and the resulting scalability was undertaken as a function of the HPC architecture for a number of mesh cells ranging from 8 to 512 million and a number of cores ranging from 20 to 1600. The R&B SOR method remains at least about four times faster than the BiCGSTAB method and requires significantly less memory for all tested situations. The R&B SOR method was then implemented in a 3D MPI parallelized code that solves the classical first order model of an atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air. The 3D code capabilities were tested by following the development of one, two and four coplanar streamers generated by initial plasma spots for 6 ns. The preliminary results obtained allowed us to follow in detail the formation of the tree structure of a corona discharge and the effects of the mutual interactions between the streamers in terms of streamer velocity, trajectory and diameter. The computing time for 64 million of mesh cells distributed over 1000 cores using the MPI procedures is about 30 min ns-1, regardless of the number of streamers.

  6. Distributed quantum computing with single photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beige, A.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Distributed quantum computing requires the ability to perform nonlocal gate operations between the distant nodes (stationary qubits) of a large network. To achieve this, it has been proposed to interconvert stationary qubits with flying qubits. In contrast to this, we show that distributed quantum computing only requires the ability to encode stationary qubits into flying qubits but not the conversion of flying qubits into stationary qubits. We describe a scheme for the realization of an eventually deterministic controlled phase gate by performing measurements on pairs of flying qubits. Our scheme could be implemented with a linear optics quantum computing setup including sources for the generation of single photons on demand, linear optics elements and photon detectors. In the presence of photon loss and finite detector efficiencies, the scheme could be used to build large cluster states for one way quantum computing with a high fidelity. (author)

  7. Parallel kinematic mechanisms for distributed actuation of future structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, G.; Plummer, A. R.; Cleaver, D. J.; Zhou, H.

    2016-09-01

    Future machines will require distributed actuation integrated with load-bearing structures, so that they are lighter, move faster, use less energy, and are more adaptable. Good examples are shape-changing aircraft wings which can adapt precisely to the ideal aerodynamic form for current flying conditions, and light but powerful robotic manipulators which can interact safely with human co-workers. A 'tensegrity structure' is a good candidate for this application due to its potentially excellent stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio and a multi-element structure into which actuators could be embedded. This paper presents results of an analysis of an example practical actuated tensegrity structure consisting of 3 ‘unit cells’. A numerical method is used to determine the stability of the structure with varying actuator length, showing how four actuators can be used to control movement in three degrees of freedom as well as simultaneously maintaining the structural pre-load. An experimental prototype has been built, in which 4 pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are embedded in one unit cell. The PAMs are controlled antagonistically, by high speed switching of on-off valves, to achieve control of position and structure pre-load. Experimental and simulation results are presented, and future prospects for the approach are discussed.

  8. A distributed parallel genetic algorithm of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-Shuang; Xu, Gao-Chao; Fu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The cloud platform provides various services to users. More and more cloud centers provide infrastructure as the main way of operating. To improve the utilization rate of the cloud center and to decrease the operating cost, the cloud center provides services according to requirements of users by sharding the resources with virtualization. Considering both QoS for users and cost saving for cloud computing providers, we try to maximize performance and minimize energy cost as well. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel genetic algorithm (DPGA) of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform. It executes the genetic algorithm parallelly and distributedly on several selected physical hosts in the first stage. Then it continues to execute the genetic algorithm of the second stage with solutions obtained from the first stage as the initial population. The solution calculated by the genetic algorithm of the second stage is the optimal one of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed placement strategy of VM deployment can ensure QoS for users and it is more effective and more energy efficient than other placement strategies on the cloud platform.

  9. A Distributed Parallel Genetic Algorithm of Placement Strategy for Virtual Machines Deployment on Cloud Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shuang Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloud platform provides various services to users. More and more cloud centers provide infrastructure as the main way of operating. To improve the utilization rate of the cloud center and to decrease the operating cost, the cloud center provides services according to requirements of users by sharding the resources with virtualization. Considering both QoS for users and cost saving for cloud computing providers, we try to maximize performance and minimize energy cost as well. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel genetic algorithm (DPGA of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform. It executes the genetic algorithm parallelly and distributedly on several selected physical hosts in the first stage. Then it continues to execute the genetic algorithm of the second stage with solutions obtained from the first stage as the initial population. The solution calculated by the genetic algorithm of the second stage is the optimal one of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed placement strategy of VM deployment can ensure QoS for users and it is more effective and more energy efficient than other placement strategies on the cloud platform.

  10. Programming a massively parallel, computation universal system: static behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1986-01-01

    In previous work by the authors, the ''optimum finding'' properties of Hopfield neural nets were applied to the nets themselves to create a ''neural compiler.'' This was done in such a way that the problem of programming the attractors of one neural net (called the Slave net) was expressed as an optimization problem that was in turn solved by a second neural net (the Master net). In this series of papers that approach is extended to programming nets that contain interneurons (sometimes called ''hidden neurons''), and thus deals with nets capable of universal computation. 22 refs.

  11. Weighted Local Active Pixel Pattern (WLAPP for Face Recognition in Parallel Computation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundavarapu Mallikarjuna Rao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  - The availability of multi-core technology resulted totally new computational era. Researchers are keen to explore available potential in state of art-machines for breaking the bearer imposed by serial computation. Face Recognition is one of the challenging applications on so ever computational environment. The main difficulty of traditional Face Recognition algorithms is lack of the scalability. In this paper Weighted Local Active Pixel Pattern (WLAPP, a new scalable Face Recognition Algorithm suitable for parallel environment is proposed.  Local Active Pixel Pattern (LAPP is found to be simple and computational inexpensive compare to Local Binary Patterns (LBP. WLAPP is developed based on concept of LAPP. The experimentation is performed on FG-Net Aging Database with deliberately introduced 20% distortion and the results are encouraging. Keywords — Active pixels, Face Recognition, Local Binary Pattern (LBP, Local Active Pixel Pattern (LAPP, Pattern computing, parallel workers, template, weight computation.  

  12. 10th International Workshop on Parallel Tools for High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia, José; Hilbrich, Tobias; Knüpfer, Andreas; Resch, Michael; Nagel, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the 10th International Parallel Tools Workshop, held October 4-5, 2016 in Stuttgart, Germany – a forum to discuss the latest advances in parallel tools. High-performance computing plays an increasingly important role for numerical simulation and modelling in academic and industrial research. At the same time, using large-scale parallel systems efficiently is becoming more difficult. A number of tools addressing parallel program development and analysis have emerged from the high-performance computing community over the last decade, and what may have started as collection of small helper script has now matured to production-grade frameworks. Powerful user interfaces and an extensive body of documentation allow easy usage by non-specialists.

  13. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Dan V; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C M J M; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V

    2016-03-08

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology.

  14. Teaching Scientific Computing: A Model-Centered Approach to Pipeline and Parallel Programming with C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiras Dolgopolovas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an approach to the introduction into pipeline and parallel computing, using a model of the multiphase queueing system. Pipeline computing, including software pipelines, is among the key concepts in modern computing and electronics engineering. The modern computer science and engineering education requires a comprehensive curriculum, so the introduction to pipeline and parallel computing is the essential topic to be included in the curriculum. At the same time, the topic is among the most motivating tasks due to the comprehensive multidisciplinary and technical requirements. To enhance the educational process, the paper proposes a novel model-centered framework and develops the relevant learning objects. It allows implementing an educational platform of constructivist learning process, thus enabling learners’ experimentation with the provided programming models, obtaining learners’ competences of the modern scientific research and computational thinking, and capturing the relevant technical knowledge. It also provides an integral platform that allows a simultaneous and comparative introduction to pipelining and parallel computing. The programming language C for developing programming models and message passing interface (MPI and OpenMP parallelization tools have been chosen for implementation.

  15. Vector and parallel computing on the IBM ES/3090, a powerful approach to solving problems in the utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes IBM's approach to parallel computing using the IBM ES/3090 computer. Parallel processing concepts were discussed including its advantages, potential performance improvements and limitations. Particular applications and capabilities for the IBM ES/3090 were presented along with preliminary results from some utilities in the application of parallel processing to simulation of system reliability, air pollution models, and power network dynamics

  16. Distributed computing environment for Mine Warfare Command

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Lane L.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The Mine Warfare Command in Charleston, South Carolina has been converting its information systems architecture from a centralized mainframe based system to a decentralized network of personal computers over the past several years. This thesis analyzes the progress Of the evolution as of May of 1992. The building blocks of a distributed architecture are discussed in relation to the choices the Mine Warfare Command has made to date. Ar...

  17. CUDA/GPU Technology : Parallel Programming For High Performance Scientific Computing

    OpenAIRE

    YUHENDRA; KUZE, Hiroaki; JOSAPHAT, Tetuko Sri Sumantyo

    2009-01-01

    [ABSTRACT]Graphics processing units (GP Us) originally designed for computer video cards have emerged as the most powerful chip in a high-performance workstation. In the high performance computation capabilities, graphic processing units (GPU) lead to much more powerful performance than conventional CPUs by means of parallel processing. In 2007, the birth of Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and CUDA-enabled GPUs by NVIDIA Corporation brought a revolution in the general purpose GPU a...

  18. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairz, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb −1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, energies and event complexities. An essential requirement will be the efficient utilisation of current and future processor technologies as well as a broad range of computing platforms, including supercomputing and cloud resources. We will report on experience gained thus far and our progress in preparing ATLAS computing for the future

  19. Parallel file system with metadata distributed across partitioned key-value store c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary; Torres, Aaron

    2017-09-19

    Improved techniques are provided for storing metadata associated with a plurality of sub-files associated with a single shared file in a parallel file system. The shared file is generated by a plurality of applications executing on a plurality of compute nodes. A compute node implements a Parallel Log Structured File System (PLFS) library to store at least one portion of the shared file generated by an application executing on the compute node and metadata for the at least one portion of the shared file on one or more object storage servers. The compute node is also configured to implement a partitioned data store for storing a partition of the metadata for the shared file, wherein the partitioned data store communicates with partitioned data stores on other compute nodes using a message passing interface. The partitioned data store can be implemented, for example, using Multidimensional Data Hashing Indexing Middleware (MDHIM).

  20. Massively parallel computation of PARASOL code on the Origin 3800 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Masanari; Takizuka, Tomonori

    2001-10-01

    The divertor particle simulation code named PARASOL simulates open-field plasmas between divertor walls self-consistently by using an electrostatic PIC method and a binary collision Monte Carlo model. The PARASOL parallelized with MPI-1.1 for scalar parallel computer worked on Intel Paragon XP/S system. A system SGI Origin 3800 was newly installed (May, 2001). The parallel programming was improved at this switchover. As a result of the high-performance new hardware and this improvement, the PARASOL is speeded up by about 60 times with the same number of processors. (author)