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Sample records for distinct neuronal functions

  1. Segregated cholinergic transmission modulates dopamine neurons integrated in distinct functional circuits.

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    Dautan, Daniel; Souza, Albert S; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Valencia, Miguel; Assous, Maxime; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Tepper, James M; Bolam, J Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) receive cholinergic innervation from brainstem structures that are associated with either movement or reward. Whereas cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) carry an associative/motor signal, those of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) convey limbic information. We used optogenetics and in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling to examine the influence of brainstem cholinergic innervation of distinct neuronal subpopulations in the VTA. We found that LDT cholinergic axons selectively enhanced the bursting activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that were excited by aversive stimulation. In contrast, PPN cholinergic axons activated and changed the discharge properties of VTA neurons that were integrated in distinct functional circuits and were inhibited by aversive stimulation. Although both structures conveyed a reinforcing signal, they had opposite roles in locomotion. Our results demonstrate that two modes of cholinergic transmission operate in the VTA and segregate the neurons involved in different reward circuits.

  2. Glial response in the rat models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuronal denervations.

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    Bataveljic, Danijela; Petrovic, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Saponjic, Jasna; Andjus, Pavle

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, particularly in the nucleus basalis (NB). Similarly, Parkinson's disease (PD) might involve the selective loss of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons. Therefore, lesions of these functionally distinct cholinergic centers in rats might serve as models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. Our previous articles described dissimilar sleep/wake-state disorders in rat models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. This study further examines astroglial and microglial responses as underlying pathologies in these distinct sleep disorders. Unilateral lesions of the NB or the PPT were induced with rats under ketamine/diazepam anesthesia (50 mg/kg i.p.) by using stereotaxically guided microinfusion of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). Twenty-one days after the lesion, loss of cholinergic neurons was quantified by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry, and the astroglial and microglial responses were quantified by glia fibrillary acidic protein/OX42 immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the anatomofunctionally related astroglial response following unilateral excitotoxic PPT cholinergic neuronal lesion. Whereas IBO NB and PPT lesions similarly enhanced local astroglial and microglial responses, astrogliosis in the PPT was followed by a remote astrogliosis within the ipslilateral NB. Conversely, there was no microglial response within the NB after PPT lesions. Our results reveal the rostrorostral PPT-NB astrogliosis after denervation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT. This hierarchically and anatomofunctionally guided PPT-NB astrogliosis emerged following cholinergic neuronal loss greater than 17% throughout the overall rostrocaudal PPT dimension.

  3. Distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish Hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

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    Myron S Ignatius

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is accomplished by both genetic and epigenetic means and is required for the precise control of the development of the neural crest. In hdac1(b382 mutants, craniofacial cartilage development is defective in two distinct ways. First, fewer hoxb3a, dlx2 and dlx3-expressing posterior branchial arch precursors are specified and many of those that are consequently undergo apoptosis. Second, in contrast, normal numbers of progenitors are present in the anterior mandibular and hyoid arches, but chondrocyte precursors fail to terminally differentiate. In the peripheral nervous system, there is a disruption of enteric, DRG and sympathetic neuron differentiation in hdac1(b382 mutants compared to wildtype embryos. Specifically, enteric and DRG-precursors differentiate into neurons in the anterior gut and trunk respectively, while enteric and DRG neurons are rarely present in the posterior gut and tail. Sympathetic neuron precursors are specified in hdac1(b382 mutants and they undergo generic neuronal differentiation but fail to undergo noradrenergic differentiation. Using the HDAC inhibitor TSA, we isolated enzyme activity and temporal requirements for HDAC function that reproduce hdac1(b382 defects in craniofacial and sympathetic neuron development. Our study reveals distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

  4. Distinct functions of neuronal synaptobrevin in developing and mature fly photoreceptors.

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    Rister, Jens; Heisenberg, Martin

    2006-10-01

    Neuronal synaptobrevin (n-Syb, alias VAMP2), a synaptic vesicle membrane protein with a central role in neurotransmission, is specifically cleaved by the light chain of tetanus neurotoxin (TNT) that is known to reliably block neuroexocytosis. Here, we study fly photoreceptors transmitting continuous, graded signals to first order interneurons in the lamina, and report consequences of targeted expression of TNT in these cells using the UAS/GAL4 driver/effector system. Expressing the toxin throughout photoreceptor development causes developmental, electrophysiological, and behavioral defects. These can be differentiated by confining toxin expression to shorter developmental periods. Applying a method for controlled temporal and spatial TNT expression, we found that in the early pupa it impaired the development of the retina; in the midpupa, during synapse formation TNT caused a severe hypoplasia of the lamina that persisted into adulthood and left the photoreceptor-interneuron synapses of the lamina without function. Finally, during adulthood TNT neither blocks synaptic transmission in photoreceptors nor depletes the cells of n-Syb. Our study suggests a novel, cell type-specific function of n-Syb in synaptogenesis and it distinguishes between two synapse types: TNT resistant and TNT sensitive ones. These results need to be taken into account if TNT is used for neural circuit analysis.

  5. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

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    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  6. Functional genomic analyses of two morphologically distinct classes of Drosophila sensory neurons: post-mitotic roles of transcription factors in dendritic patterning.

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    Eswar Prasad R Iyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurons are one of the most structurally and functionally diverse cell types found in nature, owing in large part to their unique class specific dendritic architectures. Dendrites, being highly specialized in receiving and processing neuronal signals, play a key role in the formation of functional neural circuits. Hence, in order to understand the emergence and assembly of a complex nervous system, it is critical to understand the molecular mechanisms that direct class specific dendritogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used the Drosophila dendritic arborization (da neurons to gain systems-level insight into dendritogenesis by a comparative study of the morphologically distinct Class-I (C-I and Class-IV (C-IV da neurons. We have used a combination of cell-type specific transcriptional expression profiling coupled to a targeted and systematic in vivo RNAi functional validation screen. Our comparative transcriptomic analyses have revealed a large number of differentially enriched/depleted gene-sets between C-I and C-IV neurons, including a broad range of molecular factors and biological processes such as proteolytic and metabolic pathways. Further, using this data, we have identified and validated the role of 37 transcription factors in regulating class specific dendrite development using in vivo class-specific RNAi knockdowns followed by rigorous and quantitative neurometric analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reports the first global gene-expression profiles from purified Drosophila C-I and C-IV da neurons. We also report the first large-scale semi-automated reconstruction of over 4,900 da neurons, which were used to quantitatively validate the RNAi screen phenotypes. Overall, these analyses shed global and unbiased novel insights into the molecular differences that underlie the morphological diversity of distinct neuronal cell-types. Furthermore, our class-specific gene expression datasets should prove a

  7. Giant neurons in the macaque pulvinar: a distinct relay subpopulation

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    Kosuke Imura

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Calbindin positive (CB+ giant neurons are known to occur within the pulvinar nucleus in subhuman primates. Here, we demonstrate by combined retrograde tracing and immunocytochemistry that at least some of these are pulvinocortical relay neurons, and further report several distinctive features. First, in contrast with non-giant relay neurons, the giant neurons are often solitary and isolated from a main projection focus. The question thus arises of whether their cortical projections may be non-reciprocal or otherwise distinctive. Second, these neurons are positive for GluR4; but third, they are otherwise neurochemically heterogeneous, in that about one-third are positive for both parvalbumin (PV and CB. Presumably, these subpopulations are also functionally heterogeneous. These results provide further evidence for the idea of multiple, interleaved organizations within the pulvinar; and they imply that thalamocortical projections are more disparate than has yet been appreciated. Finally, we found that giant CB+ neurons have a distinctive meshwork of large, PV+ terminations, prominent at the first dendritic branch point. In size and location, these resemble inhibitory terminations from the zona incerta or anterior pretectal nucleus (APT, as recently described in higher order thalamic nuclei in rats. One can speculate that giant neurons in the macaque pulvinar participate in a layer 5-APT-thalamus (giant neuron extrareticular pathway, functionally distinct from the layer 6-reticular nucleus-thalamus network.

  8. Distinct roles of transcription factors EGL-46 and DAF-19 in specifying the functionality of a polycystin-expressing sensory neuron necessary for C. elegans male vulva location behavior.

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    Yu, Hui; Pretot, Rene F; Burglin, Thomas R; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans polycystins LOV-1 and PKD-2 are expressed in the male-specific HOB neuron, and are necessary for sensation of the hermaphrodite vulva during mating. We demonstrate that male vulva location behavior and expression of lov-1 and pkd-2 in the ciliated sensory neuron HOB require the activities of transcription factor EGL-46 and to some extent also EGL-44. This EGL-46- regulated program is specific to HOB and is distinct from a general ciliogenic pathway functioning in all ciliated neurons. The ciliogenic pathway regulator DAF-19 affects downstream components of the HOB-specific program indirectly and is independent of EGL-46 activity. The sensory function of HOB requires the combined action of these two distinct regulatory pathways.

  9. Distinct tachykinin NK(1) receptor function in primate nucleus tractus solitarius neurons is dysregulated after second-hand tobacco smoke exposure.

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    Sekizawa, Shin-Ichi; Joad, Jesse P; Pinkerton, Kent E; Bonham, Ann C

    2011-06-01

    Second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure in children increases the risk of asthma and sudden infant death syndrome. Epidemiological and experimental data have suggested SHS can alter neuroplasticity in the CNS, associated with substance P. We hypothesized that exposure to SHS in young primates changed the effect of substance P on the plasticity of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), where airway sensory information is first processed in the CNS. Thirteen-month-old rhesus monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA, n= 5) or SHS (n= 5) for >6 months from 50 days of their fetal age. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on NTS neurons in brainstem slices from these animals to record the intrinsic cell excitability in the absence or presence of the NK(1) receptor antagonist, SR140333 (3 µM). Neurons were electrophysiologically classified based on their spiking onset from a hyperpolarized membrane potential into two phenotypes: rapid-onset spiking (RS) and delayed-onset spiking (DS) types. In RS neurons, SR140333 reduced the spiking response, similarly in both FA- and SHS-exposed animals. In DS neurons, SR140333 almost abolished the spiking response in FA-exposed animals, but had no effect in SHS-exposed animals. The contribution of NK(1) receptors to cell excitability depended on firing phenotype of primate NTS neurons and was disrupted by SHS exposure, specifically in DS neurons. Our findings reveal a novel NK(1) receptor function in the primate brainstem and support the hypothesis that chronic exposure to SHS in children causes tachykinin-related neuroplastic changes in the CNS. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Distinct neuronal populations in the basal forebrain encode motivational salience and movement

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    Irene eAvila

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Basal forebrain (BF is one of the largest cortically-projecting neuromodulatory systems in the mammalian brain, and plays a key role in attention, arousal, learning and memory. The cortically projecting BF neurons, comprised of mainly magnocellular cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, are widely distributed across several brain regions that spatially overlap with the ventral striatopallidal system at the ventral pallidum (VP. As a first step toward untangling the respective functions of spatially overlapping BF and VP systems, the goal of this study was to comprehensively characterize the behavioral correlates and physiological properties of heterogeneous neuronal populations in the BF region. We found that, while rats performed a reward-biased simple reaction time task, distinct neuronal populations encode either motivational salience or movement information. The motivational salience of attended stimuli is encoded by phasic bursting activity of a large population of slow-firing neurons that have large, broad, and complex action potential waveforms. In contrast, two other separate groups of neurons encode movement-related information, and respectively increase and decrease firing rates while rats maintained fixation. These two groups of neurons mostly have higher firing rates and small, narrow action potential waveforms. These results support the conclusion that multiple neurophysiologically distinct neuronal populations in the BF region operate independently of each other as parallel functional circuits. These observations also caution against interpreting neuronal activity in this region as a homogeneous population reflecting the function of either BF or VP alone. We suggest that salience- and movement-related neuronal populations likely correspond to BF corticopetal neurons and VP neurons, respectively.

  11. Kölliker-Fuse GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons project to distinct targets.

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    Geerling, Joel C; Yokota, Shigefumi; Rukhadze, Irma; Roe, Dan; Chamberlin, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) is known primarily for its respiratory function as the "pneumotaxic center" or "pontine respiratory group." Considered part of the parabrachial (PB) complex, KF contains glutamatergic neurons that project to respiratory-related targets in the medulla and spinal cord (Yokota, Oka, Tsumori, Nakamura, & Yasui, 2007). Here we describe an unexpected population of neurons in the caudal KF and adjacent lateral crescent subnucleus (PBlc), which are γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and have an entirely different pattern of projections than glutamatergic KF neurons. First, immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and Cre-reporter labeling revealed that many of these GABAergic neurons express FoxP2 in both rats and mice. Next, using Cre-dependent axonal tracing in Vgat-IRES-Cre and Vglut2-IRES-Cre mice, we identified different projection patterns from GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in this region. GABAergic neurons in KF and PBlc project heavily and almost exclusively to trigeminal sensory nuclei, with minimal projections to cardiorespiratory nuclei in the brainstem, and none to the spinal cord. In contrast, glutamatergic KF neurons project heavily to the autonomic, respiratory, and motor regions of the medulla and spinal cord previously identified as efferent targets mediating KF cardiorespiratory effects. These findings identify a novel, GABAergic subpopulation of KF/PB neurons with a distinct efferent projection pattern targeting the brainstem trigeminal sensory system. Rather than regulating breathing, we propose that these neurons influence vibrissal sensorimotor function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurons in the Hippocampus Exhibit Molecularly Distinct Large Dense Core Vesicles

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    Jose Jorge Ramirez-Franco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal interneurons comprise a diverse family of inhibitory neurons which function is critical for fine information processing. Along with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, interneurons secrete a myriad of neuroactive substances via secretory vesicles which molecular composition and regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we have carried out an immunohistofluorescence analysis to describe the molecular content of vesicles in distinct populations of hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that phogrin, an integral protein of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells, is highly enriched in parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Consistently, immunoelectron microscopy revealed phogrin staining in axon terminals of symmetrical synapses establishing inhibitory contacts with cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, phogrin is highly expressed in CA3 and dentate gyrus interneurons which are both positive for PV and neuropeptide Y. Surprisingly, chromogranin B a canonical large dense core vesicle marker, is excluded from inhibitory cells in the hippocampus but highly expressed in excitatory CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus granule cells. Our results provide the first evidence of phogrin expression in hippocampal interneurons and suggest the existence of molecularly distinct populations of secretory vesicles in different types of inhibitory neurons.

  13. Distinct Functions of Endophilin Isoforms in Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

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    Jifeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endophilin isoforms perform distinct characteristics in their interactions with N-type Ca2+ channels and dynamin. However, precise functional differences for the endophilin isoforms on synaptic vesicle (SV endocytosis remain unknown. By coupling RNA interference and electrophysiological recording techniques in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we investigated the functional differences of three isoforms of endophilin in SV endocytosis. The results showed that the amplitude of normalized evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in endophilin1 knockdown neurons decreased significantly for both single train and multiple train stimulations. Similar results were found using endophilin2 knockdown neurons, whereas endophilin3 siRNA exhibited no change compared with control neurons. Endophilin1 and endophilin2 affected SV endocytosis, but the effect of endophilin1 and endophilin2 double knockdown was not different from that of either knockdown alone. This result suggested that endophilin1 and endophilin2 functioned together but not independently during SV endocytosis. Taken together, our results indicate that SV endocytosis is sustained by endophilin1 and endophilin2 isoforms, but not by endophilin3, in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  14. Conditional Viral Tract Tracing Delineates the Projections of the Distinct Kisspeptin Neuron Populations to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons in the Mouse.

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    Yip, Siew Hoong; Boehm, Ulrich; Herbison, Allan E; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2015-07-01

    Kisspeptin neurons play an essential role in the regulation of fertility through direct regulation of the GnRH neurons. However, the relative contributions of the two functionally distinct kisspeptin neuron subpopulations to this critical regulation are not fully understood. Here we analyzed the specific projection patterns of kisspeptin neurons originating from either the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle (RP3V) or the arcuate nucleus (ARN) using a cell-specific, viral-mediated tract-tracing approach. We stereotaxically injected a Cre-dependent recombinant adenovirus encoding farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein into the ARN or RP3V of adult male and female mice expressing Cre recombinase in kisspeptin neurons. Fibers from ARN kisspeptin neurons projected widely; however, we did not find any evidence for direct contact with GnRH neuron somata or proximal dendrites in either sex. In contrast, we identified RP3V kisspeptin fibers in close contact with GnRH neuron somata and dendrites in both sexes. Fibers originating from both the RP3V and ARN were observed in close contact with distal GnRH neuron processes in the ARN and in the lateral and internal aspects of the median eminence. Furthermore, GnRH nerve terminals were found in close contact with the proximal dendrites of ARN kisspeptin neurons in the ARN, and ARN kisspeptin fibers were found contacting RP3V kisspeptin neurons in both sexes. Together these data delineate selective zones of kisspeptin neuron inputs to GnRH neurons and demonstrate complex interconnections between the distinct kisspeptin populations and GnRH neurons.

  15. Distinct Nav1.7-dependent pain sensations require different sets of sensory and sympathetic neurons.

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    Minett, Michael S; Nassar, Mohammed A; Clark, Anna K; Passmore, Gayle; Dickenson, Anthony H; Wang, Fan; Malcangio, Marzia; Wood, John N

    2012-04-24

    Human acute and inflammatory pain requires the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 but its significance for neuropathic pain is unknown. Here we show that Nav1.7 expression in different sets of mouse sensory and sympathetic neurons underlies distinct types of pain sensation. Ablating Nav1.7 gene (SCN9A) expression in all sensory neurons using Advillin-Cre abolishes mechanical pain, inflammatory pain and reflex withdrawal responses to heat. In contrast, heat-evoked pain is retained when SCN9A is deleted only in Nav1.8-positive nociceptors. Surprisingly, responses to the hotplate test, as well as neuropathic pain, are unaffected when SCN9A is deleted in all sensory neurons. However, deleting SCN9A in both sensory and sympathetic neurons abolishes these pain sensations and recapitulates the pain-free phenotype seen in humans with SCN9A loss-of-function mutations. These observations demonstrate an important role for Nav1.7 in sympathetic neurons in neuropathic pain, and provide possible insights into the mechanisms that underlie gain-of-function Nav1.7-dependent pain conditions.

  16. Histamine Neurons In The Tuberomamillary Nucleus: A Whole Center Or Distinct Subpopulations?

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    Patrizio eBlandina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Histamine axons originate from a single source, the tuberomamillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus, to innervate almost all CNS regions. This feature, a compact cell group with widely distributed fibers, resembles that of other amines systems, such as noradrenaline or serotonin, and is consistent with a function for histamine over a host of physiological processes, including the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, appetite, endocrine homeostasis, body temperature, pain perception, learning, memory and emotion. An important question is whether these diverse physiological roles are served by different histamine neuronal subpopulation. While the histamine system is generally regarded as one single functional unit that provides histamine throughout the brain, evidence is beginning to accumulate in favour of heterogeneity of the histamine neurons. The aim of this review is to summarize experimental evidence demonstrating that histamine neurons are heterogeneous, organized into functionally distinct circuits, impinging on different brain regions, and displaying selective control mechanisms. This could imply independent functions of subsets of histamine neurons according to their respective origin and terminal projections.

  17. EGL-13/SoxD Specifies Distinct O2 and CO2 Sensory Neuron Fates in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Gramstrup Petersen, Jakob; Rojo Romanos, Teresa; Juozaityte, Vaida

    2013-01-01

    Animals harbor specialized neuronal systems that are used for sensing and coordinating responses to changes in oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In Caenorhabditis elegans, the O2/CO2 sensory system comprises functionally and morphologically distinct sensory neurons that mediate rapid behavioral...... responses to exquisite changes in O2 or CO2 levels via different sensory receptors. How the diversification of the O2- and CO2-sensing neurons is established is poorly understood. We show here that the molecular identity of both the BAG (O2/CO2-sensing) and the URX (O2-sensing) neurons is controlled...... by the phylogenetically conserved SoxD transcription factor homolog EGL-13. egl-13 mutant animals fail to fully express the distinct terminal gene batteries of the BAG and URX neurons and, as such, are unable to mount behavioral responses to changes in O2 and CO2. We found that the expression of egl-13 is regulated...

  18. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications.

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    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michele; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-27

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features.

  19. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

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    Amel Bendali

    Full Text Available Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  20. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

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    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  1. Distinctive Glial and Neuronal Interfacing on Nanocrystalline Diamond

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    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth. PMID:24664111

  2. Transgenic Mouse Lines Subdivide External Segment of the Globus Pallidus (GPe) Neurons and Reveal Distinct GPe Output Pathways

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    Mastro, Kevin J.; Bouchard, Rachel S.; Holt, Hiromi A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-type diversity in the brain enables the assembly of complex neural circuits, whose organization and patterns of activity give rise to brain function. However, the identification of distinct neuronal populations within a given brain region is often complicated by a lack of objective criteria to distinguish one neuronal population from another. In the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), neuronal populations have been defined using molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological criteria, but these classification schemes are often not generalizable across preparations and lack consistency even within the same preparation. Here, we present a novel use of existing transgenic mouse lines, Lim homeobox 6 (Lhx6)–Cre and parvalbumin (PV)–Cre, to define genetically distinct cell populations in the GPe that differ molecularly, anatomically, and electrophysiologically. Lhx6–GPe neurons, which do not express PV, are concentrated in the medial portion of the GPe. They have lower spontaneous firing rates, narrower dynamic ranges, and make stronger projections to the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta compared with PV–GPe neurons. In contrast, PV–GPe neurons are more concentrated in the lateral portions of the GPe. They have narrower action potentials, deeper afterhyperpolarizations, and make stronger projections to the subthalamic nucleus and parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus. These electrophysiological and anatomical differences suggest that Lhx6–GPe and PV–GPe neurons participate in different circuits with the potential to contribute to different aspects of motor function and dysfunction in disease. PMID:24501350

  3. Ionic currents of morphologically distinct peptidergic neurons in defined culture.

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    Meyers, D E; Graf, R A; Cooke, I M

    1992-05-01

    1. The X-organ sinus gland is a major peptidergic neurosecretory system in Crustacea, analogous to the vertebrate hypothalamoneurohypophyseal system. Neuronal somata isolated from the crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ and maintained in primary culture in unconditioned, fully defined medium show immediate regenerative outgrowth. Outgrowth occurring as broad lamellipodia ("veiled") distinguishes neurons consistently showing crustacean hyperglycemic hormone immunoreactivity. Neurons that are immunoreactive against molt-inhibiting hormone and red pigment concentrating hormone antisera give rise to branched neurites ("branched"). 2. The whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique was used to study the electrophysiology of these two cell types 24-48 h after plating. Under current clamp, only veiled neurons fired overshooting action potentials either spontaneously or in response to depolarization. 3. Under voltage clamp, net current was predominantly outward. When solutions that suppressed outward current were used, only veiled neurons showed significant inward current. These included a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na current and a slow (time to peak 6-10 ms at 0 mV) Cd-sensitive Ca current (ICa) that was activated at potentials less than -30 mV, was maximal at 0 to +20 mV, and did not reverse at potentials up to +60 mV. 4. In TTX, the form of the Ca current I(V) curve was unchanged by changes of holding potential between -40 and -80 mV, and 75-100% of ICa was available from -40 mV. 5. ICa inactivated slowly and incompletely. Analysis with two-pulse regimes suggested that both inactivation and facilitation mechanisms were present. 6. Outward current was examined in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM Cd2+ (1 microM TTX was always present in the external medium). Cd2+ ions slightly reduced the peak outward current, usually by less than 10% (Vc = -10 to +20 mV; Vh = -80 mV). All additional observations were in the presence of TTX and Cd2+. 7. Both cell types expressed

  4. Functional diversity and developmental changes in rat neuronal kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, T J; Huettner, J E

    2001-04-15

    1. Whole-cell currents evoked by kainate and the GluR5-selective agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tertbutylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA) were used to compare the physiological properties of kainate receptors expressed by neurons from rat hippocampus, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. 2. In contrast to kainate, which evoked desensitizing currents with similar decay rates and steady-state components in all three cell types, responses to ATPA were distinctly different in the three cell populations. Currents evoked by ATPA displayed a significant steady-state component in hippocampal neurons, but decayed rapidly to baseline in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. ATPA failed to evoke current in many of the spinal neurons. 3. ATPA caused steady-state desensitization in DRG cells with an IC50 of 41 nM. Recovery from desensitization of DRG cell receptors by ATPA was significantly slower than for any previously described agonist. In contrast, hippocampal kainate receptors recovered from desensitization by ATPA within a few seconds. 4. Half-maximal activation of kainate receptors in hippocampal neurons required 938 nM ATPA. In DRG cells treated with concanavalin A the EC50 for ATPA was 341 nM. ATPA evoked current in embryonic hippocampal neurons but with lower amplitude relative to kainate than in cultured postnatal neurons. 5. Collectively, these results highlight functional differences between neuronal kainate receptors that may reflect their distinct subunit composition and their diverse roles in synaptic transmission.

  5. Motor neurons and oligodendrocytes arise from distinct cell lineages by progenitor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanelli, Andrew M; Appel, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    During spinal cord development, ventral neural progenitor cells that express the transcription factors Olig1 and Olig2, called pMN progenitors, produce motor neurons and then oligodendrocytes. Whether motor neurons and oligodendrocytes arise from common or distinct progenitors in vivo is not known. Using zebrafish, we found that motor neurons and oligodendrocytes are produced sequentially by distinct progenitors that have distinct origins. When olig2(+) cells were tracked during the peak period of motor neuron formation, most differentiated as motor neurons without further cell division. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that, as motor neurons differentiated, more dorsally positioned neuroepithelial progenitors descended to the pMN domain and initiated olig2 expression. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling during motor neuron differentiation blocked the ventral movement of progenitors, the progressive initiation of olig2 expression, and oligodendrocyte formation. We therefore propose that the motor neuron-to-oligodendrocyte switch results from Hedgehog-mediated recruitment of glial-fated progenitors to the pMN domain subsequent to neurogenesis.

  6. Mirror neurons: from origin to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey; Catmur, Caroline; Press, Clare; Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    This article argues that mirror neurons originate in sensorimotor associative learning and therefore a new approach is needed to investigate their functions. Mirror neurons were discovered about 20 years ago in the monkey brain, and there is now evidence that they are also present in the human brain. The intriguing feature of many mirror neurons is that they fire not only when the animal is performing an action, such as grasping an object using a power grip, but also when the animal passively observes a similar action performed by another agent. It is widely believed that mirror neurons are a genetic adaptation for action understanding; that they were designed by evolution to fulfill a specific socio-cognitive function. In contrast, we argue that mirror neurons are forged by domain-general processes of associative learning in the course of individual development, and, although they may have psychological functions, they do not necessarily have a specific evolutionary purpose or adaptive function. The evidence supporting this view shows that (1) mirror neurons do not consistently encode action "goals"; (2) the contingency- and context-sensitive nature of associative learning explains the full range of mirror neuron properties; (3) human infants receive enough sensorimotor experience to support associative learning of mirror neurons ("wealth of the stimulus"); and (4) mirror neurons can be changed in radical ways by sensorimotor training. The associative account implies that reliable information about the function of mirror neurons can be obtained only by research based on developmental history, system-level theory, and careful experimentation.

  7. Amygdalar auditory neurons contribute to self-other distinction during ultrasonic social vocalization in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Matsumoto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical studies reported hyperactivation of the auditory system and amygdala in patients with auditory hallucinations (hearing others’ but not one’s own voice, independent of any external stimulus, neural mechanisms of self/other attribution is not well understood. We recorded neuronal responses in the dorsal amygdala including the lateral amygdaloid nucleus to ultrasonic vocalization (USVs emitted by subjects and conspecifics during free social interaction in 16 adult male rats. The animals emitting the USVs were identified by EMG recordings. One-quarter of the amygdalar neurons (15/60 responded to 50 kHz calls by the subject and/or conspecifics. Among the responsive neurons, most neurons (Type-Other neurons (73%, 11/15 responded only to calls by conspecifics but not subjects. Two Type-Self neurons (13%, 2/15 responded to calls by the subject but not those by conspecifics, although their response selectivity to subjects vs. conspecifics was lower than that of Type-Other neurons. The remaining two neurons (13% responded to calls by both the subject and conspecifics. Furthermore, population coding of the amygdalar neurons represented distinction of subject vs. conspecific calls. The present results provide the first neurophysiological evidence that the amygdala discriminately represents affective social calls by subject and conspecifics. These findings suggest that the amygdala is an important brain region for self/other attribution. Furthermore, pathological activation of the amygdala, where Type-Other neurons predominate, could induce external misattribution of percepts of vocalization.

  8. A chemical-genetic strategy reveals distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1 kinase in neuronal polarization and synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokat Kevan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons assemble into a functional network through a sequence of developmental processes including neuronal polarization and synapse formation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the serine/threonine SAD-1 kinase is essential for proper neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. To determine if SAD-1 activity regulates the establishment or maintenance of these neuronal structures, we examined its temporal requirements using a chemical-genetic method that allows for selective and reversible inactivation of its kinase activity in vivo. Results We generated a PP1 analog-sensitive variant of SAD-1. Through temporal inhibition of SAD-1 kinase activity we show that its activity is required for the establishment of both neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. However, while SAD-1 activity is needed strictly when neurons are polarizing, the temporal requirement for SAD-1 is less stringent in synaptic organization, which can also be re-established during maintenance. Conclusion This study reports the first temporal analysis of a neural kinase activity using the chemical-genetic system. It reveals that neuronal polarity and synaptic organization have distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1.

  9. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Friedrich, Anja B; Sima, Richard J; Preat, Thomas; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-13

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons.

  10. Distinct requirements for TrkB and TrkC signaling in target innervation by sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Antonio; Calella, Anna Maria; Fritzsch, Bernd; Knipper, Marlies; Katz, David; Eilers, Andreas; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewin, Gary R.; Klein, Rudiger; Minichiello, Liliana

    2002-01-01

    Signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via the TrkB receptor, or by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) through the TrkC receptor support distinct populations of sensory neurons. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by Trk (tyrosine kinase) receptors, which in vivo promote neuronal survival and target innervation, are not well understood. Using mice with TrkB or TrkC receptors lacking the docking site for Shc adaptors (trkB(shc/shc) and trkC(shc/shc) mice), we show that TrkB and TrkC promote survival of sensory neurons mainly through Shc site-independent pathways, suggesting that these receptors use similar pathways to prevent apoptosis. In contrast, the regulation of target innervation appears different: in trkB(shc/shc) mice neurons lose target innervation, whereas in trkC(shc/shc) mice the surviving TrkC-dependent neurons maintain target innervation and function. Biochemical analysis indicates that phosphorylation at the Shc site positively regulates autophosphorylation of TrkB, but not of TrkC. Our findings show that although TrkB and TrkC signals mediating survival are largely similar, TrkB and TrkC signals required for maintenance of target innervation in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms.

  11. Monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic neurons have distinct expression profiles of histone deacetylases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenkichi Takase

    Full Text Available Monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic neurons regulate a wide variety of behaviors, such as feeding, sleep/wakefulness behavior, stress response, addiction, and social behavior. These neurons form neural circuits to integrate different modalities of behavioral and environmental factors, such as stress, maternal care, and feeding conditions. One possible mechanism for integrating environmental factors through the monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic neurons is through the epigenetic regulation of gene expression via altered acetylation of histones. Histone deacetylases (HDACs play an important role in altering behavior in response to environmental factors. Despite increasing attention and the versatile roles of HDACs in a variety of brain functions and disorders, no reports have detailed the localization of the HDACs in the monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic neurons. Here, we examined the expression profile of the HDAC protein family from HDAC1 to HDAC11 in corticotropin-releasing hormone, oxytocin, vasopressin, agouti-related peptide (AgRP, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, orexin, histamine, dopamine, serotonin, and noradrenaline neurons. Immunoreactivities for HDAC1,-2,-3,-5,-6,-7,-9, and -11 were very similar among the monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic neurons, while the HDAC4, -8, and -10 immunoreactivities were clearly different among neuronal groups. HDAC10 expression was found in AgRP neurons, POMC neurons, dopamine neurons and noradrenaline neurons but not in other neuronal groups. HDAC8 immunoreactivity was detected in the cytoplasm of almost all histamine neurons with a pericellular pattern but not in other neuropeptidergic and monoaminergic neurons. Thus, the differential expression of HDACs in monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic neurons may be crucial for the maintenance of biological characteristics and may be altered in response to environmental factors.

  12. Mirror neurons: functions, mechanisms and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztop, Erhan; Kawato, Mitsuo; Arbib, Michael A

    2013-04-12

    Mirror neurons for manipulation fire both when the animal manipulates an object in a specific way and when it sees another animal (or the experimenter) perform an action that is more or less similar. Such neurons were originally found in macaque monkeys, in the ventral premotor cortex, area F5 and later also in the inferior parietal lobule. Recent neuroimaging data indicate that the adult human brain is endowed with a "mirror neuron system," putatively containing mirror neurons and other neurons, for matching the observation and execution of actions. Mirror neurons may serve action recognition in monkeys as well as humans, whereas their putative role in imitation and language may be realized in human but not in monkey. This article shows the important role of computational models in providing sufficient and causal explanations for the observed phenomena involving mirror systems and the learning processes which form them, and underlines the need for additional circuitry to lift up the monkey mirror neuron circuit to sustain the posited cognitive functions attributed to the human mirror neuron system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  14. Structure of the adult central complex in Drosophila: organization of distinct neuronal subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J M; Armstrong, J D

    2010-05-01

    The central complex (CX) is a defined set of neuropils located on the midline of the protocerebrum in several arthropods and has been implicated in a number of behaviors. To investigate the function of the CX further it is imperative to know the neuroarchitecture of this structure and to ensure all known neuron types conform to a common nomenclature system. Several types of CX neuron have been identified but it is not known if these exist singly or as components of isomorphic sets. We used an enhancer trap approach to study the adult structure, connectivity, and polarity of CX neurons in Drosophila. We observed several isomorphic sets of small-field neurons including pontine and fb-eb neurons, and also isomorphic sets of large-field neurons including R neurons and F neurons. We found that several types of large-field F neurons existed in isomorphic sets of approximately eight (four per hemisphere) and found evidence for small-field neuron types existing as isomorphic sets of 16. Small-field neurons were observed in clearly organized layers. This study provides a novel insight into CX structure and connectivity and provides a set of characterized enhancer trap lines that will be valuable for future study. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Local interneurons define functionally distinct regions within lobster olfactory glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowiak; Diebel; Ache

    1997-01-01

    Whole-cell recording coupled with biocytin injection revealed four types of interneurons intrinsic to the olfactory lobe (OL) of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. Each type of neuron had a distinct pattern of arborization within the three anatomically defined regions of OL glomeruli (cap, subcap and base). Type I interneurons innervated all three regions, while types II, III and IV branched only in the cap, subcap and base, respectively. Type I interneurons responded to electrical stimulation of the antennular (olfactory) nerve with a burst of 1­20 action potentials and a 1­10 s depolarization. Type II (cap) interneurons responded to the same input with a burst of 1­3 action potentials followed by a shorter hyperpolarization. Type III (subcap) interneurons responded with a burst of 1­6 action potentials followed by a delayed, 0.5­4 s depolarization. Type IV (base) interneurons responded with a brief depolarization or a burst of 1­3 action potentials followed by a 1 s hyperpolarization. The regionalized arborization and the different response properties of the type II, III and IV interneurons strongly imply that lobster olfactory glomeruli contain functionally distinct regions, a feature that should be useful in understanding the multiple synaptic pathways involved in processing olfactory input.

  16. SCYL pseudokinases in neuronal function and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephane Pelletier

    2016-01-01

    The generation of mice lacking SCYL1 or SCYL2 and the identiifcation ofScyl1 as the causative gene in the motor neuron disease mouse model muscle deifcient (Scyl1mdf/mdf) demonstrated the importance of the SCY1-like family of protein pseudokinases in neuronal function and survival. Several essential cellular processes such as intracellular trafifcking and nuclear tRNA export are thought to be regulated by SCYL proteins. How-ever, whether deregulation of these processes contributes to the neurodegenerative processes associated with the loss of SCYL proteins is still unclear. Here, I brielfy review the evidence supporting that SCYL proteins play a role in these processes and discuss their possible involvement in the neuronal functions of SCYL pro-teins. I also propose ways to determine the importance of these pathways for the functions of SCYL proteins in vivo.

  17. Neuronal, non-neuronal and hybrid forms of enolase in brain: structural, immunological and functional comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangos, P J; Zis, A P; Clark, R L; Goodwin, F K

    1978-07-07

    Three forms of the glycolytic enzyme, enolase [2-phospho-D-glycerate hydrolase (E.C. No. 4.2.1.11)] have been prepared from rat whole brain extract. The most acidic enolase form is neuron specific enolase (NSE) which had previously been designated neuron specific protein (NSP). The least acidic form designated non-neuronal enolase (NNE) has been purified and compared structurally, immunologically and functionally to NSE. NNE is a dimer of 86,500 M.W. consistint of two very similar subunits. The data establish that NNE is larger than NSE which has been shown to be composed of two apparently identical 39,000 molecular weight subunits (78,000). NNE is less acidic than NSE having a pI of 5.9 compared to the value of 4.7 for NSE. Structural and immunological analysis establishes that the NNE subunit is distinct from the NSE subunit, and are therfore products of two separate genes. The structural designation of NSE is (gammagamma) and that of NNE (alpha' alpha'). NSE is strictly localized in neurons indicating that the gene coding for the gamma subunit is only expressed in neuronal cells. The intermediate brain enolase form has been partially purified; structural and immunological evidence indicate that it is a hybrid molecule consisting of one NNE subunit and one NSE subunit (alpha'gamma).

  18. Neurons with radial basis like rate functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsolt László

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural networks constructed with "locally tuned processing units" and more generally referred to as "radial basis function networks" have been proposed by a number of workers. In this communication, I submit a conjecture, based on indirect experimental and direct computational evidence of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, that there may be biological neurons in nervous systems for which the rate function is locally tuned. If proved to be valid, this conjecture may simplify neurodynamic models of some functions of nervous systems.

  19. Relating neuronal firing patterns to functional differentiation of cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Shinomoto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been empirically established that the cerebral cortical areas defined by Brodmann one hundred years ago solely on the basis of cellular organization are closely correlated to their function, such as sensation, association, and motion. Cytoarchitectonically distinct cortical areas have different densities and types of neurons. Thus, signaling patterns may also vary among cytoarchitectonically unique cortical areas. To examine how neuronal signaling patterns are related to innate cortical functions, we detected intrinsic features of cortical firing by devising a metric that efficiently isolates non-Poisson irregular characteristics, independent of spike rate fluctuations that are caused extrinsically by ever-changing behavioral conditions. Using the new metric, we analyzed spike trains from over 1,000 neurons in 15 cortical areas sampled by eight independent neurophysiological laboratories. Analysis of firing-pattern dissimilarities across cortical areas revealed a gradient of firing regularity that corresponded closely to the functional category of the cortical area; neuronal spiking patterns are regular in motor areas, random in the visual areas, and bursty in the prefrontal area. Thus, signaling patterns may play an important role in function-specific cerebral cortical computation.

  20. Distinct Nav1.7-dependent pain sensations require different sets of sensory and sympathetic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Minett, Michael S.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Clark, Anna K.; Passmore, Gayle; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Wang, Fan; Malcangio, Marzia; John N. Wood

    2012-01-01

    Human acute and inflammatory pain requires the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 but its significance for neuropathic pain is unknown. Here we show that Nav1.7 expression in different sets of mouse sensory and sympathetic neurons underlies distinct types of pain sensation. Ablating Nav1.7 gene (SCN9A) expression in all sensory neurons using Advillin-Cre abolishes mechanical pain, inflammatory pain and reflex withdrawal responses to heat. In contrast, heat-evoked pain is retain...

  1. In monkeys making value-based decisions, amygdala neurons are sensitive to cue value as distinct from cue salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Marvin L; Olson, Carl R

    2017-04-01

    that neurons of the lateral intraparietal (LIP) area encode motivational salience. Here, it reveals that amygdala neurons encode value. The results establish a sharp functional distinction between the two areas. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Differential expression of K4-AP currents and Kv3.1 potassium channel transcripts in cortical neurons that develop distinct firing phenotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Massengill, Jennifer L; Smith, Martin A.; Son, Dong Ik; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    1997-01-01

    Maturation of electrical excitability during early postnatal development is critical to formation of functional neural circuitry in the mammalian neocortex. Little is known, however, about the changes in gene expression underlying the development of firing properties that characterize different classes of cortical neurons. Here we describe the development of cortical neurons with two distinct firing phenotypes, regular-spiking (RS) and fast-spiking (FS), that appear to emerge from a populatio...

  3. Multiple distinct subtypes of GABAergic neurons in mouse visual cortex identified by triple immunostaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Gonchar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of cortical interneurons use GABA (gamma amino butyric acid as inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurons are morphologically, connectionally, electrically and chemically heterogeneous. In rat cerebral cortex three distinct groups of GABAergic interneurons have been identifi ed by the expression of parvalbumin (PV, calretinin (CR and somatostatin (SOM. Recent studies in mouse cerebral cortex have revealed a different organization in which the CR and SOM populations are partially overlapping. Because CR and SOM neurons derive from different progenitors located in different embryonic structures, the coexpression of CR + SOM suggests that the chemical differentiation of interneurons is regulated postmitotically. Here, we have taken an important fi rst step towards understanding this process by triple immunostaining mouse visual cortex with a panel of antibodies, which has been used extensively for classifying developing interneurons. We have found at least 13 distinct groups of GABAergic neurons which include PV, CR, SOM, CCK (cholecystokinin, CR + SOM, CR + NPY (neuropeptide Y, CR + VIP (vasointestinal polypeptide, SOM + NPY, SOM + VIP, VIP + ChAT (choline acetyltransferase, CCK + NPY, CR + SOM + NPY and CR + SOM + VIP expressing cells. Triple immunostaining with PV, CR and SOM antibodies during postnatal development further showed that PV is never colocalized with CR and SOM. Importantly, expression of SOM and CR + SOM developed after the percentage of CR cells that do not express SOM has reached the mature level, suggesting that the chemical differentiation of SOM and CR + SOM neurons is a postnatal event, which may be controlled by transcriptional regulation.

  4. Functionally distinct dopamine signals in nucleus accumbens core and shell in the freely moving rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob K.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Lovic, Vedran

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic signaling of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) neurons has been implicated in reward learning, drug abuse, and motivation. However, this system is complex because firing patterns of these neurons are heterogeneous; subpopulations receive distinct synaptic inputs, and project to anatomically...... and functionally distinct downstream targets, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core. The functional roles of these cell populations and their real-time signaling properties in freely moving animals are unknown. Resolving the real-time DA signal requires simultaneous knowledge of the synchronized...... activity of DA cell subpopulations and assessment of the down-stream functional effect ofDArelease. Because this is not yet possible solely by experimentation in vivo,we combine computational modeling and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry data to reconstruct the functionally relevantDAsignal in...

  5. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  6. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Jokela

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ, 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  7. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  8. Estradiol selectively enhances auditory function in avian forebrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caras, Melissa L; O'Brien, Matthew; Brenowitz, Eliot A; Rubel, Edwin W

    2012-12-01

    Sex steroids modulate vertebrate sensory processing, but the impact of circulating hormone levels on forebrain function remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that circulating sex steroids modulate single-unit responses in the avian telencephalic auditory nucleus, field L. We mimicked breeding or nonbreeding conditions by manipulating plasma 17β-estradiol levels in wild-caught female Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii). Extracellular responses of single neurons to tones and conspecific songs presented over a range of intensities revealed that estradiol selectively enhanced auditory function in cells that exhibited monotonic rate level functions to pure tones. In these cells, estradiol treatment increased spontaneous and maximum evoked firing rates, increased pure tone response strengths and sensitivity, and expanded the range of intensities over which conspecific song stimuli elicited significant responses. Estradiol did not significantly alter the sensitivity or dynamic ranges of cells that exhibited non-monotonic rate level functions. Notably, there was a robust correlation between plasma estradiol concentrations in individual birds and physiological response properties in monotonic, but not non-monotonic neurons. These findings demonstrate that functionally distinct classes of anatomically overlapping forebrain neurons are differentially regulated by sex steroid hormones in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Turtle Dorsal Cortex Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types with Indistinguishable Visual Responses.

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    Thomas Crockett

    Full Text Available A detailed inventory of the constituent pieces in cerebral cortex is considered essential to understand the principles underlying cortical signal processing. Specifically, the search for pyramidal neuron subtypes is partly motivated by the hypothesis that a subtype-specific division of labor could create a rich substrate for computation. On the other hand, the extreme integration of individual neurons into the collective cortical circuit promotes the hypothesis that cellular individuality represents a smaller computational role within the context of the larger network. These competing hypotheses raise the important question to what extent the computational function of a neuron is determined by its individual type or by its circuit connections. We created electrophysiological profiles from pyramidal neurons within the sole cellular layer of turtle visual cortex by measuring responses to current injection using whole-cell recordings. A blind clustering algorithm applied to these data revealed the presence of two principle types of pyramidal neurons. Brief diffuse light flashes triggered membrane potential fluctuations in those same cortical neurons. The apparently network driven variability of the visual responses concealed the existence of subtypes. In conclusion, our results support the notion that the importance of diverse intrinsic physiological properties is minimized when neurons are embedded in a synaptic recurrent network.

  10. Radiation induces acute alterations in neuronal function.

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    Peter H Wu

    Full Text Available Every year, nearly 200,000 patients undergo radiation for brain tumors. For both patients and caregivers the most distressing adverse effect is impaired cognition. Efforts to protect against this debilitating effect have suffered from inadequate understanding of the cellular mechanisms of radiation damage. In the past it was accepted that radiation-induced normal tissue injury resulted from a progressive reduction in the survival of clonogenic cells. Moreover, because radiation-induced brain dysfunction is believed to evolve over months to years, most studies have focused on late changes in brain parenchyma. However, clinically, acute changes in cognition are also observed. Because neurons are fully differentiated post-mitotic cells, little information exists on the acute effects of radiation on synaptic function. The purpose of our study was to assess the potential acute effects of radiation on neuronal function utilizing ex vivo hippocampal brain slices. The cellular localization and functional status of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors was identified by immunoblotting. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained both for populations of neuronal cells and individual neurons. In the dentate gyrus region of isolated ex vivo slices, radiation led to early decreases in tyrosine phosphorylation and removal of excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs from the cell surface while simultaneously increasing the surface expression of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(ARs. These alterations in cellular localization corresponded with altered synaptic responses and inhibition of long-term potentiation. The non-competitive NMDAR antagonist memantine blocked these radiation-induced alterations in cellular distribution. These findings demonstrate acute effects of radiation on neuronal cells within isolated brain slices and open new avenues for study.

  11. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protei...

  12. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors.

  13. Connectivity from OR37 expressing olfactory sensory neurons to distinct cell types in the hypothalamus

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    Andrea eBader

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons which express a member from the OR37 subfamily of odorant receptor genes are wired to the main olfactory bulb in a unique monoglomerular fashion; from these glomeruli an untypical connectivity into higher brain centers exists. In the present study we have investigated by DiI and transsynaptic tracing approaches how the connection pattern from these glomeruli into distinct hypothalamic nuclei is organized. The application of DiI onto the ventral domain of the bulb which harbors the OR37 glomeruli resulted in the labeling of fibers within the paraventricular and supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus; some of these fibers were covered with varicose-like structures. No DiI-labeled cell somata were detectable in these nuclei. The data indicate that projection neurons which originate in the OR37 region of the main olfactory bulb form direct connections into these nuclei. The cells that were labeled by the transsynaptic tracer WGA in these nuclei were further characterized. Their distribution pattern in the paraventricular nucleus was reminiscent of cells which produce distinct neuropeptides. Double labeling experiments confirmed that they contained vasopressin, but not the related neuropeptide oxytocin. Morphological analysis revealed that they comprise of magno- and parvocellular cells. A comparative investigation of the WGA-positive cells in the supraoptic nucleus demonstrated that these were vasopressin-positive, as well, whereas oxytocin-producing cells of this nucleus also contained no transsynaptic tracer. Together, the data demonstrate a connectivity from OR37 expressing sensory neurons to distinct hypothalamic neurons with the same neuropeptide content.

  14. Expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the adult mouse forebrain.

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    Marsicano, G; Lutz, B

    1999-12-01

    Cannabinoids can modulate motor behaviour, learning and memory, cognition and pain perception. These effects correlate with the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and with the presence of endogenous cannabinoids in the brain. In trying to obtain further insights into the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of cannabinoids, CB1-positive neurons were determined in the murine forebrain at a single cell resolution. We performed a double in situ hybridization study to detect mRNA of CB1 in combination with mRNA of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65k, neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK), parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin D28k, respectively. Our results revealed that CB1-expressing cells can be divided into distinct neuronal subpopulations. There is a clear distinction between neurons containing CB1 mRNA either at high levels or low levels. The majority of high CB1-expressing cells are GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurons belonging mainly to the cholecystokinin-positive and parvalbumin-negative type of interneurons (basket cells) and, to a lower extent, to the calbindin D28k-positive mid-proximal dendritic inhibitory interneurons. Only a fraction of low CB1-expressing cells is GABAergic. In the hippocampus, amygdala and entorhinal cortex area, CB1 mRNA is present at low but significant levels in many non-GABAergic cells that can be considered as projecting principal neurons. Thus, a complex mechanism appears to underlie the modulatory effects of cannabinoids. They might act on principal glutamatergic circuits as well as modulate local GABAergic inhibitory circuits. CB1 is very highly coexpressed with CCK. It is known that cannabinoids and CCK often have opposite effects on behaviour and physiology. Therefore, we suggest that a putative cross-talk between cannabinoids and CCK might exist and will be relevant to better understanding of physiology and pharmacology of the cannabinoid system.

  15. Spatial distribution of intermingling pools of projection neurons with distinct targets: A 3D analysis of the commissural ganglia in Cancer borealis.

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    Follmann, Rosangela; Goldsmith, Christopher John; Stein, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Projection neurons play a key role in carrying long-distance information between spatially distant areas of the nervous system and in controlling motor circuits. Little is known about how projection neurons with distinct anatomical targets are organized, and few studies have addressed their spatial organization at the level of individual cells. In the paired commissural ganglia (CoGs) of the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis, projection neurons convey sensory, motor, and modulatory information to several distinct anatomical regions. While the functions of descending projection neurons (dPNs) which control downstream motor circuits in the stomatogastric ganglion are well characterized, their anatomical distribution as well as that of neurons projecting to the labrum, brain, and thoracic ganglion have received less attention. Using cell membrane staining, we investigated the spatial distribution of CoG projection neurons in relation to all CoG neurons. Retrograde tracing revealed that somata associated with different axonal projection pathways were not completely spatially segregated, but had distinct preferences within the ganglion. Identified dPNs had diameters larger than 70% of CoG somata and were restricted to the most medial and anterior 25% of the ganglion. They were contained within a cluster of motor neurons projecting through the same nerve to innervate the labrum, indicating that soma position was independent of function and target area. Rather, our findings suggest that CoG neurons projecting to a variety of locations follow a generalized rule: for all nerve pathway origins, the soma cluster centroids in closest proximity are those whose axons project down that pathway. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Striatal Balancing Act in Drug Addiction: Distinct Roles of Direct and Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neurons

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    Mary Kay eLobo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a key role in mediating the acute and chronic effects of addictive drugs, with drugs of abuse causing long-lasting molecular and cellular alterations in both dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum. Despite the wealth of research on the biological actions of abused drugs in striatum, until recently, the distinct roles of the striatum’s two major subtypes of medium spiny neuron (MSN in drug addiction remained elusive. Recent advances in cell-type specific technologies, including fluorescent reporter mice, transgenic or knockout mice, and viral-mediated gene transfer, have advanced the field toward a more comprehensive understanding of the two MSN subtypes in the long-term actions of drugs of abuse. Here we review progress in defining the distinct molecular and functional contributions of the two MSN subtypes in mediating addiction.

  17. Distinct Developmental Origins Manifest in the Specialized Encoding of Movement by Adult Neurons of the External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Paul D.; Larvin, Joseph T.; Duffell, James M.; Garas, Farid N.; Doig, Natalie M.; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Duguid, Ian C.; Bogacz, Rafal; Butt, Simon J.B.; Magill, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional codes initiated during brain development are ultimately realized in adulthood as distinct cell types performing specialized roles in behavior. Focusing on the mouse external globus pallidus (GPe), we demonstrate that the potential contributions of two GABAergic GPe cell types to voluntary action are fated from early life to be distinct. Prototypic GPe neurons derive from the medial ganglionic eminence of the embryonic subpallium and express the transcription factor Nkx2-1. These neurons fire at high rates during alert rest, and encode movements through heterogeneous firing rate changes, with many neurons decreasing their activity. In contrast, arkypallidal GPe neurons originate from lateral/caudal ganglionic eminences, express the transcription factor FoxP2, fire at low rates during rest, and encode movements with robust increases in firing. We conclude that developmental diversity positions prototypic and arkypallidal neurons to fulfil distinct roles in behavior via their disparate regulation of GABA release onto different basal ganglia targets. PMID:25843402

  18. Cadherins in neuronal morphogenesis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sachihiro C; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2008-06-01

    Classic cadherins represent a family of calcium-dependent homophilic cell-cell adhesion molecules. They confer strong adhesiveness to animal cells when they are anchored to the actin cytoskeleton via their cytoplasmic binding partners, catenins. The cadherin/catenin adhesion system plays key roles in the morphogenesis and function of the vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In early vertebrate development, cadherins are involved in multiple events of brain morphogenesis including the formation and maintenance of the neuroepithelium, neurite extension and migration of neuronal cells. In the invertebrate nervous system, classic cadherin-mediated cell-cell interaction plays important roles in wiring among neurons. For synaptogenesis, the cadherin/catenin system not only stabilizes cell-cell contacts at excitatory synapses but also assembles synaptic molecules at synaptic sites. Furthermore, this system is involved in synaptic plasticity. Recent studies on the role of individual cadherin subtypes at synapses indicate that individual cadherin subtypes play their own unique role to regulate synaptic activities.

  19. NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the lizard hippocampus: a distinct subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, J C; Megías, M; Andreu, M J; Real, M A; Guirado, S

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution and light-microscopic features of the NADPH diaphorase-containing structures in the lizard hippocampus, likely to correspond to nitric oxide synthase-containing cells and fibers, and thus likely to release nitric oxide. We also studied co-localization of NADPH diaphorase with the neurotransmitter GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, and the neuropeptide somatostatin, in order to examine whether putative nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons represent a different subpopulation of GABA cells, on which the authors recently reported in lizards. We also studied co-localization of NADPH diaphorase with parvalbumin or somatostatin in mice to ascertain whether the characteristics of this population in reptiles parallel the situation in mammals. Most of the positive NADPH diaphorase neurons were stained in a Golgi-like manner and were in the plexiform layers of the lizard hippocampus with morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar. Co-localization with GABA was 100%, and NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the lizard hippocampus did not contain parvalbumin or somatostatin. The results indicate that putative nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons represent a distinct subpopulation of GABA interneurons in the lizard hippocampus. Two different types of fibers were described in the plexiform layers: one type bearing thick varicosities, and the other thinner ones. We discuss the possibility that at least part of the positive fibers arise from a hypothalamic aminergic nucleus contacting the third ventricle, the periventricular hypothalamic organ. Most radial glia were stained almost completely and formed typical end-feet both at the pia and around capillaries. The results of this study confirm that the capacity for synthesizing nitric oxide is linked to a determined set of neuronal markers depending on the specific brain region, and they provide new resemblances between hippocampal regions in different classes of vertebrates.

  20. Local Circuits of V1 Layer 4B Neurons Projecting to V2 Thick Stripes Define Distinct Cell Classes and Avoid Cytochrome Oxidase Blobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarch, Jeff; Federer, Frederick; Angelucci, Alessandra

    2017-01-11

    Decades of anatomical studies on the primate primary visual cortex (V1) have led to a detailed diagram of V1 intrinsic circuitry, but this diagram lacks information about the output targets of V1 cells. Understanding how V1 local processing relates to downstream processing requires identification of neuronal populations defined by their output targets. In primates, V1 layers (L)2/3 and 4B send segregated projections to distinct cytochrome oxidase (CO) stripes in area V2: neurons in CO blob columns project to thin stripes while neurons outside blob columns project to thick and pale stripes, suggesting functional specialization of V1-to-V2 CO streams. However, the conventional diagram of V1 shows all L4B neurons, regardless of their soma location in blob or interblob columns, as projecting selectively to CO blobs in L2/3, suggesting convergence of blob/interblob information in L2/3 blobs and, possibly, some V2 stripes. However, it is unclear whether all L4B projection neurons show similar local circuitries. Using viral-mediated circuit tracing, we have identified the local circuits of L4B neurons projecting to V2 thick stripes in macaque. Consistent with previous studies, we found the somata of this L4B subpopulation to reside predominantly outside blob columns; however, unlike previous descriptions of local L4B circuits, these cells consistently projected outside CO blob columns in all layers. Thus, the local circuits of these L4B output neurons, just like their extrinsic projections to V2, preserve CO streams. Moreover, the intra-V1 laminar patterns of axonal projections identify two distinct neuron classes within this L4B subpopulation, including a rare novel neuron type, suggestive of two functionally specialized output channels.

  1. Temporal expectation and spectral expectation operate in distinct fashion on neuronal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Fang; Hämäläinen, Jarmo A; Waszak, Florian

    2013-11-01

    The formation of temporal expectation (i.e., the prediction of "when") is of prime importance to sensory processing. It can modulate sensory processing at early processing stages probably via the entrainment of low-frequency neuronal oscillations in the brain. However, sensory predictions involve not only temporal expectation but also spectral expectation (i.e., the prediction of "what"). Here we investigated how temporal expectation may interrelate with spectral expectation by explicitly setting up temporal expectation and spectral expectation in a target detection task. We found that reaction time (RT) was shorter when targets were temporally expected than when they were temporally unexpected. The temporal expectation effect was larger with than without spectral expectation. However, this interaction in the behavioural data did not result from an interaction in the electroencephalography (EEG), where we observed independent main effects of temporal expectation and spectral expectation. More precisely, we found that the N1 and P2 event-related potential (ERP) components and the entrainment of low-frequency neuronal oscillations were exclusively modulated by temporal expectation, whilst only the P3 ERP component was modulated by spectral expectation. Our results, thus, support the idea that temporal expectation and spectral expectation operate in distinct fashion on neuronal populations.

  2. Distinct C9orf72-Associated Dipeptide Repeat Structures Correlate with Neuronal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Amy; Sawaya, Michael R.; Paulson, Henry L.; Todd, Peter K.; Barmada, Sami J.; Ivanova, Magdalena I.

    2016-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common inherited cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The expansions elicit toxicity in part through repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation of the intronic (GGGGCC)n sequence into dipeptide repeat-containing proteins (DPRs). Little is known, however, about the structural characteristics and aggregation propensities of the dipeptide units comprising DPRs. To address this question, we synthesized dipeptide units corresponding to the three sense-strand RAN translation products, analyzed their structures by circular dichroism, electron microscopy and dye binding assays, and assessed their relative toxicity when applied to primary cortical neurons. Short, glycine-arginine (GR)3 dipeptides formed spherical aggregates and selectively reduced neuronal survival compared to glycine-alanine (GA)3 and glycine-proline (GP)3 dipeptides. Doubling peptide length had little effect on the structure of GR or GP peptides, but (GA)6 peptides formed β-sheet rich aggregates that bound thioflavin T and Congo red yet lacked the typical fibrillar morphology of amyloids. Aging of (GA)6 dipeptides increased their β-sheet content and enhanced their toxicity when applied to neurons. We also observed that the relative toxicity of each tested dipeptide was proportional to peptide internalization. Our results demonstrate that different C9orf72-related dipeptides exhibit distinct structural properties that correlate with their relative toxicity. PMID:27776165

  3. Distinct protein domains and expression patterns confer divergent axon guidance functions for Drosophila Robo receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzweck, Bettina; Brankatschk, Marko; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-02-05

    The orthogonal array of axon pathways in the Drosophila CNS is constructed in part under the control of three Robo family axon guidance receptors: Robo1, Robo2 and Robo3. Each of these receptors is responsible for a distinct set of guidance decisions. To determine the molecular basis for these functional specializations, we used homologous recombination to create a series of 9 "robo swap" alleles: expressing each of the three Robo receptors from each of the three robo loci. We demonstrate that the lateral positioning of longitudinal axon pathways relies primarily on differences in gene regulation, not distinct combinations of Robo proteins as previously thought. In contrast, specific features of the Robo1 and Robo2 proteins contribute to their distinct functions in commissure formation. These specializations allow Robo1 to prevent crossing and Robo2 to promote crossing. These data demonstrate how diversification of expression and structure within a single family of guidance receptors can shape complex patterns of neuronal wiring.

  4. Distinct regulation of activity-dependent transcription of immediate early genes in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Mamoru; Sanabe, Tomofumi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kubota, Takane; Tabuchi, Akiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2017-08-26

    The activity-regulated expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) contributes to long-lasting neuronal functions underlying long-term memory. However, their response properties following neuronal activity are unique and remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, here we further investigated the response properties of two representative IEGs, c-fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). Treatment of cultured cortical cells with KCl produces a depolarization process that results in the increase of intracellular calcium concentration in a KCl concentration-dependent manner. Consistent with this increase, c-fos expression was induced in a KCl concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, however, Bdnf expression was optimally activated by both 25 and 50 mM concentration of KCl. Similar results were observed when the cells were treated with okadaic acid, which inhibits protein phosphatases and elicits the hyper-phosphorylation of signaling molecules. Thus, Bdnf expression is strictly regulated by a neuronal activity threshold in an all or nothing manner, whereas c-fos expression is activated in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Our findings also suggest that these differential responses might be due to the presence or absence of a TATA box. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The origin and function of mirror neurons: the missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingnau, Angelika; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    We argue, by analogy to the neural organization of the object recognition system, that demonstration of modulation of mirror neurons by associative learning does not imply absence of genetic adaptation. Innate connectivity defines the types of processes mirror neurons can participate in while allowing for extensive local plasticity. However, the proper function of these neurons remains to be worked out.

  6. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found marked homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we were able to describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal.

  7. Acute stress enhances the glutamatergic transmission onto basoamygdala neurons embedded in distinct microcircuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chen; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Wang, Xue-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Tian, Xiao-Li; Yin, Xiao-Ping; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2017-01-09

    Amygdala activation is known to be critical for the processing of stressful events in brain. Recent studies have shown that the projection neurons (PNs) in amygdala, although architecturally intermingled, are integrated into distinct microcircuits and thus play divergent roles in amygdala-related behaviors. It remains unknown how stress regulates the individual amygdala PNs embedded in distinct microcircuits. Here, by using retrograde tracing and electrophysiological recording in in vitro slices, we explored the modulation of acute immobilization stress (AIS) on the basoamygdala (BA) PNs projecting either to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) or elsewhere, which we designated as BA-mPFC and non-BA-mPFC PNs respectively. The results showed that in the control mice, both the excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs/sIPSCs) were comparable between these two subsets of BA PNs. The influences of AIS on sEPSCs and sIPSCs were overall similar between the two neuronal populations. It markedly increased the sEPSCs amplitude but left unaltered their frequency as well as the sIPSCs amplitude and frequency. Despite this, several differences emerged between the effects of AIS on the distribution of sEPSCs/sIPSCs frequency in these two groups of BA PNs. Similar changes were also observed in the sEPSCs/sIPSCs of the two PN populations from mice experiencing forced swimming stress. Their intrinsic excitability, on the other hand, was nearly unaltered following AIS. Our results thus suggest that acute stress recruit both BA-mPFC and non-BA-mPFC PNs mainly through enhancing the glutamatergic transmission they receive.

  8. Distinct Spatiotemporal Response Properties of Excitatory Versus Inhibitory Neurons in the Mouse Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Ido; Shalev, Amos; Mizrahi, Adi

    2016-01-01

    In the auditory system, early neural stations such as brain stem are characterized by strict tonotopy, which is used to deconstruct sounds to their basic frequencies. But higher along the auditory hierarchy, as early as primary auditory cortex (A1), tonotopy starts breaking down at local circuits. Here, we studied the response properties of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the auditory cortex of anesthetized mice. We used in vivo two photon-targeted cell-attached recordings from identified parvalbumin-positive neurons (PVNs) and their excitatory pyramidal neighbors (PyrNs). We show that PyrNs are locally heterogeneous as characterized by diverse best frequencies, pairwise signal correlations, and response timing. In marked contrast, neighboring PVNs exhibited homogenous response properties in pairwise signal correlations and temporal responses. The distinct physiological microarchitecture of different cell types is maintained qualitatively in response to natural sounds. Excitatory heterogeneity and inhibitory homogeneity within the same circuit suggest different roles for each population in coding natural stimuli. PMID:27600839

  9. Three Types of Cortical Layer 5 Neurons That Differ in Brain-wide Connectivity and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Euiseok J; Juavinett, Ashley L; Kyubwa, Espoir M; Jacobs, Matthew W; Callaway, Edward M

    2015-12-16

    Cortical layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons integrate inputs from many sources and distribute outputs to cortical and subcortical structures. Previous studies demonstrate two L5 pyramid types: cortico-cortical (CC) and cortico-subcortical (CS). We characterize connectivity and function of these cell types in mouse primary visual cortex and reveal a new subtype. Unlike previously described L5 CC and CS neurons, this new subtype does not project to striatum [cortico-cortical, non-striatal (CC-NS)] and has distinct morphology, physiology, and visual responses. Monosynaptic rabies tracing reveals that CC neurons preferentially receive input from higher visual areas, while CS neurons receive more input from structures implicated in top-down modulation of brain states. CS neurons are also more direction-selective and prefer faster stimuli than CC neurons. These differences suggest distinct roles as specialized output channels, with CS neurons integrating information and generating responses more relevant to movement control and CC neurons being more important in visual perception.

  10. Dopaminergic Neurons Controlling Anterior Pituitary Functions: Anatomy and Ontogenesis in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Romain; Affaticati, Pierre; Bureau, Charlotte; Colin, Ingrid; Demarque, Michaël; Dufour, Sylvie; Vernier, Philippe; Yamamoto, Kei; Pasqualini, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons located in the preoptico-hypothalamic region of the brain exert a major neuroendocrine control on reproduction, growth, and homeostasis by regulating the secretion of anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) hormones. Here, using a retrograde tract tracing experiment, we identified the neurons playing this role in the zebrafish. The DA cells projecting directly to the anterior pituitary are localized in the most anteroventral part of the preoptic area, and we named them preoptico-hypophyseal DA (POHDA) neurons. During development, these neurons do not appear before 72 hours postfertilization (hpf) and are the last dopaminergic cell group to differentiate. We found that the number of neurons in this cell population continues to increase throughout life proportionally to the growth of the fish. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation analysis suggested that this increase is due to continuous neurogenesis and not due to a phenotypic change in already-existing neurons. Finally, expression profiles of several genes (foxg1a, dlx2a, and nr4a2a/b) were different in the POHDA compared with the adjacent suprachiasmatic DA neurons, suggesting that POHDA neurons develop as a distinct DA cell population in the preoptic area. This study offers some insights into the regional identity of the preoptic area and provides the first bases for future functional genetic studies on the development of DA neurons controlling anterior pituitary functions.

  11. GDNF family ligands display distinct action profiles on cultured GABAergic and serotonergic neurons of rat ventral mesencephalon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducray, Angélique; Krebs, Sandra H:; Schaller, Benoft;

    2006-01-01

    of the GFLs affected soma size of GABA-ir neurons. In contrast, only NRTN treatment significantly increased 5-HT-ir cells densities at 10 ng/ml (1.3-fold), while an augmentation was seen for GDNF and PSPN at 100 ng/ml (2.4-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively). ARTN had no effect on 5-HT-ir cell densities....... Morphological analysis of 5-HT-ir neurons revealed a significant increase of soma size, number of primary neurites/neuron and neurite length/neuron after GDNF exposure, while PSPN only affected soma size, and NRTN and ARTN failed to exert any effect. In conclusion, we identified GFLs as effective neurotrophic...... factors for VM GABAergic and serotonergic neurons, demonstrating characteristic individual action profiles emphasizing their important and distinct roles during brain development....

  12. Distinct Physiological Effects of Dopamine D4 Receptors on Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons and Fast-Spiking Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ping; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine D4 receptor (D4R), which is strongly linked to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia, is highly expressed in pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC). In this study, we examined the impact of D4R on the excitability of these 2 neuronal populations. We found that D4R activation decreased the frequency of spontaneous action potentials (sAPs) in PFC pyramidal neurons, whereas it induced a transient increase followed by a decrease of sAP frequency in PFC parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons. D4R activation also induced distinct effects in both types of PFC neurons on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, which drive the generation of sAP. Moreover, dopamine substantially decreased sAP frequency in PFC pyramidal neurons, but markedly increased sAP frequency in PV+ interneurons, and both effects were partially mediated by D4R activation. In the phencyclidine model of schizophrenia, the decreasing effect of D4R on sAP frequency in both types of PFC neurons was attenuated, whereas the increasing effect of D4R on sAP in PV+ interneurons was intact. These results suggest that D4R activation elicits distinct effects on synaptically driven excitability in PFC projection neurons versus fast-spiking interneurons, which are differentially altered in neuropsychiatric disorder-related conditions.

  13. Functional dissociation of adult-born neurons along the dorsoventral axis of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Melody V; Hen, René

    2014-07-01

    Adult-born granule cells in the mammalian dentate gyrus have long been implicated in hippocampal dependent spatial learning and behavioral effects of chronic antidepressant treatment. Although recent anatomical and functional evidence indicates a dissociation of the dorsal and ventral regions of the hippocampus, it is not known if adult neurogenesis within each region specifically contributes to distinct functions or whether adult-born cells along the entire dorsoventral axis are required for these behaviors. We examined the role of distinct subpopulations of adult-born hippocampal granule cells in learning- and anxiety-related behaviors using low-dose focal x-irradiation directed specifically to the dorsal or ventral dentate gyrus. Our findings indicate a functional dissociation between adult-born neurons along the longitudinal axis of the dentate gyrus wherein new neurons in the dorsal dentate gyrus are required for timely acquisition of contextual discrimination while immature neurons in the ventral dentate gyrus are necessary for anxiolytic/antidepressant-related effects of fluoxetine. Interestingly, when contexts are presented with altered temporal cues, or fluoxetine is administered alongside chronic glucocorticoid treatment, this dissociation is abrogated such that adult-born neurons across the entire dorsoventral extent of the dentate gyrus appear to contribute to these behaviors. Our results suggest that individual subpopulations of adult-born hippocampal neurons may be sufficient to mediate distinct behaviors in certain conditions, but are required to act in concert in more challenging situations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. LTP Induction Modifies Functional Relationship among Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung H.; Lee, Deok S.; Lee, Hyunjung; Baeg, Eun H.; Kim, Yun B.; Jung, Min W.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain evidence linking long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory, we examined whether LTP induction modifies functional relationship among neurons in the rat hippocampus. In contrast to neurons in low-frequency stimulated or AP5-treated slices, LTP induction altered "functional connectivity," as defined by the degree of synchronous firing, among…

  15. Structural and functional diversity of native brain neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotti, Cecilia; Clementi, Francesco; Fornari, Alice; Gaimarri, Annalisa; Guiducci, Stefania; Manfredi, Irene; Moretti, Milena; Pedrazzi, Patrizia; Pucci, Luca; Zoli, Michele

    2009-10-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are a family of ligand-gated ion channels present in the central and peripheral nervous systems, that are permeable to mono- and divalent cations. They share a common basic structure but their pharmacological and functional properties arise from the wide range of different subunit combinations making up distinctive subtypes. nAChRs are involved in many physiological functions in the central and peripheral nervous systems, and are the targets of the widely used drug of abuse nicotine. In addition to tobacco dependence, changes in their number and/or function are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, ranging from epilepsy to dementia. Although some of the neural circuits involved in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine have been identified, much less is known about which native nAChR subtypes are involved in specific physiological functions and pathophysiological conditions. We briefly review some recent findings concerning the structure and function of native nAChRs, focusing on the subtypes identified in the mesostriatal and habenulo-interpeduncular pathways, two systems involved in nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal. We also discuss recent findings concerning the effect of chronic nicotine on the expression of native subtypes.

  16. Distinct localization and target specificity of galanin-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons of a teleost, the filefish Stephanolepis cirrhifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, K; Kadota, T; Atobe, Y; Nakano, M; Hibiya, K; Goris, R C; Kishida, R

    2000-03-15

    Immunoreactivity for galanin was examined in the sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord, adrenal glands, sympathetic ganglia, and some sensory ganglia of the filefish Stephanolepis cirrhifer. Galanin-immunoreactive neurons were found only in the rostral part, but not in the caudal part of the central autonomic nucleus (a column of sympathetic preganglionic neurons of teleosts). Many galanin-immunoreactive nerve terminals were found in contact with neurons in the celiac ganglia and the cranial sympathetic ganglia on both sides of the body. Most neurons encircled by galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers were negative for tyrosine hydroxylase. Galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers were very sparse in the spinal sympathetic paravertebral ganglia. No galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers were found in the adrenal glands. No sensory neurons of the trigeminal, vagal, or spinal dorsal root ganglia were positive for galanin-immunoreactivity. These results suggest that galanin-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons have distinct segmental localization and might project specifically to a population of non-adrenergic sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the celiac and cranial sympathetic ganglia.

  17. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  18. New approach to equipment quality evaluation method with distinct functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milisavljević Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new approach for improving method for quality evaluation and selection of equipment (devices and machinery by applying distinct functions. Quality evaluation and selection of devices and machinery is a multi-criteria problem which involves the consideration of numerous parameters of various origins. Original selection method with distinct functions is based on technical parameters with arbitrary evaluation of each parameter importance (weighting. Improvement of this method, presented in this paper, addresses the issue of weighting of parameters by using Delphi Method. Finally, two case studies are provided, which included quality evaluation of standard boilers for heating and evaluation of load-haul-dump (LHD machines, to demonstrate applicability of this approach. Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP is used as a control method.

  19. Subthreshold membrane currents confer distinct tuning properties that enable neurons to encode the integral or derivative of their input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eRatté

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons rely on action potentials, or spikes, to encode information. But spikes can encode different stimulus features in different neurons. We show here through simulations and experiments how neurons encode the integral or derivative of their input based on the distinct tuning properties conferred upon them by subthreshold currents. Slow-activating subthreshold inward (depolarizing current mediates positive feedback control of subthreshold voltage, sustaining depolarization and allowing the neuron to spike on the basis of its integrated stimulus waveform. Slow-activating subthreshold outward (hyperpolarizing current mediates negative feedback control of subthreshold voltage, truncating depolarization and forcing the neuron to spike on the basis of its differentiated stimulus waveform. Depending on its direction, slow-activating subthreshold current cooperates or competes with fast-activating inward current during spike initiation. This explanation predicts that sensitivity to the rate of change of stimulus intensity differs qualitatively between integrators and differentiators. This was confirmed experimentally in spinal sensory neurons that naturally behave as specialized integrators or differentiators. Predicted sensitivity to different stimulus features was confirmed by covariance analysis. Integration and differentiation, which are themselves inverse operations, are thus shown to be implemented by the slow feedback mediated by oppositely directed subthreshold currents expressed in different neurons.

  20. Functional circuits of new neurons in the dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eVivar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is crucial for memory formation. New neurons are added throughout life to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG, a brain area considered important for differential storage of similar experiences and contexts. To better understand the functional contribution of adult neurogenesis to pattern separation processes, we recently used a novel synapse specific trans-neuronal tracing approach to identify the (sub cortical inputs to new dentate granule cells. It was observed that newly born neurons receive sequential innervation from structures important for memory function. Initially, septal-hippocampal cells provide input to new neurons, followed after about one month by perirhinal and lateral entorhinal cortex. These cortical areas are deemed relevant to encoding of novel environmental information and may enable pattern separation. Here, we review the developmental time-course and proposed functional relevance of new neurons, within the context of their unique neural circuitry.  

  1. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie M King

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  2. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Connie M; Hentges, Shane T

    2011-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  3. Cholinergic, Glutamatergic, and GABAergic Neurons of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Have Distinct Effects on Sleep/Wake Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L; Petit, Gaetan; Mahoney, Carrie E; Fuller, Patrick M; Arrigoni, Elda; Scammell, Thomas E

    2017-02-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been implicated in the regulation of cortical activity and behavioral states, including rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. For example, electrical stimulation of the PPT region during sleep leads to rapid awakening, whereas lesions of the PPT in cats reduce REM sleep. Though these effects have been linked with the activity of cholinergic PPT neurons, the PPT also includes intermingled glutamatergic and GABAergic cell populations, and the precise roles of cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT cell groups in regulating cortical activity and behavioral state remain unknown. Using a chemogenetic approach in three Cre-driver mouse lines, we found that selective activation of glutamatergic PPT neurons induced prolonged cortical activation and behavioral wakefulness, whereas inhibition reduced wakefulness and increased non-REM (NREM) sleep. Activation of cholinergic PPT neurons suppressed lower-frequency electroencephalogram rhythms during NREM sleep. Last, activation of GABAergic PPT neurons slightly reduced REM sleep. These findings reveal that glutamatergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons differentially influence cortical activity and sleep/wake states. More than 40 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disruption, and the development of effective treatments requires a more detailed understanding of the neuronal mechanisms controlling sleep and arousal. The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been considered a key site for regulating wakefulness and REM sleep. This is mainly because of the cholinergic neurons contained in the PPT nucleus. However, the PPT nucleus also contains glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons that likely contribute to the regulation of cortical activity and sleep-wake states. The chemogenetic experiments in the present study reveal that cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons each have distinct effects on sleep/wake behavior, improving our

  4. Fragile X Proteins FMRP and FXR2P Control Synaptic GluA1 Expression and Neuronal Maturation via Distinct Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixiang Guo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP and its autosomal paralog FXR2P are selective neuronal RNA-binding proteins, and mice that lack either protein exhibit cognitive deficits. Although double-mutant mice display more severe learning deficits than single mutants, the molecular mechanism behind this remains unknown. In the present study, we discovered that FXR2P (also known as FXR2 is important for neuronal dendritic development. FMRP and FXR2P additively promote the maturation of new neurons by regulating a common target, the AMPA receptor GluA1, but they do so via distinct mechanisms: FXR2P binds and stabilizes GluA1 mRNA and enhances subsequent protein expression, whereas FMRP promotes GluA1 membrane delivery. Our findings unveil important roles for FXR2P and GluA1 in neuronal development, uncover a regulatory mechanism of GluA1, and reveal a functional convergence between fragile X proteins in neuronal development.

  5. Distribution of Kv3.3 potassium channel subunits in distinct neuronal populations of mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su Ying; Zagha, Edward; Kwon, Elaine S; Ozaita, Andres; Bobik, Marketta; Martone, Maryann E; Ellisman, Mark H; Heintz, Nathaniel; Rudy, Bernardo

    2007-06-20

    Kv3.3 proteins are pore-forming subunits of voltage-dependent potassium channels, and mutations in the gene encoding for Kv3.3 have recently been linked to human disease, spinocerebellar ataxia 13, with cerebellar and extracerebellar symptoms. To understand better the functions of Kv3.3 subunits in brain, we developed highly specific antibodies to Kv3.3 and analyzed immunoreactivity throughout mouse brain. We found that Kv3.3 subunits are widely expressed, present in important forebrain structures but particularly prominent in brainstem and cerebellum. In forebrain and midbrain, Kv3.3 expression was often found colocalized with parvalbumin and other Kv3 subunits in inhibitory neurons. In brainstem, Kv3.3 was strongly expressed in auditory and other sensory nuclei. In cerebellar cortex, Kv3.3 expression was found in Purkinje and granule cells. Kv3.3 proteins were observed in axons, terminals, somas, and, unlike other Kv3 proteins, also in distal dendrites, although precise subcellular localization depended on cell type. For example, hippocampal dentate granule cells expressed Kv3.3 subunits specifically in their mossy fiber axons, whereas Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex strongly expressed Kv3.3 subunits in axons, somas, and proximal and distal, but not second- and third-order, dendrites. Expression in Purkinje cell dendrites was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Kv3 channels have been demonstrated to rapidly repolarize action potentials and support high-frequency firing in various neuronal populations. In this study, we identified additional populations and subcellular compartments that are likely to sustain high-frequency firing because of the expression of Kv3.3 and other Kv3 subunits.

  6. Distinct roles for direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons in reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Kravitz, Alexxai V.; Tye, Lynne D.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement learning, but the neural substrates targeted by dopamine are poorly understood. Here, we bypassed dopamine signaling itself and tested how optogenetic activation of dopamine D1- or D2-receptor-expressing striatal projection neurons influenced reinforcement learning in mice. Stimulating D1-expressing neurons induced persistent reinforcement, whereas stimulating D2-expressing neurons induced transient punishment, demonstrating that activation of...

  7. EPSPs in rat neocortical neurons in vitro. I. Electrophysiological evidence for two distinct EPSPs

    OpenAIRE

    Sutor, Bernd; Hablitz, John H.

    1989-01-01

    1. To investigate excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), intracellular recordings were performed in layer II/III neurons of the rat medial frontal cortex. The average resting membrane potential of the neurons was more than -75 mV and their average input resistance was greater than 20 M omega. The amplitudes of the action potentials evoked by injection of depolarizing current pulses were greater than 100 mV. The electrophysiological properties of the neurons recorded were similar to those...

  8. Distinct roles for direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons in reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Alexxai V; Tye, Lynne D; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2012-06-01

    Dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement learning, but the neural substrates targeted by dopamine are poorly understood. We bypassed dopamine signaling itself and tested how optogenetic activation of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor–expressing striatal projection neurons influenced reinforcement learning in mice. Stimulating D1 receptor–expressing neurons induced persistent reinforcement, whereas stimulating D2 receptor–expressing neurons induced transient punishment, indicating that activation of these circuits is sufficient to modify the probability of performing future actions.

  9. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction : Involvement of neuroinflammation and neuronal functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Iris B.; Schoemaker, Regien G.; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Heineman, Erik; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been hypothesized to be mediated by surgery-induced inflammatory processes, which may influence neuronal functioning either directly or through modulation of intraneuronal pathways, such as the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediated pathway.

  10. Distinct influence of N-terminal elements on neuronal nitric-oxide synthase structure and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Koustubh; Adak, Subrata; Aulak, Kulwant S; Santolini, Jerome; McDonald, John F; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2003-09-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule produced in animals by three different NO synthases. Of these, only NOS I (neuronal nitric-oxide synthase; nNOS) is expressed as catalytically active N-terminally truncated forms that are missing either an N-terminal leader sequence required for protein-protein interactions or are missing the leader sequence plus three core structural motifs that in other NOS are required for dimer assembly and catalysis. To understand how the N-terminal elements impact nNOS structure-function, we generated, purified, and extensively characterized variants that were missing the N-terminal leader sequence (Delta296nNOS) or missing the leader sequence plus the three core motifs (Delta349nNOS). Eliminating the leader sequence had no impact on nNOS structure or catalysis. In contrast, additional removal of the core elements weakened but did not destroy the dimer interaction, slowed ferric heme reduction and reactivity of a hemedioxy intermediate, and caused a 10-fold poorer affinity toward substrate l-arginine. This created an nNOS variant with slower and less coupled NO synthesis that is predisposed to generate reactive oxygen species along with NO. Our findings help justify the existence of nNOS N-terminal splice variants and identify specific catalytic changes that create functional differences among them.

  11. Differential expression of K4-AP currents and Kv3.1 potassium channel transcripts in cortical neurons that develop distinct firing phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengill, J L; Smith, M A; Son, D I; O'Dowd, D K

    1997-05-01

    Maturation of electrical excitability during early postnatal development is critical to formation of functional neural circuitry in the mammalian neocortex. Little is known, however, about the changes in gene expression underlying the development of firing properties that characterize different classes of cortical neurons. Here we describe the development of cortical neurons with two distinct firing phenotypes, regular-spiking (RS) and fast-spiking (FS), that appear to emerge from a population of immature multiple-spiking (IMS) neurons during the first two postnatal weeks, both in vivo (within layer IV) and in vitro. We report the expression of a slowly inactivating, 4-AP-sensitive potassium current (K4-AP) at significantly higher density in FS compared with RS neurons. The same current is expressed at intermediate levels in IMS neurons. The kinetic, voltage-dependent, and pharmacological properties of the K4-AP current are similar to those observed by heterologous expression of Kv3.1 potassium channel mRNA. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis demonstrates that PCR products representing Kv3.1 transcripts are amplified more frequently from FS than RS neurons, with an intermediate frequency of Kv3.1 detection in neurons with immature firing properties. Taken together, these data suggest that the Kv3.1 gene encodes the K4-AP current and that expression of this gene is regulated in a cell-specific manner during development. Analysis of the effects of 4-AP on firing properties suggests that the K4-AP current is important for rapid action potential repolarization, fast after-hyperpolarization, brief refractory period, and high firing frequency characteristic of FS GABAergic interneurons.

  12. A gustatory second-order neuron that connects sucrose-sensitive primary neurons and a distinct region of the gnathal ganglion in the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takaaki; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Ito, Kei; Lee, Chi-Hon; Stopfer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Although the gustatory system provides animals with sensory cues important for food choice and other critical behaviors, little is known about neural circuitry immediately following gustatory sensory neurons (GSNs). Here, we identify and characterize a bilateral pair of gustatory second-order neurons (G2Ns) in Drosophila. Previous studies identified GSNs that relay taste information to distinct subregions of the primary gustatory center (PGC) in the gnathal ganglia (GNG). To identify candidate G2Ns, we screened ∼5,000 GAL4 driver strains for lines that label neural fibers innervating the PGC. We then combined GRASP (GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners) with presynaptic labeling to visualize potential synaptic contacts between the dendrites of the candidate G2Ns and the axonal terminals of Gr5a-expressing GSNs, which are known to respond to sucrose. Results of the GRASP analysis, followed by a single-cell analysis by FLP-out recombination, revealed a pair of neurons that contact Gr5a axon terminals in both brain hemispheres and send axonal arborizations to a distinct region outside the PGC but within the GNG. To characterize the input and output branches, respectively, we expressed fluorescence-tagged acetylcholine receptor subunit (Dα7) and active-zone marker (Brp) in the G2Ns. We found that G2N input sites overlaid GRASP-labeled synaptic contacts to Gr5a neurons, while presynaptic sites were broadly distributed throughout the neurons' arborizations. GRASP analysis and further tests with the Syb-GRASP method suggested that the identified G2Ns receive synaptic inputs from Gr5a-expressing GSNs, but not Gr66a-expressing GSNs, which respond to caffeine. The identified G2Ns relay information from Gr5a-expressing GSNs to distinct regions in the GNG, and are distinct from other, recently identified gustatory projection neurons, which relay information about sugars to a brain region called the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC). Our findings suggest

  13. Transplanted progenitors generate functional enteric neurons in the postnatal colon

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders caused by diseases of the enteric nervous system. Many studies have demonstrated that various stem/progenitor cells can give rise to functional neurons in the embryonic gut; however, it is not yet known whether transplanted neural progenitor cells can migrate, proliferate, and generate functional neurons in the postnatal bowel in vivo. We transplanted neurospheres generated from fetal and postnatal intestinal neural c...

  14. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifan; Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Nelson, Jessica C; Abe, Namiko; Gordon, Patricia; Lloret-Fernandez, Carla; Maicas, Miren; Flames, Nuria; Mann, Richard S; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Hobert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation program of the cholinergic AIY interneuron class. Using a panel of different terminal differentiation markers, including neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides, we show that ttx-3 also controls the terminal differentiation program of two additional, distinct neuron types, namely the cholinergic AIA interneurons and the serotonergic NSM neurons. We show that the type of differentiation program that is controlled by ttx-3 in different neuron types is specified by a distinct set of collaborating transcription factors. One of the collaborating transcription factors is the POU homeobox gene unc-86, which collaborates with ttx-3 to determine the identity of the serotonergic NSM neurons. unc-86 in turn operates independently of ttx-3 in the anterior ganglion where it collaborates with the ARID-type transcription factor cfi-1 to determine the cholinergic identity of the IL2 sensory and URA motor neurons. In conclusion, transcription factors operate as terminal selectors in distinct combinations in different neuron types, defining neuron type-specific identity features.

  15. Context Fear Learning Specifically Activates Distinct Populations of Neurons in Amygdala and Hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Wilson, Yvette M.; Newman, Andrew G.; Murphy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The identity and distribution of neurons that are involved in any learning or memory event is not known. In previous studies, we identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral amygdala that show learning-specific activation of a c-"fos"-regulated transgene following context fear conditioning. Here, we have extended these studies to…

  16. Dynamics of centrosome translocation and microtubule organization in neocortical neurons during distinct modes of polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Akira; Sato, Toshiyuki; Ando, Ryota; Noguchi, Namiko; Masaoka, Makoto; Miyata, Takaki

    2014-05-01

    Neuronal migration and process formation require cytoskeletal organization and remodeling. Recent studies suggest that centrosome translocation is involved in initial axon outgrowth, while the role of centrosomal positioning is not clear. Here, we examine relations between centrosomal positioning, axonogenesis, and microtubule (MT) polarization in multipolar and bipolar neocortical neurons. We monitored dynamic movements of centrosomes and MT plus ends in migratory neurons in embryonic mouse cerebral slices. In locomoting bipolar neurons, the centrosome oriented toward the pia-directed leading process. Bipolar neurons displayed dense MT plus end dynamics in leading processes, while trailing processes showed clear bidirectional MTs. In migrating multipolar neurons, new processes emerged irrespective of centrosome localization, followed by centrosome reorientations toward the dominant process. Anterograde movements of MT plus ends occurred in growing processes and retrograde movements were observed after retraction of the distal tip. In multipolar neurons, axon formed by tangential extension of a dominant process and the centrosome oriented toward the growing axon, while in locomoting neurons, an axon formed opposite to the direction of migration and the centrosome localized to the base of the leading process. Our data suggest that MT organization may alter centrosomal localization and that centrosomal positioning does not necessarily direct process formation.

  17. Cysteine Proteinase-1 and Cut Protein Isoform Control Dendritic Innervation of Two Distinct Sensory Fields by a Single Neuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray R. Lyons

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites often exhibit structural changes in response to local inputs. Although mechanisms that pattern and maintain dendritic arbors are becoming clearer, processes regulating regrowth, during context-dependent plasticity or after injury, remain poorly understood. We found that a class of Drosophila sensory neurons, through complete pruning and regeneration, can elaborate two distinct dendritic trees, innervating independent sensory fields. An expression screen identified Cysteine proteinase-1 (Cp1 as a critical regulator of this process. Unlike known ecdysone effectors, Cp1-mutant ddaC neurons pruned larval dendrites normally but failed to regrow adult dendrites. Cp1 expression was upregulated/concentrated in the nucleus during metamorphosis, controlling production of a truncated Cut homeodomain transcription factor. This truncated Cut, but not the full-length protein, allowed Cp1-mutant ddaC neurons to regenerate higher-order adult dendrites. These results identify a molecular pathway needed for dendrite regrowth after pruning, which allows the same neuron to innervate distinct sensory fields.

  18. Expression and evolution of functionally distinct haemoglobin genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, P W; Watts, R A; Trevaskis, B; Llewelyn, D J; Burnell, J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    2001-11-01

    Haemoglobin genes have been found in a number of plant species, but the number of genes known has been too small to allow effective evolutionary inferences. We present nine new non-symbiotic haemoglobin sequences from a range of plants, including class 1 haemoglobins from cotton, Citrus and tomato, class 2 haemoglobins from cotton, tomato, sugar beet and canola and two haemoglobins from the non-vascular plants, Marchantia polymorpha (a liverwort) and Physcomitrella patens (a moss). Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of all currently known non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes and a selection of symbiotic haemoglobins have confirmed the existence of two distinct classes of haemoglobin genes in the dicots. It is likely that all dicots have both class 1 and class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes whereas in monocots we have detected only class 1 genes. The symbiotic haemoglobins from legumes and Casuarina are related to the class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobins, whilst the symbiotic haemoglobin from Parasponia groups with the class 1 non-symbiotic genes. Probably, there have been two independent recruitments of symbiotic haemoglobins. Although the functions of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins remain unknown, their patterns of expression within plants suggest different functions. We examined the expression in transgenic plants of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins from Arabidopsis using promoter fusions to a GUS reporter gene. The Arabidopsis GLB1 and GLB2 genes are likely to be functionally distinct. The class 2 haemoglobin gene (GLB2) is expressed in the roots, leaves and inflorescence and can be induced in young plants by cytokinin treatment in contrast to the class 1 gene (GLB1) which is active in germinating seedlings and can be induced by hypoxia and increased sucrose supply, but not by cytokinin treatment.

  19. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception.

  20. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  1. Neuron-NG2 Cell Synapses: Novel Functions for Regulating NG2 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Kun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells are a population of CNS cells that are distinct from neurons, mature oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. These cells can be identified by their NG2 proteoglycan expression. NG2 cells have a highly branched morphology, with abundant processes radiating from the cell body, and express a complex set of voltage-gated channels, AMPA/kainate, and GABA receptors. Neurons notably form classical and nonclassical synapses with NG2 cells, which have varied characteristics and functions. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses could fine-tune NG2 cell activities, including the NG2 cell cycle, differentiation, migration, and myelination, and may be a novel potential therapeutic target for NG2 cell-related diseases, such as hypoxia-ischemia injury and periventricular leukomalacia. Furthermore, neuron-NG2 cell synapses may be correlated with the plasticity of CNS in adulthood with the synaptic contacts passing onto their progenies during proliferation, and synaptic contacts decrease rapidly upon NG2 cell differentiation. In this review, we highlight the characteristics of classical and nonclassical neuron-NG2 cell synapses, the potential functions, and the fate of synaptic contacts during proliferation and differentiation, with the emphasis on the regulation of the NG2 cell cycle by neuron-NG2 cell synapses and their potential underlying mechanisms.

  2. Short- and long-term memory in Drosophila require cAMP signaling in distinct neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Allison L; Li, Wanhe; Cressy, Mike; Dubnau, Josh

    2009-08-25

    A common feature of memory and its underlying synaptic plasticity is that each can be dissected into short-lived forms involving modification or trafficking of existing proteins and long-term forms that require new gene expression. An underlying assumption of this cellular view of memory consolidation is that these different mechanisms occur within a single neuron. At the neuroanatomical level, however, different temporal stages of memory can engage distinct neural circuits, a notion that has not been conceptually integrated with the cellular view. Here, we investigated this issue in the context of aversive Pavlovian olfactory memory in Drosophila. Previous studies have demonstrated a central role for cAMP signaling in the mushroom body (MB). The Ca(2+)-responsive adenylyl cyclase RUTABAGA is believed to be a coincidence detector in gamma neurons, one of the three principle classes of MB Kenyon cells. We were able to separately restore short-term or long-term memory to a rutabaga mutant with expression of rutabaga in different subsets of MB neurons. Our findings suggest a model in which the learning experience initiates two parallel associations: a short-lived trace in MB gamma neurons, and a long-lived trace in alpha/beta neurons.

  3. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomina Alla F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic cellular environment. Results We demonstrate that cultured olfactory sensory neurons express endogenous odorant receptors. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer enables successful ectopic expression of odorant receptors. We show that the ectopically expressed mouse I7 is functional in the cultured olfactory sensory neurons. When two different odorant receptors are ectopically expressed simultaneously, both receptor proteins co-localized in the same olfactory sensory neurons up to 10 days in vitro. Conclusion This culture technique provided an efficient method to culture olfactory sensory neurons whose morphology, molecular characteristics and maturation progression resembled those observed in vivo. Using this system, regulation of odorant receptor expression and its ligand specificity can be studied in its intrinsic cellular environment.

  4. Transplanted progenitors generate functional enteric neurons in the postnatal colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Ryo; Stamp, Lincon A.; Foong, Jaime P.P.; McConnell, Sophie N.; Bergner, Annette J.; Anderson, Richard B.; Enomoto, Hideki; Newgreen, Donald F.; Obermayr, Florian; Furness, John B.; Young, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders caused by diseases of the enteric nervous system. Many studies have demonstrated that various stem/progenitor cells can give rise to functional neurons in the embryonic gut; however, it is not yet known whether transplanted neural progenitor cells can migrate, proliferate, and generate functional neurons in the postnatal bowel in vivo. We transplanted neurospheres generated from fetal and postnatal intestinal neural crest–derived cells into the colon of postnatal mice. The neurosphere-derived cells migrated, proliferated, and generated neurons and glial cells that formed ganglion-like clusters within the recipient colon. Graft-derived neurons exhibited morphological, neurochemical, and electrophysiological characteristics similar to those of enteric neurons; they received synaptic inputs; and their neurites projected to muscle layers and the enteric ganglia of the recipient mice. These findings show that transplanted enteric neural progenitor cells can generate functional enteric neurons in the postnatal bowel and advances the notion that cell therapy is a promising strategy for enteric neuropathies. PMID:23454768

  5. Distinct Localization of SNAP47 Protein in GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons in the Mouse and the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Heilmann, Heike; Bolduan, Felix; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Vida, Imre

    2017-01-01

    major cell types. These results reveal divergent localization of SNAP47 protein in mouse and rat hippocampus indicating species- and cell type-specific differences. SNAP47 is likely to be involved in unique fusion machinery which is distinct from the one involved in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Nonetheless, our data suggest that SNAP47 may be involved not only postsynaptic, but also in presynaptic function.

  6. The therapeutic potential of melatonin on neuronal function during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to improve neuronal function during normal ageing. INTRODUCTION1. Normal ageing often leads to the decline in cell function and the onset of ... in the number of age-related disease, it is important to look .... controls of the same age (Fig.

  7. A planar microelectrode array for simultaneous detection of electrically evoked dopamine release from distinct locations of a single isolated neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavik Anil; Luk, Collin C; Leow, Pei Ling; Lee, Arthur J; Zaidi, Wali; Syed, Naweed I

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmission is a key process of communication between neurons. Although much is known about this process and the influence it has on the function of the body, little is understood about the dynamics of signalling from structural regions of a single neuron. In this study we have fabricated and characterised a microelectrode array (MEA) which was utilised for simultaneous multi-site recordings of dopamine release from an isolated single neuron. The MEA consisted of gold electrodes that were created in plane with the insulation layer using a chemical mechanical planarization process. The detection limit for dopamine measurements was 11 ± 3 nM and all the gold electrodes performed in a consistent fashion during amperometric recordings of 100 nM dopamine. Fouling of the gold electrode was investigated, where no significant change in the current was observed over 4 hours when monitoring 100 nM dopamine. The MEA was accessed using freshly isolated dopaminergic somas from the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, where electrically evoked dopamine release was clearly observed. Measurements were conducted at four structural locations of a single isolated neuron, where electrically evoked dopamine release was observed from the cell body, axonal regions and the terminal. Over time, the release of dopamine varied over the structural regions of the neuron. Such information can provide an insight into the signalling mechanism of neurons and how they potentially form synaptic connections.

  8. Distinctive transcriptome alterations of prefrontal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Dominique; Corradi, John P.; Tang, Shaowu; Datta, Dibyadeep; Boothe, Franklyn; He, Aiqing; Cacace, Angela M.; Zaczek, Robert; Albright, Charles F.; Tseng, George; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with alterations in working memory that reflect dysfunction of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) circuitry. Working memory depends on the activity of excitatory pyramidal cells in DLPFC layer 3, and to a lesser extent in layer 5. Although many studies have profiled gene expression in DLPFC gray matter in schizophrenia, little is known about cell type-specific transcript expression in these two populations of pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that interrogating gene expression specifically in DLPFC layer 3 or 5 pyramidal cells would reveal new and/or more robust schizophrenia-associated differences that would provide new insights into the nature of pyramidal cell dysfunction in the illness. We also sought to determine the impact of other variables, such as a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder or medication use at time of death, on the patterns of gene expression in pyramidal neurons. Individual pyramidal cells in DLPFC layers 3 or 5 were captured by laser microdissection from 36 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and matched normal comparison subjects. The mRNA from cell collections was subjected to transcriptome profiling by microarray followed by qPCR validation. Expression of genes involved in mitochondrial (MT) or ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) functions were markedly down-regulated in the patient group (p values for MT-related and UPS-related pathways were <10−7 and <10−5 respectively). MT-related gene alterations were more prominent in layer 3 pyramidal cells, whereas UPS-related gene alterations were more prominent in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Many of these alterations were not present, or found to a lesser degree, in samples of DLPFC gray matter from the same subjects, suggesting that they are pyramidal cell-specific. Furthermore, these findings principally reflected alterations in the schizophrenia subjects, were not present or present to a lesser degree in the schizoaffective disorder subjects

  9. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies: Promoting Microglial Clearance Versus Blocking Neuronal Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Kristen E; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2015-08-28

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥ ∼ 20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼ 10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A distinct response to endogenous DNA damage in the development of Nbs1-deficient cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Li; Yun-Gui Yang; Yunzhou Gao; Zhao-Qi Wang; Wei-Min Tong

    2012-01-01

    Microcephaly is a clinical characteristic for human nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS,mutated in NBS1 gene),a chromosomal instability syndrome.However,the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains elusive.In the present study,we demonstrate that neuronal disruption ofNBS (Nbn in mice) causes microcephaly characterized by the reduction of cerebral cortex and corpus cailosum,recapitulating neuronal anomalies in human NBS.Nbs1-deficient neocortex shows accumulative endogenous DNA damage and defective activation ofAtaxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1 pathway upon DNA damage.Notably,in contrast to massive apoptotic cell death in Nbs1-deficient cerebella,activation of p53 leads to a defective neuroprogenitor proliferation in neocortex,likely via specific persistent induction of hematopoietic zinc finger (Hzf) that preferentially promotes p53-mediated cell cycle arrest whilst inhibiting apoptosis.Moreover,Trp53 mutations substantially rescue the microcephaly in Nbs1-deficient mice.Thus,the present results reveal the first clue that developing neurons at different regions of brain selectively respond to endogenous DNA damage,and underscore an important role for Nbs1 in neurogenesis.

  11. Vestibular integrator neurons have quadratic functions due to voltage dependent conductances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Christophe; Eugène, Daniel; Idoux, Erwin; Moore, Lee E

    2013-12-01

    The nonlinear properties of the dendrites of the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus (PHN) neurons are essential for the operation of the vestibular neural integrator that converts a head velocity signal to one that controls eye position. A novel system of frequency probing, namely quadratic sinusoidal analysis (QSA), was used to decode the intrinsic nonlinear behavior of these neurons under voltage clamp conditions. Voltage clamp currents were measured at harmonic and interactive frequencies using specific nonoverlapping stimulation frequencies. Eigenanalysis of the QSA matrix reduces it to a remarkably compact processing unit, composed of just one or two dominant components (eigenvalues). The QSA matrix of rat PHN neurons provides signatures of the voltage dependent conductances for their particular dendritic and somatic distributions. An important part of the nonlinear response is due to the persistent sodium conductance (gNaP), which is likely to be essential for sustained effects needed for a neural integrator. It was found that responses in the range of 10 mV peak to peak could be well described by quadratic nonlinearities suggesting that effects of higher degree nonlinearities would add only marginal improvement. Therefore, the quadratic response is likely to sufficiently capture most of the nonlinear behavior of neuronal systems except for extremely large synaptic inputs. Thus, neurons have two distinct linear and quadratic functions, which shows that piecewise linear + quadratic analysis is much more complete than just piecewise linear analysis; in addition quadratic analysis can be done at a single holding potential. Furthermore, the nonlinear neuronal responses contain more frequencies over a wider frequency band than the input signal. As a consequence, they convert limited amplitude and bandwidth input signals to wider bandwidth and more complex output responses. Finally, simulations at subthreshold membrane potentials with realistic PHN neuron models

  12. Sleep, Neuronal Plasticity and Brain Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Benca, Ruth M.; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is truly one of the biggest mysteries in behavioral neuroscience. Humans spend a substantial portion of their lives asleep, as do all other mammalian and bird species that have been studied to date, yet the functions of sleep remain elusive and continue to be a topic of debate among sleep

  13. Sleep, Neuronal Plasticity and Brain Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Benca, Ruth M.; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is truly one of the biggest mysteries in behavioral neuroscience. Humans spend a substantial portion of their lives asleep, as do all other mammalian and bird species that have been studied to date, yet the functions of sleep remain elusive and continue to be a topic of debate among sleep rese

  14. Confounding the origin and function of mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2014-04-01

    Cook et al. argue that mirror neurons originate in sensorimotor associative learning and that their function is determined by their origin. Both these claims are hard to accept. It is here suggested that a major role in the origin of the mirror mechanism is played by top-down connections rather than by associative learning.

  15. Inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α regulate p75NTR expression in CNS neurons and astrocytes by distinct cell-type-specific signalling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma J Friedman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The p75NTR (where NTR is neurotrophin receptor can mediate many distinct cellular functions, including cell survival and apoptosis, axonal growth and cell proliferation, depending on the cellular context. This multifunctional receptor is widely expressed in the CNS (central nervous system during development, but its expression is restricted in the adult brain. However, p75NTR is induced by a variety of pathophysiological insults, including seizures, lesions and degenerative disease. We have demonstrated previously that p75NTR is induced by seizures in neurons, where it induces apoptosis, and in astrocytes, where it may regulate proliferation. In the present study, we have investigated whether the inflammatory cytokines IL (interleukin-1β and TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-α, that are commonly elevated in these pathological conditions, mediate the regulation of p75NTR in neurons and astrocytes. We have further analysed the signal transduction pathways by which these cytokines induce p75NTR expression in the different cell types, specifically investigating the roles of the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have demonstrated that both cytokines regulate p75NTR expression; however, the mechanisms governing this regulation are cytokine- and cell-type specific. The distinct mechanisms of cytokine-mediated p75NTR regulation that we demonstrate in the present study may facilitate therapeutic intervention in regulation of this receptor in a cell-selective manner.

  16. Striatal Neurons Expressing D1 and D2 Receptors are Morphologically Distinct and Differently Affected by Dopamine Denervation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, D; Petryszyn, S; Sanchez, M G; Bories, C; Beaulieu, J M; De Koninck, Y; Parent, A; Parent, M

    2017-01-27

    The loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease induces a reduction in the number of dendritic spines on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum expressing D1 or D2 dopamine receptor. Consequences on MSNs expressing both receptors (D1/D2 MSNs) are currently unknown. We looked for changes induced by dopamine denervation in the density, regional distribution and morphological features of D1/D2 MSNs, by comparing 6-OHDA-lesioned double BAC transgenic mice (Drd1a-tdTomato/Drd2-EGFP) to sham-lesioned animals. D1/D2 MSNs are uniformly distributed throughout the dorsal striatum (1.9% of MSNs). In contrast, they are heterogeneously distributed and more numerous in the ventral striatum (14.6% in the shell and 7.3% in the core). Compared to D1 and D2 MSNs, D1/D2 MSNs are endowed with a smaller cell body and a less profusely arborized dendritic tree with less dendritic spines. The dendritic spine density of D1/D2 MSNs, but also of D1 and D2 MSNs, is significantly reduced in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. In contrast to D1 and D2 MSNs, the extent of dendritic arborization of D1/D2 MSNs appears unaltered in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Our data indicate that D1/D2 MSNs in the mouse striatum form a distinct neuronal population that is affected differently by dopamine deafferentation that characterizes Parkinson's disease.

  17. A novel brain receptor is expressed in a distinct population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conzelmann, S; Levai, O; Bode, B; Eisel, U; Raming, K; Breer, H; Strotmann, J

    2000-01-01

    Three novel G-protein-coupled receptor genes related to the previously described RA1c gene have been isolated from the mouse genome. Expression of these genes has been detected in distinct areas of the brain and also in the olfactory epithelium of the nose. Developmental studies revealed a different

  18. Mirror neurons and their function in cognitively understood empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Antonella; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    The current renewal of interest in empathy is closely connected to the recent neurobiological discovery of mirror neurons. Although the concept of empathy has been widely deployed, we shall focus upon one main psychological function it serves: enabling us to understand other peoples' intentions. In this essay we will draw on neuroscientific, psychological, and philosophical literature in order to investigate the relationships between mirror neurons and empathy as to intention understanding. Firstly, it will be explored whether mirror neurons are the neural basis of our empathic capacities: a vast array of empirical results appears to confirm this hypothesis. Secondly, the higher level capacity of reenactive empathy will be examined and the question will be addressed whether philosophical analysis alone is able to provide a foundation for this more abstract level of empathy. The conclusion will be drawn that both empirical evidence and philosophical analysis can jointly contribute to the clarification of the concept of empathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functionalized anatomical models for EM-neuron Interaction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Esra; Cassará, Antonino Mario; Montanaro, Hazael; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of interactions between electromagnetic (EM) fields and nerves are crucial in contexts ranging from therapeutic neurostimulation to low frequency EM exposure safety. To properly consider the impact of in vivo induced field inhomogeneity on non-linear neuronal dynamics, coupled EM-neuronal dynamics modeling is required. For that purpose, novel functionalized computable human phantoms have been developed. Their implementation and the systematic verification of the integrated anisotropic quasi-static EM solver and neuronal dynamics modeling functionality, based on the method of manufactured solutions and numerical reference data, is described. Electric and magnetic stimulation of the ulnar and sciatic nerve were modeled to help understanding a range of controversial issues related to the magnitude and optimal determination of strength-duration (SD) time constants. The results indicate the importance of considering the stimulation-specific inhomogeneous field distributions (especially at tissue interfaces), realistic models of non-linear neuronal dynamics, very short pulses, and suitable SD extrapolation models. These results and the functionalized computable phantom will influence and support the development of safe and effective neuroprosthetic devices and novel electroceuticals. Furthermore they will assist the evaluation of existing low frequency exposure standards for the entire population under all exposure conditions.

  20. The usefulness of the grammaticality-acceptability distinction in functional approaches to language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    The distinction between grammaticality and acceptability has been regarded with strong skepticism in functional linguistics because of its origin in Chomskyan linguistics. In this paper I will argue that the distinction is useful in functional linguistics, provided that it is based on a distinction...

  1. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-08-05

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. Importance: Most bacteria grow as biofilms in the environment or in association with eukaryotic hosts. Removal of biofilms that form on surfaces is a challenge in clinical

  2. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Q. Clark

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines—chosen for sparse neuronal expression—to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°. A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program.

  3. Distinct subclassification of DRG neurons innervating the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra based on the electrophysiological current signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Cooper, Brian Y; Johnson, Richard D

    2014-09-15

    Spinal sensory neurons innervating visceral and mucocutaneous tissues have unique microanatomic distribution, peripheral modality, and physiological, pharmacological, and biophysical characteristics compared with those neurons that innervate muscle and cutaneous tissues. In previous patch-clamp electrophysiological studies, we have demonstrated that small- and medium-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can be subclassified on the basis of their patterns of voltage-activated currents (VAC). These VAC-based subclasses were highly consistent in their action potential characteristics, responses to algesic compounds, immunocytochemical expression patterns, and responses to thermal stimuli. For this study, we examined the VAC of neurons retrogradely traced from the distal colon and the glans penis/distal urethra in the adult male rat. The afferent population from the distal colon contained at least two previously characterized cell types observed in somatic tissues (types 5 and 8), as well as four novel cell types (types 15, 16, 17, and 18). In the glans penis/distal urethra, two previously described cell types (types 6 and 8) and three novel cell types (types 7, 14, and 15) were identified. Other characteristics, including action potential profiles, responses to algesic compounds (acetylcholine, capsaicin, ATP, and pH 5.0 solution), and neurochemistry (expression of substance P, CGRP, neurofilament, TRPV1, TRPV2, and isolectin B4 binding) were consistent for each VAC-defined subgroup. With identification of distinct DRG cell types that innervate the distal colon and glans penis/distal urethra, future in vitro studies related to the gastrointestinal and urogenital sensory function in normal as well as abnormal/pathological conditions may be benefitted.

  4. Evidence that ventilatory rhythmogenesis in the frog involves two distinct neuronal oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R J A; Vasilakos, K; Harris, M B; Straus, C; Remmers, J E

    2002-01-01

    In Rana catesbeiana the upper airways are used for two distinct yet highly coordinated ventilatory behaviours: buccal ventilation and lung inflation cycles. How these behaviours are generated and coordinated is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify putative rhythmogenic brainstem loci involved in these ventilatory behaviours. We surveyed the isolated postmetamorphic brainstem to determine sites where local depolarization, produced by microinjecting the non-NMDA glutamate receptor agonist, AMPA, augmented the ventilatory motor patterns. Two sites were identified: a caudal site, at the level of cranial nerve (CN) X, where AMPA injections caused increased buccal burst frequency but abolished lung bursts, and a rostral site, between the levels of CN VIII and IX, where injections increased the frequency of both types of ventilatory bursts. These two sites were further examined using GABA microinjections to locally inhibit cells. GABA injected into the caudal site suppressed the buccal rhythm but the lung rhythm continued, albeit at a different frequency. When GABA was injected into the rostral site the lung bursts were abolished but the buccal rhythm continued. When the two sites were physically separated by transection, both rostral and caudal brainstem sections were capable of rhythmogenesis. The results suggest the respiratory network within the amphibian brainstem is composed of at least two distinct but interacting oscillators, the buccal and lung oscillators. These putative oscillators may provide a promising experimental model for studying coupled oscillators in vertebrates. PMID:11956343

  5. Distinct Etiological Roles for Myocytes and Motor Neurons in a Mouse Model of Kennedy's Disease/Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Firyal; McPhail, Mike; Rao, Pengcheng; Mo, Kaiguo; Halievski, Katherine; Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Monks, D Ashley

    2015-04-22

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion of the androgen receptor (AR) causes Kennedy's disease/spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA) through poorly defined cellular mechanisms. Although KD/SBMA has been thought of as a motor neuron disease, recent evidence indicates a key role for skeletal muscle. To resolve which early aspects of the disease can be caused by neurogenic or myogenic mechanisms, we made use of the tet-On and Cre-loxP genetic systems to selectively and acutely express polyQ AR in either motor neurons (NeuroAR) or myocytes (MyoAR) of transgenic mice. After 4 weeks of transgene induction in adulthood, deficits in gross motor function were seen in NeuroAR mice, but not MyoAR mice. Conversely, reduced size of fast glycolytic fibers and alterations in expression of candidate genes were observed only in MyoAR mice. Both NeuroAR and MyoAR mice exhibited reduced oxidative capacity in skeletal muscles, as well as a shift in fast fibers from oxidative to glycolytic. Markers of oxidative stress were increased in the muscle of NeuroAR mice and were reduced in motor neurons of both NeuroAR and MyoAR mice. Despite secondary pathology in skeletal muscle and behavioral deficits, no pathological signs were observed in motor neurons of NeuroAR mice, possibly due to relatively low levels of polyQ AR expression. These results indicate that polyQ AR in motor neurons can produce secondary pathology in muscle. Results also support both neurogenic and myogenic contributions of polyQ AR to several acute aspects of pathology and provide further evidence for disordered cellular respiration in KD/SBMA skeletal muscle.

  6. hESC Differentiation toward an Autonomic Neuronal Cell Fate Depends on Distinct Cues from the Co-Patterning Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette M. Acevedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the cellular and molecular cues that promote neurovascular co-patterning at the earliest stages of human embryogenesis, we developed a human embryonic stem cell model to mimic the developing epiblast. Contact of ectoderm-derived neural cells with mesoderm-derived vasculature is initiated via the neural crest (NC, not the neural tube (NT. Neurovascular co-patterning then ensues with specification of NC toward an autonomic fate requiring vascular endothelial cell (EC-secreted nitric oxide (NO and direct contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs via T-cadherin-mediated homotypic interactions. Once a neurovascular template has been established, NT-derived central neurons then align themselves with the vasculature. Our findings reveal that, in early human development, the autonomic nervous system forms in response to distinct molecular cues from VSMCs and ECs, providing a model for how other developing lineages might coordinate their co-patterning.

  7. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  8. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K; Sato, C; Shimizu, N [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Toyo University, 1-1-1 Izumino, Itakura-machi, Ora-gun, Gunma 374-0193 (Japan); Naka, Y [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Center, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Whitby, R, E-mail: shimizu@toyonet.toyo.ac.jp [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Cockroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-19

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 {mu}g ml{sup -1} CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  9. Distinct effects of repeated restraint stress on basolateral amygdala neuronal membrane properties in resilient adolescent and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Andrea; Rosenkranz, J Amiel

    2014-08-01

    Severe and repeated stress has damaging effects on health, including initiation of depression and anxiety. Stress that occurs during development has long-lasting and particularly damaging effects on emotion. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a key role in many affective behaviors, and repeated stress causes different forms of BLA hyperactivity in adolescent and adult rats. However, the mechanism is not known. Furthermore, not every individual is susceptible to the negative consequences of stress. Differences in the effects of stress on the BLA might contribute to determine whether an individual will be vulnerable or resilient to the effects of stress on emotion. The purpose of this study is to test the cellular underpinnings for age dependency of BLA hyperactivity after stress, and whether protective changes occur in resilient individuals. To test this, the effects of repeated stress on membrane excitability and other membrane properties of BLA principal neurons were compared between adult and adolescent rats, and between vulnerable and resilient rats, using in vitro whole-cell recordings. Vulnerability was defined by adrenal gland weight, and verified by body weight gain after repeated restraint stress, and fecal pellet production during repeated restraint sessions. We found that repeated stress increased the excitability of BLA neurons, but in a manner that depended on age and BLA subnucleus. Furthermore, stress resilience was associated with an opposite pattern of change, with increased slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP) potential, whereas vulnerability was associated with decreased medium AHP. The opposite outcomes in these two populations were further distinguished by differences of anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze that were correlated with BLA neuronal excitability and AHP. These results demonstrate a substrate for BLA hyperactivity after repeated stress, with distinct membrane properties to target, as well as age-dependent factors that

  10. Distinction of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the cerebral cortex: an algorithm based on cytological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel García-Cabezas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the number or density of neurons and types of glial cells and their relative proportions in different brain areas are at the core of rigorous quantitative neuroanatomical studies. Unfortunately, the lack of detailed, updated, systematic, and well-illustrated descriptions of the cytology of neurons and glial cell types, especially in the primate brain, makes such studies especially demanding, often limiting their scope and broad use. Here, following extensive analysis of histological materials and the review of current and classical literature, we compile a list of precise morphological criteria that can facilitate and standardize identification of cells in stained sections examined under the microscope. We describe systematically and in detail the cytological features of neurons and glial cell types in the cerebral cortex of the macaque monkey and the human using semithin and thick sections stained for Nissl. We used this classical staining technique because it labels all cells in the brain in distinct ways. In addition, we corroborate key distinguishing characteristics of different cell types in sections immunolabeled for specific markers counterstained for Nissl and in ultrathin sections processed for electron microscopy. Finally, we summarize the core features that distinguish each cell type in easy-to-use tables and sketches, and structure these key features in an algorithm that can be used to systematically distinguish cellular types in the cerebral cortex. Moreover, we report high inter-observer algorithm reliability, which is a crucial test for obtaining consistent and reproducible cell counts in unbiased stereological studies. This protocol establishes a consistent framework that can be used to reliably identify and quantify cells in the cerebral cortex of primates as well as other mammalian species in health and disease.

  11. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  12. EIGENVALUE FUNCTIONS IN EXCITATORY-INHIBITORY NEURONAL NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Linghai

    2004-01-01

    We study the exponential stability of traveling wave solutions of nonlinear systems of integral differential equations arising from nonlinear, nonlocal, synaptically coupled, excitatory-inhibitory neuronal networks. We have proved that exponential stability of traveling waves is equivalent to linear stability. Moreover, if the real parts of nonzero spectrum of an associated linear differential operator have a uniform negative upper bound, namely, max{Reλ: λ∈σ(L), λ≠ 0} ≤ -D, for some positive constant D, and λ = 0 is an algebraically simple eigenvalue of , then the linear stability follows, where is the linear differential operator obtained by linearizing the nonlinear system about its traveling wave and σ(L) denotes the spectrum of . The main aim of this paper is to construct complex analytic functions (also called eigenvalue or Evans functions) for exploring eigenvalues of linear differential operators to study the exponential stability of traveling waves. The zeros of the eigenvalue functions coincide with the eigenvalues of(L) .When studying multipulse solutions, some components of the traveling waves cross their thresholds for many times. These crossings cause great difficulty in the construction of the eigenvalue functions. In particular, we have to solve an over-determined system to construct the eigenvalue functions. By investigating asymptotic behaviors as z → -co of candidates for eigenfunctions, we find a way to construct the eigenvalue functions.By analyzing the zeros of the eigenvalue functions, we can establish the exponential stability of traveling waves arising from neuronal networks.

  13. Functional role of a glycolipid in directional movements of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSALIA MENDEZ-OTERO

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Migration of neurons from their site of origin to their final destination is a critical and universal step in the formation of the complex structure of the nervous system. The migratory process is thought to be governed in part by genetically and epigenetically defined sequences of signals which are interpreted by migrating cells. The molecular mechanisms that underlie neuronal migration have been the subject of intense investigation. As in other developmental processes, many molecules must participate in neuronal migration. Some molecules, such as cell adhesion molecules and motor proteins, may contribute to discrete steps in the migration act; others, like extracellular signaling molecules, may regulate the activation and/or termination of the migration program. In this article we review findings from our group that demonstrate the functional role(s of a specific glycolipid in neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth in the developing and adult nervous system.A migração de neurônios de seus sítios de origem a seus destinos finais é uma etapa universal e crítica na formação da complexa estrutura do sistema nervoso. Admite-se que o processo migratório seja governado, em parte, por sequências de sinais definidas genetica e epigeneticamente que são interpretadas pelas células migrantes. Os mecanismos moleculares subjacentes à migração neuronal têm sido objeto de intensa investigação. Como em outros processos do desenvolvimento, muitas moléculas devem participar na migração neuronal. Algumas delas, como as moléculas de adesão e proteínas motoras, podem contribuir para etapas discretas no ato de migração; outras, como moléculas extra-celulares de sinalização, podem regular a ativação e/ou o término do programa de migração. Neste artigo nós revisamos achados de nosso grupo que demonstram o(s papel (papéis funcional(ais de um glicolipídeo específico na migração neuronal e no crescimento de neuritos no sistema

  14. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  15. Distinct developmental principles underlie the formation of ipsilateral and contralateral whisker-related axonal patterns of layer 2/3 neurons in the barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehara, K; Wakimoto, M; Ako, R; Kawasaki, H

    2012-12-13

    Axonal organizations with specific patterns underlie the functioning of local intracortical circuitry, but their precise anatomy and development still remain elusive. Here, we selectively visualized layer 2/3 neurons using in utero electroporation and examined their axonal organization in the barrel cortex contralateral to the electroporated side. We found that callosal axons run preferentially in septal regions of layer 4 and showed a whisker-related pattern in the contralateral barrel cortex in rats and mice. In addition, presynaptic marker proteins were found in this whisker-related axonal organization. Although the whisker-related patterns were observed in both the ipsilateral and contralateral barrel cortex, we found a difference in their developmental processes. While the formation of the whisker-related pattern in the ipsilateral cortex consisted of two distinct steps, that in the contralateral cortex did not have the 1st step, in which the axons were diffusely distributed without preference to septal or barrel regions. We also found that these more diffuse axons ran close to radial glial fibers. Together, our results uncovered a whisker-related axonal pattern of callosal axons and two independent developmental processes involved in the formation of the axonal trajectories of layer 2/3 neurons. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional diversity of supragranular GABAergic neurons in the barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc J Gentet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the neocortex forms a distributed system comprised of several functional areas, its vertical columnar organization is largely conserved across areas and species, suggesting the existence of a canonical neocortical microcircuit. In order to elucidate the principles governing the organization of such a cortical diagram, a detailed understanding of the dynamics binding different types of cortical neurons into a coherent algorithm is essential. Within this complex circuitry, GABAergic interneurons, while forming approximately only 15-20% of all cortical neurons, appear critical in maintaining a dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition. Despite their importance, cortical GABAergic neurons have not been extensively studied in vivo and their precise role in shaping the local microcircuit sensory response still remains to be determined. Their paucity, combined with their molecular, anatomical and physiological diversity, has made it difficult to even establish a consensual nomenclature.However, recent technological advances in microscopy and mouse genetics have fostered a renewed interest in neocortical interneurons by putting them within visible reach of experimenters. The anatomically well-defined whisker-to-barrel pathway of the rodent is particularly amenable to studies attempting to link cortical circuit dynamics to behavior. To each whisker corresponds a discrete cortical unit equivalent to a single column, specialized in the encoding and processing of the sensory information it receives. In this review, we will focus on the functional role that each subtype of supragranular GABAergic neuron embedded within such a single neocortical unit may play in shaping the dynamics of the local circuit during somatosensory integration.

  17. Functional endothelin receptors are selectively expressed in isolectin B4-negative sensory neurons and are upregulated in isolectin B4-positive neurons by neurturin and glia-derived neurotropic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellani, Vittorio; Prandini, Massimiliano; Giacomoni, Chiara; Pavesi, Giorgia; Ravegnani, Laura; Magherini, Pier Cosimo

    2011-03-24

    Activation of endothelin receptors expressed in DRG neurons is functionally coupled to translocation of PKCε from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. Using immunocytochemistry we show that in DRG cultured neurons PKCε translocation induced by endothelin-1 was prominently seen in a peptidergic subpopulation of cultured DRG neurons largely negative for isolectin B4 staining, indicating that in basal conditions functional expression of endothelin receptors does not occur in non-peptidergic, RET-expressing nociceptors. Translocation was blocked by the specific ETA-R antagonist BQ-123 while it was unaffected by the ETB-R antagonist BQ-788. No calcium response in response to endothelin-1 was observed in sensory neurons, while large and long-lasting responses were observed in the majority of non-neuronal cells present in DRG cultures, which are ensheathing Schwann cells and satellite cells, identified with the glial marker S-100. Calcium responses in non-neuronal cells were abolished by BQ-788. The fraction of peptidergic PKCε-translocated neurons was significantly increased by nerve growth factor, while in the presence of neurturin or glia-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF), an IB4-positive subpopulation of small- and medium-sized neurons showed PKCε translocation induced by endothelin-1 which could be blocked by BQ-123 but not by BQ-788. Our in vitro results show that the level of expression of functional endothelin receptors coupled to PKCε is different in peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors and is modulated with different mechanisms in distinct neuronal subpopulations.

  18. Refined anatomical isolation of functional sleep circuits exhibits distinctive regional and circadian gene transcriptional profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrow, Christopher J; Tanis, Keith Q; Rigby, Alison M; Taylor, Rhonda R; Serikawa, Kyle; McWhorter, Mollie; Tokiwa, George Y; Marton, Matthew J; Stone, David J; Koblan, Kenneth S; Renger, John J

    2009-05-19

    Powerful new approaches to study molecular variation in distinct neuronal populations have recently been developed enabling a more precise investigation of the control of neural circuits involved in complex behaviors such as wake and sleep. We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate precise brain nuclei from rat CNS at opposing circadian time points associated with wake and sleep. Discrete anatomical and temporal analysis was performed to examine the extent of variation in the transcriptional control associated with both identifiable anatomical nuclei and with light/dark cycle. Precise isolation of specific brain nuclei regulating sleep and arousal, including the LC, SCN, TMN, VTA, and VLPO, demonstrated robust changes in gene expression. Many of these differences were not observed in previous studies where whole brain lysates or gross dissections were used to probe for changes in gene expression. The robust and differential profiles of genomic data obtained from the approaches used herein underscore the requirement for careful anatomical refinement in CNS gene expression studies designed to understand genomic control within behaviorally-linked, but functionally isolated brain nuclei.

  19. The distinctive role of executive functions in implicit emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperduti, Marco; Makowski, Dominique; Arcangeli, Margherita; Wantzen, Prany; Zalla, Tiziana; Lemaire, Stéphane; Dokic, Jérôme; Pelletier, Jérôme; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-02-01

    Several theoretical models stress the role of executive functions in emotion regulation (ER). However, most of the previous studies on ER employed explicit regulatory strategies that could have engaged executive functions, beyond regulatory processes per se. Recently, there has been renewed interest in implicit forms of ER, believed to be closer to daily-life requirements. While various studies have shown that implicit and explicit ER engage partially overlapping neurocognitive processes, the contribution of different executive functions in implicit ER has not been investigated. In the present study, we presented participants with negatively valenced pictures of varying emotional intensity preceded by short texts describing them as either fictional or real. This manipulation was meant to induce a spontaneous emotional down-regulation. We recorded electrodermal activity (EDA) and subjective reports of emotion arousal. Executive functions (updating, switching, and inhibition) were also assessed. No difference was found between the fictional and real condition on EDA. A diminished self-reported arousal was observed, however, when pictures were described as fictional for high- and mild-intensity material, but not for neutral material. The amount of down-regulation in the fictional condition was found to be predicted by interindividual variability in updating performances, but not by the other measures of executive functions, suggesting its implication even in implicit forms of ER. The relationship between down-regulation and updating was significant only for high-intensity material. We discuss the role of updating in relation to the consciousness of one's emotional state.

  20. Defining inhibitory neurone function in respiratory circuits: opportunities with optogenetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana Paula; Paton, Julian F R; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-15

    Pharmacological and mathematical modelling studies support the view that synaptic inhibition in mammalian brainstem respiratory circuits is essential for generating normal and stable breathing movements. GABAergic and glycinergic neurones are known components of these circuits but their precise functional roles have not been established, especially within key microcircuits of the respiratory pre-Bötzinger (pre-BötC) and Bötzinger (BötC) complexes involved in phasic control of respiratory pump and airway muscles. Here, we review briefly current concepts of relevant complexities of inhibitory synapses and the importance of synaptic inhibition in the operation of these microcircuits. We highlight results and limitations of classical pharmacological studies that have suggested critical functions of synaptic inhibition. We then explore the potential opportunities for optogenetic strategies that represent a promising new approach for interrogating function of inhibitory circuits, including a hypothetical wish list for optogenetic approaches to allow expedient application of this technology. We conclude that recent technical advances in optogenetics should provide a means to understand the role of functionally select and regionally confined subsets of inhibitory neurones in key respiratory circuits such as those in the pre-BötC and BötC.

  1. Editing the Neuronal Genome: a CRISPR View of Chromatin Regulation in Neuronal Development, Function, and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Marty G.; West, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic orchestration of gene expression is crucial for the proper differentiation, function, and adaptation of cells. In the brain, transcriptional regulation underlies the incredible diversity of neuronal cell types and contributes to the ability of neurons to adapt their function to the environment. Recently, novel methods for genome and epigenome editing have begun to revolutionize our understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms. In particular, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system has proven to be a particularly accessible and adaptable technique for genome engineering. Here, we review the use of CRISPR/Cas9 in neurobiology and discuss how these studies have advanced understanding of nervous system development and plasticity. We cover four especially salient applications of CRISPR/Cas9: testing the consequences of enhancer mutations, tagging genes and gene products for visualization in live cells, directly activating or repressing enhancers in vivo, and manipulating the epigenome. In each case, we summarize findings from recent studies and discuss evolving adaptations of the method. PMID:28018138

  2. Toxic effects of lead on neuronal development and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, R. (Denver Veterans Administration Medical Center, CO (USA)); Olson, L. (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver (USA)); Hoffer, B.J. (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-11-01

    The effects of lead on the development of the nervous system are of immediate concern to human health. While it is clear that lead can affect neuronal development at levels of exposure within the range found in the environment, the particular mechanism of the disruption is not readily ascertained. The goal of the authors research is to develop a model system in which the effects of lead on central nervous system development can be demonstrated. To study neuronal development in a system that minimizes such difficulties, the authors have grafted discrete brain regions derived from rat fetuses into the anterior chamber of the eye of adult hosts. The brain pieces continue organotypic development in the eye, but are isolated from possible secondary changes due to alterations in the development of the endocrine and other somatic systems because the adult host has these systems already fully developed. Using this system, they have discovered that lead induces a hypernoradrenergic innervation of central nervous system tissue. The increased innervation is observed not only structurally, but also functionally. Since norepinephrine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, this ingrowth may explain the profound slowing of discharge of cerebellar neurons recorded in grafts of lead-treated animals. Studies in other tissues suggest that increased axonal ingrowth may be a general problem of lead intoxication that encompasses many brain areas, as well as peripheral sympathetic systems.

  3. Lack of functional specialization of neurons in the mouse primary visual cortex that have expressed calretinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eCamillo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Calretinin is a calcium-binding protein often used as a marker for a subset of inhibitory interneurons in the mammalian neocortex. We studied the labeled cells in offspring from a cross of a Cre-dependent reporter line with the CR-ires-Cre mice, which express Cre-recombinase in the same pattern as calretinin. We found that in the mature visual cortex, only a minority of the cells that have expressed calretinin and Cre-recombinase during their lifetime is GABAergic and only about 20% are immunoreactive for calretinin. The reason behind this is that calretinin is transiently expressed in many cortical pyramidal neurons during development. To determine whether neurons that express or have expressed calretinin share any distinct functional characteristics, we recorded their visual response properties using GCaMP6s calcium imaging. The average orientation selectivity, size tuning, and temporal and spatial frequency tuning of this group of cells, however, match the response profile of the general neuronal population, revealing the lack of functional specialization for the features studied.

  4. Distinct neuronal patterns of positive and negative moral processing in psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fede, Samantha J; Borg, Jana Schaich; Nyalakanti, Prashanth K; Harenski, Carla L; Cope, Lora M; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Koenigs, Mike; Calhoun, Vince D; Kiehl, Kent A

    2016-12-01

    Psychopathy is a disorder characterized by severe and frequent moral violations in multiple domains of life. Numerous studies have shown psychopathy-related limbic brain abnormalities during moral processing; however, these studies only examined negatively valenced moral stimuli. Here, we aimed to replicate prior psychopathy research on negative moral judgments and to extend this work by examining psychopathy-related abnormalities in the processing of controversial moral stimuli and positive moral processing. Incarcerated adult males (N = 245) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol on a mobile imaging system stationed at the prison. Psychopathy was assessed using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Participants were then shown words describing three types of moral stimuli: wrong (e.g., stealing), not wrong (e.g., charity), and controversial (e.g., euthanasia). Participants rated each stimulus as either wrong or not wrong. PCL-R total scores were correlated with not wrong behavioral responses to wrong moral stimuli, and were inversely related to hemodynamic activity in the anterior cingulate cortex in the contrast of wrong > not wrong. In the controversial > noncontroversial comparison, psychopathy was inversely associated with activity in the temporal parietal junction and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that psychopathy-related abnormalities are observed during the processing of complex, negative, and positive moral stimuli.

  5. Behavioral and TMS Markers of Action Observation Might Reflect Distinct Neuronal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hétu, Sébastien; Taschereau-Dumouchel, Vincent; Meziane, Hadj Boumediene; Jackson, Philip L.; Mercier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that observing an action induces muscle-specific changes in corticospinal excitability. From a signal detection theory standpoint, this pattern can be related to sensitivity, which here would measure the capacity to distinguish between two action observation conditions. In parallel to these TMS studies, action observation has also been linked to behavioral effects such as motor priming and interference. It has been hypothesized that behavioral markers of action observation could be related to TMS markers and thus represent a potentially cost-effective mean of assessing the functioning of the action-perception system. However, very few studies have looked at possible relationships between these two measures. The aim of this study was to investigate if individual differences in sensitivity to action observation could be related to the behavioral motor priming and interference effects produced by action observation. To this end, 14 healthy participants observed index and little finger movements during a TMS task and a stimulus–response compatibility task. Index muscle displayed sensitivity to action observation, and action observation resulted in significant motor priming+interference, while no significant effect was observed for the little finger in both task. Nevertheless, our results indicate that the sensitivity measured in TMS was not related to the behavioral changes measured in the stimulus–response compatibility task. Contrary to a widespread assumption, the current results indicate that individual differences in physiological and behavioral markers of action observation may be unrelated. This could have important impacts on the potential use of behavioral markers in place of more costly physiological markers of action observation in clinical settings. PMID:27683548

  6. Behavioral and TMS markers of action observation might reflect distinct neuronal processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Hétu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies have shown that observing an action induces muscle-specific changes in corticospinal excitability. From a signal detection theory standpoint, this pattern can be related to sensitivity, which here would measure the capacity to distinguish between two action observation conditions. In parallel to these TMS studies, action observation has also been linked to behavioral effects such as motor priming and interference. It has been hypothesized that behavioral markers of action observation could be related to TMS markers and thus represent a potentially cost-effective mean of assessing the functioning of the action-perception system. However, very few studies have looked at possible relationships between these two measures. The aim of this study was to investigate if individual differences in sensitivity to action observation could be related to the behavioral motor priming and interference effects produced by action observation. To this end, fourteen healthy participants observed index and little finger movements during a TMS task and a stimulus-response compatibility task. Index muscle displayed sensitivity to action observation, and action observation resulted in significant motor priming+interference, while no significant effect was observed for the little finger in both task. Nevertheless, our results indicate that the sensitivity measured in TMS was not related to the behavioral changes measured in the stimulus-response compatibility task. Contrary to a predominant assumption, the current results indicate that individual differences in physiological and behavioral markers of action observation may be unrelated. This could have important impacts on the potential use of behavioral markers in place of more costly physiological markers of action observation in clinical settings.

  7. Behavioral and TMS Markers of Action Observation Might Reflect Distinct Neuronal Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hétu, Sébastien; Taschereau-Dumouchel, Vincent; Meziane, Hadj Boumediene; Jackson, Philip L; Mercier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that observing an action induces muscle-specific changes in corticospinal excitability. From a signal detection theory standpoint, this pattern can be related to sensitivity, which here would measure the capacity to distinguish between two action observation conditions. In parallel to these TMS studies, action observation has also been linked to behavioral effects such as motor priming and interference. It has been hypothesized that behavioral markers of action observation could be related to TMS markers and thus represent a potentially cost-effective mean of assessing the functioning of the action-perception system. However, very few studies have looked at possible relationships between these two measures. The aim of this study was to investigate if individual differences in sensitivity to action observation could be related to the behavioral motor priming and interference effects produced by action observation. To this end, 14 healthy participants observed index and little finger movements during a TMS task and a stimulus-response compatibility task. Index muscle displayed sensitivity to action observation, and action observation resulted in significant motor priming+interference, while no significant effect was observed for the little finger in both task. Nevertheless, our results indicate that the sensitivity measured in TMS was not related to the behavioral changes measured in the stimulus-response compatibility task. Contrary to a widespread assumption, the current results indicate that individual differences in physiological and behavioral markers of action observation may be unrelated. This could have important impacts on the potential use of behavioral markers in place of more costly physiological markers of action observation in clinical settings.

  8. Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambou, Karine; Tharreau, Didier; Kohler, Annegret; Sirven, Catherine; Marguerettaz, Mélanie; Barbisan, Crystel; Sexton, Adrienne C; Kellner, Ellen M; Martin, Francis; Howlett, Barbara J; Orbach, Marc J; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2008-01-01

    Background Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3) and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1) in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea. Results The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes) contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3) with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1) was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Δtsp3 and Δtpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Δpls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice. Conclusion A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3) and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1) have been identified in fungi. Functional analysis by gene

  9. Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Francis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3 and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1 in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea. Results The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3 with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1 was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Δtsp3 and Δtpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Δpls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice. Conclusion A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3 and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1 have been identified in fungi

  10. Involvement of distinct PKC gene products in T cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried eBaier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that members of the Protein kinase C(PKC family seem to have important roles in T cells. Focusing on the physiological and non-redundant PKC functions established in primary mouse T cells via germline gene-targeting approaches, our current knowledge defines two particularly critical PKC gene products, PKCθ and PKCα, as the flavor of PKC in T cells that appear to have a positive role in signaling pathways that are necessary for full antigen receptor-mediated T cell activation ex vivo and T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. Consistently, in spite of the current dogma that PKCθ inhibition might be sufficient to achieve complete immunosuppressive effects, more recent results have indicated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ, and additionally, at least PKCα, appears to be needed to provide a successful approach for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  11. EphrinA5 Signaling Is Required for the Distinctive Targeting of Raphe Serotonin Neurons in the Forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzerelle, Aude

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission in the brain relies on a widespread axon terminal network originating from the hindbrain raphe nuclei. These projections are topographically organized such that the dorsal (DR), and median raphe (MnR) nuclei have different brain targets. However, the guidance molecules involved in this selective targeting in development are unknown. Here, we show the implication of ephrinA5 signaling in this process. We find that the EphA5 gene is selectively expressed in a subset of 5-HT neurons during embryonic and postnatal development. Highest coexpression of EphA5 and the 5-HT marker Tph2 is found in the DR, with lower coexpression in the MnR, and hardly any colocalization of the caudal raphe in the medulla. Accordingly, ephrinA induced a dose-dependent collapse response of 5-HT growth cones cultured from rostral but not caudal raphe. Ectopic expression of ephrinA3, after in utero electroporation in the amygdala and piriform cortex, repelled 5-HT raphe fiber ingrowth. Conversely, misplaced DR 5-HT axons were found in ephrin A5 knockout mice in brain regions that are normally only targeted by MnR 5-HT axons. This causes an overall increase in the density of 5-HT innervation in the ventromedial hypothalamus, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, and the olfactory bulb. All these brain areas have high expression of ephrinAs at the time of 5-HT fiber ingrowth. Present results show for the first time the role of a guidance molecule for the region-specific targeting of raphe neurons. This has important implications to understand how functional parsing of central 5-HT neurons is established during development. PMID:28197551

  12. Neurotrophin-3 Enhances the Synaptic Organizing Function of TrkC–Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase σ in Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its high-affinity receptor TrkC play crucial trophic roles in neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity in the nervous system. We demonstrated previously that postsynaptic TrkC functions as a glutamatergic synapse-inducing (synaptogenic) cell adhesion molecule trans-interacting with presynaptic protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ). Given that NT-3 and PTPσ bind distinct domains of the TrkC extracellular region, here we tested t...

  13. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-05-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification.

  14. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  15. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone's central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1.

  16. Different levels of Ih determine distinct temporal integration in bursting and regular-spiking neurons in rat subiculum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Welie, I.; Remme, M.W.H.; van Hooft, J.A.; Wadman, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the subiculum typically display either bursting or regular-spiking behaviour. Although this classification into two neuronal classes is well described, it is unknown how these two classes of neurons contribute to the integration of input to the subiculum. Here, we report that

  17. Functional cell types in taste buds have distinct longevities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Perea-Martinez

    Full Text Available Taste buds are clusters of polarized sensory cells embedded in stratified oral epithelium. In adult mammals, taste buds turn over continuously and are replenished through the birth of new cells in the basal layer of the surrounding non-sensory epithelium. The half-life of cells in mammalian taste buds has been estimated as 8-12 days on average. Yet, earlier studies did not address whether the now well-defined functional taste bud cell types all exhibit the same lifetime. We employed a recently developed thymidine analog, 5-ethynil-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU to re-evaluate the incorporation of newly born cells into circumvallate taste buds of adult mice. By combining EdU-labeling with immunostaining for selected markers, we tracked the differentiation and lifespan of the constituent cell types of taste buds. EdU was primarily incorporated into basal extragemmal cells, the principal source for replenishing taste bud cells. Undifferentiated EdU-labeled cells began migrating into circumvallate taste buds within 1 day of their birth. Type II (Receptor taste cells began to differentiate from EdU-labeled precursors beginning 2 days after birth and then were eliminated with a half-life of 8 days. Type III (Presynaptic taste cells began differentiating after a delay of 3 days after EdU-labeling, and they survived much longer, with a half-life of 22 days. We also scored taste bud cells that belong to neither Type II nor Type III, a heterogeneous group that includes mostly Type I cells, and also undifferentiated or immature cells. A non-linear decay fit described these cells as two sub-populations with half-lives of 8 and 24 days respectively. Our data suggest that many post-mitotic cells may remain quiescent within taste buds before differentiating into mature taste cells. A small number of slow-cycling cells may also exist within the perimeter of the taste bud. Based on their incidence, we hypothesize that these may be progenitors for Type III cells.

  18. Facilitation of distinct inhibitory synaptic inputs by chemical anoxia in neurons in the oculomotor, facial and hypoglossal motor nuclei of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Satoshi; Kono, Yu; Nagase, Masashi; Mochio, Soichiro; Kato, Fusao

    2017-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. Clinical studies have indicated that there is a distinct region-dependent difference in the vulnerability of motor neurons. For example, the motor neurons in the facial and hypoglossal nuclei are more susceptible to neuronal death than those in the oculomotor nucleus. To understand the mechanism underlying the differential susceptibility to cell death of the neurons in different motor nuclei, we compared the effects of chemical anoxia on the membrane currents and postsynaptic currents in different motor nuclei. The membrane currents were recorded from neurons in the oculomotor, facial and hypoglossal nuclei in brain slices of juvenile Wistar rats by using whole-cell recording in the presence of tetrodotoxin that prevents action potential-dependent synaptic transmission. NaCN consistently induced an inward current and a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic inputs in neurons from these three nuclei. However, this increase in the synaptic input frequency was abolished by strychnine, a glycine receptor antagonist, but not by picrotoxin in neurons from the hypoglossal and facial nuclei, whereas that in neurons from the oculomotor nucleus was abolished by picrotoxin, but not by strychnine. Blocking ionotropic glutamate receptors did not significantly affect the NaCN-induced release facilitation in any of the three motor nuclei. These results suggest that anoxia selectively facilitates glycine release in the hypoglossal and facial nuclei and GABA release in the oculomotor nucleus. The region-dependent differences in the neurotransmitters involved in the anoxia-triggered release facilitation might provide a basis for the selective vulnerability of motor neurons in the neurodegeneration associated with ALS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. An information theoretic approach to the functional classification of neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Schneidman, E; Berry, M J; Schneidman, Elad; Bialek, William; Berry, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A population of neurons typically exhibits a broad diversity of responses to sensory inputs. The intuitive notion of functional classification is that cells can be clustered so that most of the diversity is captured in the identity of the clusters rather than by individuals within clusters. We show how this intuition can be made precise using information theory, without any need to introduce a metric on the space of stimuli or responses. Applied to the retinal ganglion cells of the salamander, this approach recovers classical results, but also provides clear evidence for subclasses beyond those identified previously. Further, we find that each of the ganglion cells is functionally unique, and that even within the same subclass only a few spikes are needed to reliably distinguish between cells.

  20. Molecular cloning and pharmacology of functionally distinct isoforms of the human histamine H(3) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Goodman, M W; Burstein, E S

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of histamine H(3) receptors suggests the presence of distinct receptor isoforms or subtypes. We herein describe multiple, functionally distinct, alternatively spliced isoforms of the human H(3) receptor. Combinatorial splicing at three different sites creates at least six distinc...

  1. Multiple functions of precursor BDNF to CNS neurons: negative regulation of neurite growth, spine formation and cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Hisatsugu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proneurotrophins and mature neurotrophins elicit opposite effects via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR and Trk tyrosine kinase receptors, respectively; however the molecular roles of proneurotrophins in the CNS are not fully understood. Results Based on two rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, we generated R125M-, R127L- and R125M/R127L-BDNF, which have amino acid substitution(s near the cleavage site between the pro- and mature-domain of BDNF. Western blot analyses demonstrated that these BDNF variants are poorly cleaved and result in the predominant secretion of proBDNF. Using these cleavage-resistant proBDNF (CR-proBDNF variants, the molecular and cellular roles of proBDNF on the CNS neurons were examined. First, CR-proBDNF showed normal intracellular distribution and secretion in cultured hippocampal neurons, suggesting that inhibition of proBDNF cleavage does not affect intracellular transportation and secretion of BDNF. Second, we purified recombinant CR-proBDNF and tested its biological effects using cultured CNS neurons. Treatment with CR-proBDNF elicited apoptosis of cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs, while treatment with mature BDNF (matBDNF promoted cell survival. Third, we examined the effects of CR-proBDNF on neuronal morphology using more than 2-week cultures of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs and hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, in marked contrast to the action of matBDNF, which increased the number of cholinergic fibers and hippocampal dendritic spines, CR-proBDNF dramatically reduced the number of cholinergic fibers and hippocampal dendritic spines, without affecting the survival of these neurons. Conclusion These results suggest that proBDNF has distinct functions in different populations of CNS neurons and might be responsible for specific physiological cellular processes in the brain.

  2. Pelvic nerve injury causes a rapid decrease in expression of choline acetyltransferase and upregulation of c-Jun and ATF-3 in a distinct population of sacral preganglionic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Peddie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic regulation of the urogenital organs is impaired by injuries sustained during pelvic surgery or compression of lumbosacral spinal nerves (e.g. cauda equina syndrome. To understand the impact of injury on both sympathetic and parasympathetic components of this nerve supply, we performed an experimental surgical and immunohistochemical study on adult male rats, where the structure of this complex part of the nervous system has been well defined. We performed unilateral transection of pelvic or hypogastric nerves and analysed relevant regions of lumbar and sacral spinal cord, up to four weeks after injury. Expression of c-Jun, the neuronal injury marker activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3, and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT were examined. We found little evidence for chemical or structural changes in substantial numbers of functionally related but uninjured spinal neurons (e.g. in sacral preganglionic neurons after hypogastric nerve injury, failing to support the concept of compensatory events. The effects of injury were greatest in sacral cord, ipsilateral to pelvic nerve transection. Here, around half of all preganglionic neurons expressed c-Jun within one week of injury, and substantial ATF-3 expression also occurred, especially in neurons with complete loss of ChAT-immunoreactivity. There did not appear to be any death of retrogradely labelled neurons, in contrast to axotomy studies performed on other regions of spinal cord or sacral ventral root avulsion models. Each of the effects we observed occurred in only a subpopulation of preganglionic neurons at that spinal level, raising the possibility that distinct functional subgroups have different susceptibility to trauma-induced degeneration and potentially different regenerative abilities. Identification of the cellular basis of these differences may provide insights into organ-specific strategies for attenuating degeneration or promoting regeneration of these circuits after

  3. Comparative functional expression of nAChR subtypes in rodent DRG neurons

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    Nathan J. Smith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the functional expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in heterogeneous populations of dissociated rat and mouse lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons by calcium imaging. By this experimental approach, it is possible to investigate the functional expression of multiple receptor and ion-channel subtypes across more than 100 neuronal and glial cells simultaneously. Based on nAChR expression, DRG neurons could be divided into four subclasses: 1 neurons that express predominantly alpha3beta4 and alpha6beta4 nAChRs; 2 neurons that express predominantly alpha7 nAChRs; 3 neurons that express a combination of alpha3beta4/alpha6beta4 and alpha7 nAChRs; and 4 neurons that do not express nAChRs. In this comparative study, the same four neuronal subclasses were observed in mouse and rat DRG. However, the expression frequency differed between species: substantially more rat DRG neurons were in the first three subclasses than mouse DRG neurons, at all developmental time points tested in our study. Approximately 70-80% of rat DRG neurons expressed functional nAChRs, in contrast to only ~15-30% of mouse DRG neurons. Our study also demonstrated functional coupling between nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels and mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in discrete subsets of DRG neurons. In contrast to the expression of nAChRs in DRG neurons, we demonstrated that a subset of non-neuronal DRG cells expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs and not nAChRs. The general approach to comparative cellular neurobiology outlined in this paper has the potential to better integrate molecular and systems neuroscience by uncovering the spectrum of neuronal subclasses present in a given cell population and the functionally integrated signaling components expressed in each subclass.

  4. Effects of chronic ethanol exposure on neuronal function in the prefrontal cortex and extended amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Kristen E; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; Crowley, Nicole A; Li, Chia; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A; Rose, Jamie H; McCall, Nora M; Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Morrow, A Leslie; Jones, Sara R; Kash, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal leads to anxiety, escalated alcohol drinking behavior, and alcohol dependence. Alterations in the function of key structures within the cortico-limbic neural circuit have been implicated in underlying the negative behavioral consequences of chronic alcohol exposure in both humans and rodents. Here, we used chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) in male C57BL/6J mice to evaluate the effects of chronic alcohol exposure and withdrawal on anxiety-like behavior and basal synaptic function and neuronal excitability in prefrontal cortical and extended amygdala brain regions. Forty-eight hours after four cycles of CIE, mice were either assayed in the marble burying test (MBT) or their brains were harvested and whole-cell electrophysiological recordings were performed in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PLC and ILC), the lateral and medial central nucleus of the amygdala (lCeA and mCeA), and the dorsal and ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST and vBNST). Ethanol-exposed mice displayed increased anxiety in the MBT compared to air-exposed controls, and alterations in neuronal function were observed in all brain structures examined, including several distinct differences between subregions within each structure. Chronic ethanol exposure induced hyperexcitability of the ILC, as well as a shift toward excitation in synaptic drive and hyperexcitability of vBNST neurons; in contrast, there was a net inhibition of the CeA. This study reveals extensive effects of chronic ethanol exposure on the basal function of cortico-limbic brain regions, suggests that there may be complex interactions between these regions in the regulation of ethanol-dependent alterations in anxiety state, and highlights the need for future examination of projection-specific effects of ethanol in cortico-limbic circuitry.

  5. Coordination of distinct but interacting rhythmic motor programs by a modulatory projection neuron using different co-transmitters in different ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Molly A.; Gabranski, Emily R.; Huber, Kristen E.; Chapline, M. Christine; Christie, Andrew E.; Dickinson, Patsy S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY While many neurons are known to contain multiple neurotransmitters, the specific roles played by each co-transmitter within a neuron are often poorly understood. Here, we investigated the roles of the co-transmitters of the pyloric suppressor (PS) neurons, which are located in the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the lobster Homarus americanus. The PS neurons are known to contain histamine; using RT-PCR, we identified a second co-transmitter as the FMRFamide-like peptide crustacean myosuppressin (Crust-MS). The modulatory effects of Crust-MS application on the gastric mill and pyloric patterns, generated in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), closely resembled those recorded following extracellular PS neuron stimulation. To determine whether histamine plays a role in mediating the effects of the PS neurons in the STG, we bath-applied histamine receptor antagonists to the ganglion. In the presence of the antagonists, the histamine response was blocked, but Crust-MS application and PS stimulation continued to modulate the gastric and pyloric patterns, suggesting that PS effects in the STG are mediated largely by Crust-MS. PS neuron stimulation also excited the oesophageal rhythm, produced in the commissural ganglia (CoGs) of the STNS. Application of histamine, but not Crust-MS, to the CoGs mimicked this effect. Histamine receptor antagonists blocked the ability of both histamine and PS stimulation to excite the oesophageal rhythm, providing strong evidence that the PS neurons use histamine in the CoGs to exert their effects. Overall, our data suggest that the PS neurons differentially utilize their co-transmitters in spatially distinct locations to coordinate the activity of three independent networks. PMID:23393282

  6. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M. Yersak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded androgen receptor (AR. The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells.

  7. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  8. Differential expression of voltage-gated K+ currents in medial septum/diagonal band complex neurons exhibiting distinct firing phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.; Perez-Cordova, Miriam G.; Colom, Luis V.

    2011-01-01

    The medial septum/diagonal band complex (MSDB) controls hippocampal excitability, rhythms and plastic processes. Medial septal neuronal populations display heterogeneous firing patterns. In addition, some of these populations degenerate during age-related disorders (e.g. cholinergic neurons). Thus, it is particularly important to examine the intrinsic properties of theses neurons in order to create new agents that effectively modulate hippocampal excitability and enhance memory processes. Her...

  9. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  10. Constrained Synaptic Connectivity in Functional Mammalian Neuronal Networks Grown on Patterned Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Wyart, Claire; Ybert, Christophe; Herr, Catherine; Chatenay, Didier

    2002-03-01

    The use of ordered neuronal networks in vitro is a promising approach to study the development and the activity of neuronal assemblies. However in previous attempts, sufficient growth control and physiological maturation of neurons could not be achieved. We describe an original protocol in which polylysine patterns confine the adhesion of cellular bodies to prescribed spots and the neuritic growth to thin lines. Hippocampal neurons are maintained healthy in serum free medium up to five weeks in vitro. Electrophysiology and immunochemistry show that neurons exhibit mature excitatory and inhibitory synapses and calcium imaging reveals spontaneous bursting activity of neurons in isolated networks. Neurons in these geometrical networks form functional synapses preferentially to their first neighbors. We have therefore established a simple and robust protocol to constrain both the location of neuronal cell bodies and their pattern of connectivity.

  11. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis.

  12. Excitation-Transcription Coupling in Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons Employs a Novel CaM Kinase-Dependent Pathway Distinct from Excitatory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Samuel M; Ma, Huan; Kuchibhotla, Kishore V; Watson, Brendon O; Buzsáki, György; Froemke, Robert C; Tsien, Richard W

    2016-04-20

    Properly functional CNS circuits depend on inhibitory interneurons that in turn rely upon activity-dependent gene expression for morphological development, connectivity, and excitatory-inhibitory coordination. Despite its importance, excitation-transcription coupling in inhibitory interneurons is poorly understood. We report that PV+ interneurons employ a novel CaMK-dependent pathway to trigger CREB phosphorylation and gene expression. As in excitatory neurons, voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx through CaV1 channels triggers CaM nuclear translocation via local Ca(2+) signaling. However, PV+ interneurons are distinct in that nuclear signaling is mediated by γCaMKI, not γCaMKII. CREB phosphorylation also proceeds with slow, sigmoid kinetics, rate-limited by paucity of CaMKIV, protecting against saturation of phospho-CREB in the face of higher firing rates and bigger Ca(2+) transients. Our findings support the generality of CaM shuttling to drive nuclear CaMK activity, and they are relevant to disease pathophysiology, insofar as dysfunction of PV+ interneurons and molecules underpinning their excitation-transcription coupling both relate to neuropsychiatric disease.

  13. Distinct forms of synaptic inhibition and neuromodulation regulate calretinin-positive neuron excitability in the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K M; Boyle, K A; Mustapa, M; Jobling, P; Callister, R J; Hughes, D I; Graham, B A

    2016-06-21

    The dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord contains a heterogenous population of neurons that process incoming sensory signals before information ascends to the brain. We have recently characterized calretinin-expressing (CR+) neurons in the DH and shown that they can be divided into excitatory and inhibitory subpopulations. The excitatory population receives high-frequency excitatory synaptic input and expresses delayed firing action potential discharge, whereas the inhibitory population receives weak excitatory drive and exhibits tonic or initial bursting discharge. Here, we characterize inhibitory synaptic input and neuromodulation in the two CR+ populations, in order to determine how each is regulated. We show that excitatory CR+ neurons receive mixed inhibition from GABAergic and glycinergic sources, whereas inhibitory CR+ neurons receive inhibition, which is dominated by glycine. Noradrenaline and serotonin produced robust outward currents in excitatory CR+ neurons, predicting an inhibitory action on these neurons, but neither neuromodulator produced a response in CR+ inhibitory neurons. In contrast, enkephalin (along with selective mu and delta opioid receptor agonists) produced outward currents in inhibitory CR+ neurons, consistent with an inhibitory action but did not affect the excitatory CR+ population. Our findings show that the pharmacology of inhibitory inputs and neuromodulator actions on CR+ cells, along with their excitatory inputs can define these two subpopulations further, and this could be exploited to modulate discrete aspects of sensory processing selectively in the DH.

  14. Serotonin 2C receptor activates a distinct population of arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin neurons via TRPC channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CRs) expressed by pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus regulate food intake, energy homeostasis ,and glucose metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of 5-HT to regulate POMC neuronal activity via 5-HT2CRs have no...

  15. Neuronal spike sorting based on radial basis function neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghavi Kani M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Studying the behavior of a society of neurons, extracting the communication mechanisms of brain with other tissues, finding treatment for some nervous system diseases and designing neuroprosthetic devices, require an algorithm to sort neuralspikes automatically. However, sorting neural spikes is a challenging task because of the low signal to noise ratio (SNR of the spikes. The main purpose of this study was to design an automatic algorithm for classifying neuronal spikes that are emitted from a specific region of the nervous system."n "nMethods: The spike sorting process usually consists of three stages: detection, feature extraction and sorting. We initially used signal statistics to detect neural spikes. Then, we chose a limited number of typical spikes as features and finally used them to train a radial basis function (RBF neural network to sort the spikes. In most spike sorting devices, these signals are not linearly discriminative. In order to solve this problem, the aforesaid RBF neural network was used."n "nResults: After the learning process, our proposed algorithm classified any arbitrary spike. The obtained results showed that even though the proposed Radial Basis Spike Sorter (RBSS reached to the same error as the previous methods, however, the computational costs were much lower compared to other algorithms. Moreover, the competitive points of the proposed algorithm were its good speed and low computational complexity."n "nConclusion: Regarding the results of this study, the proposed algorithm seems to serve the purpose of procedures that require real-time processing and spike sorting.

  16. Functional Properties of Tooth Pulp Neurons Responding to Thermal Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, D.K.; Doutova, E.A.; McNaughton, K.; Light, A.R.; Närhi, M.; Maixner, W.

    2012-01-01

    The response properties of tooth pulp neurons that respond to noxious thermal stimulation of the dental pulp have been not well-studied. The present study was designed to characterize the response properties of tooth pulp neurons to noxious thermal stimulation of the dental pulp. Experiments were conducted on 25 male ferrets, and heat stimulation was applied by a computer-controlled thermode. Only 15% of tooth pulp neurons (n = 39) responded to noxious thermal stimulation of the teeth. Tooth ...

  17. A neuron model with trainable activation function (TAF) and its MFNN supervised learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴佑寿; 赵明生

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses a new kind of neuron model, which has trainable activation function (TAF) in addition to only trainable weights in the conventional M-P model. The final neuron activation function can be derived from a primitive neuron activation function by training. The BP like learning algorithm has been presented for MFNN constructed by neurons of TAF model. Several simulation examples are given to show the network capacity and performance advantages of the new MFNN in comparison with that of conventional sigmoid MFNN.

  18. Muscle-Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0189 TITLE: Muscle -Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS PRINCIPAL...NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0189 Muscle -Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...ALS) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to skeletal muscle atrophy, paralysis, and the death of patients

  19. Investigation of synapse formation and function in a glutamatergic-GABAergic two-neuron microcircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Jordan, Julia-Christine; Herman, Melissa A; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-15

    Neural circuits are composed of mainly glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, which communicate through synaptic connections. Many factors instruct the formation and function of these synapses; however, it is difficult to dissect the contribution of intrinsic cell programs from that of extrinsic environmental effects in an intact network. Here, we perform paired recordings from two-neuron microculture preparations of mouse hippocampal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons to investigate how synaptic input and output of these two principal cells develop. In our reduced preparation, we found that glutamatergic neurons showed no change in synaptic output or input regardless of partner neuron cell type or neuronal activity level. In contrast, we found that glutamatergic input caused the GABAergic neuron to modify its output by way of an increase in synapse formation and a decrease in synaptic release efficiency. These findings are consistent with aspects of GABAergic synapse maturation observed in many brain regions. In addition, changes in GABAergic output are cell wide and not target-cell specific. We also found that glutamatergic neuronal activity determined the AMPA receptor properties of synapses on the partner GABAergic neuron. All modifications of GABAergic input and output required activity of the glutamatergic neuron. Because our system has reduced extrinsic factors, the changes we saw in the GABAergic neuron due to glutamatergic input may reflect initiation of maturation programs that underlie the formation and function of in vivo neural circuits.

  20. Identifying Molecular Regulators of Neuronal Functions Affected in the Movement Disorder Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    the brain. 15. SUBJECT TERMS DYT1 dystonia, torsinA, neuronal function, neurobiology , calcium, synapse, synaptic transmission 16. SECURITY...VDCC, voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channel; ΔV, membrane depolarization. KEYWORDS DYT1 dystonia, torsinA, neuronal function, neurobiology ...REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Not applicable. APPENDICES The reprints of the published manuscripts are attached as appendices in the following order

  1. Passive immunization with phospho-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology and functional deficits in two distinct mouse tauopathy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Brunden, Kurt R; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies.

  2. Passive immunization with phospho-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology and functional deficits in two distinct mouse tauopathy models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethu Sankaranarayanan

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19 led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies.

  3. Developing a functional urinary bladder: a neuronal context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet R Keast

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of organs occurs in parallel with the formation of their nerve supply. The innervation of pelvic organs (lower urinary tract, hindgut, and sexual organs is complex and we know remarkably little about the mechanisms that form these neural pathways. The goal of this short review is to use the urinary bladder as an example to stimulate interest in this question. The bladder requires a healthy mature nervous system to store urine and release it at behaviourally appropriate times. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the construction of these neural circuits is not only relevant to defining the basis of developmental problems but may also suggest strategies to restore connectivity and function following injury or disease in adults. The bladder nerve supply comprises multiple classes of sensory, and parasympathetic or sympathetic autonomic effector (motor neurons. First, we define the developmental endpoint by describing this circuitry in adult rodents. Next we discuss the innervation of the developing bladder, identifying challenges posed by this area of research. Last we provide examples of genetically modified mice with bladder dysfunction and suggest potential neural contributors to this state.

  4. The function of mirror neurons in the learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, Neurosciences have developed very much, being elaborated many important theories scientific research in the field. The main goal of neuroscience is to understand how groups of neurons interact to create the behavior. Neuroscientists studying the action of molecules, genes and cells. It also explores the complex interactions involved in motion perception, thoughts, emotions and learning. Brick fundamental nervous system is the nerve cell, neuron. Neurons exchange information by sending electrical signals and chemical through connections called synapses. Discovered by a group of Italian researchers from the University of Parma, neurons - mirror are a special class of nerve cells played an important role in the direct knowledge, automatic and unconscious environment. These cortical neurons are activated not only when an action is fulfilled, but when we see how the same action is performed by someone else, they represent neural mechanism by which the actions, intentions and emotions of others can be understood automatically. In childhood neurons - mirror are extremely important. Thanks to them we learned a lot in the early years: smile, to ask for help and, in fact, all the behaviors and family and group norms. People learn by what they see and sense the others. Neurons - mirror are important to understanding the actions and intentions of other people and learn new skills through mirror image. They are involved in planning and controlling actions, abstract thinking and memory. If a child observes an action, neurons - mirror is activated and forming new neural pathways as if even he takes that action. Efficient activity of mirror neurons leads to good development in all areas at a higher emotional intelligence and the ability to empathize with others.

  5. Sleep deprivation and hippocampal vulnerability : Changes in neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and cognitive function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutzmann, J C; Havekes, R; Abel, T; Meerlo, P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ongoing fundamental controversy about the physiological function of sleep, there is general consensus that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition. In agreement with this are numerous studies showing that sleep deprivation (SD) results

  6. Elevated mRNA-levels of distinct mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual hypoglossal motor neurons of endstage SOD1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eMühling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction have emerged as major pathogenic features in familial and sporadic forms of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, a fatal degenerative motor neuron disease. However, the distinct molecular ALS-pathology remains unclear. Recently, an activity-dependent Ca2+ homeostasis deficit, selectively in highly vulnerable cholinergic motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (hMNs from a common ALS mouse model, endstage superoxide dismutase SOD1G93A transgenic mice, was described. This functional deficit was defined by a reduced hMN mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake capacity and elevated Ca2+ extrusion across the plasma membrane. To address the underlying molecular mechanisms, here we quantified mRNA-levels of respective potential mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual, choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT positive hMNs from wildtype (WT and endstage SOD1G93A mice, by combining UV laser microdissection with RT-qPCR techniques, and specific data normalization. As ChAT cDNA levels as well as cDNA and genomic DNA levels of the mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase ND1 were not different between hMNs from WT and endstage SOD1G93A mice, these genes were used to normalize hMN-specific mRNA-levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters, respectively. We detected about 2-fold higher levels of the mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters MCU/MICU1, Letm1 and UCP2 in remaining hMNs from endstage SOD1G93A mice. These higher expression-levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters in individual hMNs were not associated with a respective increase in number of mitochondrial genomes, as evident from hMN specific ND1 DNA quantification. Normalized mRNA-levels for the plasma membrane Na2+/Ca2+exchanger NCX1 was also about 2-fold higher in hMNs from SOD1G93A mice. Thus, pharmacological stimulation of Ca2+ transporters in highly vulnerable hMNs might offer a novel neuroprotective strategy for ALS.

  7. Histological and functional benefit following transplantation of motor neuron progenitors to the injured rat spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn L Rossi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motor neuron loss is characteristic of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI and contributes to functional deficit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate the amenability of the injured adult spinal cord to motor neuron differentiation, we transplanted spinal cord injured animals with a high purity population of human motor neuron progenitors (hMNP derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. In vitro, hMNPs displayed characteristic motor neuron-specific markers, a typical electrophysiological profile, functionally innervated human or rodent muscle, and secreted physiologically active growth factors that caused neurite branching and neuronal survival. hMNP transplantation into cervical SCI sites in adult rats resulted in suppression of intracellular signaling pathways associated with SCI pathogenesis, which correlated with greater endogenous neuronal survival and neurite branching. These neurotrophic effects were accompanied by significantly enhanced performance on all parameters of the balance beam task, as compared to controls. Interestingly, hMNP transplantation resulted in survival, differentiation, and site-specific integration of hMNPs distal to the SCI site within ventral horns, but hMNPs near the SCI site reverted to a neuronal progenitor state, suggesting an environmental deficiency for neuronal maturation associated with SCI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings underscore the barriers imposed on neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells by the gliogenic nature of the injured spinal cord, and the physiological relevance of transplant-derived neurotrophic support to functional recovery.

  8. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  9. On Determinatives and the Category-Function Distinction: A Reply to Brett Reynolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenchuk, Iryna; Ahmed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the arguments made in the article "Determiners, Feline Marsupials, and the Category-Function Distinction: A Critique of ELT Grammars" by Brett Reynolds recently published in the "TESL Canada Journal" (2013). In our response, we demonstrate that the author's arguments are problematic on both…

  10. Activity-dependent regulation of the K/Cl transporter KCC2 membrane diffusion, clustering, and function in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Ingrid; Heubl, Martin; Chevy, Quentin; Renner, Marianne; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Poncer, Jean Christophe; Lévi, Sabine

    2013-09-25

    The neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 exports chloride ions and thereby influences the efficacy and polarity of GABA signaling in the brain. KCC2 is also critical for dendritic spine morphogenesis and the maintenance of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons. Because KCC2 plays a pivotal role in the function of central synapses, it is of particular importance to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation. Here, we studied the impact of membrane diffusion and clustering on KCC2 function. KCC2 forms clusters in the vicinity of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Using quantum-dot-based single-particle tracking on rat primary hippocampal neurons, we show that KCC2 is slowed down and confined at excitatory and inhibitory synapses compared with extrasynaptic regions. However, KCC2 escapes inhibitory synapses faster than excitatory synapses, reflecting stronger molecular constraints at the latter. Interfering with KCC2-actin interactions or inhibiting F-actin polymerization releases diffusion constraints on KCC2 at excitatory but not inhibitory synapses. Thus, F-actin constrains KCC2 diffusion at excitatory synapses, whereas KCC2 is confined at inhibitory synapses by a distinct mechanism. Finally, increased neuronal activity rapidly increases the diffusion coefficient and decreases the dwell time of KCC2 at excitatory synapses. This effect involves NMDAR activation, Ca(2+) influx, KCC2 S940 dephosphorylation and calpain protease cleavage of KCC2 and is accompanied by reduced KCC2 clustering and ion transport function. Thus, activity-dependent regulation of KCC2 lateral diffusion and clustering allows for a rapid regulation of chloride homeostasis in neurons.

  11. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission...... in astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  12. Unique functional properties of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons in mouse barrel cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentet, L.J.; Kremer, Y.; Taniguchi, H.; Huang, Z.J.; Staiger, J.F.; Petersen, C.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical GABAergic neurons have diverse molecular, structural and electrophysiological features, but the functional correlates of this diversity are largely unknown. We found unique membrane potential dynamics of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory

  13. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaneta Odrowaz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  14. Adult adipose-derived stromal cells differentiate into neurons with normal electrophysiological functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Yuan; Yanan Cai; Ya Ou; Yanhui Lu

    2011-01-01

    β-mercaptoethanol was used to induce in vitro neuronal differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells. Within an 8-hour period post-differentiation, the induced cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, and expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 and neuron-specific enolase, which are markers of mature neurons, reached a peak at 5 hours. Specific organelle Nissl bodies of neurons were observed under transmission electron microscopy. Results of membrane potential showed that fluorescence intensity of cells was greater after 5 hours than adipose-derived stromal cells prior to induction. In addition, following stimulation with high-concentration potassium solution, fluorescence intensity increased. These experimental findings suggested that neurons differentiated from adipose-derived stromal cells and expressed mature K+ channels. In addition, following stimulation with high potassium solution, the membrane potential depolarized and fired an action potential, confirming that the induced cells possessed electrophysiological functions.

  15. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  16. The functional anatomical distinction between truth telling and deception is preserved among people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaylor-Hughes, Catherine J; Lankappa, Sudheer T; Fung, Robert; Hope-Urwin, Alexandra E; Wilkinson, Iain D; Spence, Sean A

    2011-02-01

    A recently emergent functional neuroimaging literature has described the functional anatomical correlates of deception among healthy volunteers, most often implicating the ventrolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. To date, there have been no such imaging studies of people with severe mental illness. To discover whether the brains of people with schizophrenia would manifest a similar functional anatomical distinction between the states of truthfulness and deceit. It is hypothesised that, as with healthy people, persons with schizophrenia will show activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices when lying. Fifty-two people satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder-IV criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T while responding truthfully or with lies to questions concerning their recent actions. Half the sample was concurrently experiencing delusions. As hypothesised, patients exhibited greater activity in ventrolateral prefrontal cortices while lying. Truthful responses were not associated with any areas of relatively increased activation. The presence or absence of delusions did not substantially affect these findings, although subtle laterality effects were discernible upon post hoc analyses. As in healthy cohorts, the brains of people with schizophrenia exhibit a functional anatomical distinction between the states of truthfulness and deceit. Furthermore, this distinction pertains even in the presence of delusions. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Striatal astrocytes transdifferentiate into functional mature neurons following ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chun-Ling; Liu, Chong-Wei; Shen, Shu-Wen; Yu, Zhang; Mo, Jia-Lin; Chen, Xian-Hua; Sun, Feng-Yan

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether reactive astrocytes stimulated by brain injury can transdifferentiate into functional new neurons, we labeled these cells by injecting a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) targeted enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pGfa2-eGFP plasmid) into the striatum of adult rats immediately following a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and performed immunolabeling with specific neuronal markers to trace the neural fates of eGFP-expressing (GFP(+)) reactive astrocytes. The results showed that a portion of striatal GFP(+) astrocytes could transdifferentiate into immature neurons at 1 week after MCAO and mature neurons at 2 weeks as determined by double staining GFP-expressing cells with βIII-tubulin (GFP(+)-Tuj-1(+)) and microtubule associated protein-2 (GFP(+)-MAP-2(+)), respectively. GFP(+) neurons further expressed choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase, dopamine receptor D2-like family proteins, and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit R2, indicating that astrocyte-derived neurons could develop into cholinergic or GABAergic neurons and express dopamine and glutamate receptors on their membranes. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that GFP(+) neurons could form synapses with other neurons at 13 weeks after MCAO. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that action potentials and active postsynaptic currents could be recorded in the neuron-like GFP(+) cells but not in the astrocyte-like GFP(+) cells, demonstrating that new GFP(+) neurons possessed the capacity to fire action potentials and receive synaptic inputs. These results demonstrated that striatal astrocyte-derived new neurons participate in the rebuilding of functional neural networks, a fundamental basis for brain repair after injury. These results may lead to new therapeutic strategies for enhancing brain repair after ischemic stroke.

  18. Major hnRNP proteins act as general TDP-43 functional modifiers both in Drosophila and human neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appocher, Chiara; Mohagheghi, Fatemeh; Cappelli, Sara; Stuani, Cristiana; Romano, Maurizio; Feiguin, Fabian; Buratti, Emanuele

    2017-07-27

    Nuclear factor TDP-43 is known to play an important role in several neurodegenerative pathologies. In general, TDP-43 is an abundant protein within the eukaryotic nucleus that binds to many coding and non-coding RNAs and influence their processing. Using Drosophila, we have performed a functional screening to establish the ability of major hnRNP proteins to affect TDP-43 overexpression/depletion phenotypes. Interestingly, we observed that lowering hnRNP and TDP-43 expression has a generally harmful effect on flies locomotor abilities. In parallel, our study has also identified a distinct set of hnRNPs that is capable of powerfully rescuing TDP-43 toxicity in the fly eye (Hrb27c, CG42458, Glo and Syp). Most importantly, removing the human orthologs of Hrb27c (DAZAP1) in human neuronal cell lines can correct several pre-mRNA splicing events altered by TDP-43 depletion. Moreover, using RNA sequencing analysis we show that DAZAP1 and TDP-43 can co-regulate an extensive number of biological processes and molecular functions potentially important for the neuron/motor neuron pathophysiology. Our results suggest that changes in hnRNP expression levels can significantly modulate TDP-43 functions and affect pathological outcomes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Diverse Roles of Axonemal Dyneins in Drosophila Auditory Neuron Function and Mechanical Amplification in Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Somdatta; Jacobs, Julie S; Kittelmann, Maike; Spalthoff, Christian; Katana, Radoslaw; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Schon, Michael A; Kernan, Maurice J; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C

    2015-11-26

    Much like vertebrate hair cells, the chordotonal sensory neurons that mediate hearing in Drosophila are motile and amplify the mechanical input of the ear. Because the neurons bear mechanosensory primary cilia whose microtubule axonemes display dynein arms, we hypothesized that their motility is powered by dyneins. Here, we describe two axonemal dynein proteins that are required for Drosophila auditory neuron function, localize to their primary cilia, and differently contribute to mechanical amplification in hearing. Promoter fusions revealed that the two axonemal dynein genes Dmdnah3 (=CG17150) and Dmdnai2 (=CG6053) are expressed in chordotonal neurons, including the auditory ones in the fly's ear. Null alleles of both dyneins equally abolished electrical auditory neuron responses, yet whereas mutations in Dmdnah3 facilitated mechanical amplification, amplification was abolished by mutations in Dmdnai2. Epistasis analysis revealed that Dmdnah3 acts downstream of Nan-Iav channels in controlling the amplificatory gain. Dmdnai2, in addition to being required for amplification, was essential for outer dynein arms in auditory neuron cilia. This establishes diverse roles of axonemal dyneins in Drosophila auditory neuron function and links auditory neuron motility to primary cilia and axonemal dyneins. Mutant defects in sperm competition suggest that both dyneins also function in sperm motility.

  20. Role of nitric oxide-mediated glutathionylation in neuronal function: potential regulation of energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V; Han, Derick S; Cadenas, Enrique

    2010-04-28

    Excessive generation of nitric oxide radical (NO*) in neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and during age-related neurodegenerative disorders entails the localized and concerted increase in nitric oxide synthase(s) expression in glial cells and neurons. The aim of the present study was to assess the biological significance of the impact of NO* on the cell's thiol status with emphasis on S-glutathionylation of targeted proteins. Exposure of primary cortical neurons or astrocytes to increasing flow rates of NO* (0.061-0.25 microM/s) resulted in the following. (i) A decrease in GSH (glutathione) in neurons accompanied by formation of GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) and GSSG (glutathione disulfide); neurons were far more sensitive to NO* exposure than astrocytes. (ii) A dose-dependent oxidation of the cellular redox status: the neuron's redox potential increased approximately 42 mV and that of astrocytes approximately 23 mV. A good correlation was observed between cell viability and the cellular redox potential. The higher susceptibility of neurons to NO* can be partly explained by a reduced capacity to recover GSH through lower activities of GSNO and GSSG reductases. (iii) S-glutathionylation of a small subset of proteins, among them GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the S-glutathionylation of which resulted in inhibition of enzyme activity. The quantitative analyses of changes in the cell's thiol potential upon NO* exposure and their consequences for S-glutathionylation are discussed in terms of the distinct redox environment of astrocytes and neurons.

  1. Distinct Aging Effects on Functional Networks in Good and Poor Cognitive Performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain network hubs are susceptible to normal aging processes and disruptions of their functional connectivity are detrimental to decline in cognitive functions in older adults. However, it remains unclear how the functional connectivity of network hubs cope with cognitive heterogeneity in an aging population. This study utilized cognitive and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data, cluster analysis, and graph network analysis to examine age-related alterations in the network hubs’ functional connectivity of good and poor cognitive performers. Our results revealed that poor cognitive performers showed age-dependent disruptions in the functional connectivity of the right insula and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, while good cognitive performers showed age-related disruptions in the functional connectivity of the left insula and PCC. Additionally, the left PCC had age-related declines in the functional connectivity with the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Most interestingly, good cognitive performers showed age-related declines in the functional connectivity of the left insula and PCC with their right homotopic structures. These results may provide insights of neuronal correlates for understanding individual differences in aging. In particular, our study suggests prominent protection roles of the left insula and PCC and bilateral ACC in good performers.

  2. Distinct pharmacological properties and distribution in neurons and endocrine cells of two isoforms of the human vesicular monoamine transporter.

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, J.D.; Schafer, M K; Bonner, T I; Eiden, L. E.; Weihe, E.

    1996-01-01

    A second isoform of the human vesicular monoamine transporter (hVMAT) has been cloned from a pheochromocytoma cDNA library. The contribution of the two transporter isoforms to monoamine storage in human neuroendocrine tissues was examined with isoform-specific polyclonal antibodies against hVMAT1 and hVMAT2. Central, peripheral, and enteric neurons express only VMAT2. VMAT1 is expressed exclusively in neuroendocrine, including chromaffin and enterochromaffin, cells. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are coexpr...

  3. Acute antipsychotic treatments induce distinct c-Fos expression patterns in appetite-related neuronal structures of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ramamoorthy; See, Lionel Kee Yon; Dawe, Gavin Stewart

    2013-05-01

    A number of atypical antipsychotic drugs are known to perturb appetite regulation causing greater hyperphagia in humans and rodents than earlier generation typical agents. However, the neuronal structures that underlie hyperphagic effects are poorly understood. Arcuate nucleus (ArcN), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVA) and nucleus incertus (NI) have been implicated in appetite regulation. The NI is the principal source of the relaxin-3 (RLN3) peptide, which is reported to have orexigenic effects. Moreover, ArcN, PVN, and PVA receive RLN3 immunoreactive fibers from the NI and express relaxin family peptide type 3 (RXFP3) receptor. The present study was designed to evaluate the acute effects of clozapine (atypical), chlorpromazine (typical) and fluphenazine (typical) on c-Fos expression (a marker of neuronal response) in these appetite-related centers of the rat brain. The numbers of c-Fos expressing neurons in these structures were counted in immunofluorescence stained brain sections. Acute treatment with clozapine, chlorpromazine and fluphenazine differentially influenced c-Fos expression in these brain structures. This study is also the first demonstration that antipsychotics influence the NI. The patterns of the effects of these antipsychotics are related to their reported hyperphagic properties.

  4. Microtubule Destabilizer KIF2A Undergoes Distinct Site-Specific Phosphorylation Cascades that Differentially Affect Neuronal Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayuki Ogawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons exhibit dynamic structural changes in response to extracellular stimuli. Microtubules (MTs provide rapid and dramatic cytoskeletal changes within the structural framework. However, the molecular mechanisms and signaling networks underlying MT dynamics remain unknown. Here, we have applied a comprehensive and quantitative phospho-analysis of the MT destabilizer KIF2A to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of MT dynamics within neurons in response to extracellular signals. Interestingly, we identified two different sets of KIF2A phosphorylation profiles that accelerate (A-type and brake (B-type the MT depolymerization activity of KIF2A. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates PAK1 and CDK5 kinases, which decrease the MT depolymerizing activity of KIF2A through B-type phosphorylation, resulting in enhanced outgrowth of neural processes. In contrast, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA induces ROCK2 kinase, which suppresses neurite outgrowth from round cells via A-type phosphorylation. We propose that these two mutually exclusive forms of KIF2A phosphorylation differentially regulate neuronal morphogenesis during development.

  5. The regulation and function of fibroblast growth factor 8 and its function during gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson CJ Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, numerous studies solidified the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling regulates neuroendocrine progenitor cell proliferation, fate-specification, and cell survival, and therefore is critical for the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis of the body. One important example that underscores the involvement of FGF signaling during neuroendocrine cell development is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuron ontogenesis. Indeed, transgenic mice with reduced olfactory placode (OP Fgf8 expression do not have GnRH neurons. This observation indicates the requirement of FGF8 signaling for the emergence of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuronal system in the embryonic OP, the putative birth place of GnRH neurons. Mammalian reproductive success depends on the presence of GnRH neurons to stimulate gonadotropin secretion from the anterior pituitary, which activates gonadal steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Together, these observations are critical for understanding the function of GnRH neurons and their control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis to maintain fertility. Taken together, these studies illustrate that GnRH neuron emergence, and hence HPG-function is vulnerable to genomic and molecular signals that abnormally modify Fgf8 expression in the developing mouse OP. In this short review, we focus on research that is aimed at unraveling how androgen, all-trans retinoic acid and epigenetic modifies control mouse OP Fgf8 transcription in the context of GnRH neuronal development, and mammalian reproductive success.

  6. Evidence of two distinct functionally specialized fibroblast lineages in breast stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Mikkel; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Jafari Kermani, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background The terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU) is the most dynamic structure in the human breast and the putative site of origin of human breast cancer. Although stromal cells contribute to a specialized microenvironment in many organs, this component remains largely understudied in the human...... remain phenotypically stable and functionally distinct in culture. Lobular fibroblasts have properties in common with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and they specifically convey growth and branching morphogenesis of epithelial progenitors. Conclusions Two distinct functionally specialized...... fibroblast lineages exist in the normal human breast, of which the lobular fibroblasts have properties in common with mesenchymal stem cells and support epithelial growth and morphogenesis. We propose that lobular fibroblasts constitute a specialized microenvironment for human breast luminal epithelial...

  7. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Bushong, Eric A; Shih, Tiffany P; Ellisman, Mark H; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-05-08

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional segregation of excitatory synaptic transmission from neuronal morphological development.

  8. Genetically encoded tools: bridging the gap between neuronal identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Ku

    2015-01-21

    Genetically encoded tools are positioned to serve a unique and critical role in bridging the gap between the genetic identity of neurons and their functional properties. However, the use of these tools is limited by our current understanding of cell-type identity. As we make technological advances that focus on capturing functional aspects of neurons such as connectivity, activity, and metabolic states, our understanding of neuronal identity will deepen and may enable the use of genetically encoded tools for modulating disease-specific circuits for therapeutic purposes.

  9. Neuronal correlates of cognitive function in patients with childhood cerebellar tumor lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Johanna L.; Chocholous, Monika; Leiss, Ulrike; Pletschko, Thomas; Kasprian, Gregor; Furtner, Julia; Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Slavc, Irene; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Sch?pf, Veronika; Dorfer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    While it has been shown that cerebellar tumor lesions have an impact on cognitive functions, the extent to which they shape distant neuronal pathways is still largely undescribed. Thus, the present neuroimaging study was designed to investigate different aspects of cognitive function and their neuronal correlates in patients after childhood cerebellar tumor surgery. An alertness task, a working memory task and an incompatibility task were performed by 11 patients after childhood cerebellar tu...

  10. Optogenetic Demonstration of Functional Innervation of Mouse Colon by Neurons Derived From Transplanted Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lincon A; Gwynne, Rachel M; Foong, Jaime P P; Lomax, Alan E; Hao, Marlene M; Kaplan, David I; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Allen, Andrew M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2017-05-01

    Cell therapy offers the potential to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders caused by diseased or absent enteric neurons. We examined whether neurons generated from transplanted enteric neural cells provide a functional innervation of bowel smooth muscle in mice. Enteric neural cells expressing the light-sensitive ion channel, channelrhodopsin, were isolated from the fetal or postnatal mouse bowel and transplanted into the distal colon of 3- to 4-week-old wild-type recipient mice. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of responses to light stimulation of the transplanted cells were made from colonic smooth muscle cells in recipient mice. Electrical stimulation of endogenous enteric neurons was used as a control. The axons of graft-derived neurons formed a plexus in the circular muscle layer. Selective stimulation of graft-derived cells by light resulted in excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials, the electrical events underlying contraction and relaxation, respectively, in colonic muscle cells. Graft-derived excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons released the same neurotransmitters as endogenous motor neurons-acetylcholine and a combination of adenosine triphosphate and nitric oxide, respectively. Graft-derived neurons also included interneurons that provided synaptic inputs to motor neurons, but the pharmacologic properties of interneurons varied with the age of the donors from which enteric neural cells were obtained. Enteric neural cells transplanted into the bowel give rise to multiple functional types of neurons that integrate and provide a functional innervation of the smooth muscle of the bowel wall. Circuits composed of both motor neurons and interneurons were established, but the age at which cells are isolated influences the neurotransmitter phenotype of interneurons that are generated. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is an organic/functional distinction psychologically meaningful in patients with dysphonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, A; Deary, I J; Wilson, J A; MacKenzie, K

    1999-06-01

    Dysphonia (hoarseness) is a common clinical condition and, if persistent, patients are referred to otolaryngology clinics for clinical examination. During the examination, a clinical distinction is often made among three types of patients: (1) those with a clear organic basis for dysphonia (cancer, vocal cord palsy): (2) those with some degree of organic pathology; and (3) those with an apparently functional etiology. Functional patients are often characterized as having a psychogenic disorder. This study assessed the psychological validity of the functional category in 204 out-patients (aged 17 to 87 years) with persistent hoarseness of types (2) and (3). Following clinical examination, a consultant otolaryngologist categorized patients as having functional or organic etiology. Subjects were then compared on measures of personality and psychological distress. Dysphonic subjects showed marked psychological distress compared with norms, and reported significantly more previous psychosomatic symptoms than norms, but there were no differences in personality or psychological distress between organic and functional subgroups of dysphonics.

  12. Functional and Developmental Identification of a Molecular Subtype of Brain Serotonergic Neuron Specialized to Regulate Breathing Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael D. Brust

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons modulate behavioral and physiological responses from aggression and anxiety to breathing and thermoregulation. Disorders involving serotonin (5HT dysregulation are commensurately heterogeneous and numerous. We hypothesized that this breadth in functionality derives in part from a developmentally determined substructure of distinct subtypes of 5HT neurons each specialized to modulate specific behaviors. By manipulating developmentally defined subgroups one by one chemogenetically, we find that the Egr2-Pet1 subgroup is specialized to drive increased ventilation in response to carbon dioxide elevation and acidosis. Furthermore, this subtype exhibits intrinsic chemosensitivity and modality-specific projections—increasing firing during hypercapnic acidosis and selectively projecting to respiratory chemosensory but not motor centers, respectively. These findings show that serotonergic regulation of the respiratory chemoreflex is mediated by a specialized molecular subtype of 5HT neuron harboring unique physiological, biophysical, and hodological properties specified developmentally and demonstrate that the serotonergic system contains specialized modules contributing to its collective functional breadth.

  13. A mammalian nervous-system-specific plasma membrane proteasome complex that modulates neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Kapil V; Margolis, Seth S

    2017-04-01

    In the nervous system, rapidly occurring processes such as neuronal transmission and calcium signaling are affected by short-term inhibition of proteasome function. It is unclear how proteasomes are able to acutely regulate such processes, as this action is inconsistent with their canonical role in proteostasis. Here we describe a mammalian nervous-system-specific membrane proteasome complex that directly and rapidly modulates neuronal function by degrading intracellular proteins into extracellular peptides that can stimulate neuronal signaling. This proteasome complex is closely associated with neuronal plasma membranes, exposed to the extracellular space, and catalytically active. Selective inhibition of the membrane proteasome complex by a cell-impermeable proteasome inhibitor blocked the production of extracellular peptides and attenuated neuronal-activity-induced calcium signaling. Moreover, we observed that membrane-proteasome-derived peptides were sufficient to induce neuronal calcium signaling. Our discoveries challenge the prevailing notion that proteasomes function primarily to maintain proteostasis, and highlight a form of neuronal communication that takes place through a membrane proteasome complex.

  14. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  15. MotomiRs: miRNAs in Motor Neuron Function and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary C. E. Hawley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MiRNAs are key regulators of the mammalian transcriptome that have been increasingly linked to degenerative diseases of the motor neurons. Although many of the miRNAs currently incriminated as participants in the pathogenesis of these diseases are also important to the normal development and function of motor neurons, at present there is no knowledge of the complete miRNA profile of motor neurons. In this review, we examine the current understanding with respect to miRNAs that are specifically required for motor neuron development, function and viability, and provide evidence that these should be considered as a functional network of miRNAs which we have collectively termed MotomiRs. We will also summarize those MotomiRs currently known to be associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, and discuss their potential use as biomarkers.

  16. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-02-23

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances.

  17. Molecular anatomy of neuronal interactions with special reference to the dopamine control of striatal functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bloch

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern neuroanatomy was initiated at the early beginning of the XXth century when Cajal used the so-called silver impregnation technique to study the details of the anatomy of the nervous system. This technique, for the first time, permitted description and visualization of all components of neurons (Cajal, 1909. Thanks to this major methodological advance, Cajal and followers created microscopic neuroanatomy and gave detailed description of the structure of neurons and of neuronal circuitry in brain of animals and humans. During the following decades, numerous informations were obtained on the organization of the neuronal circuitry in all parts of the central and peripheral nervous system, in normal, experimental and pathological conditions. These works considerably helped to establish the modern anatomical basis of brain functions and dysfunctions. In the early sixties, the appearance of electron microscopy gave a new impulse to the understanding of brain and neuronal structures.

  18. Niche-dependent development of functional neuronal networks from embryonic stem cell-derived neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebler Mario

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work was performed to investigate the ability of two different embryonic stem (ES cell-derived neural precursor populations to generate functional neuronal networks in vitro. The first ES cell-derived neural precursor population was cultivated as free-floating neural aggregates which are known to form a developmental niche comprising different types of neural cells, including neural precursor cells (NPCs, progenitor cells and even further matured cells. This niche provides by itself a variety of different growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that influence the proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor and progenitor cells. The second population was cultivated adherently in monolayer cultures to control most stringently the extracellular environment. This population comprises highly homogeneous NPCs which are supposed to represent an attractive way to provide well-defined neuronal progeny. However, the ability of these different ES cell-derived immature neural cell populations to generate functional neuronal networks has not been assessed so far. Results While both precursor populations were shown to differentiate into sufficient quantities of mature NeuN+ neurons that also express GABA or vesicular-glutamate-transporter-2 (vGlut2, only aggregate-derived neuronal populations exhibited a synchronously oscillating network activity 2–4 weeks after initiating the differentiation as detected by the microelectrode array technology. Neurons derived from homogeneous NPCs within monolayer cultures did merely show uncorrelated spiking activity even when differentiated for up to 12 weeks. We demonstrated that these neurons exhibited sparsely ramified neurites and an embryonic vGlut2 distribution suggesting an inhibited terminal neuronal maturation. In comparison, neurons derived from heterogeneous populations within neural aggregates appeared as fully mature with a dense neurite network and punctuated

  19. Two distinct pools of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in the somatic plasma membrane of central principal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, W.A.; Kasugai, Y.; Ferraguti, F.; Storm, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Although nerve cell membranes are often assumed to be uniform with respect to electrical properties, there is increasing evidence for compartmentalization into subdomains with heterogeneous impacts on the overall cell function. Such microdomains are characterized by specific sets of proteins determining their functional properties. Recently, clustering of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels was shown at sites of subsurface membrane cisterns in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC), where they likely participate in building a subcellular signaling unit, the 'PLasmERosome'. By applying SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL) and postembedding immunogold electron microscopy, we have now studied the spatial organization of somatic BKCa channels in neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons, principal neurons of the central and basolateral amygdaloid nuclei, hippocampal pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells to establish whether there is a common organizational principle in the distribution of BKCa channels in central principal neurons. In all cell types analyzed, somatic BKCa channels were found to be non-homogenously distributed in the plasma membrane, forming two pools of channels with one pool consisting of clustered channels and the other of scattered channels in the extrasynaptic membrane. Quantitative analysis by means of SDS-FRL revealed that about two-thirds of BKCa channels belong to the scattered pool and about one-third to the clustered pool in principal cell somata. Overall densities of channels in both pools differed in the different cell types analyzed, although being considerably lower compared to cerebellar PC. Postembedding immunogold labeling revealed association of clustered channels with subsurface membrane cisterns and confirmed extrasynaptic localization of scattered channels. This study indicates a common organizational principle for somatic BKCa channels in central principal neurons with the

  20. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A; Vu, Anthony Q; Hutt, Kasey R; Martinez, Fernando J; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J; Huelga, Stephanie C; Chun, Seung J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-07-05

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3' untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism.

  1. Passive Dendrites Enable Single Neurons to Compute Linearly Non-separable Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazé, Romain Daniel; Humphries, Mark; Gutkin, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Local supra-linear summation of excitatory inputs occurring in pyramidal cell dendrites, the so-called dendritic spikes, results in independent spiking dendritic sub-units, which turn pyramidal neurons into two-layer neural networks capable of computing linearly non-separable functions, such as the exclusive OR. Other neuron classes, such as interneurons, may possess only a few independent dendritic sub-units, or only passive dendrites where input summation is purely sub-linear, and where dendritic sub-units are only saturating. To determine if such neurons can also compute linearly non-separable functions, we enumerate, for a given parameter range, the Boolean functions implementable by a binary neuron model with a linear sub-unit and either a single spiking or a saturating dendritic sub-unit. We then analytically generalize these numerical results to an arbitrary number of non-linear sub-units. First, we show that a single non-linear dendritic sub-unit, in addition to the somatic non-linearity, is sufficient to compute linearly non-separable functions. Second, we analytically prove that, with a sufficient number of saturating dendritic sub-units, a neuron can compute all functions computable with purely excitatory inputs. Third, we show that these linearly non-separable functions can be implemented with at least two strategies: one where a dendritic sub-unit is sufficient to trigger a somatic spike; another where somatic spiking requires the cooperation of multiple dendritic sub-units. We formally prove that implementing the latter architecture is possible with both types of dendritic sub-units whereas the former is only possible with spiking dendrites. Finally, we show how linearly non-separable functions can be computed by a generic two-compartment biophysical model and a realistic neuron model of the cerebellar stellate cell interneuron. Taken together our results demonstrate that passive dendrites are sufficient to enable neurons to compute linearly non

  2. Distinct effects of miR-210 reduction on neurogenesis: increased neuronal survival of inflammation but reduced proliferation associated with mitochondrial enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A; Sun, Xiaoyun; Xu, Lijun; Ouyang, Yi-Bing; Giffard, Rona G

    2017-02-10

    Neurogenesis is essential to brain development, and plays a central role in the response to brain injury. Stroke and head trauma stimulate proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC). However, the survival of young neurons is sharply reduced by post-injury inflammation. Cellular mitochondria are critical to successful neurogenesis and are a major target of inflammatory injury. Mitochondrial protection was shown to improve survival of young neurons. This study tested whether reducing cellular microRNA-210 (miR-210) would enhance mitochondrial function and improve survival of young murine neurons under inflammatory conditions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of miR-210 inhibition to enhance and protect mitochondrial function through upregulation of mitochondrial proteins. Here miR-210 inhibition significantly increased neuronal survival and protected the activity of mitochondrial enzymes cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase in differentiating NSC cultures exposed to inflammatory mediators. Unexpectedly, we found that reducing miR-210 significantly attenuated NSC proliferation upon induction of differentiation. Further investigation revealed that increased mitochondrial function suppresses the shift to primarily glycolytic metabolism and reduced mitochondrial length characteristic of dividing cells. Activation of AMPK-retinoblastoma signaling is important in NSC proliferation, and the reduction of this activation observed by miR-210 inhibition is one mechanism contributing to the reduced proliferation. Post-injury neurogenesis occurs as a burst of proliferation that peaks in days followed by migration and differentiation over weeks. Our studies suggest that mitochondrial protective miR-210 inhibition should be delayed until after the initial burst of proliferation, but could be beneficial during the prolonged differentiation stage.Significance Statement:Increasing the success of endogenous neurogenesis after brain injury holds therapeutic promise

  3. Functionally Distinct Tendons From Elastin Haploinsufficient Mice Exhibit Mild Stiffening and Tendon-Specific Structural Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eekhoff, Jeremy D; Fang, Fei; Kahan, Lindsey G; Espinosa, Gabriela; Cocciolone, Austin J; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-11-01

    Elastic fibers are present in low quantities in tendon, where they are located both within fascicles near tenocytes and more broadly in the interfascicular matrix (IFM). While elastic fibers have long been known to be significant in the mechanics of elastin-rich tissue (i.e., vasculature, skin, lungs), recent studies have suggested a mechanical role for elastic fibers in tendons that is dependent on specific tendon function. However, the exact contribution of elastin to properties of different types of tendons (e.g., positional, energy-storing) remains unknown. Therefore, this study purposed to evaluate the role of elastin in the mechanical properties and collagen alignment of functionally distinct supraspinatus tendons (SSTs) and Achilles tendons (ATs) from elastin haploinsufficient (HET) and wild type (WT) mice. Despite the significant decrease in elastin in HET tendons, a slight increase in linear stiffness of both tendons was the only significant mechanical effect of elastin haploinsufficiency. Additionally, there were significant changes in collagen nanostructure and subtle alteration to collagen alignment in the AT but not the SST. Hence, elastin may play only a minor role in tendon mechanical properties. Alternatively, larger changes to tendon mechanics may have been mitigated by developmental compensation of HET tendons and/or the role of elastic fibers may be less prominent in smaller mouse tendons compared to the larger bovine and human tendons evaluated in previous studies. Further research will be necessary to fully elucidate the influence of various elastic fiber components on structure-function relationships in functionally distinct tendons.

  4. Functional diversity of Robo receptor immunoglobulin domains promotes distinct axon guidance decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Timothy A; Bashaw, Greg J

    2010-03-23

    Recognition molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily control axon guidance in the developing nervous system. Ig-like domains are among the most widely represented protein domains in the human genome, and the number of Ig superfamily proteins is strongly correlated with cellular complexity. In Drosophila, three Roundabout (Robo) Ig superfamily receptors respond to their common Slit ligand to regulate axon guidance at the midline: Robo and Robo2 mediate midline repulsion, Robo2 and Robo3 control longitudinal pathway selection, and Robo2 can promote midline crossing. How these closely related receptors mediate distinct guidance functions is not understood. We report that the differential functions of Robo2 and Robo3 are specified by their ectodomains and do not reflect differences in cytoplasmic signaling. Functional modularity of Robo2's ectodomain facilitates multiple guidance decisions: Ig1 and Ig3 of Robo2 confer lateral positioning activity, whereas Ig2 confers promidline crossing activity. Robo2's distinct functions are not dependent on greater Slit affinity but are instead due in part to differences in multimerization and receptor-ligand stoichiometry conferred by Robo2's Ig domains. Together, our findings suggest that diverse responses to the Slit guidance cue are imparted by intrinsic structural differences encoded in the extracellular Ig domains of the Robo receptors.

  5. Two aspects of ASIC function: Synaptic plasticity and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jun; Ji, Yong-Hua; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Zha, Xiang-ming

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular brain pH fluctuates in both physiological and disease conditions. The main postsynaptic proton receptor is the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). During the past decade, much progress has been made on protons, ASICs, and neurological disease. This review summarizes the recent progress on synaptic role of protons and our current understanding of how ASICs contribute to various types of neuronal injury in the brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional properties of human neuronal Kv11 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsen, Karoline; Calloe, Kirstine; Grunnet, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Kv11 potassium channels are important for regulation of the membrane potential. Kv11.2 and Kv11.3 are primarily found in the nervous system, where they most likely are involved in the regulation of neuronal excitability. Two isoforms of human Kv11.2 have been published so far. Here, we present...... a new splice variant that is present in human brain as demonstrated by reverse transcription PCR. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a 30-mV shift in the voltage dependence of activation to more depolarized potentials and slower activation together with faster deactivation...

  7. Feeding characteristics reveal functional distinctions among browsing herbivorous fishes on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Robert P.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-12-01

    The removal of macroalgal biomass by fishes is a key process on coral reefs. Numerous studies have identified the fish species responsible for removing mature macroalgae, and have identified how this varies spatially, temporally, and among different algal types. None, however, have considered the behavioural and morphological traits of the browsing fishes and how this may influence the removal of macroalgal material. Using video observations of fish feeding on the brown macroalga Sargassum polycystum, we quantified the feeding behaviour and morphology of the four dominant browsing species on the Great Barrier Reef ( Kyphosus vaigiensis, Naso unicornis, Siganus canaliculatus, and Siganus doliatus). The greatest distinction between species was the algal material they targeted. K. vaigiensis and N. unicornis bit on the entire macroalgal thallus in approximately 90 % of bites. In contrast, Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus avoided biting the stalks, with 80-98 % of bites being on the macroalgal leaves only. This distinctive grouping into `entire thallus-biters' versus `leaf-biters' was not supported by size-standardized measures of biting morphology. Rather, species-specific adult body sizes, tooth shape, and feeding behaviour appear to underpin this functional distinction, with adults of the two larger fish species ( N. unicornis and K. vaigiensis) eating the entire macroalgal thallus, while the two smaller species ( Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus) bite only leaves. These findings caution against assumed homogeneity within this, and potentially other, functional groups on coral reefs. As functional redundancy within the macroalgal browsers is limited, the smaller `leaf-biting' species are unlikely to be able to compensate functionally for the loss of larger `entire thallus-biting' species.

  8. Suppression of Sin3A activity promotes differentiation of pluripotent cells into functional neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Debasish; Lee, Chang-Hee; Hyun, Ji Young; Chang, Gyeong-Eon; Cheong, Eunji; Shin, Injae

    2017-01-01

    Sin3 is a transcriptional corepressor for REST silencing machinery that represses multiple neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells. However, functions of Sin3 (Sin3A and Sin3B) in suppression of neuronal phenotypes are not well characterized. Herein we show that Sin3A knockdown impedes the repressive activity of REST and enhances differentiation of pluripotent P19 cells into electrophysiologically active neurons without inducing astrogenesis. It is also found that silencing Sin3B induces neurogenesis of P19 cells with a lower efficiency than Sin3A knockdown. The results suggest that Sin3A has a more profound effect on REST repressive machinery for silencing neuronal genes in P19 cells than Sin3B. Furthermore, we show that a peptide inhibitor of Sin3A-REST interactions promotes differentiation of P19 cells into functional neurons. Observations made in studies using genetic deletion and a synthetic inhibitor suggests that Sin3A plays an important role in the repression of neuronal genes by the REST regulatory mechanism. PMID:28303954

  9. Microglia Dictate the Impact of Saturated Fat Consumption on Hypothalamic Inflammation and Neuronal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Valdearcos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diets rich in saturated fat produce inflammation, gliosis, and neuronal stress in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH. Here, we show that microglia mediate this process and its functional impact. Although microglia and astrocytes accumulate in the MBH of mice fed a diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs, only the microglia undergo inflammatory activation, along with a buildup of hypothalamic SFAs. Enteric gavage specifically with SFAs reproduces microglial activation and neuronal stress in the MBH, and SFA treatment activates murine microglia, but not astrocytes, in culture. Moreover, depleting microglia abrogates SFA-induced inflammation in hypothalamic slices. Remarkably, depleting microglia from the MBH of mice abolishes inflammation and neuronal stress induced by excess SFA consumption, and in this context, microglial depletion enhances leptin signaling and reduces food intake. We thus show that microglia sense SFAs and orchestrate an inflammatory process in the MBH that alters neuronal function when SFA consumption is high.

  10. Functional Diversification of Motor Neuron-specific Isl1 Enhancers during Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhee Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional diversification of motor neurons has occurred in order to selectively control the movements of different body parts including head, trunk and limbs. Here we report that transcription of Isl1, a major gene necessary for motor neuron identity, is controlled by two enhancers, CREST1 (E1 and CREST2 (E2 that allow selective gene expression of Isl1 in motor neurons. Introduction of GFP reporters into the chick neural tube revealed that E1 is active in hindbrain motor neurons and spinal cord motor neurons, whereas E2 is active in the lateral motor column (LMC of the spinal cord, which controls the limb muscles. Genome-wide ChIP-Seq analysis combined with reporter assays showed that Phox2 and the Isl1-Lhx3 complex bind to E1 and drive hindbrain and spinal cord-specific expression of Isl1, respectively. Interestingly, Lhx3 alone was sufficient to activate E1, and this may contribute to the initiation of Isl1 expression when progenitors have just developed into motor neurons. E2 was induced by onecut 1 (OC-1 factor that permits Isl1 expression in LMCm neurons. Interestingly, the core region of E1 has been conserved in evolution, even in the lamprey, a jawless vertebrate with primitive motor neurons. All E1 sequences from lamprey to mouse responded equally well to Phox2a and the Isl1-Lhx3 complex. Conversely, E2, the enhancer for limb-innervating motor neurons, was only found in tetrapod animals. This suggests that evolutionarily-conserved enhancers permit the diversification of motor neurons.

  11. Distinct Developmental Functions of Prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) Zymogen and Activated Prostasin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Stine; Madsen, Daniel H; Bugge, Thomas H

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-anchored serine prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) is essential for barrier acquisition of the interfollicular epidermis and for normal hair follicle development. Consequently, prostasin null mice die shortly after birth. Prostasin is found in two forms in the epidermis: a one-chain zymogen and a two-chain proteolytically active form, generated by matriptase-dependent activation site cleavage. Here we used gene editing to generate mice expressing only activation site cleavage-resistant (zymogen-locked) endogenous prostasin. Interestingly, these mutant mice displayed normal interfollicular epidermal development and postnatal survival, but had defects in whisker and pelage hair formation. These findings identify two distinct in vivo functions of epidermal prostasin: a function in the interfollicular epidermis, not requiring activation site cleavage, that can be mediated by the zymogen-locked version of prostasin and a proteolysis-dependent function of activated prostasin in hair follicles, dependent on zymogen conversion by matriptase.

  12. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly of newly synthesized histones: distinct functions for the histone tail domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlassi-Lassallette, Aïda; Thiriet, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The maintenance of the genome during replication requires the assembly of nucleosomes with newly synthesized histones. Achieving the deposition of newly synthesized histones in chromatin implies their transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the replication sites. Several lines of evidence have revealed critical functions of the histone tail domains in these conserved cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the role of the amino termini of the nucleosome building blocks, H2A/H2B and H3/H4, in different model systems. The experimental data showed that H2A/H2B tails and H3/H4 tails display distinct functions in nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Furthermore, we describe recent studies exploiting the unique properties of the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum , that have advanced understanding of the function of the highly conserved replication-dependent diacetylation of H4.

  13. Prediction of rat behavior outcomes in memory tasks using functional connections among neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hu; Yang, Shengtao; Lin, Longnian; Li, Baoming; Wei, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing the neuronal organizational structures and studying the changes in the behavior of the organism is key to understanding cognitive functions of the brain. Although some studies have indicated that spatiotemporal firing patterns of neuronal populations have a certain relationship with the behavioral responses, the issues of whether there are any relationships between the functional networks comprised of these cortical neurons and behavioral tasks and whether it is possible to take advantage of these networks to predict correct and incorrect outcomes of single trials of animals are still unresolved. This paper presents a new method of analyzing the structures of whole-recorded neuronal functional networks (WNFNs) and local neuronal circuit groups (LNCGs). The activity of these neurons was recorded in several rats. The rats performed two different behavioral tasks, the Y-maze task and the U-maze task. Using the results of the assessment of the WNFNs and LNCGs, this paper describes a realization procedure for predicting the behavioral outcomes of single trials. The methodology consists of four main parts: construction of WNFNs from recorded neuronal spike trains, partitioning the WNFNs into the optimal LNCGs using social community analysis, unsupervised clustering of all trials from each dataset into two different clusters, and predicting the behavioral outcomes of single trials. The results show that WNFNs and LNCGs correlate with the behavior of the animal. The U-maze datasets show higher accuracy for unsupervised clustering results than those from the Y-maze task, and these datasets can be used to predict behavioral responses effectively. The results of the present study suggest that a methodology proposed in this paper is suitable for analysis of the characteristics of neuronal functional networks and the prediction of rat behavior. These types of structures in cortical ensemble activity may be critical to information representation during the execution of

  14. Prediction of rat behavior outcomes in memory tasks using functional connections among neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analyzing the neuronal organizational structures and studying the changes in the behavior of the organism is key to understanding cognitive functions of the brain. Although some studies have indicated that spatiotemporal firing patterns of neuronal populations have a certain relationship with the behavioral responses, the issues of whether there are any relationships between the functional networks comprised of these cortical neurons and behavioral tasks and whether it is possible to take advantage of these networks to predict correct and incorrect outcomes of single trials of animals are still unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This paper presents a new method of analyzing the structures of whole-recorded neuronal functional networks (WNFNs and local neuronal circuit groups (LNCGs. The activity of these neurons was recorded in several rats. The rats performed two different behavioral tasks, the Y-maze task and the U-maze task. Using the results of the assessment of the WNFNs and LNCGs, this paper describes a realization procedure for predicting the behavioral outcomes of single trials. The methodology consists of four main parts: construction of WNFNs from recorded neuronal spike trains, partitioning the WNFNs into the optimal LNCGs using social community analysis, unsupervised clustering of all trials from each dataset into two different clusters, and predicting the behavioral outcomes of single trials. The results show that WNFNs and LNCGs correlate with the behavior of the animal. The U-maze datasets show higher accuracy for unsupervised clustering results than those from the Y-maze task, and these datasets can be used to predict behavioral responses effectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study suggest that a methodology proposed in this paper is suitable for analysis of the characteristics of neuronal functional networks and the prediction of rat behavior. These types of structures in cortical

  15. Importance of Being Nernst: Synaptic Activity and Functional Relevance in Stem Cell-derived Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-26

    derived from totipotent cells collected from the inner cell mass of embryos at the blastocyst stage[115]. Mouse ESC are frequently differentiated to...neurons derived from fetal NSCs have also found that long- term integration and transplanted neurons conferred resistance to PD in mouse models[208... Transplantation increases regeneration and functional recovery after ischemic stroke in neonatal rats. Stem Cells 2014; 32: 3075-3087 [PMID: 25132189 DOI

  16. The RNA Exosome Channeling and Direct Access Conformations Have Distinct In Vivo Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeil Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The RNA exosome is a 3′–5′ ribonuclease complex that is composed of nine core subunits and an essential catalytic subunit, Rrp44. Two distinct conformations of Rrp44 were revealed in previous structural studies, suggesting that Rrp44 may change its conformation to exert its function. In the channeling conformation, (Rrp44ch, RNA accesses the active site after traversing the central channel of the RNA exosome, whereas in the other conformation, (Rrp44da, RNA gains direct access to the active site. Here, we show that the Rrp44da exosome is important for nuclear function of the RNA exosome. Defects caused by disrupting the direct access conformation are distinct from those caused by channel-occluding mutations, indicating specific functions for each conformation. Our genetic analyses provide in vivo evidence that the RNA exosome employs a direct-access route to recruit specific substrates, indicating that the RNA exosome uses alternative conformations to act on different RNA substrates.

  17. Distinctive Feature of Microbial Communities and Bacterial Functional Profiles in Tricholoma matsutake Dominant Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Yoon; Fong, Jonathan J.; Park, Myung Soo; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, the pine mushroom, is a valuable forest product with high economic value in Asia, and plays an important ecological role as an ectomycorrhizal fungus. Around the host tree, T. matsutake hyphae generate a distinctive soil aggregating environment called a fairy ring, where fruiting bodies form. Because T. matsutake hyphae dominate the soil near the fairy ring, this species has the potential to influence the microbial community. To explore the influence of T. matsutake on the microbial communities, we compared the microbial community and predicted bacterial function between two different soil types—T. matsutake dominant and T. matsutake minor. DNA sequence analyses showed that fungal and bacterial diversity were lower in the T. matsutake dominant soil compared to T. matsutake minor soil. Some microbial taxa were significantly more common in the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations, many of which were previously identified as mycophillic or mycorrhiza helper bacteria. Between the two soil types, the predicted bacterial functional profiles (using PICRUSt) had significantly distinct KEGG modules. Modules for amino acid uptake, carbohydrate metabolism, and the type III secretion system were higher in the T. matsutake dominant soil than in the T. matsutake minor soil. Overall, similar microbial diversity, community structure, and bacterial functional profiles of the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations suggest that T. matsutake may generate a dominance effect. PMID:27977803

  18. PINK1 is necessary for long term survival and mitochondrial function in human dopaminergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Wood-Kaczmar

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a common age-related neurodegenerative disease and it is critical to develop models which recapitulate the pathogenic process including the effect of the ageing process. Although the pathogenesis of sporadic PD is unknown, the identification of the mendelian genetic factor PINK1 has provided new mechanistic insights. In order to investigate the role of PINK1 in Parkinson's disease, we studied PINK1 loss of function in human and primary mouse neurons. Using RNAi, we created stable PINK1 knockdown in human dopaminergic neurons differentiated from foetal ventral mesencephalon stem cells, as well as in an immortalised human neuroblastoma cell line. We sought to validate our findings in primary neurons derived from a transgenic PINK1 knockout mouse. For the first time we demonstrate an age dependent neurodegenerative phenotype in human and mouse neurons. PINK1 deficiency leads to reduced long-term viability in human neurons, which die via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Human neurons lacking PINK1 demonstrate features of marked oxidative stress with widespread mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial morphology. We report that PINK1 plays a neuroprotective role in the mitochondria of mammalian neurons, especially against stress such as staurosporine. In addition we provide evidence that cellular compensatory mechanisms such as mitochondrial biogenesis and upregulation of lysosomal degradation pathways occur in PINK1 deficiency. The phenotypic effects of PINK1 loss-of-function described here in mammalian neurons provides mechanistic insight into the age-related degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons seen in PD.

  19. Investigating GABA and its function in platelets as compared to neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneez, Fatima Shad; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2009-08-01

    We have recently suggested that platelets could be used as a model for neuronal receptors. In this paper we have investigated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism and GABA receptors in platelets and in cultured neurons to see whether platelets' GABA mimics neuronal GABA receptor activities. We used the ELISA technique for detecting the GABA concentration in platelet rich plasma and cultured neurons. The functional effects of GABA and its receptor ligands on platelets were determined using an aggregometer. We found that the GABA concentration is 30% lower in platelets than in neurons and in both preparations GABA was metabolized by GABA transaminase (GABA-T). GABA potentiated calcium dependent platelet aggregation with a higher value in washed platelets suspension (WPS) then in platelet rich plasma (PRP). This effect was inhibited by benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers and the selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase antagonist Wortmannin. GABA neurotransmission is involved in most aspects of normal brain function and can be perturbed in many neuropathologic conditions. We concluded that platelets could be further developed to be used as a peripheral model to study neuronal GABAergic function and its abnormality in diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Furthermore our results indicated that PI3-kinase is involved in calcium dependent GABA induced platelet aggregation as this synergistic effect is inhibited by Wortmannin in dose dependent manner.

  20. Isolation of functionally active and highly purified neuronal mitochondria from human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Nicolas K; Yablonska, Svitlana; Baranov, Sergei V; Baranova, Oxana V; Kretz, Eric S; Larkin, Timothy M; Carlisle, Diane L; Richardson, R Mark; Friedlander, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Functional and structural properties of mitochondria are highly tissue and cell dependent, but isolation of highly purified human neuronal mitochondria is not currently available. We developed and validated a procedure to isolate purified neuronal mitochondria from brain tissue. The method combines Percoll gradient centrifugation to obtain synaptosomal fraction with nitrogen cavitation mediated synaptosome disruption and extraction of mitochondria using anti mitochondrial outer membrane protein antibodies conjugated to magnetic beads. The final products of isolation are non-synaptosomal mitochondria, which are a mixture of mitochondria isolated from different brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia) and synaptic mitochondria, which are of neuronal origin. This method is well suited for preparing functional mitochondria from human cortex tissue that is surgically extracted. The procedure produces mitochondria with minimal cytoplasmic contaminations that are functionally active based on measurements of mitochondrial respiration as well as mitochondrial protein import. The procedure requires approximately four hours for the isolation of human neuronal mitochondria and can also be used to isolate mitochondria from mouse/rat/monkey brains. This method will allow researchers to study highly enriched neuronal mitochondria without the confounding effect of cellular and organelle contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A new kind of neuron model with a tunable activation function and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴佑寿; 赵明生; 丁晓青

    1997-01-01

    A new neuron model with a tunable activation function, denoted by the TAF model, and its application are addressed. The activation function as well as the connection weights of the neuron model can be adjusted in the training process The two-spiral problem was used as an example to show how to deduce the adjustable activation function required, and how to construct and train the network by the use of the a priori knowledge of the problem. Due to the incorporation of constraints known a priori into the activation function, many novel aspects are revealed, such as small network size, fast learning and good performances. It is believed that the introduction of the new neuron model will pave a new way in ANN studies.

  2. Visual input controls the functional activity of goldfish Mauthner neuron through the reciprocal synaptic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkov, Dmitry A; Shtanchaev, Rashid S; Mikheeva, Irina B; Bezgina, Elena N; Kokanova, Nadezhda A; Mikhailova, Gulnara Z; Tiras, Nadezhda R; Pavlik, Lyubov' L

    2013-03-01

    Goldfish are known to exhibit motor asymmetry due to functional asymmetry of their Mauthner neurons that induce the turns to the right or left during free swimming. It has been previously found that if the less active neuron is subjected to prolonged aimed visual stimulation via its ventral dendrite, the motor asymmetry of goldfish is inverted, testifying that this neuron becomes functionally dominant, while the size of the ventral dendrite under these conditions is reduced 2-3 times compared to its counterpart in mirror neuron. Earlier it has been also revealed that training optokinetic stimulation induces adaptation, a substantial resistance of both fish motor asymmetry and morphofunctional state of Mauthner neurons against prolonged optokinetic stimulation. The aim of this work was to study the cellular mechanisms of the effect of an unusual visual afferent input on goldfish motor asymmetry and Mauthner neuron function in norm and under adaptation. It was shown that serotonin applied onto Mauthner neurons greatly reduces their activity whereas its antagonist ondansetron increases it. Against the background of visual stimulation, serotonin strengthens functional asymmetry between neurons whereas ondansetron smoothes it. Taken together these data suggest the involvement of serotonergic excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of Mauthner neurons by vision. Ultrastructural study of the ventral dendrites after prolonged optokinetic stimulation has revealed depletions of numeral axo-axonal synapses with specific morphology, identified by means of immunogold label as serotonergic ones. These latter in turn are situated mainly on shaft boutons, which according to specific ultrastructural features are assigned to axo-dendritic inhibitory synapses. Thus, the excitatory serotonergic synapses seem to affect Mauthner neuron indirectly through inhibitory synapses. Further, it was morphometrically established that adaptation is accompanied by the significant

  3. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R; Marchetto, Maria C N; Gage, Fred H; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-19

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome.

  4. Corazonin neurons function in sexually dimorphic circuitry that shape behavioral responses to stress in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available All organisms are confronted with dynamic environmental changes that challenge homeostasis, which is the operational definition of stress. Stress produces adaptive behavioral and physiological responses, which, in the Metazoa, are mediated through the actions of various hormones. Based on its associated phenotypes and its expression profiles, a candidate stress hormone in Drosophila is the corazonin neuropeptide. We evaluated the potential roles of corazonin in mediating stress-related changes in target behaviors and physiologies through genetic alteration of corazonin neuronal excitability. Ablation of corazonin neurons confers resistance to metabolic, osmotic, and oxidative stress, as measured by survival. Silencing and activation of corazonin neurons lead to differential lifespan under stress, and these effects showed a strong dependence on sex. Additionally, altered corazonin neuron physiology leads to fundamental differences in locomotor activity, and these effects were also sex-dependent. The dynamics of altered locomotor behavior accompanying stress was likewise altered in flies with altered corazonin neuronal function. We report that corazonin transcript expression is altered under starvation and osmotic stress, and that triglyceride and dopamine levels are equally impacted in corazonin neuronal alterations and these phenotypes similarly show significant sexual dimorphisms. Notably, these sexual dimorphisms map to corazonin neurons. These results underscore the importance of central peptidergic processing within the context of stress and place corazonin signaling as a critical feature of neuroendocrine events that shape stress responses and may underlie the inherent sexual dimorphic differences in stress responses.

  5. Gain-of-Function Alleles in Caenorhabditis elegans Nuclear Hormone Receptor nhr-49 Are Functionally Distinct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayoung; Goh, Grace Ying Shyen; Wong, Marcus Andrew; Klassen, Tara Leah

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors that regulate numerous physiological and developmental processes and represent important drug targets. NHR-49, an ortholog of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4), has emerged as a key regulator of lipid metabolism and life span in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. However, many aspects of NHR-49 function remain poorly understood, including whether and how it regulates individual sets of target genes and whether its activity is modulated by a ligand. A recent study identified three gain-of-function (gof) missense mutations in nhr-49 (nhr-49(et7), nhr-49(et8), and nhr-49(et13), respectively). These substitutions all affect the ligand-binding domain (LBD), which is critical for ligand binding and protein interactions. Thus, these alleles provide an opportunity to test how three specific residues contribute to NHR-49 dependent gene regulation. We used computational and molecular methods to delineate how these mutations alter NHR-49 activity. We find that despite originating from a screen favoring the activation of specific NHR-49 targets, all three gof alleles cause broad upregulation of NHR-49 regulated genes. Interestingly, nhr-49(et7) and nhr-49(et8) exclusively affect nhr-49 dependent activation, whereas the nhr-49(et13) surprisingly affects both nhr-49 mediated activation and repression, implicating the affected residue as dually important. We also observed phenotypic non-equivalence of these alleles, as they unexpectedly caused a long, short, and normal life span, respectively. Mechanistically, the gof substitutions altered neither protein interactions with the repressive partner NHR-66 and the coactivator MDT-15 nor the subcellular localization or expression of NHR-49. However, in silico structural modeling revealed that NHR-49 likely interacts with small molecule ligands and that the missense mutations might alter ligand binding, providing a possible explanation for increased NHR-49 activity. In

  6. Alteration of protein folding and degradation in motor neuron diseases : Implications and protective functions of small heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carra, Serena; Crippa, Valeria; Rusmini, Paola; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Minoia, Melania; Giorgetti, Elisa; Kampinga, Harm H.; Poletti, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are neurodegenerative disorders that specifically affect the survival and function of upper and/or lower motor neurons. Since motor neurons are responsible for the control of voluntary muscular movement, MNDs are characterized by muscle spasticity, weakness and atrophy.

  7. Hierarchical modularity in ERα transcriptional network is associated with distinct functions and implicates clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Binhua; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Bonneville, Russell; Chen, Su-Shing; Huang, Tim H-M; Jin, Victor X

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide profiling reveals highly complex regulation networks among ERα and its targets. We integrated estrogen (E2)-stimulated time-series ERα ChIP-seq and gene expression data to identify the ERα-centered transcription factor (TF) hubs and their target genes, and inferred the time-variant hierarchical network structures using a Bayesian multivariate modeling approach. With its recurrent motif patterns, we determined three embedded regulatory modules from the ERα core transcriptional network. The GO analyses revealed the distinct biological function associated with each of three embedded modules. The survival analysis showed the genes in each module were able to render a significant survival correlation in breast cancer patient cohorts. In summary, our Bayesian statistical modeling and modularity analysis not only reveals the dynamic properties of the ERα-centered regulatory network and associated distinct biological functions, but also provides a reliable and effective genomic analytical approach for the analysis of dynamic regulatory network for any given TF.

  8. Voltage-gated proton currents in microglia of distinct morphology and functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, R; Heinemann, U; Eder, C

    1999-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements were performed to investigate voltage-gated proton currents (I(PR)) in cultured murine microglia of distinct morphology and functional state. We studied I(PR) in ameboid microglia of untreated cultures, in ameboid microglia which had been activated by lipopolysaccharide, and in ramified microglia which had been exposed to astrocyte-conditioned medium. Proton currents of these three microglia populations did not differ regarding their activation threshold or the voltage dependence of steady-state activation. Moreover, pharmacological properties of I(PR) were similar: proton currents were sensitive to extracellularly applied Zn2+ or La3+, and could be abolished by each of those at a concentration of 100 microM. In the presence of extracellular Na+, I(PR) was decreased to a similar small extent due to activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger in all microglial populations. In contrast, proton currents of microglia differed between the three cell populations with respect to their current density and their time-course of activation: in comparison with untreated microglia, the current density of I(PR) was reduced by about 50% in microglia after their treatment with either lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium. Moreover, I(PR) activated significantly more slowly in cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium than in untreated cells. It can be concluded that the distinct H+ current characteristics of the three microglial populations do not correlate with the functional state of the cells.

  9. Regional functional connectivity predicts distinct cognitive impairments in Alzheimer’s disease spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalini G. Ranasinghe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding neural network dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease is imperative to effectively develop network-modulating therapies. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD, cognitive decline associates with deficits in resting-state functional connectivity of diffuse brain networks. The goal of the current study was to test whether specific cognitive impairments in AD spectrum correlate with reduced functional connectivity of distinct brain regions. We recorded resting-state functional connectivity of alpha-band activity in 27 patients with AD spectrum − 22 patients with probable AD (5 logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia, 7 posterior cortical atrophy, and 10 early-onset amnestic/dysexecutive AD and 5 patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD. We used magnetoencephalographic imaging (MEGI to perform an unbiased search for regions where patterns of functional connectivity correlated with disease severity and cognitive performance. Functional connectivity measured the strength of coherence between a given region and the rest of the brain. Decreased neural connectivity of multiple brain regions including the right posterior perisylvian region and left middle frontal cortex correlated with a higher degree of disease severity. Deficits in executive control and episodic memory correlated with reduced functional connectivity of the left frontal cortex, whereas visuospatial impairments correlated with reduced functional connectivity of the left inferior parietal cortex. Our findings indicate that reductions in region-specific alpha-band resting-state functional connectivity are strongly correlated with, and might contribute to, specific cognitive deficits in AD spectrum. In the future, MEGI functional connectivity could be an important biomarker to map and follow defective networks in the early stages of AD.

  10. Functional chromatography reveals three natural products that target the same protein with distinct mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Mesa, Celestina; Tillotson, Joseph; Zhang, Donna D.; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; La Clair, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Access to lead compounds with defined molecular targets continues to be a barrier to the translation of natural product resources. As a solution, we have developed a system that uses discreet, recombinant proteins as the vehicles for natural product isolation. Here, we describe the use of this functional chromatographic method to identify natural products that bind to the AAA+ chaperone, p97, a promising cancer target. Application of this method to a panel of fungal and plant extracts identified rheoemodin, 1-hydroxydehydroherbarin and phomapyrrolidone A as distinct p97 modulators. Excitingly, each of these molecules displayed a unique mechanism of p97 modulation. This discovery provides strong support for the application of functional chromatography to the discovery of protein modulators that would likely escape traditional high-throughput or phenotypic screening platforms. PMID:25125376

  11. Distinct Functions of Specialized Dendritic Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis and the Road Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Zernecke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is modulated by immune mechanisms. Dendritic cells (DCs and T cells are present within atherosclerotic lesions and function as central players in the initiation and modulation of adaptive immune responses. In previous years, we have studied the functional contribution of distinct DC subsets in disease development, namely, that of CCL17-expressing DCs as well as that of plasmacytoid DCs that play specialized roles in disease development. This review focuses on important findings gathered in these studies and dissects the multifaceted contribution of CCL17-expressing DCs and pDCs to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, an outlook on future challenges faced when studying DCs in this detrimental disease are provided, and hurdles that will need to be overcome in order to enable a better understanding of the contribution of DCs to atherogenesis are discussed, a prerequisite for their therapeutic targeting in atherosclerosis.

  12. Generation of a Functionally Distinct Rhizopus oryzae Lipase through Protein Folding Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) has a propeptide at its N-terminus that functions as an intramolecular chaperone and facilitates the folding of mature ROL (mROL). In this study, we successfully generated a functionally distinct imprinted mROL (mROLimp) through protein folding memory using a mutated propeptide. The mutated propeptide left its structural memory on mROL and produced mROLimp that exhibited different substrate specificities compared with mROLWT (prepared from the wild type propeptide), although the amino acid sequences of both mROLs were the same. mROLimp showed a preference for substrates with medium chain-length acyl groups and, noticeably, recognized a peptidase-specific substrate. In addition, ROLimp was more stable than mROLWT. These results strongly suggest that proteins with identical amino acid sequences can fold into different conformations and that mutations in intramolecular chaperones can dynamically induce changes in enzymatic activity.

  13. A new era for functional labeling of neurons: activity-dependent promoters have come of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eKawashima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic labeling of neurons with a specific response feature is an emerging technology for precise dissection of brain circuits that are functionally heterogeneous at the single-cell level. While immediate early gene mapping has been widely used for decades to identify brain regions which are activated by external stimuli, recent characterization of the promoter and enhancer elements responsible for neuronal activity-dependent transcription have opened new avenues for live imaging of active neurons. Indeed, these advancements provided the basis for a growing repertoire of novel experiments to address the role of active neuronal networks in cognitive behaviors. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the usage and development of activity-dependent promoters and discuss the future directions of this expanding new field.

  14. Structural and functional analysis of single neurons to correlate synaptic connectivity with grooming behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kays, Ibrahim; Cvetkovska, Vedrana; Chen, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol to image the complex axonal branching structure of identified mechanosensory neurons in Drosophila, combined with a behavioral assay to evaluate the functional output of the neuron. The stimulation of identified mechanosensory neurons in live animals produces a stereotyped grooming reflex. The mechanosensory axonal arbor within the CNS is subsequently labeled with a lipophilic fluorescent dye and imaged by fluorescence microscopy. The behavioral output can therefore be correlated to the axonal morphology of the stimulated neuron in the same animal. Combining this protocol with genetic analysis provides a powerful tool for identifying the roles of molecules involved in different aspects of hard-wired neural circuit formation underlying an innate behavior. From behavioral analysis to axonal imaging, the protocol takes 4 d.

  15. Fast reversible learning based on neurons functioning as anisotropic multiplex hubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sheinin, Anton; Sardi, Shira; Kanter, Ido

    2017-05-01

    Neural networks are composed of neurons and synapses, which are responsible for learning in a slow adaptive dynamical process. Here we experimentally show that neurons act like independent anisotropic multiplex hubs, which relay and mute incoming signals following their input directions. Theoretically, the observed information routing enriches the computational capabilities of neurons by allowing, for instance, equalization among different information routes in the network, as well as high-frequency transmission of complex time-dependent signals constructed via several parallel routes. In addition, this kind of hubs adaptively eliminate very noisy neurons from the dynamics of the network, preventing masking of information transmission. The timescales for these features are several seconds at most, as opposed to the imprint of information by the synaptic plasticity, a process which exceeds minutes. Results open the horizon to the understanding of fast and adaptive learning realities in higher cognitive brain's functionalities.

  16. Common and Distinct Amygdala-Function Perturbations in Depressed vs Anxious Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesdo, Katja; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Guyer, Amanda E.; McClure-Tone, Erin B.; Monk, Christopher S.; Nelson, Eric E.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Goldwin, Michelle A.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Context Few studies directly compare amygdala function in depressive and anxiety disorders. Data from longitudinal research emphasize the need for such studies in adolescents. Objective To compare amygdala response to varying attention and emotion conditions among adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) or anxiety disorders, relative to adolescents with no psychopathology. Design Case-control study. Setting Government clinical research institute. Participants Eighty-seven adolescents matched on age, sex, intelligence, and social class: 26 with MDD (14 with and 12 without anxiety disorders), 16 with anxiety disorders but no depression, and 45 without psychopathology. Main Outcome Measures Blood oxygen level–dependent signal in the amygdala, measured by means of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. During imaging, participants viewed facial expressions (neutral, fearful, angry, and happy) while attention was constrained (afraid, hostility, and nose-width ratings) or unconstrained (passive viewing). Results Left and right amygdala activation differed as a function of diagnosis, facial expression, and attention condition both when patients with comorbid MDD and anxiety were included and when they were excluded (group × emotion × attention interactions, P≤.03). Focusing on fearful face–viewing events, patients with anxiety and those with MDD both differed in amygdala responses from healthy participants and from each other during passive viewing. However, both MDD and anxiety groups, relative to healthy participants, exhibited similar signs of amygdala hyperactivation to fearful faces when subjectively experienced fear was rated. Conclusions Adolescent MDD and anxiety disorders exhibit common and distinct functional neural correlates during face processing. Attention modulates the degree to which common or distinct amygdala perturbations manifest in these patient groups, relative to healthy peers. PMID:19255377

  17. Distinct expression patterns of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine implicate functional diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufeng Chen

    Full Text Available ICK/MRK (intestinal cell kinase/MAK-related kinase, MAK (male germ cell-associated kinase, and MOK (MAPK/MAK/MRK-overlapping kinase are closely related serine/threonine protein kinases in the protein kinome. The biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of the ICK/MAK/MOK family are still largely elusive. Despite significant similarities in their catalytic domains, they diverge markedly in the sequence and structural organization of their C-terminal non-catalytic domains, raising the question as to whether they have distinct, overlapping, or redundant biological functions. In order to gain insights into their biological activities and lay a fundamental groundwork for functional studies, we investigated the spatio-temporal distribution patterns and the expression dynamics of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine. We found that ICK/MAK/MOK proteins display divergent expression patterns along the duodenum-to-colon axis and during postnatal murine development. Furthermore, they are differentially partitioned between intestinal epithelium and mesenchyme. A significant increase in the protein level of ICK, but not MAK, was induced in human primary colon cancer specimens. ICK protein level was up-regulated whereas MOK protein level was down-regulated in mouse intestinal adenomas as compared with their adjacent normal intestinal mucosa. These data suggest distinct roles for ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the regulation of intestinal neoplasia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the expressions of ICK/MAK/MOK proteins in the intestinal tract can be differentially and dynamically regulated, implicating a significant functional diversity within this group of protein kinases.

  18. Understory plant communities and the functional distinction between savanna trees, forest trees, and pines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldman, Joseph W.; Mattingly, W. Brett; Brudvig, Lars A.

    2013-02-01

    Although savanna trees and forest trees are thought to represent distinct functional groups with different effects on ecosystem processes, few empirical studies have examined these effects. In particular, it remains unclear if savanna and forest trees differ in their ability to coexist with understory plants, which comprise the majority of plant diversity in most savannas. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) and data from 157 sites across three locations in the southeastern United States to understand the effects of broadleaf savanna trees, broadleaf forest trees, and pine trees on savanna understory plant communities. After accounting for underlying gradients in fire frequency and soil moisture, abundances (i.e., basal area and stem density) of forest trees and pines, but not savanna trees, were negatively correlated with the cover and density (i.e., local-scale species richness) of C4 graminoid species, a defining savanna understory functional group that is linked to ecosystem flammability. In analyses of the full understory community, abundances of trees from all functional groups were negatively correlated with species density and cover. For both the C4 and full communities, fire frequency promoted understory plants directly, and indirectly by limiting forest tree abundance. There was little indirect influence of fire on the understory mediated through savanna trees and pines, which are more fire tolerant than forest trees. We conclude that tree functional identity is an important factor that influences overstory tree relationships with savanna understory plant communities. In particular, distinct relationships between trees and C4 graminoids have implications for grass-tree coexistence and vegetation-fire feedbacks that maintain savanna environments and their associated understory plant diversity.

  19. MASTICATORY FUNCTION OF OBESE CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY FROM DISTINCT SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Celso Roberto; Andrade, Jacira Alves Caracik de Camargo; Tomal, Karla Thaíza; Pracucho, Eduardo Marcucci; Campos, Livia Paschoalino de; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome can be labeled as worldwide outbreak; thus, both have led to serious public health problem. Oral health can be worsened by both, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Tooth loss harms masticatory function, essential status to whom will be submitted to bariatric surgery. Assess masticatory function of obese candidates to bariatric surgery, who belong to distinct socioeconomic class range, in order to recognize hazard factors and the bias of socioeconomic factor in this context. Observational cross-section study, with samples comprised by two groups of patients, with distinct socioeconomic class range, one of them belonging to public health system (SUSG) and the other to private clinic (CPG), candidates to bariatric surgery. Were assessed anthropometric data, comorbidities and medicines usage, blood tests, habits and the number of dental functional units. The groups SUSG and CPG were homogeneous taking into account gender (p=0,890) and age range (p=0,170). The number of dental functional units was higher in the private group (pglicemia de jejum esteve mais alterada em mulheres do GSUS (p<0,001). Foram fatores de risco independentes para ter função mastigatória prejudicada: ter origem no serviço público de saúde (OR: 8,420 - p=0,003), maior idade (OR: 1,186 - p<0,001), ser do gênero feminino (OR: 0,153 - p=0,029), portador de diabete melito (OR: 2,545 - p=0,045) e tabagista (OR: 2,951 - p=0,043). A saúde geral e função mastigatória de mulheres do GSUS foram piores, ressaltando a condição socioeconômica como fator de risco.

  20. The Neuroplastin adhesion molecules: key regulators of neuronal plasticity and synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Philip W; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2014-11-01

    The Neuroplastins Np65 and Np55 are neuronal and synapse-enriched immunoglobulin superfamily molecules that play important roles in a number of key neuronal and synaptic functions including, for Np65, cell adhesion. In this review we focus on the physiological roles of the Neuroplastins in promoting neurite outgrowth, regulating the structure and function of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses in brain, and in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. We discuss the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the Neuroplastins exert their physiological effects and how these are dependent upon the structural features of Np65 and Np55, which enable them to bind to a diverse range of protein partners. In turn this enables the Neuroplastins to interact with a number of key neuronal signalling cascades. These include: binding to and activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor; Np65 trans-homophilic binding leading to activation of p38 MAPK and internalization of glutamate (GluR1) receptor subunits; acting as accessory proteins for monocarboxylate transporters, thus affecting neuronal energy supply, and binding to GABAA α1, 2 and 5 subunits, thus regulating the composition and localization of GABAA receptors. An emerging theme is the role of the Neuroplastins in regulating the trafficking and subcellular localization of specific binding partners. We also discuss the involvement of Neuroplastins in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including ischaemia, schizophrenia and breast cancer and the role of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human Neuroplastin (NPTN) gene locus in impairment of cortical development and cognitive functions. Neuroplastins are neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which induce neurite outgrowth and play important roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. This review summarizes the functional implications of Neuroplastins for correct synaptic membrane protein localization, neuronal energy supply, expression of LTP and LTD

  1. Efficient generation of functional dopaminergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swistowski, Andrzej; Peng, Jun; Liu, Qiuyue; Mali, Prashant; Rao, Mahendra S; Cheng, Linzhao; Zeng, Xianmin

    2010-10-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) reprogrammed from somatic cells represent a promising unlimited cell source for generating patient-specific cells for biomedical research and personalized medicine. As a first step, critical to clinical applications, we attempted to develop defined culture conditions to expand and differentiate human iPSCs into functional progeny such as dopaminergic neurons for treating or modeling Parkinson's disease (PD). We used a completely defined (xeno-free) system that we previously developed for efficient generation of authentic dopaminergic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and applied it to iPSCs. First, we adapted two human iPSC lines derived from different somatic cell types for the defined expansion medium and showed that the iPSCs grew similarly as hESCs in the same medium regarding pluripotency and genomic stability. Second, by using these two independent adapted iPSC lines, we showed that the process of differentiation into committed neural stem cells (NSCs) and subsequently into dopaminergic neurons was also similar to hESCs. Importantly, iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons were functional as they survived and improved behavioral deficits in 6-hydroxydopamine-leasioned rats after transplantation. In addition, iPSC-derived NSCs and neurons could be efficiently transduced by a baculoviral vector delivering episomal DNA for future gene function study and disease modeling using iPSCs. We also performed genome-wide microarray comparisons between iPSCs and hESCs, and we derived NSC and dopaminergic neurons. Our data revealed overall similarity and visible differences at a molecular level. Efficient generation of functional dopaminergic neurons under defined conditions will facilitate research and applications using PD patient-specific iPSCs.

  2. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional seg...

  3. Somatosensory neuron types identified by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing and functional heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Lin; Li, Kai-Cheng; Wu, Dan; Chen, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhao, Jing-Rong; Wang, Sa-Shuang; Sun, Ming-Ming; Lu, Ying-Jin; Zhong, Yan-Qing; Hu, Xu-Ye; Hou, Rui; Zhou, Bei-Bei; Bao, Lan; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neurons are distinguished by distinct signaling networks and receptive characteristics. Thus, sensory neuron types can be defined by linking transcriptome-based neuron typing with the sensory phenotypes. Here we classify somatosensory neurons of the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing (10 950 ± 1 218 genes per neuron) and neuron size-based hierarchical clustering. Moreover, single DRG neurons responding to cutaneous stimuli are recorded using an in vivo whole-cell patch clamp technique and classified by neuron-type genetic markers. Small diameter DRG neurons are classified into one type of low-threshold mechanoreceptor and five types of mechanoheat nociceptors (MHNs). Each of the MHN types is further categorized into two subtypes. Large DRG neurons are categorized into four types, including neurexophilin 1-expressing MHNs and mechanical nociceptors (MNs) expressing BAI1-associated protein 2-like 1 (Baiap2l1). Mechanoreceptors expressing trafficking protein particle complex 3-like and Baiap2l1-marked MNs are subdivided into two subtypes each. These results provide a new system for cataloging somatosensory neurons and their transcriptome databases.

  4. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-09-01

    Calcium is an extraordinarily versatile signaling ion, encoding cellular responses to a wide variety of external stimuli. In neurons, mitochondria can accumulate enormous amounts of calcium, with the consequence that mitochondrial calcium uptake, sequestration and release play pivotal roles in orchestrating calcium-dependent responses as diverse as gene transcription and cell death. In this review, we consider the basic chemistry of calcium as a 'sticky' cation, which leads to extremely high bound/free ratios, and discuss areas of current interest or controversy. Topics addressed include methodologies for measuring local intracellular calcium, mitochondrial calcium buffering and loading capacity, mitochondrially directed spatial calcium gradients, and the role of calcium overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury and neurodegeneration. Finally, we consider the relationship between delayed calcium de-regulation, the mitochondrial permeability transition and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and propose a unified view of the 'source specificity' and 'calcium overload' models of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent excitotoxicity. Non-NMDA receptor mechanisms of excitotoxicity are discussed briefly. Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  5. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jin, Shao-Bo [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Han, Liwei [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Lendahl, Urban [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhao, Jian, E-mail: Jian.Zhao@ki.se [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Nistér, Monica [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  6. Synthetic neuronal datasets for benchmarking directed functional connectivity metrics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodrigues, João; Andrade, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background. Datasets consisting of synthetic neural data generated with quantifiable and controlled parameters are a valuable asset in the process of testing and validating directed functional connectivity metrics...

  7. Neuronal Correlates of Functional Coupling between Reach- and Grasp-Related Components of Muscle Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geed, Shashwati; McCurdy, Martha L.; van Kan, Peter L. E.

    2017-01-01

    Coordinated reach-to-grasp movements require precise spatiotemporal synchrony between proximal forelimb muscles (shoulder, elbow) that transport the hand toward a target during reach, and distal muscles (wrist, digit) that simultaneously preshape and orient the hand for grasp. The precise mechanisms through which the redundant neuromuscular circuitry coordinates reach with grasp, however, remain unclear. Recently, Geed and Van Kan (2016) demonstrated, using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), that limited numbers of global, template-like transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components underlie the complexity and variability of intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) of up to 21 distal and proximal muscles recorded while monkeys performed reach-to-grasp tasks. Importantly, transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components showed invariant spatiotemporal coupling, which provides a potential mechanism for coordinating forelimb muscles during reach-to-grasp movements. In the present study, we tested whether ensemble discharges of forelimb neurons in the cerebellar nucleus interpositus (NI) and its target, the magnocellular red nucleus (RNm), a source of rubrospinal fibers, function as neuronal correlates of the transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components we identified. EFA applied to single-unit discharges of populations of NI and RNm neurons recorded while the same monkeys that were used previously performed the same reach-to-grasp tasks, revealed neuronal components in the ensemble discharges of both NI and RNm neuronal populations with characteristics broadly similar to muscle components. Subsets of NI and RNm neuronal components were strongly and significantly crosscorrelated with subsets of muscle components, suggesting that similar functional units of reach-to-grasp behavior are expressed by NI and RNm neuronal populations and forelimb muscles. Importantly, like transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components, their NI and RNm

  8. The dinoflagellates Durinskia baltica and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum retain functionally overlapping mitochondria from two evolutionarily distinct lineages

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    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abtract Background The dinoflagellates Durinskia baltica and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum are distinguished by the presence of a tertiary plastid derived from a diatom endosymbiont. The diatom is fully integrated with the host cell cycle and is so altered in structure as to be difficult to recognize it as a diatom, and yet it retains a number of features normally lost in tertiary and secondary endosymbionts, most notably mitochondria. The dinoflagellate host is also reported to retain mitochondrion-like structures, making these cells unique in retaining two evolutionarily distinct mitochondria. This redundancy raises the question of whether the organelles share any functions in common or have distributed functions between them. Results We show that both host and endosymbiont mitochondrial genomes encode genes for electron transport proteins. We have characterized cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1, cytochrome oxidase 2 (cox2, cytochrome oxidase 3 (cox3, cytochrome b (cob, and large subunit of ribosomal RNA (LSUrRNA of endosymbiont mitochondrial ancestry, and cox1 and cob of host mitochondrial ancestry. We show that all genes are transcribed and that those ascribed to the host mitochondrial genome are extensively edited at the RNA level, as expected for a dinoflagellate mitochondrion-encoded gene. We also found evidence for extensive recombination in the host mitochondrial genes and that recombination products are also transcribed, as expected for a dinoflagellate. Conclusion Durinskia baltica and K. foliaceum retain two mitochondria from evolutionarily distinct lineages, and the functions of these organelles are at least partially overlapping, since both express genes for proteins in electron transport.

  9. Cyclooxygenase I and II inhibitors distinctly enhance hippocampal- and cortex-dependent cognitive functions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Huma; Ikram, Muhammad Faisal; Yaqinuddin, Ahmed; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2015-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes are expressed in the brain; however, their role in hippocampus-dependent and cortex-dependent cognitive functions remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to comparatively investigate the effects of piroxicam, a selective COX-I inhibitor, and celecoxib, a selective COX‑II inhibitor, on cognitive functions in an AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity mouse model to understand the specific role of each COX enzyme in the hippocampus and cortex. The AlCl3 (250 mg/kg) was administered to the mice in drinking water and the drugs were administered in feed for 30 days. Assessments of memory, including a Morris water maze, social behavior and nesting behavior were performed in control and treated mice. The RNA expression of the COX enzymes were analyzed using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ex‑vivo 2,2‑Diphenyl‑1‑picrylhydrazyl assay was performed in the hippocampus and cortex. Following 30 days of treatment with thedrugs, the mice in the celecoxib‑ and piroxicam‑treated groups exhibited enhanced learning (6.84 ± 0.76 and 9.20 ± 1.08, respectively), compared with the AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity group (21.14 ± 0.76) on the fifth day of the Morris water maze test. Celecoxib treatment improved social affiliation in the AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity group, the results of which were superior to piroxicam. Piroxicam led to better improvement in nesting score in the AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity group. Both drugs decreased the expression levels of COX‑I and COX‑II in the hippocampus and cortex, and rescued oxidative stress levels. These findings suggested that each drug distinctly affected cognitive functions, highlighting the distinctive roles of COX-I and COX-II in learning and memory.

  10. Coupling between neuronal activity and microcirculation: implications for functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzetta, Ivo; Grinvald, Amiram

    2008-04-01

    In the neocortex, neurons with similar response properties are often clustered together in column-like structures, giving rise to what has become known as functional architecture-the mapping of various stimulus feature dimensions onto the cortical sheet. At least partially, we owe this finding to the availability of several functional brain imaging techniques, both post-mortem and in-vivo, which have become available over the last two generations, revolutionizing neuroscience by yielding information about the spatial organization of active neurons in the brain. Here, we focus on how our understanding of such functional architecture is linked to the development of those functional imaging methodologies, especially to those that image neuronal activity indirectly, through metabolic or haemodynamic signals, rather than directly through measurement of electrical activity. Some of those approaches allow exploring functional architecture at higher spatial resolution than others. In particular, optical imaging of intrinsic signals reaches the striking detail of approximately 50 mum, and, together with other methodologies, it has allowed characterizing the metabolic and haemodynamic responses induced by sensory-evoked neuronal activity. Here, we review those findings about the spatio-temporal characteristics of neurovascular coupling and discuss their implications for functional brain imaging, including position emission tomography, and non-invasive neuroimaging techniques, such as funtional magnetic resonance imaging, applicable also to the human brain.

  11. Distinct functional constraints partition sequence conservation in a cis-regulatory element.

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    Antoine Barrière

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different functional constraints contribute to different evolutionary rates across genomes. To understand why some sequences evolve faster than others in a single cis-regulatory locus, we investigated function and evolutionary dynamics of the promoter of the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-47 gene. We found that this promoter consists of two distinct domains. The proximal promoter is conserved and is largely sufficient to direct appropriate spatial expression. The distal promoter displays little if any conservation between several closely related nematodes. Despite this divergence, sequences from all species confer robustness of expression, arguing that this function does not require substantial sequence conservation. We showed that even unrelated sequences have the ability to promote robust expression. A prominent feature shared by all of these robustness-promoting sequences is an AT-enriched nucleotide composition consistent with nucleosome depletion. Because general sequence composition can be maintained despite sequence turnover, our results explain how different functional constraints can lead to vastly disparate rates of sequence divergence within a promoter.

  12. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

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    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  13. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Suh Young

    2011-10-07

    Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2), which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  14. "The developmental and functional logic of neuronal circuits": commentary on the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, J C

    2009-11-10

    The first Kavli Prize in Neuroscience recognizes a confluence of career achievements that together provide a fundamental understanding of how brain and spinal cord circuits are assembled during development and function in the adult. The members of the Kavli Neuroscience Prize Committee have decided to reward three scientists (Sten Grillner, Thomas Jessell, and Pasko Rakic) jointly "for discoveries on the developmental and functional logic of neuronal circuits". Pasko Rakic performed groundbreaking studies of the developing cerebral cortex, including the discovery of how radial glia guide the neuronal migration that establishes cortical layers and for the radial unit hypothesis and its implications for cortical connectivity and evolution. Thomas Jessell discovered molecular principles governing the specification and patterning of different neuron types and the development of their synaptic interconnection into sensorimotor circuits. Sten Grillner elucidated principles of network organization in the vertebrate locomotor central pattern generator, along with its command systems and sensory and higher order control. The discoveries of Rakic, Jessell and Grillner provide a framework for how neurons obtain their identities and ultimate locations, establish appropriate connections with each other, and how the resultant neuronal networks operate. Their work has significantly advanced our understanding of brain development and function and created new opportunities for the treatment of neurological disorders. Each has pioneered an important area of neuroscience research and left a legacy of exceptional scientific achievement, insight, communication, mentoring and leadership.

  15. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh Young Jeong

    Full Text Available Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2, which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  16. Human Cerebral Cortex Cajal-Retzius Neuron: Development, Structure and Function. A Golgi Study

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    Miguel eMarín-Padilla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development, morphology and possible functional activity of the Cajal-Retzius cell of the developing human cerebral cortex have been explored herein. The C-RC, of extracortical origin, is the essential neuron of the neocortex first lamina. It receives inputs from subcortical afferent fibers that reach the first lamina early in development. Although the origin and function of these original afferent fibers remain unknown, they target the first lamina sole neuron: the C-RC. The neuron’ orchestrates the arrival, size and stratification of all pyramidal neurons (from ependymal origin of the neocortex gray matter. Its axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the entire first lamina establishing contacts with the dendritic terminals of all gray matter pyramidal cells regardless of size, location and/or eventual functional roles. While the neuron axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the first lamina, the neuron’ bodies undergoes progressive developmental dilution and locating any of them in the adult brain become quite difficult. The neuron bodies are probably retained in the older regions of the developing neocortex while their axonic collaterals will spread throughout its more recent ones that, eventually, will represent the great majority of the brain surface. This will explain their bodies progressive dilution in the developing neocortex and, later, in the adult brain. Although quite difficult to locate the body of any of them, they have been described in the adult brain.

  17. Human cerebral cortex Cajal-Retzius neuron: development, structure and function. A Golgi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The development, morphology and possible functional activity of the Cajal-Retzius cell of the developing human cerebral cortex are explored herein. The C-RC, of extracortical origin, is the essential neuron of the neocortex first lamina. It receives inputs from afferent fibers that reach the first lamina early in development. Although the origin and function of these original afferent fibers remain unknown, their target is the first lamina sole neuron: the C-RC. This neuron orchestrates the arrival, size and stratification of all pyramidal neurons (of ependymal origin) of the neocortex gray matter. Its axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the entirety of the first lamina establishing contacts with the dendritic terminals of all gray matter pyramidal cells regardless of size, location and/or eventual functional roles. While the neuron axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the first lamina, the neuronal' body undergoes progressive developmental dilution and locating any of them in the adult brain become quite difficult. The neuron bodies are probably retained in the older regions of the neocortex while their axonic collaterals will spread throughout its more recent ones and eventually will extend to great majority of the cortical surface. The neocortex first lamina evolution and composition and that of the C-RC are intertwined and mutually interdependent. It is not possible to understand the C-RC evolving morphology without understanding that of the first lamina. The first lamina composition and its structural and functional organizations obtained with different staining methods may be utterly different. These differences have added unnecessary confusion about its nature. The essential emptiness observed in hematoxylin and eosin preparations (most commonly used) contrast sharply with the concentration of dendrites (the cortex' largest) obtained using special (MAP-2) stain for dendrites. Only Golgi preparations

  18. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development.

  19. Plasmodium alveolins possess distinct but structurally and functionally related multi-repeat domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khattaf, Fatimah S; Tremp, Annie Z; Dessens, Johannes T

    2015-02-01

    The invasive and motile life stages of malaria parasites (merozoite, ookinete and sporozoite) possess a distinctive cortical structure termed the pellicle. The pellicle is characterised by a double-layered 'inner membrane complex' (IMC) located underneath the plasma membrane, which is supported by a cytoskeletal structure termed the subpellicular network (SPN). The SPN consists of intermediate filaments, whose major constituents include a family of proteins called alveolins. Here, we re-appraise the alveolins in the genus Plasmodium with respect to their repertoire, structure and interrelatedness. Amongst 13 family members identified, we distinguish two domain types that, albeit distinct at the primary structure level, are structurally related and contain tandem repeats with a consensus 12-amino acid periodicity. Analysis in Plasmodium berghei of the most divergent alveolin, PbIMC1d, reveals a zoite-specific expression in ookinetes and a subcellular localisation in the pellicle, consistent with its predicted role as a SPN component. Knockout of PbIMC1d gives rise to a wild-type phenotype with respect to ookinete morphogenesis, tensile strength, gliding motility and infectivity, presenting the first example of apparent functional redundancy amongst alveolin family members.

  20. Affinity for self antigen selects Treg cells with distinct functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Lena; Stadinski, Brian D; King, Carolyn G; Schallenberg, Sonja; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Lee, Jun Young; Kretschmer, Karsten; Terracciano, Luigi M; Anderson, Graham; Surh, Charles D; Huseby, Eric S; Palmer, Ed

    2016-09-01

    The manner in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control lymphocyte homeostasis is not fully understood. We identified two Treg cell populations with differing degrees of self-reactivity and distinct regulatory functions. We found that GITR(hi)PD-1(hi)CD25(hi) (Triple(hi)) Treg cells were highly self-reactive and controlled lympho-proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes. GITR(lo)PD-1(lo)CD25(lo) (Triple(lo)) Treg cells were less self-reactive and limited the development of colitis by promoting the conversion of CD4(+) Tconv cells into induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). Although Foxp3-deficient (Scurfy) mice lacked Treg cells, they contained Triple(hi)-like and Triple(lo)-like CD4(+) T cells zsuper> T cells infiltrated the skin, whereas Scurfy Triple(lo)CD4(+) T cells induced colitis and wasting disease. These findings indicate that the affinity of the T cell antigen receptor for self antigen drives the differentiation of Treg cells into distinct subsets with non-overlapping regulatory activities.

  1. Phenotypic and functional distinctions between the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinherz, E L; Strelkauskas, A J; O'Brien, C; Schlossman, S F

    1979-07-01

    Prior work has demonstrated the existence of distinct human peripheral blood T cell subsets by utilizing heterologous as well as autoimmune antisera. In the present study, the relationship between the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets was examined. T cells were purified with Sephadex G-200 anti-F(ab)2' affinity chromatography and E-rosetting technique, and subsequently fractionated into TH2+ and TH2- subsets by utilizing indirect immunofluorescence on FACS. Approximately 40 to 45% of the TH2- subset was shown to be JRA+, whereas less than 5% of the TH2+ subset was JRA+. In reciprocal studies, T cells were fractionated into JRA+ and JRA- subsets and reacted with heterologous antisera with anti-TH2+ specificity and indirect immunofluorescence. FACS analysis demonstrated that the JRA+ population contained no TH2+ T cells. In contrast, the JRA- population contained TH2+ T cells and accounted for the entire TH2+ subset found in the unfractionated T cell population. Functional studies showed that the TH2+ subset, and not the JRA+ subset, contain the effector population for cell-mediated lympholysis. It is concluded that the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets define distinct and different T cell populations in man.

  2. Evidence for NG2-glia derived, adult-born functional neurons in the hypothalamus.

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    Sarah C Robins

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that the adult murine hypothalamus, a control site of several fundamental homeostatic processes, has neurogenic capacity. Correspondingly, the adult hypothalamus exhibits considerable cell proliferation that is ongoing even in the absence of external stimuli, and some of the newborn cells have been shown to mature into cells that express neuronal fate markers. However, the identity and characteristics of proliferating cells within the hypothalamic parenchyma have yet to be thoroughly investigated. Here we show that a subset of NG2-glia distributed throughout the mediobasal hypothalamus are proliferative and express the stem cell marker Sox2. We tracked the constitutive differentiation of hypothalamic NG2-glia by employing genetic fate mapping based on inducible Cre recombinase expression under the control of the NG2 promoter, demonstrating that adult hypothalamic NG2-glia give rise to substantial numbers of APC+ oligodendrocytes and a smaller population of HuC/D+ or NeuN+ neurons. Labelling with the cell proliferation marker BrdU confirmed that some NG2-derived neurons have proliferated shortly before differentiation. Furthermore, patch-clamp electrophysiology revealed that some NG2-derived cells display an immature neuronal phenotype and appear to receive synaptic input indicative of their electrical integration in local hypothalamic circuits. Together, our studies show that hypothalamic NG2-glia are able to take on neuronal fates and mature into functional neurons, indicating that NG2-glia contribute to the neurogenic capacity of the adult hypothalamus.

  3. Functional P2X7 receptors at cultured hippocampal astrocytes but not neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Patrizia; Pagel, Gregor; Mehri, Soghra; Marquardt, Peter; Riedel, Thomas; Illes, Peter

    2014-10-01

    P2X7 receptors have been suggested to be located both on neurons and astrocytes of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the present Ca(2+)-imaging and patch-clamp study, we reinvestigated these findings on mixed neuronal-astrocytic cell cultures prepared from embryonic or newborn rat hippocampi. We found in a Mg(2+)-free bath medium that the prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist dibenzoyl-adenosine triphosphate (Bz-ATP) increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) both in the neuronal cell bodies and in their axo-dendritic processes only to a very minor extent. However, Bz-ATP produced marked [Ca(2+)]i transients in the neuronal processes, when they grew above a glial carpet, which was uniformly sensitive to Bz-ATP. These glial signals might be misinterpreted as neuronal responses because of the poor focal discrimination by a fluorescent microscope. Most astrocytes had a polygonal shape without clearly circumscribable boundaries, but a subgroup of them had neuron-like appearance. The cellular processes of this astrocytic subgroup, just as their cell somata and their polygonal counterparts, appeared to possess a high density of functional P2X7 receptors. In contrast to astrocytes, in a low Ca(2+)/no Mg(2+)-containing bath medium, hippocampal neurons failed to respond to Bz-ATP with membrane currents. In addition, neither the amplitude nor the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents, representing the quantal release of glutamate, was modified by Bz-ATP. We conclude that cultured hippocampal neurons, in contrast to astrocytes, possess P2X7 receptors, if at all, only at a low density.

  4. Distinct Shifts in Microbiota Composition during Drosophila Aging Impair Intestinal Function and Drive Mortality

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    Rebecca I. Clark

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota have been correlated with aging and measures of frailty in the elderly. However, the relationships between microbial dynamics, age-related changes in intestinal physiology, and organismal health remain poorly understood. Here, we show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, characterized by an expansion of the Gammaproteobacteria, is tightly linked to age-onset intestinal barrier dysfunction in Drosophila. Indeed, alterations in the microbiota precede and predict the onset of intestinal barrier dysfunction in aged flies. Changes in microbial composition occurring prior to intestinal barrier dysfunction contribute to changes in excretory function and immune gene activation in the aging intestine. In addition, we show that a distinct shift in microbiota composition follows intestinal barrier dysfunction, leading to systemic immune activation and organismal death. Our results indicate that alterations in microbiota dynamics could contribute to and also predict varying rates of health decline during aging in mammals.

  5. Gain-of-function SOS1 mutations cause a distinctive form of noonansyndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartaglia, Marco; Pennacchio, Len A.; Zhao, Chen; Yadav, KamleshK.; Fodale, Valentina; Sarkozy, Anna; Pandit, Bhaswati; Oishi, Kimihiko; Martinelli, Simone; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska, Anna; Martin, Joes; Bristow, James; Carta, Claudio; Lepri, Francesca; Neri, Cinzia; Vasta,Isabella; Gibson, Kate; Curry, Cynthia J.; Lopez Siguero, Juan Pedro; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Gelb, Brude D.

    2006-09-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disordercharacterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heartdefects and skeletal anomalies1. Increased RAS-mitogenactivated proteinkinase (MAPK) signaling due to PTPN11 and KRAS mutations cause 50 percentof NS2-6. Here, we report that 22 of 129 NS patients without PTPN11 orKRAS mutation (17 percent) have missense mutations in SOS1, which encodesa RAS-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). SOS1 mutationscluster at residues implicated in the maintenance of SOS1 in itsautoinhibited form and ectopic expression of two NS-associated mutantsinduced enhanced RAS activation. The phenotype associated with SOS1defects is distinctive, although within NS spectrum, with a highprevalence of ectodermal abnormalities but generally normal developmentand linear growth. Our findings implicate for the first timegain-of-function mutations in a RAS GEF in inherited disease and define anew mechanism by which upregulation of the RAS pathway can profoundlychange human development.

  6. Distinct Shifts in Microbiota Composition during Drosophila Aging Impair Intestinal Function and Drive Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rebecca I; Salazar, Anna; Yamada, Ryuichi; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Morselli, Marco; Alcaraz, Jeanette; Rana, Anil; Rera, Michael; Pellegrini, Matteo; Ja, William W; Walker, David W

    2015-09-08

    Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota have been correlated with aging and measures of frailty in the elderly. However, the relationships between microbial dynamics, age-related changes in intestinal physiology, and organismal health remain poorly understood. Here, we show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, characterized by an expansion of the Gammaproteobacteria, is tightly linked to age-onset intestinal barrier dysfunction in Drosophila. Indeed, alterations in the microbiota precede and predict the onset of intestinal barrier dysfunction in aged flies. Changes in microbial composition occurring prior to intestinal barrier dysfunction contribute to changes in excretory function and immune gene activation in the aging intestine. In addition, we show that a distinct shift in microbiota composition follows intestinal barrier dysfunction, leading to systemic immune activation and organismal death. Our results indicate that alterations in microbiota dynamics could contribute to and also predict varying rates of health decline during aging in mammals.

  7. Insulin receptor signaling in the development of neuronal structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Hollis T

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sensory experience plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal shape and in developing synaptic contacts during brain formation. These features are required for a neuron to receive, integrate, and transmit signals within the neuronal network so that animals can adapt to the constant changing environment. Insulin receptor signaling, which has been extensively studied in peripheral organ systems such as liver, muscle and adipocyte, has recently been shown to play important roles in the central nervous system. Here we review the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate structural and functional aspects of circuit development, particularly with respect to the role of insulin receptor signaling in synaptic function and the development of dendritic arbor morphology. The potential link between insulin receptor signaling malfunction and neurological disorders will also be discussed.

  8. Assigning Function to Adult-Born Neurons: A Theoretical Framework for Characterizing Neural Manipulation of Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eHersman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientists are concerned with neural processes or computations, but these may not be directly observable. In the field of learning, a behavioral procedure is observed to lead to performance outcomes, but differing inferences on underlying internal processes can lead to difficulties in interpreting conflicting results. An example of this challenge is how many functions have been attributed to adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus. Some of these functions were suggested by computational models of the properties of these neurons, while others were hypothesized after manipulations of adult-born neurons resulted in changes to behavioral metrics. This review seeks to provide a framework, based in learning theory classification of behavioral procedures, of the processes that may be underlying behavioral results after manipulating procedure and observing performance. We propose that this framework can serve to clarify experimental findings on adult-born neurons as well as other classes of neural manipulations and their effects on behavior.

  9. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network.

  10. Special function of nestin+neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhong Zhao; Kaihua Guo; Dongpei Li; Qunfang Yuan; Zhibin Yao

    2014-01-01

    Nestin+neurons have been shown to express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca in adult rats. This study explored the projection of nestin+neu-rons to the olfactory bulb and the time course of nestin+neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca in adult rats during injury recovery after olfactory nerve transection. This study observed that all nestin+neurons were double-labeled with ChAT in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca. Approximately 53.6%of nestin+neurons were projected to the olfactory bulb and co-labeled with fast blue. A large number of nestin+neurons were not present in each region of the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca. Nestin+neurons in the medial septum and vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca showed obvious compensatory function. The number of nestin+neurons decreased to a minimum later than nestin-/ChAT+neurons in the medial sep-tum-diagonal band of Broca. The results suggest that nestin+cholinergic neurons may have a closer connection to olfactory bulb neurons. Nestin+cholinergic neurons may have a stronger tolerance to injury than Nestin-/ChAT+neurons. The difference between nestin+and nestin-/ChAT+neurons during the recovery process requires further investigations.

  11. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, Daniel L.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Thomas J. (WU-MED)

    2016-12-20

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Characterization of long-range functional connectivity in epileptic networks by neuronal spike-triggered local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopour, Beth A.; Staba, Richard J.; Stern, John M.; Fried, Itzhak; Ringach, Dario L.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Quantifying the relationship between microelectrode-recorded multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFPs) in distinct brain regions can provide detailed information on the extent of functional connectivity in spatially widespread networks. These methods are common in studies of cognition using non-human animal models, but are rare in humans. Here we applied a neuronal spike-triggered impulse response to electrophysiological recordings from the human epileptic brain for the first time, and we evaluate functional connectivity in relation to brain areas supporting the generation of seizures. Approach. Broadband interictal electrophysiological data were recorded from microwires adapted to clinical depth electrodes that were implanted bilaterally using stereotactic techniques in six presurgical patients with medically refractory epilepsy. MUA and LFPs were isolated in each microwire, and we calculated the impulse response between the MUA on one microwire and the LFPs on a second microwire for all possible MUA/LFP pairs. Results were compared to clinical seizure localization, including sites of seizure onset and interictal epileptiform discharges. Main results. We detected significant interictal long-range functional connections in each subject, in some cases across hemispheres. Results were consistent between two independent datasets, and the timing and location of significant impulse responses reflected anatomical connectivity. However, within individual subjects, the spatial distribution of impulse responses was unique. In two subjects with clear seizure localization and successful surgery, the epileptogenic zone was associated with significant impulse responses. Significance. The results suggest that the spike-triggered impulse response can provide valuable information about the neuronal networks that contribute to seizures using only interictal data. This technique will enable testing of specific hypotheses regarding functional connectivity

  13. Associative Encoding and Retrieval Are Predicted by Functional Connectivity in Distinct Hippocampal Area CA1 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Katherine; Tompary, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    Determining how the hippocampus supports the unique demands of memory encoding and retrieval is fundamental for understanding the biological basis of episodic memory. One possibility proposed by theoretical models is that the distinct computational demands of encoding and retrieval are accommodated by shifts in the functional interaction between the hippocampal CA1 subregion and its input structures. However, empirical tests of this hypothesis are lacking. To test this in humans, we used high-resolution fMRI to measure functional connectivity between hippocampal area CA1 and regions of the medial temporal lobe and midbrain during extended blocks of associative encoding and retrieval tasks. We found evidence for a double dissociation between the pathways supporting successful encoding and retrieval. Specifically, during the associative encoding task, but not the retrieval task, functional connectivity only between area CA1 and the ventral tegmental area predicted associative long-term memory. In contrast, connectivity between area CA1 and DG/CA3 was greater, on average, during the retrieval task compared with the encoding task, and, importantly, the strength of this connectivity significantly correlated with retrieval success. Together, these findings serve as an important first step toward understanding how the demands of fundamental memory processes may be met by changes in the relative strength of connectivity within hippocampal pathways. PMID:25143600

  14. Invisible cities: segregated domains in the yeast genome with distinct structural and functional attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Christoforos

    2017-08-05

    Recent advances in our understanding of the three-dimensional organization of the eukaryotic nucleus have rendered the spatial distribution of genes increasingly relevant. In a recent work (Tsochatzidou et al., Nucleic Acids Res 45:5818-5828, 2017), we proposed the existence of a functional compartmentalization of the yeast genome according to which, genes occupying the chromosomal regions at the nuclear periphery have distinct structural, functional and evolutionary characteristics compared to their centromeric-proximal counterparts. Around the same time, it was also shown that the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is organized in topologically associated domains (TADs), which are largely associated with the replication timing. In this work, we proceed to investigate whether such units of three-dimensional genomic organization can be linked to transcriptional activity as a driving force for the shaping of genomic architecture. Through the application of a simple boundary-calling criterion in genome-wide 3C data, we define ~100 TAD-like domains which can be clustered in six different classes with radically different nucleosomal organizations, significant variations in transcription factor binding and uneven chromosomal distribution. Approximately ~20% of the genome is found to be confined in regions with "closed" chromatin structure around gene promoters. Most interestingly, we find both "open" and "closed" regions to be segregated, in the sense that they tend to avoid inter-chromosomal interactions. Our data further enforce the notion of a marked compartmentalization of the yeast genome in isolated territories, with implications in its function and evolution.

  15. Distinct intracellular sAC-cAMP domains regulate ER calcium signaling and OXPHOS function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Federica; Konrad, Csaba; D'Aurelio, Marilena; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S; Stepanova, Anna; Burstein, Suzanne R; Galkin, Alexander; Magranè, Jordi; Starkov, Anatoly; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    cAMP regulates a wide variety of physiological functions in mammals. This single second messenger can regulate multiple, seemingly disparate functions within independently regulated cell compartments. We previously identified one such compartment inside the matrix of the mitochondria, where soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) regulates oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We now show that sAC KO fibroblasts have a defect in OXPHOS activity and attempt to compensate for this defect by increasing OXPHOS proteins. Importantly, sAC KO cells also exhibit decreased probability of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) release associated with diminished phosphorylation of the inositol 3-phosphate receptor. Restoring sAC expression exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix rescues OXPHOS activity and reduces its biogenesis, indicating that these phenotypes are regulated by intramitochondrial sAC. In contrast, ER Ca(2+) release is only rescued when sAC expression is restored throughout the cell. Thus, we show that functionally distinct, sAC-defined, intracellular cAMP signaling domains regulate metabolism and Ca(2+) signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Uncoupling Neogenin association with lipid rafts promotes neuronal survival and functional recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanzadeh, A P; Tassew, N G; Szydlowska, K; Tymianski, M; Banerjee, P; Vigouroux, R J; Eubanks, J H; Huang, L; Geraerts, M; Koeberle, P D; Mueller, B K; Monnier, P P

    2015-05-07

    The dependence receptor Neogenin and its ligand, the repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa), regulate apoptosis and axonal growth in the developing and the adult central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that this pathway has also a critical role in neuronal death following stroke, and that providing RGMa to neurons blocks Neogenin-induced death. Interestingly, the Neogenin pro-death function following ischemic insult depends on Neogenin association with lipid rafts. Thus, a peptide that prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts increased neuronal survival in several in vitro stroke models. In rats, a pro-survival effect was also observed in a model of ocular ischemia, as well as after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Treatments that prevented Neogenin association with lipid rafts improved neuronal survival and the complexity of the neuronal network following occlusion of the middle artery. Toward the development of a treatment for stroke, we developed a human anti-RGMa antibody that also prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts. We show that this antibody also protected CNS tissue from ischemic damage and that its application resulted in a significant functional improvement even when administrated 6 h after artery occlusion. Thus, our results draw attention to the role of Neogenin and lipid rafts as potential targets following stroke.

  17. Functional adaptation to loading of a single bone is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Susannah J; Behan, Mary; Smith, Lesley; Oldenhoff, William E; Markel, Mark D; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; Miletic, Vjekoslav; Muir, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Regulation of load-induced bone formation is considered a local phenomenon controlled by osteocytes, although it has also been hypothesized that functional adaptation may be neuronally regulated. The aim of this study was to examine bone formation in multiple bones, in response to loading of a single bone, and to determine whether adaptation may be neuronally regulated. Load-induced responses in the left and right ulnas and humeri were determined after loading of the right ulna in male Sprague-Dawley rats (69 +/- 16 days of age). After a single period of loading at -760-, -2000-, or -3750-microepsilon initial peak strain, rats were given calcein to label new bone formation. Bone formation and bone neuropeptide concentrations were determined at 10 days. In one group, temporary neuronal blocking was achieved by perineural anesthesia of the brachial plexus with bupivicaine during loading. We found right ulna loading induces adaptive responses in other bones in both thoracic limbs compared with Sham controls and that neuronal blocking during loading abrogated bone formation in the loaded ulna and other thoracic limb bones. Skeletal adaptation was more evident in distal long bones compared with proximal long bones. We also found that the single period of loading modulated bone neuropeptide concentrations persistently for 10 days. We conclude that functional adaptation to loading of a single bone in young rapidly growing rats is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones. Persistent changes in bone neuropeptide concentrations after a single loading period suggest that plasticity exists in the innervation of bone.

  18. Dopaminergic neurons generated from monkey embryonic stem cells function in a Parkinson primate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasushi; Takahashi, Jun; Saiki, Hidemoto; Morizane, Asuka; Hayashi, Takuya; Kishi, Yo; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Yo; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Ideguchi, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideki; Imazato, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Suemori, Hirofumi; Omachi, Shigeki; Iida, Hidehiko; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuji, Norio; Sasai, Yoshiki; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. ES cells are currently the most promising donor cell source for cell-replacement therapy in PD. We previously described a strong neuralizing activity present on the surface of stromal cells, named stromal cell-derived inducing activity (SDIA). In this study, we generated neurospheres composed of neural progenitors from monkey ES cells, which are capable of producing large numbers of DA neurons. We demonstrated that FGF20, preferentially expressed in the substantia nigra, acts synergistically with FGF2 to increase the number of DA neurons in ES cell-derived neurospheres. We also analyzed the effect of transplantation of DA neurons generated from monkey ES cells into 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated (MPTP-treated) monkeys, a primate model for PD. Behavioral studies and functional imaging revealed that the transplanted cells functioned as DA neurons and attenuated MPTP-induced neurological symptoms.

  19. α-synuclein and synapsin III cooperatively regulate synaptic function in dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaltieri, Michela; Grigoletto, Jessica; Longhena, Francesca; Navarria, Laura; Favero, Gaia; Castrezzati, Stefania; Colivicchi, Maria Alessandra; Della Corte, Laura; Rezzani, Rita; Pizzi, Marina; Benfenati, Fabio; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Missale, Cristina; Spano, PierFranco; Bellucci, Arianna

    2015-07-01

    The main neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease are dopaminergic nigrostriatal neuron degeneration, and intraneuronal and intraneuritic proteinaceous inclusions named Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, respectively, which mainly contain α-synuclein (α-syn, also known as SNCA). The neuronal phosphoprotein synapsin III (also known as SYN3), is a pivotal regulator of dopamine neuron synaptic function. Here, we show that α-syn interacts with and modulates synapsin III. The absence of α-syn causes a selective increase and redistribution of synapsin III, and changes the organization of synaptic vesicle pools in dopamine neurons. In α-syn-null mice, the alterations of synapsin III induce an increased locomotor response to the stimulation of synapsin-dependent dopamine overflow, despite this, these mice show decreased basal and depolarization-dependent striatal dopamine release. Of note, synapsin III seems to be involved in α-syn aggregation, which also coaxes its increase and redistribution. Furthermore, synapsin III accumulates in the caudate and putamen of individuals with Parkinson's disease. These findings support a reciprocal modulatory interaction of α-syn and synapsin III in the regulation of dopamine neuron synaptic function. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Functional Properties of Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Weick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-derived neurons from various source materials present unique model systems to examine the fundamental properties of central nervous system (CNS development as well as the molecular underpinnings of disease phenotypes. In order to more accurately assess potential therapies for neurological disorders, multiple strategies have been employed in recent years to produce neuronal populations that accurately represent in vivo regional and transmitter phenotypes. These include new technologies such as direct conversion of somatic cell types into neurons and glia which may accelerate maturation and retain genetic hallmarks of aging. In addition, novel forms of genetic manipulations have brought human stem cells nearly on par with those of rodent with respect to gene targeting. For neurons of the CNS, the ultimate phenotypic characterization lies with their ability to recapitulate functional properties such as passive and active membrane characteristics, synaptic activity, and plasticity. These features critically depend on the coordinated expression and localization of hundreds of ion channels and receptors, as well as scaffolding and signaling molecules. In this review I will highlight the current state of knowledge regarding functional properties of human stem cell-derived neurons, with a primary focus on pluripotent stem cells. While significant advances have been made, critical hurdles must be overcome in order for this technology to support progression toward clinical applications.

  1. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  2. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittag, J.; Lyons, D.J.; Sällström, J.; Vujoviv, M.; Dudazy-Gralla, S.; Warner, A.; Wallis, K.; Alkemade, A.; Nordström, K.; Monyer, H.; Broberger, C.; Arner, A.; Vennström, B.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s

  3. (Prorenin receptor triggers distinct angiotensin II-independent extracellular matrix remodeling and deterioration of cardiac function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mari Moilanen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activation of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS plays a key pathophysiological role in heart failure in patients with hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, the function of (prorenin receptor ((PRR is not yet solved. We determined here the direct functional and structural effects of (PRR in the heart. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (PRR was overexpressed by using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in normal adult rat hearts up to 2 weeks. (PRR gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle decreased ejection fraction (P<0.01, fractional shortening (P<0.01, and intraventricular septum diastolic and systolic thickness, associated with approximately 2-fold increase in left ventricular (PRR protein levels at 2 weeks. To test whether the worsening of cardiac function and structure by (PRR gene overexpression was mediated by angiotensin II (Ang II, we infused an AT(1 receptor blocker losartan via osmotic minipumps. Remarkably, cardiac function deteriorated in losartan-treated (PRR overexpressing animals as well. Intramyocardial (PRR gene delivery also resulted in Ang II-independent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation and myocardial fibrosis, and the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor genes. In contrast, activation of heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation and apoptotic cell death by (PRR gene delivery was Ang II-dependent. Finally, (PRR overexpression significantly increased direct protein-protein interaction between (PRR and promyelocytic zinc-finger protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate for the first time that (PRR triggers distinct Ang II-independent myocardial fibrosis and deterioration of cardiac function in normal adult heart and identify (PRR as a novel therapeutic target to optimize RAS blockade in failing hearts.

  4. Distinct cytoplasmic and nuclear functions of the stress induced protein DDIT3/CHOP/GADD153.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jauhiainen

    Full Text Available DDIT3, also known as GADD153 or CHOP, encodes a basic leucine zipper transcription factor of the dimer forming C/EBP family. DDIT3 is known as a key regulator of cellular stress response, but its target genes and functions are not well characterized. Here, we applied a genome wide microarray based expression analysis to identify DDIT3 target genes and functions. By analyzing cells carrying tamoxifen inducible DDIT3 expression constructs we show distinct gene expression profiles for cells with cytoplasmic and nuclear localized DDIT3. Of 175 target genes identified only 3 were regulated by DDIT3 in both cellular localizations. More than two thirds of the genes were downregulated, supporting a role for DDIT3 as a dominant negative factor that could act by either cytoplasmic or nuclear sequestration of dimer forming transcription factor partners. Functional annotation of target genes showed cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis/survival as the most affected categories. Cytoplasmic DDIT3 affected more migration associated genes, while nuclear DDIT3 regulated more cell cycle controlling genes. Cell culture experiments confirmed that cytoplasmic DDIT3 inhibited migration, while nuclear DDIT3 caused a G1 cell cycle arrest. Promoters of target genes showed no common sequence motifs, reflecting that DDIT3 forms heterodimers with several alternative transcription factors that bind to different motifs. We conclude that expression of cytoplasmic DDIT3 regulated 94 genes. Nuclear translocation of DDIT3 regulated 81 additional genes linked to functions already affected by cytoplasmic DDIT3. Characterization of DDIT3 regulated functions helps understanding its role in stress response and involvement in cancer and degenerative disorders.

  5. Association between two distinct executive tasks in schizophrenia: a functional transcranial Doppler sonography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoridou Anastasia

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder involving impairments in executive functioning, which are important cognitive processes that can be assessed by planning tasks such as the Stockings of Cambridge (SOC, and tasks of rule learning/abstraction such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. We undertook this study to investigate the association between performance during separate phases of SOC and WCST, including mean cerebral blood flow velocity (MFV measurements in chronic schizophrenia. Methods Functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD was used to assess bilateral MFV changes in the middle (MCA and anterior (ACA cerebral arteries. Twenty-two patients with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy subjects with similar sociodemographic characteristics performed SOC and WCST during fTCD measurements of the MCA and the ACA. The SOC was varied in terms of easy and difficult problems, and also in terms of separate phases, namely mental planning and movement execution. The WCST performance was assessed separately for maintaining set and set shifting. This allowed us to examine the impact of problem difficulty and the impact of separate phases of a planning task on distinct intervals of WCST. Simultaneous registration of MFV was carried out to investigate the linkage of brain perfusion during the tasks. Results In patients, slowing of movement execution during easy problems (SOC was associated with slowing during maintaining set (WCST (P Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate performance and brain perfusion abnormalities in the association pattern of two different tasks of executive functioning in schizophrenia, and they support the notion that executive functions have a pathological functional correlate predominantly in the lateral hemispheres of the brain. This study also underpins the scientific potential of fTCD in assessing brain perfusion in patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Functionally distinct regions for spatial processing and sensory motor integration in the planum temporale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, A Lisette; Vaden, Kenneth I; Saberi, Kourosh; Muftuler, L Tugan; Hickok, Gregory

    2012-10-01

    There has been much debate recently over the functional role played by the planum temporale (PT) within the context of the dorsal auditory processing stream. Some studies indicate that regions in the PT support spatial hearing and other auditory functions, whereas others demonstrate sensory-motor response properties. This multifunctionality has led to the claim that the PT is performing a common computational pattern matching operation, then routing the signals (spatial, object, sensory-motor) into an appropriate processing stream. An alternative possibility is that the PT is functionally subdivided with separate regions supporting various functions. We assess this possibility using a within subject fMRI block design. DTI data were also collected to examine connectivity. There were four auditory conditions: stationary noise, moving noise, listening to pseudowords, and shadowing pseudowords (covert repetition). Contrasting the shadow and listen conditions should activate regions specific to sensory-motor processes, while contrasting the stationary and moving noise conditions should activate regions involved in spatial hearing. Subjects (N = 16) showed greater activation for shadowing in left posterior PT, area Spt, when the shadow and listen conditions were contrasted. The motion vs. stationary noise contrast revealed greater activation in a more medial and anterior portion of left PT. Seeds from these two contrasts were then used to guide the DTI analysis in an examination of connectivity via streamline tractography, which revealed different patterns of connectivity. Findings support a heterogeneous model of the PT, with functionally distinct regions for sensory-motor integration and processes involved in auditory spatial perception. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Novel Insights into the Distribution and Functional Aspects of the Calcium Binding Protein Secretagogin from Studies on Rat Brain and Primary Neuronal Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Magdalena; Milenkovic, Ivan; Bauer, Jan; Berggård, Tord; Veit, Martina; Ilhan-Mutlu, Aysegül; Wagner, Ludwig; Tretter, Verena

    2012-01-01

    Secretagogin is a calcium binding protein (CBP) highly expressed in neuroendocrine cells. It has been shown to be involved in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and is a strong candidate as a biomarker for endocrine tumors, stroke, and eventually psychiatric conditions. Secretagogin has been hypothesized to exert a neuroprotective role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease. The expression pattern of Secretagogin is not conserved from rodents to humans. We used brain tissue and primary neuronal cell cultures from rat to further characterize this CBP in rodents and to perform a few functional assays in vitro. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain slices revealed a high density of Secretagogin-positive cells in distinct brain regions. Secretagogin was found in the cytosol or associated with subcellular compartments. We tested primary neuronal cultures for their suitability as model systems to further investigate functional properties of Secretagogin. These cultures can easily be manipulated by treatment with drugs or by transfection with test constructs interfering with signaling cascades that might be linked to the cellular function of Secretagogin. We show that, like in pancreatic beta cells and insulinoma cell lines, also in neurons the expression level of Secretagogin is dependent on extracellular insulin and glucose. Further, we show also for rat brain neuronal tissue that Secretagogin interacts with the microtubule-associated protein Tau and that this interaction is dependent on Ca2+. Future studies should aim to study in further detail the molecular properties and function of Secretagogin in individual neuronal cell types, in particular the subcellular localization and trafficking of this protein and a possible active secretion by neurons. PMID:22888312

  8. Aβ induces acute depression of excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission through distinct phosphatase-dependent mechanisms in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wen; Zou, Hao-Jun; Sun, Da; Ren, Si-Qiang

    2013-06-17

    Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) has a causal role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies indicate that Aβ can disrupt excitatory glutamatergic synaptic function at synaptic level. However, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, we recorded evoked and spontaneous EPSCs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons via whole-cell voltage-clamping methods and found that 1 μM Aβ can induce acute depression of basal glutamatergic synaptic transmission through both presynaptic and postsynaptic dysfunction. Moreover, we also found that Aβ-induced both presynaptic and postsynaptic dysfunction can be reversed by the inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B), FK506, whereas only postsynaptic disruption can be ameliorated by the inhibitor of PP1/PP2A, Okadaic acid (OA). These results indicate that PP1/PP2A and PP2B have overlapping but not identical functions in Aβ-induced acute depression of excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  9. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  10. Functional Characterization of the Octenol Receptor Neuron on the Maxillary Palps of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    Functional Characterization of the Octenol Receptor Neuron on the Maxillary Palps of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti Alan J. Grant, Joseph C...Dickens JC (2011) Functional Characterization of the Octenol Receptor Neuron on the Maxillary Palps of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti . PLoS...palps. Both sexes of mosquitoes possess basiconic sensilla that contain three neurons; in Aedes aegypti these sensilla number about 35 in females and 21

  11. Arrested neuronal proliferation and impaired hippocampal function following fractionated brain irradiation in the adult rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard; Kristjansen, P.E.G.; Bolwig, Tom Gert

    2003-01-01

    irradiation blocked the formation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. At different time points after the termination of the irradiation procedure, the animals were tested in two tests of short-term memory that differ with respect to their dependence on hippocampal function. Eight and 21...

  12. Neuronal correlates of cognitive function in patients with childhood cerebellar tumor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Johanna L; Chocholous, Monika; Leiss, Ulrike; Pletschko, Thomas; Kasprian, Gregor; Furtner, Julia; Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Slavc, Irene; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Schöpf, Veronika; Dorfer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    While it has been shown that cerebellar tumor lesions have an impact on cognitive functions, the extent to which they shape distant neuronal pathways is still largely undescribed. Thus, the present neuroimaging study was designed to investigate different aspects of cognitive function and their neuronal correlates in patients after childhood cerebellar tumor surgery. An alertness task, a working memory task and an incompatibility task were performed by 11 patients after childhood cerebellar tumor surgery and 17 healthy controls. Neuronal correlates as reflected by alterations in functional networks during tasks were assessed using group independent component analysis. We were able to identify eight networks involved during task performance: default mode network, precuneus, anterior salience network, executive control network, visual network, auditory and sensorimotor network and a cerebellar network. For the most 'basic' cognitive tasks, a weaker task-modulation of default mode network, left executive control network and the cerebellar network was observed in patients compared to controls. Results for higher-order tasks are in line with a partial restoration of networks responsible for higher-order task execution. Our results provide tentative evidence that the synchronicity of brain activity in patients was at least partially restored in the course of neuroplastic reorganization, particularly for networks related to higher-order cognitive processes. The complex activation patterns underline the importance of testing several cognitive functions to assess the specificity of cognitive deficits and neuronal reorganization processes after brain lesions.

  13. Neuronal correlates of cognitive function in patients with childhood cerebellar tumor lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocholous, Monika; Leiss, Ulrike; Pletschko, Thomas; Kasprian, Gregor; Furtner, Julia; Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Slavc, Irene; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    While it has been shown that cerebellar tumor lesions have an impact on cognitive functions, the extent to which they shape distant neuronal pathways is still largely undescribed. Thus, the present neuroimaging study was designed to investigate different aspects of cognitive function and their neuronal correlates in patients after childhood cerebellar tumor surgery. An alertness task, a working memory task and an incompatibility task were performed by 11 patients after childhood cerebellar tumor surgery and 17 healthy controls. Neuronal correlates as reflected by alterations in functional networks during tasks were assessed using group independent component analysis. We were able to identify eight networks involved during task performance: default mode network, precuneus, anterior salience network, executive control network, visual network, auditory and sensorimotor network and a cerebellar network. For the most ‘basic’ cognitive tasks, a weaker task-modulation of default mode network, left executive control network and the cerebellar network was observed in patients compared to controls. Results for higher-order tasks are in line with a partial restoration of networks responsible for higher-order task execution. Our results provide tentative evidence that the synchronicity of brain activity in patients was at least partially restored in the course of neuroplastic reorganization, particularly for networks related to higher-order cognitive processes. The complex activation patterns underline the importance of testing several cognitive functions to assess the specificity of cognitive deficits and neuronal reorganization processes after brain lesions. PMID:28692686

  14. Polyethyleneimine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as a substrate for neuronal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Ni, Yingchun; Mandal, Swadhin K; Montana, Vedrana; Zhao, Bin; Haddon, Robert C; Parpura, Vladimir

    2005-03-17

    We report the synthesis of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) graft copolymer. This polymer was prepared by the functionalization of SWNTs with polyethyleneimine (PEI). We used this graft copolymer, SWNT-PEI, as a substrate for cultured neurons and found that it promotes neurite outgrowth and branching.

  15. Dual compartment neurofluidic system for electrophysiological measurements in physically segregated and functionally connected neuronal cell culture

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    Thirukumaran T eKanagasabapathi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed a dual compartment neurofluidic system with inter-connecting microchannels to connect neurons from their respective compartments, placed on a planar microelectrode array (MEA.The design and development of the compartmented microfluidic device for neuronal cell culture, protocol for sustaining long-term cultures and neurite growth through microchannels in such a closed compartment device are presented. Using electrophysiological measurements of spontaneous network activity in the compartments and selective pharmacological manipulation of cells in one compartment, the biological origin of network activity and the fluidic isolation between the compartments are demonstrated. The connectivity between neuronal populations via the microchannels and the crossing-over of neurites are verified using transfection experiments and immunofluorescence staining. In addition to the neurite cross-over to the adjacent compartment, functional connectivity between cells in both the compartments is verified using cross-correlation based techniques. Bidirectional signal propagation between the compartments is demonstrated using functional connectivity maps. Cross-correlation analysis and connectivity maps demonstrate that the two neuronal populations are not only functionally connected within each compartment but also with each other and a well connected functional network was formed between the compartments despite the physical barrier introduced by the microchannels.

  16. Parkin functionally interacts with PGC-1α to preserve mitochondria and protect dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Moullan, Norman; D'Amico, Davide; Auwerx, Johan; Moore, Darren J; Knott, Graham; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard L

    2017-02-01

    To understand the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), it is important to determine the functional interactions between factors linked to the disease. Parkin is associated with autosomal recessive early-onset PD, and controls the transcription of PGC-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. These two factors functionally interact to regulate the turnover and quality of mitochondria, by increasing both mitophagic activity and mitochondria biogenesis. In cortical neurons, co-expressing PGC-1α and Parkin increases the number of mitochondria, enhances maximal respiration, and accelerates the recovery of the mitochondrial membrane potential following mitochondrial uncoupling. PGC-1α enhances Mfn2 transcription, but also leads to increased degradation of the Mfn2 protein, a key ubiquitylation target of Parkin on mitochondria. In vivo, Parkin has significant protective effects on the survival and function of nigral dopaminergic neurons in which the chronic expression of PGC-1α is induced. Ultrastructural analysis shows that these two factors together control the density of mitochondria and their interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum. These results highlight the combined effects of Parkin and PGC-1α in the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons. These two factors synergistically control the quality and function of mitochondria, which is important for the survival of neurons in Parkinson's disease. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Glutamate mediates the function of melanocortin receptor 4 on sim1 neurons in body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a well-established mediator of body weight homeostasis. However, the neurotransmitter(s) that mediate MC4R function remain largely unknown; as a result, little is known about the second-order neurons of the MC4R neural pathway. Single-minded 1 (Sim1)-expressing ...

  18. Neurovirulence of H5N1 infection in ferrets is mediated by multifocal replication in distinct permissive neuronal cell regions.

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    Jennifer R Plourde

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI, subtype H5N1, remains an emergent threat to the human population. While respiratory disease is a hallmark of influenza infection, H5N1 has a high incidence of neurological sequelae in many animal species and sporadically in humans. We elucidate the temporal/spatial infection of H5N1 in the brain of ferrets following a low dose, intranasal infection of two HPAI strains of varying neurovirulence and lethality. A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN1203 induced mortality in 100% of infected ferrets while A/Hong Kong/483/1997 (HK483 induced lethality in only 20% of ferrets, with death occurring significantly later following infection. Neurological signs were prominent in VN1203 infection, but not HK483, with seizures observed three days post challenge and torticollis or paresis at later time points. VN1203 and HK483 replication kinetics were similar in primary differentiated ferret nasal turbinate cells, and similar viral titers were measured in the nasal turbinates of infected ferrets. Pulmonary viral titers were not different between strains and pathological findings in the lungs were similar in severity. VN1203 replicated to high titers in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, and brain stem; whereas HK483 was not recovered in these tissues. VN1203 was identified adjacent to and within the olfactory nerve tract, and multifocal infection was observed throughout the frontal cortex and cerebrum. VN1203 was also detected throughout the cerebellum, specifically in Purkinje cells and regions that coordinate voluntary movements. These findings suggest the increased lethality of VN1203 in ferrets is due to increased replication in brain regions important in higher order function and explains the neurological signs observed during H5N1 neurovirulence.

  19. Imaging brain neuronal activity using functionalized magnetonanoparticles and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, Massoud; Bragin, Anatol; Moats, Rex; Frew, Andrew; Mandelkern, Mark

    2012-10-01

    This study explored the use of non-radioactive 2-deoxy glucose (2DG)-labeled magnetonanoparticles (MNP) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect functional activity during rest, peripheral stimulation, and epileptic seizures, in animal models. Non-radioactive 2DG was covalently attached to magnetonanoparticles composed of iron oxide and dextran and intravenous (tail) injections were performed. 2DG-MNP was injected in resting and stimulated naïve rodents and the subsequent MRI was compared to published (14)C-2DG autoradiography data. Reproducibility and statistical significance was established in one studied model. Negative contrast enhancement (NCE) in acute seizures and chronic models of epilepsy were investigated. MRI NCE due to 2DG-MNP particles was compared to that of plain (unconjugated) MNP in one animal. NCE due to 2DG-MNP particles at 3 T, which is approved for human use, was also investigated. Histology showed presence of MNP (following intravenous injection) in the brain tissues of resting naïve animal. 2DG-MNP intraparenchymal uptake was visible on MRI and histology. The locations of NCE agreed with published results of 2DG autoradiography in resting and stimulated animals and epileptic rats. Localization of epileptogenicity was confirmed by subsequent depth-electrode EEG (iEEG). Non-radioactive 2DG-MNP can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and may accurately localize areas of increased activity. Although, this proof-of-principle study involves only a limited number of animals, and much more research and quantification are necessary to demonstrate that 2DG-MNP, or MNPs conjugated with other ligands, could eventually be used to image localized cerebral function with MRI in humans, this MNP-MRI approach is potentially applicable to the use of many bioactive molecules as ligands for imaging normal and abnormal localized cerebral functions.

  20. Social cognitive impairments and negative symptoms in schizophrenia: are there subtypes with distinct functional correlates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Morris D; Corbera, Silvia; Johannesen, Jason K; Fiszdon, Joanna M; Wexler, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Social cognitive impairments and negative symptoms are core features of schizophrenia closely associated with impaired community functioning. However, little is known about whether these are independent dimensions of illness and if so, whether individuals with schizophrenia can be meaningfully classified based on these dimensions (SANS) and potentially differentially treated. Five social cognitive measures plus Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores in a sample of 77 outpatients produced 2 distinct factors--a social cognitive factor and a negative symptom factor. Factor scores were used in a cluster analysis, which yielded 3 well-defined groupings--a high negative symptom group (HN) and 2 low negative symptom groups, 1 with higher social cognition (HSC) and 1 with low social cognition (LSC). To make these findings more practicable for research and clinical settings, a rule of thumb for categorizing using only the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and PANSS negative component was created and produced 84.4% agreement with the original cluster groups. An additional 63 subjects were added to cross validate the rule of thumb. When samples were combined (N = 140), the HSC group had significantly better quality of life and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores, higher rates of marriage and more hospitalizations. The LSC group had worse criminal and substance abuse histories. With 2 common assessment instruments, people with schizophrenia can be classified into 3 subgroups that have different barriers to community integration and could potentially benefit from different treatments.

  1. Type 2 Diabetes Variants Disrupt Function of SLC16A11 through Two Distinct Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Victor; Hoch, Eitan; Mercader, Josep M; Tenen, Danielle E; Gymrek, Melissa; Hartigan, Christina R; DeRan, Michael; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Fontanillas, Pierre; Spooner, Alexandra; Guzman, Gaelen; Deik, Amy A; Pierce, Kerry A; Dennis, Courtney; Clish, Clary B; Carr, Steven A; Wagner, Bridget K; Schenone, Monica; Ng, Maggie C Y; Chen, Brian H; Centeno-Cruz, Federico; Zerrweck, Carlos; Orozco, Lorena; Altshuler, David M; Schreiber, Stuart L; Florez, Jose C; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Lander, Eric S

    2017-06-29

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects Latinos at twice the rate seen in populations of European descent. We recently identified a risk haplotype spanning SLC16A11 that explains ∼20% of the increased T2D prevalence in Mexico. Here, through genetic fine-mapping, we define a set of tightly linked variants likely to contain the causal allele(s). We show that variants on the T2D-associated haplotype have two distinct effects: (1) decreasing SLC16A11 expression in liver and (2) disrupting a key interaction with basigin, thereby reducing cell-surface localization. Both independent mechanisms reduce SLC16A11 function and suggest SLC16A11 is the causal gene at this locus. To gain insight into how SLC16A11 disruption impacts T2D risk, we demonstrate that SLC16A11 is a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter and that genetic perturbation of SLC16A11 induces changes in fatty acid and lipid metabolism that are associated with increased T2D risk. Our findings suggest that increasing SLC16A11 function could be therapeutically beneficial for T2D. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Two Functionally Distinct Sources of Actin Monomers Supply the Leading Edge of Lamellipodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitriol, Eric A.; McMillen, Laura M.; Kapustina, Maryna; Gomez, Shawn M.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Zheng, James Q.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lamellipodia, the sheet-like protrusions of motile cells, consist of networks of actin filaments (F-actin) regulated by the ordered assembly from and disassembly into actin monomers (G-actin). Traditionally, G-actin is thought to exist as a homogeneous pool. Here, we show that there are two functionally and molecularly distinct sources of G-actin that supply lamellipodial actin networks. G-actin originating from the cytosolic pool requires the monomer binding protein thymosin β4 (Tβ4) for optimal leading edge localization, is targeted to formins, and is responsible for creating an elevated G/F-actin ratio that promotes membrane protrusion. The second source of G-actin comes from recycled lamellipodia F-actin. Recycling occurs independently of Tβ4 and appears to regulate lamellipodia homeostasis. Tβ4-bound G-actin specifically localizes to the leading edge because it doesn’t interact with Arp2/3-mediated polymerization sites found throughout the lamellipodia. These findings demonstrate that actin networks can be constructed from multiple sources of monomers with discrete spatiotemporal functions. PMID:25865895

  3. Functional characterization of myrcene hydroxylases from two geographically distinct Ips pini populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minmin; Kim, Amy C; Gorzalski, Andrew J; MacLean, Marina; Young, Sharon; Ginzel, Matthew D; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2013-04-01

    Ips pini bark beetles use myrcene hydroxylases to produce the aggregation pheromone component, ipsdienol, from myrcene. The enantiomeric ratio of pheromonal ipsdienol is an important prezygotic mating isolation mechanism of I. pini and differs among geographically distinct populations. We explored the substrate and product ranges of myrcene hydroxylases (CYP9T2 and CYP9T3) from reproductively-isolated western and eastern I. pini. The two cytochromes P450 share 94% amino acid identity. CYP9T2 mRNA levels were not induced in adults exposed to myrcene-saturated atmosphere. Functional assays of recombinant enzymes showed both hydroxylated myrcene, (+)- and (-)-α-pinene, 3-carene, and R-(+)-limonene, but not α-phellandrene, (-)-β-pinene, γ-terpinene, or terpinolene, with evidence that CYP9T2 strongly preferred myrcene over other substrates. They differed in the enantiomeric ratios of ipsdienol produced from myrcene, and in the products resulting from different α-pinene enantiomers. These data provide new information regarding bark beetle pheromone evolution and factors affecting cytochrome P450 structure-function relationships.

  4. Distinct expression profiles and different functions of odorant binding proteins in Nilaparvata lugens Stal.

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    Peng He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Odorant binding proteins (OBPs play important roles in insect olfaction. The brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens Stål (Delphacidae, Auchenorrhyncha, Hemiptera is one of the most important rice pests. Its monophagy (only feeding on rice, wing form (long and short wing variation, and annual long distance migration (seeking for rice plants of high nutrition imply that the olfaction would play a central role in BPH behavior. However, the olfaction related proteins have not been characterized in this insect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full length cDNA of three OBPs were obtained and distinct expression profiles were revealed regarding to tissue, developmental stage, wing form and gender for the first time for the species. The results provide important clues in functional differentiation of these genes. Binding assays with 41 compounds demonstrated that NlugOBP3 had markedly higher binding ability and wider binding spectrum than the other two OBPs. Terpenes and Ketones displayed higher binding while Alkanes showed no binding to the three OBPs. Focused on NlugOBP3, RNA interference experiments showed that NlugOBP3 not only involved in nymph olfaction on rice seedlings, but also had non-olfactory functions, as it was closely related to nymph survival. CONCLUSIONS: NlugOBP3 plays important roles in both olfaction and survival of BPH. It may serve as a potential target for developing behavioral disruptant and/or lethal agent in N. lugens.

  5. Opposing aminergic modulation of distinct spinal locomotor circuits and their functional coupling during amphibian metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscent, Aude; Einum, James; Le Ray, Didier; Simmers, John; Combes, Denis

    2009-01-28

    The biogenic amines serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) are well known modulators of central pattern-generating networks responsible for vertebrate locomotion. Here we have explored monoaminergic modulation of the spinal circuits that generate two distinct modes of locomotion in the metamorphosing frog Xenopus laevis. At metamorphic climax when propulsion is achieved by undulatory larval tail movements and/or by kicking of the newly developed adult hindlimbs, the underlying motor networks remain spontaneously active in vitro, producing either separate fast axial and slow appendicular rhythms or a single combined rhythm that drives coordinated tail-based and limb-based swimming in vivo. In isolated spinal cords already expressing distinct axial and limb rhythms, bath-applied 5-HT induced coupled network activity through an opposite slowing of axial rhythmicity (by increasing motoneuron burst and cycle durations) and an acceleration of limb rhythmicity (by decreasing burst and cycle durations). In contrast, in preparations spontaneously expressing coordinated fictive locomotion, exogenous NA caused a dissociation of spinal activity into separate faster axial and slower appendicular rhythms by decreasing and increasing burst and cycle durations, respectively. Moreover, in preparations from premetamorphic and postmetamorphic animals that express exclusively axial-based or limb-based locomotion, 5-HT and NA modified the developmentally independent rhythms in a similar manner to the amines' opposing effects on the coexisting circuits at metamorphic climax. Thus, by exerting differential modulatory actions on one network that are opposite to their influences on a second adjacent circuit, these two amines are able to precisely regulate the functional relationship between different rhythmogenic networks in a developing vertebrate's spinal cord.

  6. Two distinct phosphorylation events govern the function of muscle FHOD3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskratsch, Thomas; Reijntjes, Susan; Dwyer, Joseph; Toselli, Paul; Dégano, Irene R; Dominguez, Isabel; Ehler, Elisabeth

    2013-03-01

    Posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation are universally acknowledged regulators of protein function. Recently we characterised a striated muscle-specific isoform of the formin FHOD3 that displays distinct subcellular targeting and protein half-life compared to its non-muscle counterpart and which is dependent on phosphorylation by CK2 (formerly casein kinase 2). We now show that the two isoforms of FHOD3 are already expressed in the vertebrate embryonic heart. Analysis of CK2 alpha knockout mice showed that phosphorylation by CK2 is also required for proper targeting of muscle FHOD3 to the myofibrils in embryonic cardiomyocytes in situ. The localisation of muscle FHOD3 in the sarcomere varies depending on the maturation state, being either broader or restricted to the Z-disc proper in the adult heart. Following myofibril disassembly, such as that in dedifferentiating adult rat cardiomyocytes in culture, the expression of non-muscle FHOD3 is up-regulated, which is reversed once the myofibrils are reassembled. The shift in expression levels of different isoforms is accompanied by an increased co-localisation with p62, which is involved in autophagy, and affects the half-life of FHOD3. Phosphorylation of three amino acids in the C-terminus of FHOD3 by ROCK1 is sufficient for activation, which results in increased actin filament synthesis in cardiomyocytes and also a broader localisation pattern of FHOD3 in the myofibrils. ROCK1 can directly phosphorylate FHOD3, and FHOD3 seems to be the downstream mediator of the exaggerated actin filament formation phenotype that is induced in cardiomyocytes upon the overexpression of constitutively active ROCK1. We conclude that the expression of the muscle FHOD3 isoform is characteristic of the healthy mature heart and that two distinct phosphorylation events are crucial to regulate the activity of this isoform in thin filament assembly and maintenance.

  7. Role of Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphatase in Neuronal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kamceva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP is a CNS-enriched protein implicated in multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. STEP regulates key signaling proteins required for synaptic strengthening as well as NMDA and AMPA receptor trafficking. Both high and low levels of STEP disrupt synaptic function and contribute to learning and behavioral deficits. High levels of STEP are present in human postmortem samples and animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and schizophrenia and in animal models of fragile X syndrome. Low levels of STEP activity are present in additional disorders that include ischemia, Huntington’s chorea, alcohol abuse, and stress disorders. Thus the current model of STEP is that optimal levels are required for optimal synaptic function. Here we focus on the role of STEP in Alzheimer’s disease and the mechanisms by which STEP activity is increased in this illness. Both genetic lowering of STEP levels and pharmacological inhibition of STEP activity in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease reverse the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities that are present. These findings suggest that STEP is an important point for modulation of proteins required for synaptic plasticity.

  8. Effects of photoperiod on kisspeptin neuronal populations of the ewe diencephalon in connection with reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalivoix, S; Bagnolini, A; Caraty, A; Cognié, J; Malpaux, B; Dufourny, L

    2010-02-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss) is a key regulator of reproductive function in both prepubertal and adult mammals. Its expression appears to vary throughout the year in seasonal species. We aimed to determine the impact of a change of photoperiod on the size of Kiss neuronal populations found in the preoptic area (POA) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the ewe brain. Using immunocytochemistry, we first examined the proportion of neurones expressing Kiss, using HuC/D as a neuronal marker, at different time-points after transition from long days (LD; 16 : 8 h light/dark cycle) to short days (SD; 8 : 16 h light/dark cycle). Luteinising hormone (LH) secretion was measured in ovariectomised oestradiol replaced ewes from the month preceding the transition to SD until the sacrifice of the animals at days 0, 45 and 112 from this photoperiodic transition. High LH levels were only observed in animals killed at day 112. The number of Kiss neurones/mm(2) doubled in the caudal ARC at day 112. The percentage of neurones showing Kiss immunoreactivity increased significantly in both the POA and ARC in the day 112 group. In a second experiment, ewes kept in LD received an i.c.v. injection of colchicine 20 h before sacrifice. Colchicine treatment increased the number and the percentage of neurones with Kiss in both the POA and caudal ARC. The data obtained suggest that the increase in Kiss neurones detected in the POA and caudal ARC after transition to SD stemmed from an increase in Kiss synthesis. This up-regulation of Kiss content under the shorter day condition appears to be a late event within the cascade activated by a longer secretion of melatonin, which is a critical factor in switching gonadotrophin-releasing hormone secretion to a breeding season profile.

  9. Disruption of zebrafish cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK function impairs the expression of Notch-dependent genes during neurogenesis and causes defects in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeto Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The J-domain-containing protein auxilin, a critical regulator in clathrin-mediated transport, has been implicated in Drosophila Notch signaling. To ask if this role of auxilin is conserved and whether auxilin has additional roles in development, we have investigated the functions of auxilin orthologs in zebrafish. Results Like mammals, zebrafish has two distinct auxilin-like molecules, auxilin and cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK, differing in their domain structures and expression patterns. Both zebrafish auxilin and GAK can functionally substitute for the Drosophila auxilin, suggesting that they have overlapping molecular functions. Still, they are not completely redundant, as morpholino-mediated knockdown of the ubiquitously expressed GAK alone can increase the specification of neuronal cells, a known Notch-dependent process, and decrease the expression of Her4, a Notch target gene. Furthermore, inhibition of GAK function caused an elevated level of apoptosis in neural tissues, resulting in severe degeneration of neural structures. Conclusion In support of the notion that endocytosis plays important roles in Notch signaling, inhibition of zebrafish GAK function affects embryonic neuronal cell specification and Her4 expression. In addition, our analysis suggests that zebrafish GAK has at least two functions during the development of neural tissues: an early Notch-dependent role in neuronal patterning and a late role in maintaining the survival of neural cells.

  10. Chemically-Induced RAT Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adopt Molecular Properties of Neuronal-Like Cells but Do Not Have Basic Neuronal Functional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagnotto, Maria E.; Motta, Fabiana L.; Martinez, Gilberto; de Oliveira, Allan C.; Keim, Leda M. N.; D'Almeida, Vânia; Mendez-Otero, Rosália; Mello, Luiz E.

    2009-01-01

    Induction of adult rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) by means of chemical compounds (β-mercaptoethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide and butylated hydroxyanizole) has been proposed to lead to neuronal transdifferentiation, and this protocol has been broadly used by several laboratories worldwide. Only a few hours of MSC chemical induction using this protocol is sufficient for the acquisition of neuronal-like morphology and neuronal protein expression. However, given that cell death is abundant, we hypothesize that, rather than true neuronal differentiation, this particular protocol leads to cellular toxic effects. We confirm that the induced cells with neuronal-like morphology positively stained for NF-200, S100, β-tubulin III, NSE and MAP-2 proteins. However, the morphological and molecular changes after chemical induction are also associated with an increase in the apoptosis of over 50% of the plated cells after 24 h. Moreover, increased intracellular cysteine after treatment indicates an impairment of redox circuitry during chemical induction, and in vitro electrophysiological recordings (patch-clamp) of the chemically induced MSC did not indicate neuronal properties as these cells do not exhibit Na+ or K+ currents and do not fire action potentials. Our findings suggest that a disruption of redox circuitry plays an important role in this specific chemical induction protocol, which might result in cytoskeletal alterations and loss of functional ion-gated channels followed by cell death. Despite the neuronal-like morphology and neural protein expression, induced rat bone marrow MSC do not have basic functional neuronal properties, although it is still plausible that other methods of induction and/or sources of MSC can achieve a successful neuronal differentiation in vitro. PMID:19370156

  11. Pharmacological and kinetic characterization of two functional classes of serotonergic modulation in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L L; Mercer, A R; Emptage, N J; Carew, T J

    1996-02-01

    1. Modulation of mechanoafferent sensory neurons (SNs) by the neutrotransmitter serotonin (5HT) plays a significant role in behavioral sensitization of several withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia. The modulatory effects of 5HT on these SNs include increased excitability, increased input resistance, action potential broadening, and increased synaptic transmission. Based on a previously described dissociation of some of these modulatory effects, revealed with the 5HT-receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, we investigated whether a similar dissociation could be found by systematically varying the concentration of the endogenous agonist, 5HT. 2. We first applied a range of 5HT concentrations to isolated pleural/pedal ganglia (containing tail SNs and tail motor neurons, respectively), and measured the magnitude of 5HT-induced modulation of spike broadening and increased excitability. The resulting dose-response curve showed that both forms of modulation increase monotonically as a function of 5HT concentration, but that excitability has a lower threshold for modulation by 5HT than does spike duration. 3. We further characterized the modulatory effects of 5HT on Aplysia SNs by comparing the time course of onset of modulation by 5HT and the time course of recovery after washout. Independent of 5HT concentration, modulation of excitability increases rapidly in the presence of 5HT and recovers rapidly (broadening, which resembles the kinetics of increased excitability and increased input resistance. Higher concentrations of 5HT (2.5 and 5 microM) induce a more slowly developing and prolonged-recovery form of spike broadening (> 9 min). At these higher concentrations, the recovery profile for prolonged spike broadening is significantly different from those observed for both increased excitability and increased input resistance. 4. We next compared the relationship between spike broadening and short-term synaptic facilitation. We found that significant facilitation of synaptic

  12. Coupling between neuronal activity and microcirculation: implications for functional brain imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vanzetta, Ivo; Grinvald, Amiram

    2008-01-01

    In the neocortex, neurons with similar response properties are often clustered together in column-like structures, giving rise to what has become known as functional architecture—the mapping of various stimulus feature dimensions onto the cortical sheet. At least partially, we owe this finding to the availability of several functional brain imaging techniques, both post-mortem and in-vivo, which have become available over the last two generations, revolutionizing neuroscience by yielding info...

  13. CMOS VLSI Hyperbolic Tangent Function & its Derivative Circuits for Neuron Implementation

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    Hussein CHIBLE,

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The hyperbolic tangent function and its derivative are key essential element in analog signal processing and especially in analog VLSI implementation of neuron of artificial neural networks. The main conditions of these types of circuits are the small silicon area, and the low power consumption. The objective of this paper is to study and design CMOS VLSI hyperbolic tangent function and its derivative circuit for neural network implementation. A circuit is designed and the results are presented

  14. Functional localization of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic inputs to mature neurons of the medial superior olive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, Kiri; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) code for the azimuthal location of low-frequency sound sources via a binaural coincidence detection system operating on microsecond time scales. These neurons are morphologically simple and stereotyped, and anatomical studies have indicated a functional segregation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs between cellular compartments. It is thought that this morphological arrangement holds important implications for the computational task of these cells. To date, however, there has been no functional investigation into synaptic input sites or functional receptor distributions on mature neurons of the MSO. Here, functional neurotransmitter receptor maps for amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), glycine (Gly), and ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors (Rs) were compared and complemented by their corresponding synaptic input map. We find in MSO neurons from postnatal day 20-35 gerbils that AMPARs and their excitatory inputs target the soma and dendrites. Functional GlyRs and their inhibitory inputs are predominantly refined to the somata, although a pool of functional GlyRs is present extrasynaptically on MSO dendrites. GABA(A)R responses are present throughout the cell but lack direct synaptic contact indicating an involvement in volume transmission. NMDARs are present both synaptically and extrasynaptically with an overall distribution similar to GlyRs. Interestingly, even at physiological temperatures these functional NMDARs can be potentiated by synaptically released Gly. The functional receptor and synaptic input maps produced here led to the identification of a cross talk between transmitter systems and raises the possibility that extrasynaptic receptors could be modulating leak conductances as a homeostatic mechanism.

  15. Distinct effects of childhood ADHD and cannabis use on brain functional architecture in young adults

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    Clare Kelly, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most salient long-term implications of a childhood diagnosis of ADHD is an increased risk for substance use, abuse, or dependence in adolescence and adulthood. The extent to which cannabis use affects ADHD-related alterations in brain functional organization is unknown, however. To address this research gap, we recruited a sample of 75 individuals aged 21–25 years with and without a childhood diagnosis of ADHD Combined Type, who were either frequent users or non-users of cannabis. These participants have been followed longitudinally since age 7–9.9 years as part of a large multi-site longitudinal study of ADHD, the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA. We examined task-independent intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC within 9 functional networks using a 2 × 2 design, which compared four groups of participants: (1 individuals with a childhood diagnosis of ADHD who currently use cannabis (n = 23; (2 individuals with ADHD who do not currently use cannabis (n = 22; (3 comparisons who currently use cannabis (n = 15; and (4 comparisons who do not currently use cannabis (n = 15. The main effects of childhood ADHD were primarily weakened iFC in networks supporting executive function and somatomotor control. Contrary to expectations, effects of cannabis use were distinct from those of diagnostic group and no interactions were observed. Exploratory brain-behavior analyses suggested that ADHD-related effects were primarily linked with poorer neurocognitive performance. Deficits in the integrity of functional networks supporting executive function and somatomotor control are consistent with the phenotypic and neurocognitive features of ADHD. Our data suggest that cannabis use does not exacerbate ADHD-related alterations, but this finding awaits replication in a larger sample. Longitudinal neuroimaging studies are urgently required to delineate the neurodevelopmental cascade that culminates in positive and

  16. Gliotransmission by Prostaglandin E2: a prerequisite for GnRH neuronal function?

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    Jerome eClasadonte

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past four decades it has become clear that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a phospholipid-derived signaling molecule, plays a fundamental role in modulating the GnRH neuroendocrine system and in shaping the hypothalamus. In this review, after a brief historical overview, we highlight studies revealing that PGE2 released by glial cells such as astrocytes and tanycytes is intimately involved in the active control of GnRH neuronal activity and neurosecretion. Recent evidence suggests that hypothalamic astrocytes surrounding GnRH neuronal cell bodies may respond to neuronal activity with an activation of the erbB receptor tyrosine-kinase signaling, triggering the release of PGE2 as a chemical transmitter from the glia themselves, and, in turn, leading to the feedback regulation of GnRH neuronal activity. At the GnRH neurohemal junction, in the median eminence of the hypothalamus, PGE2 is released by tanycytes in response to cell-cell signaling initiated by glial cells and vascular endothelial cells. Upon its release, PGE2 causes the retraction of the tanycyte end feet enwrapping the GnRH nerve terminals, enabling them to approach the adjacent pericapillary space and thus likely facilitating neurohormone diffusion from these nerve terminals into the pituitary portal blood. In view of these new insights, we suggest that synaptically-associated astrocytes and perijunctional tanycytes are integral modulatory elements of GnRH neuronal function at the cell soma/dendrite and nerve terminal levels, respectively.

  17. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons

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    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-01-01

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22466.001 PMID:28231043

  18. Cell Death, Neuronal Plasticity and Functional Loading in the Development of the Central Nervous System

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    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research on the precise timing and regulation of neuron production and maturation in the vestibular and visual systems of Wistar rats and several inbred strains of mice (C57B16 and Pallid mutant) concentrated upon establishing a timing baseline for mitotic development of the neurons of the vestibular nuclei and the peripheral vestibular sensory structures (maculae, cristae). This involved studies of the timing and site of neuronal cell birth and preliminary studies of neuronal cell death in both central and peripheral elements of the mammalian vestibular system. Studies on neuronal generation and maturation in the retina were recently added to provide a mechanism for more properly defining the in utero' developmental age of the individual fetal subject and to closely monitor potential transplacental effects of environmentally stressed maternal systems. Information is given on current efforts concentrating upon the (1) perinatal period of development (E18 thru P14) and (2) the role of cell death in response to variation in the functional loading of the vestibular and proprioreceptive systems in developing mammalian organisms.

  19. Functional properties of parietal hand manipulation-related neurons and mirror neurons responding to vision of own hand action.

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    Maeda, Kazutaka; Ishida, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Katsumi; Inase, Masahiko; Murata, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Parietofrontal pathways play an important role in visually guided motor control. In this pathway, hand manipulation-related neurons in the inferior parietal lobule represent 3-D properties of an object and motor patterns to grasp it. Furthermore, mirror neurons show visual responses that are concerned with the actions of others and motor-related activity during execution of the same grasping action. Because both of these categories of neurons integrate visual and motor signals, these neurons may play a role in motor control based on visual feedback signals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these neurons in inferior parietal lobule including the anterior intraparietal area and PFG of macaques represent visual images of the monkey's own hand during a self-generated grasping action. We recorded 235 neurons related to hand manipulation tasks. Of these, 54 responded to video clips of the monkey's own hand action, the same as visual feedback during that action or clips of the experimenter's hand action in a lateral view. Of these 54 neurons, 25 responded to video clips of the monkey's own hand, even without an image of the target object. We designated these 25 neurons as "hand-type." Thirty-three of 54 neurons that were defined as mirror neurons showed visual responses to the experimenter's action and motor responses. Thirteen of these mirror neurons were classified as hand-type. These results suggest that activity of hand manipulation-related and mirror neurons in anterior intraparietal/PFG plays a fundamental role in monitoring one's own body state based on visual feedback.

  20. Distinct functions of neuromedin u and neuromedin s in orange-spotted grouper.

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    Li, Shuisheng; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Qiongyu; Zheng, Binbin; Chen, Huapu; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2015-10-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS) play inhibitory roles in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis in mammals. However, their functions are not clearly established in teleost fish. In the present study, nmu and nms homologs were identified in several fish species. Subsequently, their cDNA sequences were cloned from the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). Sequence analysis showed that the orange-spotted grouper Nmu proprotein contains a 21-amino acid mature Nmu peptide (Nmu-21). The Nms proprotein lost the typical mature Nms peptide, but it retains a putative 34-amino acid peptide (Nmsrp). In situ hybridization revealed that nmu- and nms-expressing cells are mainly localized in the hypothalamic regions associated with appetite regulation. Food deprivation decreased the hypothalamic nmu mRNA levels but induced an increase of nms mRNA levels. Periprandial expression analysis showed that hypothalamic expression of nmu increased significantly at 3 h post-feeding, while nms expression was elevated at the normal feeding time. I.p. injection of synthetic Nmu-21 peptide suppressed the hypothalamic neuropeptide y (npy) expression, while Nmsrp administration significantly increased the expression of npy and orexin in orange-spotted grouper. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of LH beta subunit (lhβ) and gh in the pituitary were significantly down-regulated after Nmu-21 peptide administration, while Nmsrp was able to significantly stimulate the expression of FSH beta subunit (fshβ), prolactin (prl), and somatolaction (sl). Our results indicate that nmu and nms possess distinct neuroendocrine functions and pituitary functions in the orange spotted grouper.

  1. Differential expression of two distinct functional isoforms of melanopsin (Opn4) in the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Susana S; Hughes, Steven; Turton, Michael; Melyan, Zare; Peirson, Stuart N; Zheng, Lei; Kosmaoglou, Maria; Bellingham, James; Cheetham, Michael E; Lucas, Robert J; Foster, Russell G; Hankins, Mark W; Halford, Stephanie

    2009-09-30

    Melanopsin is the photopigment that confers photosensitivity to a subset of retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) that regulate many non-image-forming tasks such as the detection of light for circadian entrainment. Recent studies have begun to subdivide the pRGCs on the basis of morphology and function, but the origin of these differences is not yet fully understood. Here we report the identification of two isoforms of melanopsin from the mouse Opn4 locus, a previously described long isoform (Opn4L) and a novel short isoform (Opn4S) that more closely resembles the sequence and structure of rat and human melanopsins. Both isoforms, Opn4L and Opn4S, are expressed in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, traffic to the plasma membrane and form a functional photopigment in vitro. Quantitative PCR revealed that Opn4S is 40 times more abundant than Opn4L. The two variants encode predicted proteins of 521 and 466 aa and only differ in the length of their C-terminal tails. Antibodies raised to isoform-specific epitopes identified two discrete populations of melanopsin-expressing RGCs, those that coexpress Opn4L and Opn4S and those that express Opn4L only. Recent evidence suggests that pRGCs show a range of anatomical subtypes, which may reflect the functional diversity reported for mouse Opn4-mediated light responses. The distinct isoforms of Opn4 described in this study provide a potential molecular basis for generating this diversity, and it seems likely that their differential expression plays a role in generating the variety of pRGC light responses found in the mammalian retina.

  2. Studies on functional roles of the histaminergic neuron system by using pharmacological agents, knockout mice and positron emission tomography

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    Watanabe, Takehiko; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2001-12-01

    Since one of us, Takehiko Watanabe (TW), elucidated the location and distribution of the histaminergic neuron system in the brain with antibody raised against L-histidine decarboxylase (a histamine-forming enzyme, HDC) as a marker in 1984 and came to Tohoku University School of Medicine in Sendai, we have been collaborating on the functions of this neuron system by using pharmacological agents, knockout mice of the histamine-related genes, and, in some cases, positron emission tomography (PET). Many of our graduate students and colleagues have been actively involved in histamine research since 1985. Our extensive studies have clarified some of the functions of histamine neurons using methods from molecular techniques to non-invasive human PET imaging. Histamine neurons are involved in many brain functions, such as spontaneous locomotion, arousal in wake-sleep cycle, appetite control, seizures, learning and memory, aggressive behavior and emotion. Particularly, the histaminergic neuron system is one of the most important neuron systems to maintain and stimulate wakefulness. Histamine also functions as a biprotection system against various noxious and unfavorable stimuli (for examples, convulsion, nociception, drug sensitization, ischemic lesions, and stress). Although activators of histamine neurons have not been clinically available until now, we would like to point out that the activation of the histaminergic neuron system is important to maintain mental health. Here, we summarize the newly-discovered functions of histamine neurons mainly on the basis of results from our research groups. (author)

  3. Age-related neuroinflammatory changes negatively impact on neuronal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina A Lynch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammatory changes, characterized by an increase in microglial activation and often accompanied by upregulation of inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1β (IL-1β, are common to many, if not all, neurodegenerative diseases. Similar, though less dramatic neuroinflammatory changes are also known to occur with age. Among the consequences of these changes is an impairment in synaptic function and the evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokines may be the primary contributory factor responsible for the deficits in synaptic plasticity which have been identified in aged rodents. Specifically a decrease in the ability of aged rats to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP in perforant path-granule cells of the hippocampus is associated with increased microglial activation. This review considers the evidence which suggests a causal relationship between these changes and the factors which contribute to the age-related microglial activation, and reflects on data which demonstrate that agents which inhibit microglial activation also improve ability of rats to sustain LTP.

  4. Odd-skipped labels a group of distinct neurons associated with the mushroom body and optic lobe in the adult Drosophila brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Peter; Larsen, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory processing has been intensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster. However, we still know little about the descending neural pathways from the higher order processing centers and how these connect with other neural circuits. Here we describe, in detail, the adult projections patterns that arise from a cluster of 78 neurons, defined by the expression of the Odd-skipped transcription factor. We term these neurons Odd neurons. By using expression of genetically encoded axonal and dendritic markers, we show that a subset of the Odd neurons projects dendrites into the calyx of the mushroom body (MB) and axons into the inferior protocerebrum. We exclude the possibility that the Odd neurons are part of the well-known Kenyon cells whose projections form the MB and conclude that the Odd neurons belong to a previously not described class of extrinsic MB neurons. In addition, three of the Odd neurons project into the lobula plate of the optic lobe, and two of these cells extend axons ipsi- and contralaterally in the brain. Anatomically, these cells do not resemble any previously described lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs) in Drosophila. We show that the Odd neurons are predominantly cholinergic but also include a small number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons. Finally, we provide evidence that the Odd neurons are a hemilineage, suggesting they are born from a defined set of neuroblasts. Our anatomical analysis hints at the possibility that subgroups of Odd neurons could be involved in olfactory and visual processing. PMID:23749685

  5. Prions, From Structure to Epigenetics and Neuronal Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Prions are a unique type of protein that can misfold and convert other proteins to the same shape. The well-characterized yeast prion [PSI+] is formed from an inactive amyloid fiber conformation of the translation-termination factor, Sup35. This altered conformation is passed from mother cells to daughters, acting as a template to perpetuate the prion state and providing a mechanism of protein-based inheritance. We employed a variety of methods to determine the structure of Sup35 amyloid fibrils. First, using fluorescent tags and cross-linking we identified specific segments of the protein monomer that form intermolecular contacts in a ``Head-to-Head,'' ``Tail-to-Tail'' fashion while a central region forms intramolecular contacts. Then, using peptide arrays we mapped the region responsible for the prion transmission barrier between two different yeast species. We have also used optical tweezers to reveal that the non-covalent intermolecular contacts between monomers are unusually strong, and maintain fibril integrity even under forces that partially unfold individual monomers and extend fibril length. Based on the handful of known yeast prion proteins we predicted sequences that could be responsible for prion-like amyloid folding. Our screen identified 19 new candidate prions, whose protein-folding properties and diverse cellular functions we have characterized using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques. Prion-driven phenotypic diversity increases under stress, and can be amplified by the dynamic maturation of prion-initiating states. These qualities allow prions to act as ``bet-hedging'' devices that facilitate the adaptation of yeast to stressful environments, and might speed the evolution of new traits. Together with Kandel and Si, we have also found that a regulatory protein that plays an important role in synaptic plasticity behaves as a prion in yeast. Cytoplasmic polyAdenylation element binding protein, CPEB, maintains synapses by promoting

  6. The influence of stress and gonadal hormones on neuronal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Mollee R; Gruene, Tina M; Shansky, Rebecca M

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". The brain is highly plastic, allowing us to adapt and respond to environmental and physiological challenges and experiences. In this review, we discuss the relationships among alterations in dendritic arborization, spine morphology, and behavior due to stress exposure, endogenous hormone fluctuation, or exogenous hormonal manipulation. Very few studies investigate structure-function associations directly in the same cohort of animals, and there are notable inconsistencies in evidence of structure-function relationships in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Moreover, little work has been done to probe the causal relationship between dendritic morphology and neuronal excitability, leaving only speculation about the adaptive versus maladaptive nature of experience-dependent dendritic remodeling. We propose that future studies combine electrophysiology with a circuit-level approach to better understand how dendritic structure contributes to neuronal functional properties and behavioral outcomes.

  7. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  8. Two Arabidopsis orthologs of the transcriptional coactivator ADA2 have distinct biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Amy T; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E; Pavangadkar, Kanchan A; Rao, Sumana; Gordon, Hillary; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis; Kaldis, Athanasios; Thomashow, Michael F; Triezenberg, Steven J

    2009-02-01

    Histone acetylation is an example of covalent modification of chromatin structure that has the potential to regulate gene expression. Gcn5 is a prototypical histone acetyltransferase that associates with the transcriptional coactivator Ada2. In Arabidopsis, two genes encode proteins that resemble yeast ADA2 and share approximately 45% amino acid sequence identity. We previously reported that plants harboring a T-DNA insertion in the ADA2b gene display a dwarf phenotype with developmental defects in several organs. Here we describe T-DNA insertion alleles in the ADA2a gene, which result in no dramatic growth or developmental phenotype. Both ADA2a and ADA2b are expressed in a variety of plant tissues; moreover, expression of ADA2a from a constitutive promoter fails to complement the ada2b-1 mutant phenotype, consistent with the hypothesis that the two proteins have distinct biochemical roles. To further probe the cellular roles of ADA2a and ADA2b, we studied the response of the transcriptional coactivator mutants to abiotic stress. Although ada2b seedlings display hypersensitivity to salt and abscisic acid and altered responses to low temperature stress, the responses of ada2a seedlings to abiotic stress generally parallel those of wildtype plants. Intriguingly, ada2a;ada2b double mutant plants display an intermediate, gcn5-like phenotype, suggesting that ADA2a and ADA2b each work independently with GCN5 to affect genome function in Arabidopsis.

  9. Identification of distinct biological functions for four 3′-5′ RNA polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yicheng; Abad, Maria G.; Olson, Erik D.; Carrillo, Elisabeth Y.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of 3′-5′ polymerases synthesize RNA in the opposite direction to all other DNA/RNA polymerases, and its members include eukaryotic tRNAHis guanylyltransferase (Thg1), as well as Thg1-like proteins (TLPs) of unknown function that are broadly distributed, with family members in all three domains of life. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes one Thg1 and three TLPs (DdiTLP2, DdiTLP3 and DdiTLP4). Here, we demonstrate that depletion of each of the genes results in a significant growth defect, and that each protein catalyzes a unique biological reaction, taking advantage of specialized biochemical properties. DdiTLP2 catalyzes a mitochondria-specific tRNAHis maturation reaction, which is distinct from the tRNAHis maturation reaction typically catalyzed by Thg1 enzymes on cytosolic tRNA. DdiTLP3 catalyzes tRNA repair during mitochondrial tRNA 5′-editing in vivo and in vitro, establishing template-dependent 3′-5′ polymerase activity of TLPs as a bona fide biological activity for the first time since its unexpected discovery more than a decade ago. DdiTLP4 is cytosolic and, surprisingly, catalyzes robust 3′-5′ polymerase activity on non-tRNA substrates, strongly implying further roles for TLP 3′-5′ polymerases in eukaryotes. PMID:27484477

  10. Identification of distinct biological functions for four 3'-5' RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yicheng; Abad, Maria G; Olson, Erik D; Carrillo, Elisabeth Y; Jackman, Jane E

    2016-09-30

    The superfamily of 3'-5' polymerases synthesize RNA in the opposite direction to all other DNA/RNA polymerases, and its members include eukaryotic tRNA(His) guanylyltransferase (Thg1), as well as Thg1-like proteins (TLPs) of unknown function that are broadly distributed, with family members in all three domains of life. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes one Thg1 and three TLPs (DdiTLP2, DdiTLP3 and DdiTLP4). Here, we demonstrate that depletion of each of the genes results in a significant growth defect, and that each protein catalyzes a unique biological reaction, taking advantage of specialized biochemical properties. DdiTLP2 catalyzes a mitochondria-specific tRNA(His) maturation reaction, which is distinct from the tRNA(His) maturation reaction typically catalyzed by Thg1 enzymes on cytosolic tRNA. DdiTLP3 catalyzes tRNA repair during mitochondrial tRNA 5'-editing in vivo and in vitro, establishing template-dependent 3'-5' polymerase activity of TLPs as a bona fide biological activity for the first time since its unexpected discovery more than a decade ago. DdiTLP4 is cytosolic and, surprisingly, catalyzes robust 3'-5' polymerase activity on non-tRNA substrates, strongly implying further roles for TLP 3'-5' polymerases in eukaryotes.

  11. Choriodecidual Cells from Term Human Pregnancies Show Distinctive Functional Properties Related to the Induction of Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Castrejon, Marisol; Meraz-Cruz, Noemí; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Flores-Pliego, Arturo; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martín; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Problem Human parturition is associated with an intrauterine pro-inflammatory environment in the choriodecidua. Evidence that some mediators of this signaling cascade also elicit responses leading to labor prompted us to characterize the cellular sources of these mediators in the human choriodecidua. Method of study Leukocyte-enriched preparations from human choriodecidua (ChL) and intervillous placental blood leukocytes (PL) were maintained in culture. Secretions of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and MMP-9 were documented. Leukocyte phenotype of ChL and PL was determined by flow cytometry using specific fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies. Results and Conclusions ChL showed a distinct pro-inflammatory secretion pattern of cytokines and chemokines when compared with PL, including higher amounts of TNF-α and IL-6, and decreased secretions of IL-4 and IL-1ra. ChL also secreted more MIP-1α and MCP-1 and MMP-9 than PL. No significant differences were found in leukocytes subsets between compartments. Based on our findings, we propose that ChL isolated from fetal membranes at term are functionally different from PL and may collaborate to modulate the microenvironment linked to induction and progression of human labor. PMID:24286217

  12. SLAM family markers resolve functionally distinct subpopulations of hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Hideyuki; Ding, Lei; Morrison, Sean J

    2013-07-03

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent hematopoietic progenitors (MPPs) are routinely isolated using various markers but remain heterogeneous. Here we show that four SLAM family markers, CD150, CD48, CD229, and CD244, can distinguish HSCs and MPPs from restricted progenitors and subdivide them into a hierarchy of functionally distinct subpopulations with stepwise changes in cell-cycle status, self-renewal, and reconstituting potential. CD229 expression largely distinguished lymphoid-biased HSCs from rarely dividing myeloid-biased HSCs, enabling prospective enrichment of these HSC subsets. Differences in CD229 and CD244 expression resolved CD150(-)CD48(-/low)Lineage(-/low)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) cells into a hierarchy of highly purified MPPs that retained erythroid and platelet potential but exhibited progressive changes in mitotic activity and reconstituting potential. Use of these markers, and reconstitution assays, showed that conditional deletion of Scf from endothelial cells and perivascular stromal cells eliminated the vast majority of bone marrow HSCs, including nearly all CD229(-/low) HSCs, demonstrating that quiescent HSCs are maintained by a perivascular niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR TWO DISTINCT STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS: REVISITING THE EFFECTS OF CLUSTER DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Pessev, Peter M. [Gemini South Observatory, c/o AURA Inc., Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Chandar, Rupali, E-mail: dzaritsky@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We measure the velocity dispersions of six galactic globular clusters using spatially integrated spectra, to test for the effects of internal dynamical evolution in the stellar mass-to-light ratios, Y{sub *}, of star clusters. In particular, we revisit whether the low values of Y{sub *} that we found in our previous study, from which we concluded that there are at least two population of stellar clusters with distinct stellar initial mass functions, are artificially depressed by relaxation driven mass loss. The combination of our previous sample of five old clusters and these six now provide an order of magnitude range in cluster mass with which to explore this issue. We find no relationship between cluster mass, or relaxation time, and Y{sub *}. Because relaxation is mass dependent, we conclude that the values of Y{sub *} for these clusters are not strongly affected by dynamical effects, and so confirm the presence of the population of clusters with low Y{sub *}.

  14. Functional olfactory sensory neurons housed in olfactory sensilla on the ovipositor of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Felix Klinner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory systems evolved to detect and identify volatile chemical cues, in many cases across great distances. However, the precision of copulatory and oviposition behaviors suggest that they may be guided by olfactory cues detected by sensory systems located on or near the ovipositor. Here we present evidence of a small number of functional olfactory sensilla on the ovipositor of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. Gene expression analysis of isolated ovipositor tissue indicated active transcription of gustatory and both classes of olfactory receptor genes. Expression of the olfactory co-receptor ORCo and the antennal ionotropic co-receptors IR8a and IR25a suggests that functional olfactory proteins may be present in the sensory structures located on the ovipositor. Scanning electron microscopy identified five to nine porous sensilla on each of the anal papillae of the ovipositor. Furthermore, HRP immunostaining indicated that these sensilla are innervated by the dendrite-like structures from multiple neurons. Finally, we functionally characterized neural responses in these sensilla using single sensillum recordings. Stimulation with a panel of 142 monomolecular odorants revealed that these sensilla indeed house functional olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. While it remains to be determined what role these chemosensory sensilla play in odor and gustatory guided behaviors, our data clearly demonstrate an olfactory function for neurons present in M. sexta ovipositor sensilla.

  15. Neurokinin B and reproductive functions: "KNDy neuron" model in mammals and the emerging story in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangfu; Lin, Chengyuan; He, Mulan; Wong, Anderson O L

    2014-11-01

    In mammals, neurokinin B (NKB), the gene product of the tachykinin family member TAC3, is known to be a key regulator for episodic release of luteinizing hormone (LH). Its regulatory actions are mediated by a subpopulation of kisspeptin neurons within the arcuate nucleus with co-expression of NKB and dynorphin A (commonly called the "KNDy neurons"). By forming an "autosynaptic feedback loop" within the hypothalamus, the KNDy neurons can modulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulsatility and subsequent LH release in the pituitary. NKB regulation of LH secretion has been recently demonstrated in zebrafish, suggesting that the reproductive functions of NKB may be conserved from fish to mammals. Interestingly, the TAC3 genes in fish not only encode the mature peptide of NKB but also a novel tachykinin-like peptide, namely NKB-related peptide (or neurokinin F). Recent studies in zebrafish also reveal that the neuroanatomy of TAC3/kisspeptin system within the fish brain is quite different from that of mammals. In this article, the current ideas of "KNDy neuron" model for GnRH regulation and steroid feedback, other reproductive functions of NKB including its local actions in the gonad and placenta, the revised model of tachykinin evolution from invertebrates to vertebrates, as well as the emerging story of the two TAC3 gene products in fish, NKB and NKB-related peptide, will be reviewed with stress on the areas with interesting questions for future investigations.

  16. Functional changes in piriform cortex pyramidal neurons in the chronic methamphetamine-treated rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Nobuaki; Kadota, Tomoko; Akaike, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with methamphetamine (MAP) causes a range of functional changes to the central nervous system (CNS), including a toxicity that is widespread throughout the brain (Frost and Cadet 2000; Fasihpour et al. 2013). In this report, we examined the effect of chronic MAP treatment on pyramidal neurons of the rat piriform cortex, an area involved in sensory processing, associative learning and a model system for studies on synaptic plasticity. MAP treatment significantly depolarized the membrane potential and decreased neuronal input resistance. Furthermore, the voltage-dependence of both AMPA and NMDA responses was disturbed by chronic MAP treatment, and the extent of long-term potentiation (LTP) was decreased. Morphological changes of MAP-treated rat pyramidal neurons were observed as blebbing of the dendrite trees. The changes we observed represent detrimental effects on the function of piriform cortical neurons further illustrating deficits in synaptic plasticity extend beyond the hippocampus. These changes may contribute to behavioural deficits in chronic MAP-treated animals.

  17. Analyzing topological characteristics of neuronal functional networks in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hu [School of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu 212003 (China); School of Computer Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang, Shengtao [Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Yuqing [School of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu 212003 (China); Wei, Hui [School of Computer Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-08-28

    In this study, we recorded spike trains from brain cortical neurons of several behavioral rats in vivo by using multi-electrode recordings. An NFN was constructed in each trial, obtaining a total of 150 NFNs in this study. The topological characteristics of NFNs were analyzed by using the two most important characteristics of complex networks, namely, small-world structure and community structure. We found that the small-world properties exist in different NFNs constructed in this study. Modular function Q was used to determine the existence of community structure in NFNs, through which we found that community-structure characteristics, which are related to recorded spike train data sets, are more evident in the Y-maze task than in the DM-GM task. Our results can also be used to analyze further the relationship between small-world characteristics and the cognitive behavioral responses of rats. - Highlights: • We constructed the neuronal function networks based on the recorded neurons. • We analyzed the two main complex network characteristics, namely, small-world structure and community structure. • NFNs which were constructed based on the recorded neurons in this study exhibit small-world properties. • Some NFNs have community structure characteristics.

  18. Distinct functions of the dual leucine zipper kinase depending on its subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, Manuel; Duque Escobar, Jorge; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Blume, Roland; Schröder, Sabine; Kruegel, Jenny; Maedler, Kathrin; Kluth, Oliver; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Miosge, Nicolai; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The dual leucine zipper kinase DLK induces β-cell apoptosis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity conferred by the β-cell protective transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein CREB. This action might contribute to β-cell loss and ultimately diabetes. Within its kinase domain DLK shares high homology with the mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3, which is activated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and interleukin (IL)-1β, known prediabetic signals. In the present study, the regulation of DLK in β-cells by these cytokines was investigated. Both, TNFα and IL-1β induced the nuclear translocation of DLK. Mutations within a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) prevented basal and cytokine-induced nuclear localization of DLK and binding to the importin receptor importin α, thereby demonstrating a functional NLS within DLK. DLK NLS mutants were catalytically active as they phosphorylated their down-stream kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase to the same extent as DLK wild-type but did neither inhibit CREB-dependent gene transcription nor transcription conferred by the promoter of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL-xL. In addition, the β-cell apoptosis-inducing effect of DLK was severely diminished by mutation of its NLS. In a murine model of prediabetes, enhanced nuclear DLK was found. These data demonstrate that DLK exerts distinct functions, depending on its subcellular localization and thus provide a novel level of regulating DLK action. Furthermore, the prevention of the nuclear localization of DLK as induced by prediabetic signals with consecutive suppression of β-cell apoptosis might constitute a novel target in the therapy of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Origin of a Non-Clarke's Column Division of the Dorsal Spinocerebellar Tract and the Role of Caudal Proprioceptive Neurons in Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuengert, Rachel; Hori, Kei; Kibodeaux, Erin E; McClellan, Jacob X; Morales, Justin E; Huang, Teng-Wei P; Neul, Jeffrey L; Lai, Helen C

    2015-11-10

    Proprioception, the sense of limb and body position, is essential for generating proper movement. Unconscious proprioceptive information travels through cerebellar-projecting neurons in the spinal cord and medulla. The progenitor domain defined by the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, ATOH1, has been implicated in forming these cerebellar-projecting neurons; however, their precise contribution to proprioceptive tracts and motor behavior is unknown. Significantly, we demonstrate that Atoh1-lineage neurons in the spinal cord reside outside Clarke's column (CC), a main contributor of neurons relaying hindlimb proprioception, despite giving rise to the anatomical and functional correlate of CC in the medulla, the external cuneate nucleus (ECu), which mediates forelimb proprioception. Elimination of caudal Atoh1-lineages results in mice with relatively normal locomotion but unable to perform coordinated motor tasks. Altogether, we reveal that proprioceptive nuclei in the spinal cord and medulla develop from more than one progenitor source, suggesting an avenue to uncover distinct proprioceptive functions.

  20. Distinct aetiopathogenesis in subgroups of functional dyspepsia according to the Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Jen; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Chen, Chieh-Chang; Lee, Ji-Yuh; Hsu, Yao-Chun; Chen, Mei-Jyh; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Yang, Tsung-Hua; Chang, Wen-Hsiung; Wu, Jeng-Yi; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Lin, Jaw-Town; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-10-01

    Whether there is distinct pathogenesis in subgroups of functional dyspepsia (FD), the postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) remains controversial. We aimed to identify the risk factors of FD and its subgroups in the Chinese population. Patients with dyspepsia and healthy subjects who underwent gastric cancer screening were enrolled in this multicentre study from 2010 to 2012. All patients were evaluated by questionnaire, oesophagoduodenoscopy, histological examination and Helicobacter pylori tests. Subgroups of FD were classified according to the Rome III criteria. Psychiatric stress was assessed by the short form Brief Symptom Rating Scale. CagA and VacA genotypes were determined by PCR. Of 2378 patients screened for eligibility, 771 and 491 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of uninvestigated dyspepsia and FD, respectively. 298 (60.7%) and 353 (71.9%) individuals were diagnosed with EPS and PDS, respectively, whereas 169 (34.4%) had the overlap syndrome. As compared with 1031 healthy controls, PDS and EPS shared some common risk factors, including younger age (OR 0.95; 99.5% CI 0.93 to 0.98), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR 6.60; 99.5% CI 3.13 to 13.90), anxiety (OR 3.41; 99.5% CI 2.01 to 5.77) and concomitant IBS (OR 6.89; 99.5% CI 3.41 to 13.94). By contrast, H. pylori (OR 1.86; 99.5% CI 1.01 to 3.45), unmarried status (OR 4.22; 99.5% CI 2.02 to 8.81), sleep disturbance (OR 2.56; 99.5% CI 1.29 to 5.07) and depression (OR 2.34; 99.5% CI 1.04 to 5.36) were associated with PDS. Moderate to severe antral atrophy and CagA positive strains were also more prevalent in PDS. Different risk factors exist among FD subgroups based on the Rome III criteria, indicating distinct aetiopathogenesis of the subdivisions that may necessitate different therapeutic strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Maturation of neuronal form and function in a mouse thalamo-cortical circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, R A; Jones, E G

    1997-01-01

    Postnatal development of physiological properties underlying slow intrathalamic oscillations was studied by whole-cell recording from synaptically coupled neurons of the reticular nucleus (RTN) and ventral posterior nucleus (VPN) of mouse brain slices in vitro and compared with the morphological development of dye-injected cells. Between postnatal days 3 and 11 (P3-P11), progressive changes in RTN and VPN neurons included shortening of the membrane time constant, decreasing input resistance, and lowering of the resting membrane potential (RMP). Low-threshold Ca2+ spikes (LTS) were present from P3, but their capacity to sustain multispike bursts was limited before P11. Synaptic responses were evoked in RTN and VPN neurons by electrical stimulation of the internal capsule from P3. Younger RTN neurons responded with a single spike, but their capacity to fire bursts gradually improved as the RMP reached levels below the LTS activation potential. Concomitantly, as the reversal potential of the inhibitory postsynaptic potential in VPN neurons became more negative, its capacity to deinactivate the LTS increased, and rebound bursts that could maintain oscillations were produced; sustained oscillations became the typical response to internal capsule stimulation at P12. The functional maturation of the intrathalamic circuitry, particularly between P10 and P14, occurs in parallel with the morphological maturation (size, dendritic growth, and dendritic field structure) of individual RTN and VPN neurons, as studied by confocal microscopy. Maturation of RTN cells led that of VPN cells by 2-3 d. The appearance of intrathalamic oscillations is probably correlated with the appearance of slow-wave sleep in postnatal animals.

  2. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  3. Functional heterogeneity of NMDA receptors in rat substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, F; Zhao, Q; Monaghan, D T; Jane, D E; Jones, S; Gibb, A J

    2010-08-01

    The nigra substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and substantia pars reticulata (SNr) form two major basal ganglia components with different functional roles. SNc dopaminergic (DA) neurones are vulnerable to cell death in Parkinson's disease, and NMDA receptor activation is a potential contributing mechanism. We have investigated the sensitivity of whole-cell and synaptic NMDA responses to intracellular ATP and GTP application in the SNc and SNr from rats on postnatal day (P) 7 and P28. Both NMDA current density (pA/pF) and desensitization to prolonged or repeated NMDA application were greater in the SNr than in the SNc. When ATP levels were not supplemented, responses to prolonged NMDA administration desensitized in P7 SNc DA neurones but not at P28. At P28, SNr neurones desensitized more than SNc neurones, with or without added ATP. Responses to brief NMDA applications and synaptic NMDA currents were not sensitive to inclusion of ATP in the pipette solution. To investigate these differences between the SNc and SNr, NR2 subunit-selective antagonists were tested. NMDA currents were inhibited by ifenprodil (10 microM) and UBP141 (4 microM), but not by Zn(2+) (100 nm), in both the SNr and SNc, suggesting that SNc and SNr neurones express similar receptor subunits; NR2B and NR2D, but not NR2A. The different NMDA response properties in the SNc and SNr may be caused by differences in receptor modulation and/or trafficking. The vulnerability of SNc DA neurones to cell death is not correlated with NMDA current density or receptor subtypes, but could in part be related to inadequate NMDA receptor desensitization.

  4. Common and Distinctive Functions of the Hippo Effectors Taz and Yap in Skeletal Muscle Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Congshan; De Mello, Vanessa; Mohamed, Abdalla; Ortuste Quiroga, Huascar P; Garcia-Munoz, Amaya; Al Bloshi, Abdullah; Tremblay, Annie M; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; Collie-Duguid, Elaina; Vargesson, Neil; Matallanas, David; Wackerhage, Henning; Zammit, Peter S

    2017-08-01

    Hippo pathway downstream effectors Yap and Taz play key roles in cell proliferation and regeneration, regulating gene expression especially via Tead transcription factors. To investigate their role in skeletal muscle stem cells, we analyzed Taz in vivo and ex vivo in comparison with Yap. Small interfering RNA knockdown or retroviral-mediated expression of wild-type human or constitutively active TAZ mutants in satellite cells showed that TAZ promoted proliferation, a function shared with YAP. However, at later stages of myogenesis, TAZ also enhanced myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, whereas YAP inhibits such differentiation. Functionally, while muscle growth was mildly affected in Taz (gene Wwtr1(-/-) ) knockout mice, there were no overt effects on regeneration. Conversely, conditional knockout of Yap in satellite cells of Pax7(Cre-ERT2/+) : Yap(fl) °(x/fl) °(x) :Rosa26(Lacz) mice produced a regeneration deficit. To identify potential mechanisms, microarray analysis showed many common TAZ/YAP target genes, but TAZ also regulates some genes independently of YAP, including myogenic genes such as Pax7, Myf5, and Myod1 (ArrayExpress-E-MTAB-5395). Proteomic analysis revealed many novel binding partners of TAZ/YAP in myogenic cells, but TAZ also interacts with proteins distinct from YAP that are often involved in myogenesis and aspects of cytoskeleton organization (ProteomeXchange-PXD005751). Neither TAZ nor YAP bind members of the Wnt destruction complex but both regulated expression of Wnt and Wnt-cross talking genes with known roles in myogenesis. Finally, TAZ operates through Tead4 to enhance myogenic differentiation. In summary, Taz and Yap have overlapping functions in promoting myoblast proliferation but Taz then switches to enhance myogenic differentiation. Stem Cells 2017;35:1958-1972. © 2017 The Authors. The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  5. miR-212/132 expression and functions: within and beyond the neuronal compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanet, Anaïs; Tacheny, Aurélie; Arnould, Thierry; Renard, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, microRNAs (miRNAs) emerged as critical regulators of gene expression. By modulating the expression of numerous target mRNAs mainly at the post-transcriptional level, these small non-coding RNAs have been involved in most, if not all, biological processes as well as in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. miR-132 and miR-212 are tandem miRNAs whose expression is necessary for the proper development, maturation and function of neurons and whose deregulation is associated with several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies (neurodegenerative diseases resulting from the pathological aggregation of tau protein in the human brain). Although their involvement in neuronal functions is the most described, evidences point towards a role of these miRNAs in many other biological processes, including inflammation and immune functions. Incidentally, miR-132 was recently classified as a ‘neurimmiR’, a class of miRNAs operating within and between the neural and immune compartments. In this review, we propose an outline of the current knowledge about miR-132 and miR-212 functions in neurons and immune cells, by describing the signalling pathways and transcription factors regulating their expression as well as their putative or demonstrated roles and validated mRNA targets. PMID:22362752

  6. Do Delay Aversion and Executive Function Deficits Make Distinct Contributions to the Functional Impact of ADHD Symptoms? A Study of Early Academic Skill Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, Lisa B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The present study examined the distinct properties of executive functioning in relation to ADHD symptoms, as well as functional outcomes associated with ADHD. In line with the dual-pathway model of ADHD, executive functioning and delay aversion were expected to show independent effects on ADHD symptoms. Furthermore, relations to early…

  7. In search of neural mechanisms of mirror neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia: resting state functional connectivity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yuliya; Bendova, Marie; Garakh, Zhanna; Tintera, Jaroslav; Rydlo, Jan; Spaniel, Filip; Horacek, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that schizophrenia patients have immense alterations in goal-directed behaviour, social cognition, and social interactions, cognitive abilities that are presumably driven by the mirror neurons system (MNS). However, the neural bases of these deficits still remain unclear. Along with the task-related fMRI and EEG research tapping into the mirror neuron system, the characteristics of the resting state activity in the particular areas that encompass mirror neurons might be of interest as they obviously determine the baseline of the neuronal activity. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated resting state functional connectivity (FC) in four predefined brain structures, ROIs (inferior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, premotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus), known for their mirror neurons activity, in 12 patients with first psychotic episode and 12 matched healthy individuals. As a specific hypothesis, based on the knowledge of the anatomical inputs of thalamus to all preselected ROIs, we have investigated the FC between thalamus and the ROIs. Of all ROIs included, seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis revealed significantly decreased FC only in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the areas in visual cortex and cerebellum in patients as compared to controls. Using ROI-to-ROI analysis (thalamus and selected ROIs), we have found an increased FC of STG and bilateral thalamus whereas the FC of these areas was decreased in controls. Our results suggest that: (1) schizophrenia patients exhibit FC of STG which corresponds to the previously reported changes of superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia and might contribute to the disturbances of specific functions, such as emotional processing or spatial awareness; (2) as the thalamus plays a pivotal role in the sensory gating, providing the filtering of the redundant stimulation, the observed hyperconnectivity between the thalami and the STGs in patients with schizophrenia

  8. The C. elegans NeuroD homolog cnd-1 functions in multiple aspects of motor neuron fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, S; Singer, E; Waring, D; Jin, Y

    2000-10-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD (Neurod1) has been implicated in neuronal fate determination, differentiation and survival. Here we report the expression and functional analysis of cnd-1, a C. elegans NeuroD homolog. cnd-1 expression was first detected in neuroblasts of the AB lineage in 14 cell embryos and maintained in many neuronal descendants of the AB lineage during embryogenesis, diminishing in most terminally differentiated neurons prior to hatching. Specifically, cnd-1 reporter genes were expressed in the precursors of the embryonic ventral cord motor neurons and their progeny. A loss-of-function mutant, cnd-1(ju29), exhibited multiple defects in the ventral cord motor neurons. First, the number of motor neurons was reduced, possibly caused by the premature withdrawal of the precursors from mitotic cycles. Second, the strict correlation between the fate of a motor neuron with respect to its lineage and position in the ventral cord was disrupted, as manifested by the variable expression pattern of motor neuron fate specific markers. Third, motor neurons also exhibited defects in terminal differentiation characteristics including axonal morphology and synaptic connectivity. Finally, the expression patterns of three neuronal type-specific transcription factors, unc-3, unc-4 and unc-30, were altered. Our data suggest that cnd-1 may specify the identity of ventral cord motor neurons both by maintaining the mitotic competence of their precursors and by modulating the expression of neuronal type-specific determination factors. cnd-1 appears to have combined the functions of several vertebrate neurogenic bHLH proteins and may represent an ancestral form of this protein family.

  9. Phragmoplast of the green alga Spirogyra is functionally distinct from the higher plant phragmoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitzky, H; Grolig, F

    1995-09-01

    Cytokinesis in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnemataceae) is characterized by centripetal growth of a septum, which impinges on a persistent, centrifugally expanding telophase spindle, leading to a phragmoplast-like structure of potential phylogenetic significance (Fowke, L. C., and J. D. Pickett-Heaps. 1969. J. Phycol. 5:273-281). Combining fluorescent tagging of the cytoskeleton in situ and video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy of live cells, the process of cytokinesis was investigated with emphasis on cytoskeletal reorganization and concomitant redistribution of organelles. Based on a sequence of cytoskeletal arrangements and the effects of cytoskeletal inhibitors thereon, cytokinetic progression could be divided into three functional stages with respect to the contribution of microfilaments (MFs) and microtubules (MTs): (1) Initiation: in early prophase, a cross wall initial was formed independently of MFs and MTs at the presumptive site of wall growth. (2) Septum ingrowth: numerous organelles accumulated at the cross wall initial concomitant with reorganization of the extensive peripheral interphase MF array into a distinct circumferential MF array. This array guided the ingrowing septum until it contacted the expanding interzonal MT array. (3) Cross wall closure: MFs at the growing edge of the septum coaligned with and extended along the interzonal MTs toward the daughter nuclei. Thus, actin-based transportation of small organelles during this third stage occurred, in part, along a scaffold previously deployed in space by MTs. Displacement of the nuclei-associated interzonal MT array by centrifugation and depolymerization of the phragmoplast-like structure showed that the success of cytokinesis at the third stage depends on the interaction of both MF and MT cytoskeletons. Important features of the phragmoplast-like structure in Spirogyra were different from the higher plant phragmoplast: in particular, MFs were responsible for the

  10. Neurological function following intra-neural injection of fluorescent neuronal tracers in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Hu; Dan Liu; Yanping Zhang; Zhongyi Shen; Tianwen Gu; Xiaosong Gu; Jianhui Gu

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent neuronal tracers should not be toxic to the nervous system when used in long-term labeling. Previous studies have addressed tracer toxicity, but whether tracers injected into an intact nerve result in functional impairment remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the functions of motor, sensory and autonomic nerves following the application of 5% Fluoro-Gold, 4% True Blue and 10% Fluoro-Ruby (5 μL) to rat tibial nerves via pressure injection. A set of evaluation methods including walking track analysis, plantar test and laser Doppler perfusion imaging was used to determine the action of the fluorescent neuronal tracers. Additionally, nerve pathology and ratio of muscle wet weight were also observed. Results showed that injection of Fluoro-Gold significantly resulted in loss of motor nerve function, lower plantar sensibility, increasing blood flow volume and higher neurogenic vasodilatation. Myelinated nerve fiber degeneration, unclear boundaries in nerve fibers and high retrograde labeling efficacy were observed in the Fluoro-Gold group. The True Blue group also showed obvious neurogenic vasodilatation, but less severe loss of motor function and degeneration, and fewer labeled motor neurons were found compared with the Fluoro-Gold group. No anomalies of motor and sensory nerve function and no myelinated nerve fiber degeneration were observed in the Fluoro-Ruby group. Experimental findings indicate that Fluoro-Gold tracing could lead to significant functional impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic nerves, while functional impairment was less severe following True Blue tracing. Fluoro-Ruby injection appears to have no effect on neurological function.

  11. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cellular and behavioral outcomes of dorsal striatonigral neuron ablation: new insights into striatal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révy, Delphine; Jaouen, Florence; Salin, Pascal; Melon, Christophe; Chabbert, Dorian; Tafi, Elisiana; Concetta, Lena; Langa, Francina; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Marie, Hélène; Beurrier, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    The striatum is the input structure of the basal ganglia network that contains heterogeneous neuronal populations, including two populations of projecting neurons called the medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and different types of interneurons. We developed a transgenic mouse model enabling inducible ablation of the striatonigral MSNs constituting the direct pathway by expressing the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the Slc35d3 gene promoter, a gene enriched in striatonigral MSNs. DT injection into the striatum triggered selective elimination of the majority of striatonigral MSNs. DT-mediated ablation of striatonigral MSNs caused selective loss of cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum but not in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens), suggesting a region-specific critical role of the direct pathway in striatal cholinergic neuron homeostasis. Mice with DT injection into the dorsal striatum showed altered basal and cocaine-induced locomotion and dramatic reduction of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the parkinsonian condition. In addition, these mice exhibited reduced anxiety, revealing a role of the dorsal striatum in the modulation of behaviors involving an emotional component, behaviors generally associated with limbic structures. Altogether, these results highlight the implication of the direct striatonigral pathway in the regulation of heterogeneous functions from cell survival to regulation of motor and emotion-associated behaviors.

  13. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber as Nano-Neuron Interface for Monitoring Neural Function

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhe; McKnight, Timothy E.; Ericson, M. Nance; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Simpson, Michael L.; Morrison, Barclay

    2012-01-01

    Neural chips, which are capable of simultaneous, multi-site neural recording and stimulation, have been used to detect and modulate neural activity for almost 30 years. As a neural interface, neural chips provide dynamic functional information for neural decoding and neural control. By improving sensitivity and spatial resolution, nano-scale electrodes may revolutionize neural detection and modulation at cellular and molecular levels as nano-neuron interfaces. We developed a carbon-nanofiber ...

  14. Proliferative reactive gliosis is compatible with glial metabolic support and neuronal function

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The response of mammalian glial cells to chronic degeneration and trauma is hypothesized to be incompatible with support of neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inducible model of proliferative reactive gliosis in the absence of degenerative stimuli by genetically inactivating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27 or Cdkn1b) in the adult mouse and determined the outcome on retinal structure ...

  15. Computational Analysis of Axonal Transport: A Novel Assessment of Neurotoxicity, Neuronal Development and Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Gotoh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport plays a crucial role in neuronal morphogenesis, survival and function. Despite its importance, however, the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport remain mostly unknown because a simple and quantitative assay system for monitoring this cellular process has been lacking. In order to better characterize the mechanisms involved in axonal transport, we formulate a novel computer-assisted monitoring system of axonal transport. Potential uses of this system and implications for future studies will be discussed.

  16. Engrafted Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Promote Functional Recovery through Synapse Reorganization with Spared Host Neurons after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Yokota

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI. However, the efficacy of NSPC transplantation on severe SCI is poorly understood. We herein show that NSPC transplantation promotes functional recovery after mild and moderate SCI, but not after severe SCI. In severe SCI mice, there were few remaining host neurons within the range of NSPC engraftment; thus, we examined whether the co-distribution of transplant and host is a contributory factor for functional improvement. A cellular selective analysis using laser microdissection revealed that drug-induced host neuronal ablation considerably decreased the synaptogenic potential of the engrafted NSPCs. Furthermore, following host neuronal ablation, neuronal retrograde tracing showed less propriospinal relay connections bridging the lesion after NSPC transplantation. Our findings suggest that the interactive synaptic reorganization between engrafted NSPCs and spared host neurons is crucial for functional recovery, providing significant insight for establishing therapeutic strategies for severe SCI.

  17. Dissociated neurons of the pupal blowfly antenna in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A; Iwama, A

    1995-12-01

    Primary cell cultures are useful for studying the function of neurons in a simplified and controlled environment. We established a primary culture of antennal cells from pupal blowflies in order to investigate olfactory receptor neurons. In cultures, neuron-like cells were identified on the basis of morphology and immunocytochemical characterization with anti-HRP staining. Neuron-like cells showed variety in the extension pattern of neurites. Many neuron-like cells extended a single prominent long process, which reached about 200 microm after four days, and several short ones. However, some neuron-like cells differentiated in other ways; some exhibited bipolar or multipolar processes, distinct from intact olfactory receptor neurons. The size of cell bodies of neuron-like cells as divisible into two groups; approx. 7 microm diameter and 10-15 microm diameter. Neuron-like cells in culture will provide a good model for electrophysiological analysis and for developmental studies of olfactory receptor neurons.

  18. Neuroserpin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in neuroendocrine and neuronal plasticity : functional studies in (transgenic) Xenopus intermediate pituitary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, D.M. de

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity, i.e. the capacity of the brain to continuously adapt its structural organization to new situations, remain largely unknown. In this thesis, we explored functional aspects of two proteins that presumably play a role in neuronal plasticity,

  19. Templated misfolding of Tau by prion-like seeding along neuronal connections impairs neuronal network function and associated behavioral outcomes in Tau transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Ris, Laurence; Wang, Peng; Villers, Agnès; Peeraer, Eve; Buist, Arjan; Terwel, Dick; Baatsen, Peter; Oyelami, Tutu; Pierrot, Nathalie; Casteels, Cindy; Bormans, Guy; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Nöel; Moechars, Diederik; Dewachter, Ilse

    2015-06-01

    Prion-like seeding and propagation of Tau-pathology have been demonstrated experimentally and may underlie the stereotyped progression of neurodegenerative Tauopathies. However, the involvement of templated misfolding of Tau in neuronal network dysfunction and behavioral outcomes remains to be explored in detail. Here we analyzed the repercussions of prion-like spreading of Tau-pathology via neuronal connections on neuronal network function in TauP301S transgenic mice. Spontaneous and GABA(A)R-antagonist-induced neuronal network activity were affected following templated Tau-misfolding using synthetic preformed Tau fibrils in cultured primary neurons. Electrophysiological analysis in organotypic hippocampal slices of Tau transgenic mice demonstrated impaired synaptic transmission and impaired long-term potentiation following Tau-seed induced Tau-aggregation. Intracerebral injection of Tau-seeds in TauP301S mice, caused prion-like spreading of Tau-pathology through functionally connected neuroanatomical pathways. Electrophysiological analysis revealed impaired synaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 region 6 months after Tau-seeding in entorhinal cortex (EC). Furthermore, templated Tau aggregation impaired cognitive function, measured in the object recognition test 6 months post-seeding. In contrast, Tau-seeding in basal ganglia and subsequent spreading through functionally connected neuronal networks involved in motor control, resulted in motoric deficits reflected in clasping and impaired inverted grid hanging, not significantly affected following Tau-seeding in EC. Immunostaining, biochemical and electron microscopic analysis in the different models suggested early pathological forms of Tau, including Tau-oligomers, rather than fully mature neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) as culprits of neuronal dysfunction. We here demonstrate for the first time using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models, that prion-like spreading of Tau-misfolding by Tau seeds, along unique

  20. Functional analysis of neuronal microRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans dauer formation by combinational genetics and Neuronal miRISC immunoprecipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh T Than

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the physiological functions of microRNAs (miRNAs is often challenging because miRNAs commonly impact gene expression under specific physiological conditions through complex miRNA::mRNA interaction networks and in coordination with other means of gene regulation, such as transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. Such complexity creates difficulties in dissecting miRNA functions through traditional genetic methods using individual miRNA mutations. To investigate the physiological functions of miRNAs in neurons, we combined a genetic "enhancer" approach complemented by biochemical analysis of neuronal miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISCs in C. elegans. Total miRNA function can be compromised by mutating one of the two GW182 proteins (AIN-1, an important component of miRISC. We found that combining an ain-1 mutation with a mutation in unc-3, a neuronal transcription factor, resulted in an inappropriate entrance into the stress-induced, alternative larval stage known as dauer, indicating a role of miRNAs in preventing aberrant dauer formation. Analysis of this genetic interaction suggests that neuronal miRNAs perform such a role partly by regulating endogenous cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP signaling, potentially influencing two other dauer-regulating pathways. Through tissue-specific immunoprecipitations of miRISC, we identified miRNAs and their likely target mRNAs within neuronal tissue. We verified the biological relevance of several of these miRNAs and found that many miRNAs likely regulate dauer formation through multiple dauer-related targets. Further analysis of target mRNAs suggests potential miRNA involvement in various neuronal processes, but the importance of these miRNA::mRNA interactions remains unclear. Finally, we found that neuronal genes may be more highly regulated by miRNAs than intestinal genes. Overall, our study identifies miRNAs and their targets, and a physiological function of these miRNAs in

  1. Increased actin polymerization and stabilization interferes with neuronal function and survival in the AMPKγ mutant Loechrig.

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    Mandy Cook

    Full Text Available loechrig (loe mutant flies are characterized by progressive neuronal degeneration, behavioral deficits, and early death. The mutation is due to a P-element insertion in the gene for the γ-subunit of the trimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK complex, whereby the insertion affects only one of several alternative transcripts encoding a unique neuronal isoform. AMPK is a cellular energy sensor that regulates a plethora of signaling pathways, including cholesterol and isoprenoid synthesis via its downstream target hydroxy-methylglutaryl (HMG-CoA reductase. We recently showed that loe interferes with isoprenoid synthesis and increases the prenylation and thereby activation of RhoA. During development, RhoA plays an important role in neuronal outgrowth by activating a signaling cascade that regulates actin dynamics. Here we show that the effect of loe/AMPKγ on RhoA prenylation leads to a hyperactivation of this signaling pathway, causing increased phosphorylation of the actin depolymerizating factor cofilin and accumulation of filamentous actin. Furthermore, our results show that the resulting cytoskeletal changes in loe interfere with neuronal growth and disrupt axonal integrity. Surprisingly, these phenotypes were enhanced by expressing the Slingshot (SSH phosphatase, which during development promotes actin depolymerization by dephosphorylating cofilin. However, our studies suggest that in the adult SSH promotes actin polymerization, supporting in vitro studies using human SSH1 that suggested that SSH can also stabilize and bundle filamentous actin. Together with the observed increase in SSH levels in the loe mutant, our experiments suggest that in mature neurons SSH may function as a stabilization factor for filamentous actin instead of promoting actin depolymerization.

  2. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron.

  3. Hyperandrogenism in female athletes with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea: a distinct phenotype

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    Javed A

    2015-01-01

    /dL (P=0.01 but not different from FHA-AN (P=0.31. Percentage of women with stress fractures was lower in FHA-EX+HA (4.5% as compared to both FHA-EX (27.3% and FHA-AN (50%; P=0.04 and 0.01 respectively. The LH/FSH ratio was weakly positively associated with serum glucose (adjusted r2=0.102; P=0.01 as well as with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry spine score (adjusted r2=0.191; P=0.04 in the entire cohort.Conclusion: In a small cohort of female athletes with hyperandrogenism, a distinct reproductive hormone profile consisting of higher LH to FHS ratio may be associated with adverse metabolic health markers but improved skeletal health. Keywords: functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovary syndrome, young athletes

  4. A statistical method of identifying interactions in neuron-glia systems based on functional multicell Ca2+ imaging.

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    Ken Nakae

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Crosstalk between neurons and glia may constitute a significant part of information processing in the brain. We present a novel method of statistically identifying interactions in a neuron-glia network. We attempted to identify neuron-glia interactions from neuronal and glial activities via maximum-a-posteriori (MAP-based parameter estimation by developing a generalized linear model (GLM of a neuron-glia network. The interactions in our interest included functional connectivity and response functions. We evaluated the cross-validated likelihood of GLMs that resulted from the addition or removal of connections to confirm the existence of specific neuron-to-glia or glia-to-neuron connections. We only accepted addition or removal when the modification improved the cross-validated likelihood. We applied the method to a high-throughput, multicellular in vitro Ca2+ imaging dataset obtained from the CA3 region of a rat hippocampus, and then evaluated the reliability of connectivity estimates using a statistical test based on a surrogate method. Our findings based on the estimated connectivity were in good agreement with currently available physiological knowledge, suggesting our method can elucidate undiscovered functions of neuron-glia systems.

  5. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

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    Jan Tønnesen

    Full Text Available Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD, but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 and halorhodopsin (NpHR, respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  6. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnesen, Jan; Parish, Clare L; Sørensen, Andreas T; Andersson, Angelica; Lundberg, Cecilia; Deisseroth, Karl; Arenas, Ernest; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Merab

    2011-03-04

    Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA) neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  7. Two Distinct Isoforms of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Are Associated with Human Delayed Kidney Graft Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanga, Shaynah; Ceron, Carla S; Delgado, Cynthia; Joshi, Sunil K; Spaulding, Kimberly; Walker, Joy P; Song, Sangheon; Olson, Jean L; Lovett, David H

    2015-01-01

    Delayed graft function (DGF) is a frequent complication of renal transplantation, particularly in the setting of transplantation of kidneys derived from deceased donors and expanded-criteria donors. DGF results from tubular epithelial cell injury and has immediate and long term consequences. These include requirement for post-transplantation dialysis, increased incidence of acute rejection, and poorer long-term outcomes. DGF represents one of the clearest clinical examples of renal acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. Experimental studies have demonstrated that ischemia/reperfusion injury induces the synthesis of the full length secreted isoform of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (FL-MMP-2), as well as an intracellular N-terminal truncated MMP-2 isoform (NTT-MMP-2) that initiates an innate immune response. We hypothesized that the two MMP-2 isoforms mediate tubular epithelial cell injury in DGF. Archival renal biopsy sections from 10 protocol biopsy controls and 41 cases with a clinical diagnosis of DGF were analyzed for the extent of tubular injury, expression of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoforms by immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization, and qPCR to determine isoform abundance. Differences in transcript abundance were related to tubular injury score. Markers of MMP-2-mediated injury included TUNEL staining and assessment of peritubular capillary density. There was a clear relationship between tubular epithelial cell expression of both FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 IHC with the extent of tubular injury. The MMP-2 isoforms were detected in the same tubular segments and were present at sites of tubular injury. qPCR demonstrated highly significant increases in both the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts. Statistical analysis revealed highly significant associations between FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcript abundance and the extent of tubular injury, with NTT-MMP-2 having the strongest association. We conclude that two distinct MMP-2 isoforms are associated with

  8. Two Distinct Isoforms of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Are Associated with Human Delayed Kidney Graft Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaynah Wanga

    Full Text Available Delayed graft function (DGF is a frequent complication of renal transplantation, particularly in the setting of transplantation of kidneys derived from deceased donors and expanded-criteria donors. DGF results from tubular epithelial cell injury and has immediate and long term consequences. These include requirement for post-transplantation dialysis, increased incidence of acute rejection, and poorer long-term outcomes. DGF represents one of the clearest clinical examples of renal acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. Experimental studies have demonstrated that ischemia/reperfusion injury induces the synthesis of the full length secreted isoform of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (FL-MMP-2, as well as an intracellular N-terminal truncated MMP-2 isoform (NTT-MMP-2 that initiates an innate immune response. We hypothesized that the two MMP-2 isoforms mediate tubular epithelial cell injury in DGF. Archival renal biopsy sections from 10 protocol biopsy controls and 41 cases with a clinical diagnosis of DGF were analyzed for the extent of tubular injury, expression of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoforms by immunohistochemistry (IHC, in situ hybridization, and qPCR to determine isoform abundance. Differences in transcript abundance were related to tubular injury score. Markers of MMP-2-mediated injury included TUNEL staining and assessment of peritubular capillary density. There was a clear relationship between tubular epithelial cell expression of both FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 IHC with the extent of tubular injury. The MMP-2 isoforms were detected in the same tubular segments and were present at sites of tubular injury. qPCR demonstrated highly significant increases in both the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts. Statistical analysis revealed highly significant associations between FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcript abundance and the extent of tubular injury, with NTT-MMP-2 having the strongest association. We conclude that two distinct MMP-2 isoforms are

  9. The role of mitochondrial function in glutamate-dependent metabolism in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaili, S S; Ureshino, R P; Rodrigues, L; Rocha, K K; Carvalho, J T; Oseki, K T; Bincoletto, C; Lopes, G S; Hirata, H

    2011-12-01

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in neurons and glial cells and it is one of the keys to the neuron-glial interaction in the brain. Glutamate transmission is strongly dependent on calcium homeostasis and on mitochondrial function. In the present work we presented several aspects related to the role of mitochondria in glutamate signaling and in brain diseases. We focused on glutamateinduced calcium signaling and its relation to the organelle dysfunction with cell death processes. In addition, we have discussed how alterations in this pathway may lead or aggravate a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. We compiled information on how mitochondria can influence cell fate during glutamate stimulation and calcium signaling. These organelles play a pivotal role in neuron and glial exchange, in synaptic plasticity and several pathological conditions related to Aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. We have also presented autophagy as a mechanism activated during mitochondrial dysfunction which may function as a protective mechanism during injury. Furthermore, some new perspectives and approaches to treat these neurodegenerative diseases are offered and evaluated.

  10. Role of Dicer and the miRNA system in neuronal plasticity and brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Anna; Barco, Angel

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory non-coding RNAs that contribute to fine-tuning regulation of gene expression by mRNA destabilization and/or translational repression. Their abundance in the nervous system, their temporally and spatially regulated expression and their ability to respond in an activity-dependent manner make miRNAs ideal candidates for the regulation of complex processes in the brain, including neuronal plasticity, memory formation and neural development. The conditional ablation of the RNase III Dicer, which is essential for the maturation of most miRNAs, is a useful model to investigate the effect of the loss of the miRNA system, as a whole, in different tissues and cellular types. In this review, we first provide an overview of Dicer function and structure, and discuss outstanding questions concerning the role of miRNAs in the regulation of gene expression and neuronal function, to later focus on the insight derived from studies in which the genetic ablation of Dicer was used to determine the role of the miRNA system in the nervous system. In particular, we highlight the collective role of miRNAs fine-tuning plasticity-related gene expression and providing robustness to neuronal gene expression networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuronal porosome - The secretory portal at the nerve terminal: Its structure-function, composition, and reconstitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Bhanu P.

    2014-09-01

    Cup-shaped secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane called porosomes mediate secretion from cells. Membrane bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the cytosolic compartment of the porosome base to expel intravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the structure, isolation, composition, and functional reconstitution of the neuronal porosome complex has been accomplished providing a molecular understanding of its structure-function. Neuronal porosomes are 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures composed of nearly 40 proteins; compared to the 120 nm nuclear pore complex comprised of over 500 protein molecules composed of 30 different proteins. Being a membrane-associated supramolecular complex has precluded determination of the atomic structure of the porosome. However recent studies using small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS), provide at sub-nanometer resolution, the native 3D structure of the neuronal porosome complex associated with docked synaptic vesicle at the nerve terminal. Additionally, results from the SAXS study and earlier studies using atomic force microscopy, provide the possible molecular mechanism involved in porosome-mediated neurotransmitter release at the nerve terminal.

  12. An ultra-low-voltage electronic implementation of inertial neuron model with nonmonotonous Liao's activation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Nasir Ali; Dar, Mohamad Rafiq; Khanday, Farooq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The output of every neuron in neural network is specified by the employed activation function (AF) and therefore forms the heart of neural networks. As far as the design of artificial neural networks (ANNs) is concerned, hardware approach is preferred over software one because it promises the full utilization of the application potential of ANNs. Therefore, besides some arithmetic blocks, designing AF in hardware is the most important for designing ANN. While attempting to design the AF in hardware, the designs should be compatible with the modern Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design techniques. In this regard, the implemented designs should: only be in Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) technology in order to be compatible with the digital designs, provide electronic tunability feature, and be able to operate at ultra-low voltage. Companding is one of the promising circuit design techniques for achieving these goals. In this paper, 0.5 V design of Liao's AF using sinh-domain technique is introduced. Furthermore, the function is tested by implementing inertial neuron model. The performance of the AF and inertial neuron model have been evaluated through simulation results, using the PSPICE software with the MOS transistor models provided by the 0.18-μm Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturer Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (TSM CMOS) process.

  13. Ultrasoft Alginate Hydrogels Support Long-Term Three-Dimensional Functional Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Gemma; Broguiere, Nicolas; Cenciarelli, Orlando; Dermutz, Harald; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2015-08-01

    Neuron development and function are exquisitely sensitive to the mechanical properties of their surroundings. Three-dimensional (3D) cultures are therefore being explored as they better mimic the features of the native extracellular matrix. Limitations of existing 3D culture models include poorly defined composition, rapid degradation, and suboptimal biocompatibility. Here we show that ionically cross-linked ultrasoft hydrogels made from unmodified alginate can potently promote neuritogenesis. Alginate hydrogels were characterized mechanically and a remarkable range of stiffness (10-4000 Pa) could be produced by varying the macromer content (0.1-0.4% w/v) and CaCl2 concentration. Dissociated rat embryonic cortical neurons encapsulated within the softest of the hydrogels (0.1% w/v, 10 mM CaCl2) showed excellent viability, extensive formation of axons and dendrites, and long-term activity as determined by calcium imaging. In conclusion, alginate is an off-the-shelf, easy to handle, and inexpensive material, which can be used to make ultrasoft hydrogels for the formation of stable and functional 3D neuronal networks. This 3D culture system could have important applications in neuropharmacology, toxicology, and regenerative medicine.

  14. Function of PTEN during the formation and maintenance of neuronal circuits in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Eickholt, Britta J

    2008-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) is a tumor suppressor that can inhibit proliferation and migration and controls apoptosis in a number of cell types, mainly through inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. Patients carrying inactivating mutations of PTEN show a prevalence to develop tumors that can coincide with neurological defects such as mental retardation, ataxia and seizures. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies were instrumental in uncovering a direct correlation between deregulated PI3K/PTEN signaling and changes in neuronal morphogenesis, which is likely to have profound bearings upon the pathogenesis of neurological symptoms. This review outlines recent work on the function of PTEN during vertebrate brain development and the current understanding of the signaling pathways downstream of PTEN that control neuronal connectivity in the brain.

  15. Supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons function as glucose and metabolic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhilin; Levin, Barry E.; Stevens, Wanida

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) produce oxytocin and vasopressin and express insulin receptors (InsR) and glucokinase. Since oxytocin is an anorexigenic agent and glucokinase and InsR are hallmarks of cells that function as glucose and/or metabolic sensors, we evaluated the effect of glucose, insulin, and their downstream effector ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels on calcium signaling in SON neurons and on oxytocin and vasopressin release from explants of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. We also evaluated the effect of blocking glucokinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K; mediates insulin-induced mobilization of glucose transporter, GLUT4) on responses to glucose and insulin. Glucose and insulin increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The responses were glucokinase and PI3K dependent, respectively. Insulin and glucose alone increased vasopressin release (P sensors to participate in appetite regulation. PMID:24477542

  16. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber as nano-neuron interface for monitoring neural function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Morrison, Barclay [ORNL; Yu, Zhe [Columbia University

    2012-01-01

    Neural chips, which are capable of simultaneous, multi-site neural recording and stimulation, have been used to detect and modulate neural activity for almost 30 years. As a neural interface, neural chips provide dynamic functional information for neural decoding and neural control. By improving sensitivity and spatial resolution, nano-scale electrodes may revolutionize neural detection and modulation at cellular and molecular levels as nano-neuron interfaces. We developed a carbon-nanofiber neural chip with lithographically defined arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrodes and demonstrated its capability of both stimulating and monitoring electrophysiological signals from brain tissues in vitro and monitoring dynamic information of neuroplasticity. This novel nano-neuron interface can potentially serve as a precise, informative, biocompatible, and dual-mode neural interface for monitoring of both neuroelectrical and neurochemical activity at the single cell level and even inside the cell.

  17. Nurr1 regulates Top IIβ and functions in axon genesis of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

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    Heng Xin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NURR1 (also named as NR4A2 is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor family, which can bind to DNA and modulate expression of target genes. Previous studies have shown that NURR1 is essential for the nigral dopaminergic neuron phenotype and function maintenance, and the defects of the gene are possibly associated with Parkinson's disease (PD. Results In this study, we used new born Nurr1 knock-out mice combined with Affymetrix genechip technology and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR to identify Nurr1 regulated genes, which led to the discovery of several transcripts differentially expressed in the nigro-striatal pathway of Nurr1 knock-out mice. We found that an axon genesis gene called Topoisomerase IIβ (Top IIβ was down-regulated in Nurr1 knock-out mice and we identified two functional NURR1 binding sites in the proximal Top IIβ promoter. While in Top IIβ null mice, we saw a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantial nigra and lack of neurites along the nigro-striatal pathway. Using specific TOP II antagonist ICRF-193 or Top IIβ siRNA in the primary cultures of ventral mesencephalic (VM neurons, we documented that suppression of TOP IIβ expression resulted in VM neurites shortening and growth cones collapsing. Furthermore, microinjection of ICRF-193 into the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB led to the loss of nigro-striatal projection. Conclusion Taken together, our findings suggest that Top IIβ might be a down-stream target of Nurr1, which might influence the processes of axon genesis in dopaminergic neurons via the regulation of TOP IIβ expression. The Nurr1-Top IIβ interaction may shed light on the pathologic role of Nurr1 defect in the nigro-striatal pathway deficiency associated with PD.

  18. Error-based analysis of optimal tuning functions explains phenomena observed in sensory neurons

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    Steve Yaeli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems display impressive capabilities in effectively responding to environmental signals in real time. There is increasing evidence that organisms may indeed be employing near optimal Bayesian calculations in their decision-making. An intriguing question relates to the properties of optimal encoding methods, namely determining the properties of neural populations in sensory layers that optimize performance, subject to physiological constraints. Within an ecological theory of neural encoding/decoding, we show that optimal Bayesian performance requires neural adaptation which reflects environmental changes. Specifically, we predict that neuronal tuning functions possess an optimal width, which increases with prior uncertainty and environmental noise, and decreases with the decoding time window. Furthermore, even for static stimuli, we demonstrate that dynamic sensory tuning functions, acting at relatively short time scales, lead to improved performance. Interestingly, the narrowing of tuning functions as a function of time was recently observed in several biological systems. Such results set the stage for a functional theory which may explain the high reliability of sensory systems, and the utility of neuronal adaptation occurring at multiple time scales.

  19. Functional expression of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells of rat dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Han, Ping; Faltynek, Connie R; Jarvis, Michael F; Shieh, Char-Chang

    2005-08-02

    The P2X7 receptor is an ATP-sensitive ligand-gated cation channel, expressed predominantly in cells with immune origin. Recent studies have demonstrated that P2X7 may play an important role in pain signaling. In the present study, the expression of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells and neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia was characterized using patch clamp, pharmacological and confocal microscopy approaches. In small diameter DRG neurons, 100 microM 2', 3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) evoked an inward current, which was inhibited completely by 1 microM A-317491, a potent and selective P2X3 receptor antagonist. In contrast, BzATP evoked concentration-dependent increases in inward currents in non-neuronal DRG cells with an EC50 value of 26 +/- 0.14 microM, which were resistant to the blockade by A-317491. The activity to evoke cationic currents by P2X receptor agonists in non-neuronal cells showed a rank order of BzATP > ATP > alpha,beta-meATP. Pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-,2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) and Mg2+ produced concentration-dependent inhibition of BzATP-evoked currents in non-neuronal cells. Confocal microscopy revealed positive immunoreactivity of anti-P2X7 receptor antibodies on non-neuronal cells. No anti-P2X7 immunoreactivity was observed on DRG neurons. Further electrophysiological studies showed that prolonged agonist activation of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells did not lead to cytolytic pore formation. Taken together, the present study demonstrated functional expression of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal but not in small diameter neurons from rat DRG. Modulation of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells might have impact on peripheral sensory transduction under normal and pathological states.

  20. Combined small-molecule inhibition accelerates the derivation of functional cortical neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuchen; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Renier, Nicolas; Wu, Zhuhao; Atkin, Talia; Sun, Ziyi; Ozair, M Zeeshan; Tchieu, Jason; Zimmer, Bastian; Fattahi, Faranak; Ganat, Yosif; Azevedo, Ricardo; Zeltner, Nadja; Brivanlou, Ali H; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph; Tomishima, Mark; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Shi, Song-Hai; Studer, Lorenz

    2017-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in converting human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into functional neurons. However, the protracted timing of human neuron specification and functional maturation remains a key challenge that hampers the routine application of hPSC-derived lineages in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Using a combinatorial small-molecule screen, we previously identified conditions to rapidly differentiate hPSCs into peripheral sensory neurons. Here we generalize the approach to central nervous system (CNS) fates by developing a small-molecule approach for accelerated induction of early-born cortical neurons. Combinatorial application of six pathway inhibitors induces post-mitotic cortical neurons with functional electrophysiological properties by day 16 of differentiation, in the absence of glial cell co-culture. The resulting neurons, transplanted at 8 d of differentiation into the postnatal mouse cortex, are functional and establish long-distance projections, as shown using iDISCO whole-brain imaging. Accelerated differentiation into cortical neuron fates should facilitate hPSC-based strategies for disease modeling and cell therapy in CNS disorders.

  1. MicroRNA function is required for neurite outgrowth of mature neurons in the mouse postnatal cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eHong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the postnatal mammalian cerebral cortex is an assembly of numerous mature neurons that exhibit proper neurite outgrowth and axonal and dendritic morphology. While many protein coding genes are shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in this process is also becoming evident. We here report that blocking miRNA biogenesis in differentiated neurons results in microcephaly-like phenotypes in the postnatal mouse brain. The smaller brain defect is not caused by defective neurogenesis, altered neuronal migration or significant neuronal cell death. Surprisingly, a dramatic increase in neuronal packing density within the postnatal brain is observed. Loss of miRNA function causes shorter neurite outgrowth and smaller soma size of mature neurons in vitro. Our results reveal the impact of miRNAs on normal development of neuronal morphology and brain function. Because neurite outgrowth is critical for neuroregeneration, our studies further highlight the importance of miRNAs in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Influence of functional variant of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on impulsive behaviors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andreas; Jacob, Christian P; Rujescu, Dan; Herterich, Sabine; Lang, Sebastian; Gutknecht, Lise; Baehne, Christina G; Strobel, Alexander; Freitag, Christine M; Giegling, Ina; Romanos, Marcel; Hartmann, Annette; Rösler, Michael; Renner, Tobias J; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Retz, Wolfgang; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Human personality is characterized by substantial heritability but few functional gene variants have been identified. Although rodent data suggest that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) modifies diverse behaviors including aggression, this has not been translated to human studies. To investigate the functionality of an NOS1 promoter repeat length variation (NOS1 Ex1f variable number tandem repeat [VNTR]) and to test whether it is associated with phenotypes relevant to impulsivity. Molecular biological studies assessed the cellular consequences of NOS1 Ex1f VNTR; association studies were conducted to investigate the impact of this genetic variant on impulsivity; imaging genetics was applied to determine whether the polymorphism is functional on a neurobiological level. Three psychiatric university clinics in Germany. More than 3200 subjects were included in the association study: 1954 controls, 403 patients with personality disorder, 383 patients with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 151 with familial ADHD, 189 suicide attempters, and 182 criminal offenders. For the association studies, the major outcome criteria were phenotypes relevant to impulsivity, namely, the dimensional phenotype conscientiousness and the categorical phenotypes adult ADHD, aggression, and cluster B personality disorder. A novel functional promoter polymorphism in NOS1 was associated with traits related to impulsivity, including hyperactive and aggressive behaviors. Specifically, the short repeat variant was more frequent in adult ADHD, cluster B personality disorder, and autoaggressive and heteroaggressive behavior. This short variant came along with decreased transcriptional activity of the NOS1 exon 1f promoter and alterations in the neuronal transcriptome including RGS4 and GRIN1. On a systems level, it was associated with hypoactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex, which is involved in the processing of emotion and reward in behavioral

  3. The chromatin remodeling factor Bap55 functions through the TIP60 complex to regulate olfactory projection neuron dendrite targeting

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    Luo Liqun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Drosophila olfactory system exhibits very precise and stereotyped wiring that is specified predominantly by genetic programming. Dendrites of olfactory projection neurons (PNs pattern the developing antennal lobe before olfactory receptor neuron axon arrival, indicating an intrinsic wiring mechanism for PN dendrites. These wiring decisions are likely determined through a transcriptional program. Results We find that loss of Brahma associated protein 55 kD (Bap55 results in a highly specific PN mistargeting phenotype. In Bap55 mutants, PNs that normally target to the DL1 glomerulus mistarget to the DA4l glomerulus with 100% penetrance. Loss of Bap55 also causes derepression of a GAL4 whose expression is normally restricted to a small subset of PNs. Bap55 is a member of both the Brahma (BRM and the Tat interactive protein 60 kD (TIP60 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. The Bap55 mutant phenotype is partially recapitulated by Domino and Enhancer of Polycomb mutants, members of the TIP60 complex. However, distinct phenotypes are seen in Brahma and Snf5-related 1 mutants, members of the BRM complex. The Bap55 mutant phenotype can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Bap55, or its human homologs BAF53a and BAF53b. Conclusions Our results suggest that Bap55 functions through the TIP60 chromatin remodeling complex to regulate dendrite wiring specificity in PNs. The specificity of the mutant phenotypes suggests a position for the TIP60 complex at the top of a regulatory hierarchy that orchestrates dendrite targeting decisions.

  4. Neuronal Dystroglycan Is Necessary for Formation and Maintenance of Functional CCK-Positive Basket Cell Terminals on Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früh, Simon; Romanos, Jennifer; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Bürgisser, Daniela; Tyagarajan, Shiva K; Campbell, Kevin P; Santello, Mirko; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-05

    Distinct types of GABAergic interneurons target different subcellular domains of pyramidal cells, thereby shaping pyramidal cell activity patterns. Whether the presynaptic heterogeneity of GABAergic innervation is mirrored by specific postsynaptic factors is largely unexplored. Here we show that dystroglycan, a protein responsible for the majority of congenital muscular dystrophies when dysfunctional, has a function at postsynaptic sites restricted to a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Conditional deletion of Dag1, encoding dystroglycan, in pyramidal cells caused loss of CCK-positive basket cell terminals in hippocampus and neocortex. PV-positive basket cell terminals were unaffected in mutant mice, demonstrating interneuron subtype-specific function of dystroglycan. Loss of dystroglycan in pyramidal cells had little influence on clustering of other GABAergic postsynaptic proteins and of glutamatergic synaptic proteins. CCK-positive terminals were not established at P21 in the absence of dystroglycan and were markedly reduced when dystroglycan was ablated in adult mice, suggesting a role for dystroglycan in both formation and maintenance of CCK-positive terminals. The necessity of neuronal dystroglycan for functional innervation by CCK-positive basket cell axon terminals was confirmed by reduced frequency of inhibitory events in pyramidal cells of dystroglycan-deficient mice and further corroborated by the inefficiency of carbachol to increase IPSC frequency in these cells. Finally, neurexin binding seems dispensable for dystroglycan function because knock-in mice expressing binding-deficient T190M dystroglycan displayed normal CCK-positive terminals. Together, we describe a novel function of dystroglycan in interneuron subtype-specific trans-synaptic signaling, revealing correlation of presynaptic and postsynaptic molecular diversity.

  5. Cysteine Specific Targeting of the Functionally Distinct Peroxiredoxin and Glutaredoxin Proteins by the Investigational Disulfide BNP7787

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    Aulma R. Parker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin (Grx, peroxiredoxin (Prx, and thioredoxin (Trx are redoxin family proteins that catalyze different types of chemical reactions that impact cell growth and survival through functionally distinct intracellular pathways. Much research is focused on understanding the roles of these redoxin proteins in the development and/or progression of human diseases. Grx and Prx are overexpressed in human cancers, including human lung cancers. BNP7787 is a novel investigational agent that has been evaluated in previous clinical studies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC studies. Herein, data from activity assays, mass spectrometry analyses, and X-ray crystallographic studies indicate that BNP7787 forms mixed disulfides with select cysteine residues on Grx and Prx and modulates their function. Studies of interactions between BNP7787 and Trx have been conducted and reported separately. Despite the fact that Trx, Grx, and Prx are functionally distinct proteins that impact oxidative stress, cell proliferation and disease processes through different intracellular pathways, BNP7787 can modify each protein and appears to modulate function through mechanisms that are unique to each target protein. Tumor cells are often genomically heterogeneous containing subpopulations of cancer cells that often express different tumor-promoting proteins or that have multiple dysregulated signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation and drug resistance. A multi-targeted agent that simultaneously modulates activity of proteins important in mediating cell proliferation by functionally distinct intracellular pathways could have many potentially useful therapeutic applications.

  6. Remodelling of spared proprioceptive circuit involving a small number of neurons supports functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Edmund R; Ishiko, Nao; Pessian, Maysam; Tolentino, Kristine; Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Calcutt, Nigel A; Zou, Yimin

    2015-01-19

    Studies show that limited functional recovery can be achieved by plasticity and adaptation of the remaining circuitry in partial injuries in the central nervous system, although the new circuits that arise in these contexts have not been clearly identified or characterized. We show here that synaptic contacts from dorsal root ganglions to a small number of dorsal column neurons, a caudal extension of nucleus gracilis, whose connections to the thalamus are spared in a precise cervical level 1 lesion, underwent remodeling over time. These connections support proprioceptive functional recovery in a conditioning lesion paradigm, as silencing or eliminating the remodelled circuit completely abolishes the recovered proprioceptive function of the hindlimb. Furthermore, we show that blocking repulsive Wnt signalling increases axon plasticity and synaptic connections that drive greater functional recovery.

  7. Mirror neuron activation in children with developmental coordination disorder: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jess E; Licari, Melissa K; Billington, Jac; Chen, Yihui; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa; Werner, Julie; Winsor, Anne M; Bynevelt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal cortical areas that may contribute to the movement difficulties seen in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Specifically, we hypothesized that there may be a deficit in the mirror neuron system (MNS), a neural system that responds to both performed and observed actions. Using functional MRI, 14 boys with DCD (x=10.08 years ± 1.31, range=7.83-11.58 years) and 12 typically developing controls (x=10.10 years ± 1.15, range=8.33-12.00 years) were scanned observing, executing and imitating a finger sequencing task using their right hand. Cortical activations of mirror neuron regions, including posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), ventral premotor cortex, anterior inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal sulcus were examined. Children with DCD had decreased cortical activation mirror neuron related regions, including the precentral gyrus and IFG, as well as in the posterior cingulate and precuneus complex when observing the sequencing task. Region of interest analysis revealed lower activation in the pars opercularis, a primary MNS region, during imitation in the DCD group compared to controls. These findings provide some preliminary evidence to support a possible MNS dysfunction in children with DCD.

  8. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response

    OpenAIRE

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2012-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum (MADS) response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differ...

  9. From shared to distinct self-other representations in empathy: evidence from neurotypical function and socio-cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, C; Bukowski, H; Silani, G

    2016-01-19

    Neuroscientific research has identified two fundamental components of empathy: shared emotional representations between self and other, and self-other distinction. The concept of shared representations suggests that during empathy, we co-represent another person's affect by engaging brain and bodily functions underpinning the first-hand experience of the emotion we are empathizing with. This possible grounding of empathy in our own emotional experiences explains the necessity for self-other distinction, which is the capacity to correctly distinguish between our own affective representations and those related to the other. In spite of the importance of these two components in empathy, several aspects still remain controversial. This paper addresses some of them and focuses on (i) the distinction between shared activations versus representations, raising the question what shared representations entail in terms of the underlying neural mechanisms, (ii) the possible mechanisms behind self-other distinction in the cognitive and the affective domains, and whether they have distinct neural underpinnings and (iii) the consequences associated with a selective impairment of one of the two components, thereby addressing their importance in mental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders, psychopathy and alexithymia.

  10. Functional profiles of SCN9A variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons and superior cervical ganglion neurons correlate with autonomic symptoms in small fibre neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Liu, Shujun; Gerrits, Monique M; te Morsche, Rene H M; Lauria, Giuseppe; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Drenth, Joost P H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-09-01

    Patients with small fibre neuropathy typically manifest pain in distal extremities and severe autonomic dysfunction. However, occasionally patients present with minimal autonomic symptoms. The basis for this phenotypic difference is not understood. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in the peripheral nervous system within sensory dorsal root ganglion and sympathetic ganglion neurons and their small diameter peripheral axons. We recently reported missense substitutions in SCN9A that encode functional Na(v)1.7 variants in 28% of patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy. Two patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy manifested minimal autonomic dysfunction unlike the other six patients in this series, and both of these patients carry the Na(v)1.7/R185H variant, presenting the opportunity to compare variants associated with extreme ends of a spectrum from minimal to severe autonomic dysfunction. Herein, we show by voltage-clamp that R185H variant channels enhance resurgent currents within dorsal root ganglion neurons and show by current-clamp that R185H renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable. We also show that in contrast, R185H variant channels do not produce detectable changes when studied by voltage-clamp within sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion, and have no effect on the excitability of these cells. As a comparator, we studied the Na(v)1.7 variant I739V, identified in three patients with small fibre neuropathy characterized by severe autonomic dysfunction as well as neuropathic pain, and show that this variant impairs channel slow inactivation within both dorsal root ganglion and superior cervical ganglion neurons, and renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable and superior cervical ganglion neurons hypoexcitable. Thus, we show that R185H, from patients with minimal autonomic dysfunction, does not produce detectable changes in the properties of

  11. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

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    Patricia J Ward

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2, we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555 was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour, one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-. We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons.

  12. Subpopulations of neurokinin 1 receptor-expressing neurons in the rat lateral amygdala display a differential pattern of innervation from distinct glutamatergic afferents

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    Sreepathi, H.K.; Ferraguti, F.

    2012-01-01

    Substance P by acting on its preferred receptor neurokinin 1 (NK1) in the amygdala appears to be critically involved in the modulation of fear and anxiety. The present study was undertaken to identify neurochemically specific subpopulations of neuron expressing NK1 receptors in the lateral amygdaloid nucleus (LA), a key site for regulating these behaviors. We also analyzed the sources of glutamatergic inputs to these neurons. Immunofluorescence analysis of the co-expression of NK1 with calcium binding proteins in LA revealed that ∼35% of NK1-containing neurons co-expressed parvalbumin (PV), whereas no co-localization was detected in the basal amygdaloid nucleus. We also show that neurons expressing NK1 receptors in LA did not contain detectable levels of calcium/calmodulin kinase IIα, thus suggesting that NK1 receptors are expressed by interneurons. By using a dual immunoperoxidase/immunogold-silver procedure at the ultrastructural level, we found that in LA ∼75% of glutamatergic synapses onto NK1-expressing neurons were labeled for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they most likely are of cortical, hippocampal, or intrinsic origin. The remaining ∼25% were immunoreactive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2), and may then originate from subcortical areas. On the other hand, we could not detect VGluT2-containing inputs onto NK1/PV immunopositive neurons. Our data add to previous localization studies by describing an unexpected variation between LA and basal nucleus of the amygdala (BA) in the neurochemical phenotype of NK1-expressing neurons and reveal the relative source of glutamatergic inputs that may activate these neurons, which in turn regulate fear and anxiety responses. PMID:22210508

  13. Subpopulations of neurokinin 1 receptor-expressing neurons in the rat lateral amygdala display a differential pattern of innervation from distinct glutamatergic afferents

    OpenAIRE

    Sreepathi, H.K.; Ferraguti, F.

    2012-01-01

    Substance P by acting on its preferred receptor neurokinin 1 (NK1) in the amygdala appears to be critically involved in the modulation of fear and anxiety. The present study was undertaken to identify neurochemically specific subpopulations of neuron expressing NK1 receptors in the lateral amygdaloid nucleus (LA), a key site for regulating these behaviors. We also analyzed the sources of glutamatergic inputs to these neurons. Immunofluorescence analysis of the co-expression of NK1 with calciu...

  14. The zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (Zeb1) promotes the conversion of mouse fibroblasts into functional neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Li, Yue; Shi, Zixiao; Lu, Xiaoyin; Ma, Jiao; Hu, Baoyang; Jiao, Jianwei; Wang, Hongmei

    2017-08-04

    The zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor Zeb1 plays a pivotal role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Numerous studies have focused on the molecular mechanisms by which Zeb1 contributes to this process. However, the functions of Zeb1 beyond the epithelial-mesenchymal transition remain largely elusive. Using a transdifferentiation system to convert mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into functional neurons via the neuronal transcription factors achaete-scute family bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) transcription factor1 (Ascl1), POU class 3 homeobox 2 (POU3F2/Brn2), and neurogenin 2 (Neurog2, Ngn2) (ABN), we found that Zeb1 was up-regulated during the early stages of transdifferentiation. Knocking down Zeb1 dramatically attenuated the transdifferentiation efficiency, whereas Zeb1 overexpression obviously increased the efficiency of transdifferentiation from MEFs to neurons. Interestingly, Zeb1 improved the transdifferentiation efficiency induced by even a single transcription factor (e.g. Asc1 or Ngn2). Zeb1 also rapidly promoted the maturation of induced neuron cells to functional neurons and improved the formation of neuronal patterns and electrophysiological characteristics. Induced neuron cells could form functional synapse in vivo after transplantation. Genome-wide RNA arrays showed that Zeb1 overexpression up-regulated the expression of neuron-specific genes and down-regulated the expression of epithelial-specific genes during conversion. Taken together, our results reveal a new role for Zeb1 in the transdifferentiation of MEFs into neurons. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. TRPA1 is functionally expressed primarily by IB4-binding, non-peptidergic mouse and rat sensory neurons.

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    Marie E Barabas

    Full Text Available Subpopulations of somatosensory neurons are characterized by functional properties and expression of receptor proteins and surface markers. CGRP expression and IB4-binding are commonly used to define peptidergic and non-peptidergic subpopulations. TRPA1 is a polymodal, plasma membrane ion channel that contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity during tissue injury, making it a key target for pain therapeutics. Some studies have shown that TRPA1 is predominantly expressed by peptidergic sensory neurons, but others indicate that TRPA1 is expressed extensively within non-peptidergic, IB4-binding neurons. We used FURA-2 calcium imaging to define the functional distribution of TRPA1 among peptidergic and non-peptidergic adult mouse (C57BL/6J DRG neurons. Approximately 80% of all small-diameter (<27 µm neurons from lumbar 1-6 DRGs that responded to TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; 79% or cinnamaldehyde (84% were IB4-positive. Retrograde labeling via plantar hind paw injection of WGA-Alexafluor594 showed similarly that most (81% cutaneous neurons responding to TRPA1 agonists were IB4-positive. Additionally, we cultured DRG neurons from a novel CGRP-GFP mouse where GFP expression is driven by the CGRPα promoter, enabling identification of CGRP-expressing live neurons. Interestingly, 78% of TRPA1-responsive neurons were CGRP-negative. Co-labeling with IB4 revealed that the majority (66% of TRPA1 agonist responders were IB4-positive but CGRP-negative. Among TRPA1-null DRGs, few small neurons (2-4% responded to either TRPA1 agonist, indicating that both cinnamaldehyde and AITC specifically target TRPA1. Additionally, few large neurons (≥27 µm diameter responded to AITC (6% or cinnamaldehyde (4%, confirming that most large-diameter somata lack functional TRPA1. Comparison of mouse and rat DRGs showed that the majority of TRPA1-responsive neurons in both species were IB4-positive. Together, these data demonstrate that TRPA1 is

  16. TRPA1 Is Functionally Expressed Primarily by IB4-Binding, Non-Peptidergic Mouse and Rat Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of somatosensory neurons are characterized by functional properties and expression of receptor proteins and surface markers. CGRP expression and IB4-binding are commonly used to define peptidergic and non-peptidergic subpopulations. TRPA1 is a polymodal, plasma membrane ion channel that contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity during tissue injury, making it a key target for pain therapeutics. Some studies have shown that TRPA1 is predominantly expressed by peptidergic sensory neurons, but others indicate that TRPA1 is expressed extensively within non-peptidergic, IB4-binding neurons. We used FURA-2 calcium imaging to define the functional distribution of TRPA1 among peptidergic and non-peptidergic adult mouse (C57BL/6J) DRG neurons. Approximately 80% of all small-diameter (neurons from lumbar 1–6 DRGs that responded to TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; 79%) or cinnamaldehyde (84%) were IB4-positive. Retrograde labeling via plantar hind paw injection of WGA-Alexafluor594 showed similarly that most (81%) cutaneous neurons responding to TRPA1 agonists were IB4-positive. Additionally, we cultured DRG neurons from a novel CGRP-GFP mouse where GFP expression is driven by the CGRPα promoter, enabling identification of CGRP-expressing live neurons. Interestingly, 78% of TRPA1-responsive neurons were CGRP-negative. Co-labeling with IB4 revealed that the majority (66%) of TRPA1 agonist responders were IB4-positive but CGRP-negative. Among TRPA1-null DRGs, few small neurons (2–4%) responded to either TRPA1 agonist, indicating that both cinnamaldehyde and AITC specifically target TRPA1. Additionally, few large neurons (≥27 µm diameter) responded to AITC (6%) or cinnamaldehyde (4%), confirming that most large-diameter somata lack functional TRPA1. Comparison of mouse and rat DRGs showed that the majority of TRPA1-responsive neurons in both species were IB4-positive. Together, these data demonstrate that TRPA1 is functionally expressed

  17. VARIABILITY OF NEURONAL RESPONSES: TYPES AND FUNCTIONAL SIGNIFICANCE IN NEUROPLASTICITY AND NEURAL DARWINISM

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    Alexander Chervyakov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, neural signals detected under the same external experimental conditions significantly change from trial to trial. The variability phenomenon, which complicates extraction of reproducible results and is ignored in many studies by averaging, has attracted attention of researchers in recent years. In this paper, we classify possible types of variability based on its functional significance and describe features of each type. We describe the key adaptive significance of variability at the neural network level and the degeneracy phenomenon that may be important for learning processes in connection with the principle of neuronal group selection.

  18. Channel based generating function approach to the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Anqi; Huang, Yandong; Shuai, Jianwei; Lan, Yueheng

    2016-03-01

    Internal and external fluctuations, such as channel noise and synaptic noise, contribute to the generation of spontaneous action potentials in neurons. Many different Langevin approaches have been proposed to speed up the computation but with waning accuracy especially at small channel numbers. We apply a generating function approach to the master equation for the ion channel dynamics and further propose two accelerating algorithms, with an accuracy close to the Gillespie algorithm but with much higher efficiency, opening the door for expedited simulation of noisy action potential propagating along axons or other types of noisy signal transduction.

  19. Theoretical Neuroanatomy:Analyzing the Structure, Dynamics,and Function of Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil K.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    The mammalian brain is an extraordinary object: its networks give rise to our conscious experiences as well as to the generation of adaptive behavior for the organism within its environment. Progress in understanding the structure, dynamics and function of the brain faces many challenges. Biological neural networks change over time, their detailed structure is difficult to elucidate, and they are highly heterogeneous both in their neuronal units and synaptic connections. In facing these challenges, graph-theoretic and information-theoretic approaches have yielded a number of useful insights and promise many more.

  20. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks.

  1. An in silico agent-based model demonstrates Reelin function in directing lamination of neurons during cortical development.

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    James R Caffrey

    Full Text Available The characteristic six-layered appearance of the neocortex arises from the correct positioning of pyramidal neurons during development and alterations in this process can cause intellectual disabilities and developmental delay. Malformations in cortical development arise when neurons either fail to migrate properly from the germinal zones or fail to cease migration in the correct laminar position within the cortical plate. The Reelin signalling pathway is vital for correct neuronal positioning as loss of Reelin leads to a partially inverted cortex. The precise biological function of Reelin remains controversial and debate surrounds its role as a chemoattractant or stop signal for migrating neurons. To investigate this further we developed an in silico agent-based model of cortical layer formation. Using this model we tested four biologically plausible hypotheses for neuron motility and four biologically plausible hypotheses for the loss of neuron motility (conversion from migration. A matrix of 16 combinations of motility and conversion rules was applied against the known structure of mouse cortical layers in the wild-type cortex, the Reelin-null mutant, the Dab1-null mutant and a conditional Dab1 mutant. Using this approach, many combinations of motility and conversion mechanisms can be rejected. For example, the model does not support Reelin acting as a repelling or as a stopping signal. In contrast, the study lends very strong support to the notion that the glycoprotein Reelin acts as a chemoattractant for neurons. Furthermore, the most viable proposition for the conversion mechanism is one in which conversion is affected by a motile neuron sensing in the near vicinity neurons that have already converted. Therefore, this model helps elucidate the function of Reelin during neuronal migration and cortical development.

  2. Proliferative hypothalamic neurospheres express NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A and differentiate to functional neurons.

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    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Some pathological conditions with feeding pattern alterations, including obesity and Huntington disease (HD are associated with hypothalamic dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Additionally, the hypothalamus is a neurogenic region with the constitutive capacity to generate new cells of neuronal lineage, in adult rodents. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of feeding-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and their capacity to differentiate to functional neurons which have been described to be affected by hypothalamic dysfunction. Our study shows that hypothalamic progenitor cells from rat embryos grow as floating neurospheres and express the feeding-related neuropeptides Neuropeptide Y (NPY, Agouti-related Protein (AGRP, Pro-OpioMelanocortin (POMC, Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Responsive Transcript (CART and Orexin-A/Hypocretin-1. Moreover the relative mRNA expression of NPY and POMC increases during the expansion of hypothalamic neurospheres in proliferative conditions.Mature neurons were obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic progenitor cells including NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A positive neurons. Furthermore the relative mRNA expression of NPY, CART and Orexin-A increases after the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres. Similarly to the adult hypothalamic neurons the neurospheres-derived neurons express the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The orexigenic and anorexigenic phenotype of these neurons was identified by functional response to ghrelin and leptin hormones, respectively. This work demonstrates the presence of appetite-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and neurons obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres, including the neuronal phenotypes that have been described by others as being affected by hypothalamic neurodegeneration. These in vitro models can be used to study hypothalamic progenitor cells aiming a therapeutic intervention to

  3. Correlation between serum neuron specific enolase and functional neurological outcome in patients of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Sana; Beg, Mujahid; Rizvi, Imran; Islam, Najmul; Ullah, Ekram; Akhtar, Nishat

    2013-10-01

    The use of biomarkers to predict stroke prognosis is gaining particular attention nowadays. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is a dimeric isoenzyme of the glycolytic enzyme enolase and is found mainly in the neurons is one such biomarker. This study was carried out on patients of acute ischemic stroke with the aims to determine the correlation between NSE levels on the day of admission with infarct volume, stroke severity, and functional neurological outcome on day 30. Seventy five patients of acute ischemic stroke admitted in the Department of Medicine were included in the study. Levels of NSE were determined on day 1 using the human NSE ELISA kit (Alpha Diagnostic International Texas 78244, USA). Volume of infarct was measured by computed tomography (CT) scan using the preinstalled software Syngo (version A40A) of Siemen's medical solutions (Forchheim, Germany). Stroke severity at admission was assessed using Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and functional neurological outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS) on day 30. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software for windows version 15.0 (SPSS). A positive correlation was found between concentration of NSE on day 1 and infarct volume determined by CT scan (r = 0.955, P serve as a useful marker to predict stroke severity and early functional outcome. However, larger studies with serial estimation of NSE are needed to establish these observations more firmly.

  4. Direct lineage reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts to functional midbrain dopaminergic neuronal progenitors

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    Han-Seop Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct lineage reprogramming of somatic cells to other lineages by defined factors has led to innovative cell-fate-change approaches for providing patient-specific cells. Recent reports have demonstrated that four pluripotency factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc are sufficient to directly reprogram fibroblasts to other specific cells, including induced neural stem cells (iNSCs. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into midbrain dopaminergic neuronal progenitors (DPs by temporal expression of the pluripotency factors and environment containing sonic hedgehog and fibroblast growth factor 8. Within thirteen days, self-renewing and functional induced DPs (iDPs were generated. Interestingly, the inhibition of both Jak and Gsk3β notably enhanced the iDP reprogramming efficiency. We confirmed the functionality of the iDPs by showing that the dopaminergic neurons generated from iDPs express midbrain markers, release dopamine, and show typical electrophysiological profiles. Our results demonstrate that the pluripotency factors-mediated direct reprogramming is an invaluable strategy for supplying functional and proliferating iDPs and may be useful for other neural progenitors required for disease modeling and cell therapies for neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Proliferative reactive gliosis is compatible with glial metabolic support and neuronal function

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    Fero Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of mammalian glial cells to chronic degeneration and trauma is hypothesized to be incompatible with support of neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS and retina. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inducible model of proliferative reactive gliosis in the absence of degenerative stimuli by genetically inactivating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27 or Cdkn1b in the adult mouse and determined the outcome on retinal structure and function. Results p27-deficient Müller glia reentered the cell cycle, underwent aberrant migration, and enhanced their expression of intermediate filament proteins, all of which are characteristics of Müller glia in a reactive state. Surprisingly, neuroglial interactions, retinal electrophysiology, and visual acuity were normal. Conclusion The benign outcome of proliferative reactive Müller gliosis suggests that reactive glia display context-dependent, graded and dynamic phenotypes and that reactivity in itself is not necessarily detrimental to neuronal function.

  6. Sleep deprivation and hippocampal vulnerability: changes in neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and cognitive function.

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    Kreutzmann, J C; Havekes, R; Abel, T; Meerlo, P

    2015-11-19

    Despite the ongoing fundamental controversy about the physiological function of sleep, there is general consensus that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition. In agreement with this are numerous studies showing that sleep deprivation (SD) results in learning and memory impairments. Interestingly, such impairments appear to occur particularly when these learning and memory processes require the hippocampus, suggesting that this brain region may be particularly sensitive to the consequences of sleep loss. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying sleep and memory formation remain to be investigated, available evidence suggests that SD may impair hippocampal neuronal plasticity and memory processes by attenuating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling which may lead to alterations in cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene transcription, neurotrophic signaling, and glutamate receptor expression. When restricted sleep becomes a chronic condition, it causes a reduction of hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, which may eventually lead to a reduction in hippocampal volume. Ultimately, by impairing hippocampal plasticity and function, chronically restricted and disrupted sleep contributes to cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  7. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration

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    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L.; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons—in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  8. Nxnl2 splicing results in dual functions in neuronal cell survival and maintenance of cell integrity

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    Jaillard, Céline; Mouret, Aurélie; Niepon, Marie-Laure; Clérin, Emmanuelle; Yang, Ying; Lee-Rivera, Irene; Aït-Ali, Najate; Millet-Puel, Géraldine; Cronin, Thérèse; Sedmak, Tina; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Kinzel, Bernd; Trembleau, Alain; Poch, Olivier; Bennett, Jean; Wolfrum, Uwe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The Rod-derived Cone Viability Factors, RdCVF and RdCVF2, have potential therapeutical interests for the treatment of inherited photoreceptor degenerations. In the mouse lacking Nxnl2, the gene encoding RdCVF2, the progressive decline of the visual performance of the cones in parallel with their degeneration arises due to loss of trophic support from RdCVF2. Contrarily, the progressive loss of rod visual function of the Nxnl2−/− mouse results from a decrease in outer segment length, mediated by a cell-autonomous mechanism involving the putative thioredoxin protein RdCVF2L, the second spliced product of the Nxnl2 gene. This novel signaling mechanism extends to olfaction as shown by the progressive impairment of olfaction in aged Nxnl2−/− mice and the protection of olfactory neurons by RdCVF2. This study shows that Nxnl2 is a bi-functional gene involved in the maintenance of both the function and the viability of sensory neurons. PMID:22343139

  9. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor ligands display functional selectivity in a cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons.

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    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Dupré, Denis J; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2014-09-05

    Modulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activity has been touted as a potential means of treating addiction, anxiety, depression, and neurodegeneration. Different agonists of CB1 are known to evoke varied responses in vivo. Functional selectivity is the ligand-specific activation of certain signal transduction pathways at a receptor that can signal through multiple pathways. To understand cannabinoid-specific functional selectivity, different groups have examined the effect of individual cannabinoids on various signaling pathways in heterologous expression systems. In the current study, we compared the functional selectivity of six cannabinoids, including two endocannabinoids (2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA)), two synthetic cannabinoids (WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940), and two phytocannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) on arrestin2-, Gα(i/o)-, Gβγ-, Gα(s)-, and Gα(q)-mediated intracellular signaling in the mouse STHdh(Q7/Q7) cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons that endogenously express CB1. In this system, 2-AG, THC, and CP55,940 were more potent mediators of arrestin2 recruitment than other cannabinoids tested. 2-AG, AEA, and WIN55,212-2, enhanced Gα(i/o) and Gβγ signaling, with 2-AG and AEA treatment leading to increased total CB1 levels. 2-AG, AEA, THC, and WIN55,212-2 also activated Gα(q)-dependent pathways. CP55,940 and CBD both signaled through Gα(s). CP55,940, but not CBD, activated downstream Gα(s) pathways via CB1 targets. THC and CP55,940 promoted CB1 internalization and decreased CB1 protein levels over an 18-h period. These data demonstrate that individual cannabinoids display functional selectivity at CB1 leading to activation of distinct signaling pathways. To effectively match cannabinoids with therapeutic goals, these compounds must be screened for their signaling bias.

  10. Expression and function of a CP339,818-sensitive K⁺ current in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons from adult mouse trigeminal ganglia.

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    Sforna, Luigi; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Servettini, Ilenio; Guglielmi, Luca; Pessia, Mauro; Franciolini, Fabio; Catacuzzeno, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous, and the molecular basis of this heterogeneity is still not fully understood. Here we describe experiments showing that a subpopulation of neurons expresses a delayed-rectifying K(+) current (IDRK) with a characteristically high (nanomolar) sensitivity to the dihydroquinoline CP339,818 (CP). Although submicromolar CP has previously been shown to selectively block Kv1.3 and Kv1.4 channels, the CP-sensitive IDRK found in TG neurons could not be associated with either of these two K(+) channels. It could neither be associated with Kv2.1 channels homomeric or heteromerically associated with the Kv9.2, Kv9.3, or Kv6.4 subunits, whose block by CP, tested using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings from Xenopus oocytes, resulted in the low micromolar range, nor to the Kv7 subfamily, given the lack of blocking efficacy of 3 μM XE991. Within the group of multiple-firing neurons considered in this study, the CP-sensitive IDRK was preferentially expressed in a subpopulation showing several nociceptive markers, such as small membrane capacitance, sensitivity to capsaicin, and slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP); in these neurons the CP-sensitive IDRK controls the membrane resting potential, the firing frequency, and the AHP duration. A biophysical study of the CP-sensitive IDRK indicated the presence of two kinetically distinct components: a fast deactivating component having a relatively depolarized steady-state inactivation (IDRKf) and a slow deactivating component with a more hyperpolarized V1/2 for steady-state inactivation (IDRKs). Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving population density functions of cortical pyramidal and thalamic neuronal populations.

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    Huang, Chih-Hsu; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2015-02-01

    Compared with the Monte Carlo method, the population density method is efficient for modeling collective dynamics of neuronal populations in human brain. In this method, a population density function describes the probabilistic distribution of states of all neurons in the population and it is governed by a hyperbolic partial differential equation. In the past, the problem was mainly solved by using the finite difference method. In a previous study, a continuous Galerkin finite element method was found better than the finite difference method for solving the hyperbolic partial differential equation; however, the population density function often has discontinuity and both methods suffer from a numerical stability problem. The goal of this study is to improve the numerical stability of the solution using discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. To test the performance of the new approach, interaction of a population of cortical pyramidal neurons and a population of thalamic neurons was simulated. The numerical results showed good agreement between results of discontinuous Galerkin finite element and Monte Carlo methods. The convergence and accuracy of the solutions are excellent. The numerical stability problem could be resolved using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method which has total-variation-diminishing property. The efficient approach will be employed to simulate the electroencephalogram or dynamics of thalamocortical network which involves three populations, namely, thalamic reticular neurons, thalamocortical neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons.

  12. Two classes of ovarian primordial follicles exhibit distinct developmental dynamics and physiological functions.

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    Zheng, Wenjing; Zhang, Hua; Gorre, Nagaraju; Risal, Sanjiv; Shen, Yan; Liu, Kui

    2014-02-15

    In the mammalian ovary, progressive activation of primordial follicles serves as the source of fertilizable ova, and disorders in the development of primordial follicles lead to various ovarian diseases. However, very little is known about the developmental dynamics of primordial follicles under physiological conditions, and the fates of distinct populations of primordial follicles also remain unclear. In this study, by generating the Foxl2-CreER(T2) and Sohlh1-CreER(T2) inducible mouse models, we have specifically labeled and traced the in vivo development of two classes of primordial follicles, the first wave of simultaneously activated follicles after birth and the primordial follicles that are gradually activated in adulthood. Our results show that the first wave of follicles exists in the ovaries for ∼3 months and contributes to the onset of puberty and to early fertility. The primordial follicles at the ovarian cortex gradually replace the first wave of follicles and dominate the ovary after 3 months of age, providing fertility until the end of reproductive life. Moreover, by tracing the time periods needed for primordial follicles to reach various advanced stages in vivo, we were able to determine the exact developmental dynamics of the two classes of primordial follicles. We have now revealed the lifelong developmental dynamics of ovarian primordial follicles under physiological conditions and have clearly shown that two classes of primordial follicles follow distinct, age-dependent developmental paths and play different roles in the mammalian reproductive lifespan.

  13. Implement of the Owner Distinction Function for Healing-Type Pet Robots

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    Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Hirose, Sadaki

    In recent years, a robotics technology is extremely progressive, and robots are widely applied in many fields. One of the most typical robots is a pet robot. The pet robot is based on an animal pet, such as a dog or a cat. Also, it is known that an animal pet has a healing effect. Therefore, the study to apply pet robots to Animal Assisted Therapy instead of an animal pet has begun to be investigated. We, also, have investigated a method of an owner distinction for pet robot, to emphasize a healing effect of pet robots. In this paper, taking account of implementation into pet robots, a real-time owner distinction method is proposed. In the concrete, the method provides a real-time matching algorithm and an oblivion mechanism. The real-time matching means that a matching and a data acquisition are processed simultaneously. The oblivion mechanism is deleting features of owners in the database of the pet robots. Additionally, the mechanism enables to reduce matching costs or size of database and it enables to follow a change of owners. Furthermore, effectivity and a practicality of the method are evaluated by experiments.

  14. Mitochondrial function in neuronal cells depends on p97/VCP/Cdc48-mediated quality control

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    Lei eFang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining mitochondrial function is essential for neuronal survival and offers protection against neurodegeneration. Ubiquitin-mediated, proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the form of outer mitochondrial membrane associated degradation (OMMAD was shown to play roles in maintenance of mitochondria on the level of proteostasis, but also mitophagy and cell death. Recently, the AAA-ATPase p97/VCP/Cdc48 was recognized as part of OMMAD acting as retrotranslocase of ubiquitinated mitochondrial proteins for proteasomal degradation. Thus, p97 likely plays a major role in mitochondrial maintenance. Support for this notion comes from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD caused by p97 mutation. Using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing p97 or dominant-negative p97QQ treated with mitochondrial toxins rotenone, 6-OHDA, or Aβ-peptide as model for neuronal cells suffering from mitochondrial dysfunction, we found mitochondrial fragmentation under normal and stress conditions was significantly increased upon inactivation of p97. Furthermore, inactivation of p97 resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Under additional stress conditions, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production was even more pronounced. Loss of mitochondrial fidelity upon inactivation of p97 was likely due to disturbed maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis as the employed treatments neither induced mitophagy nor cell death. This was supported by the accumulation of oxidatively-damaged proteins on mitochondria in response to p97 inactivation. Dysfunction of p97 under normal and stress conditions in neuron-like cells severely impacts mitochondrial function, thus supporting for the first time a role for p97 as a major component of mitochondrial

  15. Distinct Roles for JNK and IKK Activation in Agouti-Related Peptide Neurons in the Development of Obesity and Insulin Resistance

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    Eva Tsaousidou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1- and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase 2 (IKK2-dependent signaling plays a crucial role in the development of obesity-associated insulin and leptin resistance not only in peripheral tissues but also in the CNS. Here, we demonstrate that constitutive JNK activation in agouti-related peptide (AgRP-expressing neurons of the hypothalamus is sufficient to induce weight gain and adiposity in mice as a consequence of hyperphagia. JNK activation increases spontaneous action potential firing of AgRP cells and causes both neuronal and systemic leptin resistance. Similarly, activation of IKK2 signaling in AgRP neurons also increases firing of these cells but fails to cause obesity and leptin resistance. In contrast to JNK activation, IKK2 activation blunts insulin signaling in AgRP neurons and impairs systemic glucose homeostasis. Collectively, these experiments reveal both overlapping and nonredundant effects of JNK- and IKK-dependent signaling in AgRP neurons, which cooperate in the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. A new photosensory function for simple photoreceptors, the intrinsically photoresponsive neurons of the sea slug Onchidium

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    Tsukasa Gotow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple photoreceptors, namely intrinsically light-sensitive neurons without microvilli and/or cilia, have long been known to exist in the central ganglia of crayfish, Aplysia, Onchidium, and Helix. These simple photoreceptors are not only first-order photosensory cells, but also second-order neurons (interneurons, relaying several kinds of sensory synaptic inputs. Another important issue is that the photoresponses of these simple photoreceptors show very slow kinetics and little adaptation. These characteristics suggest that the simple photoreceptors of the Onchidium have a function in non-image-forming vision, different from classical eye photoreceptors used for cording dynamic images of vision. The cited literature provides evidence that the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing photoresponses of simple photoreceptors play a role in the long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission of excitatory and inhibitory sensory inputs, and as well as in the potentiation and the suppression of the subsequent behavioral outputs. In short, we suggest that simple photoreceptors operate in the general potentiation of synaptic transmission and subsequent motor output; i.e., they perform a new photosensory function.

  17. Two distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases have complementary functions in the regulation of delta and serrate signaling in Drosophila.

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    Roland Le Borgne

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling by the Notch ligands Delta (Dl and Serrate (Ser regulates a wide variety of essential cell-fate decisions during animal development. Two distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, Neuralized (Neur and Mind bomb (Mib, have been shown to regulate Dl signaling in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio, respectively. While the neur and mib genes are evolutionarily conserved, their respective roles in the context of a single organism have not yet been examined. We show here that the Drosophila mind bomb (D-mib gene regulates a subset of Notch signaling events, including wing margin specification, leg segmentation, and vein determination, that are distinct from those events requiring neur activity. D-mib also modulates lateral inhibition, a neur- and Dl-dependent signaling event, suggesting that D-mib regulates Dl signaling. During wing development, expression of D-mib in dorsal cells appears to be necessary and sufficient for wing margin specification, indicating that D-mib also regulates Ser signaling. Moreover, the activity of the D-mib gene is required for the endocytosis of Ser in wing imaginal disc cells. Finally, ectopic expression of neur in D-mib mutant larvae rescues the wing D-mib phenotype, indicating that Neur can compensate for the lack of D-mib activity. We conclude that D-mib and Neur are two structurally distinct proteins that have similar molecular activities but distinct developmental functions in Drosophila.

  18. Patterning human neuronal networks on photolithographically engineered silicon dioxide substrates functionalized with glial analogues.

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    Hughes, Mark A; Brennan, Paul M; Bunting, Andrew S; Cameron, Katherine; Murray, Alan F; Shipston, Mike J

    2014-05-01

    Interfacing neurons with silicon semiconductors is a challenge being tackled through various bioengineering approaches. Such constructs inform our understanding of neuronal coding and learning and ultimately guide us toward creating intelligent neuroprostheses. A fundamental prerequisite is to dictate the spatial organization of neuronal cells. We sought to pattern neurons using photolithographically defined arrays of polymer parylene-C, activated with fetal calf serum. We used a purified human neuronal cell line [Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES)] to establish whether neurons remain viable when isolated on-chip or whether they require a supporting cell substrate. When cultured in isolation, LUHMES neurons failed to pattern and did not show any morphological signs of differentiation. We therefore sought a cell type with which to prepattern parylene regions, hypothesizing that this cellular template would enable secondary neuronal adhesion and network formation. From a range of cell lines tested, human embryonal kidney (HEK) 293 cells patterned with highest accuracy. LUHMES neurons adhered to pre-established HEK 293 cell clusters and this coculture environment promoted morphological differentiation of neurons. Neurites extended between islands of adherent cell somata, creating an orthogonally arranged neuronal network. HEK 293 cells appear to fulfill a role analogous to glia, dictating cell adhesion, and generating an environment conducive to neuronal survival. We next replaced HEK 293 cells with slower growing glioma-derived precursors. These primary human cells patterned accurately on parylene and provided a similarly effective scaffold for neuronal adhesion. These findings advance the use of this microfabrication-compatible platform for neuronal patterning.

  19. Myocardial Perfusion and Function Are Distinctly Altered by Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Diet-Induced Prediabetic Rats

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    Charissa E. van den Brom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of myocardial perfusion during surgery is particularly important in patients with increased risk for perioperative complications, such as diabetes. Volatile anesthetics, like sevoflurane, have cardiodepressive effects and may aggravate cardiovascular complications. We investigated the effect of sevoflurane on myocardial perfusion and function in prediabetic rats. Rats were fed a western diet (WD; n=18 or control diet (CD; n=18 for 8 weeks and underwent (contrast echocardiography to determine perfusion and function during baseline and sevoflurane exposure. Myocardial perfusion was estimated based on the product of microvascular filling velocity and blood volume. WD-feeding resulted in a prediabetic phenotype characterized by obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia. At baseline, WD-feeding impaired myocardial perfusion and systolic function compared to CD-feeding. Exposure of healthy rats to sevoflurane increased the microvascular filling velocity without altering myocardial perfusion but impaired systolic function. In prediabetic rats, sevoflurane did also not affect myocardial perfusion; however, it further impaired systolic function. Diet-induced prediabetes is associated with impaired myocardial perfusion and function in rats. While sevoflurane further impaired systolic function, it did not affect myocardial perfusion in prediabetic rats. Our findings suggest that sevoflurane anesthesia leads to uncoupling of myocardial perfusion and function, irrespective of the metabolic state.

  20. Myocardial Perfusion and Function Are Distinctly Altered by Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Diet-Induced Prediabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brom, Charissa E; Boly, Chantal A; Bulte, Carolien S E; van den Akker, Rob F P; Kwekkeboom, Rick F J; Loer, Stephan A; Boer, Christa; Bouwman, R Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of myocardial perfusion during surgery is particularly important in patients with increased risk for perioperative complications, such as diabetes. Volatile anesthetics, like sevoflurane, have cardiodepressive effects and may aggravate cardiovascular complications. We investigated the effect of sevoflurane on myocardial perfusion and function in prediabetic rats. Rats were fed a western diet (WD; n = 18) or control diet (CD; n = 18) for 8 weeks and underwent (contrast) echocardiography to determine perfusion and function during baseline and sevoflurane exposure. Myocardial perfusion was estimated based on the product of microvascular filling velocity and blood volume. WD-feeding resulted in a prediabetic phenotype characterized by obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia. At baseline, WD-feeding impaired myocardial perfusion and systolic function compared to CD-feeding. Exposure of healthy rats to sevoflurane increased the microvascular filling velocity without altering myocardial perfusion but impaired systolic function. In prediabetic rats, sevoflurane did also not affect myocardial perfusion; however, it further impaired systolic function. Diet-induced prediabetes is associated with impaired myocardial perfusion and function in rats. While sevoflurane further impaired systolic function, it did not affect myocardial perfusion in prediabetic rats. Our findings suggest that sevoflurane anesthesia leads to uncoupling of myocardial perfusion and function, irrespective of the metabolic state.

  1. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

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    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

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    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD.

  3. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

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    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  4. Targeted gene knockdown in zebrafish reveals distinct intraembryonic functions for insulin-like growth factor II signaling.

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    White, Yvonne A R; Kyle, Joshua T; Wood, Antony W

    2009-09-01

    IGF-II is the predominant IGF ligand regulating prenatal growth in all vertebrates, including humans, but its central role in placental development has confounded efforts to fully elucidate its functions within the embryo. Here we use a nonplacental model vertebrate (zebrafish) to interrogate the intraembryonic functions of IGF-II signaling. The zebrafish genome contains two coorthologs of mammalian IGF2 (igf2a, igf2b), which exhibit distinct patterns of expression during embryogenesis. Expression of igf2a mRNA is restricted to the notochord, primarily during segmentation/neurulation. By contrast, igf2b mRNA is expressed in midline tissues adjacent to the notochord, with additional sites of expression in the ventral forebrain, and the pronephros. To identify their intraembryonic functions, we suppressed the expression of each gene with morpholino oligonucleotides. Knockdown of igf2a led to defects in dorsal midline development, characterized by delayed segmentation, notochord undulations, and ventral curvature. Similarly, suppression of igf2b led to defects in dorsal midline development but also induced ectopic fusion of the nephron primordia, and defects in ventral forebrain development. Subsequent onset of severe body edema in igf2b, but not igf2a morphants, further suggested a distinct role for igf2b in development of the embryonic kidney. Simultaneous knockdown of both genes increased the severity of dorsal midline defects, confirming a conserved role for both genes in dorsal midline development. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the zebrafish orthologs of IGF2 function in dorsal midline development during segmentation/neurulation, whereas one paralog, igf2b, has evolved additional, distinct functions during subsequent organogenesis.

  5. Correlation between serum neuron specific enolase and functional neurological outcome in patients of acute ischemic stroke

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    Sana Zaheer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The use of biomarkers to predict stroke prognosis is gaining particular attention nowadays. Neuron specific enolase (NSE, which is a dimeric isoenzyme of the glycolytic enzyme enolase and is found mainly in the neurons is one such biomarker. Aims: This study was carried out on patients of acute ischemic stroke with the aims to determine the correlation between NSE levels on the day of admission with infarct volume, stroke severity, and functional neurological outcome on day 30. Materials and Methods: Seventy five patients of acute ischemic stroke admitted in the Department of Medicine were included in the study. Levels of NSE were determined on day 1 using the human NSE ELISA kit (Alpha Diagnostic International Texas 78244, USA. Volume of infarct was measured by computed tomography (CT scan using the preinstalled software Syngo (version A40A of Siemen′s medical solutions (Forchheim, Germany. Stroke severity at admission was assessed using Glasgow coma scale (GCS and functional neurological outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS on day 30. Statistical Analysi