WorldWideScience

Sample records for distributed interactive simulation

  1. New logistics protocols for distributed interactive simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Darrin; Morrison, John; Katz, Warren; Felton, Erik; Herman, Deborah A.

    1995-06-01

    In today's environment, the transportation and maintenance of military forces is nearly as important as combat operations. Rapid deployment to regions of low-intensity conflict will become a very common training scenario for the U.S. military. Thus it is desirable to apply distributed simulation technology to train logistics personnel in their combat support roles. Currently, distributed interactive simulation (DIS) only contains rudimentary logistics protocols. This paper introduces new protocols designed to handle the logistics problem. The Newtonian protocol takes a physics-based approach to modeling interactions on the simulation network. This protocol consists of a family of protocol data units (PDUs) which are used to communicate forces in different circumstances. The protocol implements a small set of physical relations. This represents a flexible and general mechanism to describe battlefield interactions between network entities. The migratory object protocol (MOP) family addresses the transfer of control. General mechanisms provide the means to simulate resupply, repair, and maintenance of entities at any level of abstraction (individual soldier to division). It can also increase the fidelity of mine laying, enable handover of weapons for terminal guidance, allow for the distribution of aggregate-level simulation entities, provide capabilities for the simulation of personnel, etc.

  2. Interactive simulations for quantum key distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohnle, Antje; Rizzoli, Aluna

    2017-01-01

    Secure communication protocols are becoming increasingly important, e.g. for internet-based communication. Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties, commonly called Alice and Bob, to generate a secret sequence of 0s and 1s called a key that is only known to themselves. Classically, Alice and Bob could never be certain that their communication was not compromised by a malicious eavesdropper. Quantum mechanics however makes secure communication possible. The fundamental principle of quantum mechanics that taking a measurement perturbs the system (unless the measurement is compatible with the quantum state) also applies to an eavesdropper. Using appropriate protocols to create the key, Alice and Bob can detect the presence of an eavesdropper by errors in their measurements. As part of the QuVis Quantum Mechanics Visualisation Project, we have developed a suite of four interactive simulations that demonstrate the basic principles of three different QKD protocols. The simulations use either polarised photons or spin 1/2 particles as physical realisations. The simulations and accompanying activities are freely available for use online or download, and run on a wide range of devices including tablets and PCs. Evaluation with students over three years was used to refine the simulations and activities. Preliminary studies show that the refined simulations and activities help students learn the basic principles of QKD at both the introductory and advanced undergraduate levels. (paper)

  3. Interactive simulations for quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnle, Antje; Rizzoli, Aluna

    2017-05-01

    Secure communication protocols are becoming increasingly important, e.g. for internet-based communication. Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties, commonly called Alice and Bob, to generate a secret sequence of 0s and 1s called a key that is only known to themselves. Classically, Alice and Bob could never be certain that their communication was not compromised by a malicious eavesdropper. Quantum mechanics however makes secure communication possible. The fundamental principle of quantum mechanics that taking a measurement perturbs the system (unless the measurement is compatible with the quantum state) also applies to an eavesdropper. Using appropriate protocols to create the key, Alice and Bob can detect the presence of an eavesdropper by errors in their measurements. As part of the QuVis Quantum Mechanics Visualisation Project, we have developed a suite of four interactive simulations that demonstrate the basic principles of three different QKD protocols. The simulations use either polarised photons or spin 1/2 particles as physical realisations. The simulations and accompanying activities are freely available for use online or download, and run on a wide range of devices including tablets and PCs. Evaluation with students over three years was used to refine the simulations and activities. Preliminary studies show that the refined simulations and activities help students learn the basic principles of QKD at both the introductory and advanced undergraduate levels.

  4. Simulated galaxy interactions as probes of merger spectral energy distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Brassington, Nicola, E-mail: llanz@ipac.caltech.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-10

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to the simulated SEDs that are close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with the SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient for identifying the interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.

  5. A unified framework for spiking and gap-junction interactions in distributed neuronal network simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eHahne

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary simulators for networks of point and few-compartment model neurons come with a plethora of ready-to-use neuron and synapse models and support complex network topologies. Recent technological advancements have broadened the spectrum of application further to the efficient simulation of brain-scale networks on supercomputers. In distributed network simulations the amount of spike data that accrues per millisecond and process is typically low, such that a common optimization strategy is to communicate spikes at relatively long intervals, where the upper limit is given by the shortest synaptic transmission delay in the network. This approach is well-suited for simulations that employ only chemical synapses but it has so far impeded the incorporation of gap-junction models, which require instantaneous neuronal interactions. Here, we present a numerical algorithm based on a waveform-relaxation technique which allows for network simulations with gap junctions in a way that is compatible with the delayed communication strategy. Using a reference implementation in the NEST simulator, we demonstrate that the algorithm and the required data structures can be smoothly integrated with existing code such that they complement the infrastructure for spiking connections. To show that the unified framework for gap-junction and spiking interactions achieves high performance and delivers high accuracy...

  6. Wave-Particle Interactions Associated with Nongyrotropic Distribution Functions: A Hybrid Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, P. D.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Richard, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    Nongyrotropic plasma distribution functions can be formed in regions of space where guiding center motion breaks down as a result of strongly curved and weak ambient magnetic fields. Such are the conditions near the current sheet in the Earth's middle and distant magnetotail, where observations of nongyrotropic ion distributions have been made. Here a systematic parameter study of nongyrotropic proton distributions using electromagnetic hybrid simulations is made. We model the observed nongyrotropic distributions by removing a number of arc length segments from a cold ring distribution and find significant differences with the results of simulations that initially have a gyrotropic ring distribution. Model nongyrotropic distributions with initially small perpendicular thermalization produce growing fluctuations that diffuse the ions into a stable Maxwellian-like distribution within a few proton gyro periods. The growing waves produced by nongyrotropic distributions are similar to the electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves produced by a gyrotropic proton ring distribution in that they propagate parallel to the background magnetic field and occur at frequencies on the order of the proton gyrofrequency, The maximum energy of the fluctuating magnetic field increases as the initial proton distribution is made more nongyrotropic, that is, more highly bunched in perpendicular velocity space. This increase can be as much as twice the energy produced in the gyrotropic case.

  7. Towards intelligent automation of power plant design and operations: The role of interactive simulations and distributed expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The design process of a power plant can be viewed as machine- chromosome engineering: When the final layout is implemented, the lifetime operating characteristics, constraints, strengths, and weaknesses of the resulting power-plant-specimen are durably determined. Hence, the safety, operability, maneuverability, availability, maintenance requirements, and costs of a power plant are directly related to the goodness of its electromechanical-genes. This paper addresses the desirability of incorporating distributed computing, distributed object management, and multimedia technologies to power plant engineering, in particular, to design and operations. The promise these technologies have for enhancing the quality and amount of engineering knowledge available, concurrently, online, to plant designers, maintenance crews, and operators is put into perspective. The role that advanced interactive simulations and expert systems will play in the intelligent automation of power plant design and operations is discussed

  8. Advanced Distributed Simulation Technology II (ADST-II) Distributed Interactive Fire Mission II Concept Evaluation Program Final Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ...), Fort Knox, KY sponsored the experiment. The experiment utilized a synthetic environment that employed virtual simulations to depict an Armor Platoon executing six basic platoon-level scenarios in realistic combat situations in various...

  9. Strawman Distributed Interactive Simulation Architecture Description Document. Volume 2. Supporting Rationale. Book 2. DIS Architecture Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-31

    the-loop, interactive training environment. Its primary advantage is that it has a long history of use and a number of experienced users. However...programmer teams. Mazda IsU ADST/WDLPr,-92.OO8O1O 2 The Object Oriented Behavioral Decomposition Approach Object oriented behavioral decomposition is

  10. Distributed Hardware-in-the-loop simulator for autonomous continuous dynamical systems with spatially constrained interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, D.J.; Papp, Z.; Dorrepaal, M.

    2003-01-01

    The state-of-the-art intelligent vehicle, autonomous guided vehicle and mobile robotics application domains can be described as collection of interacting highly autonomous complex dynamical systems. Extensive formal analysis of these systems – except special cases – is not feasible, consequently the

  11. Problem solving environment for distributed interactive applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rycerz, K.; Bubak, M.; Sloot, P.; Getov, V.; Gorlatch, S.; Bubak, M.; Priol, T.

    2008-01-01

    Interactive Problem Solving Environments (PSEs) offer an integrated approach for constructing and running complex systems, such as distributed simulation systems. To achieve efficient execution of High Level Architecture (HLA)-based distributed interactive simulations on the Grid, we introduce a PSE

  12. Interactive Foresight Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sanne; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Jacobsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Combined Simulation Approach (CSA) is a way to evaluate risks and address potential unforeseen problems in a more interactive way than what is often observed in practice in companies or sectors. The approach is based on a combination of scenario analysis and discrete-event computer simulation...

  13. Intelligently interactive combat simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Lawrence J.; Porto, Vincent W.; Alexander, Steven M.

    2001-09-01

    To be fully effective, combat simulation must include an intelligently interactive enemy... one that can be calibrated. But human operated combat simulations are uncalibratable, for we learn during the engagement, there's no average enemy, and we cannot replicate their culture/personality. Rule-based combat simulations (expert systems) are not interactive. They do not take advantage of unexpected mistakes, learn, innovate, and reflect the changing mission/situation. And it is presumed that the enemy does not have a copy of the rules, that the available experts are good enough, that they know why they did what they did, that their combat experience provides a sufficient sample and that we know how to combine the rules offered by differing experts. Indeed, expert systems become increasingly complex, costly to develop, and brittle. They have face validity but may be misleading. In contrast, intelligently interactive combat simulation is purpose- driven. Each player is given a well-defined mission, reference to the available weapons/platforms, their dynamics, and the sensed environment. Optimal tactics are discovered online and in real-time by simulating phenotypic evolution in fast time. The initial behaviors are generated randomly or include hints. The process then learns without instruction. The Valuated State Space Approach provides a convenient way to represent any purpose/mission. Evolutionary programming searches the domain of possible tactics in a highly efficient manner. Coupled together, these provide a basis for cruise missile mission planning, and for driving tank warfare simulation. This approach is now being explored to benefit Air Force simulations by a shell that can enhance the original simulation.

  14. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  15. CUMULVS: Collaborative infrastructure for developing distributed simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, J.A.; Papadopoulos, P.M.; Geist, G.A. II

    1997-03-01

    The CUMULVS software environment provides remote collaboration among scientists by allowing them to dynamically attach to, view, and steer a running simulation. Users can interactively examine intermediate results on demand, saving effort for long-running applications gone awry. In addition, it provides fault tolerance to distributed applications via user-directed checkpointing, heterogeneous task migration and automatic restart. This talk describes CUMULVS and how this tool benefits scientists developing large distributed applications.

  16. A new generic plant growth model framework (PMF): Simulating distributed dynamic interaction of biomass production and its interaction with water and nutrients fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multsch, Sebastian; Kraft, Philipp; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2010-05-01

    about changing boundary conditions. The crop model concept refers to two main elements. A plant model, which represents an abstract network of plant organs and processes and a process library, which holds mathematical solutions for the growth processes. Growth processes were mainly taken from existing, well known crop models such as SUCROS and CERES. The crop specific properties of root architecture are described based on a maximum rooting depth and a vertical growth rate. The biomass distribution depends on an interactive allocation process due to the soil layers with a daily time step. In order to show the performance and capabilities of PMF, the model is coupled with the Catchment Modeling Framework (CMF) and the simple nitrogen mineralization model DeComp. The main feature of the integrated model set up is the interaction between root growth, water uptake and nitrogen supply of the soil. We show a virtual case study on the hillslope scale and spatially dependence of water and nitrogen stress based on topographic position and seasonal development.

  17. Situational simulations in interactive video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Advanced Training Technologies section is using situational simulations in several Interactive Video training courses. Two applications of situational simulations will be discussed. In the first, used in the Hanford General Employee Training course, the student evaluates employee's actions in simulations of possible workplace situations. In the second, used in the Criticality Safety course, students must follow well-defined procedures to complete tasks. Design and incorporation of situational simulations will be discussed. 3 refs.

  18. Situational simulations in interactive video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Advanced Training Technologies section is using situational simulations in several Interactive Video training courses. Two applications of situational simulations will be discussed. In the first, used in the Hanford General Employee Training course, the student evaluates employee's actions in simulations of possible workplace situations. In the second, used in the Criticality Safety course, students must follow well-defined procedures to complete tasks. Design and incorporation of situational simulations will be discussed. 3 refs

  19. SIMULATION OF THE FORCE INTERACTION OF THE SOIL COMPACTING DISK MOVING ALONG A RHEOLOGICAL BEAM THAT HAS DISTRIBUTED MASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Georgiy Vasil'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe an original solution to the new problem of a soil compacting disk moving along a rheological beam (Kelvin model in the proposed paper. The motion of the mechanical system that is composed of a disk and a rheological beam is described by a hybrid system of differential equations consisting of an integral-differential equation that stands for the interaction of the beam with a moving disk and Lagrange equations describing the pattern of the disk motion. These equations are considered as equations of nonholonomic links. The problem is solved through the employment of simplifying prerequisites and by determining the operating condition of the disk. Condition of uniform and uniformly variable motions is considered as an opportunity to integrate the equation of beam vibrations regardless of the system of equations describing the disk motion pattern. The solution to the equation in partial derivatives is found through the employment of the Fourier method of separation of variables coupled with the Laplace integral transformation method. The solution to the problem of constrained vibrations was implemented as a series of homogenous problems with zero initial and boundary conditions. The equation describing changes in the time function is reduced to its standard form, and thereafter the solution is found through the employment of asymptotic methods. Disk motion stability is assessed through the employment of the first approximation method. The motion of the disk is stable. As a result of the analysis of patterns of dependencies between beam deformations and the time period, the conclusion of feasibility of a stable pattern of forced vibrations of a rheological beam, supported by a driving force and a variable friction force, caused by the slightly elastic field of the beam material, is made by the authors.

  20. Interactive Simulations of Biohybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Albrecht von Mammen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present approaches to interactive simulations of biohybrid systems. These simulations are comprised of two major computational components: (1 agent-based developmental models that retrace organismal growth and unfolding of technical scaffoldings and (2 interfaces to explore these models interactively. Simulations of biohybrid systems allow us to fast forward and experience their evolution over time based on our design decisions involving the choice, configuration and initial states of the deployed biological and robotic actors as well as their interplay with the environment. We briefly introduce the concept of swarm grammars, an agent-based extension of L-systems for retracing growth processes and structural artifacts. Next, we review an early augmented reality prototype for designing and projecting biohybrid system simulations into real space. In addition to models that retrace plant behaviors, we specify swarm grammar agents to braid structures in a self-organizing manner. Based on this model, both robotic and plant-driven braiding processes can be experienced and explored in virtual worlds. We present an according user interface for use in virtual reality. As we present interactive models concerning rather diverse description levels, we only ensured their principal capacity for interaction but did not consider efficiency analyzes beyond prototypic operation. We conclude this article with an outlook on future works on melding reality and virtuality to drive the design and deployment of biohybrid systems.

  1. Capstone Renaissance = Simulation + Interaction + DSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Lawrence R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the development of integrated business policy and strategic management courses, or capstone courses, in business school curricula. A simulation game is described that incorporates the need for computer literacy, decision support systems (DSS), and interaction to effectively meet the needs for a capstone course. (14 references) (LRW)

  2. Interactive monitoring portal for fusion simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abla, G.; Schissel, D.P.; Kim, E.N.; Flanagan, S.M.; Lee, X.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We designed a web-based monitoring system that tracks the status of fusion simulations. ► Our system is scalable to monitor the simulations running on distributed supercomputers and clusters located at multiple geographical locations. ► The monitoring portal provides a web-based interface for post-run analysis, such as visualizing the results, logging the user comments, and rating the simulation quality. ► Our system utilizes the open source software, such as Python, Django, MySQL, Apache, and MDSplus. - Abstract: The Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM) Project is a proto-Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) whose goal is to study high-performance fusion plasmas and perform comprehensive simulations that are essential to the development of fusion. SWIM team members are geographically distributed and utilize distributed supercomputers for computational simulations. Due to the highly distributed computational work environment, the SWIM team has the difficulty of monitoring code runs and discovering historical runs. To alleviate this difficulty a web-based monitoring portal has been developed and deployed. The monitoring portal tracks the progress of simulations and automatically collects metadata in real-time. This capability helps scientists to effectively utilize precious computer resources. Furthermore, the portal provides a web-based interface for post-run analysis, such as visualizing the results, logging the user comments, and rating the simulation quality. The user interface provides rapid discovery capability via multi-field searching and sorting. The development of the monitoring portal used open source software, such as Python, Django, MySQL, and Apache. It uses MDSplus for data management, Memcached for data caches, and OpenID for single sign-on security. This paper describes the software architecture, related technologies and deployment experiences of the monitoring portal.

  3. Studies of halo distributions under beam-beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.; Irwin, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    The halo distribution due to the beam-beam interaction in circular electron-positron colliders is simulated with a program which uses a technique that saves a factor of hundreds to thousands of CPU time. The distribution and the interference between the beam-beam interaction and lattice nonlinearities has been investigated. The effects on the halo distribution due to radiation damping misalignment at the collision point, and chromatic effect are presented

  4. Computer Graphics Simulations of Sampling Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer graphics simulations to enhance student understanding of sampling distributions that arise in introductory statistics. Highlights include the distribution of sample proportions, the distribution of the difference of sample means, the distribution of the difference of sample proportions, and the distribution of sample…

  5. Distributed simulation a model driven engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Topçu, Okan; Oğuztüzün, Halit; Yilmaz, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Backed by substantive case studies, the novel approach to software engineering for distributed simulation outlined in this text demonstrates the potent synergies between model-driven techniques, simulation, intelligent agents, and computer systems development.

  6. Simulation-Based Testing of Distributed Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rutherford, Matthew J; Carzaniga, Antonio; Wolf, Alexander L

    2006-01-01

    .... Typically written using an imperative programming language, these simulations capture basic algorithmic functionality at the same time as they focus attention on properties critical to distribution...

  7. Distribution view: a tool to write and simulate distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, José; Branco, Fernando; Oliveira, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    In our work we present a tool to write and simulate distributions. This tool allows to write mathematical expressions which can contain not only functions and variables, but also statistical distributions, including mixtures. Each time the expression is evaluated, for all inner distributions, is generated a value according to the distribution and is used for expression value determination. The inversion method can be used in this language, allowing to generate all distributions...

  8. Fel simulations using distributed computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, J.; Biedron, S.G.; Freund, H.P.; Milton, S.V.; Van Der Slot, P. J M; Bernabeu, G.

    2016-01-01

    While simulation tools are available and have been used regularly for simulating light sources, including Free-Electron Lasers, the increasing availability and lower cost of accelerated computing opens up new opportunities. This paper highlights a method of how accelerating and parallelizing code

  9. Distributed simulation of large computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzolla, M.

    2001-01-01

    Sequential simulation of large complex physical systems is often regarded as a computationally expensive task. In order to speed-up complex discrete-event simulations, the paradigm of Parallel and Distributed Discrete Event Simulation (PDES) has been introduced since the late 70s. The authors analyze the applicability of PDES to the modeling and analysis of large computer system; such systems are increasingly common in the area of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, because many modern experiments make use of large 'compute farms'. Some feasibility tests have been performed on a prototype distributed simulator

  10. Role of selective interaction in wealth distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.

    2005-08-01

    In our simplified description 'money' is wealth. A kinetic theory model of money is investigated where two agents interact (trade) selectively and exchange random amount of money between them while keeping total money of all the agents constant. The probability distributions of individual money (P(m) vs. m) is seen to be influenced by certain modes of selective interactions. The distributions shift away from Boltzmann-Gibbs like exponential distribution and in some cases distributions emerge with power law tails known as Pareto's law (P(m) ∝ m -(1+α) ). (author)

  11. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  12. Simulating the Interactions Among Land Use, Transportation ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most transportation studies, computer models that forecast travel behavior statistics for a future year use static projections of the spatial distribution of future population and employment growth as inputs. As a result, they are unable to account for the temporally dynamic and non-linear interactions among transportation, land use, and socioeconomic systems. System dynamics (SD) provides a common framework for modeling the complex interactions among transportation and other related systems. This study uses a SD model to simulate the cascading impacts of a proposed light rail transit (LRT) system in central North Carolina, USA. The Durham-Orange Light Rail Project (D-O LRP) SD model incorporates relationships among the land use, transportation, and economy sectors to simulate the complex feedbacks that give rise to the travel behavior changes forecasted by the region’s transportation model. This paper demonstrates the sensitivity of changes in travel behavior to the proposed LRT system and the assumptions that went into the transportation modeling, and compares those results to the impacts of an alternative fare-free transit system. SD models such as the D-O LRP SD model can complement transportation studies by providing valuable insight into the interdependent community systems that collectively contribute to travel behavior changes. Presented at the 35th International Conference of the System Dynamics Society in Cambridge, MA, July 18th, 2017

  13. Automated Distributed Simulation in Ptolemy II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lázaro Cuadrado, Daniel; Ravn, Anders Peter; Koch, Peter

    2007-01-01

    the ensuing communication and synchronization problems. Very often the designer has to explicitly specify extra information concerning distribution for the framework to make an effort to exploit parallelism. This paper presents Automated Distributed Simulation (ADS), which allows the designer to forget about...

  14. Multiparton interactions and multiparton distributions in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus

    2011-11-15

    After a brief recapitulation of the general interest of parton densities, we discuss multiple hard interactions and multiparton distributions. We report on recent theoretical progress in their QCD description, on outstanding conceptual problems and on possibilities to use multiparton distributions as a laboratory to test and improve our understanding of hadron structure. (orig.)

  15. Multiparton interactions and multiparton distributions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Markus

    2011-11-01

    After a brief recapitulation of the general interest of parton densities, we discuss multiple hard interactions and multiparton distributions. We report on recent theoretical progress in their QCD description, on outstanding conceptual problems and on possibilities to use multiparton distributions as a laboratory to test and improve our understanding of hadron structure. (orig.)

  16. Software To Secure Distributed Propulsion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2003-01-01

    Distributed-object computing systems are presented with many security threats, including network eavesdropping, message tampering, and communications middleware masquerading. NASA Glenn Research Center, and its industry partners, has taken an active role in mitigating the security threats associated with developing and operating their proprietary aerospace propulsion simulations. In particular, they are developing a collaborative Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) Security (CORBASec) test bed to secure their distributed aerospace propulsion simulations. Glenn has been working with its aerospace propulsion industry partners to deploy the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) object-based technology. NPSS is a program focused on reducing the cost and time in developing aerospace propulsion engines

  17. Parallel and Distributed System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongarra, Jack

    1998-01-01

    This exploratory study initiated our research into the software infrastructure necessary to support the modeling and simulation techniques that are most appropriate for the Information Power Grid. Such computational power grids will use high-performance networking to connect hardware, software, instruments, databases, and people into a seamless web that supports a new generation of computation-rich problem solving environments for scientists and engineers. In this context we looked at evaluating the NetSolve software environment for network computing that leverages the potential of such systems while addressing their complexities. NetSolve's main purpose is to enable the creation of complex applications that harness the immense power of the grid, yet are simple to use and easy to deploy. NetSolve uses a modular, client-agent-server architecture to create a system that is very easy to use. Moreover, it is designed to be highly composable in that it readily permits new resources to be added by anyone willing to do so. In these respects NetSolve is to the Grid what the World Wide Web is to the Internet. But like the Web, the design that makes these wonderful features possible can also impose significant limitations on the performance and robustness of a NetSolve system. This project explored the design innovations that push the performance and robustness of the NetSolve paradigm as far as possible without sacrificing the Web-like ease of use and composability that make it so powerful.

  18. Cellular Automata Simulation for Wealth Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Ching

    2009-08-01

    Wealth distribution of a country is a complicate system. A model, which is based on the Epstein & Axtell's "Sugars cape" model, is presented in Netlogo. The model considers the income, age, working opportunity and salary as control variables. There are still other variables should be considered while an artificial society is established. In this study, a more complicate cellular automata model for wealth distribution model is proposed. The effects of social welfare, tax, economical investment and inheritance are considered and simulated. According to the cellular automata simulation for wealth distribution, we will have a deep insight of financial policy of the government.

  19. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to study energetic plasma phenomena by using particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations, we need to deal with relativistic velocity distributions in these simulations. However, numerical algorithms to deal with relativistic distributions are not well known. In this contribution, we overview basic algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in PIC and Monte-Carlo simulations. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are newly proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are 􏰅50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  20. ESIM_DSN Web-Enabled Distributed Simulation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth; Novotny, John

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the eSim(sup DSN) approach to achieve distributed simulation capability using the Internet is presented. With this approach a complete simulation can be assembled from component subsystems that run on different computers. The subsystems interact with each other via the Internet The distributed simulation uses a hub-and-spoke type network topology. It provides the ability to dynamically link simulation subsystem models to different computers as well as the ability to assign a particular model to each computer. A proof-of-concept demonstrator is also presented. The eSim(sup DSN) demonstrator can be accessed at http://www.jsc.draper.com/esim which hosts various examples of Web enabled simulations.

  1. Radial particle distributions in PARMILA simulation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1984-03-01

    The estimation of beam spill in particle accelerators is becoming of greater importance as higher current designs are being funded. To the present, no numerical method for predicting beam-spill has been available. In this paper, we present an approach to the loss-estimation problem that uses probability distributions fitted to particle-simulation beams. The properties of the PARMILA code's radial particle distribution are discussed, and a broad class of probability distributions are examined to check their ability to fit it. The possibility that the PARMILA distribution is a mixture is discussed, and a fitting distribution consisting of a mixture of two generalized gamma distributions is found. An efficient algorithm to accomplish the fit is presented. Examples of the relative prediction of beam spill are given. 26 references, 18 figures, 1 table

  2. Toward an Ontology of Simulated Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibt, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    and asymmetric modes of realizing Á, called the ‘simulatory expansion’ of interaction type Á. Simulatory expansions of social interactions can be used to map out different kinds and degrees of sociality in human-human and human-robot interaction, relative to current notions of sociality in philosophy......, anthropology, and linguistics. The classificatory framework developed (SISI) thus represents the field of possible simulated social interactions. SISI can be used to clarify which conceptual and empirical grounds we can draw on to evaluate capacities and affordances of robots for social interaction......The paper develops a general conceptual framework for the ontological classification of human-robot interaction. After arguing against fictionalist interpretations of human-robot interactions, I present five notions of simulation or partial realization, formally defined in terms of relationships...

  3. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms

  4. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenitani, Seiji, E-mail: seiji.zenitani@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  5. Simulation of warehousing and distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Pupavac

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The modern world abounds in simulation models. Thousands of organizations use simulation models to solve business problems. Problems in micro logistics systems are a very important segment of the business problems that can be solved by a simulation method. In most cases logistics simulation models should be developed with a purpose to evaluate the performance of individual value-adding indirect resources of logistics system, their possibilities and operational advantages as well as the flow of logistics entities between the plants, warehouses, and customers. Accordingly, this scientific paper elaborates concisely the theoretical characteristics of simulation models and the domains in which the simulation approach is best suited in logistics. Special attention is paid to simulation modeling of warehousing and distribution subsystems of logistic system and there is an example of spreadsheet application in the function of simulated demand for goods from warehouse. Apart from simulation model induction and deduction methods, the description method and a method of information modeling are applied.

  6. Salesperson Ethics: An Interactive Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberry, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A new interactive computer simulation designed to teach sales ethics is described. Simulation learner objectives include gaining a better understanding of legal issues in selling; realizing that ethical dilemmas do arise in selling; realizing the need to be honest when selling; seeing that there are conflicting demands from a salesperson's…

  7. Numerical simulation of ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper, based on examples from the author's contribution, aims to illustrate the role of ballistic simulations of the interaction between an ion beam and a surface in the characterization of surface properties. Several aspects of the ion-surface interaction have been modelled to various levels of sophistication by computer simulation. Particular emphasis is given to the ion scattering in the impact mode, in the multiple scattering regime and at grazing incidence, as well as to the Auger emission resulting from electronic excitation. Some examples are then given in order to illustrate the use of the combination between simulation and experiment to study the ion-surface interaction and surface properties. Ion-induced Auger emission, the determination of potentials and of overlay structures are discusse. The possibility to tackle dynamical surface properties by menas of a combination between molecular dynamics, ballistic simulations and ion scattering measurements in then briefly discussed. (orig.)

  8. Interactive simulation of technology management foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sanne; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    of either qualitative or quantitative processes due to the complexity and uncertainty of the more or less interrelated technology tracks. Accordingly, the foresight approach must allow for interaction between the real-world system and the model builders, for example by using an interacting narrative...... is often occurring in companies. The use of CSA makes it possible for management to close the often experienced knowledge and activity gaps between the strategic, tactical and operational levels in a company. The outcome of developing and using CSA is a generic approach that enables the interaction between...... narrative simulation (scenarios) and numerical simulation. These interactive processes can take place on the strategic, tactical and operational levels of an organization and thus contribute to close the gaps that often exist between these levels. The combined foresight simulation approach is, however...

  9. RISM theory distribution functions for Lennard--Jones interaction site fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Hazoume, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    Reference interaction site model (RISM) theory distribution functions for Lennard-Jones interaction site fluids are discussed. The comparison with computer simulation results suggests that these distribution functions are as accurate as RISM distribution functions for fused hard sphere molecular fluids

  10. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs

  11. EVALUATING AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYER CONTRIBUTIONS USING INTERACTIVE NETWORK SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sargent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line".

  12. Distributed interactive graphics applications in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.E.; Buning, P.G.; Merritt, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Implementation of two distributed graphics programs used in computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Both programs are interactive in nature. They run on a CRAY-2 supercomputer and use a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation as the front-end machine. The hardware and supporting software are from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation project. The supercomputer does all numerically intensive work and the workstation, as the front-end machine, allows the user to perform real-time interactive transformations on the displayed data. The first program was written as a distributed program that computes particle traces for fluid flow solutions existing on the supercomputer. The second is an older post-processing and plotting program modified to run in a distributed mode. Both programs have realized a large increase in speed over that obtained using a single machine. By using these programs, one can learn quickly about complex features of a three-dimensional flow field. Some color results are presented

  13. A Modular Toolkit for Distributed Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Lange

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the design, architecture, and implementation of a toolkit which supports some theories for distributed interactions. The main design principles of our architecture are flexibility and modularity. Our main goal is to provide an easily extensible workbench to encompass current algorithms and incorporate future developments of the theories. With the help of some examples, we illustrate the main features of our toolkit.

  14. Interactive Mathematica Simulations in Chemical Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Nicodemus, Garret D.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive Mathematica simulations with graphical displays of system behavior are an excellent addition to chemical engineering courses. The Manipulate command in Mathematica creates on-screen controls that allow users to change system variables and see the graphical output almost instantaneously. They can be used both in and outside class. More…

  15. Local simulation algorithms for Coulombic interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider a problem in dynamically constrained Monte Carlo dynamics and show that this leads to the generation of long ranged effective interactions. This allows us to construct a local algorithm for the simulation of charged systems without ever having to evaluate pair potentials or solve the Poisson equation.

  16. Dynamic Interactions for Network Visualization and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    projects.htm, Site accessed January 5, 2009. 12. John S. Weir, Major, USAF, Mediated User-Simulator Interactive Command with Visualization ( MUSIC -V). Master’s...Computing Sciences in Colleges, December 2005). 14. Enrique Campos -Nanez, “nscript user manual,” Department of System Engineer- ing University of

  17. Interactive Heat Transfer Simulations for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Heat transfer is widely taught in secondary Earth science and physics. Researchers have identified many misconceptions related to heat and temperature. These misconceptions primarily stem from hunches developed in everyday life (though the confusions in terminology often worsen them). Interactive computer simulations that visualize thermal energy,…

  18. Interactive visualization to advance earthquake simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, L.H.; Bawden, G.W.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kreylos, O.; Staadt, O.; Sumner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. For example, simulations of earthquake-related processes typically generate complex, time-varying data sets in two or more dimensions. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these data sets, evaluate the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. Virtual mapping tools allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions. Interactive tools allow us to manipulate shapes in order to construct models of geological features for geodynamic models, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulation or field observations, thereby enabling us to improve our interpretation of the dynamical processes that drive earthquakes. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool, albeit with active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. This approach also takes advantage of the specialized skills of geological scientists who are trained to interpret, the often limited, geological and geophysical data available from field observations. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  19. Interactive methods for exploring particle simulation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Co, Christopher S.; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Bethel, E. Wes; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we visualize high-dimensional particle simulation data using a suite of scatter plot-based visualizations coupled with interactive selection tools. We use traditional 2D and 3D projection scatter plots as well as a novel oriented disk rendering style to convey various information about the data. Interactive selection tools allow physicists to manually classify ''interesting'' sets of particles that are highlighted across multiple, linked views of the data. The power of our application is the ability to correspond new visual representations of the simulation data with traditional, well understood visualizations. This approach supports the interactive exploration of the high-dimensional space while promoting discovery of new particle behavior.

  20. An interactive beam position monitor system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, W.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-03-01

    A system simulator has been implemented to aid the development of the RHIC position monitor system. Based on the LabVIEW software package by National Instruments, this simulator allows engineers and technicians to interactively explore the parameter space of a system during the design phase. Adjustable parameters are divided into three categories: beam, pickup, and electronics. The simulator uses these parameters in simple formulas to produce results in both time-domain and frequencydomain. During the prototyping phase, these simulated results can be compared to test data acquired with the same software package. The RHIC position monitor system is presented as an example, but the software is applicable to several other systems as well

  1. A heuristic for efficient data distribution management in distributed simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Guha, Ratan K.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for reducing the complexity of region matching and efficient multicasting in data distribution management component of High Level Architecture (HLA) Run Time Infrastructure (RTI). The current data distribution management (DDM) techniques rely on computing the intersection between the subscription and update regions. When a subscription region and an update region of different federates overlap, RTI establishes communication between the publisher and the subscriber. It subsequently routes the updates from the publisher to the subscriber. The proposed algorithm computes the update/subscription regions matching for dynamic allocation of multicast group. It provides new multicast routines that exploit the connectivity of federation by communicating updates regarding interactions and routes information only to those federates that require them. The region-matching problem in DDM reduces to clique-covering problem using the connections graph abstraction where the federations represent the vertices and the update/subscribe relations represent the edges. We develop an abstract model based on connection graph for data distribution management. Using this abstract model, we propose a heuristic for solving the region-matching problem of DDM. We also provide complexity analysis of the proposed heuristics.

  2. Methodology for the interactive graphic simulator construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milian S, Idalmis; Rodriguez M, Lazaro; Lopez V, Miguel A.

    1997-01-01

    The PC-supported Interactive Graphic Simulators (IGS) have successfully been used for industrial training programs in many countries. This paper is intended to illustrate the general methodology applied by our research team for the construction of this kind of conceptual or small scale simulators. The information and tools available to achieve this goal are also described. The applicability of the present methodology was confirmed with the construction of a set of IGS for nuclear power plants operators training programs in Cuba. One of them, relating reactor kinetics, is shown and briefly described in this paper. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs

  3. Simulations of light antinucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galoyan, A., E-mail: galoyan@lxmx00.jinr.ru [JINR, LHEP (Russian Federation); Uzhinsky, V. [JINR, LIT (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    Creations of light anti-nuclei (anti-deuterium, anti-tritium, anti-{sup 3}He and anti-{sup 4}He) are observed by collaborations at the LHC and RHIC accelerators. Some cosmic ray experiments are aimed to find the anti-nuclei in cosmic rays. To support the experimental studies of anti-nuclei a Monte Carlo simulation of anti-nuclei interactions with matter is implemented in the Geant4 toolkit. The implementation combines practically all known theoretical approaches to the problem of antinucleon-nucleon interactions.

  4. Simulation of Light Antinucleus-Nucleus Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Creations of light anti-nuclei (anti-deuterium, anti-tritium, anti-He3 and anti-He4) are observed by collaborations at the LHC and RHIC accelerators. Some cosmic ray experiments are aimed to find the anti-nuclei in cosmic rays. To support the experimental studies of the anti-nuclei a Monte Carlo simulation of anti-nuclei interactions with matter is implemented in the Geant4 toolkit. The implementation combines practically all known theoretical approaches to the problem of antinucleon-nucleon interactions.

  5. Simulation of coherent interactions between Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robicheaux, F.; Hernandez, J.V.; Topcu, T.; Noordam, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the coherent interaction between many Rydberg atoms are reported. The atoms are assumed to move very little during the time range we investigate. We describe the basic interaction between atoms and show that (contrary to previous theoretical studies) the interaction between the atoms can be coherent. The band structure for a perfect lattice of atoms and the density of states for an amorphous distribution of atoms are presented. We also give results for when the atoms are roughly positioned in a lattice. Finally, we performed detailed calculations to understand when the Rydberg interactions are too strong for an essential states type of approximation. The relevance of our results to previous measurements in a Rydberg gas and to possible future experiments is discussed

  6. Pseudo-interactive monitoring in distributed computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfiligoi, I.; Bradley, D.; Livny, M.

    2009-01-01

    Distributed computing, and in particular Grid computing, enables physicists to use thousands of CPU days worth of computing every day, by submitting thousands of compute jobs. Unfortunately, a small fraction of such jobs regularly fail; the reasons vary from disk and network problems to bugs in the user code. A subset of these failures result in jobs being stuck for long periods of time. In order to debug such failures, interactive monitoring is highly desirable; users need to browse through the job log files and check the status of the running processes. Batch systems typically don't provide such services; at best, users get job logs at job termination, and even this may not be possible if the job is stuck in an infinite loop. In this paper we present a novel approach of using regular batch system capabilities of Condor to enable users to access the logs and processes of any running job. This does not provide true interactive access, so commands like vi are not viable, but it does allow operations like ls, cat, top, ps, lsof, netstat and dumping the stack of any process owned by the user; we call this pseudo-interactive monitoring. It is worth noting that the same method can be used to monitor Grid jobs in a glidein-based environment. We further believe that the same mechanism could be applied to many other batch systems.

  7. Pseudo-interactive monitoring in distributed computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfiligoi, I; Bradley, D; Livny, M

    2010-01-01

    Distributed computing, and in particular Grid computing, enables physicists to use thousands of CPU days worth of computing every day, by submitting thousands of compute jobs. Unfortunately, a small fraction of such jobs regularly fail; the reasons vary from disk and network problems to bugs in the user code. A subset of these failures result in jobs being stuck for long periods of time. In order to debug such failures, interactive monitoring is highly desirable; users need to browse through the job log files and check the status of the running processes. Batch systems typically don't provide such services; at best, users get job logs at job termination, and even this may not be possible if the job is stuck in an infinite loop. In this paper we present a novel approach of using regular batch system capabilities of Condor to enable users to access the logs and processes of any running job. This does not provide true interactive access, so commands like vi are not viable, but it does allow operations like ls, cat, top, ps, lsof, netstat and dumping the stack of any process owned by the user; we call this pseudo-interactive monitoring. It is worth noting that the same method can be used to monitor Grid jobs in a glidein-based environment. We further believe that the same mechanism could be applied to many other batch systems.

  8. Pseudo-interactive monitoring in distributed computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfiligoi, I.; /Fermilab; Bradley, D.; Livny, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-05-01

    Distributed computing, and in particular Grid computing, enables physicists to use thousands of CPU days worth of computing every day, by submitting thousands of compute jobs. Unfortunately, a small fraction of such jobs regularly fail; the reasons vary from disk and network problems to bugs in the user code. A subset of these failures result in jobs being stuck for long periods of time. In order to debug such failures, interactive monitoring is highly desirable; users need to browse through the job log files and check the status of the running processes. Batch systems typically don't provide such services; at best, users get job logs at job termination, and even this may not be possible if the job is stuck in an infinite loop. In this paper we present a novel approach of using regular batch system capabilities of Condor to enable users to access the logs and processes of any running job. This does not provide true interactive access, so commands like vi are not viable, but it does allow operations like ls, cat, top, ps, lsof, netstat and dumping the stack of any process owned by the user; we call this pseudo-interactive monitoring. It is worth noting that the same method can be used to monitor Grid jobs in a glidein-based environment. We further believe that the same mechanism could be applied to many other batch systems.

  9. Uncertainty quantification in ion–solid interaction simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuss, R., E-mail: preuss@ipp.mpg.de; Toussaint, U. von

    2017-02-15

    Within the framework of Bayesian uncertainty quantification we propose a non-intrusive reduced-order spectral approach (polynomial chaos expansion) to the simulation of ion–solid interactions. The method not only reduces the number of function evaluations but provides simultaneously a quantitative measure for which combinations of inputs have the most important impact on the result. It is applied to SDTRIM-simulations (Möller et al., 1988) with several uncertain and Gaussian distributed input parameters (i.e. angle, projectile energy, surface binding energy, target composition) and the results are compared to full-grid based approaches and sampling based methods with respect to reliability, efficiency and scalability.

  10. PIC Simulation of Laser Plasma Interactions with Temporal Bandwidths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2015-11-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temperal bandwidths under conditions relevant to current and future shock ignition experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth, the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using smoothing techniques such as SSD or ISI). We will show that temporal bandwidth along play an important role in the control of LPI's in these lasers and discuss future directions. This work is conducted under the auspices of NRL.

  11. Interactive physically-based sound simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj

    The realization of interactive, immersive virtual worlds requires the ability to present a realistic audio experience that convincingly compliments their visual rendering. Physical simulation is a natural way to achieve such realism, enabling deeply immersive virtual worlds. However, physically-based sound simulation is very computationally expensive owing to the high-frequency, transient oscillations underlying audible sounds. The increasing computational power of desktop computers has served to reduce the gap between required and available computation, and it has become possible to bridge this gap further by using a combination of algorithmic improvements that exploit the physical, as well as perceptual properties of audible sounds. My thesis is a step in this direction. My dissertation concentrates on developing real-time techniques for both sub-problems of sound simulation: synthesis and propagation. Sound synthesis is concerned with generating the sounds produced by objects due to elastic surface vibrations upon interaction with the environment, such as collisions. I present novel techniques that exploit human auditory perception to simulate scenes with hundreds of sounding objects undergoing impact and rolling in real time. Sound propagation is the complementary problem of modeling the high-order scattering and diffraction of sound in an environment as it travels from source to listener. I discuss my work on a novel numerical acoustic simulator (ARD) that is hundred times faster and consumes ten times less memory than a high-accuracy finite-difference technique, allowing acoustic simulations on previously-intractable spaces, such as a cathedral, on a desktop computer. Lastly, I present my work on interactive sound propagation that leverages my ARD simulator to render the acoustics of arbitrary static scenes for multiple moving sources and listener in real time, while accounting for scene-dependent effects such as low-pass filtering and smooth attenuation

  12. Network characteristics emerging from agent interactions in balanced distributed system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Mahdi Abed; Bertelle, Cyrille; Sanlaville, Eric

    2015-01-01

    A distributed computing system behaves like a complex network, the interactions between nodes being essential information exchanges and migrations of jobs or services to execute. These actions are performed by software agents, which behave like the members of social networks, cooperating and competing to obtain knowledge and services. The load balancing consists in distributing the load evenly between system nodes. It aims at enhancing the resource usage. A load balancing strategy specifies scenarios for the cooperation. Its efficiency depends on quantity, accuracy, and distribution of available information. Nevertheless, the distribution of information on the nodes, together with the initial network structure, may create different logical network structures. In this paper, different load balancing strategies are tested on different network structures using a simulation. The four tested strategies are able to distribute evenly the load so that the system reaches a steady state (the mean response time of the jobs is constant), but it is shown that a given strategy indeed behaves differently according to structural parameters and information spreading. Such a study, devoted to distributed computing systems (DCSs), can be useful to understand and drive the behavior of other complex systems.

  13. Distribution of Steps with Finite-Range Interactions: Analytic Approximations and Numerical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    GonzáLez, Diego Luis; Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; TéLlez, Gabriel; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    While most Monte Carlo simulations assume only nearest-neighbor steps interact elastically, most analytic frameworks (especially the generalized Wigner distribution) posit that each step elastically repels all others. In addition to the elastic repulsions, we allow for possible surface-state-mediated interactions. We investigate analytically and numerically how next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions and, more generally, interactions out to q'th nearest neighbor alter the form of the terrace-width distribution and of pair correlation functions (i.e. the sum over n'th neighbor distribution functions, which we investigated recently.[2] For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when NNN interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  14. Particle simulation on a distributed memory highly parallel processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Ikesaka, Morio

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes parallel molecular dynamics simulation of atoms governed by local force interaction. The space in the model is divided into cubic subspaces and mapped to the processor array of the CAP-256, a distributed memory, highly parallel processor developed at Fujitsu Labs. We developed a new technique to avoid redundant calculation of forces between atoms in different processors. Experiments showed the communication overhead was less than 5%, and the idle time due to load imbalance was less than 11% for two model problems which contain 11,532 and 46,128 argon atoms. From the software simulation, the CAP-II which is under development is estimated to be about 45 times faster than CAP-256 and will be able to run the same problem about 40 times faster than Fujitsu's M-380 mainframe when 256 processors are used. (author)

  15. Designing a Distributed Space Systems Simulation in Accordance with the Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Simulations are essential for engineering design. These virtual realities provide characteristic data to scientists and engineers in order to understand the details and complications of the desired mission. A standard development simulation package known as Trick is used in developing a source code to model a component (federate in HLA terms). The runtime executive is integrated into an HLA based distributed simulation. TrickHLA is used to extend a Trick simulation for a federation execution, develop a source code for communication between federates, as well as foster data input and output. The project incorporates international cooperation along with team collaboration. Interactions among federates occur throughout the simulation, thereby relying on simulation interoperability. Communication through the semester went on between participants to figure out how to create this data exchange. The NASA intern team is designing a Lunar Rover federate and a Lunar Shuttle federate. The Lunar Rover federate supports transportation across the lunar surface and is essential for fostering interactions with other federates on the lunar surface (Lunar Shuttle, Lunar Base Supply Depot and Mobile ISRU Plant) as well as transporting materials to the desired locations. The Lunar Shuttle federate transports materials to and from lunar orbit. Materials that it takes to the supply depot include fuel and cargo necessary to continue moon-base operations. This project analyzes modeling and simulation technologies as well as simulation interoperability. Each team from participating universities will work on and engineer their own federate(s) to participate in the SISO Spring 2011 Workshop SIW Smackdown in Boston, Massachusetts. This paper will focus on the Lunar Rover federate.

  16. Migrating to a real-time distributed parallel simulator architecture

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A legacy non-distributed logical time simulator is migrated to a distributed architecture to parallelise execution. The existing Discrete Time System Specification (DTSS) modelling formalism is retained to simplify the reuse of existing models...

  17. Numerical simulation of bosonic-superconducting-string interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, P.; Matzner, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulations show that bosonic superconducting U(1) gauge cosmic strings interact by reconnecting and chopping off in a fashion similar to nonconducting strings. Cancellation of the electromagnetic current occurs when, in one of the strings, the direction of the U(1) gauge magnetic field is opposite to the electromagnetic current flow. Electric charge accumulates on the segments of the reconnected strings where the current is discontinuous or vanishes. A virtual photon appears after the collision and intercommutation, and a bubble of electromagnetic radiation emerges as the currents in the reconnected strings equalize. These phenomena suggest new possible mechanisms for void production in the large-scale distribution of galaxies

  18. Interactive simulations as teaching tools for engineering mechanics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Victoria; Romero, Carlos; Martínez, Elvira; Flórez, Mercedes

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to gauge the effect of interactive simulations in class as an active teaching strategy for a mechanics course. Engineering analysis and design often use the properties of planar sections in calculations. In the stress analysis of a beam under bending and torsional loads, cross-sectional properties are used to determine stress and displacement distributions in the beam cross section. The centroid, moments and products of inertia of an area made up of several common shapes (rectangles usually) may thus be obtained by adding the moments of inertia of the component areas (U-shape, L-shape, C-shape, etc). This procedure is used to calculate the second moments of structural shapes in engineering practice because the determination of their moments of inertia is necessary for the design of structural components. This paper presents examples of interactive simulations developed for teaching the ‘Mechanics and mechanisms’ course at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain. The simulations focus on fundamental topics such as centroids, the properties of the moment of inertia, second moments of inertia with respect to two axes, principal moments of inertia and Mohr's Circle for plane stress, and were composed using Geogebra software. These learning tools feature animations, graphics and interactivity and were designed to encourage student participation and engagement in active learning activities, to effectively explain and illustrate course topics, and to build student problem-solving skills.

  19. Stochastic simulation of ecohydrological interactions between vegetation and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwelle, M. C.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Sargsyan, K.

    2017-12-01

    The complex interactions between groundwater and vegetation in the Amazon rainforest may yield vital ecophysiological interactions in specific landscape niches such as buffering plant water stress during dry season or suppression of water uptake due to anoxic conditions. Representation of such processes is greatly impacted by both external and internal sources of uncertainty: inaccurate data and subjective choice of model representation. The models that can simulate these processes are complex and computationally expensive, and therefore make it difficult to address uncertainty using traditional methods. We use the ecohydrologic model tRIBS+VEGGIE and a novel uncertainty quantification framework applied to the ZF2 watershed near Manaus, Brazil. We showcase the capability of this framework for stochastic simulation of vegetation-hydrology dynamics. This framework is useful for simulation with internal and external stochasticity, but this work will focus on internal variability of groundwater depth distribution and model parameterizations. We demonstrate the capability of this framework to make inferences on uncertain states of groundwater depth from limited in situ data, and how the realizations of these inferences affect the ecohydrological interactions between groundwater dynamics and vegetation function. We place an emphasis on the probabilistic representation of quantities of interest and how this impacts the understanding and interpretation of the dynamics at the groundwater-vegetation interface.

  20. Interactive simulations as teaching tools for engineering mechanics courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, Victoria; Martínez, Elvira; Flórez, Mercedes; Romero, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to gauge the effect of interactive simulations in class as an active teaching strategy for a mechanics course. Engineering analysis and design often use the properties of planar sections in calculations. In the stress analysis of a beam under bending and torsional loads, cross-sectional properties are used to determine stress and displacement distributions in the beam cross section. The centroid, moments and products of inertia of an area made up of several common shapes (rectangles usually) may thus be obtained by adding the moments of inertia of the component areas (U-shape, L-shape, C-shape, etc). This procedure is used to calculate the second moments of structural shapes in engineering practice because the determination of their moments of inertia is necessary for the design of structural components. This paper presents examples of interactive simulations developed for teaching the ‘Mechanics and mechanisms’ course at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain. The simulations focus on fundamental topics such as centroids, the properties of the moment of inertia, second moments of inertia with respect to two axes, principal moments of inertia and Mohr's Circle for plane stress, and were composed using Geogebra software. These learning tools feature animations, graphics and interactivity and were designed to encourage student participation and engagement in active learning activities, to effectively explain and illustrate course topics, and to build student problem-solving skills. (paper)

  1. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnikov, K.K.; Makletsov, A.A.; Mileev, V.N.; Novikov, L.S.; Sinolits, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language

  2. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnikov, K K; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language.

  3. On the entrance distribution in RESTART simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garvels, M.J.J.; Kroese, Dirk

    The RESTART method is a widely applicable simulation technique for the estimation of rare event probabilities. The method is based on the idea to restart the simulation at certain intermediate stages, in order to generate more occurrences of the rare event. In many cases we are interested in the

  4. Implementation of force distribution analysis for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Christian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The way mechanical stress is distributed inside and propagated by proteins and other biopolymers largely defines their function. Yet, determining the network of interactions propagating internal strain remains a challenge for both, experiment and theory. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we developed force distribution analysis (FDA, a method that allows visualizing strain propagation in macromolecules. Results To be immediately applicable to a wide range of systems, FDA was implemented as an extension to Gromacs, a commonly used package for molecular simulations. The FDA code comes with an easy-to-use command line interface and can directly be applied to every system built using Gromacs. We provide an additional R-package providing functions for advanced statistical analysis and presentation of the FDA data. Conclusions Using FDA, we were able to explain the origin of mechanical robustness in immunoglobulin domains and silk fibers. By elucidating propagation of internal strain upon ligand binding, we previously also successfully revealed the functionality of a stiff allosteric protein. FDA thus has the potential to be a valuable tool in the investigation and rational design of mechanical properties in proteins and nano-materials.

  5. Execution Management Solutions for Geographically Distributed Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.W. van den; Jansen, H.G.M.; Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Managing the initialization, execution control and monitoring of HLA federates is not always straightforward, especially for a geographically distributed time managed federation. Issues include pre and post run-time data distribution and run-time data collection; starting, stopping and monitoring

  6. Toward Designing a Quantum Key Distribution Network Simulation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Miralem Mehic; Peppino Fazio; Miroslav Voznak; Erik Chromy

    2016-01-01

    As research in quantum key distribution network technologies grows larger and more complex, the need for highly accurate and scalable simulation technologies becomes important to assess the practical feasibility and foresee difficulties in the practical implementation of theoretical achievements. In this paper, we described the design of simplified simulation environment of the quantum key distribution network with multiple links and nodes. In such simulation environment, we analyzed several ...

  7. Multivariate stochastic simulation with subjective multivariate normal distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. J. Ince; J. Buongiorno

    1991-01-01

    In many applications of Monte Carlo simulation in forestry or forest products, it may be known that some variables are correlated. However, for simplicity, in most simulations it has been assumed that random variables are independently distributed. This report describes an alternative Monte Carlo simulation technique for subjectively assesed multivariate normal...

  8. Numerical simulations for quantitative analysis of electrostatic interaction between atomic force microscopy probe and an embedded electrode within a thin dielectric: meshing optimization, sensitivity to potential distribution and impact of cantilever contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azib, M.; Baudoin, F.; Binaud, N.; Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Bugarin, F.; Segonds, S.; Teyssedre, G.

    2018-04-01

    Recent experimental results demonstrated that an electrostatic force distance curve (EFDC) can be used for space charge probing in thin dielectric layers. A main advantage of the method is claimed to be its sensitivity to charge localization, which, however, needs to be substantiated by numerical simulations. In this paper, we have developed a model which permits us to compute an EFDC accurately by using the most sophisticated and accurate geometry for the atomic force microscopy probe. To avoid simplifications and in order to reproduce experimental conditions, the EFDC has been simulated for a system constituted of a polarized electrode embedded in a thin dielectric layer (SiN x ). The individual contributions of forces on the tip and on the cantilever have been analyzed separately to account for possible artefacts. The EFDC sensitivity to potential distribution is studied through the change in electrode shape, namely the width and the depth. Finally, the numerical results have been compared with experimental data.

  9. Combining Interactive Thermodynamics Simulations with Screencasts and Conceptests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.

    2016-01-01

    More than 40 interactive "Mathematica" simulations were prepared for chemical engineering thermodynamics, screencasts were prepared that explain how to use each simulation, and more than 100 ConcepTests were prepared that utilize the simulations. They are located on www.LearnChemE.com. The purposes of these simulations are to clarify…

  10. RadSim: a program to simulate individual particle interactions for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Palefsky, Steven; DeBlois, Francois

    2006-01-01

    A program was developed, RadSim, which can be used to simulate certain individual interactions of photons, electrons, positrons and alpha particles with a single atom for educational purposes. The program can be run in two modes: manual and simulated. In the manual mode, an individual particle undergoing a specified interaction with a target atom can be simulated, which essentially comes down to a graphical evaluation of kinematic equations. In the simulated mode, a preset number of identical particles are allowed to undergo a specified interaction type with a target atom. The exit channel of the interaction is sampled from probability distributions using Monte Carlo methods. The incoming and outgoing particles are visualized and the frequency distribution of the kinematic variables of the exit channel is displayed graphically. It has to be emphasized that RadSim was mainly developed for educational purposes. (note)

  11. A Process for Comparing Dynamics of Distributed Space Systems Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cures, Edwin Z.; Jackson, Albert A.; Morris, Jeffery C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a process that was developed for comparing the primary orbital dynamics behavior between space systems distributed simulations. This process is used to characterize and understand the fundamental fidelities and compatibilities of the modeling of orbital dynamics between spacecraft simulations. This is required for high-latency distributed simulations such as NASA s Integrated Mission Simulation and must be understood when reporting results from simulation executions. This paper presents 10 principal comparison tests along with their rationale and examples of the results. The Integrated Mission Simulation (IMSim) (formerly know as the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)) is a NASA research and development project focusing on the technologies and processes that are related to the collaborative simulation of complex space systems involved in the exploration of our solar system. Currently, the NASA centers that are actively participating in the IMSim project are the Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Kennedy Space Center, the Langley Research Center and the Marshall Space Flight Center. In concept, each center participating in IMSim has its own set of simulation models and environment(s). These simulation tools are used to build the various simulation products that are used for scientific investigation, engineering analysis, system design, training, planning, operations and more. Working individually, these production simulations provide important data to various NASA projects.

  12. SIMULATION AND INVESTIGATION OF TIRE TREAD BLOCKS INTERACTION WITH ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Ružinskas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The car tire is an essential subject analysing its interaction with the road. From tire’s tread condition, geometry and rubber compound depends grip and vehicle stability. This is especially relevant in winter time, when roads are covered with the layer of snow or ice. Generally, new tires are tested in real traffic conditions using vehicles. However, ensuring these conditions requires many resources and sometimes it could be a big challenge. For this reason, simulation of the tire interaction with the road becomes more important in nowadays tire researches. Since the tire is a complex engineering subject, the tire tread blocks could be separated for individual analysis. The interaction between the dry ice and the tread block with sipes was analysed using finite element analysis. The tread block was described using hyperelastic Mooney­Rivlin material model. The deformations, distribution of the contact pressure and shear stresses were obtained for the soft and hard rubber compounds with different vertical load conditions. Also a solid tread block interaction was analysed and it was found that values of contact pressure and shear stresses are much lower comparing to siped tread block.

  13. A Simulation Tool for Distributed Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    11-8 . Reed’s multiversion system [RE1T8] may also be viewed aa updating only copies until the commit is made. The decision to make the changes...distributed voting, and Ellis’ ring algorithm. Other, significantly different algorithms not covered in his work include Reed’s multiversion algorithm, the

  14. Toward Designing a Quantum Key Distribution Network Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miralem Mehic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As research in quantum key distribution network technologies grows larger and more complex, the need for highly accurate and scalable simulation technologies becomes important to assess the practical feasibility and foresee difficulties in the practical implementation of theoretical achievements. In this paper, we described the design of simplified simulation environment of the quantum key distribution network with multiple links and nodes. In such simulation environment, we analyzed several routing protocols in terms of the number of sent routing packets, goodput and Packet Delivery Ratio of data traffic flow using NS-3 simulator.

  15. CAGE IIIA Distributed Simulation Design Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    2 VHF Very High Frequency VLC Video LAN Codec – an Open-source cross-platform multimedia player and framework VM Virtual Machine VOIP Voice Over...Implementing Defence Experimentation (GUIDEx). The key challenges for this methodology are with understanding how to: • design it o define the...operation and to be available in the other nation’s simulations. The challenge for the CAGE campaign of experiments is to continue to build upon this

  16. Nuclear interactive evaluations on distributed processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dix, G.E.; Congdon, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    BWR [boiling water reactor] nuclear design is a complicated process, involving trade-offs among a variety of conflicting objectives. Complex computer calculations and usually required for each design iteration. GE Nuclear Energy has implemented a system where the evaluations are performed interactively on a large number of small microcomputers. This approach minimizes the time it takes to carry out design iterations even through the processor speeds are low compared with modern super computers. All of the desktop microcomputers are linked to a common data base via an ethernet communications system so that design data can be shared and data quality can be maintained

  17. Prototyping and Simulating Parallel, Distributed Computations with VISA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demeure, Isabelle M; Nutt, Gary J

    1989-01-01

    ...] to support the design, prototyping, and simulation of parallel, distributed computations. In particular, VISA is meant to guide the choice of partitioning and communication strategies for such computations, based on their performance...

  18. Organisational learning via Interactive Process Simulation in AGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szirbik, N. B.; Roest, G. B.; Sklenar, J; Tanguy, A; Bertelle, C; Fortino, G

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the concept of Interactive Process Simulation is introduced as a specialisation of Business Gaming. A specific gaming and agent development framework, based oil interactive simulation and a specific modelling langauge, is shortly presented. The concepts of the language are explained

  19. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  20. Spatial distribution sampling and Monte Carlo simulation of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Krainer, Alexander Michael

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the implementation of a program for random sampling of uniformly spatially distributed isotopes for Monte Carlo particle simulations and in specific FLUKA. With FLUKA it is possible to calculate the radio nuclide production in high energy fields. The decay of these nuclide, and therefore the resulting radiation field, however can only be simulated in the same geometry. This works gives the tool to simulate the decay of the produced nuclide in other geometries. With that the radiation field from an irradiated object can be simulated in arbitrary environments. The sampling of isotope mixtures was tested by simulating a 50/50 mixture of $Cs^{137}$ and $Co^{60}$. These isotopes are both well known and provide therefore a first reliable benchmark in that respect. The sampling of uniformly distributed coordinates was tested using the histogram test for various spatial distributions. The advantages and disadvantages of the program compared to standard methods are demonstrated in the real life ca...

  1. Distributed Geant4 simulation in medical and space science applications using DIANE framework and the GRID

    CERN Document Server

    Moscicki, J T; Mantero, A; Pia, M G

    2003-01-01

    Distributed computing is one of the most important trends in IT which has recently gained significance for large-scale scientific applications. Distributed analysis environment (DIANE) is a R&D study, focusing on semiinteractive parallel and remote data analysis and simulation, which has been conducted at CERN. DIANE provides necessary software infrastructure for parallel scientific applications in the master-worker model. Advanced error recovery policies, automatic book-keeping of distributed jobs and on-line monitoring and control tools are provided. DIANE makes a transparent use of a number of different middleware implementations such as load balancing service (LSF, PBS, GRID Resource Broker, Condor) and security service (GSI, Kerberos, openssh). A number of distributed Geant 4 simulations have been deployed and tested, ranging from interactive radiotherapy treatment planning using dedicated clusters in hospitals, to globally-distributed simulations of astrophysics experiments using the European data g...

  2. Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II Parachute Simulation with Interacting Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories of multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed, tested and validated. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2). The standard version of POST 2 allows trajectory simulation of multiple bodies without force interaction. In the current implementation, the force interaction between the parachute and the suspended bodies has been modeled using flexible lines, allowing accurate trajectory simulation of the individual bodies in flight. The POST 2 multibody capability is intended to be general purpose and applicable to any parachute entry trajectory simulation. This research paper explains the motivation for multibody parachute simulation, discusses implementation methods, and presents validation of this capability.

  3. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Timothy M.; Palmintier, Bryan; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Maciejewski, Anthony A.; Siegel, Howard Jay

    2015-07-03

    As more Smart Grid technologies (e.g., distributed photovoltaic, spatially distributed electric vehicle charging) are integrated into distribution grids, static distribution simulations are no longer sufficient for performing modeling and analysis. GridLAB-D is an agent-based distribution system simulation environment that allows fine-grained end-user models, including geospatial and network topology detail. A problem exists in that, without outside intervention, once the GridLAB-D simulation begins execution, it will run to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management systems and aggregator control. We address this lack of runtime interaction by designing a flexible communication interface, Bus.py (pronounced bus-dot-pie), that uses Python to pass messages between one or more GridLAB-D instances and a Smart Grid simulator. This work describes the design and implementation of Bus.py, discusses its usefulness in terms of some Smart Grid scenarios, and provides an example of an aggregator-based residential demand response system interacting with GridLAB-D through Bus.py. The small scale example demonstrates the validity of the interface and shows that an aggregator using said interface is able to control residential loads in GridLAB-D during runtime to cause a reduction in the peak load on the distribution system in (a) peak reduction and (b) time-of-use pricing cases.

  4. Distributed practice. The more the merrier? A randomised bronchoscopy simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Anne Sofie; Eika, Berit; Charles, Peder; Hilberg, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of practice affects the acquisition of skills. Distributed practice has shown to be more effective for skills acquisition than massed training. However, it remains unknown as to which is the most effective distributed practice schedule for learning bronchoscopy skills through simulation training. This study compares two distributed practice schedules: One-day distributed practice and weekly distributed practice. Twenty physicians in training were randomly assigned to one-day distributed or weekly distributed bronchoscopy simulation practice. Performance was assessed with a pre-test, a post-test after each practice session, and a 4-week retention test using previously validated simulator measures. Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA. No interaction was found between group and test (F(4,72) 0.16), except for the measure 'percent-segments-entered', and no main effect of group was found for any of the measures (F(1,72)0.36), which indicates that there was no difference between the learning curves of the one-day distributed practice schedule and the weekly distributed practice schedule. We found no difference in effectiveness of bronchoscopy skills acquisition between the one-day distributed practice and the weekly distributed practice. This finding suggests that the choice of bronchoscopy training practice may be guided by what best suits the clinical practice.

  5. Simulation of the Sampling Distribution of the Mean Can Mislead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ann E.; Bargagliotti, Anna; Franklin, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of simulation to teach the sampling distribution of the mean is meant to provide students with sound conceptual understanding, it may lead them astray. We discuss a misunderstanding that can be introduced or reinforced when students who intuitively understand that "bigger samples are better" conduct a simulation to…

  6. Distributed simulation of mixing flow of dough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a study concerned with the numerical simulation of incompressible complex mixing flows of viscoelastic fluids is of industrial importance, particularly relevance in the food processing industry, such as occurs in dough mixing. The flows considered are in a complex domain setting. The present problem is one of this form, expressed as the flow between an outer rotating cylindrical vessel all and a stationary cylindrical/stirrers. The context is one of mixing with in a cylindrical vessel, where stirrers are located on the mixing vessel lid, and placed in a concentric/eccentric position with respect to the central cylindrical axis of the vessel. Here, the motion is considered as driven by the rotation of the outer vessel wall, with various stirrer locations. Two dough mixers at various rotation speeds are studied; one with one stirrer and the other with two stirrers. With a singular circular stirrer, an eccentric configuration is adopted. A further eccentric case with two circular stirrers is also contrasted against the above, where a symmetrical arrangement is assumed. Numerical simulations are based on two dimensions in the cylindrical polar co-ordinates system. The results reflected close agreement with the equivalent experimental results. The motivation for this work is to develop and advance technology to model the mixing of dough. The ultimate target is to predict and adjust the design of dough mixers, so that optimal dough processing may be achieved notably, with reference to work input on the dough. The hardware platform is a network combination of homogeneous Intel Linux clusters of workstations. A semi-implicit time-stepping Taylor-Galerkin scheme is employed with PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) message passing libraries as the message passing protocol. Parallel results are compared against single processor (sequentially) solutions, using the parallelism paradigm of domain decomposition. Linear speed-up with the number of processors is

  7. GROWTH OF HETROTROPHIC BIOFILMS IN A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA has designed and constructed a distribution system simulator (DSS) to evaluate factors which influence water quality within water distribution systems. Six individual 25 meter lengths of 15 cm diameter ductile iron pipe are arranged into loop configurations. Each lo...

  8. Multi parton interactions and multi parton distributions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, M.

    2012-01-01

    After a brief recapitulation of the general interest of parton densities, we discuss multiple hard interactions and multi parton distributions. We report on recent theoretical progress in their QCD description, on outstanding conceptual problems and on possibilities to use multi parton distributions as a laboratory to test and improve our understanding of hadron structure. (author)

  9. An educational tool for interactive parallel and distributed processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2012-01-01

    In this article we try to describe how the modular interactive tiles system (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing a handson educational tool that allows a change in the representation...... of abstract problems related to designing interactive parallel and distributed systems. Indeed, the MITS seems to bring a series of goals into education, such as parallel programming, distributedness, communication protocols, master dependency, software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback......, connectivity, topology, island modeling, and user and multi-user interaction which can rarely be found in other tools. Finally, we introduce the system of modular interactive tiles as a tool for easy, fast, and flexible hands-on exploration of these issues, and through examples we show how to implement...

  10. Simulation of Distributed PV Power Output in Oahu Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lave, Matthew Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) power generation in Oahu has grown rapidly since 2008. For applications such as determining the value of energy storage, it is important to have PV power output timeseries. Since these timeseries of not typically measured, here we produce simulated distributed PV power output for Oahu. Simulated power output is based on (a) satellite-derived solar irradiance, (b) PV permit data by neighborhood, and (c) population data by census block. Permit and population data was used to model locations of distributed PV, and irradiance data was then used to simulate power output. PV power output simulations are presented by sub-neighborhood polygons, neighborhoods, and for the whole island of Oahu. Summary plots of annual PV energy and a sample week timeseries of power output are shown, and a the files containing the entire timeseries are described.

  11. An Educational Tool for Interactive Parallel and Distributed Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we try to describe how the Modular Interactive Tiles System (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing an educational hands-on tool that allows a change of representation of the abs......In this paper we try to describe how the Modular Interactive Tiles System (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing an educational hands-on tool that allows a change of representation...... of the abstract problems related to designing interactive parallel and distributed systems. Indeed, MITS seems to bring a series of goals into the education, such as parallel programming, distributedness, communication protocols, master dependency, software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback......, connectivity, topology, island modeling, user and multiuser interaction, which can hardly be found in other tools. Finally, we introduce the system of modular interactive tiles as a tool for easy, fast, and flexible hands-on exploration of these issues, and through examples show how to implement interactive...

  12. Distribution load forecast with interactive correction of horizon loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glamochanin, V.; Andonov, D.; Gagovski, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the interactive distribution load forecast application that performs the distribution load forecast with interactive correction of horizon loads. It consists of two major parts implemented in Fortran and Visual Basic. The Fortran part is used for the forecasts computations. It consists of two methods: Load Transfer Coupling Curve Fitting (LTCCF) and load Forecast Using Curve Shape Clustering (FUCSC). LTCCF is used to 'correct' the contaminated data because of load transfer among neighboring distribution areas. FUCSC uses curve shape clustering to forecast the distribution loads of small areas. The forecast for each small area is achieved by using the shape of corresponding cluster curve. The comparison of forecasted loads of the area with historical data will be used as a tool for the correction of the estimated horizon load. The Visual Basic part is used to provide flexible interactive user-friendly environment. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  13. IMPETUS - Interactive MultiPhysics Environment for Unified Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vi Q; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-12-08

    We introduce IMPETUS - Interactive MultiPhysics Environment for Unified Simulations, an object oriented, easy-to-use, high performance, C++ program for three-dimensional simulations of complex physical systems that can benefit a large variety of research areas, especially in cell mechanics. The program implements cross-communication between locally interacting particles and continuum models residing in the same physical space while a network facilitates long-range particle interactions. Message Passing Interface is used for inter-processor communication for all simulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Framework for the Interactive Handling of High-Dimensional Simulation Data in Complex Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Benzina, Amal; Buse, Gerrit; Butnaru, Daniel; Murarasu, Alin; Treib, Marc; Varduhn, Vasco; Mundani, Ralf-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Flow simulations around building infrastructure models involve large scale complex geometries, which when discretized in adequate detail entail high computational cost. Moreover, tasks such as simulation insight by steering or optimization require many such costly simulations. In this paper, we illustrate the whole pipeline of an integrated solution for interactive computational steering, developed for complex flow simulation scenarios that depend on a moderate number of both geometric and physical parameters. A mesh generator takes building information model input data and outputs a valid cartesian discretization. A sparse-grids-based surrogate model—a less costly substitute for the parameterized simulation—uses precomputed data to deliver approximated simulation results at interactive rates. Furthermore, a distributed multi-display visualization environment shows building infrastructure together with flow data. The focus is set on scalability and intuitive user interaction.

  15. Thermal interaction effect on nucleation site distribution in subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay

    2012-01-01

    An experimental work on subcooled boiling of refrigerant, R134a, to examine nucleation site distributions on both copper and stainless steel heating surfaces was performed. In order to obtain high fidelity active nucleation site density and distribution data, a high-speed digital camera was utilized to record bubble emission images from a view normal to heating surfaces. Statistical analyses on nucleation site data were done and their statistical distributions were obtained. Those experimentally observed nucleation site distributions were compared to the random spatial Poisson distribution. The comparisons showed that, rather than purely random, active nucleation site distributions on boiling surfaces are relatively more uniform. Experimental results also showed that on the copper heating surface, nucleation site distributions are slightly more uniform than on the stainless steel surface. This was concluded as the results of thermal interactions between nucleation sites with different solid thermal conductivities. A two dimensional thermal interaction model was then developed to quantitatively examine the thermal interactions between nucleation sites. The results give a reasonable explanation to the experimental observation on nucleation site distributions.

  16. XNsim: Internet-Enabled Collaborative Distributed Simulation via an Extensible Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, John; Karpov, Igor; Zhang, Chendi; Bedrossian, Nazareth S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the XNsim approach to achieve Internet-enabled, dynamically scalable collaborative distributed simulation capabilities is presented. With this approach, a complete simulation can be assembled from shared component subsystems written in different formats, that run on different computing platforms, with different sampling rates, in different geographic locations, and over singlelmultiple networks. The subsystems interact securely with each other via the Internet. Furthermore, the simulation topology can be dynamically modified. The distributed simulation uses a combination of hub-and-spoke and peer-topeer network topology. A proof-of-concept demonstrator is also presented. The XNsim demonstrator can be accessed at http://www.jsc.draver.corn/xn that hosts various examples of Internet enabled simulations.

  17. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  18. Timing Interactions in Social Simulations: The Voter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Miguel, Maxi San

    The recent availability of huge high resolution datasets on human activities has revealed the heavy-tailed nature of the interevent time distributions. In social simulations of interacting agents the standard approach has been to use Poisson processes to update the state of the agents, which gives rise to very homogeneous activity patterns with a well defined characteristic interevent time. As a paradigmatic opinion model we investigate the voter model and review the standard update rules and propose two new update rules which are able to account for heterogeneous activity patterns. For the new update rules each node gets updated with a probability that depends on the time since the last event of the node, where an event can be an update attempt (exogenous update) or a change of state (endogenous update). We find that both update rules can give rise to power law interevent time distributions, although the endogenous one more robustly. Apart from that for the exogenous update rule and the standard update rules the voter model does not reach consensus in the infinite size limit, while for the endogenous update there exist a coarsening process that drives the system toward consensus configurations.

  19. Simulating market dynamics: interactions between consumer psychology and social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marco A; Jager, Wander

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. In a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model. The main results indicated that the behavioral rules dominating the artificial consumer's decision making determine the resulting market dynamics, such as fashions, lock-in, and unstable renewal. Results also show the importance of psychological variables like social networks, preferences, and the need for identity to explain the dynamics of markets. In this article we extend this work in two directions. First, we will focus on a more systematic investigation of the effects of different network structures. The previous article was based on Watts and Strogatz's approach, which describes the small-world and clustering characteristics in networks. More recent research demonstrated that many large networks display a scale-free power-law distribution for node connectivity. In terms of market dynamics this may imply that a small proportion of consumers may have an exceptional influence on the consumptive behavior of others (hubs, or early adapters). We show that market dynamics is a self-organized property depending on the interaction between the agents' decision-making process (heuristics), the product characteristics (degree of satisfaction of unit of consumption, visibility), and the structure of interactions between agents (size of network and hubs in a social network).

  20. Numerical Simulation of Wind Turbine Blade-Tower Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wang; Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of wind turbine blade-tower interaction by using the open source OpenFOAM tools coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method were presented.The governing equations were the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) which were solved by the pimpleDyMFoam solver,and the AMI method was employed to handle mesh movements.The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase Ⅵ wind turbine in upwind configuration was selected for numerical tests with different incoming wind speeds (5,10,15,and 25 m/s) at a fixed blade pitch and constant rotational speed.Detailed numerical results of vortex structure,time histories of thrust,and pressure distribution on the blade and tower were presented.The findings show that the wind turbine tower has little effect on the whole aerodynamic performance of an upwind wind turbine,while the rotating rotor will induce an obvious cyclic drop in the front pressure of the tower.Also,strong interaction of blade tip vortices with separation from the tower was observed.

  1. Euclidean Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montvay, Istvan; Bonn Univ.; Urbach, Carsten

    2011-05-01

    We present an exploratory study of chiral effective theories of nuclei with methods adopted from lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We show that the simulations in the Euclidean path integral approach are feasible and that we can determine the energy of the two nucleon state. By varying the parameters and the simulated volumes phase shifts can be determined in principle and hopefully tuned to their physical values in the future. The physical cut-off of the theory is realised by blocking of the lattice fields. By keeping this physical cut-off fixed in physical units the lattice cut-off can be changed and in this way the lattice artefacts can be eliminated. (orig.)

  2. Simulation study of the beam-beam interaction at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, J.

    1980-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation study of the beam-beam interaction at SPEAR indicates that quantum fluctuations affecting the horizontal betatron oscillation play a critical role in the vertical beam blowup

  3. Simulation of Daily Weather Data Using Theoretical Probability Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, J. A.; Fry, W. E.; Fick, G. W.

    1980-09-01

    A computer simulation model was constructed to supply daily weather data to a plant disease management model for potato late blight. In the weather model Monte Carlo techniques were employed to generate daily values of precipitation, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, minimum relative humidity and total solar radiation. Each weather variable is described by a known theoretical probability distribution but the values of the parameters describing each distribution are dependent on the occurrence of rainfall. Precipitation occurrence is described by a first-order Markov chain. The amount of rain, given that rain has occurred, is described by a gamma probability distribution. Maximum and minimum temperature are simulated with a trivariate normal probability distribution involving maximum temperature on the previous day, maximum temperature on the current day and minimum temperature on the current day. Parameter values for this distribution are dependent on the occurrence of rain on the previous day. Both minimum relative humidity and total solar radiation are assumed to be normally distributed. The values of the parameters describing the distribution of minimum relative humidity is dependent on rainfall occurrence on the previous day and current day. Parameter values for total solar radiation are dependent on the occurrence of rain on the current day. The assumptions made during model construction were found to be appropriate for actual weather data from Geneva, New York. The performance of the weather model was evaluated by comparing the cumulative frequency distributions of simulated weather data with the distributions of actual weather data from Geneva, New York and Fort Collins, Colorado. For each location, simulated weather data were similar to actual weather data in terms of mean response, variability and autocorrelation. The possible applications of this model when used with models of other components of the agro-ecosystem are discussed.

  4. Simulation of concentration distribution of urban particles under wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanghou; Yang, Hangsheng

    2018-02-01

    The concentration of particulate matter in the air is too high, which seriously affects people’s health. The concentration of particles in densely populated towns is also high. Understanding the distribution of particles in the air helps to remove them passively. The concentration distribution of particles in urban streets is simulated by using the FLUENT software. The simulation analysis based on Discrete Phase Modelling (DPM) of FLUENT. Simulation results show that the distribution of the particles is caused by different layout of buildings. And it is pointed out that in the windward area of the building and the leeward sides of the high-rise building are the areas with high concentration of particles. Understanding the concentration of particles in different areas is also helpful for people to avoid and reduce the concentration of particles in high concentration areas.

  5. Interactive Modelling and Simulation of Human Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol

    menneskers led, der udviser både ikke-konveksitet og flere frihedsgrader • En generel og alsidig model for aktivering af bløde legemer. Modellen kan anvendes som et animations værktøj, men er lige så velegnet til simulering af menneskelige muskler, da den opfylder de grundlæggende fysiske principper......Dansk resumé Denne ph.d.-afhandling beskæftiger sig med modellering og simulation af menneskelig bevægelse. Emnerne i denne afhandling har mindst to ting til fælles. For det første beskæftiger de sig med menneskelig bevægelse. Selv om de udviklede modeller også kan benyttes til andre ting,er det...... primære fokus på at modellere den menneskelige krop. For det andet, beskæftiger de sig alle med simulering som et redskab til at syntetisere bevægelse og dermed skabe animationer. Dette er en vigtigt pointe, da det betyder, at vi ikke kun skaber værktøjer til animatorer, som de kan bruge til at lave sjove...

  6. Simulation of interactions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckeck, Guenter [Munich Univ. (Germany). Physics Faculty

    2016-11-01

    The LHC Run-2 is planned to continue until end of 2018 and should increase the data volume by at least a factor 5 compared to Run-1. A corresponding increase of the simulated data volume is required in order to analyze and interpret the recorded data. This will allow us to determine with much better precision the properties of the Higgs Boson and either find new particles as predicted by 'New Physics' theories or further increase the constraints on these models. Using SuperMUC to simulate events will be a crucial component to reach these goals. Active development of the simulation software is ongoing in order to make the workflow more flexible and better parallelizable for smaller work-units. Adapting the software for Intel/Mic architectures is an important goal, though presumably more in the long-term after LHC Run-2 (Run-3 is planned to start in 2021). We would hope that ''SuperMUC Next Generation'' provides Intel/Mic architecture extensions.

  7. Ecological interactions and the distribution, abundance, and diversity of sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Janie

    2012-01-01

    Although abiotic factors may be important first-order filters dictating which sponge species can thrive at a particular site, ecological interactions can play substantial roles influencing distribution and abundance, and thus diversity. Ecological interactions can modify the influences of abiotic factors both by further constraining distribution and abundance due to competitive or predatory interactions and by expanding habitat distribution or abundance due to beneficial interactions that ameliorate otherwise limiting circumstances. It is likely that the importance of ecological interactions has been greatly underestimated because they tend to only be revealed by experiments and time-series observations in the field. Experiments have revealed opportunistic predation to be a primary enforcer of sponge distribution boundaries that coincide with habitat boundaries in several systems. Within habitats, by contrast, dramatic effects of predators on sponge populations seem to occur primarily in cases of unusually high recruitment rates or unusually low mortality rates for the predators, which are often specialists on the sponge species affected. Competitive interactions have been demonstrated to diminish populations or exclude sponge species from a habitat in only a few cases. Cases in which competitive interactions have appeared obvious have often turned out to be neutral or even beneficial interactions when observed over time. Especially striking in this regard are sponge-sponge interactions in dense sponge-dominated communities, which may promote the continued coexistence of all participating species. Mutualistic symbioses of sponges with other animals, plants, or macroalgae have been demonstrated to increase abundance, habitat distribution, and diversity of all participants. Symbiotic microbes can enhance sponge distribution and abundance but also render their hosts more vulnerable to environmental changes. And while photosynthetic symbionts can boost growth and

  8. Distributed dynamic simulations of networked control and building performance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, Azzedine

    2018-02-01

    The use of computer-based automation and control systems for smart sustainable buildings, often so-called Automated Buildings (ABs), has become an effective way to automatically control, optimize, and supervise a wide range of building performance applications over a network while achieving the minimum energy consumption possible, and in doing so generally refers to Building Automation and Control Systems (BACS) architecture. Instead of costly and time-consuming experiments, this paper focuses on using distributed dynamic simulations to analyze the real-time performance of network-based building control systems in ABs and improve the functions of the BACS technology. The paper also presents the development and design of a distributed dynamic simulation environment with the capability of representing the BACS architecture in simulation by run-time coupling two or more different software tools over a network. The application and capability of this new dynamic simulation environment are demonstrated by an experimental design in this paper.

  9. An Interactive Simulation Tool for Production Planning in Bacon Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes an interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories. The main aim of the tool is to make it possible to combine the production plans of all parts of the factory......The paper describes an interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories. The main aim of the tool is to make it possible to combine the production plans of all parts of the factory...

  10. Simulation of AntiMatter–Matter Interactions in Geant4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galoyan Aida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross sections of antiproton and antinucleus interactions with nuclei are calculated using stochastic averaging method. A new implementation of the Quark-Gluon-String Model (QGSM is proposed for simulation of multi-particle production in antinucleus-nucleus collisions. A combination of the cross sections and the new implementation of QGSM allows experimental data on antiproton and antinucleus interactions with nuclei to be described. The combination is included in the well-known Geant4 simulation toolkit.

  11. INTERACTIVE MOTION PLATFORMS AND VIRTUAL REALITY FOR VEHICLE SIMULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evžen Thöndel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactive motion platforms are intended for vehicle simulators, where the direct interaction of the human body is used for controlling the simulated vehicle (e.g. bicycle, motorbike or other sports vehicles. The second use of interactive motion platforms is for entertainment purposes or fitness. The development of interactive motion platforms reacts to recent calls in the simulation industry to provide a device, which further enhances the virtual reality experience, especially with connection to the new and very fast growing business in virtual reality glasses. The paper looks at the design and control of an interactive motion platform with two degrees of freedom to be used in virtual reality applications. The paper provides the description of the control methods and new problems related to the virtual reality sickness are discussed here.

  12. Challenges in reducing the computational time of QSTS simulations for distribution system analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deboever, Jeremiah [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhang, Xiaochen [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Reno, Matthew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Broderick, Robert Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grijalva, Santiago [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Therrien, Francis [CME International T& D, St. Bruno, QC (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    The rapid increase in penetration of distributed energy resources on the electric power distribution system has created a need for more comprehensive interconnection modelling and impact analysis. Unlike conventional scenario - based studies , quasi - static time - series (QSTS) simulation s can realistically model time - dependent voltage controllers and the diversity of potential impacts that can occur at different times of year . However, to accurately model a distribution system with all its controllable devices, a yearlong simulation at 1 - second resolution is often required , which could take conventional computers a computational time of 10 to 120 hours when an actual unbalanced distribution feeder is modeled . This computational burden is a clear l imitation to the adoption of QSTS simulation s in interconnection studies and for determining optimal control solutions for utility operations . Our ongoing research to improve the speed of QSTS simulation has revealed many unique aspects of distribution system modelling and sequential power flow analysis that make fast QSTS a very difficult problem to solve. In this report , the most relevant challenges in reducing the computational time of QSTS simulations are presented: number of power flows to solve, circuit complexity, time dependence between time steps, multiple valid power flow solutions, controllable element interactions, and extensive accurate simulation analysis.

  13. Device for simulation of integral dose distribution in multifield radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyakov, E K; Voronin, V V; Kolosova, V F; Moskalev, A I; Marova, Yu M; Stavitskii, R V; Yarovoi, V S

    1974-11-15

    Described is a device for simulation of the sum dose distribution at multifield radiation therapy; the device comprises a mechanical unit on which the emission sources and detectors are mounted, an electromechanical scanning equipment, amplifiers, an adder, a position sensor and a recording instrument. The device suggested raises an accuracy of a sick man radiation program elaboration at a remote multifield radiation therapy, permits to estimate the irradiated medium heterogeneity and beam shaper influence on the sum dose distribution and also ensured the information on the sum dose distribution of the relative or absolute units. Additional filters simulating heterogeneity and beam shaping conditions of ionizing radiation may be mounted between the quantum emission sources and detectors, and an amplifier with a variable amplification factor may be placed between the adders and printers. Thus it is possible to obtain a sum dose distribution at static methods of the remote radiation therapy at a high degree of accuracy (up to +-10%).

  14. Simulation of speckle patterns with pre-defined correlation distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lipei; Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xueyan; Zhao, Xing; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    We put forward a method to easily generate a single or a sequence of fully developed speckle patterns with pre-defined correlation distribution by utilizing the principle of coherent imaging. The few-to-one mapping between the input correlation matrix and the correlation distribution between simulated speckle patterns is realized and there is a simple square relationship between the values of these two correlation coefficient sets. This method is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The square relationship enables easy conversion from any desired correlation distribution. Since the input correlation distribution can be defined by a digital matrix or a gray-scale image acquired experimentally, this method provides a convenient way to simulate real speckle-related experiments and to evaluate data processing techniques. PMID:27231589

  15. Global simulation of interactions between groundwater and terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhekke, M. C.; Rebel, K.; Dekker, S. C.; Smith, B.; Van Beek, L. P.; Sutanudjaja, E.; van Kampenhout, L.; Wassen, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    In many places in the world ecosystems are influenced by the presence of a shallow groundwater table. In these regions upward water flux due to capillary rise increases soil moisture availability in the root zone, which has strong positive effect on evapotranspiration. Additionally it has important consequences for vegetation dynamics and fluxes of carbon and nitrogen. Under water limited conditions shallow groundwater stimulates vegetation productivity, and soil organic matter decomposition while under saturated conditions groundwater may have a negative effect on these processes due to lack of oxygen. Furthermore, since plant species differ with respect to their root distribution, preference for moisture conditions, and resistance to oxygen stress, shallow groundwater also influences vegetation type. Finally, processes such as denitrification and methane production occur under strictly anaerobic conditions and are thus strongly influenced by moisture availability. Most global hydrological models and several land surface models simulate groundwater table dynamics and their effects on land surface processes. However, these models typically have relatively simplistic representation of vegetation and do not consider changes in vegetation type and structure and are therefore less suitable to represent effects of groundwater on biogeochemical fluxes. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), describe land surface from an ecological perspective, combining detailed description of vegetation dynamics and structure and biogeochemical processes. These models are thus more appropriate to simulate the ecological and biogeochemical effects of groundwater interactions. However, currently virtually all DGVMs ignore these effects, assuming that water tables are too deep to affect soil moisture in the root zone. We have implemented a tight coupling between the dynamic global ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS and the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. Using this coupled model we aim to

  16. A compositional reservoir simulator on distributed memory parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rame, M.; Delshad, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the application of distributed memory parallel computes to field scale reservoir simulations using a parallel version of UTCHEM, The University of Texas Chemical Flooding Simulator. The model is a general purpose highly vectorized chemical compositional simulator that can simulate a wide range of displacement processes at both field and laboratory scales. The original simulator was modified to run on both distributed memory parallel machines (Intel iPSC/960 and Delta, Connection Machine 5, Kendall Square 1 and 2, and CRAY T3D) and a cluster of workstations. A domain decomposition approach has been taken towards parallelization of the code. A portion of the discrete reservoir model is assigned to each processor by a set-up routine that attempts a data layout as even as possible from the load-balance standpoint. Each of these subdomains is extended so that data can be shared between adjacent processors for stencil computation. The added routines that make parallel execution possible are written in a modular fashion that makes the porting to new parallel platforms straight forward. Results of the distributed memory computing performance of Parallel simulator are presented for field scale applications such as tracer flood and polymer flood. A comparison of the wall-clock times for same problems on a vector supercomputer is also presented

  17. Interactive Simulations to Support Quantum Mechanics Instruction for Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnle, Antje; Benfield, Cory; Hahner, Georg; Paetkau, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The QuVis Quantum Mechanics Visualization Project provides freely available research-based interactive simulations with accompanying activities for the teaching and learning of quantum mechanics across a wide range of topics and levels. This article gives an overview of some of the simulations and describes their use in an introductory physical…

  18. Depletion interactions in two-dimensional colloid-polymer mixtures: molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul; Seong, Baek-Seok; Suh, Soong-Hyuck

    2009-01-01

    The depletion interactions acting between two hard colloids immersed in a bath of polymers, in which the interaction potentials include the soft repulsion/attraction, are extensively studied by using the molecular dynamics simulations. The collision frequencies and collision angle distributions for both incidental and reflection conditions are computed to study the dynamic properties of the colloidal mixtures. The depletion effect induced by the polymer-polymer and colloid-polymer interactions are investigated as well as the size ratio of the colloid and polymer. The simulated results show that the strong depletion interaction between two hard colloids appears for the highly asymmetric hard-disc mixtures. The attractive depletion force at contact becomes deeper and the repulsive barrier becomes wider as the asymmetry in size ratio increases. The strong polymer-polymer attraction leads to the purely attractive depletion interaction between two hard colloids, whereas the purely repulsive depletion interaction is induced by the strong colloid-polymer attraction.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of electrostatics and hydration distributions around RNA and DNA motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Ashley E.; Singh, Abhishek; Semichaevsky, Andrey V.; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2009-03-01

    Nucleic acid nanoparticles can self-assembly through the formation of complementary loop-loop interactions or stem-stem interactions. Presence and concentration of ions can significantly affect the self-assembly process and the stability of the nanostructure. In this presentation we use explicit molecular dynamics simulations to examine the variations in cationic distributions and hydration environment around DNA and RNA helices and loop-loop interactions. Our simulations show that the potassium and sodium ionic distributions are different around RNA and DNA motifs which could be indicative of ion mediated relative stability of loop-loop complexes. Moreover in RNA loop-loop motifs ions are consistently present and exchanged through a distinct electronegative channel. We will also show how we used the specific RNA loop-loop motif to design a RNA hexagonal nanoparticle.

  20. High Level Architecture Distributed Space System Simulation for Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization Simulation Smackdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuqun

    2011-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation plays a very important role in mission design. It not only reduces design cost, but also prepares astronauts for their mission tasks. The SISO Smackdown is a simulation event that facilitates modeling and simulation in academia. The scenario of this year s Smackdown was to simulate a lunar base supply mission. The mission objective was to transfer Earth supply cargo to a lunar base supply depot and retrieve He-3 to take back to Earth. Federates for this scenario include the environment federate, Earth-Moon transfer vehicle, lunar shuttle, lunar rover, supply depot, mobile ISRU plant, exploratory hopper, and communication satellite. These federates were built by teams from all around the world, including teams from MIT, JSC, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Bordeaux from France, and University of Genoa from Italy. This paper focuses on the lunar shuttle federate, which was programmed by the USRP intern team from NASA JSC. The shuttle was responsible for provide transportation between lunar orbit and the lunar surface. The lunar shuttle federate was built using the NASA standard simulation package called Trick, and it was extended with HLA functions using TrickHLA. HLA functions of the lunar shuttle federate include sending and receiving interaction, publishing and subscribing attributes, and packing and unpacking fixed record data. The dynamics model of the lunar shuttle was modeled with three degrees of freedom, and the state propagation was obeying the law of two body dynamics. The descending trajectory of the lunar shuttle was designed by first defining a unique descending orbit in 2D space, and then defining a unique orbit in 3D space with the assumption of a non-rotating moon. Finally this assumption was taken away to define the initial position of the lunar shuttle so that it will start descending a second after it joins the execution. VPN software from SonicWall was used to connect federates with RTI during testing

  1. Mesoscale simulations of hydrodynamic squirmer interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Ingo O; Gompper, Gerhard

    2010-10-01

    The swimming behavior of self-propelled microorganisms is studied by particle-based mesoscale simulations. The simulation technique includes both hydrodynamics and thermal fluctuations that are both essential for the dynamics of microswimmers. The swimmers are modeled as squirmers, i.e., spherical objects with a prescribed tangential surface velocity, where the focus of thrust generation can be tuned from pushers to pullers. For passive squirmers (colloids), we show that the velocity autocorrelation function agrees quantitatively with the Boussinesq approximation. Single active squirmers show a persistent random-walk behavior, determined by forward motion, lateral diffusion, and orientational fluctuations, in agreement with theoretical predictions. For pairs of squirmers, which are initially swimming in parallel, we find an attraction for pushers and a repulsion for pullers, as expected. The hydrodynamic force between squirmer pairs is calculated as a function of the center-to-center distances d(cm) and is found to be consistent with a logarithmic distance dependence for d(cm) less than about two sphere diameters; here, the force is considerably stronger than expected from the far-field expansion. The dependence of the force strength on the asymmetry of the polar surface velocity is obtained. During the collision process, thermal fluctuations turn out to be very important and to strongly affect the postcollision velocity directions of both squirmers.

  2. Simulation of cosmic ray interaction at Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1996-01-01

    Accelerator experiments provide the basis for the development of physical models describing the production of cosmogenic nuclides by cosmic ray particles. Here, experiments are presented by which the irradiation of stony and iron meteoroids in space by galactic cosmic ray protons was successfully simulated; two thick spherical targets made of gabbro and of steel with radii of 25 and 10 cm, respectively, were isotropically irradiated with 1.6 GeV protons at LNS. The artificial meteoroids contained large numbers of individual small targets of up to 27 elements in which the depth-dependent production of radioactive and stable nuclides was analyzed by model calculations based on depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary particles calculated by the HERMES code system and on experimental and theoretical thin-target cross sections. Due to the results of the two simulation experiments at LNS a consistent modelling of cosmogenic nuclide production rates in stony and iron meteorites was achieved for the first time which allows to interpret the observed abundances of cosmogenic nuclides in stony and iron meteorites with respect to their exposure histories and to describe the history of the cosmic radiation itself. (author)

  3. An open source platform for multi-scale spatially distributed simulations of microbial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2014-08-14

    The goal of this project was to develop a tool for facilitating simulation, validation and discovery of multiscale dynamical processes in microbial ecosystems. This led to the development of an open-source software platform for Computation Of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space (COMETS). COMETS performs spatially distributed time-dependent flux balance based simulations of microbial metabolism. Our plan involved building the software platform itself, calibrating and testing it through comparison with experimental data, and integrating simulations and experiments to address important open questions on the evolution and dynamics of cross-feeding interactions between microbial species.

  4. Web-Based Distributed Simulation of Aeronautical Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Desheng; Follen, Gregory J.; Pavlik, William R.; Kim, Chan M.; Liu, Xianyou; Blaser, Tammy M.; Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    An application was developed to allow users to run and view the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) engine simulations from web browsers. Simulations were performed on multiple INFORMATION POWER GRID (IPG) test beds. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) was used for brokering data exchange among machines and IPG/Globus for job scheduling and remote process invocation. Web server scripting was performed by JavaServer Pages (JSP). This application has proven to be an effective and efficient way to couple heterogeneous distributed components.

  5. SCI-Clone/32 - a distributed real time simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilks, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in engineering and in particular digital computers has enabled the simulation manufacturers to deliver a realism of a kind undreamt of a decade ago. 32-bit computers ranging in processor power from several hundred thousand instructions per second to many millions are at the heart of each simulator. Gould has pioneered digital computers in simulation with real time systems using shared memory, parallel processors, 64KByte cache, and shadow memory. The market is planning for higher iteration rates, lower life cycle costs, and the development of part task products. These can be met by distributing the tasks amongst nodal computers having a unique architecture for sharing data variables with minimal contention. (Auth.)

  6. Stand, Harvest, and Equipment Interactions in Simulated Harvesting Prescriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; W. Dale Greene; Bryce J. Stokes

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated potential interactions of stand type, harvesting method, and equipment in an experiment using interactive simulation. We examined three felling methods (chain saw, feller-buncher, harvester) and two extraction methods (grapple skidder and forwarder) performing clearcuts, sheltenvood cuts, and single-tree selection cuts in both an uneven-aged natural stand...

  7. Mathematical simulation of point defect interaction with grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojko, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    Published works, where the interaction of point defects and grain boundaries was studied by mathematical simulation methods, have been analysed. Energetics of the vacancy formation both in nuclei of large-angle special grain boundaries and in lattice regions adjoining them has been considered. The data obtained permit to explain specific features of grain-boundary diffusion processes. Results of mathematical simulation of the interaction of impurity atoms and boundaries have been considered. Specific features of the helium atom interaction with large-angle grain boundaries are analysed as well

  8. A Coordinated Initialization Process for the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert; Dexter, Dan; Hasan, David; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2007-01-01

    This document describes the federate initialization process that was developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center with the HIIA Transfer Vehicle Flight Controller Trainer (HTV FCT) simulations and refined in the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES). These simulations use the High Level Architecture (HLA) IEEE 1516 to provide the communication and coordination between the distributed parts of the simulation. The purpose of the paper is to describe a generic initialization sequence that can be used to create a federate that can: 1. Properly initialize all HLA objects, object instances, interactions, and time management 2. Check for the presence of all federates 3. Coordinate startup with other federates 4. Robustly initialize and share initial object instance data with other federates.

  9. VASA: Interactive Computational Steering of Large Asynchronous Simulation Pipelines for Societal Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sungahn; Zhao, Jieqiong; Xia, Jing; Afzal, Shehzad; Wang, Xiaoyu; Abram, Greg; Elmqvist, Niklas; Kne, Len; Van Riper, David; Gaither, Kelly; Kennedy, Shaun; Tolone, William; Ribarsky, William; Ebert, David S

    2014-12-01

    We present VASA, a visual analytics platform consisting of a desktop application, a component model, and a suite of distributed simulation components for modeling the impact of societal threats such as weather, food contamination, and traffic on critical infrastructure such as supply chains, road networks, and power grids. Each component encapsulates a high-fidelity simulation model that together form an asynchronous simulation pipeline: a system of systems of individual simulations with a common data and parameter exchange format. At the heart of VASA is the Workbench, a visual analytics application providing three distinct features: (1) low-fidelity approximations of the distributed simulation components using local simulation proxies to enable analysts to interactively configure a simulation run; (2) computational steering mechanisms to manage the execution of individual simulation components; and (3) spatiotemporal and interactive methods to explore the combined results of a simulation run. We showcase the utility of the platform using examples involving supply chains during a hurricane as well as food contamination in a fast food restaurant chain.

  10. Electric field distribution and simulation of avalanche formation due ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electric field distributions and their role in the formation of avalanche due to the passage of heavy ions in parallel grid avalanche type wire chamber detectors are evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The relative merits and demerits of parallel and crossed wire grid configurations are studied. It is found that the crossed ...

  11. Ray tracing the Wigner distribution function for optical simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mout, B.M.; Wick, Michael; Bociort, F.; Petschulat, Joerg; Urbach, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We study a simulation method that uses the Wigner distribution function to incorporate wave optical effects in an established framework based on geometrical optics, i.e., a ray tracing engine. We use the method to calculate point spread functions and show that it is accurate for paraxial systems

  12. Simulation of tail distributions in electron-positron circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.

    1992-02-01

    In addition to the Gaussian shaped core region, particle bunches in electron-positron circular colliders have a rarefied halo region of importance in determining beam lifetimes and backgrounds in particle detectors. A method is described which allows simulation of halo particle distributions

  13. Correction of measured multiplicity distributions by the simulated annealing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafidouni, M.

    1993-01-01

    Simulated annealing is a method used to solve combinatorial optimization problems. It is used here for the correction of the observed multiplicity distribution from S-Pb collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon. (author) 11 refs., 2 figs

  14. An analog simulation technique for distributed flow systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Kümmel, Mogens

    1973-01-01

    earlier[3]. This is an important extension since flow systems are frequently controlled through manipulation of the flow rate. Previously the tech­nique has been applied with constant flows [4, 5]. Results demonstrating the new hardware are presented from simula­tion of a transportation lag and a double......Simulation of distributed flow systems in chemical engine­ering has been applied more and more during the last decade as computer techniques have developed [l]. The applications have served the purpose of identification of process dynamics and parameter estimation as well as improving process...... and process control design. Although the conventional analog computer has been expanded with hybrid techniques and digital simulation languages have appeared, none of these has demonstrated superiority in simulating distributed flow systems in general [l]. Conventional analog techniques are expensive...

  15. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

  16. i3Drive, a 3D interactive driving simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroz, Miha; Prebil, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    i3Drive, a wheeled-vehicle simulator, can accurately simulate vehicles of various configurations with up to eight wheels in real time on a desktop PC. It presents the vehicle dynamics as an interactive animation in a virtual 3D environment. The application is fully GUI-controlled, giving users an easy overview of the simulation parameters and letting them adjust those parameters interactively. It models all relevant vehicle systems, including the mechanical models of the suspension, power train, and braking and steering systems. The simulation results generally correspond well with actual measurements, making the system useful for studying vehicle performance in various driving scenarios. i3Drive is thus a worthy complement to other, more complex tools for vehicle-dynamics simulation and analysis.

  17. Interactive Anatomy-Augmented Virtual Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebersold, Michelle; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Cherara, Leila; Weber, Monica; Khouri, Christina; Levine, Robert; Tait, Alan R

    2018-02-01

    Traditionally, clinical psychomotor skills are taught through videos and demonstration by faculty which does not allow for the visualization of internal structures and anatomical landmarks that would enhance the learner skill performance. Sophomore and junior nursing students attending a large Midwestern Institution (N=69) participated in this mixed methods study. Students demonstrated their ability to place a nasogastric tube (NGT) after being randomly assigned to usual training (Control group) or an iPad anatomy-augmented virtual simulation training module (AR group). The ability of the participants to demonstrate competence in placing the NGT was assessed using a 17-item competency checklist. After the demonstration, students completed a survey to elicit information about students' level of training, prior experience with NGT placement, satisfaction with the AR technology, and perceptions of AR as a potential teaching tool for clinical skills training. The ability to correctly place the NGT through all the checklist items was statistically significant in the AR group compared with the control group (P = 0.011). Eighty-six percent of participants in the AR group rated AR as superior/far superior to other procedural training programs to which they had been exposed, whereas, only 5.9% of participants in the control group rated the control program as superior/far superior (P < 0.001). Overall the AR module was better received compared with the control group with regards to realism, identifying landmarks, visualization of internal organs, ease of use, usefulness, and promoting learning and understanding.

  18. Distributed Sensor Network Software Development Testing through Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Sean M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2003-12-01

    The distributed sensor network (DSN) presents a novel and highly complex computing platform with dif culties and opportunities that are just beginning to be explored. The potential of sensor networks extends from monitoring for threat reduction, to conducting instant and remote inventories, to ecological surveys. Developing and testing for robust and scalable applications is currently practiced almost exclusively in hardware. The Distributed Sensors Simulator (DSS) is an infrastructure that allows the user to debug and test software for DSNs independent of hardware constraints. The exibility of DSS allows developers and researchers to investigate topological, phenomenological, networking, robustness and scaling issues, to explore arbitrary algorithms for distributed sensors, and to defeat those algorithms through simulated failure. The user speci es the topology, the environment, the application, and any number of arbitrary failures; DSS provides the virtual environmental embedding.

  19. Simulation and energy analysis of distributed electric heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Han, Shenchao; Yang, Yanchun; Liu, Mingyuan

    2018-02-01

    Distributed electric heating system assistssolar heating systemby using air-source heat pump. Air-source heat pump as auxiliary heat sourcecan make up the defects of the conventional solar thermal system can provide a 24 - hour high - efficiency work. It has certain practical value and practical significance to reduce emissions and promote building energy efficiency. Using Polysun software the system is simulated and compared with ordinary electric boiler heating system. The simulation results show that upon energy request, 5844.5kW energy is saved and 3135kg carbon - dioxide emissions are reduced and5844.5 kWhfuel and energy consumption is decreased with distributed electric heating system. Theeffect of conserving energy and reducing emissions using distributed electric heating systemis very obvious.

  20. Mercury interactions in a simulated gold platter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.W. [University of North Carolina, Asheville, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Studies; Callahan, J.E. [Appalachian State Univ., Boone, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology; Craig, J.R. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    2002-07-01

    A simulated stream sediment bed was constructed in a laboratory to determine whether dissolved Hg could be transported through sediment and deposited as amalgam on Au grains. Metallic Hg was placed in a sump at one end of a tank filled with gravel (quartz sand, granules, and pebbles), and Au grains were buried in the gravel at the other end. Water was circulated in a continuous closed loop over the Hg and through the gravel that included the Au grains for more than 850 days. The Hg content of the water increased from nil at the beginning to approximately 0.5 {mu}g/l after approximately 22 days. The Hg content on the rims of Au grains went from nil to approximately 0.2 wt.% over 22 days reaching a maximum 0.48 wt.% Hg after 14 days. Subsequent measurements indicated a persistent decrease of the maximum Hg on Au grains to {<=}0.19 wt.% Hg at 552 days and to {<=}0.05 wt.% at 851 days. Deposition of Hg on the Au grains indicates that amalgams can form without actual contact of Hg on Au in stream sediments. Why Hg first deposited on Au and then dissolved from the Au is unknown, but a paucity of microbiota early in the experiment and subsequent development of microbiota that could facilitate dissolution of Hg is suspected. The simulated Au placer, with its coarse sediments and free water flow, is analogous to streams that have measurable (>0.2 {mu}g/l) Hg in the water and no amalgams on Au grains within the sediments. An example of a Au mining region with similar water concentrations of Hg would be the Amazon Basin, although information on the presence of amalgam rims on Au grains is lacking, as for most regions. Lower but still measurable ({<=}0.55 {mu}g/l Hg) concentrations of Hg in stream water and a lack of amalgams on Au grains occur in Au placers near Talladega, Alabama. The opposite case would be streams with less-than-measurable (<0.2 {mu}g/l) Hg in the water but amalgams on Au grains, where conditions are less aerated and Hg would be more likely to remain in the

  1. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebrock, L.M. [Liebrock-Hicks Research, Calumet, MI (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed.

  2. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebrock, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed

  3. Temporal acceleration of spatially distributed kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2006-01-01

    The computational intensity of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation is a major impediment in simulating large length and time scales. In recent work, an approximate method for KMC simulation of spatially uniform systems, termed the binomial τ-leap method, was introduced [A. Chatterjee, D.G. Vlachos, M.A. Katsoulakis, Binomial distribution based τ-leap accelerated stochastic simulation, J. Chem. Phys. 122 (2005) 024112], where molecular bundles instead of individual processes are executed over coarse-grained time increments. This temporal coarse-graining can lead to significant computational savings but its generalization to spatially lattice KMC simulation has not been realized yet. Here we extend the binomial τ-leap method to lattice KMC simulations by combining it with spatially adaptive coarse-graining. Absolute stability and computational speed-up analyses for spatial systems along with simulations provide insights into the conditions where accuracy and substantial acceleration of the new spatio-temporal coarse-graining method are ensured. Model systems demonstrate that the r-time increment criterion of Chatterjee et al. obeys the absolute stability limit for values of r up to near 1

  4. Simulating quantum correlations as a distributed sampling problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degorre, Julien; Laplante, Sophie; Roland, Jeremie

    2005-01-01

    It is known that quantum correlations exhibited by a maximally entangled qubit pair can be simulated with the help of shared randomness, supplemented with additional resources, such as communication, postselection or nonlocal boxes. For instance, in the case of projective measurements, it is possible to solve this problem with protocols using one bit of communication or making one use of a nonlocal box. We show that this problem reduces to a distributed sampling problem. We give a new method to obtain samples from a biased distribution, starting with shared random variables following a uniform distribution, and use it to build distributed sampling protocols. This approach allows us to derive, in a simpler and unified way, many existing protocols for projective measurements, and extend them to positive operator value measurements. Moreover, this approach naturally leads to a local hidden variable model for Werner states

  5. The thermal pressure distribution of a simulated cold neutral medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazol, Adriana, E-mail: a.gazol@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A. P. 3-72, c.p. 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    We numerically study the thermal pressure distribution in a gas with thermal properties similar to those of the cold neutral interstellar gas by analyzing three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in boxes with sides of 100 pc with turbulent compressible forcing at 50 pc and different Mach numbers. We find that at high pressures and for large Mach numbers, both the volume-weighted and the density-weighted distributions can be appropriately described by a log-normal distribution, whereas for small Mach numbers they are better described by a power law. Thermal pressure distributions resulting from similar simulations but with self-gravity differ only for low Mach numbers; in this case, they develop a high pressure tail.

  6. System Engineering Strategy for Distributed Multi-Purpose Simulation Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhula, Dlilpkumar; Kurt, Cindy Marie; Luty, Roger

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the system engineering approach used to develop distributed multi-purpose simulations. The multi-purpose simulation architecture focuses on user needs, operations, flexibility, cost and maintenance. This approach was used to develop an International Space Station (ISS) simulator, which is called the International Space Station Integrated Simulation (ISIS)1. The ISIS runs unmodified ISS flight software, system models, and the astronaut command and control interface in an open system design that allows for rapid integration of multiple ISS models. The initial intent of ISIS was to provide a distributed system that allows access to ISS flight software and models for the creation, test, and validation of crew and ground controller procedures. This capability reduces the cost and scheduling issues associated with utilizing standalone simulators in fixed locations, and facilitates discovering unknowns and errors earlier in the development lifecycle. Since its inception, the flexible architecture of the ISIS has allowed its purpose to evolve to include ground operator system and display training, flight software modification testing, and as a realistic test bed for Exploration automation technology research and development.

  7. The simulation approach to lipid-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramo, Teresa; Garzón, Diana; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Khalid, Syma; Bond, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between lipids and proteins are crucial for a range of biological processes, from the folding and stability of membrane proteins to signaling and metabolism facilitated by lipid-binding proteins. However, high-resolution structural details concerning functional lipid/protein interactions are scarce due to barriers in both experimental isolation of native lipid-bound complexes and subsequent biophysical characterization. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach provides a means to complement available structural data, yielding dynamic, structural, and thermodynamic data for a protein embedded within a physiologically realistic, modelled lipid environment. In this chapter, we provide a guide to current methods for setting up and running simulations of membrane proteins and soluble, lipid-binding proteins, using standard atomistically detailed representations, as well as simplified, coarse-grained models. In addition, we outline recent studies that illustrate the power of the simulation approach in the context of biologically relevant lipid/protein interactions.

  8. Building Interactive Simulations in Web Pages without Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailen Kootsey, J; McAuley, Grant; Bernal, Julie

    2005-01-01

    A software system is described for building interactive simulations and other numerical calculations in Web pages. The system is based on a new Java-based software architecture named NumberLinX (NLX) that isolates each function required to build the simulation so that a library of reusable objects could be assembled. The NLX objects are integrated into a commercial Web design program for coding-free page construction. The model description is entered through a wizard-like utility program that also functions as a model editor. The complete system permits very rapid construction of interactive simulations without coding. A wide range of applications are possible with the system beyond interactive calculations, including remote data collection and processing and collaboration over a network.

  9. Simulation of soot size distribution in an ethylene counterflow flame

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-01-06

    Soot, an aggregate of carbonaceous particles produced during the rich combustion of fossil fuels, is an undesirable pollutant and health hazard. Soot evolution involves various dynamic processes: nucleation soot formation from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) condensation PAHs condensing on soot particle surface surface processes hydrogen-abstraction-C2H2-addition, oxidation coagulation two soot particles coagulating to form a bigger particle This simulation work investigates soot size distribution and morphology in an ethylene counterflow flame, using i). Chemkin with a method of moments to deal with the coupling between vapor consumption and soot formation; ii). Monte Carlo simulation of soot dynamics.

  10. A Coordinated Initialization Process for the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crues, Edwin Z.; Phillips, Robert G.; Dexter, Dan; Hasan, David

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the federate initialization process for the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) is described. The topics include: 1) Background: DSES; 2) Simulation requirements; 3) Nine Step Initialization; 4) Step 1: Create the Federation; 5) Step 2: Publish and Subscribe; 6) Step 3: Create Object Instances; 7) Step 4: Confirm All Federates Have Joined; 8) Step 5: Achieve initialize Synchronization Point; 9) Step 6: Update Object Instances With Initial Data; 10) Step 7: Wait for Object Reflections; 11) Step 8: Set Up Time Management; 12) Step 9: Achieve startup Synchronization Point; and 13) Conclusions

  11. Real-time modeling and simulation of distribution feeder and distributed resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan

    The analysis of the electrical system dates back to the days when analog network analyzers were used. With the advent of digital computers, many programs were written for power-flow and short circuit analysis for the improvement of the electrical system. Real-time computer simulations can answer many what-if scenarios in the existing or the proposed power system. In this thesis, the standard IEEE 13-Node distribution feeder is developed and validated on a real-time platform OPAL-RT. The concept and the challenges of the real-time simulation are studied and addressed. Distributed energy resources include some of the commonly used distributed generation and storage devices like diesel engine, solar photovoltaic array, and battery storage system are modeled and simulated on a real-time platform. A microgrid encompasses a portion of an electric power distribution which is located downstream of the distribution substation. Normally, the microgrid operates in paralleled mode with the grid; however, scheduled or forced isolation can take place. In such conditions, the microgrid must have the ability to operate stably and autonomously. The microgrid can operate in grid connected and islanded mode, both the operating modes are studied in the last chapter. Towards the end, a simple microgrid controller modeled and simulated on the real-time platform is developed for energy management and protection for the microgrid.

  12. Interactive microbial distribution analysis using BioAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jesper; List, Markus; Baumbach, Jan

    2017-01-01

    body maps and (iii) user-defined maps. It further allows for (iv) uploading of own sample data, which can be placed on existing maps to (v) browse the distribution of the associated taxonomies. Finally, BioAtlas enables users to (vi) contribute custom maps (e.g. for plants or animals) and to map...... to analyze microbial distribution in a location-specific context. BioAtlas is an interactive web application that closes this gap between sequence databases, taxonomy profiling and geo/body-location information. It enables users to browse taxonomically annotated sequences across (i) the world map, (ii) human...

  13. Modelling and analysis of distributed simulation protocols with distributed graph transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Lara, Juan de; Taentzer, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works. J. de Lara, and G. Taentzer, "Modelling and analysis of distributed simulation protocols with distributed graph transformation...

  14. CFD Simulation of Air Velocity Distribution in Occupied Livestock Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.; Bjerg, B.

    In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants in the de......In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants....... In this study laboratory measurements in a ventilated test room with "pig simulators" are compared with CFD-simulations....

  15. Hybrid Simulations of Plasma-Neutral-Dust Interactions at Enceladus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidi, N.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Tokar, R. L.; Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Leisner, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Through ejection from its southern hemisphere, Enceladus is a dominant source of neutral gas and dust in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The interaction of the corotating plasma with the gas and dust modifies the plasma environment around Enceladus. We use 3-D hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations to examine the effects of gas and dust on the nature of the interaction region and use Cassini observations to constrain their properties.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of interacting particle mixtures in ratchet potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendrik, A J; Romanelli, L

    2012-01-01

    There are different models of devices for achieving a separation of mixtures of particles by using the ratchet effect. On the other hand, it has been proposed that one could also control the separation by means of appropriate interactions. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we show that inclusion of simple interactions leads to a decrease of the ratchet effect and therefore also a separation of the mixtures.

  17. Ray tracing the Wigner distribution function for optical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mout, Marco; Wick, Michael; Bociort, Florian; Petschulat, Joerg; Urbach, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We study a simulation method that uses the Wigner distribution function to incorporate wave optical effects in an established framework based on geometrical optics, i.e., a ray tracing engine. We use the method to calculate point spread functions and show that it is accurate for paraxial systems but produces unphysical results in the presence of aberrations. The cause of these anomalies is explained using an analytical model.

  18. Transverse Momentum Distributions of Electron in Simulated QED Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navdeep; Dahiya, Harleen

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, we have studied the transverse momentum distributions (TMDs) for the electron in simulated QED model. We have used the overlap representation of light-front wave functions where the spin-1/2 relativistic composite system consists of spin-1/2 fermion and spin-1 vector boson. The results have been obtained for T-even TMDs in transverse momentum plane for fixed value of longitudinal momentum fraction x.

  19. Simulation of flame-vortex interaction using detailed and reduced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilka, M. [Gaz de France (GDF), 75 - Paris (France); Veynante, D. [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Laboratoire EM2C. CNRS, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France); Baum, M. [CERFACS (France); Poinsot, T.J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse

    1996-12-31

    The interaction between a pair of counter-rotating vortices and a lean premixed CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flame ({Phi} = + 0.55) has been studied by direct numerical simulations using detailed and reduced chemical reaction schemes. Results from the complex chemistry simulation are discussed with respect to earlier experiments and differences in the simulations using detailed and reduces chemistry are investigated. Transient evolutions of the flame surface and the total heat release rate are compared and modifications in the evolution of the local flame structure are displayed. (authors) 22 refs.

  20. Design and simulation for real-time distributed processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, I.C.; Gellrich, A.; Gensah, U.; Leich, H.; Wegner, P.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a proper framework for the simulation and the optimization of the event building, the on-line third level trigger, and complete event reconstruction processor farm for the future HERA-B experiment. A discrete event, process oriented, simulation developed in concurrent μC++ is used for modelling the farm nodes running with multi-tasking constraints and different types of switching elements and digital signal processors interconnected for distributing the data through the system. An adequate graphic interface to the simulation part which allows to monitor features on-line and to analyze trace files, provides a powerful development tool for evaluating and designing parallel processing architectures. Control software and data flow protocols for event building and dynamic processor allocation are presented for two architectural models. (author)

  1. Interfacing Space Communications and Navigation Network Simulation with Distributed System Integration Laboratories (DSIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Esther H.; Nguyen, Sam P.; Wang, Shin-Ywan; Woo, Simon S.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's planned Lunar missions will involve multiple NASA centers where each participating center has a specific role and specialization. In this vision, the Constellation program (CxP)'s Distributed System Integration Laboratories (DSIL) architecture consist of multiple System Integration Labs (SILs), with simulators, emulators, testlabs and control centers interacting with each other over a broadband network to perform test and verification for mission scenarios. To support the end-to-end simulation and emulation effort of NASA' exploration initiatives, different NASA centers are interconnected to participate in distributed simulations. Currently, DSIL has interconnections among the following NASA centers: Johnson Space Center (JSC), Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Through interconnections and interactions among different NASA centers, critical resources and data can be shared, while independent simulations can be performed simultaneously at different NASA locations, to effectively utilize the simulation and emulation capabilities at each center. Furthermore, the development of DSIL can maximally leverage the existing project simulation and testing plans. In this work, we describe the specific role and development activities at JPL for Space Communications and Navigation Network (SCaN) simulator using the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) tool to simulate communications effects among mission assets. Using MACHETE, different space network configurations among spacecrafts and ground systems of various parameter sets can be simulated. Data that is necessary for tracking, navigation, and guidance of spacecrafts such as Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), and Lunar Relay Satellite (LRS) and orbit calculation data are disseminated to different NASA centers and updated periodically using the High Level Architecture (HLA). In

  2. Spatial Distribution of Flower Color Induced by Interspecific Sexual Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuma Takahashi

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms shaping the spatiotemporal distribution of species has long been a central concern of ecology and evolutionary biology. Contemporary patterns of plant assemblies suggest that sexual interactions among species, i.e., reproductive interference, lead to the exclusive distributions of closely related species that share pollinators. However, the fitness consequences and the initial ecological/evolutionary responses to reproductive interference remain unclear in nature, since reproductive isolation or allopatric distribution has already been achieved in the natural community. In Japan, three species of blue-eyed grasses (Sisyrinchium with incomplete reproductive isolation have recently colonized and occur sympatrically. Two of them are monomorphic with white flowers, whereas the other exhibits heritable color polymorphism (white and purple morphs. Here we investigated the effects of the presence of two monomorphic species on the distribution and reproductive success of color morphs. The frequency and reproductive success of white morphs decreased in area where monomorphic species were abundant, while those of purple morphs did not. The rate of hybridization between species was higher in white morphs than in the purple ones. Resource competition and habitat preference seemed not to contribute to the spatial distribution and reproductive success of two morphs. Our results supported that color-dependent reproductive interference determines the distribution of flower color polymorphism in a habitat, implying ecological sorting promoted by pollinator-mediated reproductive interference. Our study helps us to understand the evolution and spatial structure of flower color in a community.

  3. Simulated CONUS Flash Flood Climatologies from Distributed Hydrologic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamig, Z.; Gourley, J. J.; Vergara, H. J.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    This study will describe a CONUS flash flood climatology created over the period from 2002 through 2011. The MRMS reanalysis precipitation dataset was used as forcing into the Ensemble Framework For Flash Flood Forecasting (EF5). This high resolution 1-sq km 5-minute dataset is ideal for simulating flash floods with a distributed hydrologic model. EF5 features multiple water balance components including SAC-SMA, CREST, and a hydrophobic model all coupled with kinematic wave routing. The EF5/SAC-SMA and EF5/CREST water balance schemes were used for the creation of dual flash flood climatologies based on the differing water balance principles. For the period from 2002 through 2011 the daily maximum streamflow, unit streamflow, and time of peak streamflow was stored along with the minimum soil moisture. These variables are used to describe the states of the soils right before a flash flood event and the peak streamflow that was simulated during the flash flood event. The results will be shown, compared and contrasted. The resulting model simulations will be verified on basins less than 1,000-sq km with USGS gauges to ensure the distributed hydrologic models are reliable. The results will also be compared spatially to Storm Data flash flood event observations to judge the degree of agreement between the simulated climatologies and observations.

  4. Parallel and distributed processing in power system simulation and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Djalma M [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in computer technology will certainly have a great impact in the methodologies used in power system expansion and operational planning as well as in real-time control. Parallel and distributed processing are among the new technologies that present great potential for application in these areas. Parallel computers use multiple functional or processing units to speed up computation while distributed processing computer systems are collection of computers joined together by high speed communication networks having many objectives and advantages. The paper presents some ideas for the use of parallel and distributed processing in power system simulation and control. It also comments on some of the current research work in these topics and presents a summary of the work presently being developed at COPPE. (author) 53 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Biotic Interactions Shape the Ecological Distributions of Staphylococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastman, Erik K; Kamelamela, Noelani; Norville, Josh W; Cosetta, Casey M; Dutton, Rachel J; Wolfe, Benjamin E

    2016-10-18

    Many metagenomic sequencing studies have observed the presence of closely related bacterial species or genotypes in the same microbiome. Previous attempts to explain these patterns of microdiversity have focused on the abiotic environment, but few have considered how biotic interactions could drive patterns of microbiome diversity. We dissected the patterns, processes, and mechanisms shaping the ecological distributions of three closely related Staphylococcus species in cheese rind biofilms. Paradoxically, the most abundant species (S. equorum) is the slowest colonizer and weakest competitor based on growth and competition assays in the laboratory. Through in vitro community reconstructions, we determined that biotic interactions with neighboring fungi help resolve this paradox. Species-specific stimulation of the poor competitor by fungi of the genus Scopulariopsis allows S. equorum to dominate communities in vitro as it does in situ Results of comparative genomic and transcriptomic experiments indicate that iron utilization pathways, including a homolog of the S. aureus staphyloferrin B siderophore operon pathway, are potential molecular mechanisms underlying Staphylococcus-Scopulariopsis interactions. Our integrated approach demonstrates that fungi can structure the ecological distributions of closely related bacterial species, and the data highlight the importance of bacterium-fungus interactions in attempts to design and manipulate microbiomes. Decades of culture-based studies and more recent metagenomic studies have demonstrated that bacterial species in agriculture, medicine, industry, and nature are unevenly distributed across time and space. The ecological processes and molecular mechanisms that shape these distributions are not well understood because it is challenging to connect in situ patterns of diversity with mechanistic in vitro studies in the laboratory. Using tractable cheese rind biofilms and a focus on coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS

  6. Long-range interactions and parallel scalability in molecular simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patra, M.; Hyvönen, M.T.; Falck, E.; Sabouri-Ghomi, M.; Vattulainen, I.; Karttunen, M.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Typical biomolecular systems such as cellular membranes, DNA, and protein complexes are highly charged. Thus, efficient and accurate treatment of electrostatic interactions is of great importance in computational modeling of such systems. We have employed the GROMACS simulation package to perform

  7. Simulation of the interaction between uranium dioxide and zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Garcia, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The code solves the oxygen diffusion equations of the five phases formed during the UO 2 /Zircaloy interaction, using an implicit finite difference method with parabolic interpolation at the interfaces. Uranium and Zirconium mass conservation are considered. The code gives a good simulation of the experimental results for isothermal conditions. (orig.)

  8. Two dimensional simulation of ion beam-plasm interaction | Echi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hybrid plasma simulation is a model in which different components of the plasma are treated differently. In this work the ions are treated as particles while the electrons are treated as a neutralizing background fluid through which electric signals may propagate. Deuterium ion beams incident on the tritium plasma interact ...

  9. Brownian dynamics simulations of a flexible polymer chain which includes continuous resistance and multibody hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jason E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2005-01-01

    Using methods adapted from the simulation of suspension dynamics, we have developed a Brownian dynamics algorithm with multibody hydrodynamic interactions for simulating the dynamics of polymer molecules. The polymer molecule is modeled as a chain composed of a series of inextensible, rigid rods with constraints at each joint to ensure continuity of the chain. The linear and rotational velocities of each segment of the polymer chain are described by the slender-body theory of Batchelor [J. Fluid Mech. 44, 419 (1970)]. To include hydrodynamic interactions between the segments of the chain, the line distribution of forces on each segment is approximated by making a Legendre polynomial expansion of the disturbance velocity on the segment, where the first two terms of the expansion are retained in the calculation. Thus, the resulting linear force distribution is specified by a center of mass force, couple, and stresslet on each segment. This method for calculating the hydrodynamic interactions has been successfully used to simulate the dynamics of noncolloidal suspensions of rigid fibers [O. G. Harlen, R. R. Sundararajakumar, and D. L. Koch, J. Fluid Mech. 388, 355 (1999); J. E. Butler and E. S. G. Shaqfeh, J. Fluid Mech. 468, 204 (2002)]. The longest relaxation time and center of mass diffusivity are among the quantities calculated with the simulation technique. Comparisons are made for different levels of approximation of the hydrodynamic interactions, including multibody interactions, two-body interactions, and the "freely draining" case with no interactions. For the short polymer chains studied in this paper, the results indicate a difference in the apparent scaling of diffusivity with polymer length for the multibody versus two-body level of approximation for the hydrodynamic interactions.

  10. Towards Real Time Simulation of Ship-Ship Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ole; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present recent and preliminary work directed towards the development of a simplified, physics-based model for improved simulation of ship-ship interaction that can be used for both analysis and real-time computing (i.e. with real-time constraints due to visualization). The goal is to implement...... accurate (realistic) and much faster ship-wave and ship-ship simulations than are currently possible. The coupling of simulation with visualization should improve the visual experience such that it can be perceived as more realistic in training. Today the state-of-art in real-time ship-ship interaction...... is for efficiency reasons and time-constraints in visualization based on model experiments in towing tanks and precomputed force tables. We anticipate that the fast, and highly parallel, algorithm described by Engsig-Karup et al. [2011] for execution on affordable modern high-throughput Graphics Processing Units...

  11. Incorporating Context Dependency of Species Interactions in Species Distribution Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Nina K; Zarnetske, Phoebe L; Gouhier, Tarik C; Menge, Bruce A

    2017-07-01

    Species distribution models typically use correlative approaches that characterize the species-environment relationship using occurrence or abundance data for a single species. However, species distributions are determined by both abiotic conditions and biotic interactions with other species in the community. Therefore, climate change is expected to impact species through direct effects on their physiology and indirect effects propagated through their resources, predators, competitors, or mutualists. Furthermore, the sign and strength of species interactions can change according to abiotic conditions, resulting in context-dependent species interactions that may change across space or with climate change. Here, we incorporated the context dependency of species interactions into a dynamic species distribution model. We developed a multi-species model that uses a time-series of observational survey data to evaluate how abiotic conditions and species interactions affect the dynamics of three rocky intertidal species. The model further distinguishes between the direct effects of abiotic conditions on abundance and the indirect effects propagated through interactions with other species. We apply the model to keystone predation by the sea star Pisaster ochraceus on the mussel Mytilus californianus and the barnacle Balanus glandula in the rocky intertidal zone of the Pacific coast, USA. Our method indicated that biotic interactions between P. ochraceus and B. glandula affected B. glandula dynamics across >1000 km of coastline. Consistent with patterns from keystone predation, the growth rate of B. glandula varied according to the abundance of P. ochraceus in the previous year. The data and the model did not indicate that the strength of keystone predation by P. ochraceus varied with a mean annual upwelling index. Balanus glandula cover increased following years with high phytoplankton abundance measured as mean annual chlorophyll-a. M. californianus exhibited the same

  12. Noise and the statistical mechanics of distributed transport in a colony of interacting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katifori, Eleni; Graewer, Johannes; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Mazza, Marco G.

    Inspired by the process of liquid food distribution between individuals in an ant colony, in this work we consider the statistical mechanics of resource dissemination between interacting agents with finite carrying capacity. The agents move inside a confined space (nest), pick up the food at the entrance of the nest and share it with other agents that they encounter. We calculate analytically and via a series of simulations the global food intake rate for the whole colony as well as observables describing how uniformly the food is distributed within the nest. Our model and predictions provide a useful benchmark to assess which strategies can lead to efficient food distribution within the nest and also to what level the observed food uptake rates and efficiency in food distribution are due to stochastic fluctuations or specific food exchange strategies by an actual ant colony.

  13. Ion-surface interaction: simulation of plasma-wall interaction (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salou, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The wall materials of magnetic confinement in fusion machines are exposed to an aggressive environment; the reactor blanket is bombarded with a high flux of particles extracted from the plasma, leading to the sputtering of surface material. This sputtering causes wall erosion as well as plasma contamination problems. In order to control fusion reactions in complex reactors, it is thus imperative to well understand the plasma-wall interactions. This work proposes the study of the sputtering of fusion relevant materials. We propose to simulate the charged particles influx by few keV single-charged ion beams. This study is based on the catcher method; to avoid any problem of pollution (especially in the case of carbon) we designed a new setup allowing an in situ Auger electron spectroscopy analysis. The results provide the evolution of the angular distribution of the sputtering yield as a function of the ion mass (from helium to xenon) and its energy (from 3 keV to 9 keV). (author) [fr

  14. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update . In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  15. SLiM 2: Flexible, Interactive Forward Genetic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Benjamin C; Messer, Philipp W

    2017-01-01

    Modern population genomic datasets hold immense promise for revealing the evolutionary processes operating in natural populations, but a crucial prerequisite for this goal is the ability to model realistic evolutionary scenarios and predict their expected patterns in genomic data. To that end, we present SLiM 2: an evolutionary simulation framework that combines a powerful, fast engine for forward population genetic simulations with the capability of modeling a wide variety of complex evolutionary scenarios. SLiM achieves this flexibility through scriptability, which provides control over most aspects of the simulated evolutionary scenarios with a simple R-like scripting language called Eidos. An example SLiM simulation is presented to illustrate the power of this approach. SLiM 2 also includes a graphical user interface for simulation construction, interactive runtime control, and dynamic visualization of simulation output, facilitating easy and fast model development with quick prototyping and visual debugging. We conclude with a performance comparison between SLiM and two other popular forward genetic simulation packages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. THE DYNAMICS OF A DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATED ON A SPREADSHEET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Reinecke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The dynamics of a typical production-distribution system, namely from manufacturer to distributors to retailers has been simulated with the aid of Lotus 123 on a personal computer. The original simulation program DYNAr10 was run on an IBM 1620 mainframe computer but we successfully converted it to run on a personal computer using LOTUS 123.
    This paper deals with problems encountered in using the present MS-DOS limited PC machines to run application programmes written for earlier mainframe machines. It is also shown that results very comparable with those obtained on mainframe machines can be generated on a simple PC.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Hierdie referaat beskryf die ervaring van magisterstudente met die omskakeling van die simulasieprogram DYNAMO vir die ondersoek van die dinamika van industriele stelsels van hoofraamrekenaar na 'n persoonlike rekenaar.

  17. Simulation of depth distribution of geological strata. HQSW program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czubek, J.A.; Kolakowski, L.

    1987-01-01

    The method of simulation of the layered geological formation for a given geological parameter is presented. The geological formation contains at least two types of layers and is given with the depth resolution Δh corresponding to the thickness of the hypothetical elementary layer. Two types of geostatistical distributions of the rock parameters are considered: modified normal and modified lognormal for which the input data are expected value and the variance. The HQSW simulation program given in the paper generates in a random way (but in a given repeatable sequence) the thicknesses of a given type of strata, their average specific radioactivity and the variance of specific radioactivity within a given layer. 8 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  18. CORBASec Used to Secure Distributed Aerospace Propulsion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and its industry partners are developing a Common Object Request Broker (CORBA) Security (CORBASec) test bed to secure their distributed aerospace propulsion simulations. Glenn has been working with its aerospace propulsion industry partners to deploy the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) object-based technology. NPSS is a program focused on reducing the cost and time in developing aerospace propulsion engines. It was developed by Glenn and is being managed by the NASA Ames Research Center as the lead center reporting directly to NASA Headquarters' Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Glenn is an active domain member of the Object Management Group: an open membership, not-for-profit consortium that produces and manages computer industry specifications (i.e., CORBA) for interoperable enterprise applications. When NPSS is deployed, it will assemble a distributed aerospace propulsion simulation scenario from proprietary analytical CORBA servers and execute them with security afforded by the CORBASec implementation. The NPSS CORBASec test bed was initially developed with the TPBroker Security Service product (Hitachi Computer Products (America), Inc., Waltham, MA) using the Object Request Broker (ORB), which is based on the TPBroker Basic Object Adaptor, and using NPSS software across different firewall products. The test bed has been migrated to the Portable Object Adaptor architecture using the Hitachi Security Service product based on the VisiBroker 4.x ORB (Borland, Scotts Valley, CA) and on the Orbix 2000 ORB (Dublin, Ireland, with U.S. headquarters in Waltham, MA). Glenn, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft are the initial industry partners contributing to the NPSS CORBASec test bed. The test bed uses Security SecurID (RSA Security Inc., Bedford, MA) two-factor token-based authentication together with Hitachi Security Service digital-certificate-based authentication to validate the various NPSS users. The test

  19. Multiplicity distributions in high-energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.W.; Coffin, C.T.; Diamond, R.N.; French, H.; Louis, W.; Roe, B.P.; Seidl, A.A.; Vander Velde, J.C.; Berge, J.P.; Bogert, D.V.; DiBianca, F.A.; Cundy, D.C.; Dunaitsev, A.; Efremenko, V.; Ermolov, P.; Fowler, W.; Hanft, R.; Harigel, G.; Huson, F.R.; Kolganov, V.; Mukhin, A.; Nezrick, F.A.; Rjabov, Y.; Scott, W.G.; Smart, W.

    1976-01-01

    Results from the Fermilab 15-ft bubble chamber on the charged-particle multiplicity distributions produced in high-energy charged-current neutrino-proton interactions are presented. Comparisons are made to γp, ep, μp, and inclusive pp scattering. The mean hadronic multiplicity appears to depend only on the mass of the excited hadronic state, independent of the mode of excitation. A fit to the neutrino data gives = (1.09+-0.38) +(1.09+-0.03)lnW 2

  20. BioAtlas: Interactive web service for microbial distribution analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jesper; List, Markus; Baumbach, Jan

    Massive amounts of 16S rRNA sequencing data have been stored in publicly accessible databases, such as GOLD, SILVA, GreenGenes (GG), and the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP). Many of these sequences are tagged with geo-locations. Nevertheless, researchers currently lack a user-friendly tool...... to analyze microbial distribution in a location-specific context. BioAtlas is an interactive web application that closes this gap between sequence databases, taxonomy profiling and geo/body-location information. It enables users to browse taxonomically annotated sequences across (i) the world map, (ii) human...

  1. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  2. Simulation of the beam halo from the beam-beam interaction in LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.; Irwin, J.; Siemann, R.

    1994-02-01

    The luminosity lifetimes of e + e - colliders are often dominated by the halo produced by the beam-beam interaction. They have developed a simulation technique to model this halo using the flux across boundaries in amplitude space to decrease the CPU time by a factor of one-hundred or more over 'brute force' tracking. It allows simulation of density distributions and halos corresponding to realistic lifetimes. Reference 1 shows the agreement with brute force tracking in a number of cases and the importance of beam-beam resonances in determining the density distribution of large amplitudes. this research is now directed towards comparisons with operating colliders and studies of the combined effects of lattice and beam-beam nonlinearities. LEP offers an ideal opportunity for both, and in this paper they are presenting the first results of LEP simulations

  3. Simulation of hydrogen distribution in an Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhudharwadkar, Deoras M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai (India); Iyer, Kannan N., E-mail: kiyer@iitb.ac.i [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai (India); Mohan, Nalini; Bajaj, Satinder S. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai (India); Markandeya, Suhas G. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: This work addresses hydrogen dispersion in commercial nuclear reactor containment. The numerical tool used for simulation is first benchmarked with experimental data. Parametric results are then carried out for different release configurations. Results lead to the conclusion that the dispersal is buoyancy dominated. Also, the hydrogen concentration is high enough to demand mitigation devices. - Abstract: The management of hydrogen in a Nuclear Reactor Containment after LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) is of practical importance to preserve the structural integrity of the containment. This paper presents the results of systematic work carried out using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT to assess the concentration distribution of hydrogen in a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of hydrogen concentration distribution, a suitable model for turbulence closure is required to be selected. Using guidelines from the previous studies reported in the literature and a comparative simulation study using simple benchmark problems, the most suitable turbulence model for hydrogen mixing prediction was identified. Subsequently, unstructured meshes were generated to represent the containment of a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor. Analyses were carried out to quantify the hydrogen distribution for three cases. These were (1) Uniform injection of hydrogen for a given period of time at room temperature, (2) Time varying injection as has been computed from an accident analysis code, (3) Time varying injection (as used in case (2)) at a high temperature. A parametric exercise was also carried out in case (1) where the effect of various inlet orientations and locations on hydrogen distribution was studied. The results indicate that the process of hydrogen dispersal is buoyancy dominated. Further for typical injection rates encountered following LOCA, the dispersal is quite poor and most

  4. Simulation of hydrogen distribution in an Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhudharwadkar, Deoras M.; Iyer, Kannan N.; Mohan, Nalini; Bajaj, Satinder S.; Markandeya, Suhas G.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This work addresses hydrogen dispersion in commercial nuclear reactor containment. → The numerical tool used for simulation is first benchmarked with experimental data. → Parametric results are then carried out for different release configurations. → Results lead to the conclusion that the dispersal is buoyancy dominated. → Also, the hydrogen concentration is high enough to demand mitigation devices. - Abstract: The management of hydrogen in a Nuclear Reactor Containment after LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) is of practical importance to preserve the structural integrity of the containment. This paper presents the results of systematic work carried out using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT to assess the concentration distribution of hydrogen in a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of hydrogen concentration distribution, a suitable model for turbulence closure is required to be selected. Using guidelines from the previous studies reported in the literature and a comparative simulation study using simple benchmark problems, the most suitable turbulence model for hydrogen mixing prediction was identified. Subsequently, unstructured meshes were generated to represent the containment of a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor. Analyses were carried out to quantify the hydrogen distribution for three cases. These were (1) Uniform injection of hydrogen for a given period of time at room temperature, (2) Time varying injection as has been computed from an accident analysis code, (3) Time varying injection (as used in case (2)) at a high temperature. A parametric exercise was also carried out in case (1) where the effect of various inlet orientations and locations on hydrogen distribution was studied. The results indicate that the process of hydrogen dispersal is buoyancy dominated. Further for typical injection rates encountered following LOCA, the dispersal is

  5. Testing advanced driver assistance systems with the interactive driving simulator; Erprobung von Fahrerassistenzsystemen mit dem Interactive Driving Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrichs, A.; Grosse-Kappenberg, S.; Happe, J. [Zentrum fuer Lern- und Wissensmanagement und Lehrstuhl Informatik im Maschinenbau ZLW/IMA der RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The Centre for Learning and Knowledge Management and Department of Computer Science in Engineering of the Technical University Aachen has developed a truck driving simulator which combines a driving simulation as well as traffic flow calculations to the interactive Driving Simulator (InDriveS). In real-time the effects of the driver's behaviour on the surrounding traffic are considered and vice versa. The integrative part of InDriveS is a software-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop development environment. By means of this tool, all phases of development (Analysis, Design, Modelling, Simulation, Implementation as well as Testing and Evaluation) of new vehicle technologies, e.g. Information and Assistance Systems, can be realised in consideration of the road traffic and the driver's behaviour. (orig.)

  6. DSMC simulations of shock interactions about sharp double cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James N.

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical study of shock interactions resulting from Mach 10 flow about sharp double cones. Computations are made by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The sensitivity and characteristics of the interactions are examined by varying flow conditions, model size, and configuration. The range of conditions investigated includes those for which experiments have been or will be performed in the ONERA R5Ch low-density wind tunnel and the Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel.

  7. Developing Models for Embodied Learning with Live Interactive Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Live simulations may offer a natural form of multimodal learning through embodied action, which can be engaging to a variety of learners and provide a platform for inclusion of special needs learners across the classroom. In this approach to interactive learning, the subject matter is embedded...... learning design is available that provides for interactive and embodied learning, which appeals to the segment of boys that are often difficult to motivate with ordinary uni-modal teaching methods. The paper will present preliminary results from an action research project carried out in collaboration...

  8. Phantom-based interactive simulation system for dental treatment training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Kee, Bundit; Riener, Robert; Frey, Martin; Pröll, Thomas; Burgkart, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interactive simulation system for dental treatment training. The system comprises a virtual reality environment and a force-torque measuring device to enhance the capabilities of a passive phantom of tooth anatomy in dental treatment training processes. The measuring device is connected to the phantom, and provides essential input data for generating the graphic animations of physical behaviors such as drilling and bleeding. The animation methods of those physical behaviors are also presented. This system is not only able to enhance interactivity and accessibility of the training system compared to conventional methods but it also provides possibilities of recording, evaluating, and verifying the training results.

  9. Simulation of Fuzzy Adaptive PI Controlled Grid Interactive Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necmi ALTIN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a voltage source grid interactive inverter is modeled and simulated in MATLAB/Simulink. Inverter is designed as current controlled and a fuzzy-PI current controller used for the generation of switching pattern to shape the inverter output current. The grid interactive inverter consists of a line frequency transformer and a LC type filter. Galvanic isolation between the grid and renewable energy source is obtained by the line frequency transformer and LC filter is employed to filter the high frequency harmonic components in current waveform due to PWM switching and to reduce the output current THD. Results of the MATLAB/Simulink simulation show that inverter output current is in sinusoidal waveform and in phase with line voltage, and current harmonics are in the limits of international standards (

  10. Implementation of quantum key distribution network simulation module in the network simulator NS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Miralem; Maurhart, Oliver; Rass, Stefan; Voznak, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    As the research in quantum key distribution (QKD) technology grows larger and becomes more complex, the need for highly accurate and scalable simulation technologies becomes important to assess the practical feasibility and foresee difficulties in the practical implementation of theoretical achievements. Due to the specificity of the QKD link which requires optical and Internet connection between the network nodes, to deploy a complete testbed containing multiple network hosts and links to validate and verify a certain network algorithm or protocol would be very costly. Network simulators in these circumstances save vast amounts of money and time in accomplishing such a task. The simulation environment offers the creation of complex network topologies, a high degree of control and repeatable experiments, which in turn allows researchers to conduct experiments and confirm their results. In this paper, we described the design of the QKD network simulation module which was developed in the network simulator of version 3 (NS-3). The module supports simulation of the QKD network in an overlay mode or in a single TCP/IP mode. Therefore, it can be used to simulate other network technologies regardless of QKD.

  11. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  12. Interactive exploration of tokamak turbulence simulations in virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; Pierce, T.; Milovich, J.L.; Shumaker, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed an immersive visualization system designed for interactive data exploration as an integral part of our computing environment for studying tokamak turbulence. This system of codes can reproduce the results of simulations visually for scrutiny in real time, interactively and with more realism than ever before. At peak performance, the VR system can present for view some 400 coordinated images per second. The long term vision this approach targets is a open-quote holodeck-like close-quote virtual-reality environment in which one can explore gyrofluid or gyrokinetic plasma simulations interactively and in real time, visually, with concurrent simulations of experimental diagnostic devices. In principle, such a open-quote virtual tokamak close-quote computed environment could be as all encompassing or as focussed as one likes, in terms of the physics involved. The computing framework in one within which a group of researchers can work together to produce a real and identifiable product with easy access to all contributions. This could be our version of NASA's next generation Numerical Wind Tunnel. The principal purpose of this VR capability for Numerical Tokamak simulation is to provide interactive visual experience to help create new ways of understanding aspects of the convective transport processes operating in tokamak fusion experiments. The effectiveness of the visualization method is strongly dependent on the density of frame-to-frame correlation. Below a threshold of this quantity, short term visual memory does not bridge the gap between frames well enough for there to exist a strong visual connection. Above the threshold, evolving structures appear clearly. The visualizations show the 3D structure of vortex evolution and the gyrofluid motion associated with it. We discovered that it was very helpful for visualizing the cross field flows to compress the virtual world in the toroidal angle

  13. Neurosurgical simulation by interactive computer graphics on iPad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Toki; Suematsu, Shinya; Gomyo, Miho; Noguchi, Akio; Nagane, Motoo; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Presurgical simulation before complicated neurosurgery is a state-of-the-art technique, and its usefulness has recently become well known. However, simulation requires complex image processing, which hinders its widespread application. We explored handling the results of interactive computer graphics on the iPad tablet, which can easily be controlled anywhere. Data from preneurosurgical simulations from 12 patients (4 men, 8 women) who underwent complex brain surgery were loaded onto an iPad. First, DICOM data were loaded using Amira visualization software to create interactive computer graphics, and ParaView, another free visualization software package, was used to convert the results of the simulation to be loaded using the free iPad software KiwiViewer. The interactive computer graphics created prior to neurosurgery were successfully displayed and smoothly controlled on the iPad in all patients. The number of elements ranged from 3 to 13 (mean 7). The mean original data size was 233 MB, which was reduced to 10.4 MB (4.4% of original size) after image processing by ParaView. This was increased to 46.6 MB (19.9%) after decompression in KiwiViewer. Controlling the magnification, transfer, rotation, and selection of translucence in 10 levels of each element were smoothly and easily performed using one or two fingers. The requisite skill to smoothly control the iPad software was acquired within 1.8 trials on average in 12 medical students and 6 neurosurgical residents. Using an iPad to handle the result of preneurosurgical simulation was extremely useful because it could easily be handled anywhere.

  14. Distributed interactive virtual environments for collaborative experiential learning and training independent of distance over Internet2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Saiki, Stanley M; Jacobs, Joshua; Saland, Linda; Keep, Marcus F; Norenberg, Jeffrey; Baker, Rex; Nakatsu, Curtis; Kalishman, Summers; Lindberg, Marlene; Wax, Diane; Mowafi, Moad; Summers, Kenneth L; Holten, James R; Greenfield, John A; Aalseth, Edward; Nickles, David; Sherstyuk, Andrei; Haines, Karen; Caudell, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    Medical knowledge and skills essential for tomorrow's healthcare professionals continue to change faster than ever before creating new demands in medical education. Project TOUCH (Telehealth Outreach for Unified Community Health) has been developing methods to enhance learning by coupling innovations in medical education with advanced technology in high performance computing and next generation Internet2 embedded in virtual reality environments (VRE), artificial intelligence and experiential active learning. Simulations have been used in education and training to allow learners to make mistakes safely in lieu of real-life situations, learn from those mistakes and ultimately improve performance by subsequent avoidance of those mistakes. Distributed virtual interactive environments are used over distance to enable learning and participation in dynamic, problem-based, clinical, artificial intelligence rules-based, virtual simulations. The virtual reality patient is programmed to dynamically change over time and respond to the manipulations by the learner. Participants are fully immersed within the VRE platform using a head-mounted display and tracker system. Navigation, locomotion and handling of objects are accomplished using a joy-wand. Distribution is managed via the Internet2 Access Grid using point-to-point or multi-casting connectivity through which the participants can interact. Medical students in Hawaii and New Mexico (NM) participated collaboratively in problem solving and managing of a simulated patient with a closed head injury in VRE; dividing tasks, handing off objects, and functioning as a team. Students stated that opportunities to make mistakes and repeat actions in the VRE were extremely helpful in learning specific principles. VRE created higher performance expectations and some anxiety among VRE users. VRE orientation was adequate but students needed time to adapt and practice in order to improve efficiency. This was also demonstrated successfully

  15. Stochastic annealing simulations of defect interactions among subcascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Singh, B.N.

    1997-04-01

    The effects of the subcascade structure of high energy cascades on the temperature dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are investigated. The subcascade structure is simulated by closely spaced groups of lower energy MD cascades. The simulation results illustrate the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent intracascade evolution. Other significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution are the large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. Annealing simulations are also performed on high-energy, subcascade-producing cascades generated with the binary collision approximation and calibrated to MD results.

  16. Fokker-Planck simulations of interactions of femtosecond laser pulses with dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drska, L.; Limpouch, J.; Liska, R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with fully ionized solid-state density plasmas in the regime of the normal skin effect was investigated by means of numerical simulation. For short wavelength lasers and 120 fs FWHM laser pulses the regime of normal skin effect is shown to hold for peak intensities up to 10 17 W/cm 2 . Basic characteristics of the interaction are revealed and certain departures of the electron distribution function, of the plasma dielectric constant and of laser absorption from simplistic models are pointed out. (author) 1 tab., 4 figs., 14 refs

  17. A treecode to simulate dust-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Holgate, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of a small object with surrounding plasma is an area of plasma-physics research with a multitude of applications. This paper introduces the plasma octree code pot, a microscopic simulator of a spheroidal dust grain in a plasma. pot uses the Barnes-Hut treecode algorithm to perform N-body simulations of electrons and ions in the vicinity of a chargeable spheroid, employing also the Boris particle-motion integrator and Hutchinson’s reinjection algorithm from SCEPTIC; a description of the implementation of all three algorithms is provided. We present results from pot simulations of the charging of spheres in magnetised plasmas, and of spheroids in unmagnetized plasmas. The results call into question the validity of using the Boltzmann relation in hybrid PIC codes. Substantial portions of this paper are adapted from chapters 4 and 5 of the first author’s recent PhD dissertation.

  18. Simulation of intense short-pulse laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagiwa, Mitsuru

    2000-01-01

    We have completed the massive parallelization of a 2-dimensional giga-particle code and have achieved a 530-fold acceleration rate with 512 processing elements (PE's). Using this we have implemented a simulation of the interaction of a solid thin film and a high intensity laser and have discovered a phenomenon in which high quality short pulses from the far ultraviolet to soft X-rays are generated at the back surface of the thin layer. We have also introduced the atomic process database code (Hullac) and have the possibility for high precision simulations of X-ray laser radiation. With respect to laser acceleration we have the possibility to quantitatively evaluate relativistic self-focusing assumed to occur in higher intensity fields. Ion acceleration from a solid target and an underdense plasma irradiated by an intense and an ultra intense laser, respectively, has also been studied by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. (author)

  19. Two dimensional simulation of high power laser-surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.; Wilke, M.D.; Green, R.E.L.; Johnson, R.P.; Busch, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    For laser intensities in the range of 10 8 --10 9 W/cm 2 , and pulse lengths of order 10 microsec or longer, the authors have modified the inertial confinement fusion code Lasnex to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects of the laser-matter interaction. The unique aspect of their treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material-vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model treats the dense material as a rigid two-dimensional mass and heat reservoir suppressing all hydrodynamic motion in the dense material. The computer simulations and additional post-processors provide predictions for measurements including impulse given to the target, pressures at the target interface, electron temperatures and densities in the vapor-plasma plume region, and emission of radiation from the target. The authors will present an analysis of some relatively well diagnosed experiments which have been useful in developing their modeling. The simulations match experimentally obtained target impulses, pressures at the target surface inside the laser spot, and radiation emission from the target to within about 20%. Hence their simulational technique appears to form a useful basis for further investigation of laser-surface interaction in this intensity, pulse-width range. This work is useful in many technical areas such as materials processing

  20. In vitro simulation of distribution processes following intramuscular injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probst Mareike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for in vitro dissolution test setups for intramuscularly applied dosage forms. Especially biorelevant methods are needed to predict the in vivo behavior of newly developed dosage forms in a realistic way. There is a lack of knowledge regarding critical in vivo parameters influencing the release and absorption behavior of an intramuscularly applied drug. In the presented work the focus was set on the simulation of blood perfusion and muscle tissue. A solid agarose gel, being incorporated in an open-pored foam, was used to mimic the gel phase of muscle tissue and implemented in a flow through cell. An aqueous solution of fluorescein sodium was injected. Compared to recently obtained in vivo results the distribution of the model substance was very slow. Furthermore an agarose gel of lower viscosity an open-pored foam and phosphate buffer saline pH 7.4 were implemented in a multi-channel-ceramic membrane serving as a holder for the muscle imitating material. Blood simulating release medium was perfused through the ceramic membrane including filling materials. Transport of the dissolved fluorescein sodium was, in case of the gel, not only determined by diffusion but also by convective transport processes. The more realistic the muscle simulating materials were constituted the less reproducible results were obtained with the designed test setups.

  1. Simulation of robotic courier deliveries in hospital distribution services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, M D; Felder, R A; Kumar, A

    2000-06-01

    Flexible automation in the form of robotic couriers holds the potential for decreasing operating costs while improving delivery performance in hospital delivery systems. This paper discusses the use of simulation modeling to analyze the costs, benefits, and performance tradeoffs related to the installation and use of a fleet of robotic couriers within hospital facilities. The results of this study enable a better understanding of the delivery and transportation requirements of hospitals. Specifically, we examine how a fleet of robotic couriers can meet the performance requirements of the system while maintaining cost efficiency. We show that for clinical laboratory and pharmaceutical deliveries a fleet of six robotic couriers can achieve significant performance gains in terms of turn-around time and delivery variability over the current system of three human couriers per shift or 13 FTEs. Specifically, the simulation results indicate that using robotic couriers to perform both clinical laboratory and pharmaceutical deliveries would result in a 34% decrease in turn-around time, and a 38% decrease in delivery variability. In addition, a break-even analysis indicated that a positive net present value occurs if nine or more FTEs are eliminated with a resulting ROI of 12%. This analysis demonstrates that simulation can be a valuable tool for examining health care distribution services and indicates that a robotic courier system may yield significant benefits over a traditional courier system in this application.

  2. Quantified, Interactive Simulation of AMCW ToF Camera Including Multipath Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulczak, David; Lambers, Martin; Kolb, Andreas

    2017-12-22

    In the last decade, Time-of-Flight (ToF) range cameras have gained increasing popularity in robotics, automotive industry, and home entertainment. Despite technological developments, ToF cameras still suffer from error sources such as multipath interference or motion artifacts. Thus, simulation of ToF cameras, including these artifacts, is important to improve camera and algorithm development. This paper presents a physically-based, interactive simulation technique for amplitude modulated continuous wave (AMCW) ToF cameras, which, among other error sources, includes single bounce indirect multipath interference based on an enhanced image-space approach. The simulation accounts for physical units down to the charge level accumulated in sensor pixels. Furthermore, we present the first quantified comparison for ToF camera simulators. We present bidirectional reference distribution function (BRDF) measurements for selected, purchasable materials in the near-infrared (NIR) range, craft real and synthetic scenes out of these materials and quantitatively compare the range sensor data.

  3. DataSpaces: An Interaction and Coordination Framework for Coupled Simulation Workflows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott A.; Parashar, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Emerging high-performance distributed computing environments are enabling new end-to-end formulations in science and engineering that involve multiple interacting processes and data-intensive application workflows. For example, current fusion simulation efforts are exploring coupled models and codes that simultaneously simulate separate application processes, such as the core and the edge turbulence, and run on different high performance computing resources. These components need to interact, at runtime, with each other and with services for data monitoring, data analysis and visualization, and data archiving. As a result, they require efficient support for dynamic and flexible couplings and interactions, which remains a challenge. This paper presents Data-Spaces, a flexible interaction and coordination substrate that addresses this challenge. DataSpaces essentially implements a semantically specialized virtual shared space abstraction that can be associatively accessed by all components and services in the application workflow. It enables live data to be extracted from running simulation components, indexes this data online, and then allows it to be monitored, queried and accessed by other components and services via the space using semantically meaningful operators. The underlying data transport is asynchronous, low-overhead and largely memory-to-memory. The design, implementation, and experimental evaluation of DataSpaces using a coupled fusion simulation workflow is presented.

  4. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  5. Simulator: A Pilot Interactive Simulation Program for Use in Teaching Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlik, John V.

    An interactive simulation program was developed for use in teaching students how to handle public relations problems. The program user is placed in the role of assistant newsletter editor, facing a series of decision-making situations. Each choice the user makes affects the subsequent reality created by the program, which is designed to provide…

  6. Design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of a distributed energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultura, Ambrosio B., II

    This dissertation presents the design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of distributed energy resources (DER) consisting of photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines, batteries, a PEM fuel cell and supercapacitors. The distributed energy resources installed at UMass Lowell consist of the following: 2.5kW PV, 44kWhr lead acid batteries and 1500W, 500W & 300W wind turbines, which were installed before year 2000. Recently added to that are the following: 10.56 kW PV array, 2.4 kW wind turbine, 29 kWhr Lead acid batteries, a 1.2 kW PEM fuel cell and 4-140F supercapacitors. Each newly added energy resource has been designed, modeled, simulated and evaluated before its integration into the existing PV/Wind grid-connected system. The Mathematical and Simulink model of each system was derived and validated by comparing the simulated and experimental results. The Simulated results of energy generated from a 10.56kW PV system are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed electrical model of a 2.4kW wind turbine system equipped with a permanent magnet generator, diode rectifier, boost converter and inverter is presented. The analysis of the results demonstrates the effectiveness of the constructed simulink model, and can be used to predict the performance of the wind turbine. It was observed that a PEM fuel cell has a very fast response to load changes. Moreover, the model has validated the actual operation of the PEM fuel cell, showing that the simulated results in Matlab Simulink are consistent with the experimental results. The equivalent mathematical equation, derived from an electrical model of the supercapacitor, is used to simulate its voltage response. The model is completely capable of simulating its voltage behavior, and can predict the charge time and discharge time of voltages on the supercapacitor. The bi-directional dc-dc converter was designed in order to connect the 48V battery bank storage to the 24V battery bank storage. This connection was

  7. Relaxation of the distribution function tails for gases with power-law interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapenko, I.F.; Bobylev, A.V.; de Azevedo, C.A.; de Assis, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The relaxation of rarefied gases of particles with the power-law interaction potentials U=α/r s , where 1≤s<4, is considered. The formation and evolution of the distribution function tails are investigated on the basis of the one-dimensional kinetic Landau endash Fokker-Planck equation. For long times, the constructed asymptotic solutions have a propagating-wave appearance in the high velocity region. The analytical solutions are expressed explicitly in terms of the error function. The analytical consideration is accomplished by numerical calculations. The obtained analytical results are in a good agreement with the numerical simulation results. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Neuronal model with distributed delay: analysis and simulation study for gamma distribution memory kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmeshu; Gupta, Varun; Kadambari, K V

    2011-06-01

    A single neuronal model incorporating distributed delay (memory)is proposed. The stochastic model has been formulated as a Stochastic Integro-Differential Equation (SIDE) which results in the underlying process being non-Markovian. A detailed analysis of the model when the distributed delay kernel has exponential form (weak delay) has been carried out. The selection of exponential kernel has enabled the transformation of the non-Markovian model to a Markovian model in an extended state space. For the study of First Passage Time (FPT) with exponential delay kernel, the model has been transformed to a system of coupled Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) in two-dimensional state space. Simulation studies of the SDEs provide insight into the effect of weak delay kernel on the Inter-Spike Interval(ISI) distribution. A measure based on Jensen-Shannon divergence is proposed which can be used to make a choice between two competing models viz. distributed delay model vis-á-vis LIF model. An interesting feature of the model is that the behavior of (CV(t))((ISI)) (Coefficient of Variation) of the ISI distribution with respect to memory kernel time constant parameter η reveals that neuron can switch from a bursting state to non-bursting state as the noise intensity parameter changes. The membrane potential exhibits decaying auto-correlation structure with or without damped oscillatory behavior depending on the choice of parameters. This behavior is in agreement with empirically observed pattern of spike count in a fixed time window. The power spectral density derived from the auto-correlation function is found to exhibit single and double peaks. The model is also examined for the case of strong delay with memory kernel having the form of Gamma distribution. In contrast to fast decay of damped oscillations of the ISI distribution for the model with weak delay kernel, the decay of damped oscillations is found to be slower for the model with strong delay kernel.

  9. Thermodynamical analyses of molecular simulations of dislocation-defect interactions: simulations at 0 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnet, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Static molecular (SM) simulations of dislocation-defect interaction are analysed through a framework of different interaction regimes, in which the applied work has different roles. In most regimes, the applied work is transformed into elastic energy, a dissipative energy resulting from the lattice friction and a large quantity of energy needed to enable the dislocation to bow out when it is pinned by the defect. While the dissipative work is entirely evacuated in SM simulations, the elastic and curvature energies contribute to a large increase of the internal energy of the system. A method is presented in this work to evaluate the curvature energy and the result is compared to prediction of the line tension model. These analyses allow the determination of the dislocation-defect interaction energy. (author)

  10. Chemical interaction of tetravalent actinides simulators and the engineering barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, Pablo; Alba, Maria D.; Castro, Miguel A.; Pavon, Esperanza; Mar Orta, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Deep Geological Repository (DGR) is the most internationally accepted option for the storage of high radioactive wastes. This confinement is based on the Multi-barrier Concept where the engineered barrier is a crucial safety wise. Nowadays, bentonite is accepted as the best argillaceous material in the engineered barrier of DGR. Additionally to its well-known physical role, a chemical interaction between lutetium, as actinide simulator, and the smectite has been demonstrated. The existence of a reaction mechanism, which was not previously described, based on the chemical interaction between the lanthanide cations and the orthosilicate anions of the lamellar structure has been identified. This finding has aroused the interest of the scientific community because lanthanides are used as simulators of high activity radionuclide (HAR) in agreement with the guidelines established in the bibliography. It has been observed that in conditions of moderate temperature and pressure a chemical interaction exists between smectites and rare earth elements (RE) and phases of insoluble di-silicate, RE 2 Si 2 O 7 , which would immobilize RE, are generated. It is remarkable that the reaction extends to all the set of the smectites, although they do not display the same reactivity, the saponite being the most reactive. The main isotopes present in the HLW belong to the actinide elements Np, Pu, Am and Cm, in addition to uranium generated by neutron capture during the fuel combustion process. The study of the mobilization of actinide (IV) thorough the bentonite barrier is limited because of their radioactivity. However, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV) and Th(IV) can be simulated by the stable isotopes of the Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), because they exhibit ionic radius and physicochemical properties very similar to those of the actinide elements. It is the main objective of this research to investigate the chemical interaction of Zr(IV) as actinide

  11. Simulations of Shock Wave Interaction with a Particle Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.'Bala'

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of a shock wave interacting with a cloud of particles are performed in an attempt to understand similar phenomena observed in dispersal of solid particles under such extreme environment as an explosion. We conduct numerical experiments in which a particle curtain fills only 87% of the shock tube from bottom to top. As such, the particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In this study, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. In these simulations we use a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions of the particle cloud. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the particle curtain with respect to the initial conditions is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  12. Modeling, Simulation, and Characterization of Distributed Multi-agent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed F. Young

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A strategy is described that utilizes a novel application of a potential-force function that includes the tuning of coefficients to control mobile robots orchestrated as a distributed multiagent system. Control system parameters are manipulated methodically via simulation and hardware experimentation to gain a better understanding of their impact upon mission performance of the multi-agent system as applied to a predetermined task of area exploration and mapping. Also included are descriptions of experiment infrastructure components that afford convenient solutions to research challenges. These consist of a surrogate localization (position and orientation function utilizing a novel MATLAB executable (MEX function and a user datagram protocol (UDP-based communications protocol that facilitates communication among network-based control computers.

  13. Interactive visualization system to analyze corrugated millimeter-waveguide component of ECH in nuclear fusion with FDTD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashima, N; Nakamura, H; Kubo, S; Tamura, Y; Ito, A M

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated distribution of electromagnetic waves through the system composed of miter bends by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation. We develop the interactive visualization system using a new interactive GUI system which is composed of the virtual reality system and android tablet to analyze the FDTD simulation. The effect of the waveguide system with grooves have been investigated to quantitatively by visualization system. Comparing waveguide system with grooves and without grooves, grooves have been confirmed to suppress the surface current at the metal surface. The surface current at complex shape such as the miter bend have been investigated

  14. Application of spectral distributions in effective interaction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The calculation of observable quantities in a large many-particle space is very complicated and often impractical. In effective interaction theory, to simplify the calculation, the full many-particle space is truncated to a small, manageable model space and the operators associated with the observables are renormalized to accommodate the truncation effects. The operator that has been most extensively studied for renormalization is the Hamiltonian. The renormalized Hamiltonian, often called the effective Hamiltonian, can be defined such that it not only gives the eigenvalues, but also the projections of the full-space (true) eigen-functions onto the model space. These projected wave functions then provide a convenient basis for renormalization of other operators. The usual framework for renormalization is perturbation theory. Unfortunately, the conventional perturbation series for effective Hamiltonians have problems with convergence and their high order terms (especially 4th or higher) are also difficult to calculate. The characteristics of spectral distributions can be helptul in determining the model space and calculating the effective Hamiltonian. In this talk applications of spectral distributions are discussed in the following areas: (1) truncation of many particle spaces by selection of configurations; (2) orthogonal polynomial expansions for the effective Hamiltonian; and (3) establishing new criteria for the effective Hamiltonian

  15. Embedding a Virtual Patient Simulator in an Interactive Surgical lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Plum, Patrick; Heiermann, Nadine; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Huan; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk L

    2016-01-01

    Lectures are traditionally used for teaching declarative knowledge. One established tool for clinical education is the demonstration of a real patient. The use of real patients in the daily clinical environment is increasingly difficult. The use of a virtual patient simulator (VPS) can potentially circumvent these problems. Unlimited availability and the opportunity of an electronic feedback system could possibly enrich traditional lectures by enabling more interactivity that meets the expectations of the current student generation. As students face the consequences of their own decisions they take a more active role in the lecture. VPS links declarative knowledge with visual perception that is known to influence students' motivation. Until now, there have been no reports covering the usage and validation of interactive VPS for supporting traditional lectures. In this study, we (1) described the development of a custom-made three-dimensional (3D) VPS for supporting the traditional lecture and (2) performed a feasibility study including an initial assessment of this novel educational concept. Conceptualization included definition of curricular content, technical realization and validation. A custom-made simulator was validated with 68 students. The degree of student acceptance was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect on knowledge gain was determined by testing prelecture and postlecture performance. A custom-made simulator prototype that displays a 3D virtual clinic environment was developed and linked to a PowerPoint presentation. Students were able to connect to the simulator via electronic devices (smartphones and tablets) and to control the simulator via majority vote. The simulator was used in 6 lectures and validated in 2 lectures with 68 students each. Student acceptance and their opinion about effectiveness and applicability were determined. Students showed a high level of motivation when using the simulator as most of them had fun using it. Effect on

  16. Simulating and stimulating performance: Introducing distributed simulation to enhance musical learning and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eWilliamon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Musicians typically rehearse far away from their audiences and in practice rooms that differ significantly from the concert venues in which they aspire to perform. Due to the high costs and inaccessibility of such venues, much current international music training lacks repeated exposure to realistic performance situations, with students learning all too late (or not at all how to manage performance stress and the demands of their audiences. Virtual environments have been shown to be an effective training tool in the fields of medicine and sport, offering practitioners access to real-life performance scenarios but with lower risk of negative evaluation and outcomes. The aim of this research was to design and test the efficacy of simulated performance environments in which conditions of real performance could be recreated. Advanced violin students (n=11 were recruited to perform in two simulations: a solo recital with a small virtual audience and an audition situation with three expert virtual judges. Each simulation contained back-stage and on-stage areas, life-sized interactive virtual observers, and pre- and post-performance protocols designed to match those found at leading international performance venues. Participants completed a questionnaire on their experiences of using the simulations. Results show that both simulated environments offered realistic experience of performance contexts and were rated particularly useful for developing performance skills. For a subset of 7 violinists, state anxiety and electrocardiographic data were collected during the simulated audition and an actual audition with real judges. Results display comparable levels of reported state anxiety and patterns of heart rate variability in both situations, suggesting that responses to the simulated audition closely approximate those of a real audition. The findings are discussed in relation to their implications, both generalizable and individual-specific, for

  17. Simulating and stimulating performance: introducing distributed simulation to enhance musical learning and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamon, Aaron; Aufegger, Lisa; Eiholzer, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Musicians typically rehearse far away from their audiences and in practice rooms that differ significantly from the concert venues in which they aspire to perform. Due to the high costs and inaccessibility of such venues, much current international music training lacks repeated exposure to realistic performance situations, with students learning all too late (or not at all) how to manage performance stress and the demands of their audiences. Virtual environments have been shown to be an effective training tool in the fields of medicine and sport, offering practitioners access to real-life performance scenarios but with lower risk of negative evaluation and outcomes. The aim of this research was to design and test the efficacy of simulated performance environments in which conditions of "real" performance could be recreated. Advanced violin students (n = 11) were recruited to perform in two simulations: a solo recital with a small virtual audience and an audition situation with three "expert" virtual judges. Each simulation contained back-stage and on-stage areas, life-sized interactive virtual observers, and pre- and post-performance protocols designed to match those found at leading international performance venues. Participants completed a questionnaire on their experiences of using the simulations. Results show that both simulated environments offered realistic experience of performance contexts and were rated particularly useful for developing performance skills. For a subset of 7 violinists, state anxiety and electrocardiographic data were collected during the simulated audition and an actual audition with real judges. Results display comparable levels of reported state anxiety and patterns of heart rate variability in both situations, suggesting that responses to the simulated audition closely approximate those of a real audition. The findings are discussed in relation to their implications, both generalizable and individual-specific, for performance training.

  18. Slurry spray distribution within a simulated laboratory scale spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    It was found that the distribution of liquid striking the sides of a simulated room temperature spray dryer was not significantly altered by the choice of nozles, nor by a variation in nozzle operating conditions. Instead, it was found to be a function of the spray dryer's configuration. A cocurrent flow of air down the drying cylinder, not possible with PNL's closed top, favorably altered the spray distribution by both decreasing the amount of liquid striking the interior of the cylinder from 72 to 26% of the feed supplied, and by shifting the zone of maximum impact from 1.0 to 1.7 feet from the nozzle. These findings led to the redesign of the laboratory scale spray dryer to be tested at the Savannah River Plant. The diameter of the drying chamber was increased from 5 to 8 inches, and a cocurrent flow of air was established with a closed recycle. Finally, this investigation suggested a drying scheme which offers all the advantages of spray drying without many of its limitations

  19. Simulation of Coulomb interaction effects in electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, John; Zhu Xieqing; Liu Haoning; Munro, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Over many years, we have developed electron source simulation software that has been used widely in the electron optics community to aid the development of rotationally symmetric electron and ion guns. The simulation includes the modelling of cathode emission and the effects of volumetric space charge. In the present paper we describe the existing software and explain how we have extended this software to include the effects of discrete Coulomb interactions between the electrons as they travel from the cathode surface to the exit of the gun. In the paper, we will describe the numerical models we have employed, the techniques we have used to maximize the speed of the Coulomb force computation and present several illustrative examples of cases analyzed using the new software, including thermal field emitters, LaB 6 guns and flat dispenser-type cathodes.

  20. Mesoscale simulation of semiflexible chains. I. Endpoint distribution and chain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Robert D.

    2013-06-01

    The endpoint distribution and dynamics of semiflexible fibers are studied by numerical simulation. A brief overview is given over the analytical theory of flexible and semiflexible polymers. In particular, a closed expression is given for the relaxation spectrum of wormlike chains, which determines polymer diffusion and rheology. Next a simulation model for wormlike chains with full hydrodynamic interaction is described, and relations for the bending and torsion modulus are given. Two methods are introduced to include torsion stiffness into the model. The model is validated by simulating single chains in a heat bath, and comparing the endpoint distribution of the chains with established Monte Carlo results. It is concluded that torsion stiffness leads to a slightly shorter effective persistence length for a given bending stiffness. To further validate the simulation model, polymer diffusion is studied for fixed persistence length and varying polymer length N. The diffusion constant shows crossover from Rouse (D ∝ N-1) to reptation behaviour (D ∝ N-2). The terminal relaxation time obtained from the monomer displacement is consistent with the theory of wormlike chains. The probability for chain crossing has also been studied. This probability is so low that it does not influence the present results.

  1. Hydrometeor Trajectories and Distributions in a Simulation of TC Rapid Intensification (RI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Zhu, P.

    2010-12-01

    It has long been recognized that the microphysics scheme used in a numerical simulation of tropical cyclones (TC) can greatly affect the precipitation distribution, intensity and thermodynamic structure of the simulated TC. This suggests that the mixing ratios, concentrations and size distributions of hydrometeor(snow, graupel,rain,cloud ice) are important factors in the evolution of TC . The transport of hydrometeor may have a strong influence on these factors through its interactions with the growth and the latent heat forcing of hydrometeor and the wind filed, hence is a key to understanding TC microphysics. Schematic hydrometeor trajectories were first constructed using 3-D wind field and particle fallspeeds derived from airborne radar observations in a steady-state mature hurricane,Alicia(1983). Since then, little effort has been put in understanding hydrometeor transport in TC, especially the potential link between its evolution and the intensity and structure changes in a non-steady-state TC. This study is focused on investigating such a link by means of numerical simulations of TC Rapid Intensification(RI) using WRF model. We use the tracer utility in WRF to construct hydrometeor trajectories. Most of the popular microphysics schemes are tested, and the most reasonable test( which is determined by comparing the simulated TC intensity and structure with airborne radar observations) and the ensemble mean of all the tests are picked for detailed examinations.

  2. Audio-haptic interaction in simulated walking experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    and interchangeable use of the haptic and auditory modality in floor interfaces, and for the synergy of perception and action in capturing and guiding human walking. We describe the technology developed in the context of this project, together with some experiments performed to evaluate the role of auditory......In this paper an overview of the work conducted on audio-haptic physically based simulation and evaluation of walking is provided. This work has been performed in the context of the Natural Interactive Walking (NIW) project, whose goal is to investigate possibilities for the integrated...... and haptic feedback in walking tasks....

  3. Light & Skin Interactions Simulations for Computer Graphics Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baranoski, Gladimir V G

    2010-01-01

    Light and Skin Interactions immerses you in one of the most fascinating application areas of computer graphics: appearance simulation. The book first illuminates the fundamental biophysical processes that affect skin appearance, and reviews seminal related works aimed at applications in life and health sciences. It then examines four exemplary modeling approaches as well as definitive algorithms that can be used to generate realistic images depicting skin appearance. An accompanying companion site also includes complete code and data sources for the BioSpec model, which is considered to be the

  4. Working with simulated forms of interaction in health care education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    This paper argues that role-play as a simulated form of interaction - live and performed on video - is a creative method which has the potential to generate and support authentic dialogues in practice. In the paper we draw on experiences from 6 interdisciplinary workshops at a Danish hospital...... in which role-play of practice situations - both live and performed on video - formed the launching-pad for participants’ oral and written reflections. Our findings show that role-play has the potential to 1) develop professionals’ sensitivity to the significance of unexpected, embodied and emotional...

  5. Boundary Slip and Surface Interaction: A Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Yan, Chen; Hua-Bing, Li; Hou-Hui, Yi

    2008-01-01

    The factors affecting slip length in Couette geometry flows are analysed by means of a two-phase mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann model including non-ideal fluid-fluid and fluid-wall interactions. The main factors influencing the boundary slip are the strength of interactions between fluid-fluid and fluid-wall particles. Other factors, such as fluid viscosity, bulk pressure may also change the slip length. We find that boundary slip only occurs under a certain density (bulk pressure). If the density is large enough, the slip length will tend to zero. In our simulations, a low density layer near the wall does not need to be postulated a priori but emerges naturally from the underlying non-ideal mesoscopic dynamics. It is the low density layer that induces the boundary slip. The results may be helpful to understand recent experimental observations on the slippage of micro flows

  6. Simulation of laser-target interactions in a vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.; Gitomer, S.L.; Kopp, R.A.; Saltzman, J.S.; Dingus, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations for two problem classes. First we study (and compare against one-dimensional analogues) the two dimensional azimuthally symmetric interaction appropriate to a laser pulse energy of order 100 joules, flat-top pulse of width 50 nanoseconds, and wavelength of 0.25 μm, with intensities ranging from 2 x 10 9 W/cm 2 to 2 x 10 12 W/cm 2 . These conditions correspond to an experimental series shot on the Sprite laser at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory during the summer of 1985. Next we study the interaction, especially as concerns momentum coupling, for one-dimensional nondiverging geometry, at laser wavelengths of 0.25 μm and 10.6 μm and flat-topped pulsewidths of 1 μsec, with intensities ranging from 10 9 to 10 12 W/cm 2 . In all cases, calculations are for aluminum targets in vacuum

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers : major artifacts due to truncating electrostatic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patra, M.; Karttunen, M.E.J.; Hyvönen, M.T.; Falck, E.; Lindqvist, P.; Vattulainen, I.

    2003-01-01

    We study the influence of truncating the electrostatic interactions in a fully hydrated pure dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer through 20 ns molecular dynamics simulations. The computations in which the electrostatic interactions were truncated are compared to similar simulations using

  8. A Graphical Interactive Simulation Environment for Production Planning in Bacon Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes a graphical interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories........The paper describes a graphical interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories.....

  9. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehouani, A.; Merzouki, A.; Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J.

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511 * MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique.

  10. Computer simulation of structures and distributions of particles in MAGIC fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yongsheng; Umehara, Noritsugu; Ido, Yasushi; Sato, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    MAGIC (MAG-netic Intelligent Compound) is a solidified magnetic ferrofluid (MF) containing both magnetic particles (MPs) and abrasive particles (APs, nonmagnetic) of micron size. The distribution of APs in MAGIC can be controlled by applying a magnetic field during cooling process of MAGIC fluid. In this paper, the influences of magnetic field, size and concentration of particles on the final structures of MPs and the distributions of APs in MAGIC fluid are preliminarily investigated using Stokesian dynamic (SD) simulation method. Simulation results show that MPs prefer to form strip-like structures in MAGIC fluid, the reason for this phenomenon is mainly attributed to the strong dipolar interactions between them. It is also found that MPs prefer to form big agglomerations in weak magnetic field while chains and strip-like structures in strong magnetic field; no long chains or strip-like structures of MPs are observed in low-concentration MAGIC fluid; and for big-size MPs, pure wall-like structures are formed. Evaluation on the distribution of APs with uniformity coefficient shows that strong magnetic field, high concentration and small-size particles can induce more uniform distribution of APs in MAGIC fluid, the uniformity of APs in MAGIC is about 10% higher than that in normal grinding tools

  11. Numerical and machine learning simulation of parametric distributions of groundwater residence time in streams and wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starn, J. J.; Belitz, K.; Carlson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater residence-time distributions (RTDs) are critical for assessing susceptibility of water resources to contamination. This novel approach for estimating regional RTDs was to first simulate groundwater flow using existing regional digital data sets in 13 intermediate size watersheds (each an average of 7,000 square kilometers) that are representative of a wide range of glacial systems. RTDs were simulated with particle tracking. We refer to these models as "general models" because they are based on regional, as opposed to site-specific, digital data. Parametric RTDs were created from particle RTDs by fitting 1- and 2-component Weibull, gamma, and inverse Gaussian distributions, thus reducing a large number of particle travel times to 3 to 7 parameters (shape, location, and scale for each component plus a mixing fraction) for each modeled area. The scale parameter of these distributions is related to the mean exponential age; the shape parameter controls departure from the ideal exponential distribution and is partly a function of interaction with bedrock and with drainage density. Given the flexible shape and mathematical similarity of these distributions, any of them are potentially a good fit to particle RTDs. The 1-component gamma distribution provided a good fit to basin-wide particle RTDs. RTDs at monitoring wells and streams often have more complicated shapes than basin-wide RTDs, caused in part by heterogeneity in the model, and generally require 2-component distributions. A machine learning model was trained on the RTD parameters using features derived from regionally available watershed characteristics such as recharge rate, material thickness, and stream density. RTDs appeared to vary systematically across the landscape in relation to watershed features. This relation was used to produce maps of useful metrics with respect to risk-based thresholds, such as the time to first exceedance, time to maximum concentration, time above the threshold

  12. SIMUL - a program for the simulation of interactions in the streamer chamber RISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebel, W.; Gajewski, J.; Halm, I.

    1976-08-01

    A program for the simulation of interactions in the streamer chamber RISK is described. This program allows first investigations and tests for planning and preparing experiments. In the program the trajectories of all particles taking part in the interaction are computed. Selected points are projected onto film planes serving as measurement points for the use in the geometrical reconstruction. The program is used for testing a geometry program. But it also seems to be very helpful in investigating counter and trigger constellations and in the calculation of counting rates and trigger effectivities. (author)

  13. Pigeon interaction mode switch-based UAV distributed flocking control under obstacle environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huaxin; Duan, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flocking control is a serious and challenging problem due to local interactions and changing environments. In this paper, a pigeon flocking model and a pigeon coordinated obstacle-avoiding model are proposed based on a behavior that pigeon flocks will switch between hierarchical and egalitarian interaction mode at different flight phases. Owning to the similarity between bird flocks and UAV swarms in essence, a distributed flocking control algorithm based on the proposed pigeon flocking and coordinated obstacle-avoiding models is designed to coordinate a heterogeneous UAV swarm to fly though obstacle environments with few informed individuals. The comparative simulation results are elaborated to show the feasibility, validity and superiority of our proposed algorithm. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF HOT JUPITER–STELLAR WIND HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Gas giant exoplanets orbiting at close distances to the parent star are subjected to large radiation and stellar wind fluxes. In this paper, hydrodynamic simulations of the planetary upper atmosphere and its interaction with the stellar wind are carried out to understand the possible flow regimes and how they affect the Lyα transmission spectrum. Following Tremblin and Chiang, charge exchange reactions are included to explore the role of energetic atoms as compared to thermal particles. In order to understand the role of the tail as compared to the leading edge of the planetary gas, the simulations were carried out under axisymmetry, and photoionization and stellar wind electron impact ionization reactions were included to limit the extent of the neutrals away from the planet. By varying the planetary gas temperature, two regimes are found. At high temperature, a supersonic planetary wind is found, which is turned around by the stellar wind and forms a tail behind the planet. At lower temperatures, the planetary wind is shut off when the stellar wind penetrates inside where the sonic point would have been. In this regime mass is lost by viscous interaction at the boundary between planetary and stellar wind gases. Absorption by cold hydrogen atoms is large near the planetary surface, and decreases away from the planet as expected. The hot hydrogen absorption is in an annulus and typically dominated by the tail, at large impact parameter, rather than by the thin leading edge of the mixing layer near the substellar point

  15. AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF HOT JUPITER–STELLAR WIND HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Gas giant exoplanets orbiting at close distances to the parent star are subjected to large radiation and stellar wind fluxes. In this paper, hydrodynamic simulations of the planetary upper atmosphere and its interaction with the stellar wind are carried out to understand the possible flow regimes and how they affect the Lyα transmission spectrum. Following Tremblin and Chiang, charge exchange reactions are included to explore the role of energetic atoms as compared to thermal particles. In order to understand the role of the tail as compared to the leading edge of the planetary gas, the simulations were carried out under axisymmetry, and photoionization and stellar wind electron impact ionization reactions were included to limit the extent of the neutrals away from the planet. By varying the planetary gas temperature, two regimes are found. At high temperature, a supersonic planetary wind is found, which is turned around by the stellar wind and forms a tail behind the planet. At lower temperatures, the planetary wind is shut off when the stellar wind penetrates inside where the sonic point would have been. In this regime mass is lost by viscous interaction at the boundary between planetary and stellar wind gases. Absorption by cold hydrogen atoms is large near the planetary surface, and decreases away from the planet as expected. The hot hydrogen absorption is in an annulus and typically dominated by the tail, at large impact parameter, rather than by the thin leading edge of the mixing layer near the substellar point.

  16. THIEF: An interactive simulation of nuclear materials safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanbro, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The safeguards community is facing an era in which it will be called upon to tighten protection of nuclear material. At the same time, it is probable that safeguards will face more competition for available resources from other activities such as environmental cleanup. To exist in this era, it will be necessary to understand and coordinate all aspects of the safeguards system. Because of the complexity of the interactions involved, this process puts a severe burden on designers and operators of safeguards systems. This paper presents a simulation tool developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to allow users to examine the interactions among safeguards elements as they apply to combating the insider threat. The tool consists of a microcomputer-based simulation in which the user takes the role of the insider trying to remove nuclear material from a facility. The safeguards system is run by the computer and consists of both physical protection and MC A computer elements. All data elements describing a scenario can be altered by the user. The program can aid in training, as well as in developing threat scenarios. 4 refs.

  17. Building interactive simulations in a Web page design program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kootsey, J Mailen; Siriphongs, Daniel; McAuley, Grant

    2004-01-01

    A new Web software architecture, NumberLinX (NLX), has been integrated into a commercial Web design program to produce a drag-and-drop environment for building interactive simulations. NLX is a library of reusable objects written in Java, including input, output, calculation, and control objects. The NLX objects were added to the palette of available objects in the Web design program to be selected and dropped on a page. Inserting an object in a Web page is accomplished by adding a template block of HTML code to the page file. HTML parameters in the block must be set to user-supplied values, so the HTML code is generated dynamically, based on user entries in a popup form. Implementing the object inspector for each object permits the user to edit object attributes in a form window. Except for model definition, the combination of the NLX architecture and the Web design program permits construction of interactive simulation pages without writing or inspecting code.

  18. An interactive beam line simulator module for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the interactive simulation engine, bl, designed for the RHIC project. The program tracks as output to shared memory the central orbit, Twiss and dispersion functions, as well as the 6 x 6 beam hyperellipsoid. Transfer matrices between elements are available via interactive requests. Using a 6-d model, optical elements are modeled with a linear transfer matrix and a vector. The vector allows simulation of misalignments, shifts in field strengths, and beam rigidity. Currently only a linear model is used for elements. In addition to the usual magnets, a foil element is included which can shift the beam's rigidity (resulting from a change of charge and energy loss), as well as increase the momentum spread and emittance. Running as a Glish client, bl can be interfaced to other programs, such as an orbit plotter and a power supply application to give a quick prediction of the beam orbit from actual operating currents in the accelerator. Various strengths and offsets may be changed by sending Glish events to bl

  19. Interaction of light with hematite hierarchical structures: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distaso, Monica; Zhuromskyy, Oleksander; Seemann, Benjamin; Pflug, Lukas; Mačković, Mirza; Encina, Ezequiel; Taylor, Robin Klupp; Müller, Rolf; Leugering, Günter; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peschel, Ulf; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Mesocrystalline particles have been recognized as a class of multifunctional materials with potential applications in different fields. However, the internal organization of nanocomposite mesocrystals and its influence on the final properties have not yet been investigated. In this paper, a novel strategy based on electrodynamic simulations is developed to shed light on how the internal structure of mesocrystals influences their optical properties. In a first instance, a unified design protocol is reported for the fabrication of hematite/PVP particles with different morphologies such as pseudo-cubes, rods-like and apple-like structures and controlled particle size distributions. The optical properties of hematite/PVP mesocrystals are effectively simulated by taking their aggregate and nanocomposite structure into consideration. The superposition T-Matrix approach accounts for the aggregate nature of mesocrystalline particles and validate the effective medium approximation used in the framework of the Mie theory and electromagnetic simulation such as Finite Element Method. The approach described in our paper provides the framework to understand and predict the optical properties of mesocrystals and more general, of hierarchical nanostructured particles.

  20. Distribution and interaction patterns of bacterial communities in an ornithogenic soil of Seymour Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampelotto, Pabulo Henrique; Barboza, Anthony Diego Muller; Pereira, Antônio Batista; Triplett, Eric W; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G R; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio; Roesch, Luiz Fernando Wurdig

    2015-04-01

    Next-generation, culture-independent sequencing offers an excellent opportunity to examine network interactions among different microbial species. In this study, soil bacterial communities from a penguin rookery site at Seymour Island were analyzed for abundance, structure, diversity, and interaction networks to identify interaction patterns among the various taxa at three soil depths. The analysis revealed the presence of eight phyla distributed in different proportions among the surface layer (0-8 cm), middle layer (20-25 cm), and bottom (35-40 cm). The bottom layer presented the highest values of bacterial richness, diversity, and evenness when compared to surface and middle layers. The network analysis revealed the existence of a unique pattern of interactions in which the soil microbial network formed a clustered topology, rather than a modular structure as is usually found in biological communities. In addition, specific taxa were identified as important players in microbial community structure. Furthermore, simulation analyses indicated that the loss of potential keystone groups of microorganisms might alter the patterns of interactions within the microbial community. These findings provide new insights for assessing the consequences of environmental disturbances at the whole-community level in Antarctica.

  1. Simulations of the Sampling Distribution of the Mean Do Not Necessarily Mislead and Can Facilitate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently Watkins, Bargagliotti, and Franklin (2014) discovered that simulations of the sampling distribution of the mean can mislead students into concluding that the mean of the sampling distribution of the mean depends on sample size. This potential error arises from the fact that the mean of a simulated sampling distribution will tend to be…

  2. Enabling the Analysis of Emergent Behavior in Future Electrical Distribution Systems Using Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kolen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In future electrical distribution systems, component heterogeneity and their cyber-physical interactions through electrical lines and communication lead to emergent system behavior. As the distribution systems represent the largest part of an energy system with respect to the number of nodes and components, large-scale studies of their emergent behavior are vital for the development of decentralized control strategies. This paper presents and evaluates DistAIX, a novel agent-based modeling and simulation tool to conduct such studies. The major novelty is a parallelization of the entire model—including the power system, communication system, control, and all interactions—using processes instead of threads. Thereby, a distribution of the simulation to multiple computing nodes with a distributed memory architecture becomes possible. This makes DistAIX scalable and allows the inclusion of as many processing units in the simulation as desired. The scalability of DistAIX is demonstrated by simulations of large-scale scenarios. Additionally, the capability of observing emergent behavior is demonstrated for an exemplary distribution grid with a large number of interacting components.

  3. Simulations of structure formation in interacting dark energy cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The evidence in favor of a dark energy component dominating the Universe, and driving its presently accelerated expansion, has progressively grown during the last decade of cosmological observations. If this dark energy is given by a dynamic scalar field, it may also have a direct interaction with other matter fields in the Universe, in particular with cold dark matter. Such interaction would imprint new features on the cosmological background evolution as well as on the growth of cosmic structure, like an additional long-range fifth-force between massive particles, or a variation in time of the dark matter particle mass. We present here the implementation of these new physical effects in the N-body code GADGET-2, and we discuss the outcomes of a series of high-resolution N-body simulations for a selected family of interacting dark energy models. We interestingly find, in contrast with previous claims, that the inner overdensity of dark matter halos decreases in these models with respect to ΛCDM, and consistently halo concentrations show a progressive reduction for increasing couplings. Furthermore, the coupling induces a bias in the overdensities of cold dark matter and baryons that determines a decrease of the halo baryon fraction below its cosmological value. These results go in the direction of alleviating tensions between astrophysical observations and the predictions of the ΛCDM model on small scales, thereby opening new room for coupled dark energy models as an alternative to the cosmological constant.

  4. Simulating the interaction of jets with the intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Rainer; Ehlert, Kristian; Pfrommer, Christoph; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-10-01

    Jets from supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxy clusters are a potential candidate for moderating gas cooling and subsequent star formation through depositing energy in the intracluster gas. In this work, we simulate the jet-intracluster medium interaction using the moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics code arepo. Our model injects supersonic, low-density, collimated and magnetized outflows in cluster centres, which are then stopped by the surrounding gas, thermalize and inflate low-density cavities filled with cosmic rays. We perform high-resolution, non-radiative simulations of the lobe creation, expansion and disruption, and find that its dynamical evolution is in qualitative agreement with simulations of idealized low-density cavities that are dominated by a large-scale Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The buoyant rising of the lobe does not create energetically significant small-scale chaotic motion in a volume-filling fashion, but rather a systematic upward motion in the wake of the lobe and a corresponding back-flow antiparallel to it. We find that, overall, 50 per cent of the injected energy ends up in material that is not part of the lobe, and about 25 per cent remains in the inner 100 kpc. We conclude that jet-inflated, buoyantly rising cavities drive systematic gas motions that play an important role in heating the central regions, while mixing of lobe material is subdominant. Encouragingly, the main mechanisms responsible for this energy deposition can be modelled already at resolutions within reach in future, high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters.

  5. Interaction systems design and the protocol- and middleware-centred paradigms in distributed application development

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Almeida, João; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Quartel, Dick; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at demonstrating the benefits and importance of interaction systems design in the development of distributed applications. We position interaction systems design with respect to two paradigms that have influenced the design of distributed applications: the middleware-centred and the protocol-centred paradigm. We argue that interaction systems that support application-level interactions should be explicitly designed, using the externally observable behaviour of the interaction ...

  6. Numerical Simulation of Particle Distribution in Capillary Membrane during Backwash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Keller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The membrane filtration with inside-out dead-end driven UF-/MF- capillary membranes is an effective process for particle removal in water treatment. Its industrial application increased in the last decade exponentially. To date, the research activities in this field were aimed first of all at the analysis of filtration phenomena disregarding the influence of backwash on the operation parameters of filtration plants. However, following the main hypothesis of this paper, backwash has great potential to increase the efficiency of filtration. In this paper, a numerical approach for a detailed study of fluid dynamic processes in capillary membranes during backwash is presented. The effect of particle size and inlet flux on the backwash process are investigated. The evaluation of these data concentrates on the analysis of particle behavior in the cross sectional plane and the appearance of eventually formed particle plugs inside the membrane capillary. Simulations are conducted in dead-end filtration mode and with two configurations. The first configuration includes a particle concentration of 10% homogeneously distributed within the capillary and the second configuration demonstrates a cake layer on the membrane surface with a packing density of 0:6. Analyzing the hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles shows that the lift force plays the main role in defining the particle enrichment areas. The operation parameters contribute in enhancing the lift force and the heterogeneity to anticipate the clogging of the membrane.

  7. Virtual patient simulator for distributed collaborative medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudell, Thomas P; Summers, Kenneth L; Holten, Jim; Hakamata, Takeshi; Mowafi, Moad; Jacobs, Joshua; Lozanoff, Beth K; Lozanoff, Scott; Wilks, David; Keep, Marcus F; Saiki, Stanley; Alverson, Dale

    2003-01-01

    Project TOUCH (Telehealth Outreach for Unified Community Health; http://hsc.unm.edu/touch) investigates the feasibility of using advanced technologies to enhance education in an innovative problem-based learning format currently being used in medical school curricula, applying specific clinical case models, and deploying to remote sites/workstations. The University of New Mexico's School of Medicine and the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawai'i face similar health care challenges in providing and delivering services and training to remote and rural areas. Recognizing that health care needs are local and require local solutions, both states are committed to improving health care delivery to their unique populations by sharing information and experiences through emerging telehealth technologies by using high-performance computing and communications resources. The purpose of this study is to describe the deployment of a problem-based learning case distributed over the National Computational Science Alliance's Access Grid. Emphasis is placed on the underlying technical components of the TOUCH project, including the virtual reality development tool Flatland, the artificial intelligence-based simulation engine, the Access Grid, high-performance computing platforms, and the software that connects them all. In addition, educational and technical challenges for Project TOUCH are identified. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  9. 3D FE simulation of PCMI (Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction) considering frictionless contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Uk; Lee, Eun-Ho; Yang, Dong-Yol; Kim, Hyo-Chan; Yang, Yong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this code is coupling every aspect of physical phenomenon. Monodimensional FE model has been made for METEOR. It is good to evaluate the global behavior in high burn up levels. However, the multi-dimensional PCI analysis code is necessary to precisely analyze the stress distribution especially in case of the crack analysis. CAST3M 3D finite element code has been developed considering thermo-mechanical interaction in detail for TOUTATIS code. The advanced multidimensional code called ALCYONE has been developed considering chemical-physics and thermomechanical aspects. Although there are many codes that analyze pellet and cladding interaction, it is difficult to consider every physical aspect. In this paper, pellet to cladding mechanical interaction in 3D has been simulated with frictionless contact using the developed module, which is written in FORTRANN90. In this paper, 3D PCMI FE model is simulated with frictionless contact and elastic deformation. From the frictionless contact analysis, the interfacial pressure has been calculated and then this is used to obtain the solid heat coefficient which is a main factor to analyze the thermal distribution

  10. Detrended analysis of shower track distribution in nucleus-nucleus interactions at CERN SPS energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mali, P.; Manna, S.K.; Haldar, P.K.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Singh, G.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the charged particle density fluctuations in "1"6O+Ag(Br) and "3"2S+Ag(Br) interactions at 200A GeV incident energy in the laboratory frame by using the detrended methods. These methods can extract (multi)fractal properties of the underlying distributions after filtering out the average trend of fluctuations associated. Multifractal parameters obtained from data analysis are systematically compared with event samples generated by the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model, where Bose–Einstein correlation (BEC) effect is mimicked via a charge reassignment algorithm implemented as an after burner. Both the experimental and the simulated data are subjected to two different statistical techniques namely the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) and multifractal detrended moving average (MFDMA) analysis. The results indicate that for both the interactions considered the pseudorapidity distributions of the shower tracks are multifractal in nature. Qualitatively, both methods of analysis and both interactions considered, result in similar behavior of multifractal parameters. We do however notice significant quantitative differences in certain cases.

  11. Monitoring peptide-surface interaction by means of molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonella, Marco, E-mail: mnonella@pci.uzh.ch [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Seeger, Stefan, E-mail: sseeger@pci.uzh.ch [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-12-09

    Graphical abstract: Protein-surface interactions play a crucial role in a wide field of research areas like biology, biotechnology, or pharmacology. Only recently, it has been shown that not only peptide adsorption represents an important process but also spreading and clustering of adsorbed proteins. By means of classical molecular dynamics, peptide adsorption as well as the dynamics of adsorbed peptides have been investigated in order to gain deeper insight into such processes. The picture shows a snapshot of an adsorbed peptide on a silica surface showing strong direct hydrogen bonding. Research highlights: {yields} Simulation of peptide surface interaction. {yields} Dynamics of hydrogen bond formation and destruction. {yields} Internal flexibility of adsorbed peptides. - Abstract: Protein adsorption and protein surface interactions have become an important research topic in recent years. Very recently, for example, it has been shown that protein clusters can undergo a surface-induced spreading after adsorption. Such phenomena emphasize the need of a more detailed insight into protein-silica interaction at an atomic level. Therefore, we have studied a model system consisting of a short peptide, a silica slab, and water molecules by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study reveals that, besides of electrostatic interactions caused by the chosen charge distribution, the peptide interacts with the silica surface through formation of direct peptide-surface hydrogen bonds as well as indirect peptide-water-surface hydrogen bonds. The number of created hydrogen bonds varies considerably among the simulated structures. The strength of hydrogen bonding determines the mobility of the peptide on the surface and the internal flexibility of the adsorbed peptide.

  12. gRINN: a tool for calculation of residue interaction energies and protein energy network analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serçinoglu, Onur; Ozbek, Pemra

    2018-05-25

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generate a wealth of information related to the dynamics of proteins. If properly analyzed, this information can lead to new insights regarding protein function and assist wet-lab experiments. Aiming to identify interactions between individual amino acid residues and the role played by each in the context of MD simulations, we present a stand-alone software called gRINN (get Residue Interaction eNergies and Networks). gRINN features graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and a command-line interface for generating and analyzing pairwise residue interaction energies and energy correlations from protein MD simulation trajectories. gRINN utilizes the features of NAMD or GROMACS MD simulation packages and automatizes the steps necessary to extract residue-residue interaction energies from user-supplied simulation trajectories, greatly simplifying the analysis for the end-user. A GUI, including an embedded molecular viewer, is provided for visualization of interaction energy time-series, distributions, an interaction energy matrix, interaction energy correlations and a residue correlation matrix. gRINN additionally offers construction and analysis of Protein Energy Networks, providing residue-based metrics such as degrees, betweenness-centralities, closeness centralities as well as shortest path analysis. gRINN is free and open to all users without login requirement at http://grinn.readthedocs.io.

  13. Probability distributions in conservative energy exchange models of multiple interacting agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; West, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    Herein we study energy exchange models of multiple interacting agents that conserve energy in each interaction. The models differ regarding the rules that regulate the energy exchange and boundary effects. We find a variety of stochastic behaviours that manifest energy equilibrium probability distributions of different types and interaction rules that yield not only the exponential distributions such as the familiar Maxwell-Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution of an elastically colliding ideal particle gas, but also uniform distributions, truncated exponential distributions, Gaussian distributions, Gamma distributions, inverse power law distributions, mixed exponential and inverse power law distributions, and evolving distributions. This wide variety of distributions should be of value in determining the underlying mechanisms generating the statistical properties of complex phenomena including those to be found in complex chemical reactions

  14. Interactions of microbicide nanoparticles with a simulated vaginal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, José; Rocha, Cristina M R; Gonçalves, Maria Pilar; Carrier, Rebecca L; Amiji, Mansoor; Bahia, Maria Fernanda; Sarmento, Bruno

    2012-11-05

    The interaction with cervicovaginal mucus presents the potential to impact the performance of drug nanocarriers. These systems must migrate through this biological fluid in order to deliver their drug payload to the underlying mucosal surface. We studied the ability of dapivirine-loaded polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanoparticles (NPs) to interact with a simulated vaginal fluid (SVF) incorporating mucin. Different surface modifiers were used to produce NPs with either negative (poloxamer 338 NF and sodium lauryl sulfate) or positive (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) surface charge. Studies were performed using the mucin particle method, rheological measurements, and real-time multiple particle tracking. Results showed that SVF presented rheological properties similar to those of human cervicovaginal mucus. Analysis of NP transport indicated mild interactions with mucin and low adhesive potential. In general, negatively charged NPs underwent subdiffusive transport in SVF, i.e., hindered as compared to their diffusion in water, but faster than for positively charged NPs. These differences were increased when the pH of SVF was changed from 4.2 to 7.0. Diffusivity was 50- and 172-fold lower in SVF at pH 4.2 than in water for negatively charged and positively charged NPs, respectively. At pH 7.0, this decrease was around 20- and 385-fold, respectively. The estimated times required to cross a layer of SVF were equal to or lower than 1.7 h for negatively charged NPs, while for positively charged NPs these values were equal to or higher than 7 h. Overall, our results suggest that negatively charged PCL NPs may be suitable to be used as carriers in order to deliver dapivirine and potentially other antiretroviral drugs to the cervicovaginal mucosal lining. Also, they further reinforce the importance in characterizing the interactions of nanosystems with mucus fluids or surrogates when considering mucosal drug delivery.

  15. Simulations of GCR interactions within planetary bodies using GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesick, K.; Feldman, W. C.; Stonehill, L. C.; Coupland, D. D. S.

    2017-12-01

    On planetary bodies with little to no atmosphere, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) can hit the body and produce neutrons primarily through nuclear spallation within the top few meters of the surfaces. These neutrons undergo further nuclear interactions with elements near the planetary surface and some will escape the surface and can be detected by landed or orbiting neutron radiation detector instruments. The neutron leakage signal at fast neutron energies provides a measure of average atomic mass of the near-surface material and in the epithermal and thermal energy ranges is highly sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Gamma-rays can also escape the surface, produced at characteristic energies depending on surface composition, and can be detected by gamma-ray instruments. The intra-nuclear cascade (INC) that occurs when high-energy GCRs interact with elements within a planetary surface to produce the leakage neutron and gamma-ray signals is highly complex, and therefore Monte Carlo based radiation transport simulations are commonly used for predicting and interpreting measurements from planetary neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments. In the past, the simulation code that has been widely used for this type of analysis is MCNPX [1], which was benchmarked against data from the Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment (LPNE) on Apollo 17 [2]. In this work, we consider the validity of the radiation transport code GEANT4 [3], another widely used but open-source code, by benchmarking simulated predictions of the LPNE experiment to the Apollo 17 data. We consider the impact of different physics model options on the results, and show which models best describe the INC based on agreement with the Apollo 17 data. The success of this validation then gives us confidence in using GEANT4 to simulate GCR-induced neutron leakage signals on Mars in relevance to a re-analysis of Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer data. References [1] D.B. Pelowitz, Los Alamos National Laboratory, LA-CP-05

  16. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    whose lipid composition and transmembrane distribution are to a large extent consistent with real plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. To this end, we use a model system which comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The simulations...... clearly show that AuNP- attaches to the extracellular membrane surface within a few tens of nanoseconds, while it avoids contact with the membrane on the cytosolic side. This behavior stems from several factors. In essence, when the nanoparticle interacts with lipids in the extracellular compartment...

  17. Hydroacoustic simulation of rotor-stator interaction in resonance conditions in Francis pump-turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolet, C; Ruchonnet, N; Alligne, S; Avellan, F; Koutnik, J

    2010-01-01

    Combined effect of rotating pressure field related to runner blade and wakes of wicket gates leads to rotor stator interactions, RSI, in Francis pump-turbines. These interactions induce pressures waves propagating in the entire hydraulic machine. Superposition of those pressure waves may result in standing wave in the spiral casing and rotating diametrical mode in the guide vanes and can cause strong pressure fluctuations and vibrations. This paper presents the modeling, simulation and analysis of Rotor-Stator Interaction of a scale model of a Francis pump-turbine and related test rig using a one-dimensional approach. The hydroacoustic modeling of the Francis pump-turbine takes into account the spiral casing, the 20 guide vanes, the 9 rotating runner vanes. The connection between stationary and rotating parts is ensured by a valve network driven according to the unsteady flow distribution between guide vanes and runner vanes. Time domain simulations are performed for 2 different runner rotational speeds in turbine mode. The simulation results are analyzed in frequency domain and highlights hydroacoustic resonance between RSI excitations and the spiral case. Rotating diametrical mode in the vaneless gap and standing wave in the spiral case are identified. The influence of the resonance on phase and amplitude of pressure fluctuations obtained for both the spiral case and the vaneless gap is analyzed. The mode shape and frequencies are confirmed using eigenvalues analysis.

  18. Contribution of static and dynamic load balancing in a real-time distributed air defence simulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulations with a large number of model instances make use of parallel architectures to improve performance. When using such a parallel architecture a challenge is to effectively distribute the simulation objects across the processing platforms...

  19. Beam equipment electromagnetic interaction in accelerators: simulation and experimental benchmarking

    CERN Document Server

    Passarelli, Andrea; Vaccaro, Vittorio Giorgio; Massa, Rita; Masullo, Maria Rosaria

    One of the most significant technological problems to achieve the nominal performances in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) concerns the system of collimation of particle beams. The use of collimators crystals, exploiting the channeling effect on extracted beam, has been experimentally demonstrated. The first part of this thesis is about the optimization of UA9 goniometer at CERN, this device used for beam collimation will replace a part of the vacuum chamber. The optimization process, however, requires the calculation of the coupling impedance between the circulating beam and this structure in order to define the threshold of admissible intensity to do not trigger instability processes. Simulations have been performed with electromagnetic codes to evaluate the coupling impedance and to assess the beam-structure interaction. The results clearly showed that the most concerned resonance frequencies are due solely to the open cavity to the compartment of the motors and position sensors considering the crystal in o...

  20. Software Design for Interactive Graphic Radiation Treatment Simulation Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalet, Ira J.; Sweeney, Christine; Jacky, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    We examine issues in the design of interactive computer graphic simulation programs for radiation treatment planning (RTP), as well as expert system programs that automate parts of the RTP process, in light of ten years of experience at designing, building and using such programs. An experiment in object-oriented design using standard Pascal shows that while some advantage is gained from the design, it is still difficult to achieve modularity and to integrate expert system components. A new design based on the Common LISP Object System (CLOS) is described. This series of designs for RTP software shows that this application benefits in specific ways from object-oriented design methods and appropriate languages and tools.

  1. Hot interstellar tunnels. I. Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    Reexamining a suggestion of Cox and Smith, we find that intersecting supernova remnants can indeed generate and maintain hot interstellar regions with napproximately-less-than10 -2 cm -3 and Tapprox.10 6 K. These regions are likely to occupy at least 30% of the volume of a spiral arm near the midplane of the gaseous disk if the local supernova rate there is greater than 1.5 x 10 -7 Myr -1 pc -3 . Their presence in the interstellar medium is supported by observations of the soft X-ray background. The theory required to build a numerical simulation of interacting supernova remnants is developed. The hot cavities within a population of remnants will become connected for a variety of assumed conditions in the outer shells of old remnants. Extensive hot cavity regions or tunnels are built and enlarged by supernovae occurring in relatively dense gas which produce connections, but tunnels are kept hot primarily by supernovae occurring within the tunnels. The latter supernovae initiate fast shock waves which apparently reheat tunnels faster than they are destroyed by thermal conduction in a galactic magnetic field or by radiative cooling. However, the dispersal of these rejuvenating shocks over a wide volume is inhibited by motions of cooler interstellar gas in the interval between shocks. These motions disrupt the contiguity of the component cavities of a tunnel and may cause its death.The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a quasi-equilibrium is reached within 10 7 years of the first supernova in a spiral arm. This equilibrium is characterized by a constant average filling fraction for cavities in the interstellar volume. Aspects of the equilibrium are discussed for a range of supernova rates. Two predictions of Cox and Smith are not confirmed within this range: critical growth of hot regions to encompass the entire medium, and the efficient quenching of a remnant's expansion by interaction with other cavities

  2. Hardware-in-the-Loop Co-simulation of Distribution Grid for Demand Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotger-Griful, Sergi; Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Jacobsen, Rune H.; Stewart, Emma M.; Domingo, Javier M.; Wetter, Michael

    2016-06-20

    In modern power systems, co-simulation is proposed as an enabler for analyzing the interactions between disparate systems. This paper introduces the co-simulation platform Virtual Grid Integration Laboratory (VirGIL) including Hardware-in-the-Loop testing, and demonstrates its potential to assess demand response strategies. VirGIL is based on a modular architecture using the Functional Mock-up Interface industrial standard to integrate new simulators. VirGIL combines state-of-the-art simulators in power systems, communications, buildings, and control. In this work, VirGIL is extended with a Hardware-in-the-Loop component to control the ventilation system of a real 12-story building in Denmark. VirGIL capabilities are illustrated in three scenarios: load following, primary reserves and load following aggregation. Experimental results show that the system can track one minute changing signals and it can provide primary reserves for up-regulation. Furthermore, the potential of aggregating several ventilation systems is evaluated considering the impact at distribution grid level and the communications protocol effect.

  3. Migrating to a real-time distributed parallel simulator architecture- An update

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A legacy non-distributed logical time simulator was previously migrated to a distributed architecture to parallelise execution. The existing Discrete Time System Specification (DTSS) modelling formalism was retained to simplify the reuse of existing...

  4. Interactive Media and Simulation Tools for Technical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramoll, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    Over the last several years, integration of multiple media sources into a single information system has been rapidly developing. It has been found that when sound, graphics, text, animations, and simulations are skillfully integrated, the sum of the parts exceeds the individual parts for effective learning. In addition, simulations can be used to design and understand complex engineering processes. With the recent introduction of many high-level authoring, animation, modeling, and rendering programs for personal computers, significant multimedia programs can be developed by practicing engineers, scientists and even managers for both training and education. However, even with these new tools, a considerable amount of time is required to produce an interactive multimedia program. The development of both CD-ROM and Web-based programs are discussed in addition to the use of technically oriented animations. Also examined are various multimedia development tools and how they are used to develop effective engineering education courseware. Demonstrations of actual programs in engineering mechanics are shown.

  5. Enhancing food engineering education with interactive web-based simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Koulouris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional deductive approach in teaching any engineering topic, teachers would first expose students to the derivation of the equations that govern the behavior of a physical system and then demonstrate the use of equations through a limited number of textbook examples. This methodology, however, is rarely adequate to unmask the cause-effect and quantitative relationships between the system variables that the equations embody. Web-based simulation, which is the integration of simulation and internet technologies, has the potential to enhance the learning experience by offering an interactive and easily accessible platform for quick and effortless experimentation with physical phenomena.This paper presents the design and development of a web-based platform for teaching basic food engineering phenomena to food technology students. The platform contains a variety of modules (“virtual experiments” covering the topics of mass and energy balances, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. In this paper, the design and development of three modules for mass balances and heat transfer is presented. Each webpage representing an educational module has the following features: visualization of the studied phenomenon through graphs, charts or videos, computation through a mathematical model and experimentation.  The student is allowed to edit key parameters of the phenomenon and observe the effect of these changes on the outputs. Experimentation can be done in a free or guided fashion with a set of prefabricated examples that students can run and self-test their knowledge by answering multiple-choice questions.

  6. Seismic simulation analysis of nuclear reactor building by soil-building interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Motohashi, S.; Kusano, N.; Mizuno, N.; Sugiyama, N.

    1981-01-01

    Seismic simulation analysis were performed for evaluating soil-structure interaction effects by an analytical approach using a 'Lattice Model' developed by the authors. The purpose of this paper is to check the adequacy of this procedure for analyzing soil-structure interaction by means of comparing computed results with recorded ones. The 'Lattice Model' approach employs a lumped mass interactive model, in which not only the structure but also the underlying and/or surrounding soil are modeled as descretized elements. The analytical model used for this study extends about 310 m in the horizontal direction and about 103 m in depth. The reactor building is modeled as three shearing-bending sticks (outer wall, inner wall and shield wall) and the underlying and surrounding soil are divided into four shearing sticks (column directly beneath the reactor building, adjacent, near and distant columns). A corresponding input base motion for the 'Lattice Model' was determined by a deconvolution analysis using a recorded motion at elevation -18.5 m in the free-field. The results of this simulation analysis were shown to be in reasonably good agreement with the recorded ones in the forms of the distribution of ground motions and structural responses, acceleration time histories and related response spectra. These results showed that the 'Lattice Model' approach was an appropriate one to estimate the soil-structure interaction effects. (orig./HP)

  7. Distributed practice. The more the merrier? A randomised bronchoscopy simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerrum, Anne Sofie; Eika, Berit; Charles, Peder; Hilberg, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The distribution of practice affects the acquisition of skills. Distributed practice has shown to be more effective for skills acquisition than massed training. However, it remains unknown as to which is the most effective distributed practice schedule for learning bronchoscopy skills through simulation training. This study compares two distributed practice schedules: One-day distributed practice and weekly distributed practice.Method: Twenty physicians in training were randomly...

  8. Impact of soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions on the spatial rainfall distribution in the Central Sahel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Breil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a Regional Climate Model (RCM the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere are described by a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer Model (SVAT. In the presented study two SVATs of different complexity (TERRA-ML and VEG3D are coupled to the RCM COSMO-CLM (CCLM to investigate the impact of different representations of soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions on the West African Monsoon (WAM system. In contrast to TERRA-ML, VEG3D comprises a more detailed description of the land-atmosphere coupling by including a vegetation layer in its structural design, changing the treatment of radiation and turbulent fluxes. With these two different model systems (CCLM-TERRA-ML and CCLM-VEG3D climate simulations are performed for West Africa and analyzed. The study reveals that the simulated spatial distribution of rainfall in the Sahel region is substantially affected by the chosen SVAT. Compared to CCLM-TERRA-ML, the application of CCLM-VEG3D results in higher near surface temperatures in the Sahel region during the rainy season. This implies a southward expansion of the Saharian heat-low. Consequently, the mean position of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ is also shifted to the south, leading to a southward displacement of tracks for Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS, developing in connection with the AEJ. As a result, less precipitation is produced in the Sahel region, increasing the agreement with observations. These analyses indicate that soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions impact the West African Monsoon system and highlight the benefit of using a more complex SVAT to simulate its dynamics.

  9. Simulation of the dynamics of laser-cluster interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deiss, C.

    2009-01-01

    Ranging in size from a few atoms to several million atoms, clusters form a link between gases and solids. When irradiating clusters with intense femtosecond laser pulses, the production of energetic and highly charged ions, hot electrons, and extreme UV and X-ray photons, gives evidence of a very efficient energy conversion. The size of the system and the multitude of mechanisms at play provide a considerable challenge for the theoretical treatment of the interaction. In this thesis, we have developed a Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo simulation that gives insight into the particle dynamics during the interaction of laser pulses with large argon clusters (with more than 10000 atoms per cluster). Elastic electron-ion scattering, electron-electron scattering, electron-impact ionization and excitation, as well as three-body recombination and Auger decay are included via stochastic events. In a strongly simplified picture, the dynamics of the laser-cluster interaction can be summarized as follows: the intense laser field ionizes the cluster atoms and drives the population of quasi-free electrons. In collision events, further free electrons and high ionic charge states are created. As some electrons leave the cluster, the ions feel a net positive charge, and the cluster ultimately disintegrates in a Coulomb explosion. Even at moderate laser intensities (approx. 10 15 W/cm 2 ), impact ionization produces inner-shell vacancies in the cluster ions that decay by emitting characteristic X-ray radiation. The small population of fast electrons responsible for these ionization events is produced near the cluster poles, where the combination of polarization and charging of the cluster leads to strongly enhanced field strengths. We achieve a good agreement over large parameter ranges between the simulation and X-ray spectroscopy experiments. We also investigate the dependence of X-ray emission on laser intensity, pulse duration and cluster size. We find that in order to

  10. Coordinating distributed work : Exploring situated coordination with gaming-simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laere, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational work has become more and more distributed nowadays. Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide opportunities to improve coordination of distributed work, but in practice many organizations struggle with integrating new organizational structures, new work practices and

  11. A Story-Based Simulation for Teaching Sampling Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen; Dabney, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference relies heavily on the concept of sampling distributions. However, sampling distributions are difficult to teach. We present a series of short animations that are story-based, with associated assessments. We hope that our contribution can be useful as a tool to teach sampling distributions in the introductory statistics…

  12. Distribution of cardiac sodium channels in clusters potentiates ephaptic interactions in the intercalated disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichri, Echrak; Abriel, Hugues; Kucera, Jan P

    2018-02-15

    It has been proposed that ephaptic conduction, relying on interactions between the sodium (Na + ) current and the extracellular potential in intercalated discs, might contribute to cardiac conduction when gap junctional coupling is reduced, but this mechanism is still controversial. In intercalated discs, Na + channels form clusters near gap junction plaques, but the functional significance of these clusters has never been evaluated. In HEK cells expressing cardiac Na + channels, we show that restricting the extracellular space modulates the Na + current, as predicted by corresponding simulations accounting for ephaptic effects. In a high-resolution model of the intercalated disc, clusters of Na + channels that face each other across the intercellular cleft facilitate ephaptic impulse transmission when gap junctional coupling is reduced. Thus, our simulations reveal a functional role for the clustering of Na + channels in intercalated discs, and suggest that rearrangement of these clusters in disease may influence cardiac conduction. It has been proposed that ephaptic interactions in intercalated discs, mediated by extracellular potentials, contribute to cardiac impulse propagation when gap junctional coupling is reduced. However, experiments demonstrating ephaptic effects on the cardiac Na + current (I Na ) are scarce. Furthermore, Na + channels form clusters around gap junction plaques, but the electrophysiological significance of these clusters has never been investigated. In patch clamp experiments with HEK cells stably expressing human Na v 1.5 channels, we examined how restricting the extracellular space modulates I Na elicited by an activation protocol. In parallel, we developed a high-resolution computer model of the intercalated disc to investigate how the distribution of Na + channels influences ephaptic interactions. Approaching the HEK cells to a non-conducting obstacle always increased peak I Na at step potentials near the threshold of I Na activation

  13. SIPSON--simulation of interaction between pipe flow and surface overland flow in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C; Ivetić, M; Savić, D

    2005-01-01

    The new simulation model, named SIPSON, based on the Preissmann finite difference method and the conjugate gradient method, is presented in the paper. This model simulates conditions when the hydraulic capacity of a sewer system is exceeded, pipe flow is pressurized, the water flows out from the piped system to the streets, and the inlets cannot capture all the runoff. In the mathematical model, buried structures and pipelines, together with surface channels, make a horizontally and vertically looped network involving a complex interaction of flows. In this paper, special internal boundary conditions related to equivalent inlets are discussed. Procedures are described for the simulation of manhole cover loss, basement flooding, the representation of street geometry, and the distribution of runoff hydrographs between surface and underground networks. All these procedures are built into the simulation model. Relevant issues are illustrated on a set of examples, focusing on specific parameters and comparison with field measurements of flooding of the Motilal ki Chal catchment (Indore, India). Satisfactory agreement of observed and simulated hydrographs and maximum surface flooding levels is obtained. It is concluded that the presented approach is an improvement compared to the standard "virtual reservoir" approach commonly applied in most of the models.

  14. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; hide

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  15. Interactive Room Support for Complex and Distributed Design Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Gundersen, Kristian Kroyer; Mogensen, Preben Holst

    2001-01-01

    We are investigating the design of digital 3D interaction technology embedded in a physical environment. We take as point of departure cemplex, collaborative industrial design projects involving heterogeneous sets of documents, and physical as well as digital 3D models. The paper introduces our...... interaction devices being experimented with in the interactive room environment. The interactive room technologies have all been designed with the requirement that they must seamlessly integrate both into the physical and into the digital work environment while providing new affordances for industrial design...

  16. Simulation of antiproton-nucleus interactions in the framework of the UrQMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galoyan, A.S.; Polanski, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes to apply the Ultra-Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) approach to implement the PANDA project (GSI, Germany). Simulation of p bar A interactions has been performed at antiproton energies from 1 to 200 GeV by using the UrQMD model. We have studied average multiplicities, multiplicity distributions of various types of secondary particles, correlations between the multiplicities, rapidity, and transverse momentum distributions of the particles. The UrQMD model predictions on inelastic p bar A collisions have been found to reproduce qualitatively the experimental data. However, to reach the quantitative agreement, especially, in fragmentation regions, it is needed to modify the UrQMD model

  17. Equilibrium magnetization and microstructure of the system of superparamagnetic interacting particles: numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pshenichnikov, A F

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to study the equilibrium magnetization of a 3D system of superparamagnetic particles taking into account the steric and dipole-dipole interparticle interactions. Two types of systems are considered: magnetic fluids and solidified ferrocolloids containing randomly spatially distributed particles with negligible energy of magnetic anisotropy. The results of numerical simulations confirm the universality of Langevin susceptibility as a main dimensionless parameter determining the influence of interparticle interactions on the magnetization of the system for moderate values of the aggregation parameter. The obtained results are in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. At large values of the aggregation parameter, the clustering of particles in magnetic fluids is observed resulting in a reduction of their magnetization as compared to solidified systems. It is shown that the magnetization of solidified systems can be well described by the modified effective field appr...

  18. Equilibrium magnetization and microstructure of the system of superparamagnetic interacting particles: numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, A.F.; Mekhonoshin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to study the equilibrium magnetization of a 3D system of superparamagnetic particles taking into account the steric and dipole-dipole interparticle interactions. Two types of systems are considered: magnetic fluids and solidified ferrocolloids containing randomly spatially distributed particles with negligible energy of magnetic anisotropy. The results of numerical simulations confirm the universality of Langevin susceptibility as a main dimensionless parameter determining the influence of interparticle interactions on the magnetization of the system for moderate values of the aggregation parameter. The obtained results are in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. At large values of the aggregation parameter, the clustering of particles in magnetic fluids is observed resulting in a reduction of their magnetization as compared to solidified systems. It is shown that the magnetization of solidified systems can be well described by the modified effective field approximation within the whole investigated range of parameters

  19. Simulation of the thermomechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.; Soba, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that simulates some of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel element of a nuclear power reactor throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modeled. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. The code assumes an axial symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses also a finite element scheme. Once the temperature distribution in the pellet and the cladding is obtained and in order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one representative grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  20. The Density Functional Theory of Flies: Predicting distributions of interacting active organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkhabwala, Yunus; Valderrama, Juan; Cohen, Itai; Arias, Tomas

    On October 2nd, 2016, 52 people were crushed in a stampede when a crowd panicked at a religious gathering in Ethiopia. The ability to predict the state of a crowd and whether it is susceptible to such transitions could help prevent such catastrophes. While current techniques such as agent based models can predict transitions in emergent behaviors of crowds, the assumptions used to describe the agents are often ad hoc and the simulations are computationally expensive making their application to real-time crowd prediction challenging. Here, we pursue an orthogonal approach and ask whether a reduced set of variables, such as the local densities, are sufficient to describe the state of a crowd. Inspired by the theoretical framework of Density Functional Theory, we have developed a system that uses only measurements of local densities to extract two independent crowd behavior functions: (1) preferences for locations and (2) interactions between individuals. With these two functions, we have accurately predicted how a model system of walking Drosophila melanogaster distributes itself in an arbitrary 2D environment. In addition, this density-based approach measures properties of the crowd from only observations of the crowd itself without any knowledge of the detailed interactions and thus it can make predictions about the resulting distributions of these flies in arbitrary environments, in real-time. This research was supported in part by ARO W911NF-16-1-0433.

  1. Trophallaxis-inspired model for distributed transport between randomly interacting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräwer, Johannes; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Mazza, Marco G.; Katifori, Eleni

    2017-08-01

    Trophallaxis, the regurgitation and mouth to mouth transfer of liquid food between members of eusocial insect societies, is an important process that allows the fast and efficient dissemination of food in the colony. Trophallactic systems are typically treated as a network of agent interactions. This approach, though valuable, does not easily lend itself to analytic predictions. In this work we consider a simple trophallactic system of randomly interacting agents with finite carrying capacity, and calculate analytically and via a series of simulations the global food intake rate for the whole colony as well as observables describing how uniformly the food is distributed within the nest. Our model and predictions provide a useful benchmark to assess to what level the observed food uptake rates and efficiency in food distribution is due to stochastic effects or specific trophallactic strategies by the ant colony. Our work also serves as a stepping stone to describing the collective properties of more complex trophallactic systems, such as those including division of labor between foragers and workers.

  2. Simulating SAL formation and aerosol size distribution during SAMUM-I

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-04-01

    To understand the formation mechanisms of Saharan Air Layer (SAL), we combine model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. We employed the Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF-Chem) to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The experimental domain covers northwest Africa including the southern Sahara, Morocco and part of the Atlantic Ocean with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground-based observations show that WRF-Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol spatial distribution across the entire region and along the airplane\\'s tracks. We evaluated several aerosol uplift processes and found that orographic lifting, aerosol transport through the land/sea interface with steep gradients of meteorological characteristics, and interaction of sea breezes with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface-detached aerosol plume over the ocean. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with airplane and ground-based observations are generally good, but suggest that more detailed treatment of microphysics in the model is required to capture the full-scale effect of large aerosol particles.

  3. Cloud Service for Interactive Simulation of Interregional Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Velichko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a mathematical model of trade flows between the territories of a region or a country in a transport network having one or more different types of marine or ground transportation. We use the approach of modeling complex communication systems to determine the most probable values of flows in case of incomplete information about the system. Transport costs between the territories are modeled within the framework of the gravity model. The payment for transportation depends on the distance between regions, the distance is estimated as the shortest way length in a given transport network or geographical distance. The mathematical formulation of the problem belongs to the class of convex mathematical programming problems and assumes the numerical solution of nonlinear optimization problem with linear constraints. Based on the model, the software is implemented as a cloud service on heterogeneous computing architectures: the simulation module is made on a highperformance server platform, management and visualization modules are produced with IACPaaS cloud platform. Communication between the platforms is established via asynchronous http-queries. For information exchange between the modules the declarative model with JSON format is developed and implemented for the objects considered in the mathematical model which are products, areas and communications. Visualization module allows to present graphically the original and the resulting matrix data and to modify the input parameters of the model interactively. The paper demonstrates the use of software for the simulation of inter-regional freight traffic of the Russian Far East region based on input data provided by open statistics sources.

  4. Multiagent-Based Simulation of Temporal-Spatial Characteristics of Activity-Travel Patterns Using Interactive Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a multiagent-based reinforcement learning algorithm, in which the interactions between travelers and the environment are considered to simulate temporal-spatial characteristics of activity-travel patterns in a city. Road congestion degree is added to the reinforcement learning algorithm as a medium that passes the influence of one traveler’s decision to others. Meanwhile, the agents used in the algorithm are initialized from typical activity patterns extracted from the travel survey diary data of Shangyu city in China. In the simulation, both macroscopic activity-travel characteristics such as traffic flow spatial-temporal distribution and microscopic characteristics such as activity-travel schedules of each agent are obtained. Comparing the simulation results with the survey data, we find that deviation of the peak-hour traffic flow is less than 5%, while the correlation of the simulated versus survey location choice distribution is over 0.9.

  5. Effects of non-adiabatic walls on shock/boundary-layer interaction using direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpiani, Pedro S.; Bernardini, Matteo; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    The influence of wall thermal conditions on the properties of an impinging shock wave interacting with a turbulent supersonic boundary layer is a research topic that still remains underexplored. In the present study, direct numerical simulations (DNS) are employed to investigate the flow properties of a shock wave interacting with a turbulent boundary layer at free-stream Mach number M∞ = 2.28 with distinct wall thermal conditions and shock strengths. Instantaneous and mean flow fields, wall quantities and the low-frequency unsteadiness are analyzed. While heating contributes to increase the extent of the interaction zone, wall cooling turns out to be a good candidate for flow control. The distribution of the Stanton number shows a good agreement with prior experimental studies and confirms the strong heat transfer and complex pattern within the interaction region. Numerical results indicate that the changes in the interaction length are mainly linked to the incoming boundary layer as suggested in previous studies (Souverein et al., 2013 and Jaunet et al., 2014). This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant FA95501610385.

  6. Distributed-Order Dynamic Systems Stability, Simulation, Applications and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Zhuang; Podlubny, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Distributed-order differential equations, a generalization of fractional calculus, are of increasing importance in many fields of science and engineering from the behaviour of complex dielectric media to the modelling of nonlinear systems. This Brief will broaden the toolbox available to researchers interested in modeling, analysis, control and filtering. It contains contextual material outlining the progression from integer-order, through fractional-order to distributed-order systems. Stability issues are addressed with graphical and numerical results highlighting the fundamental differences between constant-, integer-, and distributed-order treatments. The power of the distributed-order model is demonstrated with work on the stability of noncommensurate-order linear time-invariant systems. Generic applications of the distributed-order operator follow: signal processing and viscoelastic damping of a mass–spring set up. A new general approach to discretization of distributed-order derivatives and integrals ...

  7. Distributed force simulation for arbitrarily shaped IPMC actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M; Lumia, R

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation model that predicts the force output of arbitrarily shaped ionic polymer–metal composite (IPMC) actuators. Theoretical and experimental force measurements are compared for a triangular IPMC actuator with a tip length of 11 mm. The results show that the simulated tip force is within 80% of the experimentally determined value. Simulated electrical results for an artificial shark pectoral fin and a 7 mm × 17 mm actuator are also presented. In each case, the voltage is shown to decrease exponentially from the input point. The results of an ion migration simulation for a 180 μm cubic element of Nafion are presented for both a constant 2 V input and a 2 V 0.25 Hz sine signal. Finally, the simulated deformation of an IPMC shark fin is shown. (paper)

  8. Computerized method for X-ray angular distribution simulation in radiological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Marcio A.; Oliveira, Henrique J.Q. de; Frere, Annie F.; Schiabel, Homero; Marques, Paulo M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A method to simulate the changes in X-ray angular distribution (the Heel effect) for radiologic imaging systems is presented. This simulation method is described as to predict images for any exposure technique considering that the distribution is the cause of the intensity variation along the radiation field

  9. Comparing Simulated and Theoretical Sampling Distributions of the U3 Person-Fit Statistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emons, Wilco H. M.; Meijer, Rob R.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2002-01-01

    Studied whether the theoretical sampling distribution of the U3 person-fit statistic is in agreement with the simulated sampling distribution under different item response theory models and varying item and test characteristics. Simulation results suggest that the use of standard normal deviates for the standardized version of the U3 statistic may…

  10. Analysis of pellet cladding mechanical interaction using computational simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berretta, José R.; Suman, Ricardo B.; Faria, Danilo P.; Rodi, Paulo A., E-mail: jose.berretta@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Riscos

    2017-07-01

    During the operation of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), specifically under power transients, the fuel pellet experiences many phenomena, such as swelling and thermal expansion. These dimensional changes in the fuel pellet can enable occurrence of contact it and the cladding along the fuel rod. Thus, pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), due this contact, induces stress increase at the contact points during a period, until the accommodation of the cladding to the stress increases. This accommodation occurs by means of the cladding strain, which can produce failure, if the fuel rod deformation is permanent or the burst limit of the cladding is reached. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of the cladding during the occurrence of PCMI under power transients shall be investigated during the fuel rod design. Considering the Accident Tolerant Fuel program which aims to develop new materials to be used as cladding in PWR, one important design condition to be evaluated is the cladding behavior under PCMI. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of the PCMI on a typical PWR fuel rod geometry with stainless steel cladding under normal power transients using computational simulation (ANSYS code). The PCMI was analyzed considering four geometric situations at the region of interaction between pellet and cladding. The first case, called “perfect fuel model” was used as reference for comparison. In the second case, it was considered the occurrence of a pellet crack with the loss of a chip. The goal for the next two cases was that a pellet chip was positioned into the gap of pellet-cladding, in the situations described in the first two cases. (author)

  11. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  12. Delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae with late events resulting from binary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapartas, E.; de Mink, S. E.; Izzard, R. G.; Yoon, S.-C.; Badenes, C.; Götberg, Y.; de Koter, A.; Neijssel, C. J.; Renzo, M.; Schootemeijer, A.; Shrotriya, T. S.

    2017-05-01

    Most massive stars, the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, are in close binary systems and may interact with their companion through mass transfer or merging. We undertake a population synthesis study to compute the delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae, that is, the supernova rate versus time following a starburst, taking into account binary interactions. We test the systematic robustness of our results by running various simulations to account for the uncertainties in our standard assumptions. We find that a significant fraction, %, of core-collapse supernovae are "late", that is, they occur 50-200 Myr after birth, when all massive single stars have already exploded. These late events originate predominantly from binary systems with at least one, or, in most cases, with both stars initially being of intermediate mass (4-8 M⊙). The main evolutionary channels that contribute often involve either the merging of the initially more massive primary star with its companion or the engulfment of the remaining core of the primary by the expanding secondary that has accreted mass at an earlier evolutionary stage. Also, the total number of core-collapse supernovae increases by % because of binarity for the same initial stellar mass. The high rate implies that we should have already observed such late core-collapse supernovae, but have not recognized them as such. We argue that φ Persei is a likely progenitor and that eccentric neutron star - white dwarf systems are likely descendants. Late events can help explain the discrepancy in the delay-time distributions derived from supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds and extragalactic type Ia events, lowering the contribution of prompt Ia events. We discuss ways to test these predictions and speculate on the implications for supernova feedback in simulations of galaxy evolution.

  13. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 2. Time evolution of the distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Villalon, E.

    1995-11-01

    The evolution of the bounce-averaged ring current/radiation belt proton distribution is simulated during resonant interactions with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. The plasmaspheric hiss is assumed to be generated by ring current electrons and to be damped by the energetic protons. Thus energy is transferred between energetic electrons and protons using the plasmaspheric hiss as a mediary. The problem is not solved self-consistently. During the simulation period, interactions with ring current electrons (not represented in the model) are assumed to maintain the wave amplitudes in the presence of damping by the energetic protons, allowing the wave spectrum to be held fixed. Diffusion coefficients in pitch angle, cross pitch angle/energy, and energy were previously calculated by Kozyra et al. (1994) and are adopted for the present study. The simulation treats the energy range, E>=80 keV, within which the wave diffusion operates on a shorter timescale than other proton loss processes (i.e., Coulomb drag and charge exchange). These other loss processes are not included in the simulation. An interesting result of the simulation is that energy diffusion maximizes at moderate pitch angles near the edge of the atmospheric loss cone. Over the simulation period, diffusion in energy creates an order of magnitude enhancement in the bounce-averaged proton distribution function at moderate pitch angles. The loss cone is nearly empty because scattering of particles at small pitch angles is weak. The bounce-averaged flux distribution, mapped to ionospheric heights, results in elevated locally mirroring proton fluxes. OGO 5 observed order of magnitude enhancements in locally mirroring energetic protons at altitudes between 350 and 1300 km and invariant latitudes between 50° and 60° (Lundblad and Soraas, 1978). The proton distributions were highly anisotropic in pitch angle with nearly empty loss cones. The similarity between the observed distributions and those resulting from this

  14. From inter-specific behavioural interactions to species distribution patterns along gradients of habitat heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The strength of the behavioural processes associated with competitor coexistence may vary when different physical environments, and their biotic communities, come into contact, although empirical evidence of how interference varies across gradients of environmental complexity is still scarce in vertebrates. Here, I analyse how behavioural interactions and habitat selection regulate the local distribution of steppeland larks (Alaudidae) in a gradient from simple to heterogeneous agricultural landscapes in Spain, using crested lark Galerida cristata and Thekla lark G. theklae as study models. Galerida larks significantly partitioned by habitat but frequently co-occurred in heterogeneous environments. Irrespective of habitat divergence, however, the local densities of the two larks were negatively correlated, and the mechanisms beyond this pattern were investigated by means of playback experiments. When simulating the intrusion of the congener by broadcasting the species territorial calls, both larks responded with an aggressive response as intense with respect to warning and approach behaviour as when responding to the intrusion of a conspecific. However, birds promptly responded to playbacks only when congener territories were nearby, a phenomenon that points to learning as the mechanisms through which individuals finely tune their aggressive responses to the local competition levels. Heterospecifics occurred in closer proximity in diverse agro-ecosystems, possibly because of more abundant or diverse resources, and here engage in antagonistic interactions. The drop of species diversity associated with agricultural homogenisation is therefore likely to also bring about the disappearance of the behavioural repertoires associated with species interactions.

  15. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  16. KAPOOL experiments to simulate molten corium - sacrificial concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.

    2001-01-01

    In future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) might be required to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. In the planned European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) the core melt is retained in the reactor cavity for ∼ 1 h to pick up late melts after the failure of the reactor pressure vessel. The reactor cavity is protected by a layer of sacrificial concrete and closed by a melt gate at the bottom towards the spreading compartment. After erosion of the sacrificial concrete and melt-through of the gate the core melt should be distributed homogeneously into the spreading compartment. There the melt is cooled by flooding with water. The knowledge of the sacrificial concrete erosion phase in the reactor cavity is essential for the severe accident assessment. Several KAPOOL experiments have been performed to investigate the erosion of two possible compositions of sacrificial concretes using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant for the core melt. Erosion rates as a function of the melt temperature and the inhomogeneity of the melt front are presented in this paper. (authors)

  17. Distributed energy resources in grid interactive AC microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Guerrero, Josep; Chen, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    Increased penetration of distributed energy resources (DER) and large-scale deployment of renewable energy sources are challenging the entire architecture of traditional power system. Microgrid, featuring higher flexibility and reliability, becomes an attractive candidate for the configuration...

  18. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  19. DIGI-vis: Distributed interactive geospatial information visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Ponto, Kevin; Kuester, Falk

    2010-01-01

    data sets. We propose a distributed data gathering and visualization system that allows researchers to view these data at hundreds of megapixels simultaneously. This system allows scientists to view real-time geospatial information at unprecedented

  20. Numerical Simulation of Tower Rotor Interaction for Downwind Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Janajreh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Downwind wind turbines have lower upwind rotor misalignment, and thus lower turning moment and self-steered advantage over the upwind configuration. In this paper, numerical simulation to the downwind turbine is conducted to investigate the interaction between the tower and the blade during the intrinsic passage of the rotor in the wake of the tower. The moving rotor has been accounted for via ALE formulation of the incompressible, unsteady, turbulent Navier-Stokes equations. The localized CP, CL, and CD are computed and compared to undisturbed flow evaluated by Panel method. The time history of the CP, aerodynamic forces (CL and CD, as well as moments were evaluated for three cross-sectional tower; asymmetrical airfoil (NACA0012 having four times the rotor's chord length, and two circular cross-sections having four and two chords lengths of the rotor's chord. 5%, 17%, and 57% reductions of the aerodynamic lift forces during the blade passage in the wake of the symmetrical airfoil tower, small circular cross-section tower and large circular cross-section tower were observed, respectively. The pronounced reduction, however, is confined to a short time/distance of three rotor chords. A net forward impulsive force is also observed on the tower due to the high speed rotor motion.

  1. Implementation of interactive virtual simulation of physical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, H; Escobar, J J; Gonzalez, J D; Beltran, J

    2014-01-01

    Considering the limited availability of laboratories for physics teaching and the difficulties this causes in the learning of school students in Santa Marta Colombia, we have developed software in order to generate greater student interaction with the phenomena physical and improve their understanding. Thereby, this system has been proposed in an architecture Model/View- View- Model (MVVM), sharing the benefits of MVC. Basically, this pattern consists of 3 parts: The Model, that is responsible for business logic related. The View, which is the part with which we are most familiar and the user sees. Its role is to display data to the user and allowing manipulation of the data of the application. The ViewModel, which is the middle part of the Model and the View (analogous to the Controller in the MVC pattern), as well as being responsible for implementing the behavior of the view to respond to user actions and expose data model in a way that is easy to use links to data in the view. .NET Framework 4.0 and editing package Silverlight 4 and 5 are the main requirements needed for the deployment of physical simulations that are hosted in the web application and a web browser (Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox or Chrome). The implementation of this innovative application in educational institutions has shown that students improved their contextualization of physical phenomena

  2. The role of biotic interactions in shaping distributions and realised assemblages of species: implications for species distribution modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisz, Mary Susanne; Pottier, Julien; Kissling, W Daniel; Pellissier, Loïc; Lenoir, Jonathan; Damgaard, Christian F; Dormann, Carsten F; Forchhammer, Mads C; Grytnes, John-Arvid; Guisan, Antoine; Heikkinen, Risto K; Høye, Toke T; Kühn, Ingolf; Luoto, Miska; Maiorano, Luigi; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Normand, Signe; Öckinger, Erik; Schmidt, Niels M; Termansen, Mette; Timmermann, Allan; Wardle, David A; Aastrup, Peter; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-02-01

    Predicting which species will occur together in the future, and where, remains one of the greatest challenges in ecology, and requires a sound understanding of how the abiotic and biotic environments interact with dispersal processes and history across scales. Biotic interactions and their dynamics influence species' relationships to climate, and this also has important implications for predicting future distributions of species. It is already well accepted that biotic interactions shape species' spatial distributions at local spatial extents, but the role of these interactions beyond local extents (e.g. 10 km(2) to global extents) are usually dismissed as unimportant. In this review we consolidate evidence for how biotic interactions shape species distributions beyond local extents and review methods for integrating biotic interactions into species distribution modelling tools. Drawing upon evidence from contemporary and palaeoecological studies of individual species ranges, functional groups, and species richness patterns, we show that biotic interactions have clearly left their mark on species distributions and realised assemblages of species across all spatial extents. We demonstrate this with examples from within and across trophic groups. A range of species distribution modelling tools is available to quantify species environmental relationships and predict species occurrence, such as: (i) integrating pairwise dependencies, (ii) using integrative predictors, and (iii) hybridising species distribution models (SDMs) with dynamic models. These methods have typically only been applied to interacting pairs of species at a single time, require a priori ecological knowledge about which species interact, and due to data paucity must assume that biotic interactions are constant in space and time. To better inform the future development of these models across spatial scales, we call for accelerated collection of spatially and temporally explicit species data. Ideally

  3. Prediction of the filtrate particle size distribution from the pore size distribution in membrane filtration: Numerical correlations from computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo-Hernández, Norma Alejandra; Hernández-Guerrero, Maribel; Nápoles-Duarte, José Manuel; Palomares-Báez, Juan Pedro; Chávez-Rojo, Marco Antonio

    2018-03-01

    We present a computational model that describes the diffusion of a hard spheres colloidal fluid through a membrane. The membrane matrix is modeled as a series of flat parallel planes with circular pores of different sizes and random spatial distribution. This model was employed to determine how the size distribution of the colloidal filtrate depends on the size distributions of both, the particles in the feed and the pores of the membrane, as well as to describe the filtration kinetics. A Brownian dynamics simulation study considering normal distributions was developed in order to determine empirical correlations between the parameters that characterize these distributions. The model can also be extended to other distributions such as log-normal. This study could, therefore, facilitate the selection of membranes for industrial or scientific filtration processes once the size distribution of the feed is known and the expected characteristics in the filtrate have been defined.

  4. Some Technical Implications of Distributed Cognition on the Design on Interactive Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Maintains that diagnosis, explanation, and tutoring, the functions of an interactive learning environment, are collaborative processes. Examines how human-computer interaction can be improved using a distributed cognition framework. Discusses situational and distributed knowledge theories and provides a model on how they can be used to redesign…

  5. Interaction systems design and the protocol- and middleware-centred paradigms in distributed application development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade Almeida, João; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Quartel, Dick; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at demonstrating the benefits and importance of interaction systems design in the development of distributed applications. We position interaction systems design with respect to two paradigms that have influenced the design of distributed applications: the middleware-centred and the

  6. DiSC: A Simulation Framework for Distribution System Voltage Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus; Sloth, Christoffer Eg; Andresen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the MATLAB simulation framework, DiSC, for verifying voltage control approaches in power distribution systems. It consists of real consumption data, stochastic models of renewable resources, flexible assets, electrical grid, and models of the underlying communication channels....... The simulation framework makes it possible to validate control approaches, and thus advance realistic and robust control algorithms for distribution system voltage control. Two examples demonstrate the potential voltage issues from penetration of renewables in the distribution grid, along with simple control...

  7. Quantified, Interactive Simulation of AMCW ToF Camera Including Multipath Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bulczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, Time-of-Flight (ToF range cameras have gained increasing popularity in robotics, automotive industry, and home entertainment. Despite technological developments, ToF cameras still suffer from error sources such as multipath interference or motion artifacts. Thus, simulation of ToF cameras, including these artifacts, is important to improve camera and algorithm development. This paper presents a physically-based, interactive simulation technique for amplitude modulated continuous wave (AMCW ToF cameras, which, among other error sources, includes single bounce indirect multipath interference based on an enhanced image-space approach. The simulation accounts for physical units down to the charge level accumulated in sensor pixels. Furthermore, we present the first quantified comparison for ToF camera simulators. We present bidirectional reference distribution function (BRDF measurements for selected, purchasable materials in the near-infrared (NIR range, craft real and synthetic scenes out of these materials and quantitatively compare the range sensor data.

  8. Monte carlo simulation of penetration range distribution of ion beam with low energy implanted in plant seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xuchu; Hou Juan; Liu Xiaoyong

    2009-01-01

    The depth and density distribution of V + ion beam implanted into peanut seed is simulated by the Monte Carlo method. The action of ions implanted in plant seeds is studied by the classical collision theory of two objects, the electronic energy loss is calculated by Lindhard-Scharff formulation. The result indicates that the depth of 200keV V + implanted into peanut seed is 5.57μm, which agrees with experimental results, and the model is appropriate to describe this interaction. This paper provides a computational method for the depth and density distribution of ions with low energy implanted in plant seeds. (authors)

  9. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churmakov, D Y; Meglinski, I V; Piletsky, S A; Greenhalgh, D A

    2003-01-01

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an 'effective' depth

  10. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churmakov, D Y [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Meglinski, I V [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Piletsky, S A [Institute of BioScience and Technology, Cranfield University, Silsoe, MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D A [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an 'effective' depth.

  11. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Churmakov, D.; Meglinski, I. V.; Piletsky, S. A.; Greenhalgh, D. A.

    2003-07-01

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an `effective' depth.

  12. Hybrid Simulation of the Interaction of Europa's Atmosphere with the Jovian Plasma: Multiprocessor Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, V. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Cassidy, T. A.; Crary, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We model the interaction of Europa's tenuous atmosphere with the plasma of Jupiter's torus with an improved version of our hybrid plasma code. In a hybrid plasma code, the ions are treated as kinetic Macro-particles moving under the Lorentz force and the electrons as a fluid leading to a generalized formulation of Ohm's law. In this version, the spatial simulation domain is decomposed in 2 directions and is non-uniform in the plasma convection direction. The code is run on a multi-processor supercomputer that offers 16416 cores and 2GB Ram per core. This new version allows us to tap into the large memory of the supercomputer and simulate the full interaction volume (Reuropa=1561km) with a high spatial resolution (50km). Compared to Io, Europa's atmosphere is about 100 times more tenuous, the ambient magnetic field is weaker and the density of incident plasma is lower. Consequently, the electrodynamic interaction is also weaker and substantial fluxes of thermal torus ions might reach and sputter the icy surface. Molecular O2 is the dominant atmospheric product of this surface sputtering. Observations of oxygen UV emissions (specifically the ratio of OI 1356A / 1304A emissions) are roughly consistent with an atmosphere that is composed predominantely of O2 with a small amount of atomic O. Galileo observations along flybys close to Europa have revealed the existence of induced currents in a conducting ocean under the icy crust. They also showed that, from flyby to flyby, the plasma interaction is very variable. Asymmetries of the plasma density and temperature in the wake of Europa were also observed and still elude a clear explanation. Galileo mag data also detected ion cyclotron waves, which is an indication of heavy ion pickup close to the moon. We prescribe an O2 atmosphere with a vertical density column consistent with UV observations and model the plasma properties along several Galileo flybys of the moon. We compare our results with the magnetometer

  13. Controlling simulations of human-artifact interaction with scenario bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegte, W.F.; Rusák, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a methodology for modeling and simulating fully virtual human-artifact systems, aiming to resolve two issues in virtual prototyping: (i) integration of distinct modeling and simulation approaches, and (ii) extending the deployability of simulations towards conceptual design. We are

  14. Computer simulations and theoretical aspects of the depletion interaction in protein-oligomer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncina, M; Rescic, J; Kalyuzhnyi, Yu V; Vlachy, V

    2007-07-21

    The depletion interaction between proteins caused by addition of either uncharged or partially charged oligomers was studied using the canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique and the integral equation theory. A protein molecule was modeled in two different ways: either as (i) a hard sphere of diameter 30.0 A with net charge 0, or +5, or (ii) as a hard sphere with discrete charges (depending on the pH of solution) of diameter 45.4 A. The oligomers were pictured as tangentially jointed, uncharged, or partially charged, hard spheres. The ions of a simple electrolyte present in solution were represented by charged hard spheres distributed in the dielectric continuum. In this study we were particularly interested in changes of the protein-protein pair-distribution function, caused by addition of the oligomer component. In agreement with previous studies we found that addition of a nonadsorbing oligomer reduces the phase stability of solution, which is reflected in the shape of the protein-protein pair-distribution function. The value of this function in protein-protein contact increases with increasing oligomer concentration, and is larger for charged oligomers. The range of the depletion interaction and its strength also depend on the length (number of monomer units) of the oligomer chain. The integral equation theory, based on the Wertheim Ornstein-Zernike approach applied in this study, was found to be in fair agreement with Monte Carlo results only for very short oligomers. The computer simulations for a model mimicking the lysozyme molecule (ii) are in qualitative agreement with small-angle neutron experiments for lysozyme-dextran mixtures.

  15. Network Regulation and Support Schemes - How Policy Interactions Affect the Integration of Distributed Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropenus, Stephanie; Jacobsen, Henrik; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate the interactions between the policy dimensions of support schemes and network regulation and how they affect distributed generation. Firstly, the incentives of distributed generators and distribution system operators are examined. Frequently there exists a trade......-off between the incentives for these two market agents to facilitate the integration of distributed generation. Secondly, the interaction of these policy dimensions is analyzed, including case studies based on five EU Member States. Aspects of operational nature and investments in grid and distributed...

  16. Radiation interaction with substance and simulation of the nuclear geophysical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnyj, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Main processes of interaction of various types of nuclear radiation (NR) with substance, NR transport theory and physical- mathematical simulation of basic problems of nuclear geophysics (NG) are considered. General classification of NG methods according to the type of the detected radiation with a more detailed division according to the physical essence of the interaction process employed is given. Direct NG problems are related to the study of space- energy radiation distribution in substance under certain cross sections of elementary interaction processes, substance properties and specified geometric conditions. The theoretical solution of the direct problems is based on using mathematical models of radiation transport in specified media. The NG inverse problems consist in determining element composition and other medium properties by data of integral or spectral characteristics of NR fields measurements. The NR in the course of its transport in substance can experience dozens of elementary interaction processes, the predominance of this or that process depending on NR energy, medium properties and geometric measurement conditions. This explains a wide NG method diversity. The Monte Carlo method application in the NR transport theory and various methods of decreasing calculations labour input are considered [ru

  17. Simulation of thermal phenomena expected in fuel coolant interactions in LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasin, J.

    1976-12-01

    High pressures and mechanical work may result when thermal energy is transferred from molten fuel to the coolant in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor core meltdown accident. Two aspects of the interaction are examined in the thesis. First, the formation of high pressure pulses termed ''Vapor Explosions,'' and second, the distribution of the molten material into smaller particles, termed ''Fragmentation'', are studied. To understand the nature of the interaction simulant materials were used. Molten bismuth, molten tin and molten glass were dropped into water under various conditions. The interactions were recorded using multiflash and high speed photographing techniques. The pressure pulses were measured using transducers and the debris was examined by photographing them with an electron microscope. It was observed that vapor explosions have thresholds which depend on the material being dropped, its temperature and the bath conditions. The vapor explosions were enhanced by stratifying the bath. It was also noticed that the intensity of the vapor explosion depends on the way the molten drop fragmented in the initial stages of the interaction. The experiments with glass showed that the mode of fragmentation is important in determining when and if a vapor explosion is to be expected. The glass fragmented extensively but without any accompanying vapor explosion. The electron microscope photographs of the glass debris showed that thermal stress and surface tension phenomenon are apparently the cause of the fragmentation

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Guo-jian; Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi; Luo, Guang-nan

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Guo-jian, E-mail: niugj@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  20. Simulation study of proton inelastic interaction with nuclei in the 50 to 350 MeV range by Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, J.C.

    1982-11-01

    This study settles a contribution to the proton-nucleus inelastic interaction simulation. Experimental display of deuton, triton, ion 3 He and alpha clusters in nucleus led us to include them in intranuclear cascade. We use a FERMI type distribution of nucleons; knowledge of each fundamental phenomenon allowed us to follow every particle moving in the medium. Inelastic interaction simulation was performed by the use of a MONTE CARLO method [fr

  1. Study of electrons distribution produced by laser-plasma interaction on x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikzad, L.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In the present work, X-ray beams are generated from interaction of relativistic electron beams produced by interaction of 500 mJ, 30 femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses with thin solid targets such as lead, molybdenum and tungsten. After interaction of an intense pulsed laser with He gas-jet, a micron-scale laser produced plasma, creates and accelerates electron bunches, which propagate in the ion channel produced in the wake of the laser pulse. When an electron bunch is injected into the bubble in phase with its field, it will gain relativistic energies within very short distance. These accelerated electrons with Megaelectron-Volt energy and different distributions, can interact with targets to generate X-ray radiation with Kiloelectron-Volt energy, providing to be close enough to the gas-jet, where the relativistic accelerated electrons exist. Here, to determine the results, Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-4C code) is employed to present Bremsstrahlung and characteristic X-ray production by quasi-Maxwellian and quasi-monoenergetic electron beams for three samples with different thicknesses. The outcome shows that for one specific electron spectrum and one definite target, the energy which the maximum characteristic x-ray flux takes place, varies with thickness. Also, for each material the energy which this maximum happens is constant for all thicknesses, for both produced electron spectra. For each sample, x-ray flux is calculated for different thicknesses and the thickness which the maximum characteristic x-ray flux occurs is obtained. Besides, it is concluded that by increasing the atomic number of the target, maximum X-ray flux moves towards higher energy. Also, comparison of the results for three targets and two electron distributions shows that by using quasi-monoenergetic electron spectra, more intense and narrower characteristic X-ray can be produced compared to the quasi-Maxwellian electron distribution, almost for all

  2. Multi-scale interactions of geological processes during mineralization: cascade dynamics model and multifractal simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Relations between mineralization and certain geological processes are established mostly by geologist's knowledge of field observations. However, these relations are descriptive and a quantitative model of how certain geological processes strengthen or hinder mineralization is not clear, that is to say, the mechanism of the interactions between mineralization and the geological framework has not been thoroughly studied. The dynamics behind these interactions are key in the understanding of fractal or multifractal formations caused by mineralization, among which singularities arise due to anomalous concentration of metals in narrow space. From a statistical point of view, we think that cascade dynamics play an important role in mineralization and studying them can reveal the nature of the various interactions throughout the process. We have constructed a multiplicative cascade model to simulate these dynamics. The probabilities of mineral deposit occurrences are used to represent direct results of mineralization. Multifractal simulation of probabilities of mineral potential based on our model is exemplified by a case study dealing with hydrothermal gold deposits in southern Nova Scotia, Canada. The extent of the impacts of certain geological processes on gold mineralization is related to the scale of the cascade process, especially to the maximum cascade division number nmax. Our research helps to understand how the singularity occurs during mineralization, which remains unanswered up to now, and the simulation may provide a more accurate distribution of mineral deposit occurrences that can be used to improve the results of the weights of evidence model in mapping mineral potential.

  3. Investigation of Probability Distributions Using Dice Rolling Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Stanislav; Engel, Radovan

    2010-01-01

    Dice are considered one of the oldest gambling devices and thus many mathematicians have been interested in various dice gambling games in the past. Dice have been used to teach probability, and dice rolls can be effectively simulated using technology. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) recommends that teachers use simulations…

  4. Numerical simulations of the metallicity distribution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf

  5. Pedagogical Simulation of Sampling Distributions and the Central Limit Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagtvedt, Reidar; Jones, Gregory Todd; Jones, Kari

    2007-01-01

    Students often find the fact that a sample statistic is a random variable very hard to grasp. Even more mysterious is why a sample mean should become ever more Normal as the sample size increases. This simulation tool is meant to illustrate the process, thereby giving students some intuitive grasp of the relationship between a parent population…

  6. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  7. Mathematical simulation of gamma-radiation angle distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Egorov, V.V.; Fedorchenko, D.V.; Kochnev, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed mathematical model of the facility for gamma-radiation angle distribution measurement and calculated response functions for gamma-radiation intensities. We developed special software for experimental data processing, the 'Shelter' object radiation spectra unfolding and Sphere detector (ShD) angle resolution estimation. Neuronet method using for detection of the radiation directions is given. We developed software based on the neuronet algorithm, that allows obtaining reliable distribution of gamma-sources that make impact on the facility detectors at the measurement point. 10 refs.; 15 figs.; 4 tab

  8. DIGI-vis: Distributed interactive geospatial information visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Ponto, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Geospatial information systems provide an abundance of information for researchers and scientists. Unfortunately this type of data can usually only be analyzed a few megapixels at a time, giving researchers a very narrow view into these voluminous data sets. We propose a distributed data gathering and visualization system that allows researchers to view these data at hundreds of megapixels simultaneously. This system allows scientists to view real-time geospatial information at unprecedented levels expediting analysis, interrogation, and discovery. ©2010 IEEE.

  9. DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM FOR HUMAN MACHINE INTERACTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Obed Chan-Canche

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The communication networks built by multiple devices and sensors are becoming more frequent. These device networks allow human-machine interaction development which aims to improve the human performance generating an adaptive environment in response to the information provided by it. The problem of this work is the quick integration of a device network that allows the development of a flexible immersive environment for different uses.

  10. A parallel interaction potential approach coupled with the immersed boundary method for fully resolved simulations of deformable interfaces and membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandan, Vamsi; Meschini, Valentina; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Querzoli, Giorgio; de Tullio, Marco D.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we show and discuss how the deformation dynamics of closed liquid-liquid interfaces (for example drops and bubbles) can be replicated with use of a phenomenological interaction potential model. This new approach to simulate liquid-liquid interfaces is based on the fundamental principle of minimum potential energy where the total potential energy depends on the extent of deformation of a spring network distributed on the surface of the immersed drop or bubble. Simulating liquid-liquid interfaces using this model require computing ad-hoc elastic constants which is done through a reverse-engineered approach. The results from our simulations agree very well with previous studies on the deformation of drops in standard flow configurations such as a deforming drop in a shear flow or cross flow. The interaction potential model is highly versatile, computationally efficient and can be easily incorporated into generic single phase fluid solvers to also simulate complex fluid-structure interaction problems. This is shown by simulating flow in the left ventricle of the heart with mechanical and natural mitral valves where the imposed flow, motion of ventricle and valves dynamically govern the behaviour of each other. Results from these simulations are compared with ad-hoc in-house experimental measurements. Finally, we present a simple and easy to implement parallelisation scheme, as high performance computing is unavoidable when studying large scale problems involving several thousands of simultaneously deforming bodies in highly turbulent flows.

  11. Simulation model of load balancing in distributed computing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botygin, I. A.; Popov, V. N.; Frolov, S. G.

    2017-02-01

    The availability of high-performance computing, high speed data transfer over the network and widespread of software for the design and pre-production in mechanical engineering have led to the fact that at the present time the large industrial enterprises and small engineering companies implement complex computer systems for efficient solutions of production and management tasks. Such computer systems are generally built on the basis of distributed heterogeneous computer systems. The analytical problems solved by such systems are the key models of research, but the system-wide problems of efficient distribution (balancing) of the computational load and accommodation input, intermediate and output databases are no less important. The main tasks of this balancing system are load and condition monitoring of compute nodes, and the selection of a node for transition of the user’s request in accordance with a predetermined algorithm. The load balancing is one of the most used methods of increasing productivity of distributed computing systems through the optimal allocation of tasks between the computer system nodes. Therefore, the development of methods and algorithms for computing optimal scheduling in a distributed system, dynamically changing its infrastructure, is an important task.

  12. Building interactive virtual environments for simulated training in medicine using VRML and Java/JavaScript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korocsec, D; Holobar, A; Divjak, M; Zazula, D

    2005-12-01

    Medicine is a difficult thing to learn. Experimenting with real patients should not be the only option; simulation deserves a special attention here. Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) as a tool for building virtual objects and scenes has a good record of educational applications in medicine, especially for static and animated visualisations of body parts and organs. However, to create computer simulations resembling situations in real environments the required level of interactivity and dynamics is difficult to achieve. In the present paper we describe some approaches and techniques which we used to push the limits of the current VRML technology further toward dynamic 3D representation of virtual environments (VEs). Our demonstration is based on the implementation of a virtual baby model, whose vital signs can be controlled from an external Java application. The main contributions of this work are: (a) outline and evaluation of the three-level VRML/Java implementation of the dynamic virtual environment, (b) proposal for a modified VRML Timesensor node, which greatly improves the overall control of system performance, and (c) architecture of the prototype distributed virtual environment for training in neonatal resuscitation comprising the interactive virtual newborn, active bedside monitor for vital signs and full 3D representation of the surgery room.

  13. Simulations of bremsstrahlung emission in ultra-intense laser interactions with foil targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskočil, Jiří; Klimo, Ondřej; Weber, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Bremsstrahlung emission from interactions of short ultra-intense laser pulses with solid foils is studied using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A module for simulating bremsstrahlung has been implemented in the PIC loop to self-consistently account for the dynamics of the laser–plasma interaction, plasma expansion, and the emission of gamma ray photons. This module made it possible to study emission from thin targets, where refluxing of hot electrons plays an important role. It is shown that the angular distribution of the emitted photons exhibits a four-directional structure with the angle of emission decreasing with the increase of the width of the target. Additionally, a collimated forward flash consisting of high energy photons has been identified in thin targets. The conversion efficiency of the energy of the laser pulse to the energy of the gamma rays rises with both the driving pulse intensity, and the thickness of the target. The amount of gamma rays also increases with the atomic number of the target material, despite a lower absorption of the driving laser pulse. The angular spectrum of the emitted gamma rays is directly related to the increase of hot electron divergence during their refluxing and its measurement can be used in experiments to study this process.

  14. Using interactive model simulations in co-design : An experiment in urban design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.G.D.; Arendsen, J.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Vries, A. de; Jong, J.M.G. de; Koning, N.M. de

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experiment in which people performed a co-design task in urban design, using a multi-user touch table application with or without interactive model simulations. We hypothesised that using the interactive model simulations would improve communication and co-operation between

  15. Modeling the Electrostatics of Hollow Shell Suspensions: Ion Distribution, Pair Interactions, and Many-Body Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Yannick; Meireles, Martine

    2016-10-11

    Electrostatic interactions play a key role in hollow shell suspensions as they determine their structure, stability, thermodynamics, and rheology and also the loading capacity of small charged species for nanoreservoir applications. In this work, fast, reliable modeling strategies aimed at predicting the electrostatics of hollow shells for one, two, and many colloids are proposed and validated. The electrostatic potential inside and outside a hollow shell with a finite thickness and a specific permittivity is determined analytically in the Debye-Hückel (DH) limit. An expression for the interaction potential between two such hollow shells is then derived and validated numerically. It follows a classical Yukawa form with an effective charge depending on the shell geometry, permittivity, and inner and outer surface charge densities. The predictions of the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation with this pair potential to determine equations of state are then evaluated by comparison to results obtained with a Brownian dynamics algorithm coupled to the resolution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann and Laplace equations (PB-BD simulations). The OZ equation based on the DLVO-like potential performs very well in the dilute regime as expected, but also quite well, and more surprisingly, in the concentrated regime in which full spheres exhibit significant many-body effects. These effects are shown to vanish for shells with small thickness and high permittivity. For highly charged hollow shells, we propose and validate a charge renormalization procedure. Finally, using PB-BD simulations, we show that the cell model predicts the ion distribution inside and outside hollow shells accurately in both electrostatically dilute and concentrated suspensions. We then determine the shell loading capacity as a function of salt concentration, volume fraction, and surface charge density for nanoreservoir applications such as drug delivery, sensing, or smart coatings.

  16. Aggregated Representation of Distribution Networks for Large-Scale Transmission Network Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Ömer; Altin, Müfit; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2014-01-01

    As a common practice of large-scale transmission network analysis the distribution networks have been represented as aggregated loads. However, with increasing share of distributed generation, especially wind and solar power, in the distribution networks, it became necessary to include...... the distributed generation within those analysis. In this paper a practical methodology to obtain aggregated behaviour of the distributed generation is proposed. The methodology, which is based on the use of the IEC standard wind turbine models, is applied on a benchmark distribution network via simulations....

  17. Interactive verification of Markov chains: Two distributed protocol case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Hölzl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic model checkers like PRISM only check probabilistic systems of a fixed size. To guarantee the desired properties for an arbitrary size, mathematical analysis is necessary. We show for two case studies how this can be done in the interactive proof assistant Isabelle/HOL. The first case study is a detailed description of how we verified properties of the ZeroConf protocol, a decentral address allocation protocol. The second case study shows the more involved verification of anonymity properties of the Crowds protocol, an anonymizing protocol.

  18. Distribution of fluorescein sodium and triamcinolone acetonide in the simulated liquefied and vitrectomized Vitreous Model with simulated eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Sandra; Bogdahn, Malte; Rosenbaum, Christoph; Weitschies, Werner; Seidlitz, Anne

    2017-11-15

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice for drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye with special emphasis on the vitreous body and its surrounding retinal vasculature. In order to gain a better understanding of the underlying distribution processes, an in vitro model simulating the vitreous body (Vitreous Model, VM) and a system simulating the impact of movement on the VM (Eye Movement System, EyeMoS) was previously developed. In the study reported here, these systems were modified in regard to a standardized injection procedure, the diversity of simulated eye movements, extended periods of investigation, the opportunity to simulate the state after vitrectomy and in considering the physiological temperature. Fluorescein sodium (FS) and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) were used as (model) drugs to examine the drug distribution within the VM. Vitrectomy was simulated by replacing half the volume of the polyacrylamide gel that was used as vitreous substitute with the clinically used Siluron® 5000 whereas for a simulated liquefaction half the volume of the gel was replaced by buffer. A simulated liquefaction caused a 12-fold faster distribution of FS compared to the simulated juvenile VM, which was most likely caused by convective forces and mass transfer. Also, the injection technique (injection into the gel or into the buffer compartment) influenced the resulting distribution pattern. Without any liquefaction, the previously described initial injection channel occurred with both (model) drugs and, in the case of TA, remained almost unchanged during the investigation period of 72h. Simulating vitrectomized eyes, TA did not spread uniformly, but either remained in the depot or strongly sedimented within the VM suggesting that a homogenous distribution of a TA suspension is highly unlikely in vitrectomized eyes. High variabilities were observed with ex vivo animal eyes, demonstrating the limited benefit of explanted tissues for such distribution

  19. A simulation model for methane emissions from landfills with interaction of vegetation and cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Rongxing; Xin, Danhui; Chai, Xiaoli

    2018-01-01

    Global climate change and ecological problems brought about by greenhouse gas effect have become a severe threat to humanity in the 21st century. Vegetation plays an important role in methane (CH 4 ) transport, oxidation and emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills as it modifies the physical and chemical properties of the cover soil, and transports CH 4 to the atmosphere directly via their conduits, which are mainly aerenchymatous structures. In this study, a novel 2-D simulation CH 4 emission model was established, based on an interactive mechanism of cover soil and vegetation, to model CH 4 transport, oxidation and emissions in landfill cover soil. Results of the simulation model showed that the distribution of CH 4 concentration and emission fluxes displayed a significant difference between vegetated and non-vegetated areas. CH 4 emission flux was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than bare areas in simulation conditions. Vegetation play a negative role in CH 4 emissions from landfill cover soil due to the strong CH 4 transport capacity even though vegetation also promotes CH 4 oxidation via changing properties of cover soil and emitting O 2 via root system. The model will be proposed to allow decision makers to reconsider the actual CH 4 emission from vegetated and non-vegetated covered landfills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Compact X-ray sources. Simulating the electron/strong laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartin, Anthony [DESY, CFEL, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The collision of an intense laser with an electron bunch can be used to produce X-rays via the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) mechanism. The ICS can be simulated via either a classical theory in which electrons and photons are treated in terms of classical electromagnetic waves - or a quantum theory in which charged particles interact with strong electromagnetic fields. The laser intensity used in a practical ICS collision is likely to be at such a level that quantum effects may be significant and the use of quantum theory may become a necessity. A simulation study is presented here comparing the classical and quantum approaches to the ICS. A custom particle-in-cell (PIC) software code, with photon generation by monte carlo of the exact quantum transition probability is used to simulate the quantum treatment. Peak resonant energies and the angular distribution of the X-rays are obtained and compared with those predicted by the classical theory. The conditions under which significant differences between the two theories emerges is obtained.

  1. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia; Soba, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel rod throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, gas mixing, swelling, and densification are modeled. The modular structure of the code allows for the incorporation of models to simulate different phenomena and material properties. Collapsible rods can be also simulated. The code is bidimensional, assumes cylindrical symmetry for the rod and uses the finite element method to integrate the differential equations. The stress-strain and heat conduction problems are nonlinear due to plasticity and to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The fission gas inventory is calculated with a diffusion model, assuming spherical grains and using a one-dimensional finite element scheme. Pressure increase, swelling and densification are coupled with the stress field. Good results are obtained for the simulation of the irradiation tests of the first argentine prototypes of MOX fuels, where the bamboo effect is clearly observed, and of the FUMEX series for the fuel centerline temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release.

  2. Implementing electric vehicles in urban distribution: A discrete event simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lebeau, Philippe; Macharis, Cathy; Mierlo, Joeri Van; Maes, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Urban freight transport becomes increasingly important with the development of cities. However, it generates also inefficiencies on social, economic and environmental aspects. A possible solution is the use of urban distribution centres in order to rationalise the deliveries and to operate the last miles with clean vehicles. Electric vehicles are gaining attention lately but some barriers remain. Since costs barriers were already investigated, the paper aimed at evaluating the difference of p...

  3. On modelling the interaction between two rotating bodies with statistically distributed features: an application to dressing of grinding wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, A.; Axinte, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    The mechanisms of interaction between bodies with statistically arranged features present characteristics common to different abrasive processes, such as dressing of abrasive tools. In contrast with the current empirical approach used to estimate the results of operations based on attritive interactions, the method we present in this paper allows us to predict the output forces and the topography of a simulated grinding wheel for a set of specific operational parameters (speed ratio and radial feed-rate), providing a thorough understanding of the complex mechanisms regulating these processes. In modelling the dressing mechanisms, the abrasive characteristics of both bodies (grain size, geometry, inter-space and protrusion) are first simulated; thus, their interaction is simulated in terms of grain collisions. Exploiting a specifically designed contact/impact evaluation algorithm, the model simulates the collisional effects of the dresser abrasives on the grinding wheel topography (grain fracture/break-out). The method has been tested for the case of a diamond rotary dresser, predicting output forces within less than 10% error and obtaining experimentally validated grinding wheel topographies. The study provides a fundamental understanding of the dressing operation, enabling the improvement of its performance in an industrial scenario, while being of general interest in modelling collision-based processes involving statistically distributed elements.

  4. Simulation of Robot Kinematics Using Interactive Computer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, M. C.; Mahajan, R.

    1984-01-01

    Development of a robot simulation program based on geometric transformation softwares available in most computer graphics systems and program features are described. The program can be extended to simulate robots coordinating with external devices (such as tools, fixtures, conveyors) using geometric transformations to describe the…

  5. Analyzing Interaction Patterns to Verify a Simulation/Game Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rodney Dean

    2012-01-01

    In order for simulations and games to be effective for learning, instructional designers must verify that the underlying computational models being used have an appropriate degree of fidelity to the conceptual models of their real-world counterparts. A simulation/game that provides incorrect feedback is likely to promote misunderstanding and…

  6. Simulation Architecture for Modelling Interaction Between User and Elbow-articulated Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, B.J. de; Schmidhauser, E.; Stadler, K.S.; O'Sullivan, L.W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our work is to improve the existing user-exoskeleton models by introducing a simulation architecture that can simulate its dynamic interaction, thereby altering the initial motion of the user. A simulation architecture is developed that uses the musculoskeletal models from OpenSim, and

  7. An Interactive Teaching System for Bond Graph Modeling and Simulation in Bioengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monica; Popescu, Dorin; Selisteanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to implement a teaching system useful in modeling and simulation of biotechnological processes. The interactive system is based on applications developed using 20-sim modeling and simulation software environment. A procedure for the simulation of bioprocesses modeled by bond graphs is proposed and simulators…

  8. Effects of model resolution and parameterizations on the simulations of clouds, precipitation, and their interactions with aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Yuwei; Yoo, Hyelim; Kim, Seungbum; Kim, Byung-Gon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Mok, Jungbin; Um, Junshik; Ock Choi, Kyoung; Dong, Danhong

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the roles played by model resolution and microphysics parameterizations in the well-known uncertainties or errors in simulations of clouds, precipitation, and their interactions with aerosols by the numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. For this investigation, we used cloud-system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations as benchmark simulations that adopt high-resolution and full-fledged microphysical processes. These simulations were evaluated against observations, and this evaluation demonstrated that the CSRM simulations can function as benchmark simulations. Comparisons between the CSRM simulations and the simulations at the coarse resolutions that are generally adopted by current NWP models indicate that the use of coarse resolutions as in the NWP models can lower not only updrafts and other cloud variables (e.g., cloud mass, condensation, deposition, and evaporation) but also their sensitivity to increasing aerosol concentration. The parameterization of the saturation process plays an important role in the sensitivity of cloud variables to aerosol concentrations. while the parameterization of the sedimentation process has a substantial impact on how cloud variables are distributed vertically. The variation in cloud variables with resolution is much greater than what happens with varying microphysics parameterizations, which suggests that the uncertainties in the NWP simulations are associated with resolution much more than microphysics parameterizations.

  9. Simulation of temperature distribution in tumor Photothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiyang; Qiu, Shaoping; Wu, Shulian; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The light transmission in biological tissue and the optical properties of biological tissue are important research contents of biomedical photonics. It is of great theoretical and practical significance in medical diagnosis and light therapy of disease. In this paper, the temperature feedback-controller was presented for monitoring photothermal treatment in realtime. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) and diffuse approximation were compared and analyzed. The results demonstrated that diffuse approximation using extrapolated boundary conditions by finite element method is a good approximation to MC simulation. Then in order to minimize thermal damage, real-time temperature monitoring was appraised by proportional-integral-differential (PID) controller in the process of photothermal treatment.

  10. Advanced distributed simulation technology: Digital Voice Gateway Reference Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhook, Dan; Stadler, Ed

    1994-01-01

    The Digital Voice Gateway (referred to as the 'DVG' in this document) transmits and receives four full duplex encoded speech channels over the Ethernet. The information in this document applies only to DVG's running firmware of the version listed on the title page. This document, previously named Digital Voice Gateway Reference Guide, BBN Systems and Technologies Corporation, Cambridge, MA 02138, was revised for revision 2.00. This new revision changes the network protocol used by the DVG, to comply with the SINCGARS radio simulation (For SIMNET 6.6.1). Because of the extensive changes to revision 2.00 a separate document was created rather than supplying change pages.

  11. Simulation of snow distribution and melt under cloudy conditions in an Alpine watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-Y. Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An energy balance method and remote-sensing data were used to simulate snow distribution and melt in an alpine watershed in northwestern China within a complete snow accumulation-melt period. The spatial energy budgets were simulated using meteorological observations and a digital elevation model of the watershed. A linear interpolation method was used to estimate the daily snow cover area under cloudy conditions, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Hourly snow distribution and melt, snow cover extent and daily discharge were included in the simulated results. The root mean square error between the measured snow-water equivalent samplings and the simulated results is 3.2 cm. The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency statistic (NSE between the measured and simulated discharges is 0.673, and the volume difference (Dv is 3.9 %. Using the method introduced in this article, modelling spatial snow distribution and melt runoff will become relatively convenient.

  12. Integrating international relations and environmental science course concepts through an interactive world politics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, K. H.; Kesgin, B.

    2012-12-01

    During the fall 2012 semester, students in two introductory courses at Susquehanna University - EENV:101 Environmental Science and POLI:131 World Affairs - will participate together in an online international relations simulation called Statecraft (www.statecraftsim.com). In this strategy game, students are divided into teams representing independent countries, and choose their government type (democracy, constitutional monarchy, communist totalitarian, or military dictatorship) and two country attributes (industrial, green, militaristic, pacifist, or scientific), which determine a set of rules by which that country must abide. Countries interact over issues such as resource distribution, war, pollution, immigration, and global climate change, and must also keep domestic political unrest to a minimum in order to succeed in the game. This simulation has typically been run in political science courses, as the goal is to allow students to experience the balancing act necessary to maintain control of global and domestic issues in a dynamic, diverse world. This semester, environmental science students will be integrated into the simulation, both as environmental advisers to each country and as independent actors representing groups such as Greenpeace, ExxonMobil, and UNEP. The goal in integrating the two courses in the simulation is for the students in each course to gain both 1) content knowledge of certain fundamental material in the other course, and 2) a more thorough, applied understanding of the integrated nature of the two subjects. Students will gain an appreciation for the multiple tradeoffs that decision-makers must face in the real world (economy, resources, pollution, health, defense, etc.). Environmental science students will link these concepts to the traditional course material through a "systems thinking" approach to sustainability. Political science students will face the challenges of global climate change and gain an understanding of the nature of

  13. Effects of species biological traits and environmental heterogeneity on simulated tree species distribution shifts under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen J; He, Hong S; Thompson, Frank R; Spetich, Martin A; Fraser, Jacob S

    2018-09-01

    Demographic processes (fecundity, dispersal, colonization, growth, and mortality) and their interactions with environmental changes are not well represented in current climate-distribution models (e.g., niche and biophysical process models) and constitute a large uncertainty in projections of future tree species distribution shifts. We investigate how species biological traits and environmental heterogeneity affect species distribution shifts. We used a species-specific, spatially explicit forest dynamic model LANDIS PRO, which incorporates site-scale tree species demography and competition, landscape-scale dispersal and disturbances, and regional-scale abiotic controls, to simulate the distribution shifts of four representative tree species with distinct biological traits in the central hardwood forest region of United States. Our results suggested that biological traits (e.g., dispersal capacity, maturation age) were important for determining tree species distribution shifts. Environmental heterogeneity, on average, reduced shift rates by 8% compared to perfect environmental conditions. The average distribution shift rates ranged from 24 to 200myear -1 under climate change scenarios, implying that many tree species may not able to keep up with climate change because of limited dispersal capacity, long generation time, and environmental heterogeneity. We suggest that climate-distribution models should include species demographic processes (e.g., fecundity, dispersal, colonization), biological traits (e.g., dispersal capacity, maturation age), and environmental heterogeneity (e.g., habitat fragmentation) to improve future predictions of species distribution shifts in response to changing climates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of Distributed Simulation Platform for Power Systems and Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Rui; Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    The study of wind power system strongly relies on simulations in all kinds of methods. In industry, the feasibility and efficiency of wind power projects also will be verified by simulations at first. However, taking time cost and economy into consideration, simulations in large scales often...... sacrifice model details or computing precision in order to gain acceptable results in higher simulating speed and lower hardware costs. To balance the contradiction of costs and performance, in this paper, a novel distributed simulation platform based on PC network and Matlab is proposed. Compared...

  15. Effective interactions in lysozyme aqueous solutions: a small-angle neutron scattering and computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, M C; Caccamo, C; Costa, D; Pellicane, G; Ruberto, R; Wanderlingh, U

    2012-01-21

    We report protein-protein structure factors of aqueous lysozyme solutions at different pH and ionic strengths, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering experiments. The observed upturn of the structure factor at small wavevectors, as the pH increases, marks a crossover between two different regimes, one dominated by repulsive forces, and another one where attractive interactions become prominent, with the ensuing development of enhanced density fluctuations. In order to rationalize such experimental outcome from a microscopic viewpoint, we have carried out extensive simulations of different coarse-grained models. We have first studied a model in which macromolecules are described as soft spheres interacting through an attractive r(-6) potential, plus embedded pH-dependent discrete charges; we show that the uprise undergone by the structure factor is qualitatively predicted. We have then studied a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model, in which only central interactions are advocated; we demonstrate that this model leads to a protein-rich/protein-poor coexistence curve that agrees quite well with the experimental counterpart; experimental correlations are instead reproduced only at low pH and ionic strengths. We have finally investigated a third, "mixed" model in which the central attractive term of the DLVO potential is imported within the distributed-charge approach; it turns out that the different balance of interactions, with a much shorter-range attractive contribution, leads in this latter case to an improved agreement with the experimental crossover. We discuss the relationship between experimental correlations, phase coexistence, and features of effective interactions, as well as possible paths toward a quantitative prediction of structural properties of real lysozyme solutions. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  16. Energy distribution system operator in interaction with social actors : Three cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuisen, B.M.; Veeneman, W.W.; Van Doorn, L.; Van Breen, H.

    2012-01-01

    A publicly owned Dutch energy distribution system operator (DSO) interacts during local infrastructure projects with its direct stakeholders to maximize utility in the public interest. These projects are about replacing, relocating, removing or reconstructing parts of the gas and electricity

  17. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation

  18. Cognitive load in distributed and massed practice in virtual reality mastoidectomy simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    -integrated tutoring on CL in virtual reality (VR) mastoidectomy simulation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective trial. METHODS: Forty novice medical students performed 12 repeated virtual mastoidectomy procedures in the Visible Ear Simulator: 21 completed distributed practice with practice blocks spaced in time and 19...

  19. Supporting hypothesis generation by learners exploring an interactive computer simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Joolingen, Wouter R.; de Jong, Ton

    1992-01-01

    Computer simulations provide environments enabling exploratory learning. Research has shown that these types of learning environments are promising applications of computer assisted learning but also that they introduce complex learning settings, involving a large number of learning processes. This

  20. Statics and Dynamics of Selfish Interactions in Distributed Service Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Altarelli

    Full Text Available We study a class of games which models the competition among agents to access some service provided by distributed service units and which exhibits congestion and frustration phenomena when service units have limited capacity. We propose a technique, based on the cavity method of statistical physics, to characterize the full spectrum of Nash equilibria of the game. The analysis reveals a large variety of equilibria, with very different statistical properties. Natural selfish dynamics, such as best-response, usually tend to large-utility equilibria, even though those of smaller utility are exponentially more numerous. Interestingly, the latter actually can be reached by selecting the initial conditions of the best-response dynamics close to the saturation limit of the service unit capacities. We also study a more realistic stochastic variant of the game by means of a simple and effective approximation of the average over the random parameters, showing that the properties of the average-case Nash equilibria are qualitatively similar to the deterministic ones.

  1. Computational Aspects of Sensor Network Protocols (Distributed Sensor Network Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanth Iyer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we model the sensor networks as an unsupervised learning and clustering process. We classify nodes according to its static distribution to form known class densities (CCPD. These densities are chosen from specific cross-layer features which maximizes lifetime of power-aware routing algorithms. To circumvent computational complexities of a power-ware communication STACK we introduce path-loss models at the nodes only for high density deployments. We study the cluster heads and formulate the data handling capacity for an expected deployment and use localized probability models to fuse the data with its side information before transmission. So each cluster head has a unique Pmax but not all cluster heads have the same measured value. In a lossless mode if there are no faults in the sensor network then we can show that the highest probability given by Pmax is ambiguous if its frequency is ≤ n/2 otherwise it can be determined by a local function. We further show that the event detection at the cluster heads can be modelled with a pattern 2m and m, the number of bits can be a correlated pattern of 2 bits and for a tight lower bound we use 3-bit Huffman codes which have entropy < 1. These local algorithms are further studied to optimize on power, fault detection and to maximize on the distributed routing algorithm used at the higher layers. From these bounds in large network, it is observed that the power dissipation is network size invariant. The performance of the routing algorithms solely based on success of finding healthy nodes in a large distribution. It is also observed that if the network size is kept constant and the density of the nodes is kept closer then the local pathloss model effects the performance of the routing algorithms. We also obtain the maximum intensity of transmitting nodes for a given category of routing algorithms for an outage constraint, i.e., the lifetime of sensor network.

  2. Simulation of equilibrium distribution data in a solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, S.; Giriyalkar, A.B.; Singh, A.K.; Singh, D.K.; Hubli, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    In hydrometallurgy, solvent extraction has been proved to be the purification method to recover metal in high-pure form from impure solution. Any solvent extraction process is complex and based on some operating parameters which always lure the scientists to model them. Operating parameters like aqueous to organic volume ratio and concentration of feed are related to required number of stages for a product with specific recovery. So to determine final feed concentration or aqueous to organic volume ratio for a specific extractant concentration, one needs to carry out a number of extraction experiments tediously supported by analysis. Here an attempt is being made to model the distribution of solute between organic and aqueous phases with minimum analytical and experimental support for any system. The model can predict the effect on solvent extraction for a change in the aqueous to organic volume ratio i.e. slope of operating line, percentage loading of solvent, feed concentration, solvent concentration, number of stages and in the process it can help in optimizing conditions for the best result from a solvent extraction system. Uranium-7% TBP in dodecane system was taken up to validate the model. The predicted values of the model was tallied against uranium distribution between aqueous and organic phases in a running mixer settler. The equation for operating line i.e. straight line is derived from O/A=1.5 and considering barren organic contains 2 ppm uranium: y 1 = 0.667x 0 - .002. The extraction isotherm i.e. parabola equation came as : x 1 = 0.003y 0 2 + 0.723y 0 considering three points i.e. (0,0), (13,16.7) (uranium analysis for first stage of mixer-settler) and (25, 30.69) (feed concentration, loading capacity of solvent). Using these two equations the results that were obtained, predicted the solute distribution across different stages exactly as it is in the running mixer settler. Individual isotherms could also be drawn with the predicted results from the

  3. Simulation model of multi-compartment distribution in the catering supply chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.R.; Weert, van A.; Beulens, A.J.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient distribution system of high performance is needed to anticipate market developments in the catering supply chain (CSC) in the Netherlands. A simulation model was developed to analyse a multi-compartment distribution system which should satisfy customer demands for shorter lead times,

  4. Comparing simulated and theoretical sampling distributions of the U3 person-fit statistic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, W.H.M.; Meijer, R.R.; Sijtsma, K.

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy with which the theoretical sampling distribution of van der Flier's person-.t statistic U3 approaches the empirical U3 sampling distribution is affected by the item discrimination. A simulation study showed that for tests with a moderate or a strong mean item discrimination, the Type I

  5. Comparing simulated and theoretical sampling distributions of the U3 person-fit statistic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, Wilco H.M.; Meijer, R.R.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy with which the theoretical sampling distribution of van der Flier’s person-fit statistic U3 approaches the empirical U3 sampling distribution is affected by the item discrimination. A simulation study showed that for tests with a moderate or a strong mean item discrimination, the Type I

  6. Simulation of the measure of the microparticle size distribution in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lameiras, F.S.; Silva Neto, P.P. da

    1987-01-01

    For the nuclear ceramic industry, the determination of the porous size distribution is very important to predict the dimensional thermal stability of uranium dioxide sintered pellets. The determination of the grain size distribution is still very important to predict the operation behavior of these pellets, as well as to control the fabrication process. The Saltykov method is commonly used to determine the microparticles size distribution. A simulation for two-dimensions, using this method and the size distribution of cords to calculate the area distribution [pt

  7. An interactive graphic simulator for garona nuclear power plant: development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcuera, P.; Garces, M.; Melara, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Lopez, J.V.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of a R and D project jointly undertaken by Nuclenor S.A. and the University of Cantabria, since the beginning of 1995 Santa Maria de Garona NPP holds its own plant transient and accident simulator for the training of its operators on Emergency Procedures Guides (EPG's). This paper describes the process followed in its development and the derived projects. This interactive graphic simulator is based on the MAAP computer code with an interface developed with DataViews software for X-Window terminals running under UNIX on a Hewlet Packard series 9000/712 workstation. The themarhydraulical code MAAP, with modifications to include all the controls and systems of the plant was chosen due to its capability to simulate primary system, containment and reactor building behavior during transients and accidents of any kind, including those beyond the design basis and also severe accidents. Besides, this code is currently being used for the PSA of the plant. The current configuration consists of several monitors that displays the systems and components situation and the safety parameters through the SPDS (Safety Parameter Display System) displays. With this design the simulator has fulfilled its initial main purpose of training operators on abnormal and emergency procedure guides, revealing as a very efficient and cost effective tool to accomplish this task. Furthermore it has been improved to visualize the real time plant data through the simulator displays. It is also possible to distribute the simulated data to any computer connected to the local area network (LAN). This feature has been applied successfully in the last emergency drills. Other benefits are derived from the fact that the same code is used for training and for the PSA. As an example of its flexibility, the simulator is now being used to validate the new SPDS displays designed to improve the man-machine interface and then it will serve to train the operators on them before their installation at the

  8. Simulation of load-sharing in standalone distributed generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajewole, Titus O.; Craven, Robert P. M.; Kayode, Olakunle; Babalola, Olufisayo S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a study on load-sharing among the component generating units of a multi-source electric microgrid that is operated as an autonomous ac supply-mode system. Emerging trend in power system development permits deployment of microgrids for standalone or stand-by applications, thereby requiring active- and reactive power sharing among the discrete generating units contained in hybrid-source microgrids. In this study, therefore, a laboratory-scale model of a microgrid energized with three renewable energy-based sources is employed as a simulation platform to investigate power sharing among the power-generating units. Each source is represented by a source emulator that captures the real operational characteristics of the mimicked generating unit and, with implementation of real-life weather data and load profiles on the model; the sharing of the load among the generating units is investigated. There is a proportionate generation of power by the three source emulators, with their frequencies perfectly synchronized at the point of common coupling as a result of balance flow of power among them. This hybrid topology of renewable energy-based microgrid could therefore be seamlessly adapted into national energy mix by the indigenous electric utility providers in Nigeria.

  9. The distribution of hillslope-channel interactions in a rangeland watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie M. Reid

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of erosion and deposition in a basin--and thus of the major controls on basin evolution--is dependent upon the local balance between sediment transport and sediment supply. This balance, in turn, reflects the nature, strength, and distribution of interactions between hillslope and channel processes.

  10. An Experimental Approach to Simulations of the CLIC Interaction Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esberg, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    with respect to the luminosity weighted depolarization is discussed. In the chapter on muons, the implementation of the production of incoherent muons in GUINEA-PIG++ will be discussed. Comments on the correctness and completeness of the implementation of muon production will be presented. The chapter...... experiments conducted at MAMI will be presented. Furthermore the chapter discusses the performance of new CMOS based detectors to be used in future experiments by the NA63 collaboration. The chapter on collider simulations introduces the beam-beam simulation codes GUINEA-PIG and GUINEA-PIG++, their methods...... of operation and their features. The characteristics of the simulated particles are presented and a comparison between the outputs of these codes with those from CAIN. \\item In the chapter on tridents, the implementation of the direct trident process in GUINEA-PIG++ is described. The results are compared...

  11. Simulated Galactic methanol maser distribution to constrain Milky Way parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga-Nuñez, L. H.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Reid, M. J.; Green, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Using trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of masers associated with massive young stars, the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy (BeSSeL) survey has reported the most accurate values of the Galactic parameters so far. The determination of these parameters with high accuracy has a widespread impact on Galactic and extragalactic measurements. Aims: This research is aimed at establishing the confidence with which such parameters can be determined. This is relevant for the data published in the context of the BeSSeL survey collaboration, but also for future observations, in particular from the southern hemisphere. In addition, some astrophysical properties of the masers can be constrained, notably the luminosity function. Methods: We have simulated the population of maser-bearing young stars associated with Galactic spiral structure, generating several samples and comparing them with the observed samples used in the BeSSeL survey. Consequently, we checked the determination of Galactic parameters for observational biases introduced by the sample selection. Results: Galactic parameters obtained by the BeSSeL survey do not seem to be biased by the sample selection used. In fact, the published error estimates appear to be conservative for most of the parameters. We show that future BeSSeL data and future observations with southern arrays will improve the Galactic parameters estimates and smoothly reduce their mutual correlation. Moreover, by modeling future parallax data with larger distance values and, thus, greater relative uncertainties for a larger numbers of sources, we found that parallax-distance biasing is an important issue. Hence, using fractional parallax uncertainty in the weighting of the motion data is imperative. Finally, the luminosity function for 6.7 GHz methanol masers was determined, allowing us to estimate the number of Galactic methanol masers.

  12. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS IN THE PHYSICS LABORATORY ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Physics teachers should have professional competences, aimed at the use of online technologies associated with physical experiments. Lack of teaching materials for teachers in Ukrainian language leads to the use of virtual laboratories and computer simulations by traditional methods of education, not by the latest innovative modern educational technology, which may limit their use and greatly reduce their effectiveness. Ukrainian teaching literature has practically no information about the assessment of competencies, research skills of students for the laboratory activities. The aim of the article is to describe some components of instructional design for the Web site with simulations in school physical experiments and their evaluation.

  13. Simulation by the method of inverse cumulative distribution function applied in optimising of foundry plant production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szymszal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses application of computer simulation based on the method of inverse cumulative distribution function. The simulationrefers to an elementary static case, which can also be solved by physical experiment, consisting mainly in observations of foundryproduction in a selected foundry plant. For the simulation and forecasting of foundry production quality in selected cast iron grade, arandom number generator of Excel calculation sheet was chosen. Very wide potentials of this type of simulation when applied to theevaluation of foundry production quality were demonstrated, using a number generator of even distribution for generation of a variable ofan arbitrary distribution, especially of a preset empirical distribution, without any need of adjusting to this variable the smooth theoreticaldistributions.

  14. Simulation of semi-artificial interaction events of cosmic radiation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation of artifitial A-jets was performed, using the data of observed C-jets, aiming to study the atmospheric interactions. A comparative study on artifitial A-jets with observed A-jets, considering initially, only one interaction and then, introducing the possibility of successive interactions, is presented. A process denominated ''descascatizacao'' for one interaction stage is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Real gas flow simulation in damaged distribution pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostowski, Wojciech J.; Skorek, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses chosen issues concerning damaged gas pipelines. Attention is paid to modelling the steady-state flow of natural gas in distribution pipelines, and the most commonly applied models of isothermal and adiabatic flow are evaluated for both the ideal and the real gas properties. A method of accounting for a leakage by means of a reference flow equation with a discharge coefficient is presented, and the dependency of the discharge coefficient on pressure is demonstrated both with literature data and the authors' experimental results. A relevant computational study of a pipeline failure is presented for a high- and a medium pressure pipeline. The importance of an appropriate choice of the flow model (isothermal or adiabatic flow of real or ideal gas) is demonstrated by the results of the study. It is shown that accounting for the variability of the discharge coefficient is required if medium pressure pipelines are analysed. However, it is eventually shown that the impact of the discharge coefficient on the predicted outflow rate is of lesser importance than that of the applied flow model. -- Highlights: ► Comparison of real/ideal gas, isothermal/adiabatic gas flow in a damaged pipeline. ► Variability of the discharge coefficient with pressure is demonstrated. ► Isothermal model predicts wrong values of downstream pressure, not just temperature. ► Isothermal model may cause significant error (for 2 case studies is >20%). ► Error in the discharge coefficient has a weak influence on the predicted flow rate.

  16. Towards an Information Model of Consistency Maintenance in Distributed Interactive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel framework to model and explore predictive contract mechanisms in distributed interactive applications (DIAs using information theory is proposed. In our model, the entity state update scheme is modelled as an information generation, encoding, and reconstruction process. Such a perspective facilitates a quantitative measurement of state fidelity loss as a result of the distribution protocol. Results from an experimental study on a first-person shooter game are used to illustrate the utility of this measurement process. We contend that our proposed model is a starting point to reframe and analyse consistency maintenance in DIAs as a problem in distributed interactive media compression.

  17. Distribution of ionospheric currents induced by the solar wind interaction with Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniell, R.E. Jr.; Cloutier, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The electric currents induced in the atmosphere of a non-magnetic planet such as Venus by the interaction of the solar wind satisfy a generalized Ohm's Law relationship with tensor conductivity. The distribution of these currents within the planetary ionosphere may be calculated by a variational technique which minimizes the Joule heating over the ionospheric volume. In this paper, we present the development of the variational technique, and apply it to a model of the solar wind interaction with Venus. Potential and current distributions are shown, and the use of these distributions in determining convective transport patterns of planetary ions is discussed. (author)

  18. Distribution of occupation numbers in finite Fermi systems and role of interaction in chaos and thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V.V.; Izrailev, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    A method is developed for calculation of single-particle occupation numbers in finite Fermi systems of interacting particles. It is more accurate than the canonical distribution method and gives the Fermi-Dirac distribution in the limit of large number of particles. It is shown that statistical effects of the interaction are absorbed by an increase of the effective temperature. Criteria for quantum chaos and statistical equilibrium are considered. All results are confirmed by numerical experiments in the two-body random interaction model. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Progress of laser-plasma interaction simulations with the particle-in-cell code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Hitoshi; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Taguchi, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    As the laser-plasma interaction is a non-equilibrium, non-linear and relativistic phenomenon, we must introduce a microscopic method, namely, the relativistic electromagnetic PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation code. The PIC code requires a huge number of particles to validate simulation results, and its task is very computation-intensive. Thus simulation researches by the PIC code have been progressing along with advances in computer technology. Recently, parallel computers with tremendous computational power have become available, and thus we can perform three-dimensional PIC simulations for the laser-plasma interaction to investigate laser fusion. Some simulation results are shown with figures. We discuss a recent trend of large-scale PIC simulations that enable direct comparison between experimental facts and computational results. We also discharge/lightning simulations by the extended PIC code, which include various atomic and relaxation processes. (author)

  20. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Vasenin, S.G.; Wurz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.)

  1. Good experiences with interactive temporal bone surgical simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven A W; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier; Noe, Karsten Ostergaard

    2014-01-01

    time. In a multilingual user interface the integrated tutor function provides stepwise instructions during drilling through an intuitive, volumetric approach. A censor function draws on metrics derived from the simulator to provide instant and summary feedback for the user. The VES can be downloaded...

  2. Simulating market dynamics : Interactions between consumer psychology and social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A; Jager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. in a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation

  3. Interactive X-ray and proton therapy training and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix G; Farrar, Shane; Leon, Erik

    2015-10-01

    External beam X-ray therapy (XRT) and proton therapy (PT) are effective and widely accepted forms of treatment for many types of cancer. However, the procedures require extensive computerized planning. Current planning systems for both XRT and PT have insufficient visual aid to combine real patient data with the treatment device geometry to account for unforeseen collisions among system components and the patient. The 3D surface representation (S-rep) is a widely used scheme to create 3D models of physical objects. 3D S-reps have been successfully used in CAD/CAM and, in conjunction with texture mapping, in the modern gaming industry to customize avatars and improve the gaming realism and sense of presence. We are proposing a cost-effective method to extract patient-specific S-reps in real time and combine them with the treatment system geometry to provide a comprehensive simulation of the XRT/PT treatment room. The X3D standard is used to implement and deploy the simulator on the web, enabling its use not only for remote specialists' collaboration, simulation, and training, but also for patient education. An objective assessment of the accuracy of the S-reps obtained proves the potential of the simulator for clinical use.

  4. PhET Interactive Simulations: Transformative Tools for Teaching Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Emily B.; Chamberlain, Julia M.; Parson, Robert; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Developing fluency across symbolic-, macroscopic-, and particulate-level representations is central to learning chemistry. Within the chemistry education community, animations and simulations that support multi-representational fluency are considered critical. With advances in the accessibility and sophistication of technology,…

  5. Simulation of interaction between wind farm and power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Janosi, L.

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic model of the wind farm Hagesholm has been implemented in the dedicated power system simulation program DIgSILENT. The wind farm con- sists of six 2MW NM2000/72 wind turbines from NEG-Micon. The model has been verified using simultaneous powerquality measurements on the 10 kV terminals...

  6. Reliability Assessment of Active Distribution System Using Monte Carlo Simulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyun Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have treated the reliability assessment problem of low and high DG penetration level of active distribution system using the Monte Carlo simulation method. The problem is formulated as a two-case program, the program of low penetration simulation and the program of high penetration simulation. The load shedding strategy and the simulation process were introduced in detail during each FMEA process. Results indicate that the integration of DG can improve the reliability of the system if the system was operated actively.

  7. Influence of World and Gravity Model Selection on Surface Interacting Vehicle Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    A vehicle simulation is surface-interacting if the state of the vehicle (position, velocity, and acceleration) relative to the surface is important. Surface-interacting simulations perform ascent, entry, descent, landing, surface travel, or atmospheric flight. Modeling of gravity is an influential environmental factor for surface-interacting simulations. Gravity is the free-fall acceleration observed from a world-fixed frame that rotates with the world. Thus, gravity is the sum of gravitation and the centrifugal acceleration due to the world s rotation. In surface-interacting simulations, the fidelity of gravity at heights above the surface is more significant than gravity fidelity at locations in inertial space. A surface-interacting simulation cannot treat the gravity model separately from the world model, which simulates the motion and shape of the world. The world model's simulation of the world's rotation, or lack thereof, produces the centrifugal acceleration component of gravity. The world model s reproduction of the world's shape will produce different positions relative to the world center for a given height above the surface. These differences produce variations in the gravitation component of gravity. This paper examines the actual performance of world and gravity/gravitation pairs in a simulation using the Earth.

  8. Compressible simulation of rotor-stator interaction in pump-turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, J; Koutnik, J; Seidel, U; Huebner, B

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the influence of water compressibility on pressure pulsations induced by rotor-stator interaction (RSI) in hydraulic machinery, using the commercial CFD solver ANSYS-CFX. A pipe flow example with harmonic velocity excitation at the inlet plane is simulated using different grid densities and time step sizes. Results are compared with a validated code for hydraulic networks (SIMSEN). Subsequently, the solution procedure is applied to a simplified 2.5-dimensional pump-turbine configuration in model scale with an adapted speed of sound. Pressure fluctuations are compared with numerical and experimental data based on prototype scale. The good agreement indicates that the scaling of acoustic effects with an adapted speed of sound works well. Finally, the procedure is applied to a 3-dimensional pump configuration in model scale. Pressure fluctuations are compared with results from prototype measurements. Compared to incompressible computations, compressible simulations provide similar pressure fluctuations in vaneless space, but pressure fluctuations in spiral case and penstock may be much higher. With respect to pressure fluctuation amplitudes along the centerline of runner channels, incompressible solutions exhibit a linear decrease while compressible solutions exhibit sinusoidal distributions with maximum values at half the channel length, coinciding with analytical solutions of one-dimensional acoustics.

  9. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  10. Full immersion simulation: validation of a distributed simulation environment for technical and non-technical skills training in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, James; Tang, Jessica; Dasgupta, Prokar; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Kamran; Bello, Fernando; Kneebone, Roger; Jaye, Peter

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the face, content and construct validity of the distributed simulation (DS) environment for technical and non-technical skills training in endourology. To evaluate the educational impact of DS for urology training. DS offers a portable, low-cost simulated operating room environment that can be set up in any open space. A prospective mixed methods design using established validation methodology was conducted in this simulated environment with 10 experienced and 10 trainee urologists. All participants performed a simulated prostate resection in the DS environment. Outcome measures included surveys to evaluate the DS, as well as comparative analyses of experienced and trainee urologist's performance using real-time and 'blinded' video analysis and validated performance metrics. Non-parametric statistical methods were used to compare differences between groups. The DS environment demonstrated face, content and construct validity for both non-technical and technical skills. Kirkpatrick level 1 evidence for the educational impact of the DS environment was shown. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of simulated operating room training on real operating room performance. This study has shown the validity of the DS environment for non-technical, as well as technical skills training. DS-based simulation appears to be a valuable addition to traditional classroom-based simulation training. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Beg, F. N., E-mail: fbeg@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  12. Influence of distributed delays on the dynamics of a generalized immune system cancerous cells interactions model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, M. J.; Bodnar, M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a generalisation of the mathematical models describing the interactions between the immune system and tumour cells which takes into account distributed time delays. For the analytical study we do not assume any particular form of the stimulus function describing the immune system reaction to presence of tumour cells but we only postulate its general properties. We analyse basic mathematical properties of the considered model such as existence and uniqueness of the solutions. Next, we discuss the existence of the stationary solutions and analytically investigate their stability depending on the forms of considered probability densities that is: Erlang, triangular and uniform probability densities separated or not from zero. Particular instability results are obtained for a general type of probability densities. Our results are compared with those for the model with discrete delays know from the literature. In addition, for each considered type of probability density, the model is fitted to the experimental data for the mice B-cell lymphoma showing mean square errors at the same comparable level. For estimated sets of parameters we discuss possibility of stabilisation of the tumour dormant steady state. Instability of this steady state results in uncontrolled tumour growth. In order to perform numerical simulation, following the idea of linear chain trick, we derive numerical procedures that allow us to solve systems with considered probability densities using standard algorithm for ordinary differential equations or differential equations with discrete delays.

  13. Observation and simulation of space-charge effects in a radio-frequency photoinjector using a transverse multibeamlet distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rihaoui

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental study of space-charge effects in a radio-frequency (rf photoinjector. A 5 MeV electron bunch, consisting of a number of beamlets separated transversely, was generated in an rf photocathode gun and propagated in the succeeding drift space. The collective interaction of these beamlets was studied for different experimental conditions. The experiment allowed the exploration of space-charge effects and its comparison with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Our observations also suggest the possible use of a multibeam configuration to tailor the transverse distribution of an electron beam.

  14. Computational simulation of electron and ion beams interaction with solid high-molecular dielectrics and inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyavskiy, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical investigation of interaction of electron beams (with the energy within the limits 100 keV--20 MeV) and ion beams (with the energy over the range 1 keV--50 MeV) with solid high-molecular dielectrics and inorganic glasses is performed. Note that the problem of interaction of electron beams with glass optical covers is especially interesting in connection with the problem of radiation protection of solar power elements on cosmic satellites and stations. For computational simulation of the above-mentioned processes a mathematical model was developed, describing the propagation of particle beams through the sample thickness, the accumulation and relaxation of volume charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. The calculation of energy deposition by electron beam in a target in the presence of nonuniform electric field was calculated with the assistance of the semiempirical procedure, formerly proposed by author of this work. Propagation of the low energy ions through the sample thickness was simulated using Pearson IV distribution. Damage distribution, ionization distribution and range distribution was taken into account. Propagation of high energy ions was calculated in the approximation of continuous deceleration. For description of hydrodynamic processes the system of equations of continuum mechanics in elastic-plastic approximation and the wide-range equation of state were used

  15. Simulation and optimization of logistics distribution for an engine production line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, L.; Jin, S.; Tang, P.

    2016-07-01

    In order to analyze and study the factors about Logistics distribution system, solve the problems of out of stock on the production line and improve the efficiency of the assembly line. Using the method of industrial engineering, put forward the optimization scheme of distribution system. The simulation model of logistics distribution system for engine assembly line was build based on Witness software. The optimization plan is efficient to improve Logistics distribution efficiency, production of assembly line efficiency and reduce the storage of production line. Based on the study of the modeling and simulation of engine production logistics distribution system, the result reflects some influence factors about production logistics system, which has reference value to improving the efficiency of the production line. (Author)

  16. A simulation study on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chin-cheng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Lee, Chung-chi; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the tissue heterogeneity on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate both depth and radial profiles of the radiation dose in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms, respectively. The results are compared with the dose distribution calculated using the mathematical model of Gamma Plan, the treatment planning system of the gamma knife. The skull and sinus heterogeneity were simulated by a Teflon shell and an air shell, respectively. It was found that the tissue heterogeneity caused significant perturbation on the absolute depth dose at the focus as well as on the depth-dose distribution near the phantom surface and/or at the interface but little effect on the radial dose distribution. The effect of the beam aperture on the depth-dose distribution was also investigated in this study. (author)

  17. Simulation and optimization of logistics distribution for an engine production line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to analyze and study the factors about Logistics distribution system, solve the problems of out of stock on the production line and improve the efficiency of the assembly line. Design/methodology/approach: Using the method of industrial engineering, put forward the optimization scheme of distribution system. The simulation model of logistics distribution system for engine assembly line was build based on Witness software. Findings: The optimization plan is efficient to improve Logistics distribution efficiency, production of assembly line efficiency and reduce the storage of production line Originality/value: Based on the study of the modeling and simulation of engine production logistics distribution system, the result reflects some influence factors about production logistics system, which has reference value to improving the efficiency of the production line.

  18. A variational constitutive model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-07-29

    The evolution of defects or voids, generally recognized as the basic failure mechanism in most metals and alloys, has been intensively studied. Most investigations have been limited to spatially periodic cases with non-random distributions of the radii of the voids. In this study, we use a new form of the incompressibility of the matrix to propose the formula for the volumetric plastic energy of a void inside a porous medium. As a consequence, we are able to account for the weakening effect of the surrounding voids and to propose a general model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids. We found that the single parameter in classical Gurson-type models, namely void volume fraction is not sufficient for the model. The relative growth rates of voids of different sizes, which can in principle be obtained through physical or numerical experiments, are required. To demonstrate the feasibility of the model, we analyze two cases. The first case represents exactly the same assumption hidden in the classical Gurson\\'s model, while the second embodies the competitive mechanism due to void size differences despite in a much simpler manner than the general case. Coalescence is implemented by allowing an accelerated void growth after an empirical critical porosity in a way that is the same as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model. The constitutive model presented here is validated through good agreements with experimental data. Its capacity for reproducing realistic failure patterns is shown by simulating a tensile test on a notched round bar. © 2013 The Author(s).

  19. Towards a simulation of disordered systems with interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, Angus

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of Anderson localization in disordered systems with interactions. We present a numerical approach in quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) systems which combines aspects of the transfer matrix and Green's function recursion methods with the density matrix renormalization group. The method is applied to spinless fermions in 1D and a generalization to finite cross-sections is outlined

  20. Numerical simulation of SMART-1 Hall-thruster plasma interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tajmar, Martin; Sedmik, René; Scharlemann, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    SMART-1 has been the first European mission using a Hall thruster to reach the moon. An onboard plasma diagnostic package allowed a detailed characterization of the thruster exhaust plasma and its interactions with the spacecraft. Analysis of in-flight data revealed, amongst others, an unpredicted

  1. Humans, computers and wizards human (simulated) computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Norman; McGlashan, Scott; Wooffitt, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Using data taken from a major European Union funded project on speech understanding, the SunDial project, this book considers current perspectives on human computer interaction and argues for the value of an approach taken from sociology which is based on conversation analysis.

  2. Molecular simulations of lipid-mediated protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meyer, F.J.M.; Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental results revealed that lipid-mediated interactions due to hydrophobic forces may be important in determining the protein topology after insertion in the membrane, in regulating the protein activity, in protein aggregation and in signal transduction. To gain insight into the

  3. Internet of Things: a possible change in the distributed modeling and simulation architecture paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Mark; Lessmann, Kurt; Schillero, David

    2016-05-01

    The Data Distribution Service (DDS) was started by the Object Management Group (OMG) in 2004. Currently, DDS is one of the contenders to support the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Industrial IOT (IIoT). DDS has also been used as a distributed simulation architecture. Given the anticipated proliferation of IoT and II devices, along with the explosive growth of sensor technology, can we expect this to have an impact on the broader community of distributed simulation? If it does, what is the impact and which distributed simulation domains will be most affected? DDS shares many of the same goals and characteristics of distributed simulation such as the need to support scale and an emphasis on Quality of Service (QoS) that can be tailored to meet the end user's needs. In addition, DDS has some built-in features such as security that are not present in traditional distributed simulation protocols. If the IoT and II realize their potential application, we predict a large base of technology to be built around this distributed data paradigm, much of which could be directly beneficial to the distributed M&S community. In this paper we compare some of the perceived gaps and shortfalls of current distributed M&S technology to the emerging capabilities of DDS built around the IoT. Although some trial work has been conducted in this area, we propose a more focused examination of the potential of these new technologies and their applicability to current and future problems in distributed M&S. The Internet of Things (IoT) and its data communications mechanisms such as the Data Distribution System (DDS) share properties in common with distributed modeling and simulation (M&S) and its protocols such as the High Level Architecture (HLA) and the Test and Training Enabling Architecture (TENA). This paper proposes a framework based on the sensor use case for how the two communities of practice (CoP) can benefit from one another and achieve greater capability in practical distributed

  4. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Soba, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel element throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modelized. The code assumes an axi-symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. Due to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity, the heat conduction problem is non-linear. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. Plasticity renders the stress-strain problem non linear. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses a finite element scheme. In order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  5. Numerical simulation of the gas-liquid interaction of a liquid jet in supersonic crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peibo; Wang, Zhenguo; Sun, Mingbo; Wang, Hongbo

    2017-05-01

    The gas-liquid interaction process of a liquid jet in supersonic crossflow with a Mach number of 1.94 was investigated numerically using the Eulerian-Lagrangian method. The KH (Kelvin-Helmholtz) breakup model was used to calculate the droplet stripping process, and the secondary breakup process was simulated by the competition of RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) breakup model and TAB (Taylor Analogy Breakup) model. A correction of drag coefficient was proposed by considering the compressible effects and the deformation of droplets. The location and velocity models of child droplets after breakup were improved according to droplet deformation. It was found that the calculated spray features, including spray penetration, droplet size distribution and droplet velocity profile agree reasonably well with the experiment. Numerical results revealed that the streamlines of air flow could intersect with the trajectory of droplets and are deflected towards the near-wall region after they enter into spray zone around the central plane. The analysis of gas-liquid relative velocity and droplet deformation suggested that the breakup of droplets mainly occurs around the front region of the spray where gathered a large number of droplets with different sizes. The liquid trailing phenomenon of jet spray which has been discovered by the previous experiment was successfully captured, and a reasonable explanation was given based on the analysis of gas-liquid interaction process.

  6. Fluid distribution network and steam generators and method for nuclear power plant training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alliston, W.H.; Johnson, S.J.; Mutafelija, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a training simulator for the real-time dynamic operation of a nuclear power plant which utilizes apparatus that includes control consoles having manual and automatic devices corresponding to simulated plant components and indicating devices for monitoring physical values in the simulated plant. A digital computer configuration is connected to the control consoles to calculate the dynamic real-time simulated operation of the plant in accordance with the simulated plant components to provide output data including data for operating the control console indicating devices. In the method and system for simulating a fluid distribution network of the power plant, such as that which includes, for example, a main steam system which distributes steam from steam generators to high pressure turbine steam reheaters, steam dump valves, and feedwater heaters, the simultaneous solution of linearized non-linear algebraic equations is used to calculate all the flows throughout the simulated system. A plurality of parallel connected steam generators that supply steam to the system are simulated individually, and include the simulation of shrink-swell characteristics

  7. Simulating the interaction of galaxies and the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carin, Robert A.

    2008-11-01

    The co-evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium as a function of environment is studied using hydrodynamic simulations of the ΛCDM cosmogony. It is demonstrated with non-radiative calculations that, in the absence of non-gravitational mechanisms, dark matter haloes accrete a near-universal fraction (˜ 0.9Ω_{b}/&Omega_;{m}) of baryons. The absence of a mass or redshift dependence of this fraction augurs well for parameter tests that use X-ray clusters as cosmological probes. Moreover, this result indicates that non-gravitational processes must efficiently regulate the formation of stars in dark matter haloes if the halo mass function is to be reconciled with the observed galaxy luminosity function. Simulations featuring stellar evolution and non-gravitational feedback mechanisms (photo-heating by the ultraviolet background, and thermal and kinetic supernovae feedback) are used to follow the evolution of star formation, and the thermo- and chemo-dynamical evolution of baryons. The observed star formation history of the Universe is reproduced, except at low redshift where it is overestimated by a factor of a few, possibly indicating the need for feedback from active galactic nuclei to quench cooling flows around massive galaxies. The simulations more accurately reproduce the observed abundance of galaxies with late-type morphologies than has been reported elsewhere. The unique initial conditions of these simulations, based on the Millennium Simulation, allow an unprecedented study of the role of large-scale environment to be conducted. The cosmic star formation rate density is found to vary by an order of magnitude across the extremes of environment expected in the local Universe. The mass fraction of baryons in the observationally elusive warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), and the volume filling factor that this gas occupies, is also shown to vary by a factor of a few across such environments. This variation is attributed to differences in the halo

  8. The effect of distributed virtual reality simulation training on cognitive load during subsequent dissection training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2018-05-07

    Complex tasks such as surgical procedures can induce excessive cognitive load (CL), which can have a negative effect on learning, especially for novices. To investigate if repeated and distributed virtual reality (VR) simulation practice induces a lower CL and higher performance in subsequent cadaveric dissection training. In a prospective, controlled cohort study, 37 residents in otorhinolaryngology received VR simulation training either as additional distributed practice prior to course participation (intervention) (9 participants) or as standard practice during the course (control) (28 participants). Cognitive load was estimated as the relative change in secondary-task reaction time during VR simulation and cadaveric procedures. Structured distributed VR simulation practice resulted in lower mean reaction times (32% vs. 47% for the intervention and control group, respectively, p training. Repeated and distributed VR simulation causes a lower CL to be induced when the learning situation is increased in complexity. A suggested mechanism is the formation of mental schemas and reduction of the intrinsic CL. This has potential implications for surgical skills training and suggests that structured, distributed training be systematically implemented in surgical training curricula.

  9. Simulation of product distribution at PT Anugrah Citra Boga by using capacitated vehicle routing problem method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamdjaya, T.; Jobiliong, E.

    2017-01-01

    PT Anugrah Citra Boga is a food processing industry that produces meatballs as their main product. The distribution system of the products must be considered, because it needs to be more efficient in order to reduce the shipment cost. The purpose of this research is to optimize the distribution time by simulating the distribution channels with capacitated vehicle routing problem method. Firstly, the distribution route is observed in order to calculate the average speed, time capacity and shipping costs. Then build the model using AIMMS software. A few things that are required to simulate the model are customer locations, distances, and the process time. Finally, compare the total distribution cost obtained by the simulation and the historical data. It concludes that the company can reduce the shipping cost around 4.1% or Rp 529,800 per month. By using this model, the utilization rate can be more optimal. The current value for the first vehicle is 104.6% and after the simulation it becomes 88.6%. Meanwhile, the utilization rate of the second vehicle is increase from 59.8% to 74.1%. The simulation model is able to produce the optimal shipping route with time restriction, vehicle capacity, and amount of vehicle.

  10. Social interaction, globalization and computer-aided analysis a practical guide to developing social simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Osherenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This thorough, multidisciplinary study discusses the findings of social interaction and social simulation using understandable global examples. Shows the reader how to acquire intercultural data, illustrating each step with descriptive comments and program code.

  11. CDP a graphic system for the interactive simulation and the dynamic analysis of continuous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, A.; Teolis, A.

    1973-01-01

    An IBM 2250 graphic system for the interactive simulation of continuous sytems is illustrated. Time dependent quantities can be plotted or an animated, real or schematic, representation of the system being studied can be given

  12. Initial and Final State Interaction Effects in Small-x Quark Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2010-08-30

    We study the initial and final state interaction effects in the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in the small-x saturation region. In particular, we discuss the quark distributions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan lepton pair production and dijet-correlation processes in pA collisions. We calculate the quark distributions in the scalar-QED model and then extend to the color glass condensate formalism in QCD. The quark distributions are found universal between the DIS and Drell-Yan processes. On the other hand, the quark distribution from the qq'-->qq' channel contribution to the dijet-correlation process is not universal. However, we find that it can be related to the quark distribution in DIS process by a convolution with the normalized unintegrated gluon distribution in the CGC formalism in the large Nc limit.

  13. Process monitoring and simulation code verification using interactive computer animation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, J.N.; Beelman, R.J.; Schwieder, D.H.; Stewart, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), EG and G Idaho, Inc., has developed techniques by which schematics, created for and displayed at color graphics terminals, can be driven by actual or calculated data. These input data cause changes to occur within the displayed schematic. This research is presently being done to develop a prototype to be used in nuclear power plant control rooms. Work stations have already been developed to analyze data that are produced during actual and simulated nuclear reactor experiments

  14. Enhancing food engineering education with interactive web-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandros Koulouris; Georgios Aroutidis; Dimitrios Vardalis; Petros Giannoulis; Paraskevi Karakosta

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional deductive approach in teaching any engineering topic, teachers would first expose students to the derivation of the equations that govern the behavior of a physical system and then demonstrate the use of equations through a limited number of textbook examples. This methodology, however, is rarely adequate to unmask the cause-effect and quantitative relationships between the system variables that the equations embody. Web-based simulation, which is the integration of simulat...

  15. The effect of modeled recharge distribution on simulated groundwater availability and capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, F D; Pool, D R; Leake, S A

    2015-01-01

    Simulating groundwater flow in basin-fill aquifers of the semiarid southwestern United States commonly requires decisions about how to distribute aquifer recharge. Precipitation can recharge basin-fill aquifers by direct infiltration and transport through faults and fractures in the high-elevation areas, by flowing overland through high-elevation areas to infiltrate at basin-fill margins along mountain fronts, by flowing overland to infiltrate along ephemeral channels that often traverse basins in the area, or by some combination of these processes. The importance of accurately simulating recharge distributions is a current topic of discussion among hydrologists and water managers in the region, but no comparative study has been performed to analyze the effects of different recharge distributions on groundwater simulations. This study investigates the importance of the distribution of aquifer recharge in simulating regional groundwater flow in basin-fill aquifers by calibrating a groundwater-flow model to four different recharge distributions, all with the same total amount of recharge. Similarities are seen in results from steady-state models for optimized hydraulic conductivity values, fit of simulated to observed hydraulic heads, and composite scaled sensitivities of conductivity parameter zones. Transient simulations with hypothetical storage properties and pumping rates produce similar capture rates and storage change results, but differences are noted in the rate of drawdown at some well locations owing to the differences in optimized hydraulic conductivity. Depending on whether the purpose of the groundwater model is to simulate changes in groundwater levels or changes in storage and capture, the distribution of aquifer recharge may or may not be of primary importance. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Simulating shock-bubble interactions at water-gelatin interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Stefan; Kaiser, Jakob; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Adams, Nikolaus

    2016-11-01

    Biomedical problems are often driven by fluid dynamics, as in vivo organisms are usually composed of or filled with fluids that (strongly) affected their physics. Additionally, fluid dynamical effects can be used to enhance certain phenomena or destroy organisms. As examples, we highlight the benign potential of shockwave-driven kidney-stone lithotripsy or sonoporation (acoustic cavitation of microbubbles) to improve drug delivery into cells. During the CTR SummerProgram 2016 we have performed axisymmetric three-phase simulations of a shock hitting a gas bubble in water near a gelatin interface mimicking the fundamental process during sonoporation. We used our multi-resolution finite volume method with sharp interface representation (level-set), WENO-5 shock capturing and interface scale-separation and compared the results with a diffuse-interface method. Qualitatively our simulation results agree well with the reference. Due to the interface treatment the pressure profiles are sharper in our simulations and bubble collapse dynamics are predicted at shorter time-scales. Validation with free-field collapse (Rayleigh collapse) shows very good agreement. The project leading to this application has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 667483).

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Power Distribution System in More Electric Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The More Electric Aircraft concept is a fast-developing trend in modern aircraft industry. With this new concept, the performance of the aircraft can be further optimized and meanwhile the operating and maintenance cost will be decreased effectively. In order to optimize the power system integrity and have the ability to investigate the performance of the overall system in any possible situations, one accurate simulation model of the aircraft power system will be very helpful and necessary. This paper mainly introduces a method to build a simulation model for the power distribution system, which is based on detailed component models. The power distribution system model consists of power generation unit, transformer rectifier unit, DC-DC converter unit, and DC-AC inverter unit. In order to optimize the performance of the power distribution system and improve the quality of the distributed power, a feedback control network is designed based on the characteristics of the power distribution system. The simulation result indicates that this new simulation model is well designed and it works accurately. Moreover, steady state performance and transient state performance of the model can fulfill the requirements of aircraft power distribution system in the realistic application.

  18. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  19. Implementation of Parallel Dynamic Simulation on Shared-Memory vs. Distributed-Memory Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Wu, Di; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-09

    Power system dynamic simulation computes the system response to a sequence of large disturbance, such as sudden changes in generation or load, or a network short circuit followed by protective branch switching operation. It consists of a large set of differential and algebraic equations, which is computational intensive and challenging to solve using single-processor based dynamic simulation solution. High-performance computing (HPC) based parallel computing is a very promising technology to speed up the computation and facilitate the simulation process. This paper presents two different parallel implementations of power grid dynamic simulation using Open Multi-processing (OpenMP) on shared-memory platform, and Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed-memory clusters, respectively. The difference of the parallel simulation algorithms and architectures of the two HPC technologies are illustrated, and their performances for running parallel dynamic simulation are compared and demonstrated.

  20. Development of a Strategy for Simulating Blast-Vehicle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Magnus effect . Although large rotational speeds were measured, it was concluded that the Magnus force had little influence and did not significantly...CHEM (rigid flat-plate). 104 Figure 5.3: Geometry used for blast wave interacting with a cylinder (Ofengeim and Drikakis 1997). 105 Figure 5.4: CFD...their effects on vehicles and their human occupants. The framework couples the MPMICE CFD code with DYNA3D and LS-DYNA finite element codes

  1. Enhanced effects of biotic interactions on predicting multispecies spatial distribution of submerged macrophytes after eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kun; Cui, Yichong; Zhang, Xijin; Pan, Yingji; Xu, Junli; Xu, Kaiqin; Da, Liangjun

    2017-10-01

    Water eutrophication creates unfavorable environmental conditions for submerged macrophytes. In these situations, biotic interactions may be particularly important for explaining and predicting the submerged macrophytes occurrence. Here, we evaluate the roles of biotic interactions in predicting spatial occurrence of submerged macrophytes in 1959 and 2009 for Dianshan Lake in eastern China, which became eutrophic since the 1980s. For the four common species occurred in 1959 and 2009, null species distribution models based on abiotic variables and full models based on both abiotic and biotic variables were developed using generalized linear model (GLM) and boosted regression trees (BRT) to determine whether the biotic variables improved the model performance. Hierarchical Bayesian-based joint species distribution models capable of detecting paired biotic interactions were established for each species in both periods to evaluate the changes in the biotic interactions. In most of the GLM and BRT models, the full models showed better performance than the null models in predicting the species presence/absence, and the relative importance of the biotic variables in the full models increased from less than 50% in 1959 to more than 50% in 2009 for each species. Moreover, co-occurrence correlation of each paired species interaction was higher in 2009 than that in 1959. The findings suggest biotic interactions that tend to be positive play more important roles in the spatial distribution of multispecies assemblages of macrophytes and should be included in prediction models to improve prediction accuracy when forecasting macrophytes' distribution under eutrophication stress.

  2. Simulation of a pulsatile total artificial heart: Development of a partitioned Fluid Structure Interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Simon J.; Kaufmann, Tim A. S.; Büsen, Martin R.; Laumen, Marco; Linde, Torsten; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Due to a shortage in donor organs artificial hearts can be a bridge to transplantation or even serve as a destination therapy for patients with terminal heart insufficiency. A pusher plate driven pulsatile membrane pump, the Total Artificial Heart (TAH) ReinHeart, is currently under development at the Institute of Applied Medical Engineering of RWTH Aachen University.This paper presents the methodology of a fully coupled three-dimensional time-dependent Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulation of the TAH using a commercial partitioned block-Gauss-Seidel coupling package. Partitioned coupling of the incompressible fluid with the slender flexible membrane as well as a high fluid/structure density ratio of about unity led inherently to a deterioration of the stability (‘artificial added mass instability’). The objective was to conduct a stable simulation with high accuracy of the pumping process. In order to achieve stability, a combined resistance and pressure outlet boundary condition as well as the interface artificial compressibility method was applied. An analysis of the contact algorithm and turbulence condition is presented. Independence tests are performed for the structural and the fluid mesh, the time step size and the number of pulse cycles. Because of the large deformation of the fluid domain, a variable mesh stiffness depending on certain mesh properties was specified for the fluid elements. Adaptive remeshing was avoided. Different approaches for the mesh stiffness function are compared with respect to convergence, preservation of mesh topology and mesh quality. The resulting mesh aspect ratios, mesh expansion factors and mesh orthogonalities are evaluated in detail. The membrane motion and flow distribution of the coupled simulations are compared with a top-view recording and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements, respectively, of the actual pump.

  3. D-VASim: An Interactive Virtual Laboratory Environment for the Simulation and Analysis of Genetic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    runtime. The runtime interaction gives the user a feeling of being in the lab performing a real world experiment. In this work, we present a user-friendly software tool named D-VASim (Dynamic Virtual Analyzer and Simulator), which provides a virtual laboratory environment to simulate and analyze...

  4. SIDAS - a block-diagram programming system for the interactive digital simulation of dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, H.; Burkhardt, H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a block-oriented digital simulation system. Some applications clarify the basic structure and operation. The main features of the system are: Easy handling and manipulation through interactive graphical input/output, operational flexibility through successive simulation runs and online modification of parameters, direct access to all facilities of a medium-sized computing system. (orig.) [de

  5. Statistical analysis of simulation calculation of sputtering for two interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Qiyun

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the interaction potentials (Moliere potential and Universal potential) are presented on computer simulation results of sputtering via Monte Carlo simulation based on the binary collision approximation. By means of Wilcoxon two-Sample paired sign rank test, the statistically significant difference for the above results is obtained

  6. WinGraphics: An optimized windowing environment for interactive real-time simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Vahedi, V.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a customized windowing environment, Win Graphics, which provides particle simulation codes with an interactive user interface. The environment supports real-time animation of the simulation, displaying multiple diagnostics as they evolve in time. In addition, keyboard and printer (PostScript and dot matrix) support is provided. This paper describes this environment

  7. Design and Application of Interactive Simulations in Problem-Solving in University-Level Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceberio, Mikel; Almudí, José Manuel; Franco, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, interactive computer simulations have been progressively integrated in the teaching of the sciences and have contributed significant improvements in the teaching-learning process. Practicing problem-solving is a key factor in science and engineering education. The aim of this study was to design simulation-based problem-solving…

  8. Simulation of wire-compensation of long range beam beam interaction in high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorda, U.; )

    2006-01-01

    Full text: We present weak-strong simulation results for the effect of long-range beam-beam (LRBB) interaction in LHC as well as for proposed wire compensation schemes or wire experiments, respectively. In particular, we discuss details of the simulation model, instability indicators, the effectiveness of compensation, the difference between nominal and PACMAN bunches for the LHC, beam experiments, and wire tolerances. The simulations are performed with the new code BBTrack. (author)

  9. Simulation of Martian surface-atmosphere interaction in a space-simulator: Technical considerations and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehlmann, D.; Kochan, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Simulator of the German Aerospace Research Establishment at Cologne, formerly used for testing satellites, is now, since 1987, the central unit within the research sub-program 'Comet-Simulation' (KOSI). The KOSI team has investigated physical processes relevant to comets and their surfaces. As a byproduct we gained experience in sample-handling under simulated space conditions. In broadening the scope of the research activities of the DLR Institute of Space Simulation an extension to 'Laboratory-Planetology' is planned. Following the KOSI-experiments a Mars Surface-Simulation with realistic minerals and surface soil in a suited environment (temperature, pressure, and CO2-atmosphere) is foreseen as the next step. Here, our main interest is centered on thermophysical properties of the Martian surface and energy transport (and related gas transport) through the surface. These laboratory simulation activities can be related to space missions as typical pre-mission and during-the-mission support of the experiments design and operations (simulation in parallel). Post mission experiments for confirmation and interpretation of results are of great value. The physical dimensions of the Space Simulator (cylinder of about 2.5 m diameter and 5 m length) allows for testing and qualification of experimental hardware under realistic Martian conditions.

  10. Microwave simulation of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Various electron and ion current, electric field, and magnetic field probes were developed and tested during the course of the investigation. A three dimensional probe drive system was constructed in order to investigate two and three dimensional phenomena occurring in the microwave plasma interaction. In most of the experiments reported here, a 1 GHz, 40 kilowatt, pulsed rf source (Applied Microwave), was used. The antenna was a 20 0 horn. A dipole fed parabolic antenna system capable of producing a focussed microwave beam at 2.3 GHz was developed and bench tested. This system will be used in future investigations at higher power levels

  11. 3d particle simulations on ultra short laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishihara, Katsunobu; Okamoto, Takashi; Yasui, Hidekazu [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1998-03-01

    Two topics related to ultra short laser interaction with matter, linear and nonlinear high frequency conductivity of a solid density hydrogen plasma and anisotropic self-focusing of an intense laser in an overdense plasma, have been investigated with the use of 3-d particle codes. Frequency dependence of linear conductivity in a dense plasma is obtained, which shows anomalous conductivity near plasma frequency. Since nonlinear conductivity decreases with v{sub o}{sup -3}, where v{sub o} is a quivering velocity, an optimum amplitude exists leading to a maximum electron heating. Anisotropic self-focusing of a linear polarized intense laser is observed in an overdense plasma. (author)

  12. Numerical simulation of the fluid-structure interaction between air blast waves and soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, S.; Risby, M. S.; Albert, A. Luthfi; Norazman, M.; Ariffin, I.; Alias, Y. Muhamad

    2014-03-01

    Normally, an explosion threat on free field especially from high explosives is very dangerous due to the ground shocks generated that have high impulsive load. Nowadays, explosion threats do not only occur in the battlefield, but also in industries and urban areas. In industries such as oil and gas, explosion threats may occur on logistic transportation, maintenance, production, and distribution pipeline that are located underground to supply crude oil. Therefore, the appropriate blast resistances are a priority requirement that can be obtained through an assessment on the structural response, material strength and impact pattern of material due to ground shock. A highly impulsive load from ground shocks is a dynamic load due to its loading time which is faster than ground response time. Of late, almost all blast studies consider and analyze the ground shock in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) because of its influence on the propagation and interaction of ground shock. Furthermore, analysis in the FSI integrates action of ground shock and reaction of ground on calculations of velocity, pressure and force. Therefore, this integration of the FSI has the capability to deliver the ground shock analysis on simulation to be closer to experimental investigation results. In this study, the FSI was implemented on AUTODYN computer code by using Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE). Euler-Godunov has the capability to deliver a structural computation on a 3D analysis, while ALE delivers an arbitrary calculation that is appropriate for a FSI analysis. In addition, ALE scheme delivers fine approach on little deformation analysis with an arbitrary motion, while the Euler-Godunov scheme delivers fine approach on a large deformation analysis. An integrated scheme based on Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian allows us to analyze the blast propagation waves and structural interaction simultaneously.

  13. Experimental study of simulant melt stream-water thermal interaction in pool and narrow geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, K.S.; Jasmin Sudha, A.; Murthy, S.S.; Rao, E.H.V.M.; Lydia, G.; Das, S.K.; Harvey, J.; Kannan, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Small scale experiments were carried out to investigate the thermal interaction characteristics of a few kilograms of Sn Pb, Bi and Zn as hot melt, in the film boiling region of water in an attempt to simulate a coherent fuel coolant interaction during a postulated severe accident in a nuclear reactor. Melt stream solidification and detached debris generation were studied with different melt superheat up to 200 deg. C, at different coolant temperatures of 30 deg. C, 50 deg. C, 70 deg. C, 90 deg. C, in pool geometry and in long narrow coolant column. The material was heated in an Alumina crucible and poured through a hot stainless steel funnel with a nozzle diameter of 7.7 mm, into the coolant. A stainless steel plate was used to collect the solidified mass after the interaction. Temperature monitoring was done in the coolant column close to the melt stream. The melt stream movement inside the coolant was imaged using a video camera at 25 fps. Measured melt stream entry velocity was around 1.5 m/sec. For low melt superheat and low coolant temperature, solidified porous tree like structure extended from the collector plate up to the melt release point. For water temperature of 70 deg. C, the solidified bed height at the center was found to decrease with increase in the melt superheat up to 150 deg. C. Fragmentation was found to occur when the melt superheat exceeded 200 deg. C. Particle size distribution was obtained for the fragmented debris. In 1D geometry, with 50 deg. C superheat, columnar solidification was observed with no fine debris. The paper gives the details of the results obtained in the experiments and highlights the role of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the melt physical properties on the fragmentation kinetics. (authors)

  14. The particle size distribution of fragmented melt debris from molten fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, D.F.

    1984-04-01

    Results are presented of a study of the types of statistical distributions which arise when examining debris from Molten Fuel Coolant Interactions. The lognormal probability distribution and the modifications of this distribution which result from the mixing of two distributions or the removal of some debris are described. Methods of fitting these distributions to real data are detailed. A two stage fragmentation model has been developed in an attempt to distinguish between the debris produced by coarse mixing and fine scale fragmentation. However, attempts to fit this model to real data have proved unsuccessful. It was found that the debris particle size distributions from experiments at Winfrith with thermite generated uranium dioxide/molybdenum melts were Upper Limit Lognormal. (U.K.)

  15. Characterization of 3-D particle distribution and effects on recrystallization studied by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridy, J.M.; Marthinsen, K.; Rouns, T.N.; Lippert, K.B.; Nes, E.; Richmond, O.

    1992-12-01

    Artificial particle distribution in three dimensions with different degree of clustering have been generated and used as nucleation sites for the simulation of particle stimulated recrystallization with site saturation nucleation kinetics. The clustering has a strong effect on both the Avrami exponent and the resulting sectioned grain size distributions. The Avrami exponent decreases rapidly from the expected value of 3 with the degree of clustering. A value of less than 1.5 is obtained for the Avrami exponent with a strongly clustered distribution of nucleation sites. The size distributions of sectioned grain areas are considerably broadened with clustering, but are still far from the log-normal distributions observed experimentally. A computer program has been developed to generate particle distributions whose pair correlation functions match experimentally measured functions. 15 refs., 6 figs

  16. Simulating Aerosol Size Distribution and Mass Concentration with Simultaneous Nucleation, Condensation/Coagulation, and Deposition with the GRAPES-CUACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunhong; Shen, Xiaojing; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Yangmei; Xin, Jinyuan

    2018-04-01

    A coupled aerosol-cloud model is essential for investigating the formation of haze and fog and the interaction of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. One of the key tasks of such a model is to produce correct mass and number size distributions of aerosols. In this paper, a parameterization scheme for aerosol size distribution in initial emission, which took into account the measured mass and number size distributions of aerosols, was developed in the GRAPES-CUACE [Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System-China Meteorological Administration (CMA) Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment model]—an online chemical weather forecast system that contains microphysical processes and emission, transport, and chemical conversion of sectional multi-component aerosols. In addition, the competitive mechanism between nucleation and condensation for secondary aerosol formation was improved, and the dry deposition was also modified to be in consistent with the real depositing length. Based on the above improvements, the GRAPES-CUACE simulations were verified against observational data during 1-31 January 2013, when a series of heavy regional haze-fog events occurred in eastern China. The results show that the aerosol number size distribution from the improved experiment was much closer to the observation, whereas in the old experiment the number concentration was higher in the nucleation mode and lower in the accumulation mode. Meanwhile, the errors in aerosol number size distribution as diagnosed by its sectional mass size distribution were also reduced. Moreover, simulations of organic carbon, sulfate, and other aerosol components were improved and the overestimation as well as underestimation of PM2.5 concentration in eastern China was significantly reduced, leading to increased correlation coefficient between simulated and observed PM2.5 by more than 70%. In the remote areas where bad simulation results were produced previously, the correlation coefficient

  17. LOG-NORMAL DISTRIBUTION OF COSMIC VOIDS IN SIMULATIONS AND MOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, E.; Pycke, J.-R., E-mail: er111@nyu.edu, E-mail: jrp15@nyu.edu [Division of Science and Mathematics, New York University Abu Dhabi, P.O. Box 129188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2017-01-20

    Following up on previous studies, we complete here a full analysis of the void size distributions of the Cosmic Void Catalog based on three different simulation and mock catalogs: dark matter (DM), haloes, and galaxies. Based on this analysis, we attempt to answer two questions: Is a three-parameter log-normal distribution a good candidate to satisfy the void size distributions obtained from different types of environments? Is there a direct relation between the shape parameters of the void size distribution and the environmental effects? In an attempt to answer these questions, we find here that all void size distributions of these data samples satisfy the three-parameter log-normal distribution whether the environment is dominated by DM, haloes, or galaxies. In addition, the shape parameters of the three-parameter log-normal void size distribution seem highly affected by environment, particularly existing substructures. Therefore, we show two quantitative relations given by linear equations between the skewness and the maximum tree depth, and between the variance of the void size distribution and the maximum tree depth, directly from the simulated data. In addition to this, we find that the percentage of voids with nonzero central density in the data sets has a critical importance. If the number of voids with nonzero central density reaches ≥3.84% in a simulation/mock sample, then a second population is observed in the void size distributions. This second population emerges as a second peak in the log-normal void size distribution at larger radius.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  19. Interaction between the neoclassical equilibrium and microturbulence in gyrokinetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberparleiter, Michael

    2015-07-10

    For the application of the nuclear fusion of hydrogen as a heat source for electricity generation understanding of the magnetic fuel confinement is crucial. Most of the cross-field transport in modern-day tokamaks is carried by turbulence driven by steep pressure gradients. Background neoclassical transport, however, provides a steady level of cross-field flux even in cases when turbulence becomes weak or suppressed. The goal of this work is to quantify how neoclassical (NC) effects and turbulence can influence each other. For this purpose the nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE is employed. Firstly, its ability to self-consistently calculate the NC radial electric field is successfully benchmarked against the radial force balance equation and NC transport in the plasma region close to the center of a tokamak is studied. In the next step a model system where a long-wavelength external potential is imposed on ion temperature gradient-driven (ITG) turbulence is investigated. It is found that the self-generated shear flow pattern of the turbulence adapts to the imposed pattern and a small external shear is sufficient to notably reduce turbulent transport. Motivated by this global ITG simulations with fixed pressure gradient profiles are performed with and without inclusion of NC effects. Their comparison reveals that the NC field enhances turbulent transport by 20-30 % for a ratio of ion gyroradius and device radius larger than 1/300. An explanation is that the NC field aligns a region of low shear with the maximum of the gradient profile where the turbulent drive is strongest. Further investigation reveals that NC effects also change the dependence of the system on collisionality or safety factor. Finally, in physically more comprehensive simulations with fixed power input and a self-consistently evolving temperature profile, the additional NC transport channel is found to reduce the frequency and amplitude of intermittent turbulent transport bursts.

  20. Advanced Hydroinformatic Techniques for the Simulation and Analysis of Water Supply and Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Manuel; Meniconi, Silvia; Alvisi, Stefano; Izquierdo, Joaquin

    2018-01-01

    This document is intended to be a presentation of the Special Issue “Advanced Hydroinformatic Techniques for the Simulation and Analysis of Water Supply and Distribution Systems”. The final aim of this Special Issue is to propose a suitable framework supporting insightful hydraulic mechanisms to aid the decision-making processes of water utility managers and practitioners. Its 18 peer-reviewed articles present as varied topics as: water distribution system design, optimization of network perf...

  1. On the Frequency Distribution of Neutral Particles from Low-Energy Strong Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colecchia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of the contamination, or background, from low-energy strong interactions at hadron collider experiments is a topic that has received significant attention in the field of particle physics. This article builds on a particle-level view of collision events, in line with recently proposed subtraction methods. While conventional techniques in the field usually concentrate on probability distributions, our study is, to our knowledge, the first attempt at estimating the frequency distribution of background particles across the kinematic space inside individual collision events. In fact, while the probability distribution can generally be estimated given a model of low-energy strong interactions, the corresponding frequency distribution inside a single event typically deviates from the average and cannot be predicted a priori. We present preliminary results in this direction and establish a connection between our technique and the particle weighting methods that have been the subject of recent investigation at the Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Interactive virtual simulation using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Yajima, Naoki; Sato, Yosuke; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the authors' advanced presurgical interactive virtual simulation technique using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. The authors performed interactive virtual simulation prior to surgery in 26 patients with trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm. The 3D computer graphics models for interactive virtual simulation were composed of the brainstem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, vessels, and skull individually created by the image analysis, including segmentation, surface rendering, and data fusion for data collected by 3-T MRI and 64-row multidetector CT systems. Interactive virtual simulation was performed by employing novel computer-aided design software with manipulation of a haptic device to imitate the surgical procedures of bone drilling and retraction of the cerebellum. The findings were compared with intraoperative findings. In all patients, interactive virtual simulation provided detailed and realistic surgical perspectives, of sufficient quality, representing the lateral suboccipital route. The causes of trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm determined by observing 3D computer graphics models were concordant with those identified intraoperatively in 25 (96%) of 26 patients, which was a significantly higher rate than the 73% concordance rate (concordance in 19 of 26 patients) obtained by review of 2D images only (p computer graphics model provided a realistic environment for performing virtual simulations prior to MVD surgery and enabled us to ascertain complex microsurgical anatomy.

  3. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppulury, Karthik, E-mail: karthik.uppulury@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Kolomeisky, Anatoly B. [Department of Chemistry, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Highlights: • Molecular flux strongly depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions. • There exists an optimal molecule-pore interaction potential for maximal flux. • Volume of interactions depends inversely on the strength for maximal flux. • Stronger interactions need more number of attractive sites for maximal flux. • Channels with few special sites need more attractive sites for higher flux. - Abstract: Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  4. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppulury, Karthik; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular flux strongly depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions. • There exists an optimal molecule-pore interaction potential for maximal flux. • Volume of interactions depends inversely on the strength for maximal flux. • Stronger interactions need more number of attractive sites for maximal flux. • Channels with few special sites need more attractive sites for higher flux. - Abstract: Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  5. Linking macroecology and community ecology: refining predictions of species distributions using biotic interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniczenko, Phillip P A; Sivasubramaniam, Prabu; Suttle, K Blake; Pearson, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    Macroecological models for predicting species distributions usually only include abiotic environmental conditions as explanatory variables, despite knowledge from community ecology that all species are linked to other species through biotic interactions. This disconnect is largely due to the different spatial scales considered by the two sub-disciplines: macroecologists study patterns at large extents and coarse resolutions, while community ecologists focus on small extents and fine resolutions. A general framework for including biotic interactions in macroecological models would help bridge this divide, as it would allow for rigorous testing of the role that biotic interactions play in determining species ranges. Here, we present an approach that combines species distribution models with Bayesian networks, which enables the direct and indirect effects of biotic interactions to be modelled as propagating conditional dependencies among species' presences. We show that including biotic interactions in distribution models for species from a California grassland community results in better range predictions across the western USA. This new approach will be important for improving estimates of species distributions and their dynamics under environmental change. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. DYNECHARM++: a toolkit to simulate coherent interactions of high-energy charged particles in complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagli, Enrico; Guidi, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    A toolkit for the simulation of coherent interactions between high-energy charged particles and complex crystal structures, called DYNECHARM++ has been developed. The code has been written in C++ language taking advantage of this object-oriented programing method. The code is capable to evaluating the electrical characteristics of complex atomic structures and to simulate and track the particle trajectory within them. Calculation method of electrical characteristics based on their expansion in Fourier series has been adopted. Two different approaches to simulate the interaction have been adopted, relying on the full integration of particle trajectories under the continuum potential approximation and on the definition of cross-sections of coherent processes. Finally, the code has proved to reproduce experimental results and to simulate interaction of charged particles with complex structures.

  7. An alternative phase-space distribution to sample initial conditions for classical dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Vela, A.

    2002-01-01

    A new quantum-type phase-space distribution is proposed in order to sample initial conditions for classical trajectory simulations. The phase-space distribution is obtained as the modulus of a quantum phase-space state of the system, defined as the direct product of the coordinate and momentum representations of the quantum initial state. The distribution is tested by sampling initial conditions which reproduce the initial state of the Ar-HCl cluster prepared by ultraviolet excitation, and by simulating the photodissociation dynamics by classical trajectories. The results are compared with those of a wave packet calculation, and with a classical simulation using an initial phase-space distribution recently suggested. A better agreement is found between the classical and the quantum predictions with the present phase-space distribution, as compared with the previous one. This improvement is attributed to the fact that the phase-space distribution propagated classically in this work resembles more closely the shape of the wave packet propagated quantum mechanically

  8. Simulation of drift dynamics of arbitrary carrier distributions in complex semiconductor detectors

    CERN Document Server

    De Castro Manzano, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    An extensible open-source C++ software for the simulation of elec- trons and holes drift in semiconductor detectors of complex geometries has been developed in order to understand transient currents and charge collection efficiencies of arbitrary charge distributions. The simulation is based on Ramo’s theorem formalism to obtain induced currents in the electrodes. Efficient open source C++ numerical libraries are used to ob- tain the electric and weighting field using finite-element methods and to simulate the carrier transport. A graphical user interface is also provided. The tool has already been proved useful to model laser induced transient currents

  9. Interactive Learning Environment: Web-based Virtual Hydrological Simulation System using Augmented and Immersive Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in internet technologies make it possible to manage and visualize large data on the web. Novel visualization techniques and interactive user interfaces allow users to create realistic environments, and interact with data to gain insight from simulations and environmental observations. The hydrological simulation system is a web-based 3D interactive learning environment for teaching hydrological processes and concepts. The simulation systems provides a visually striking platform with realistic terrain information, and water simulation. Students can create or load predefined scenarios, control environmental parameters, and evaluate environmental mitigation alternatives. The web-based simulation system provides an environment for students to learn about the hydrological processes (e.g. flooding and flood damage), and effects of development and human activity in the floodplain. The system utilizes latest web technologies and graphics processing unit (GPU) for water simulation and object collisions on the terrain. Users can access the system in three visualization modes including virtual reality, augmented reality, and immersive reality using heads-up display. The system provides various scenarios customized to fit the age and education level of various users. This presentation provides an overview of the web-based flood simulation system, and demonstrates the capabilities of the system for various visualization and interaction modes.

  10. Protein-protein interaction site predictions with three-dimensional probability distributions of interacting atoms on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Tai Chen

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted

  11. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  12. A study of the use of simulated work task situations in interactive information retrieval evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report a study of how the test instrument of a simulated work task situation is used in empirical evaluations of interactive information retrieval (IIR) and reported in the research literature. In particular, the author is interested to learn whether....... The paper addresses the need to carefully design and tailor simulated work task situations to suit the test participants in order to obtain the intended authentic and realistic IIR under study. Keywords Interactive information retrieval study, IIR study, Test design, Simulated work task situations, Meta-evaluation...... situations in IIR evaluations. In particular, with respect to the design and creation of realistic simulated work task situations. There is a lack of tailoring of the simulated work task situations to the test participants. Likewise, the requirement to include the test participants’ personal information...

  13. A distribution ratio model of strontium by crown ether extraction from simulated HLLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jing; Wang Qiuping; Wang Jianchen; Song Chongli

    1995-01-01

    An experiential distribution ratio model for strontium extraction by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6-n-octanol from simulated high-level waste is established. The experimental points for the model are designed by experimental homogeneous-design method. The regression of distribution ratio model of strontium is carried out by the complex-optimization method. The model is verified with experimental distribution ratio data in different extraction conditions. The results show that the relative deviations are within +-10% and the mean relative divination is 4.4% between the calculated data and the experimental ones. The experiential model together with an iteration program can be used for the strontium extraction process calculation

  14. MOCARS: a Monte Carlo code for determining the distribution and simulation limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, S.D.

    1977-07-01

    MOCARS is a computer program designed for the INEL CDC 76-173 operating system to determine the distribution and simulation limits for a function by Monte Carlo techniques. The code randomly samples data from any of the 12 user-specified distributions and then either evaluates the cut set system unavailability or a user-specified function with the sample data. After the data are ordered, the values at various quantities and associated confidence bounds are calculated for output. Also available for output on microfilm are the frequency and cumulative distribution histograms from the sample data. 29 figures, 4 tables

  15. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of antimicrobial peptides in membrane mimics can provide the high resolution, atomistic picture that is necessary to decipher which sequence and structure components are responsible for activity and toxicity. With such detailed insight, engineering new sequences that are active but non...... peptides and their interaction with membrane mimics. In this article, we discuss the promise and the challenges of widely used models and detail our recent work on peptide-micelle simulations as an attractive alternative to peptide-bilayer simulations. We detail our results with two large structural...... classes of peptides, helical and beta-sheet and demonstrate how simulations can assist in engineering of novel antimicrobials with therapeutic potential....

  16. Simulating the fluid-structure interaction of a flexible tube in an array of rigid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnica, D.; Maleki, M.; Hariri, A.; Feldman, H.

    2011-01-01

    Two important single-phase mechanisms for flow-induced vibration of heat-exchanger tube bundles were used to demonstrate the capabilities of commercial software to simulate unsteady fluid-structure interactions (FSI). Reasonable agreement was obtained between the FSI simulations and experimental data for the onset of fluid elastic instability. There was also reasonable agreement between the FSI simulations and empirical correlations for the dynamic tube response to random turbulence excitation. Additional benefits of performing FSI simulations were the ability to characterize important features of the unsteady flow fields and hydrodynamic parameters such as viscous damping coefficients, which would otherwise require elaborate experimental measurements. (author)

  17. Computer Networks E-learning Based on Interactive Simulations and SCORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Andrés Candelas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new set of compact interactive simulations developed for the constructive learning of computer networks concepts. These simulations, which compose a virtual laboratory implemented as portable Java applets, have been created by combining EJS (Easy Java Simulations with the KivaNS API. Furthermore, in this work, the skills and motivation level acquired by the students are evaluated and measured when these simulations are combined with Moodle and SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model documents. This study has been developed to improve and stimulate the autonomous constructive learning in addition to provide timetable flexibility for a Computer Networks subject.

  18. Numerical simulation of fluid structure interaction in two flexible tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhipeng; Zang Fenggang; Zhang Yixiong

    2014-01-01

    In order to further investigate fluid structure interaction problems, occurring in the nuclear field such as the behavior of PWR fuel rods, steam generator and other heat exchanger tubes, a numerical model was presented. It is a three-dimensional fully coupled approach with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously, for the tube bundles in cross flow. The unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model were solved with finite volume approach on structured grids combined with the technique of dynamic mesh. The dynamic equilibrium equation was discretized according to the finite element theory. The vibration response of a single tube in cross flow was calculated by the numerical model. Both the amplitude and frequency were compared with experimental data and existing models in the literature. It is shown that the present model is reasonable. The flow induced vibration characteristics, for both inline and parallel sets in cross flow, were investigated by the numerical model. The dynamic response and flow characteristics, for both inline tubes and parallel tubes with pitch ratio of 1.2, 1.6, 2, 3 and 4 under different incident velocities, were studied. Critical pitch and critical velocity were obtained. (authors)

  19. An Activity-Centric Approach to Configuration Work in Distributed Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven

    The widespread introduction of new types of computing devices, such as smartphones, tablet computers, large interactive displays or even wearable devices, has led to setups in which users are interacting with a rich ecology of devices. These new device ecologies have the potential to introduce...... and captures the problems and challenges of distributed interaction. Using both empirical data and related work, I argue that configuration work is composed of: curation work, task resumption lag, mobility work, physical handling and articulation work. Using configuration work as a problem description, I...

  20. Molecular simulation of polar molecules interaction with MOFs family materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Toni, M.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the adsorption of simple molecular fluids in nano-porous materials. Many industrial processes are based on this phenomenon, including ionic exchange, selective separation and heterogeneous catalysis. I used molecular simulation to study the adsorption properties of polar molecules of industrial interest (CO 2 and H 2 O) in a new class of crystalline microporous hybrid organic-inorganic materials called Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs). They have exceptional adsorption properties due to their topological variety and their versatility, allowed by the large range of possibilities offered by organic and coordination chemistry and functionalizations. I first studied the adsorption of CO 2 in a family of materials called IRMOFs, which share the same topology but have different porous volume, in order to characterize the effect of confinement on their adsorption performance. In particular, a general behavior has been highlighted: the critical temperature decreases when the confinement increases. Then, I looked at a recently synthesized cationic MOF called Zn2(CBTACN). After having localized the extra-framework halogen anions in the unit cell of the material, something which was not possible experimentally, I characterized CO 2 adsorption in this system first as a pure gas and then as a component of different mixtures. Finally, I was interested in the hydrothermal stability of MOFs, a crucial issue for their use in industrial applications. I observed the hydration mechanism of system that is analogous to the MOF-5 (IRMOF-0h) and shed light on some collaborative effects of the attack of water that were unknown to in the literature. (author)

  1. Experimental and numerical simulation the effect of distribution plates in a mobile electrostatic precipitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorpoor, A. R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation, behaviour of airflow inside an electrostatic precipitator with three different distribution plates has been considered by means of numerical and experimental methods and results have been compared together. This device has been designed and produced in this center for the first time in Iran, and its ability to absorb particles, haze and soot is good. But for increasing the efficiency there must be some changes to an miscellaneous sections. Therefore, here we consider the effect of distribution plates to increase performance, because when distribution flow at cross sections of precipitator is uniform, the efficiency will increase. To have a numerical simulation, fluent software version 5.3 was and for modeling turbulence the RNG k-Σ turbulent model applied. This program after discretization governing equations on a body fitted coordinate system, that is produced in preprocessor, integrates this equations on control volumes and determines the rate of quantities on control volume faces using order two (upwind)approximations. Finally by means of a pitot tube velocity magnitude of fluid in two sections of domain was measured and compared with numerical results which shows a good agreement. After simulation the three model, e.g. without distribution plate, with a distribution plate after inlet duct and with two distribution plates (one after inlet duct and before outlet duct), and taking some results and by comparing them, we conclude that use of combined distribution plate can give a good result

  2. Spatial dose and microdose distribution in tissues. Ionization, nuclear reactions, multiple scattering simulation of beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, C.

    1976-01-01

    Computer simulation and nuclear emulsion and gelatin techniques enabled to give the total elastic and inelastic cross sections and to forecast the spatial microdose distributions in cells, nuclei and molecules. For this purpose, the transport of a beam into tissues having a given composition is calculated, the nuclear reactions are generated and the energy depositions in standard planes perpendicular to the beam are recorded

  3. Simulation and analysis of the soot particle size distribution in a turbulent nonpremixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucchesi, Marco; Abdelgadir, Ahmed Gamaleldin; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    to the simulation of soot formation and growth in simplified configurations featuring a constant concentration of soot precursors and the evolution of the size distribution in time is found to depend on the intensity of the nucleation rate. Higher nucleation rates

  4. Simulation of distributed parameter system consisting of charged and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, P.S.; Sinha, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of positively charged light particles have been simulated in an assembly of heavy gas atoms. The system is formulated in terms of partial differential equation. The stability and convergence of the numerical algorithm has been examined. Using this formulation effects of external electric field and temperature have been investigated on the lifetime and distribution function characteristics of charged particles

  5. Improving Statistics Education through Simulations: The Case of the Sampling Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Mark A.

    This paper presents a summary of action research investigating statistics students' understandings of the sampling distribution of the mean. With four sections of an introductory Statistics in Education course (n=98 students), a computer simulation activity (R. delMas, J. Garfield, and B. Chance, 1999) was implemented and evaluated to show…

  6. Design of a distributed simulation environment for building control applications based on systems engineering methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yahiaoui, Azzedine

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of innovative designs that distributes control to buildings over a network is currently a challenging task as exciting building performance simulation tools do not offer sufficient capabilities and the flexibility to fully respond to the full complexity of Automated Buildings (ABs). For

  7. Studying distributed cognition of simulation-based team training with DiCoT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybing, Jonas; Nilsson, Heléne; Jonson, Carl-Oscar; Bang, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Health care organizations employ simulation-based team training (SBTT) to improve skill, communication and coordination in a broad range of critical care contexts. Quantitative approaches, such as team performance measurements, are predominantly used to measure SBTTs effectiveness. However, a practical evaluation method that examines how this approach supports cognition and teamwork is missing. We have applied Distributed Cognition for Teamwork (DiCoT), a method for analysing cognition and collaboration aspects of work settings, with the purpose of assessing the methodology's usefulness for evaluating SBTTs. In a case study, we observed and analysed four Emergo Train System® simulation exercises where medical professionals trained emergency response routines. The study suggests that DiCoT is an applicable and learnable tool for determining key distributed cognition attributes of SBTTs that are of importance for the simulation validity of training environments. Moreover, we discuss and exemplify how DiCoT supports design of SBTTs with a focus on transfer and validity characteristics. Practitioner Summary: In this study, we have evaluated a method to assess simulation-based team training environments from a cognitive ergonomics perspective. Using a case study, we analysed Distributed Cognition for Teamwork (DiCoT) by applying it to the Emergo Train System®. We conclude that DiCoT is useful for SBTT evaluation and simulator (re)design.

  8. SCIDAC Center for simulation of wave particle interactions CompX participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, R.W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Harnessing the energy that is released in fusion reactions would provide a safe and abundant source of power to meet the growing energy needs of the world population. The next step toward the development of fusion as a practical energy source is the construction of ITER, a device capable of producing and controlling the high performance plasma required for self-sustaining fusion reactions, or “burning” plasma. The input power required to drive the ITER plasma into the burning regime will be supplied primarily with a combination of external power from radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and energetic ions from neutral beam injection sources, in addition to internally generated Ohmic heating from the induced plasma current that also serves to create the magnetic equilibrium for the discharge. The ITER project is a large multi-billion dollar international project in which the US participates. The success of the ITER project depends critically on the ability to create and maintain burning plasma conditions, it is absolutely necessary to have physics-based models that can accurately simulate the RF processes that affect the dynamical evolution of the ITER discharge. The Center for Simulation of WavePlasma Interactions (CSWPI), also known as RF-SciDAC, is a multi-institutional collaboration that has conducted ongoing research aimed at developing: (1) Coupled core-to-edge simulations that will lead to an increased understanding of parasitic losses of the applied RF power in the boundary plasma between the RF antenna and the core plasma; (2) Development of models for core interactions of RF waves with energetic electrons and ions (including fusion alpha particles and fast neutral beam ions) that include a more accurate representation of the particle dynamics in the combined equilibrium and wave fields; and (3) Development of improved algorithms that will take advantage of massively parallel computing platforms at the petascale level and

  9. A novel approach to simulate gene-environment interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemi Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex diseases are multifactorial traits caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They represent the major part of human diseases and include those with largest prevalence and mortality (cancer, heart disease, obesity, etc.. Despite a large amount of information that has been collected about both genetic and environmental risk factors, there are few examples of studies on their interactions in epidemiological literature. One reason can be the incomplete knowledge of the power of statistical methods designed to search for risk factors and their interactions in these data sets. An improvement in this direction would lead to a better understanding and description of gene-environment interactions. To this aim, a possible strategy is to challenge the different statistical methods against data sets where the underlying phenomenon is completely known and fully controllable, for example simulated ones. Results We present a mathematical approach that models gene-environment interactions. By this method it is possible to generate simulated populations having gene-environment interactions of any form, involving any number of genetic and environmental factors and also allowing non-linear interactions as epistasis. In particular, we implemented a simple version of this model in a Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator (GENS, a tool designed to simulate case-control data sets where a one gene-one environment interaction influences the disease risk. The main aim has been to allow the input of population characteristics by using standard epidemiological measures and to implement constraints to make the simulator behaviour biologically meaningful. Conclusions By the multi-logistic model implemented in GENS it is possible to simulate case-control samples of complex disease where gene-environment interactions influence the disease risk. The user has full control of the main characteristics of the simulated population and a Monte

  10. Comparison of Muon Arrival Time Distributions measured in KASCADE Experiment with Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, A.F.; Brancus, I.M.; Haeusler, R.; Rebel, H.

    2000-01-01

    The muon arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) have been studied in KASCADE experiment by data collected in the period October 1997 - April 1999 with more than 3.4 millions of reconstructed showers. The radial distance of the shower center from the central detector has been selected smaller than 110 m. The experimental muon arrival time distributions are compared with simulations of the air shower development, calculated with the Monte Carlo air shower simulation program CORSIKA. The actual calculations are based on the QGSJET model and cover an energy range of 5·10 14 - 3.06·10 16 eV (divided in 7 overlapping energy bins) and a zenith angle range of 0 angle - 40 angle. They are performed for three mass groups: H = light group, O = CNO group, Fe = heavy group) with an energy distribution of a spectral index of -2.7. The simulations comprise a set of ≅ 2000$ showers for each case, except for the bins of the highest energies (6.51·10 15 - 1.82·10 16 eV with ≅1000$ simulated showers and 1.09·10 16 - 3.06·10 16 eV with ≅ 500 simulated showers). The response of the KASCADE detector system and the timing qualities have been simulated using the CRES program, dedicatedly developed by the KASCADE group on the basis of the GEANT code. The particles of the simulated EAS are tracked through the detector setup and the timing response of the detectors are recorded for various core distances from the central detector facilities. Particularly, it should be noted that the timing depends on the energy deposit in the scintillation detectors and on the multiplicities of the muon samples spanning the arrival time distributions of the single EAS. Such effects slightly distorts the measured time distributions and have been corrected by introducing a corresponding correction procedure. The dependence of the experimental and simulated median time values on the N μ tr range, as being proportional to the primary energy, is presented. The good agreement of the

  11. Simulative study on dose distribution of 103Pd stent in blood-vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu; Xu Zhiyong; Sun Fuyin; Xu Shuhe; Ma Fengwu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dose distribution of 103 Pd stent in the blood-vessel. Methods: Simulative study on dose distribution of endovascular 103 Pd stent was conducted with thermoluminescence dosimeter. The vessel wall was substituted by muscle equivalent material in this simulative study. Results: When radioactivity of the study 103 Pd stent was 9.8 MBq the absorbed dose from the stent surface by muscle equivalent material was 9.8 Gy at 17 d (the half-life period of 103 Pd). The radioactivity of 103 Pd stent surface rapidly attenuated over the radial distance. 80% of the radioactivity at the area that was radially 0.4 mm apart from the stent surface was absorbed by the simulative blood-vessel wall. Conclusion: Endovascular 103 Pd stent does not exert significant injury on the surrounding organs or tissues

  12. Implementation of a Real-Time Microgrid Simulation Platform Based on Centralized and Distributed Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Abrishambaf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Demand response and distributed generation are key components of power systems. Several challenges are raised at both technical and business model levels for integration of those resources in smart grids and microgrids. The implementation of a distribution network as a test bed can be difficult and not cost-effective; using computational modeling is not sufficient for producing realistic results. Real-time simulation allows us to validate the business model’s impact at the technical level. This paper comprises a platform supporting the real-time simulation of a microgrid connected to a larger distribution network. The implemented platform allows us to use both centralized and distributed energy resource management. Using an optimization model for the energy resource operation, a virtual power player manages all the available resources. Then, the simulation platform allows us to technically validate the actual implementation of the requested demand reduction in the scope of demand response programs. The case study has 33 buses, 220 consumers, and 68 distributed generators. It demonstrates the impact of demand response events, also performing resource management in the presence of an energy shortage.

  13. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Quasi-realistic distribution of interaction fields leading to a variant of Ising spin glass model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasa, Radu; Enachescu, Cristian; Stancu, Alexandru; Linares, Jorge; Varret, Francois

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of interaction fields of an Ising-like system, obtained by Monte Carlo entropic sampling is used for modeling the hysteretic behavior of patterned media made of magnetic particles with a common anisotropy axis; a variant of the canonical Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass model is introduced

  15. Asymmetric biotic interactions and abiotic niche differences revealed by a dynamic joint species distribution model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Nina K; Zarnetske, Phoebe L; Schliep, Erin M; Schaeffer, Robert N; Orians, Colin M; Orwig, David A; Preisser, Evan L

    2018-05-01

    A species' distribution and abundance are determined by abiotic conditions and biotic interactions with other species in the community. Most species distribution models correlate the occurrence of a single species with environmental variables only, and leave out biotic interactions. To test the importance of biotic interactions on occurrence and abundance, we compared a multivariate spatiotemporal model of the joint abundance of two invasive insects that share a host plant, hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) and elongate hemlock scale (EHS; Fiorina externa), to independent models that do not account for dependence among co-occurring species. The joint model revealed that HWA responded more strongly to abiotic conditions than EHS. Additionally, HWA appeared to predispose stands to subsequent increase of EHS, but HWA abundance was not strongly dependent on EHS abundance. This study demonstrates how incorporating spatial and temporal dependence into a species distribution model can reveal the dependence of a species' abundance on other species in the community. Accounting for dependence among co-occurring species with a joint distribution model can also improve estimation of the abiotic niche for species affected by interspecific interactions. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Aluminium distribution in ZSM-5 revisited: The role of Al–Al interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Salvador, A. Rabdel; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo; Gray, Aileen E.; Lewis, Dewi W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the distribution of Al atoms in zeolite ZSM-5 with Si/Al=47, where we focus on the role of Al–Al interactions rather than on the energetics of Al/Si substitutions at individual sites. Using interatomic potential methods, we evaluate the energies of the full set of symmetrically independent configurations of Al siting in a Si 94 Al 2 O 192 cell. The equilibrium Al distribution is determined by the interplay of two factors: the energetics of the Al/Si substitution at an individual site, which tends to populate particular T sites (e.g., the T14 site), and the Al–Al interaction, which at this Si/Al maximises Al–Al distances in general agreement with Dempsey’s rule. However, it is found that the interaction energy changes approximately as the inverse of the square of the distance between the two Al atoms, rather than the inverse of the distance expected if this were merely charge repulsion. Moreover, we find that the anisotropic nature of the framework density plays an important role in determining the magnitude of the interactions, which are not simply dependent on Al–Al distances. - Graphical abstract: Role of Al–Al interactions in high silica ZSM-5 is shown to be anisotropic in nature and not dependent solely on Coulombic interactions. Highlights: ► Si–Al distribution in ZSM-5 is revisited, stressing the role of the Al–Al interaction. ► Coulomb interactions are not the key factors controlling the Al siting. ► Anisotropy of the framework is identified as a source of departure from Dempsey’s rule.

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Interaction between Phosphorus and Sediment Based on the Modified Langmuir Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengjie Hu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is the primary factor that limits eutrophication of surface waters in aquatic environments. Sediment particles have a strong affinity to phosphorus due to the high specific surface areas and surface active sites. In this paper, a numerical model containing hydrodynamics, sediment, and phosphorus module based on improved Langmuir equation is established, where the processes of adsorption and desorption are considered. Through the statistical analysis of the physical experiment data, the fitting formulas of two important parameters in the Langmuir equation are obtained, which are the adsorption coefficient, ka, and the ratio k between the adsorption coefficient and the desorption coefficient. In order to simulate the experimental flume and get a constant and uniform water flow, a periodical numerical flume is built by adding a streamwise body force, Fx. The adsorbed phosphorus by sediment and the dissolved phosphorus in the water are separately added into the Advection Diffusion equation as a source term to simulate the interaction between them. The result of the numerical model turns out to be well matched with that of the physical experiment and can thus provide the basis for further analysis. With the application of the numerical model to some new and relative cases, the conclusion will be drawn through an afterwards analysis. The concentration of dissolved phosphorus proves to be unevenly distributed along the depth and the maximum value approximately appears in the 3/4 water depth because both the high velocity in the top layer and the high turbulence intensity in the bottom layer can promote sediment adsorption on phosphorus.

  18. MATLAB simulation of a Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser with chirp effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espe, Burt L.

    1994-12-01

    A model of a distributed feedback (DFB) laser was implemented in MATLAB and SIMULINK. Using the laser rate equation, the model was simulated to obtain general characteristics of the chirp of the lasers frequency. The simulations were controlled by using different drive current waveforms, based on various bit patterns, data rates, and drive current values (threshold current and the extinction ratio). Once created, the laser drive current was passed to the SIMULINK DFB laser model. The output of a simulation provided frequency chirp, laser power emitted, photon density, and carrier density data. Two sets of simulations were conducted. The first set of simulations focused on the data rates and bit patterns. From these simulations it was determined that the transition from a ZERO bit to a ONE bit caused the greatest frequency excursions. Also, as the data rate increases the maximum frequency excursion increases. Finally, the first set of simulations revealed that the predictability of the chirp decreases as the data rate increases and as the complexity of the bit pattern increases. The second set of simulations examined the effect of the extinction ratio on frequency chirp. By plotting the maximum frequency excursion against its respective extinction ratio, it was determined that in some cases the maximum frequency excursions in a system could be minimized.

  19. The SimPort-based simulators and distributed control systems development, upgrade and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, Victor A.; Yanushevich, Dmitry I.; Zenkov, Andrey D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the SimPort computer technology application experience related with power plant simulators and Distributed Control System (DCS) emulators development. The paper presents basic characteristics of the SimPort as a Windows NT-based implementation variety of the developed in RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' math modeling and simulator creation AIS technology. The new approaches and benefits of using simulation for DCS development and, especially upgrade, testing and on plant tuning are presented in the paper briefly. The DCS-inclusive power plant SimPort-based simulators are also considered. The DCS emulation principal problems, solutions and the experience-based DCS emulators development methodology are presented also. The presented technology quality and efficiency as well as presented DCS emulation problem solutions were verified by the smallest power plant full scope computer simulators development man-hours (at least twice lower in comparison with the similar simulators) in combination with the simulators correspondence to the standard and the best quality of nuclear power plant simulators. (Author)

  20. Simulation of temperature distribution in cylindrical and prismatic lithium ion secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Watase, Y.; Kitamura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The authors develop two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation codes of the transient response of the temperature distribution in the lithium ion secondary battery during a discharge cycle. At first, a two-dimensional simulation code for a cylindrical battery is developed, and the simulation results for a commercially available small size battery are compared with the corresponding experimental results. The simulation results of the transient temperature and voltage variations coincide very well with the experimental results. The simulation result of the temperature difference between the center of the battery body and the center of the battery side is also in reasonable agreement with the experimental result. Next, the authors develop a three-dimensional simulation code and perform numerical simulations for three large size prismatic batteries with the same capacity and different cross sectional shapes. It is made clear that selecting the battery with the laminated cross section has a remarkable effect on the suppression of the temperature rise in comparison with the battery with square cross section, whereas the effect of the lamination on the suppression of the temperature unevenness is unexpectedly small. These results indicate the accuracy and usefulness of the developed simulation codes