WorldWideScience

Sample records for distinct macrophage subsets

  1. Soluble immune complexes shift the TLR-induced cytokine production of distinct polarized human macrophage subsets towards IL-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Ambarus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Costimulation of murine macrophages with immune complexes (ICs and TLR ligands leads to alternative activation. Studies on human myeloid cells, however, indicate that ICs induce an increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This study aimed to clarify the effect of ICs on the pro- versus anti-inflammatory profile of human polarized macrophages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors were polarized for four days with IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, or LPS, in the presence or absence of heat aggregated gamma-globulins (HAGGs. Phenotypic polarization markers were measured by flow cytometry. Polarized macrophages were stimulated with HAGGs or immobilized IgG alone or in combination with TLR ligands. TNF, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-23 were measured by Luminex and/or RT-qPCR. RESULTS: HAGGs did not modulate the phenotypic polarization and the cytokine production of macrophages. However, HAGGs significantly altered the TLR-induced cytokine production of all polarized macrophage subsets, with the exception of MΦ(IL-4. In particular, HAGGs consistently enhanced the TLR-induced IL-10 production in both classically and alternatively polarized macrophages (M1 and M2. The effect of HAGGs on TNF and IL-6 production was less pronounced and depended on the polarization status, while IL-23p19 and IL-12p35 expression was not affected. In contrast with HAGGs, immobilized IgG induced a strong upregulation of not only IL-10, but also TNF and IL-6. CONCLUSION: HAGGs alone do not alter the phenotype and cytokine production of in vitro polarized human macrophages. In combination with TLR-ligands, however, HAGGs but not immobilized IgG shift the cytokine production of distinct macrophage subsets toward IL-10.

  2. Incomplete deletion of IL-4Rα by LysM(Cre reveals distinct subsets of M2 macrophages controlling inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M Vannella

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mice expressing a Cre recombinase from the lysozyme M-encoding locus (Lyz2 have been widely used to dissect gene function in macrophages and neutrophils. Here, we show that while naïve resident tissue macrophages from IL-4Rαf(lox/deltaLysM(Cre mice almost completely lose IL-4Rα function, a large fraction of macrophages elicited by sterile inflammatory stimuli, Schistosoma mansoni eggs, or S. mansoni infection, fail to excise Il4rα. These F4/80(hiCD11b(hi macrophages, in contrast to resident tissue macrophages, express lower levels of Lyz2 explaining why this population resists LysM(Cre-mediated deletion. We show that in response to IL-4 and IL-13, Lyz2(loIL-4Rα(+ macrophages differentiate into an arginase 1-expressing alternatively-activated macrophage (AAM population, which slows the development of lethal fibrosis in schistosomiasis. In contrast, we identified Lyz2(hiIL-4Rα(+ macrophages as the key subset of AAMs mediating the downmodulation of granulomatous inflammation in chronic schistosomiasis. Our observations reveal a limitation on using a LysMCre mouse model to study gene function in inflammatory settings, but we utilize this limitation as a means to demonstrate that distinct populations of alternatively activated macrophages control inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

  3. Incomplete deletion of IL-4Rα by LysM(Cre) reveals distinct subsets of M2 macrophages controlling inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannella, Kevin M; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Kindrachuk, Kristen N; Narasimhan, Prakash Babu; Hart, Kevin M; Thompson, Robert W; White, Sandra; Cheever, Allen W; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Mice expressing a Cre recombinase from the lysozyme M-encoding locus (Lyz2) have been widely used to dissect gene function in macrophages and neutrophils. Here, we show that while naïve resident tissue macrophages from IL-4Rαf(lox/delta)LysM(Cre) mice almost completely lose IL-4Rα function, a large fraction of macrophages elicited by sterile inflammatory stimuli, Schistosoma mansoni eggs, or S. mansoni infection, fail to excise Il4rα. These F4/80(hi)CD11b(hi) macrophages, in contrast to resident tissue macrophages, express lower levels of Lyz2 explaining why this population resists LysM(Cre)-mediated deletion. We show that in response to IL-4 and IL-13, Lyz2(lo)IL-4Rα(+) macrophages differentiate into an arginase 1-expressing alternatively-activated macrophage (AAM) population, which slows the development of lethal fibrosis in schistosomiasis. In contrast, we identified Lyz2(hi)IL-4Rα(+) macrophages as the key subset of AAMs mediating the downmodulation of granulomatous inflammation in chronic schistosomiasis. Our observations reveal a limitation on using a LysMCre mouse model to study gene function in inflammatory settings, but we utilize this limitation as a means to demonstrate that distinct populations of alternatively activated macrophages control inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

  4. Localization of Distinct Peyer's Patch Dendritic Cell Subsets and Their Recruitment by Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein (Mip)-3α, Mip-3β, and Secondary Lymphoid Organ Chemokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the anatomical localization of three distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in the murine Peyer's patch (PP) and explore the role of chemokines in their recruitment. By two-color in situ immunofluorescence, CD11b+ myeloid DCs were determined to be present in the subepithelial dome (SED) region, whereas CD8α+ lymphoid DCs are present in the T cell–rich interfollicular region (IFR). DCs that lack expression of CD8α or CD11b (double negative) are present in both the SED and IFR. By in situ hybridization, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α mRNA was dramatically expressed only by the follicle-associated epithelium overlying the SED, while its receptor, CCR6, was concentrated in the SED. In contrast, CCR7 was expressed predominantly in the IFR. Consistent with these findings, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and in vitro chemotaxis assays using freshly isolated DCs revealed that CCR6 was functionally expressed only by DC subsets present in the SED, while all subsets expressed functional CCR7. Moreover, none of the splenic DC subsets migrated toward MIP-3α. These data support a distinct role for MIP-3α/CCR6 in recruitment of CD11b+ DCs toward the mucosal surfaces and for MIP-3β/CCR7 in attraction of CD8α+ DCs to the T cell regions. Finally, we demonstrated that all DC subsets expressed an immature phenotype when freshly isolated and maintained expression of subset markers upon maturation in vitro. In contrast, CCR7 expression by myeloid PP DCs was enhanced with maturation in vitro. In addition, this subset disappeared from the SED and appeared in the IFR after microbial stimulation in vivo, suggesting that immature myeloid SED DCs capture antigens and migrate to IFR to initiate T cell responses after mucosal microbial infections. PMID:10770804

  5. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Educated Macrophages Are a Distinct High IL-6-Producing Subset that Confer Protection in Graft-versus-Host-Disease and Radiation Injury Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Moffitt, Andrea B; Kim, Jaehyup; Kink, John A; Bloom, Debra D; Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep; Hematti, Peiman; Capitini, Christian M

    2017-02-28

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive and tissue repair properties, but clinical trials using MSCs to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) have shown mixed results. Macrophages (MØs) are important regulators of immunity and can promote tissue regeneration and remodeling. We have previously shown that MSCs can educate MØs toward a unique anti-inflammatory immunophenotype (MSC-educated macrophages [MEMs]); however, their implications for in vivo models of inflammation have not been studied yet. We now show that in comparison with MØs, MEMs have increased expression of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1, PD-L2, in addition to markers of alternatively activated macrophages: CD206 and CD163. RNA-Seq analysis of MEMs, as compared with MØs, show a distinct gene expression profile that positively correlates with multiple pathways important in tissue repair. MEMs also show increased expression of IL-6, transforming growth factor-β, arginase-1, CD73, and decreased expression of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α. We show that IL-6 secretion is controlled in part by the cyclo-oxygenase-2, arginase, and JAK1/STAT1 pathway. When tested in vivo, we show that human MEMs significantly enhance survival from lethal GVHD and improve survival of mice from radiation injury. We show these effects could be mediated in part through suppression of human T cell proliferation and may have attenuated host tissue injury in part by enhancing murine fibroblast proliferation. MEMs are a unique MØ subset with therapeutic potential for the management of GVHD and/or protection from radiation-induced injury.

  6. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges; Jorgensen, Christian; Djouad, Farida

    2015-07-08

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa(+) and tnfa(-) macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa(+) macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic.

  7. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In...

  8. Macrophage subset sensitivity to endotoxin tolerisation by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Foey

    Full Text Available Macrophages (MΦs determine oral mucosal responses; mediating tolerance to commensal microbes and food whilst maintaining the capacity to activate immune defences to pathogens. MΦ responses are determined by both differentiation and activation stimuli, giving rise to two distinct subsets; pro-inflammatory M1- and anti-inflammatory/regulatory M2- MΦs. M2-like subsets predominate tolerance induction whereas M1 MΦs predominate in inflammatory pathologies, mediating destructive inflammatory mechanisms, such as those in chronic P.gingivalis (PG periodontal infection. MΦ responses can be suppressed to benefit either the host or the pathogen. Chronic stimulation by bacterial pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as LPS, is well established to induce tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of MΦ subsets to suppression by P. gingivalis. CD14(hi and CD14(lo M1- and M2-like MΦs were generated in vitro from the THP-1 monocyte cell line by differentiation with PMA and vitamin D3, respectively. MΦ subsets were pre-treated with heat-killed PG (HKPG and PG-LPS prior to stimulation by bacterial PAMPs. Modulation of inflammation was measured by TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 ELISA and NFκB activation by reporter gene assay. HKPG and PG-LPS differentially suppress PAMP-induced TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 but fail to suppress IL-1β expression in M1 and M2 MΦs. In addition, P.gingivalis suppressed NFκB activation in CD14(lo and CD14(hi M2 regulatory MΦs and CD14(lo M1 MΦs whereas CD14(hi M1 pro-inflammatory MΦs were refractory to suppression. In conclusion, P.gingivalis selectively tolerises regulatory M2 MΦs with little effect on pro-inflammatory CD14(hi M1 MΦs; differential suppression facilitating immunopathology at the expense of immunity.

  9. Seronegative necrolytic acral erythema: A distinct clinical subset?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient was referred to us with asymptomatic, erythematous, nonitchy, scaly lesions present bilaterally on the dorsa of his feet and toes since the last 2 months. Both the legs had pitting edema as well. There were hyperkeratosis, focal parakeratosis, acanthosis and scattered spongiosis in the epidermis, and proliferation of capillaries with perivascular infiltration of lymphomononuclear cells in the dermis. There was no serological evidence of hepatitis C virus. Laboratory investigations revealed hypoalbuminemia and low-normal serum zinc. On clinicopathological correlation, we made a diagnosis of necrolytic acral erythema (NAE. The lesions responded dramatically to oral zinc sulfate and topical clobetasol propionate within 3 weeks with disappearance of edema and scaling and only a minimal residual erythema. This is the first reported case of NAE from Eastern India. NAE with negative serology for hepatitis C may be viewed as a distinct subset of the condition that had been originally described.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis-stimulated macrophage subsets exhibit differential induction and responsiveness to interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foey, Andrew D; Habil, Neama; Al-Shaghdali, Khalid; Crean, StJohn

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucosal macrophages (Mϕs) determine immune responses; maintaining tolerance whilst retaining the capacity to activate defences against pathogens. Mϕ responses are determined by two distinct subsets; pro-inflammatory M1- and anti-inflammatory/regulatory M2-Mϕs. Tolerance induction is driven by M2 Mϕs, whereas M1-like Mϕs predominate in inflammation, such as that exhibited in chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) periodontal infection. Mϕ responses can be suppressed to benefit either the host or the pathogen. Chronic stimulation by pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as LPS, is well established to induce tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the P. gingivalis-driven induction of and responsiveness to the suppressive, anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, by Mϕ subsets. M1- and M2-like Mϕs were generated in vitro from the THP-1 monocyte cell line by differentiation with PMA and Vitamin D3, respectively. Mϕ subsets were stimulated by PG-LPS in the presence or absence of IL-10. PG-LPS differentially induced IL-10 secretion and endogenous IL-10 activity in M1- and M2-like subsets. In addition, these subsets exhibited differential sensitivity to IL-10-mediated suppression of TNFα, where M2 Mϕs where sensitive to IL-10 and M1 Mϕs were refractory to suppression. In addition, this differential responsiveness to IL-10 was independent of IL-10-binding and expression of the IL-10 receptor signal transducing subunit, IL-10Rβ, but was in fact dependent on activation of STAT-3. P.gingivalis selectively tolerises regulatory M2 Mϕs with little effect on pro-inflammatory M1 Mϕs; differential suppression facilitating immunopathology at the expense of immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A

    2016-01-05

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as "slanDCs", has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues.

  12. Cortistain is expressed in a distinct subset of cortical interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lecea Flores de Lemus, Luis de; Río Fernández, José Antonio del; Alcántara Horrillo, Soledad; Criado, José R.; Morales, Marisela; Danielson, Patria E.; Henriksen, Steven J.; Soriano García, Eduardo; Sutcliffe, J. Gregor

    1997-01-01

    Cortistatin is a presumptive neuropeptide that shares 11 of its 14 amino acids with somatostatin. In contrast to somatostatin, administration of cortistatin into the rat brain ventricles specifically enhances slow wave sleep, apparently by antagonizing the effects of acetylcholine on cortical excitability. Here we show that preprocortistatin mRNA is expressed in a subset of GABAergic cells in the cortex and hippocampus that partially overlap with those containing somatostatin. A significant p...

  13. A subset of CD163+ macrophages displays mixed polarizations in discoid lupus skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Benjamin F; Tseng, Lin-Chiang; Hosler, Gregory A; Teske, Noelle M; Zhang, Song; Karp, David R; Olsen, Nancy J; Mohan, Chandra

    2015-11-13

    Lesional skin of patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) contains macrophages, whose polarization has yet to be investigated. To test our hypothesis that M1 macrophages would be increased in DLE skin, we examined transcriptome alterations in immune cell gene expression and macrophage features in DLE and normal skin by using gene expression and histochemical approaches. Gene expression of RNA from DLE lesional and normal control skin was compared by microarrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Both skin groups were analyzed for CD163 expression by immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescence studies were performed to characterize protein expression of CD163+ macrophages. DLE skin had twice as many upregulated genes than downregulated genes compared with normal skin. Gene set enrichment analysis comparing differentially expressed genes in DLE and normal skin with previously published gene sets associated with M1 and M2 macrophages showed strong overlap between upregulated genes in DLE skin and M1 macrophages. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that several M1 macrophage-associated genes--e.g., chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-had amplified mRNA levels in DLE skin. CD163+ macrophages were increased near the epidermal-dermal junction and perivascular areas in DLE skin compared with normal skin. However, double immunofluorescence studies of CD163+ macrophages revealed minor co-expression of M1 (CXCL10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and CD127) and M2 (CD209 and transforming growth factor-beta) macrophage-related proteins in DLE skin. Whereas a subset of CD163+ macrophages displays mixed polarizations in DLE skin, other immune cells such as T cells can contribute to the expression of these macrophage-related genes.

  14. The transcription factor NR4A1 is essential for the development of a novel macrophage subset in the thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacke, R.; Hilgendorf, I.; Garner, H.; Waterborg, C.E.J.; Park, K.; Nowyhed, H.; Hanna, R.N.; Wu, R.; Swirski, F.K.; Geissmann, F.; Hedrick, C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue macrophages function to maintain homeostasis and regulate immune responses. While tissue macrophages derive from one of a small number of progenitor programs, the transcriptional requirements for site-specific macrophage subset development are more complex. We have identified a new tissue mac

  15. Genetically Distinct Subsets within ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul A.; Rayner, Tim F.; Trivedi, Sapna; Holle, Julia U.; Watts, Richard A.; Jayne, David R.W.; Baslund, Bo; Brenchley, Paul; Bruchfeld, Annette; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Deloukas, Panos; Feighery, Conleth; Gross, Wolfgang L.; Guillevin, Loic; Gunnarsson, Iva; P, Lorraine Harper M.R.C; Hrušková, Zdenka; Little, Mark A.; Martorana, Davide; Neumann, Thomas; Ohlsson, Sophie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pusey, Charles D.; Salama, Alan D.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Savage, Caroline O.; Segelmark, Mårten; Stegeman, Coen A.; Tesař, Vladimir; Vaglio, Augusto; Wieczorek, Stefan; Wilde, Benjamin; Zwerina, Jochen; Rees, Andrew J.; Clayton, David G.; Smith, Kenneth G.C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single disease entity and what role ANCA plays in its pathogenesis. We investigated its genetic basis. METHODS A genomewide association study was performed in a discovery cohort of 1233 U.K. patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis and 5884 controls and was replicated in 1454 Northern European case patients and 1666 controls. Quality control, population stratification, and statistical analyses were performed according to standard criteria. RESULTS We found both major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) and non-MHC associations with ANCA-associated vasculitis and also that granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis were genetically distinct. The strongest genetic associations were with the antigenic specificity of ANCA, not with the clinical syndrome. Anti–proteinase 3 ANCA was associated with HLA-DP and the genes encoding α1-antitrypsin (SERPINA1) and proteinase 3 (PRTN3) (P = 6.2×10−89, P = 5.6×10−12, and P = 2.6×10−7, respectively). Anti–myeloperoxidase ANCA was associated with HLA-DQ (P = 2.1×10−8). CONCLUSIONS This study confirms that the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis has a genetic component, shows genetic distinctions between granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis that are associated with ANCA specificity, and suggests that the response against the autoantigen proteinase 3 is a central pathogenic feature of proteinase 3 ANCA–associated vasculitis. These data provide preliminary support for the concept that proteinase 3 ANCA–associated vasculitis and myeloperoxidase ANCA–associated vasculitis are distinct autoimmune syndromes. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.) PMID

  16. Evidence for pharmacologically distinct subsets of GABAB receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, R W; Ferkany, J W; Enna, S J

    1988-09-01

    Activation of GABAB receptors augments neurotransmitter-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation while inhibiting forskolin-mediated second messenger production. Previous studies have revealed that GABAB receptors are associated with a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein, such as Gi. While such a linkage is consistent with the finding that GABAB receptor activation inhibits forskolin-mediated second messenger accumulation, it fails to explain how GABAB agonists are capable of augmenting receptor-mediated cyclic AMP production. The present experiments were undertaken to explore the possible existence of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptors in an attempt to explain this apparent discrepancy. For the study, a variety of agents were examined for their ability to inhibit GABAB binding to brain membranes and to modify isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated second messenger production in rat brain slices. Of the compounds studied, only 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid were found to inhibit GABAB binding. However, 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid failed to influence either isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. On the other hand, while 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid also failed to affect isoproterenol-stimulated second messenger accumulation, it inhibited the forskolin-mediated response. Given this finding, and the fact that some of the agents tested are known to influence GABAB receptor function in other systems, the results indicate a multiplicity of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptor recognition sites. This discovery paves the way for the development of more selective GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists possessing different therapeutic potentials.

  17. Phenotypic and functional distinctions between the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinherz, E L; Strelkauskas, A J; O'Brien, C; Schlossman, S F

    1979-07-01

    Prior work has demonstrated the existence of distinct human peripheral blood T cell subsets by utilizing heterologous as well as autoimmune antisera. In the present study, the relationship between the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets was examined. T cells were purified with Sephadex G-200 anti-F(ab)2' affinity chromatography and E-rosetting technique, and subsequently fractionated into TH2+ and TH2- subsets by utilizing indirect immunofluorescence on FACS. Approximately 40 to 45% of the TH2- subset was shown to be JRA+, whereas less than 5% of the TH2+ subset was JRA+. In reciprocal studies, T cells were fractionated into JRA+ and JRA- subsets and reacted with heterologous antisera with anti-TH2+ specificity and indirect immunofluorescence. FACS analysis demonstrated that the JRA+ population contained no TH2+ T cells. In contrast, the JRA- population contained TH2+ T cells and accounted for the entire TH2+ subset found in the unfractionated T cell population. Functional studies showed that the TH2+ subset, and not the JRA+ subset, contain the effector population for cell-mediated lympholysis. It is concluded that the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets define distinct and different T cell populations in man.

  18. The interplay between monocytes/macrophages and CD4+ T cell subsets in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceri A. Roberts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis. The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation and excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as TNFα, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages and CD4+ T cells (both pro-inflammatory and regulatory. The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA.

  19. Insulin Influences Autophagy Response Distinctively in Macrophages of Different Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K. S. Sunahara

    2014-11-01

    host they were derived from. Diabetic M1 BMM had their LC3 vesicle-bound content diminished and M2 BMM enhanced their LC3 levels and insulin treatment failed to rescue autophagy to control levels. Insulin normalizes CINC-2 level but does not modulate autophagy markers. Conclusion: Taking these results together, diabetic macrophages derived from different compartments show different levels of autophagy markers compared to healthy animals, therefore, they suffer distinctively in the absence of insulin.

  20. Constructive tissue remodeling of biologic scaffolds: A phenomenon associated with scaffold characteristics and distinctive macrophage phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bryan Nicklaus

    Scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to promote formation of site-specific, functional host tissue following implantation in a number of preclinical and clinical settings. However, the exact mechanisms by which ECM scaffolds are able to promote this type of "constructive tissue remodeling" are unknown. Further, the ability of ECM scaffolds to promote constructive tissue remodeling appears to be dependent on the methods used in their production and the applications in which they are utilized. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of ECM scaffold characteristics and their effects upon the host response and subsequent tissue remodeling outcome is essential to the design of intelligent scaffolds for specific clinical applications. The present work investigated the effects of tissue source and chemical cross-linking upon the resulting ECM scaffolds, showing that ECM scaffold materials have distinct ultrastructural and compositional characteristics which are dependant on the anatomic location from which the scaffolds are derived and the methods used in their production. These characteristics were associated with distinct patterns of cell behavior in vitro. Distinct tissue remodeling outcomes were observed following implantation of a subset of these scaffold materials in a rat abdominal wall musculature reconstruction model. Acellular, non-cross-linked ECM was associated with constructive tissue remodeling while scaffolds that contained cellular components or were chemically cross-linked resulted in dense connective tissue deposition or encapsulation, respectively. Despite differences in the tissue remodeling outcome, a histologically similar population of macrophages was observed following implantation in each of these cases. Therefore, the phenotype of the macrophage population participating in the host response was investigated. It was shown that scaffolds which resulted in constructive tissue remodeling were associated with an increase

  1. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  2. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Galkina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cell precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and dendritic cells can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic dendritic cells provide novel insights into the biology of aortic dendritic cell subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of dendritic cells and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  3. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Matthew J; Galkina, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and DC precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and DCs. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and DCs can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox, and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic DCs provide novel insights into the biology of aortic DC subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of DCs and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  4. Three distinct subsets of thymic epithelial cells in rats and mice defined by novel antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Sawanobori

    Full Text Available AIM: Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are thought to play an essential role in T cell development and have been detected mainly in mice using lectin binding and antibodies to keratins. Our aim in the present study was to create a precise map of rat TECs using antibodies to putative markers and novel monoclonal antibodies (i.e., ED 18/19/21 and anti-CD205 antibodies and compare it with a map from mouse counterparts and that of rat thymic dendritic cells. RESULTS: Rat TECs were subdivided on the basis of phenotype into three subsets; ED18+ED19+/-keratin 5 (K5+K8+CD205+ class II MHC (MHCII+ cortical TECs (cTECs, ED18+ED21-K5-K8+Ulex europaeus lectin 1 (UEA-1+CD205- medullary TECs (mTEC1s, and ED18+ED21+K5+K8dullUEA-1-CD205- medullary TECs (mTEC2s. Thymic nurse cells were defined in cytosmears as an ED18+ED19+/-K5+K8+ subset of cTECs. mTEC1s preferentially expressed MHCII, claudin-3, claudin-4, and autoimmune regulator (AIRE. Use of ED18 and ED21 antibodies revealed three subsets of TECs in mice as well. We also detected two distinct TEC-free areas in the subcapsular cortex and in the medulla. Rat dendritic cells in the cortex were MHCII+CD103+ but negative for TEC markers, including CD205. Those in the medulla were MHCII+CD103+ and CD205+ cells were found only in the TEC-free area. CONCLUSION: Both rats and mice have three TEC subsets with similar phenotypes that can be identified using known markers and new monoclonal antibodies. These findings will facilitate further analysis of TEC subsets and DCs and help to define their roles in thymic selection and in pathological states such as autoimmune disorders.

  5. Transcriptional profiling reveals developmental relationship and distinct biological functions of CD16+ and CD16- monocyte subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaobo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human peripheral blood monocytes (Mo consist of subsets distinguished by expression of CD16 (FCγRIII and chemokine receptors. Classical CD16- Mo express CCR2 and migrate in response to CCL2, while a minor CD16+ Mo subset expresses CD16 and CX3CR1 and migrates into tissues expressing CX3CL1. CD16+ Mo produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and are expanded in certain inflammatory conditions including sepsis and HIV infection. Results To gain insight into the developmental relationship and functions of CD16+ and CD16- Mo, we examined transcriptional profiles of these Mo subsets in peripheral blood from healthy individuals. Of 16,328 expressed genes, 2,759 genes were differentially expressed and 228 and 250 were >2-fold upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in CD16+ compared to CD16- Mo. CD16+ Mo were distinguished by upregulation of transcripts for dendritic cell (DC (SIGLEC10, CD43, RARA and macrophage (MΦ (CSF1R/CD115, MafB, CD97, C3aR markers together with transcripts relevant for DC-T cell interaction (CXCL16, ICAM-2, LFA-1, cell activation (LTB, TNFRSF8, LST1, IFITM1-3, HMOX1, SOD-1, WARS, MGLL, and negative regulation of the cell cycle (CDKN1C, MTSS1, whereas CD16- Mo were distinguished by upregulation of transcripts for myeloid (CD14, MNDA, TREM1, CD1d, C1qR/CD93 and granulocyte markers (FPR1, GCSFR/CD114, S100A8-9/12. Differential expression of CSF1R, CSF3R, C1QR1, C3AR1, CD1d, CD43, CXCL16, and CX3CR1 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, increased expression of RARA and KLF2 transcripts in CD16+ Mo coincided with absence of cell surface cutaneous lymphocyte associated antigen (CLA expression, indicating potential imprinting for non-skin homing. Conclusion These results suggest that CD16+ and CD16- Mo originate from a common myeloid precursor, with CD16+ Mo having a more MΦ – and DC-like transcription program suggesting a more advanced stage of differentiation. Distinct transcriptional programs, together

  6. Comparative expression profiling of distinct T cell subsets undergoing oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Lichtenfels

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of adoptive T cell transfer-based immunotherapies is often limited due to different escape mechanisms established by tumors in order to evade the hosts' immune system. The establishment of an immunosuppressive micromilieu by tumor cells along with distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes is often associated with oxidative stress that can affect antigen-specific memory/effector cytotoxic T cells thereby substantially reducing their frequency and functional activation. Therefore, protection of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from oxidative stress may enhance the anti-tumor-directed immune response. In order to better define the key pathways/proteins involved in the response to oxidative stress a comparative 2-DE-based proteome analysis of naïve CD45RA(+ and their memory/effector CD45RO(+ T cell counterparts in the presence and absence of low dose hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 was performed in this pilot study. Based on the profiling data of these T cell subpopulations under the various conditions, a series of differentially expressed spots were defined, members thereof identified by mass spectrometry and subsequently classified according to their cellular function and localization. Representative targets responding to oxidative stress including proteins involved in signaling pathways, in regulating the cellular redox status as well as in shaping/maintaining the structural cell integrity were independently verified at the transcript and protein level under the same conditions in both T cell subsets. In conclusion the resulting profiling data describe complex, oxidative stress-induced, but not strictly concordant changes within the respective expression profiles of CD45RA(+ and CD45RO(+ T cells. Some of the differentially expressed genes/proteins might be further exploited as potential targets toward modulating the redox capacity of the distinct lymphocyte subsets thereby providing the basis for further studies

  7. Tumour necrosis factor-α production in fibrosing alveolitis is macrophage subset specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelidis, Panos; McGrath, Deirdre S; Southcott, Anne Marie; Black, Carol M; du Bois, Roland M

    2001-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α is upregulated in fibrosing alveolitis (FA) in humans. The aim of this study was to compare the TNF-α secretory profile of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and peripheral blood monocytes (Mos) of patients with cryptogenic FA and systemic sclerosis (SSc), a rheumatological disorder in which lung fibrosis can occur. In particular, we wished to assess whether TNF-α levels differ between SSc patients with FA (FASSc) and a nonfibrotic group. Methods The reverse haemolytic plaque assay was used to evaluate the secretion of cytokine at a single cell level while immunostaining allowed subtyping of AMs and Mos. Results This study demonstrated a difference in total TNF-α levels produced by AMs when the levels in subjects with FA (cryptogenic FA and FASSc) were compared to levels in either SSc patients without FA (P = 0.0002) or normal healthy controls (P < 0.001). In addition, AMs from patients with FASSc secreted more TNF-α than those of patients with no FA (P = 0.003). In contrast, there were no significant differences in Mo TNF-α secretion between the groups. A positive correlation was found between total TNF-α level and number of neutrophils obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with FA (r = 0.49, P < 0.04). Finally, it was demonstrated that there was significant heterogeneity of TNF-α secretion and that a numerically significant subset of mononuclear phagocytes, RFD7, was responsible for more than 80% of TNF-α production. Conclusion By demonstrating the primary cell source of TNF-α in FASSc, more accurately targeted, possibly localized, anti-TNF strategies might be employed with success in the future. PMID:11737936

  8. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  9. Profiling of ARDS Pulmonary Edema Fluid Identifies a Metabolically Distinct Subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Angela J; Contrepois, Kevin; Wu, Manhong; Zheng, Ming; Peltz, Gary; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2017-03-03

    There is considerable biologic and physiologic heterogeneity among patients who meet standard clinical criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that there exists a sub-group of ARDS patients who exhibit a metabolically distinct profile. We examined undiluted pulmonary edema fluid obtained at the time of endotracheal intubation from 16 clinically phenotyped ARDS patients and 13 control patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Non-targeted metabolic profiling was carried out on the undiluted edema fluid. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses including principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) were conducted to find discriminant metabolites. 760 unique metabolites were identified in the pulmonary edema fluid of these 29 patients. We found that a subset of ARDS patients (6/16, 38%) presented a distinct metabolic profile with the overrepresentation of 235 metabolites compared to edema fluid from the other 10 ARDS patients, whose edema fluid metabolic profile was indistinguishable from those of the 13 control patients with hydrostatic edema. This "high metabolite" endotype was characterized by higher concentrations of metabolites belonging to all of the main metabolic classes including lipids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. This distinct group with high metabolite levels in the edema fluid was also associated with a higher mortality rate. Thus, metabolic profiling of the edema fluid of ARDS patients supports the hypothesis that there is considerable biologic heterogeneity among ARDS patients who meet standard clinical and physiologic criteria for ARDS.

  10. Distinct Functions of Specialized Dendritic Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis and the Road Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Zernecke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is modulated by immune mechanisms. Dendritic cells (DCs and T cells are present within atherosclerotic lesions and function as central players in the initiation and modulation of adaptive immune responses. In previous years, we have studied the functional contribution of distinct DC subsets in disease development, namely, that of CCL17-expressing DCs as well as that of plasmacytoid DCs that play specialized roles in disease development. This review focuses on important findings gathered in these studies and dissects the multifaceted contribution of CCL17-expressing DCs and pDCs to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, an outlook on future challenges faced when studying DCs in this detrimental disease are provided, and hurdles that will need to be overcome in order to enable a better understanding of the contribution of DCs to atherogenesis are discussed, a prerequisite for their therapeutic targeting in atherosclerosis.

  11. IL-4 dependent alternatively-activated macrophages have a distinctive in vivo gene expression phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiliano David

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Alternatively-activated" macrophages are found in Th2-mediated inflammatory settings such as nematode infection and allergic pulmonary inflammation. Due in part to a lack of markers, these cells have not been well characterized in vivo and their function remains unknown. Results We have used murine macrophages elicited by nematode infection (NeMφ as a source of in vivo derived alternatively activated macrophages. Using three distinct yet complementary molecular approaches we have established a gene expression profile of alternatively activated macrophages and identified macrophage genes that are regulated in vivo by IL-4. First, genes abundantly expressed were identified by an expressed sequence tag strategy. Second, an array of 1176 known mouse genes was screened for differential expression between NeMφ from wild type or IL-4 deficient mice. Third, a subtractive library was screened to identify novel IL-4 dependent macrophage genes. Differential expression was confirmed by real time RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that alternatively activated macrophages generated in vivo have a gene expression profile distinct from any macrophage population described to date. Several of the genes we identified, including those most abundantly expressed, have not previously been associated with macrophages and thus this study provides unique new information regarding the phenotype of macrophages found in Th2-mediated, chronic inflammatory settings. Our data also provide additional in vivo evidence for parallels between the inflammatory processes involved in nematode infection and allergy.

  12. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan eSudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many of the best studied macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly-altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly-altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and to show the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.

  13. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Targeting of CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T Cells in Secondary Lymphoid Organs Is Associated with Robust CXCL10 Expression in Monocyte/Macrophage Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Masayuki; Sato, Hirotaka; Okamura, Tomotaka; Uda, Akihiko; Takeda, Satoshi; Ahmed, Nursarat; Shichino, Shigeyuki; Shiino, Teiichiro; Saito, Yohei; Watanabe, Satoru; Sugimoto, Chie; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Ato, Manabu; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Izumo, Shuji; Matsushima, Kouji; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Ansari, Aftab A; Villinger, Francois; Mori, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Glycosylation of Env defines pathogenic properties of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We previously demonstrated that pathogenic SIVmac239 and a live-attenuated, quintuple deglycosylated Env mutant (Δ5G) virus target CD4(+) T cells residing in different tissues during acute infection. SIVmac239 and Δ5G preferentially infected distinct CD4(+) T cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) and within the lamina propria of the small intestine, respectively (C. Sugimoto et al., J Virol 86:9323-9336, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00948-12). Here, we studied the host responses relevant to SIV targeting of CXCR3(+) CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells in SLOs. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that Th1-polarized inflammatory responses, defined by expression of CXCR3 chemokines, were distinctly induced in the SIVmac239-infected animals. Consistent with robust expression of CXCL10, CXCR3(+) T cells were depleted from blood in the SIVmac239-infected animals. We also discovered that elevation of CXCL10 expression in blood and SLOs was secondary to the induction of CD14(+) CD16(+) monocytes and MAC387(+) macrophages, respectively. Since the significantly higher levels of SIV infection in SLOs occurred with a massive accumulation of infiltrated MAC387(+) macrophages, T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and residential macrophages near high endothelial venules, the results highlight critical roles of innate/inflammatory responses in SIVmac239 infection. Restricted infection in SLOs by Δ5G also suggests that glycosylation of Env modulates innate/inflammatory responses elicited by cells of monocyte/macrophage/DC lineages.IMPORTANCE We previously demonstrated that a pathogenic SIVmac239 virus and a live-attenuated, deglycosylated mutant Δ5G virus infected distinct CD4(+) T cell subsets in SLOs and the small intestine, respectively (C. Sugimoto et al., J Virol 86:9323-9336, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00948-12). Accordingly, infections with SIVmac239, but not with Δ5G

  14. Distinct macrophage phenotypes in allergic and nonallergic lung inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbe, Patricia; Draijer, Christina; Rebelo Borg, Thiago; Luinge, Marjan; Timens, Wim; Wouters, Inge M.; Melgert, Barbro N.; Hylkema, Machteld N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to farm environments is a risk factor for nonallergic lung disease. In contrast to allergic asthma, in which type 2 helper T cell (Th2) activation is dominant, exposure to farm dust extracts (FDE) induces Th1/Th17 lung inflammation, associated with neutrophil infiltration. Macrophag

  15. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  16. An abundant tissue macrophage population in the adult murine heart with a distinct alternatively-activated macrophage profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R Pinto

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs are a previously uncharacterised cell type that we have identified and characterise here as an abundant GFP(+ population within the adult Cx(3cr1(GFP/+ knock-in mouse heart. They comprise the predominant myeloid cell population in the myocardium, and are found throughout myocardial interstitial spaces interacting directly with capillary endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Flow cytometry-based immunophenotyping shows that cTMs exhibit canonical macrophage markers. Gene expression analysis shows that cTMs (CD45(+CD11b(+GFP(+ are distinct from mononuclear CD45(+CD11b(+GFP(+ cells sorted from the spleen and brain of adult Cx(3cr1(GFP/+ mice. Gene expression profiling reveals that cTMs closely resemble alternatively-activated anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, expressing a number of M2 markers, including Mrc1, CD163, and Lyve-1. While cTMs perform normal tissue macrophage homeostatic functions, they also exhibit a distinct phenotype, involving secretion of salutary factors (including IGF-1 and immune modulation. In summary, the characterisation of cTMs at the cellular and molecular level defines a potentially important role for these cells in cardiac homeostasis.

  17. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail.

  18. Distinct patterns of novel gene mutations in poor-prognostic stereotyped subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strefford, J C; Sutton, L-A; Baliakas, P

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed recurrent mutations of the NOTCH1, SF3B1 and BIRC3 genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), especially among aggressive, chemorefractory cases. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown whether their presence may differ in subsets of patients carrying stereotyped B-cell...

  19. Tumour necrosis factor-α production in fibrosing alveolitis is macrophage subset specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Carol M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α is upregulated in fibrosing alveolitis (FA in humans. The aim of this study was to compare the TNF-α secretory profile of alveolar macrophages (AMs and peripheral blood monocytes (Mos of patients with cryptogenic FA and systemic sclerosis (SSc, a rheumatological disorder in which lung fibrosis can occur. In particular, we wished to assess whether TNF-α levels differ between SSc patients with FA (FASSc and a nonfibrotic group. Methods The reverse haemolytic plaque assay was used to evaluate the secretion of cytokine at a single cell level while immunostaining allowed subtyping of AMs and Mos. Results This study demonstrated a difference in total TNF-α levels produced by AMs when the levels in subjects with FA (cryptogenic FA and FASSc were compared to levels in either SSc patients without FA (P = 0.0002 or normal healthy controls (P P = 0.003. In contrast, there were no significant differences in Mo TNF-α secretion between the groups. A positive correlation was found between total TNF-α level and number of neutrophils obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with FA (r = 0.49, P Conclusion By demonstrating the primary cell source of TNF-α in FASSc, more accurately targeted, possibly localized, anti-TNF strategies might be employed with success in the future.

  20. Immune Reactions against Gene Gun Vaccines Are Differentially Modulated by Distinct Dendritic Cell Subsets in the Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Stefanie Weber

    Full Text Available The skin accommodates multiple dendritic cell (DC subsets with remarkable functional diversity. Immune reactions are initiated and modulated by the triggering of DC by pathogen-associated or endogenous danger signals. In contrast to these processes, the influence of intrinsic features of protein antigens on the strength and type of immune responses is much less understood. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of distinct DC subsets in immune reactions against two structurally different model antigens, E. coli beta-galactosidase (betaGal and chicken ovalbumin (OVA under otherwise identical conditions. After epicutaneous administration of the respective DNA vaccines with a gene gun, wild type mice induced robust immune responses against both antigens. However, ablation of langerin+ DC almost abolished IgG1 and cytotoxic T lymphocytes against betaGal but enhanced T cell and antibody responses against OVA. We identified epidermal Langerhans cells (LC as the subset responsible for the suppression of anti-OVA reactions and found regulatory T cells critically involved in this process. In contrast, reactions against betaGal were not affected by the selective elimination of LC, indicating that this antigen required a different langerin+ DC subset. The opposing findings obtained with OVA and betaGal vaccines were not due to immune-modulating activities of either the plasmid DNA or the antigen gene products, nor did the differential cellular localization, size or dose of the two proteins account for the opposite effects. Thus, skin-borne protein antigens may be differentially handled by distinct DC subsets, and, in this way, intrinsic features of the antigen can participate in immune modulation.

  1. Resting and injury-induced inflamed periosteum contain multiple macrophage subsets that are located at sites of bone growth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kylie Anne; Raggatt, Liza-Jane; Millard, Susan; Batoon, Lena; Chiu-Ku Wu, Andy; Chang, Ming-Kang; Hume, David Arthur; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Better understanding of bone growth and regeneration mechanisms within periosteal tissues will improve understanding of bone physiology and pathology. Macrophage contributions to bone biology and repair have been established but specific investigation of periosteal macrophages has not been undertaken. We used an immunohistochemistry approach to characterize macrophages in growing murine bone and within activated periosteum induced in a mouse model of bone injury. Osteal tissue macrophages (osteomacs) and resident macrophages were distributed throughout resting periosteum. In tissues collected from 4-week-old mice, osteomacs were observed intimately associated with sites of periosteal diaphyseal and metaphyseal bone dynamics associated with normal growth. This included F4/80(+)Mac-2(-/low) osteomac association with extended tracks of bone formation (modeling) on diphyseal periosteal surfaces. Although this recapitulated endosteal osteomac characteristics, there was subtle variance in the morphology and spatial organization of periosteal modeling-associated osteomacs, which likely reflects the greater structural complexity of periosteum. Osteomacs, resident macrophages and inflammatory macrophages (F4/80(+)Mac-2(hi)) were associated with the complex bone dynamics occurring within the periosteum at the metaphyseal corticalization zone. These three macrophage subsets were also present within activated native periosteum after bone injury across a 9-day time course that spanned the inflammatory through remodeling bone healing phases. This included osteomac association with foci of endochondral ossification within the activated native periosteum. These observations confirm that osteomacs are key components of both osteal tissues, in spite of salient differences between endosteal and periosteal structure and that multiple macrophage subsets are involved in periosteal bone dynamics.

  2. Deconstruction of O-glycosylation--GalNAc-T isoforms direct distinct subsets of the O-glycoproteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjoldager, Katrine T; Joshi, Hiren J; Kong, Yun; Goth, Christoffer K; King, Sarah Louise; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is found on most proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway in metazoan cells. The O-glycoproteome is regulated by up to 20 polypeptide GalNAc-Ts and the contributions and biological functions of individual GalNAc-Ts are poorly understood. Here, we used a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-directed knockout strategy to probe the contributions of the major GalNAc-Ts (GalNAc-T1 and GalNAc-T2) in liver cells and explore how the GalNAc-T repertoire quantitatively affects the O-glycoproteome. We demonstrate that the majority of the O-glycoproteome is covered by redundancy, whereas distinct subsets of substrates are modified by non-redundant functions of GalNAc-T1 and GalNAc-T2. The non-redundant O-glycoproteome subsets and specific transcriptional responses for each isoform are related to different cellular processes; for the GalNAc-T2 isoform, these support a role in lipid metabolism. The results demonstrate that GalNAc-Ts have different non-redundant glycosylation functions, which may affect distinct cellular processes. The data serves as a comprehensive resource for unique GalNAc-T substrates. Our study provides a new view of the differential regulation of the O-glycoproteome, suggesting that the plurality of GalNAc-Ts arose to regulate distinct protein functions and cellular processes.

  3. RBP-J is required for M2 macrophage polarization in response to chitin and mediates expression of a subset of M2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldi, Julia; Shang, Yingli; Zhao, Baohong; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-03-01

    Development of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage phenotypes is a complex process that is coordinately regulated by a plethora of pathways and factors. Here, we report that RBP-J, a DNA-binding protein that integrates signals from multiple pathways including the Notch pathway, is critically involved in polarization of M2 macrophages. Mice deficient in RBP-J in the myeloid compartment exhibited impaired M2 phenotypes in vivo in a chitin-induced model of M2 polarization. Consistent with the in vivo findings, M2 polarization was partially compromised in vitro in Rbpj-deficient macrophages as demonstrated by reduced expression of a subset of M2 effector molecules including arginase 1. Functionally, myeloid Rbpj deficiency impaired M2 effector functions including recruitment of eosinophils and suppression of T cell proliferation. Collectively, we have identified RBP-J as an essential regulator of differentiation and function of alternatively activated macrophages.

  4. Distinct T cell signatures define subsets of patients with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark C.; Pierson, Emily R.; Spieker, Andrew J.; Nielsen, A. Scott; Posso, Sylvia; Kita, Mariko; Buckner, Jane H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated T cell responses to myelin proteins in the blood of healthy controls and 2 groups of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who exhibited lesions either predominantly in the brain or predominantly in the spinal cord in order to assess whether distinct neuroinflammatory patterns were associated with different myelin protein–specific T cell effector function profiles and whether these profiles differed from healthy controls. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from patients with brain-predominant RRMS, patients with spinal cord–predominant RRMS, and age-matched healthy controls and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays to quantify interferon gamma–secreting (Th1) and interleukin 17–secreting (Th17) cells responding directly ex vivo to myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Results: Although MBP and MOG elicited different responses, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had spinal cord–predominant lesions exhibited significantly higher Th17:Th1 ratios in response to both MBP and MOG compared to patients with brain-predominant MS. Incorporating the cytokine responses to both antigens into logistic regression models showed that these cytokine responses were able to provide good discrimination between patients with distinct neuroinflammatory patterns. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the localization of lesions within the brain vs the spinal cord in patients with MS is associated with different effector T cell responses to myelin proteins. Further investigation of the relationship between T cell effector function, antigen specificities, and lesion sites may reveal features of pathogenic pathways that are distinct to patients with different neuroinflammatory patterns. PMID:27606354

  5. Macrophage subsets in mechanical brain injury (MBI)--a contribution to timing of MBI based on immunohistochemical methods: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Jakob, S; Mann, S; Saternus, K S; Pedal, I; Meissner, C

    2009-05-01

    Cortical hemorrhages as a consequence of closed mechanical brain injury (MBI) trigger an inflammatory response including a distinct increase of macrophages. According to published data this reactive macrophage population is heterogenous as to their immunological properties. The expression of certain immunohistochemically detectable epitopes of macrophages, however, may correlate with the posttraumatic interval (PTI). In a pilot study, 50 selected cases of cortical hemorrhages with 1 min to 1.5 years PTI were examined by light microscopy and macrophages were labeled with CD68-, HLA-D-, HAM-56-, LN-5-, and 25F9-antibodies, while hemosiderin was detected by a Prussian-blue reaction. Qualitative and semiquantitative investigations were performed. The semiquantitative study included 5 different classes. The results of the study revealed a distinct timetable of the appearance of macrophages labeled with certain antibodies. While HLA-D immunoreactivity was detected after a PTI of 6h in the cortex and white matter bordering the traumatic hemorrhage, CD68 immunopositive macrophages were present after 12h, LN-5 and HAM-56 after 48h, and 25F9 within 10d. Hemosiderin-containing macrophages were detectable within 100h in the same region. Within the hemorrhage itself a certain immunoreactivity of macrophages starts several hours before: CD68 after 3h, LN-5 after 24h, HAM-56 after 31h, hemosiderin after 76h, and 25F9 after 4d. For forensic purposes these observations are of crucial importance because the time course of the appearance of certain immunopositive macrophages labeled with different antibodies allows a differentiated timing of contusional injuries; however, the cause of this different immunopositive reaction remains unexplained. The observed time dependency of different macrophage antigen expressions in cortical hemorrhages after closed head injury is a suitable method to estimate the PTI and will allow a forensic reliable estimation if future investigations are

  6. Recurrent somatic mutations in POLR2A define a distinct subset of meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Victoria E; Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Bai, Hanwen; Youngblood, Mark W; Lee, Tong Ihn; Baranoski, Jacob F; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Abraham, Brian J; Weintraub, Abraham S; Hnisz, Denes; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Durán, Daniel; Goldmann, Johanna E; Schramm, Johannes; Goldbrunner, Roland; Piepmeier, Joseph M; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Günel, Jennifer Moliterno; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A; Günel, Murat

    2016-10-01

    RNA polymerase II mediates the transcription of all protein-coding genes in eukaryotic cells, a process that is fundamental to life. Genomic mutations altering this enzyme have not previously been linked to any pathology in humans, which is a testament to its indispensable role in cell biology. On the basis of a combination of next-generation genomic analyses of 775 meningiomas, we report that recurrent somatic p.Gln403Lys or p.Leu438_His439del mutations in POLR2A, which encodes the catalytic subunit of RNA polymerase II (ref. 1), hijack this essential enzyme and drive neoplasia. POLR2A mutant tumors show dysregulation of key meningeal identity genes, including WNT6 and ZIC1/ZIC4. In addition to mutations in POLR2A, NF2, SMARCB1, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, PIK3CA, and SMO, we also report somatic mutations in AKT3, PIK3R1, PRKAR1A, and SUFU in meningiomas. Our results identify a role for essential transcriptional machinery in driving tumorigenesis and define mutually exclusive meningioma subgroups with distinct clinical and pathological features.

  7. Subsets of Visceral Adipose Tissue Nuclei with Distinct Levels of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Ji, Lexiang; Lee, Kevin J; Yu, Miao; He, Chuan; Ambati, Suresh; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Jackson, Crystal; Baile, Clifton A; Schmitz, Robert J; Meagher, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    The reprogramming of cellular memory in specific cell types, and in visceral adipocytes in particular, appears to be a fundamental aspect of obesity and its related negative health outcomes. We explored the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains epigenetically distinct subpopulations of adipocytes that are differentially potentiated to record cellular memories of their environment. Adipocytes are large, fragile, and technically difficult to efficiently isolate and fractionate. We developed fluorescence nuclear cytometry (FNC) and fluorescence activated nuclear sorting (FANS) of cellular nuclei from visceral adipose tissue (VAT) using the levels of the pan-adipocyte protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 (PPARg2), to distinguish classes of PPARg2-Positive (PPARg2-Pos) adipocyte nuclei from PPARg2-Negative (PPARg2-Neg) leukocyte and endothelial cell nuclei. PPARg2-Pos nuclei were 10-fold enriched for most adipocyte marker transcripts relative to PPARg2-Neg nuclei. PPARg2-Pos nuclei showed 2- to 50-fold higher levels of transcripts encoding most of the chromatin-remodeling factors assayed, which regulate the methylation of histones and DNA cytosine (e.g., DNMT1, TET1, TET2, KDM4A, KMT2C, SETDB1, PAXIP1, ARID1A, JMJD6, CARM1, and PRMT5). PPARg2-Pos nuclei were large with decondensed chromatin. TAB-seq demonstrated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) levels were remarkably dynamic in gene bodies of various classes of VAT nuclei, dropping 3.8-fold from the highest quintile of expressed genes to the lowest. In short, VAT-derived adipocytes appear to be more actively remodeling their chromatin than non-adipocytes.

  8. The magnitude of HIV-1 resistance to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc may impart a differential alteration in HIV-1 tropism for macrophages and T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Moore, Miranda S; Ellett, Anne; Gray, Lachlan R; Duncan, Renee; Salimi, Hamid; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Purcell, Damian F J; Lewin, Sharon R; Lee, Benhur; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R; Roche, Michael

    2013-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to CCR5 antagonists, including maraviroc (MVC), results from alterations in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) enabling recognition of antagonist-bound CCR5. Here, we characterized tropism alterations for CD4+ T-cell subsets and macrophages by Envs from two subjects who developed MVC resistance in vivo, which displayed either relatively efficient or inefficient recognition of MVC-bound CCR5. We show that MVC-resistant Env with efficient recognition of drug-bound CCR5 displays a tropism shift for CD4+ T-cell subsets associated with increased infection of central memory T-cells and reduced infection of effector memory and transitional memory T-cells, and no change in macrophage infectivity. In contrast, MVC-resistant Env with inefficient recognition of drug-bound CCR5 displays no change in tropism for CD4+ T-cell subsets, but exhibits a significant reduction in macrophage infectivity. The pattern of HIV-1 tropism alterations for susceptible cells may therefore be variable in subjects with MVC resistance.

  9. Distribution of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques and Their Production by Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophage Subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Nynke A.; de Vries, Bastiaan M. Wallis; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Harlaar, Niels J.; Tio, Rene A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Westra, Johanna

    In this study, the potential of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) sense for detection of atherosclerotic plaque instability was explored. Secondly, expression of MMPs by macrophage subtypes and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. Twenty-three consecutive plaques removed during carotid

  10. Yeast silencing factor Sir4 and a subset of nucleoporins form a complex distinct from nuclear pore complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapetina, Diego L; Ptak, Christopher; Roesner, Ulyss K; Wozniak, Richard W

    2017-09-07

    Interactions occurring at the nuclear envelope (NE)-chromatin interface influence both NE structure and chromatin organization. Insights into the functions of NE-chromatin interactions have come from the study of yeast subtelomeric chromatin and its association with the NE, including the identification of various proteins necessary for tethering subtelomeric chromatin to the NE and the silencing of resident genes. Here we show that four of these proteins-the silencing factor Sir4, NE-associated Esc1, the SUMO E3 ligase Siz2, and the nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein Nup170-physically and functionally interact with one another and a subset of NPC components (nucleoporins or Nups). Importantly, this group of Nups is largely restricted to members of the inner and outer NPC rings, but it lacks numerous others including cytoplasmically and nucleoplasmically positioned Nups. We propose that this Sir4-associated Nup complex is distinct from holo-NPCs and that it plays a role in subtelomeric chromatin organization and NE tethering. © 2017 Lapetina et al.

  11. A Distinct Lung-Interstitium-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cell Subset Confers Enhanced Protection to Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo Gilchuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature and anatomic location of the protective memory CD8+ T cell subset induced by intranasal vaccination remain poorly understood. We developed a vaccination model to assess the anatomic location of protective memory CD8+ T cells and their role in lower airway infections. Memory CD8+ T cells elicited by local intranasal, but not systemic, vaccination with an engineered non-replicative CD8+ T cell-targeted antigen confer enhanced protection to a lethal respiratory viral challenge. This protection depends on a distinct CXCR3LO resident memory CD8+ T (Trm cell population that preferentially localizes to the pulmonary interstitium. Because they are positioned close to the mucosa, where infection occurs, interstitial Trm cells act before inflammation can recruit circulating memory CD8+ T cells into the lung tissue. This results in a local protective immune response as early as 1 day post-infection. Hence, vaccine strategies that induce lung interstitial Trm cells may confer better protection against respiratory pathogens.

  12. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization.

  13. Identification of ITGA4/ITGB7 and ITGAE/ITGB7 expressing subsets of decidual dendritic-like cells within distinct microdomains of the pregnant mouse uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, Jochen; Karsten, Christian M; Wilke, Sonja; Röbke, Astrid; Kruse, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Several leukocyte populations have been described within the pregnant mouse uterus, some of which express the integrin beta 7 (ITGB7). Here we demonstrate that the majority of the ITGB7(+) decidual leukocytes belong to the dendritic cell (DC) lineage. By multiparameter flow cytometric analysis we demonstrated the existence of three distinct DC subsets, characterized by differential expression of ITGA4/ITGB7 (formerly alpha4beta7-integrin) and ITGAE/ITGB7 (formerly alphaEbeta7-integrin). Importantly, the predominant DC subsets reside in distinct microdomains of the Day 9 pregnant mouse uterus. ITGAX(+) ITGAM(med) ITGA4/ITGB7(+) ITGAE(-) (formerly CD11c(+) CD11b(med) alpha4beta7(+) alphaE(-)) cells represent the majority of DCs in the vascular zone (VZ), whereas ITGAX(+) ITGAM(-) ITGAE/ITGB7(+) (formerly CD11c(+) CD11b(-) alphaEbeta7(+)) DCs are mainly located in the lower central decidua basalis (cDB) and the underlying myometrium. A population of ITGAX(+) ITGAM(low) DCs lacking ITGB7 are restricted to the cDB. Confocal microscopy studies show direct contact of VZ DCs with uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, suggesting a functional relationship between both cell populations. Collectively, our data identify three phenotypically distinct DC subsets residing in distinct microdomains of the uterus. The differential expression of ITGA4/ITGB7 and ITGAE/ITGB7 suggests distinct functional roles of the different DC subsets during early pregnancy.

  14. The distinct fate of smooth and rough Mycobacterium abscessus variants inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Anne-Laure; Viljoen, Albertus; Bah, Aïcha; Simeone, Roxane; Bernut, Audrey; Laencina, Laura; Deramaudt, Therese; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Vergne, Isabelle; de Chastellier, Chantal; Kremer, Laurent; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium responsible for pulmonary and cutaneous infections in immunocompetent patients and in patients with Mendelian disorders, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Mycobacterium abscessus is known to transition from a smooth (S) morphotype with cell surface-associated glycopeptidolipids (GPL) to a rough (R) morphotype lacking GPL. Herein, we show that M. abscessus S and R variants are able to grow inside macrophages and are present in morphologically distinct phagosomes. The S forms are found mostly as single bacteria within phagosomes characterized by a tightly apposed phagosomal membrane and the presence of an electron translucent zone (ETZ) surrounding the bacilli. By contrast, infection with the R form leads to phagosomes often containing more than two bacilli, surrounded by a loose phagosomal membrane and lacking the ETZ. In contrast to the R variant, the S variant is capable of restricting intraphagosomal acidification and induces less apoptosis and autophagy. Importantly, the membrane of phagosomes enclosing the S forms showed signs of alteration, such as breaks or partial degradation. Although not frequently encountered, these events suggest that the S form is capable of provoking phagosome-cytosol communication. In conclusion, M. abscessus S exhibits traits inside macrophages that are reminiscent of slow-growing mycobacterial species.

  15. The distinct fate of smooth and rough Mycobacterium abscessus variants inside macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Anne-Laure; Viljoen, Albertus; Bah, Aïcha; Simeone, Roxane; Bernut, Audrey; Laencina, Laura; Deramaudt, Therese; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Vergne, Isabelle; de Chastellier, Chantal; Kremer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium responsible for pulmonary and cutaneous infections in immunocompetent patients and in patients with Mendelian disorders, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Mycobacterium abscessus is known to transition from a smooth (S) morphotype with cell surface-associated glycopeptidolipids (GPL) to a rough (R) morphotype lacking GPL. Herein, we show that M. abscessus S and R variants are able to grow inside macrophages and are present in morphologically distinct phagosomes. The S forms are found mostly as single bacteria within phagosomes characterized by a tightly apposed phagosomal membrane and the presence of an electron translucent zone (ETZ) surrounding the bacilli. By contrast, infection with the R form leads to phagosomes often containing more than two bacilli, surrounded by a loose phagosomal membrane and lacking the ETZ. In contrast to the R variant, the S variant is capable of restricting intraphagosomal acidification and induces less apoptosis and autophagy. Importantly, the membrane of phagosomes enclosing the S forms showed signs of alteration, such as breaks or partial degradation. Although not frequently encountered, these events suggest that the S form is capable of provoking phagosome–cytosol communication. In conclusion, M. abscessus S exhibits traits inside macrophages that are reminiscent of slow-growing mycobacterial species. PMID:27906132

  16. Distribution of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques and Their Production by Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophage Subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Nynke A.; de Vries, Bastiaan M. Wallis; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Harlaar, Niels J.; Tio, Rene A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Westra, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the potential of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) sense for detection of atherosclerotic plaque instability was explored. Secondly, expression of MMPs by macrophage subtypes and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. Twenty-three consecutive plaques removed during carotid endarter

  17. Apolipoprotein E inhibits toll-like receptor (TLR)-3- and TLR-4-mediated macrophage activation through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjuan; Kodvawala, Ahmer; Hui, David Y

    2010-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that apoE (apolipoprotein E) expression in macrophages suppresses inflammatory responses; however, whether endogenously synthesized apoE acts intracellularly or after its secretion in suppressing macrophage inflammation remains unclear. The present study used the murine monocyte macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to examine the influence of exogenous apoE on macrophage inflammatory responses induced by TLR (Toll-like receptor)-4 and TLR-3 agonists LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and poly(I-C) respectively. Results showed that exogenously added apoE suppressed the LPS and poly(I-C) induction of IL (interleukin)-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) secretion by RAW 264.7 cells. The mechanism was related to apoE suppression of TLR-agonist-induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and c-Jun. A peptide containing the tandem repeat sequence of the receptor-binding domain of apoE, apoE-(141-155)2, was similarly effective in inhibiting LPS- and poly(I-C)-induced macrophage inflammatory responses. Reductive methylation of lysine residues in apoE, which abolished its receptor-binding capability without affecting its ability to interact with HSPGs (heparin sulfate proteoglycans), inhibited the ability of apoE to suppress macrophage responses to LPS, but had no effect on apoE suppression of poly(I-C)-induced macrophage activation. The ability of apoE to suppress poly(I-C)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production was abolished by heparinase treatment of RAW 264.7 cells to remove cell-surface HSPGs. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenous apoE inhibits macrophage inflammatory responses to TLR-4 and TLR-3 agonists through distinct mechanisms related to receptor and HSPG binding respectively, and that these inhibitory effects converged on suppression of JNK and c-Jun activation which are necessary for macrophage activation.

  18. Experimentally-derived fibroblast gene signatures identify molecular pathways associated with distinct subsets of systemic sclerosis patients in three independent cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Johnson

    Full Text Available Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc has identified four 'intrinsic' subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like, each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFNα signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGFβ signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-κB. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGFβ and TNFα. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFNα is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGFβ signaling.

  19. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, D; Kruithof, E; De Rycke, L; Boots, AM; Mielants, H; Veys, EM; De Keyser, F

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes

  20. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, D; Kruithof, E; De Rycke, L; Boots, AM; Mielants, H; Veys, EM; De Keyser, F

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes a

  1. P2X7R activation drives distinct IL-1 responses in dendritic cells compared to macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Englezou, Pavlos C.; Rothwell, Simon W.; Ainscough, Joseph S.; Brough, David; Landsiedel, Robert; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    The P2X7R is a functionally distinct member of the P2X family of non-selective cation channels associated with rapid activation of the inflammasome complex and signalling interleukin (IL)-1β release in macrophages. The main focus of this investigation was to compare P2X7R-driven IL-1 production by primary murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM). P2X7R expression in murine BMDC and BMM at both transcriptional (P2X7A variant) and protein levels was demonstrated....

  2. Treg/Th17 polarization by distinct subsets of breast cancer cells is dictated by the interaction with mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A.; Dave, Meneka A.; Bliss, Sarah A.; Giec-Ujda, Agata B.; Bryan, Margarette; Pliner, Lillian F.; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) cells (BCCs) exist within a hierarchy beginning with cancer stem cells (CSCs). Unsorted BCCs interact with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs). This study investigated how distinct BCC subsets interacted with MSCs to polarize T-cell response, Tregs versus T helper 17 (Th17). This study tested BC initiating cells (CSCs) and the relatively more mature early and late BC progenitors. CSCs interacted with the highest avidity to MSCs. This interacti...

  3. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    subsets. Methods Gene expression measured in skin from mice with sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (sclGVHD), bleomycin-induced fibrosis, Tsk1... penetrant .) In) addition) to) a) readily) apparent) skin ) fibrosis) resulting) from) ECM) anomalies,) Tsk2/+) mice) show) more) autoimmune) and... penetrant in Tsk2/þ heterozygotes and it is homozygous embryonic lethal. Tsk2/þ mice have many features of human disease including tight skin , dysregulated

  4. A genome-wide linkage scan for distinct subsets of schizophrenia characterized by age at onset and neurocognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ju Lien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As schizophrenia is genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous, targeting genetically informative phenotypes may help identify greater linkage signals. The aim of the study is to evaluate the genetic linkage evidence for schizophrenia in subsets of families with earlier age at onset or greater neurocognitive deficits. METHODS: Patients with schizophrenia (n  =  1,207 and their first-degree relatives (n  =  1,035 from 557 families with schizophrenia were recruited from six data collection field research centers throughout Taiwan. Subjects completed a face-to-face semi-structured interview, the Continuous Performance Test (CPT, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and were genotyped with 386 microsatellite markers across the genome. RESULTS: A maximum nonparametric logarithm of odds (LOD score of 4.17 at 2q22.1 was found in 295 families ranked by increasing age at onset, which had significant increases in the maximum LOD score compared with those obtained in initial linkage analyses using all available families. Based on this subset, a further subsetting by false alarm rate on the undegraded and degraded CPT obtained further increase in the nested subset-based LOD on 2q22.1, with a score of 7.36 in 228 families and 7.71 in 243 families, respectively. CONCLUSION: We found possible evidence of linkage on chromosome 2q22.1 in families of schizophrenia patients with more CPT false alarm rates nested within the families with younger age at onset. These results highlight the importance of incorporating genetically informative phenotypes in unraveling the complex genetics of schizophrenia.

  5. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  6. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Trautwein-Weidner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity.

  7. Absence of the granular layer and keratohyalin define a morphologically distinct subset of individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckman, Philip; Brumbaugh, Steven

    2002-08-01

    The clinical diagnosis of ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) can be difficult. Abnormalities in the granular layer and the ultrastructure of keratohyalin granules (KHG) suggest that morphology may be helpful. To clarify morphologic findings in IV, 41 clinically affected individuals and 21 unaffected family members or age- and sex-matched controls were studied by light microscopy. In these, the granular layer was totally absent in approximately 50% of affected individuals, while present in all controls. Forty-seven individuals in the light microscopy group were also studied by electron microscopy. Keratohyalin granules were absent in all affected individuals lacking the granular layer by light microscopy. Clinical severity usually correlated with the lack of a granular layer and KHG. Absence of the granular layer was consistent in different anatomic sites and in serial biopsies taken over a 1-3-year period. In a subset of clinically affected, unrelated subjects with moderate to severe involvement, four out of 11 (36%) had similar findings. Keratinocytes cultured from affected individuals with no KHG expressed virtually no detectable profilaggrin protein in vitro. The data suggest that a subset of individuals with moderate to severe IV have a consistently absent granular layer and KHG. Absence of the granular layer and lack of KHG correlated almost perfectly; thus light microscopy offers a convenient means of identifying this subtype of IV. However, both morphologic types of IV were observed within single families. Therefore, the relationship between granular layer abnormalities and IV is complex and requires the study of more affected families. One interpretation of the data is that IV is a multigenic disorder in which one of the genes alters profilaggrin expression. We propose this clinical and histologic phenotype as useful for identifying the gene(s) involved and also for determining whether it represents a modifier or a major locus of the disorder.

  8. A novel CD14(high) CD16(high) subset of peritoneal macrophages from cirrhotic patients is associated to an increased response to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio José; Tapia-Abellán, Ana; Fernández-Fernández, María Dolores; Tristán-Manzano, María; Hernández-Caselles, Trinidad; Sánchez-Velasco, Eduardo; Miras-López, Manuel; Martínez-Esparza, María; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) from blood and ascites of cirrhotic patients comparatively with those obtained from blood of healthy controls. The phenotypic profile based on CD14/CD16 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cells were isolated and stimulated in vitro with LPS and heat killed Candida albicans. Phosphorylation of ERK, c-Jun, p38 MAPK, and PKB/Akt was analyzed by Western blotting. A novel CD14(high)CD16(high) M-DM subpopulation is present in ascites (∼33%). The CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate subset is increased in the blood of cirrhotic patients (∼from 4% to 11%) and is predominant in ascites (49%), while the classical CD14(++)CD16(-) subpopulation is notably reduced in ascites (18%). Basal hyperactivation of ERK and JNK/c-Jun pathways observed in ascites M-DM correlates with CD14/CD16 high expressing subsets, while PI3K/PKB does it with the CD16 low expressing cells. In vitro LPS treatment highly increases ERK1/2, PKB/Akt and c-Jun phosphorylation, while that of p38 MAPK is decreased in M-DM from ascites compared to control blood M-DM. Stimulation of healthy blood M-DM with LPS and C. albicans induced higher phosphorylation levels of p38 than those from ascites. Regarding cytokines secretion, in vitro activated M-DM from ascites of cirrhotic patients produced significantly higher amounts of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, and lower levels of IL-1β and IL-12 than control blood M-DM. In conclusion, a new subpopulation of CD14(high)CD16(high) peritoneal M-DM has been identified in ascites of cirrhotic patients, which is very sensitive to LPS stimulation.

  9. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. © 2016 Ma et al.

  10. Stress-Induced In Vivo Recruitment of Human Cytotoxic Natural Killer Cells Favors Subsets with Distinct Receptor Profiles and Associates with Increased Epinephrine Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc B Bigler

    Full Text Available Acute stress drives a 'high-alert' response in the immune system. Psychoactive drugs induce distinct stress hormone profiles, offering a sought-after opportunity to dissect the in vivo immunological effects of acute stress in humans.3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, methylphenidate (MPH, or both, were administered to healthy volunteers in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover-study. Lymphocyte subset frequencies, natural killer (NK cell immune-phenotypes, and changes in effector function were assessed, and linked to stress hormone levels and expression of CD62L, CX3CR1, CD18, and stress hormone receptors on NK cells.MDMA/MPH > MDMA > MPH robustly induced an epinephrine-dominant stress response. Immunologically, rapid redistribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte-subsets towards phenotypically mature NK cells occurred. NK cytotoxicity was unaltered, but they expressed slightly reduced levels of the activating receptor NKG2D. Preferential circulation of mature NK cells was associated with high epinephrine receptor expression among this subset, as well as expression of integrin ligands previously linked to epinephrine-induced endothelial detachment.The acute epinephrine-induced stress response was characterized by rapid accumulation of mature and functional NK cells in the peripheral circulation. This is in line with studies using other acute stressors and supports the role of the acute stress response in rapidly mobilizing the innate immune system to counteract incoming threats.

  11. Macrophages polarization is mediated by the combination of PRR ligands and distinct inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Cao, Xixi; Fang, Jie; Li, Yuhong; Fan, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages recognize microbes through Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs), and then release pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have highlighted that collaboration between different PRRs. However, these studies have neglected the crosstalk between various PRRs on macrophages. In the present study, we investigated the interplay of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2) and TLRs (TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8) in terms of macrophage activation, the expression and production of cytokines. The macrophages were stimulated with a single PRR ligand or a combination of TLR and NOD ligands. After 8 h of incubation, the mRNA expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p35, IL-12p40, IL-13, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was evaluated. The production of these cytokines was also measured. NOD2 synergized with TLR3 agonists on enhancement of IL-10 release. However, the combination of NOD1 with TLR3 ligands showed little effect on IL-10 production. Moreover, NOD2 inhibited the percentages of CD11b + F4/80 + cells activated by TLR3 agonist.

  12. Distinct immunoregulatory properties of macrophage migration inhibitory factors encoded by Eimeria parasites and their chicken host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in host defense against a variety of microorganisms including protozoan parasites. Interestingly, some microbial pathogens also express a MIF-like protein, although its role in disease pathogenesi...

  13. Serum milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8 elevation may subdivide systemic lupus erythematosus into two pathophysiologically distinct subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Yamaguchi, H; Ohmura, K; Yokoyama, T; Yoshifuji, H; Yukawa, N; Kawabata, D; Fujii, T; Morita, S; Nagata, S; Mimori, T

    2014-04-01

    Impaired clearance of apoptotic cells is a potential trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) plays an important role in the clearance of dying cells. Previously, we reported serum MFG-E8 was elevated in some SLE patients. Here we further investigated the prevalence of MFG-E8 in active SLE and other autoimmune diseases and also tried to clarify the characteristics of MFG-E8-positive and -negative SLE. Serum MFG-E8 was measured in 40 active non-treated SLE patients, 104 disease controls and 104 healthy controls by ELISA. Clinical characteristics and serum cytokine profiles were compared between MFG-E8-positive and MFG-E8-negative SLE patients. Prevalence of MFG-E8 was significantly higher in SLE patients (40%) than in various controls (p clinical features, the one with stronger immunological response and the other with stronger inflammatory response, and those two groups may be two distinct subtypes of SLE driven by different mechanisms. Further, MFG-E8 could be used as a biomarker for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in certain SLE patients.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy reveals distinct macrophage- and tick cell-specific morphological stages of Ehrlichia chaffeensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Dedonder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an emerging tick-borne rickettsial pathogen responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Despite the induction of an active host immune response, the pathogen has evolved to persist in its vertebrate and tick hosts. Understanding how the organism progresses in tick and vertebrate host cells is critical in identifying effective strategies to block the pathogen transmission. Our recent molecular and proteomic studies revealed differences in numerous expressed proteins of the organism during its growth in different host environments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed to assess morphological changes in the bacterium within macrophages and tick cells. The stages of pathogen progression observed included the attachment of the organism to the host cells, its engulfment and replication within a morulae by binary fission and release of the organisms from infected host cells by complete host cell lysis or by exocytosis. E. chaffeensis grown in tick cells was highly pleomorphic and appears to replicate by both binary fission and filamentous type cell divisions. The presence of Ehrlichia-like inclusions was also observed within the nucleus of both macrophages and tick cells. This observation was confirmed by confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Morphological differences in the pathogen's progression, replication, and processing within macrophages and tick cells provide further evidence that E. chaffeensis employs unique host-cell specific strategies in support of adaptation to vertebrate and tick cell environments.

  15. DMPD: Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity in primary macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16846591 Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti...Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti... IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity in primary macrophages. Authors Solis M, Goubau

  16. P2X7R activation drives distinct IL-1 responses in dendritic cells compared to macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englezou, Pavlos C; Rothwell, Simon W; Ainscough, Joseph S; Brough, David; Landsiedel, Robert; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2015-08-01

    The P2X(7)R is a functionally distinct member of the P2X family of non-selective cation channels associated with rapid activation of the inflammasome complex and signalling interleukin (IL)-1β release in macrophages. The main focus of this investigation was to compare P2X(7)R-driven IL-1 production by primary murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM). P2X(7)R expression in murine BMDC and BMM at both transcriptional (P2X(7)A variant) and protein levels was demonstrated. Priming with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and receptor activation with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) resulted in markedly enhanced IL-1 (α and β) secretion in BMDC compared with BMM. In both cell types IL-1 production was profoundly inhibited with a P2X(7)R-specific inhibitor (A-740003) demonstrating that this release is predominantly a P2X(7)R-dependent process. These data also suggest that P2X(7)R and caspase-1 activation drive IL-1α release from BMDC. Both cell types expressed constitutively the gain-of-function P2X(7)K as well as the full P2X(7)A variant at equivalent levels. LPS priming reduced significantly levels of P2X(7)A but not P2X(7)K transcripts in both BMDC and BMM. P2X(7)R-induced pore formation, assessed by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, was greater in BMDC, and these cells were protected from cell death. These data demonstrate that DC and macrophages display distinct patterns of cytokine regulation, particularly with respect to IL-1, as a consequence of cell-type specific differences in the physicochemical properties of the P2X(7)R. Understanding the cell-specific regulation of these cytokines is essential for manipulating such responses in health and disease.

  17. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarina Pena DaMata

    Full Text Available Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6, whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection.

  18. Dietary, lifestyle and clinicopathological factors associated with BRAF and K-ras mutations arising in distinct subsets of colorectal cancers in the EPIC Norfolk study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Alison

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRAF and K-ras proto-oncogenes encode components of the ERK signalling pathway and are frequently mutated in colorectal cancer. This study investigates the associations between BRAF and K-ras mutations and clinicopathological, lifestyle and dietary factors in colorectal cancers. Methods 186 adenocarcinomas and 16 adenomas from the EPIC Norfolk study were tested for BRAF and K-ras mutations. Diet and lifestyle data were collected prospectively using seven day food diaries. Results BRAF V600E mutation was found in 15.6% of colorectal cancers but at higher frequencies in cancers with proximal location, poor differentiation and microsatellite instability (MSI (all p K-ras mutation (mostly in codons 12 and 13 was found in 22.0% of colorectal cancers but at higher frequencies in cancers of more advanced Dukes' stage (p = 0.001, microsatellite stable (MSS status (p = 0.002 and in individuals with lower blood high-density lipoprotein concentrations (p = 0.04. Analysis of dietary factors demonstrated no link between BRAF mutation and any specific dietary constituent, however, K-ras mutation was found at higher frequencies in individuals with higher white meat consumption (p K-ras were observed at higher frequencies in individuals consuming lower amounts of fruit (p = 0.02. Conclusion These data support the model of BRAF and K-ras mutations arising in distinct colorectal cancer subsets associated with different clinicopathological and dietary factors, acting as mutually exclusive mechanisms of activation of the same signalling pathway.

  19. Interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are expressed by different subsets of microglia and macrophages after ischemic stroke in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Babcock, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are expressed by microglia and infiltrating macrophages following ischemic stroke. Whereas IL-1beta is primarily neurotoxic in ischemic stroke, TNF-alpha may have neurotoxic and/or neuroprotective effects. We inv...

  20. Macrophage and dendritic cell subsets in IBD: ALDH+ cells are reduced in colon tissue of patients with ulcerative colitis regardless of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, M. K.; Brynjólfsson, S. F.; Dige, A.;

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of the homeostatic balance of intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MQs) may contribute to inflammatory bowel disease. We characterized DC and MQ populations, including their ability to produce retinoic acid, in clinical material encompassing Crohn’s ileitis, Crohn’s coliti...

  1. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carmen; Pernemalm, Maria; Kohonen, Pekka; Laurent, Sophie; Hultenby, Kjell; Vahter, Marie; Lehtiö, Janne; Toprak, Muhammet S; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs.

  2. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vogt

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs.

  3. Macrophage Polarization in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cassetta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are terminally differentiated cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system that also encompasses dendritic cells, circulating blood monocytes, and committed myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Both macrophages and their monocytic precursors can change their functional state in response to microenvironmental cues exhibiting a marked heterogeneity. However, there are still uncertainties regarding distinct expression patterns of surface markers that clearly define macrophage subsets, particularly in the case of human macrophages. In addition to their tissue distribution, macrophages can be functionally polarized into M1 (proinflammatory and M2 (alternatively activated as well as regulatory cells in response to both exogenous infections and solid tumors as well as by systems biology approaches.

  4. Mouse ChemR23 is expressed in dendritic cell subsets and macrophages, and mediates an anti-inflammatory activity of chemerin in a lung disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangsay, Souphalone; Wittamer, Valérie; Bondue, Benjamin; De Henau, Olivier; Rouger, Laurie; Brait, Maryse; Franssen, Jean-Denis; de Nadai, Patricia; Huaux, François; Parmentier, Marc

    2009-11-15

    Chemerin is the ligand of the ChemR23 receptor and a chemoattractant factor for human immature dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, and NK cells. In this study, we characterized the mouse chemerin/ChemR23 system in terms of pharmacology, structure-function, distribution, and in vivo biological properties. Mouse chemerin is synthesized as an inactive precursor (prochemerin) requiring, as in human, the precise processing of its C terminus for generating an agonist of ChemR23. Mouse ChemR23 is highly expressed in immature plasmacytoid DCs and at lower levels in myeloid DCs, macrophages, and NK cells. Mouse prochemerin is expressed in most epithelial cells acting as barriers for pathogens but not in leukocytes. Chemerin promotes calcium mobilization and chemotaxis on DCs and macrophages and these functional responses were abrogated in ChemR23 knockout mice. In a mouse model of acute lung inflammation induced by LPS, chemerin displayed potent anti-inflammatory properties, reducing neutrophil infiltration and inflammatory cytokine release in a ChemR23-dependent manner. ChemR23 knockout mice were unresponsive to chemerin and displayed an increased neutrophil infiltrate following LPS challenge. Altogether, the mouse chemerin/ChemR23 system is structurally and functionally conserved between human and mouse, and mouse can therefore be considered as a good model for studying the anti-inflammatory role of this system in the regulation of immune responses and inflammatory diseases.

  5. Human decidual macrophages and NK cells differentially express Toll-like receptors and display distinct cytokine profiles upon TLR stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eDuriez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Maternofetal pathogen transmission is partially controlled at the level of the maternal uterine mucosa at the fetal implantation site (the decidua basalis, where maternal and fetal cells are in close contact. Toll-like receptors (TLRs may play an important role in initiating rapid immune responses against pathogens in the decidua basalis, however the tolerant microenvironment should be preserved in order to allow fetal development. Here we investigated the expression and functionality of TLRs expressed by decidual macrophages (dMs and NK cells (dNKs, the major decidual immune cell populations.We report for the first time that both human dMs and dNK cells express mRNAs encoding TLRs 1-9, albeit with a higher expression level in dMs. TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 protein expression checked by flow cytometry was positive for both dMs and dNK cells. In vitro treatment of primary dMs and dNK cells with specific TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7/8 and TLR9 agonists enhanced their secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as cytokines and chemokines involved in immune cell crosstalk. Only dNK cells released IFN-γ, whereas only dMs released IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-12. TLR9 activation of dMs resulted in a distinct pattern of cytokine expression compared to the other TLRs. The cytokine profiles expressed by dMs and dNK cells upon TLR activation are compatible with maintenance of the fetotolerant immune environment during initiation of immune responses to pathogens at the maternofetal interface.

  6. Oral Challenge with Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Induces Distinct Changes in B Cell Subsets in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2016-06-01

    A novel human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently established by the Oxford Vaccine Group. In this model, 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of participants developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 6-9 days post-challenge. TD was diagnosed in participants meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. Changes in B cell subpopulations following S. Typhi challenge remain undefined. To address this issue, a subset of volunteers (6 TD and 4 who did not develop TD -NoTD-) was evaluated. Notable changes included reduction in the frequency of B cells (cells/ml) of TD volunteers during disease days and increase in plasmablasts (PB) during the recovery phase (>day 14). Additionally, a portion of PB of TD volunteers showed a significant increase in activation (CD40, CD21) and gut homing (integrin α4β7) molecules. Furthermore, all BM subsets of TD volunteers showed changes induced by S. Typhi infections such as a decrease in CD21 in switched memory (Sm) CD27+ and Sm CD27- cells as well as upregulation of CD40 in unswitched memory (Um) and Naïve cells. Furthermore, changes in the signaling profile of some BM subsets were identified after S. Typhi-LPS stimulation around time of disease. Notably, naïve cells of TD (compared to NoTD) volunteers showed a higher percentage of cells phosphorylating Akt suggesting enhanced survival of these cells. Interestingly, most these changes were temporally associated with disease onset. This is the first study to describe differences in B cell subsets directly related to clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild-type S. Typhi in humans.

  7. Oral Challenge with Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Induces Distinct Changes in B Cell Subsets in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R Toapanta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi was recently established by the Oxford Vaccine Group. In this model, 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of participants developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD- 6-9 days post-challenge. TD was diagnosed in participants meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12h and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia endpoints. Changes in B cell subpopulations following S. Typhi challenge remain undefined. To address this issue, a subset of volunteers (6 TD and 4 who did not develop TD -NoTD- was evaluated. Notable changes included reduction in the frequency of B cells (cells/ml of TD volunteers during disease days and increase in plasmablasts (PB during the recovery phase (>day 14. Additionally, a portion of PB of TD volunteers showed a significant increase in activation (CD40, CD21 and gut homing (integrin α4β7 molecules. Furthermore, all BM subsets of TD volunteers showed changes induced by S. Typhi infections such as a decrease in CD21 in switched memory (Sm CD27+ and Sm CD27- cells as well as upregulation of CD40 in unswitched memory (Um and Naïve cells. Furthermore, changes in the signaling profile of some BM subsets were identified after S. Typhi-LPS stimulation around time of disease. Notably, naïve cells of TD (compared to NoTD volunteers showed a higher percentage of cells phosphorylating Akt suggesting enhanced survival of these cells. Interestingly, most these changes were temporally associated with disease onset. This is the first study to describe differences in B cell subsets directly related to clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild-type S. Typhi in humans.

  8. Oral Challenge with Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Induces Distinct Changes in B Cell Subsets in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R.; Bernal, Paula J.; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S.; Darton, Thomas C.; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S.; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2016-01-01

    A novel human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently established by the Oxford Vaccine Group. In this model, 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of participants developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 6–9 days post-challenge. TD was diagnosed in participants meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. Changes in B cell subpopulations following S. Typhi challenge remain undefined. To address this issue, a subset of volunteers (6 TD and 4 who did not develop TD -NoTD-) was evaluated. Notable changes included reduction in the frequency of B cells (cells/ml) of TD volunteers during disease days and increase in plasmablasts (PB) during the recovery phase (>day 14). Additionally, a portion of PB of TD volunteers showed a significant increase in activation (CD40, CD21) and gut homing (integrin α4β7) molecules. Furthermore, all BM subsets of TD volunteers showed changes induced by S. Typhi infections such as a decrease in CD21 in switched memory (Sm) CD27+ and Sm CD27- cells as well as upregulation of CD40 in unswitched memory (Um) and Naïve cells. Furthermore, changes in the signaling profile of some BM subsets were identified after S. Typhi-LPS stimulation around time of disease. Notably, naïve cells of TD (compared to NoTD) volunteers showed a higher percentage of cells phosphorylating Akt suggesting enhanced survival of these cells. Interestingly, most these changes were temporally associated with disease onset. This is the first study to describe differences in B cell subsets directly related to clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild-type S. Typhi in humans. PMID:27300136

  9. Distinct dendritic cell subsets dictate the fate decision between effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation by a CD24-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeg S; Gorski, Stacey A; Hahn, Steven; Murphy, Kenneth M; Braciale, Thomas J

    2014-03-20

    The contribution of different DC subsets to effector and memory CD8(+) T cell generation during infection and the mechanism by which DCs controls these fate decisions is unclear. Here we demonstrated that the CD103(+) and CD11b(hi) migratory respiratory DC (RDC) subsets after influenza virus infection activated naive virus-specific CD8(+) T cells differentially. CD103(+) RDCs supported the generation of CD8(+) T effector (Teff) cells, which migrate from lymph nodes to the infected lungs. In contrast, migrant CD11b(hi) RDCs activated CD8(+) T cells characteristic of central memory CD8(+) T (CD8(+) Tcm) cells including retention within the draining lymph nodes. CD103(+) RDCs expressed CD24 at an elevated level, contributing to the propensity of this DC subpopulation to support CD8(+) Teff cell differentiation. Mechanistically, CD24 was shown to regulate CD8(+) T cell activation through HMGB1-mediated engagement of T cell RAGE. Thus, there is distribution of labor among DC subsets in regulating CD8(+) T cell differentiation.

  10. Distinct cytokine release profiles from human endothelial and THP-1 macrophage-like cells exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Bremer, Lindsay A; Prall, David N; Schwartzhoff, Jenifer; Hartsel, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    Amphotericin B(AmB) formulations, Fungizone, and Amphotec caused substantially greater proinflammatory cytokine release than AmBisome (L-AMB) and Abelcet in TPA differentiated THP-1 macrophages as determined by antibody based protein arrays. Lipopolysaccharide but not AmB induced significant pro-inflammatory cytokines in human endothelial cells.

  11. Porcine γδ T lymphocytes can be categorized into two functionally and developmentally distinct subsets according to expression of CD2 and level of TCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Katerina; Sinkora, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Porcine γδ T cells have two levels of TCRγδ expression. Whereas TCRγδ(med) cells are mostly CD2(+)CD8(-) and CD2(+)CD8(+), TCRγδ(hi) cells are highly enriched for CD2(-)CD8(-). This distribution is independent of bacterial colonization and it is already established in the thymus prior to export of γδ cells to the periphery. Sorting and cultivation experiments revealed that CD2(-)CD8(-) γδ cells are unable to acquire CD2 and CD8, whereas CD2(+) subsets can gain or loose CD8. There is also differential susceptibility for proliferation between CD2(+) and CD2(-) γδ cells. Although CD2(-)CD8(-) almost do not proliferate, proliferation of CD2(+)CD8(-) and CD2(+)CD8(+) is substantial. Population of CD2(-) γδ cells is also absent in CD1(+) immature thymocytes. Additionally, subpopulations of CD2(+) and CD2(-) γδ cells in the thymus differ in expression of auxiliary surface molecules such as CD25, CD45RA/RC, and MHC class II. Moreover, TCRγδ(hi) cells can generate TCRγδ(med) cells but never the opposite. The only exception is the thymus, where a few TCRγδ(med) cells can be induced to TCRγδ(hi) but only under IL-2 influence. The repertoire of TCRδ is polyclonal in all subsets, indicating that there is the same extent of diversification and equal capability of immune responses. Results collectively indicate that CD2 expression determines two lineages of γδ cells that differ in many aspects. Because CD2(-) γδ cells are missing in the blood of humans and mice but are obvious in other members of γδ-high species such as ruminants and birds, our findings support the idea that circulating CD2(-) γδ T cells are a specific lineage.

  12. Microspheres prepared with different co-polymers of poly(lactic-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or with chitosan cause distinct effects on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Silva, Letícia Bueno da; Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-12-01

    Microencapsulation of bioactive molecules for modulating the immune response during infectious or inflammatory events is a promising approach, since microspheres (MS) protect these labile biomolecules against fast degradation, prolong the delivery over longer periods of time and, in many situations, target their delivery to site of action, avoiding toxic side effects. Little is known, however, about the influence of different polymers used to prepare MS on macrophages. This paper aims to address this issue by evaluating in vitro cytotoxicity, phagocytosis profile and cytokines release from alveolar macrophages (J-774.1) treated with MS prepared with chitosan, and four different co-polymers of PLGA [poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)]. The five MS prepared presented similar diameter and zeta potential each other. Chitosan-MS showed to be cytotoxic to J-774.1 cells, in contrast to PLGA-MS, which were all innocuous to this cell linage. PLGA 5000-MS was more efficiently phagocytized by macrophages compared to the other MS tested. PLGA 5000-MS and 5002-MS induced significant production of TNF-α, while 5000-MS, 5004-MS and 7502-MS decreased spontaneous IL-6 release. Nevertheless, only PLGA 5002-MS induced significant NFkB/SEAP activation. These findings together show that MS prepared with distinct PLGA co-polymers are differently recognized by macrophages, depending on proportion of lactic and glycolic acid in polymeric chain, and on molecular weight of the co-polymer used. Selection of the most adequate polymer to prepare a microparticulate drug delivery system to modulate immunologic system may take into account, therefore, which kind of immunomodulatory response is more adequate for the required treatment.

  13. Nfkb1 inhibits LPS-induced IFN-β and IL-12 p40 production in macrophages by distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixing Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nfkb1-deficient murine macrophages express higher levels of IFN-β and IL-12 p40 following LPS stimulation than control macrophages, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon has not been completely defined. Nfkb1 encodes several gene products including the NF-κB subunit p50 and its precursor p105. p50 is derived from the N-terminal of 105, and p50 homodimers can exhibit suppressive activity when overexpressed. The C-terminal region of p105 is necessary for LPS-induced ERK activation and it has been suggested that ERK activity inhibits both IFN-β and IL-12 p40 following LPS stimulation. However, the contributions of p50 and the C-terminal domain of p105 in regulating endogenous IFN-β(Ifnb and IL-12 p40 (Il12b gene expression in macrophages following LPS stimulation have not been directly compared. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used recombinant retroviruses to express p105, p50, and the C-terminal domain of p105 (p105ΔN in Nfkb1-deficient murine bone marrow-derived macrophages at near endogenous levels. We found that both p50 and p105ΔN inhibited expression of Ifnb, and that inhibition of Ifnb by p105ΔN depended on ERK activation, because a mutant of p105ΔN (p105ΔNS930A that lacks a key serine necessary to support ERK activation failed to inhibit. In contrast, only p105ΔN but not p50 inhibited Il12b expression. Surprisingly, p105ΔNS930A retained inhibitory activity for Il12b, indicating that ERK activation was not necessary for inhibition. The differential effects of p105ΔNS930A on Ifnb and Il12b expression inversely correlated with the function of one of its binding partners, c-Rel. This raised the possibility that p105ΔNS930A influences gene expression by interfering with the function of c-Rel. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that Nfkb1 exhibits multiple gene-specific inhibitory functions following TLR stimulation of murine macrophages.

  14. CovS Simultaneously Activates and Inhibits the CovR-Mediated Repression of Distinct Subsets of Group A Streptococcus Virulence Factor-Encoding Genes▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Treviño, Jeanette; Perez, Nataly; Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Liu, Zhuyun; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Musser, James M.; Sumby, Paul

    2009-01-01

    To colonize and cause disease at distinct anatomical sites, bacterial pathogens must tailor gene expression in a microenvironment-specific manner. The molecular mechanisms that control the ability of the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) to transition between infection sites have yet to be fully elucidated. A key regulator of GAS virulence gene expression is the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system (also known as CsrR-CsrS). covR and covS mutant strains arise spontaneo...

  15. Secretion by stimulated murine macrophages of a heparin-binding fibroblast growth activity, distinct from basic FGE and IL-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappolee, D.A.; Banda, M.J.; Werb, Z.

    1986-03-01

    Wound healing requires granulation and formation of neovascularization tissue. These two events require increases in fibroblasts, vascular endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Macrophages may produce several growth factors which participate in these would healing events. To test this hypothesis they have partially purified a fibroblast growth promoting activity from a murine macrophage cell line (P388 Dl). The activity causes growth in Balb/c and Swiss 3T3 cells as measured by thymidine uptake, nuclear labeling and increase in cell number. PDGF, Basic FGF, and EGF are also mitogenic by thymidine uptake, but purified human IL-1 and recombinant murine IL-1 are not. The activity is pH 2.5-, freeze/thaw-, and dialysis/lyphilyzation-stable. The activity elutes from heparin-Sepharose at 2.0M, but not 0.15m, 0.5M, or 3.0M NaCl. Basic FGF elutes from the same heparin-Sepharose batch at 3.0M, but not at the other three NaCl concentrations. The growth activity is secreted by viable murine macrophage line cells (P388D1, WEHI-3, RAW 264.7) at a 48 hour peak after activating (LPS) or phagocytic stimuli. Unstimulated P388D1 caused growth 1.7 times control whereas stimulation increases the growth 5.1 to 7.1 times control. The optimal activity concentration fails to complement insulin in an assay in which optimal basic FGF concentration complements insulin. These data suggest that the activity may contain a progression factor.

  16. Specific Uptake and Genotoxicity Induced by Polystyrene Nanobeads with Distinct Surface Chemistry on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  17. Specific uptake and genotoxicity induced by polystyrene nanobeads with distinct surface chemistry on human lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Vincent; Dekali, Samir; Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  18. Revisiting mouse peritoneal macrophages: heterogeneity, development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dos Anjos Cassado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue macrophages play a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and also contribute to inflammatory and reparatory responses during pathogenic infection and tissue injury. The high heterogeneity of these macrophages is consistent with their adaptation to distinct tissue environments and specialization to develop niche-specific functions. Although peritoneal macrophages are one of best-studied macrophage populations, only recently it was demonstrated the co-existence of two subsets in mouse PerC, which exhibit distinct phenotypes, functions and origins. These macrophage subsets have been classified according to their morphology as LPMs (large peritoneal macrophages and SPMs (small peritoneal macrophages. LPMs, the most abundant subset under steady-state conditions, express high levels of F4/80 and low levels of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. LPMs appear to be originated from embriogenic precursors, and their maintenance in PerC is regulated by expression of specific transcription factors and tissue-derived signals. Conversely, SPMs, a minor subset in unstimulated PerC, have a F4/80lowMHC-IIhigh phenotype and are generated from bone-marrow-derived myeloid precursors. In response to infectious or inflammatory stimuli, the cellular composition of PerC is dramatically altered, where LPMs disappear and SPMs become the prevalent population together with their precursor, the inflammatory monocyte. SPMs appear to be the major source of inflammatory mediators in PerC during infection whereas LPMs contribute for gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT-independent and retinoic acid-dependent IgA production by peritoneal B-1 cells. In the last years, considerable efforts have been made to broaden our understanding of LPM and SPM origin, transcriptional regulation and functional profile. This review addresses these issues, focusing on the impact of tissue-derived signals and external stimulation in the complex

  19. Heat Stress and Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation of Chicken Macrophage-Like Cell Line Activates Expression of Distinct Sets of Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawinska, Anna; Hsieh, John C; Schmidt, Carl J; Lamont, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat stress requires immediate adjustment of the stressed individual to sudden changes of ambient temperatures. Chickens are particularly sensitive to heat stress due to development of insufficient physiological mechanisms to mitigate its effects. One of the symptoms of heat stress is endotoxemia that results from release of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the guts. Heat-related cytotoxicity is mitigated by the innate immune system, which is comprised mostly of phagocytic cells such as monocytes and macrophages. The objective of this study was to analyze the molecular responses of the chicken macrophage-like HD11 cell line to combined heat stress and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro. The cells were heat-stressed and then allowed a temperature-recovery period, during which the gene expression was investigated. LPS was added to the cells to mimic the heat-stress-related endotoxemia. Semi high-throughput gene expression analysis was used to study a gene panel comprised of heat shock proteins, stress-related genes, signaling molecules and immune response genes. HD11 cell line responded to heat stress with increased mRNA abundance of the HSP25, HSPA2 and HSPH1 chaperones as well as DNAJA4 and DNAJB6 co-chaperones. The anti-apoptotic gene BAG3 was also highly up-regulated, providing evidence that the cells expressed pro-survival processes. The immune response of the HD11 cell line to LPS in the heat stress environment (up-regulation of CCL4, CCL5, IL1B, IL8 and iNOS) was higher than in thermoneutral conditions. However, the peak in the transcriptional regulation of the immune genes was after two hours of temperature-recovery. Therefore, we propose the potential influence of the extracellular heat shock proteins not only in mitigating effects of abiotic stress but also in triggering the higher level of the immune responses. Finally, use of correlation networks for the data analysis aided in discovering subtle differences in the gene expression (i.e. the role

  20. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  1. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  2. A Vibrio vulnificus VvpM Induces IL-1β Production Coupled with Necrotic Macrophage Death via Distinct Spatial Targeting by ANXA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei-Jung Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An inflammatory form of phagocyte death evoked by the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio (V. vulnificus (WT is one of hallmarks to promote their colonization, but the virulence factor and infectious mechanism involved in this process remain largely unknown. Here, we identified extracellular metalloprotease VvpM as a new virulence factor and investigated the molecular mechanism of VvpM which acts during the regulation of the inflammatory form of macrophage death and bacterial colonization. Mutation of the vvpM gene appeared to play major role in the prevention of IL-1β production due to V. vulnificus infection in macrophage. However, the recombinant protein (r VvpM caused IL-1β production coupled with necrotic cell death, which is highly susceptible to the knockdown of annexin A2 (ANXA2 located in both membrane lipid and non-lipid rafts. In lipid rafts, rVvpM recruited NOX enzymes coupled with ANXA2 to facilitate the production of ROS responsible for the epigenetic and transcriptional regulation of NF-κB in the IL-1β promoter. rVvpM acting on non-lipid rafts increased LC3 puncta formation and autophagic flux, which are required for the mRNA expression of Atg5 involved in the autophagosome formation process. The autophagy activation caused by rVvpM induced NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activation in the promoting of IL-1β production. In mouse models of V. vulnificus infection, the VvpM mutant failed to elevate the level of pro-inflammatory responses closely related to IL-1β production and prevented bacterial colonization. These findings delineate VvpM efficiently regulates two pathogenic pathways that stimulate NF-κB-dependent IL-1β production and autophagy-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome via distinct spatial targeting by ANXA2.

  3. Applications of myeloid-specific promoters in transgenic mice support in vivo imaging and functional genomics but do not support the concept of distinct macrophage and dendritic cell lineages or roles in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid lineage cells contribute to innate and acquired immunity, homeostasis, wound repair, and inflammation. There is considerable interest in manipulation of their function in transgenic mice using myeloid-specific promoters. This review considers the applications and specificity of some of the most widely studied transgenes, driven by promoter elements of the lysM, csf1r, CD11c, CD68, macrophage SRA, and CD11b genes, as well as several others. Transgenes have been used in mice to generate myeloid lineage-specific cell ablation, expression of genes of interest, including fluorescent reporters, or deletion via recombination. In general, the specificity of such transgenes has been overinterpreted, and none of them provide well-documented, reliable, differential expression in any specific myeloid cell subset, macrophages, granulocytes, or myeloid DCs. Nevertheless, they have proved valuable in cell isolation, functional genomics, and live imaging of myeloid cell behavior in many different pathologies.

  4. Polarized Macrophages Have Distinct Roles in the Differentiation and Migration of Embryonic Spinal-cord-derived Neural Stem Cells After Grafting to Injured Sites of Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Jingjing; Bian, Ganlan; Liu, Ling; Xue, Qian; Liu, Fangfang; Yu, Caiyong; Zhang, Haifeng; Song, Bing; Chung, Sookja K; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently provokes serious detrimental outcomes because neuronal regeneration is limited in the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the creation of a permissive environment for transplantation therapy with neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) is a promising strategy to replace lost neuronal cells, promote repair, and stimulate functional plasticity after SCI. Macrophages are important SCI-associated inflammatory cells and a major source of secreted factors that modify the lesion milieu. Here, we used conditional medium (CM) from bone marrow-derived M1 or M2 polarized macrophages to culture murine NS/PCs. The NS/PCs showed enhanced astrocytic versus neuronal/oligodendrocytic differentiation in the presence of M1- versus M2-CM. Similarly, cotransplantation of NS/PCs with M1 and M2 macrophages into intact or injured murine spinal cord increased the number of engrafted NS/PC-derived astrocytes and neurons/oligodendrocytes, respectively. Furthermore, when cotransplantated with M2 macrophages, the NS/PC-derived neurons integrated into the local circuitry and enhanced locomotor recovery following SCI. Interesting, engrafted M1 macrophages promoted long-distance rostral migration of NS/PC-derived cells in a chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4)-dependent manner, while engrafted M2 macrophages resulted in limited cell migration of NS/PC-derived cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that the cotransplantation of NS/PCs together with polarized macrophages could constitute a promising therapeutic approach for SCI repair.

  5. Myeloid Colony Stimulating Factors as Regulators of Macrophage Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Hamilton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of functional heterogeneity in macrophages has been defined by two polarized end states known as M1 and M2, which exhibit the pro-inflammatory activities necessary for host defense and the tissue repair activities required for tissue repair respectively. Macrophage populations in different tissue locations exist in distinct phenotypic states across this M1/M2 spectrum and the development and abundance of individual subsets result from the local and systemic action of myeloid colony stimulating factors (CSFs including M-CSF and GM-CSF. These factors have relatively non-overlapping roles in the differentiation and maintenance of specific macrophage subsets. Furthermore there is now evidence that CSFs may also regulate macrophage phenotype during challenge. Cell culture studies from multiple laboratories demonstrate that macrophages developed in the presence of GM-CSF exhibit amplified response to M1 polarizing stimuli while M-CSF potentiates responses to M2 stimuli. As a consequence these factors can be important determinants of the magnitude and duration of both acute and chronic inflammatory pathology and may, therefore, be potential targets for therapeutic manipulation in specific human disease settings.

  6. Distinct myeloid suppressor cell subsets correlate with plasma IL-6 and IL-10 and reduced interferon-alpha signaling in CD4⁺ T cells from patients with GI malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Young, Gregory S; Bauer, Todd; Binkley, Elaine; Bloomston, Mark; Bill, Matthew A; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Carson, William E; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2011-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) promotes anti-tumor immunity through its actions on immune cells. We hypothesized that elevated percentages of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood would be associated with impaired response to IFN-α in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies. This study evaluated relationships between plasma IL-6, IL-10, circulating MDSC subsets, and IFN-α-induced signal transduction in 40 patients with GI malignancies. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 were significantly higher in patients versus normal donors. CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD11b(+)CD15(+) and CD33(+)HLADR(-/low)CD14(+) MDSC subsets were also elevated in patients versus normal donors (P normal donors. Exploratory multivariable Cox proportional hazards models revealed that an increased percentage of the CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(-) MDSC subset was associated with reduced overall survival (P = 0.049), while an increased percentage of the CD33(+)HLADR(-/low)CD14(+) subset was associated with greater overall survival (P = 0.033). These data provide evidence for a unique relationship between specific cytokines, MDSC subsets, and IFN-α responsiveness in patients with GI malignancies.

  7. DNA Damage Signaling Instructs Polyploid Macrophage Fate in Granulomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrtwich, Laura; Nanda, Indrajit; Evangelou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Granulomas are immune cell aggregates formed in response to persistent inflammatory stimuli. Granuloma macrophage subsets are diverse and carry varying copy numbers of their genomic information. The molecular programs that control the differentiation of such macrophage populations in response to ...

  8. The MacBlue binary transgene (csf1r-gal4VP16/UAS-ECFP provides a novel marker for visualisation of subsets of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells and responsiveness to CSF1 administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Sauter

    Full Text Available The MacBlue transgenic mouse uses the Csf1r promoter and first intron to drive expression of gal4-VP16, which in turn drives a cointegrated gal4-responsive UAS-ECFP cassette. The Csf1r promoter region used contains a deletion of a 150 bp conserved region covering trophoblast and osteoclast-specific transcription start sites. In this study, we examined expression of the transgene in embryos and adult mice. In embryos, ECFP was expressed in the large majority of macrophages derived from the yolk sac, and as the liver became a major site of monocytopoiesis. In adults, ECFP was detected at high levels in both Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes and distinguished them from Ly6C+, F4/80+, CSF1R+ immature myeloid cells in peripheral blood. ECFP was also detected in the large majority of microglia and Langerhans cells. However, expression was lost from the majority of tissue macrophages, including Kupffer cells in the liver and F4/80+ macrophages of the lung, kidney, spleen and intestine. The small numbers of positive cells isolated from the liver resembled blood monocytes. In the gut, ECFP+ cells were identified primarily as classical dendritic cells or blood monocytes in disaggregated cell preparations. Immunohistochemistry showed large numbers of ECFP+ cells in the Peyer's patch and isolated lymphoid follicles. The MacBlue transgene was used to investigate the effect of treatment with CSF1-Fc, a form of the growth factor with longer half-life and efficacy. CSF1-Fc massively expanded both the immature myeloid cell (ECFP- and Ly6C+ monocyte populations, but had a smaller effect on Ly6C- monocytes. There were proportional increases in ECFP+ cells detected in lung and liver, consistent with monocyte infiltration, but no generation of ECFP+ Kupffer cells. In the gut, there was selective infiltration of large numbers of cells into the lamina propria and Peyer's patches. We discuss the use of the MacBlue transgene as a marker of monocyte/macrophage/dendritic cell

  9. Effects of ammonia on processing and secretion of precursor and mature lysosomal enzyme from macrophages of normal and pale ear mice: evidence for two distinct pathways

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes have been shown to be synthesized as microsomal precursors, which are processed to mature enzymes located in lysosomes. We examined the effect of ammonium chloride on the intracellular processing and secretion of two lysosomal enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase, in mouse macrophages. This lysosomotropic drug caused extensive secretion of both precursor and mature enzyme forms within a few hours, as documented by pulse radiolabeling and molecular weight analys...

  10. TCR usage, gene expression and function of two distinct FOXP3(+)Treg subsets within CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells identified by expression of CD39 and CD45RO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingying; Goodall, Jane C; Zhang, Libin; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Lam, Brian; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Wei; Yin, Jian; Lin, Li; Li, Ting; Wu, Xin; Yeo, Giles; Shugay, Mikhail; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Gaston, Hill; Xu, Huji

    2016-03-01

    FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are indispensable for immune homeostasis, but their study in humans is complicated by heterogeneity within Treg, the difficulty in purifying Tregs using surface marker expression (e.g. CD25) and the transient expression of FOXP3 by activated effector cells. Here, we report that expression of CD39 and CD45RO distinguishes three sub-populations within human CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells. Initial phenotypic and functional analysis demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD39(+)CD45RO(+) cells had properties consistent with effector Treg, CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD39(-)CD45RO(-) cells were naïve Treg and CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD39(-)CD45RO(+) cells were predominantly non-Treg with effector T-cell function. Differences in these two newly identified Treg subsets were corroborated by studies of gene expression and TCR analysis. To apply this approach, we studied these two newly identified Treg subsets in ankylosing spondylitis, and showed impairment in both effector and naïve Treg. This work highlights the importance of discriminating Treg subsets to enable proper comparisons of immune regulatory capacity in healthy individuals and those with inflammatory disease.

  11. Macrophages in T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma strongly express metal-binding proteins and show a bi-activated phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Tousseyn, Thomas; Döring, Claudia; Flüchter, Patricia; Hackstein, Holger; Herreman, An; Ponzoni, Maurilio; de Wolf-Peeters, Chris; Facchetti, Fabio; Gascoyne, Randy D; Küppers, Ralf; Steidl, Christian; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-12-01

    Abundant macrophage infiltration in tumors often correlates with a poor prognosis. T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma (THRLBCL) is a distinct aggressive B cell lymphoma entity showing a high macrophage content. To further elucidate the role of tumor-associated macrophages in THRLBCL, we performed gene expression profiling of microdissected histiocyte subsets of THRLBCL, nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL), Piringer lymphadenitis, sarcoidosis, nonspecific lymphadenitis and monocytes from peripheral blood. In a supervised principal component analysis, histiocytes from THRLBCL were most closely related to epithelioid cells from NLPHL, with both types of cells expressing genes related to proinflammatory and regulatory macrophage activity. Moreover, histiocytes from THRLBCL strongly expressed metal-binding proteins like MT2A, by which histiocytes of THRLBCL can be distinguished from the other histiocyte subsets investigated. Interestingly, the validation at the protein level showed a strong expression of TXN, CXCL9, MT2A and SOD2 not only in macrophages of THRLBCL but also in the tumor cells of NLPHL and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Overall, the present findings indicate that macrophages in the microenvironment of THRLBCL have acquired a distinct gene expression pattern that is characterized by a mixed M1/M2 phenotype and a strong expression of several metal binding proteins. The microenvironments in NLPHL and THRLBCL appear to have a similar influence on the macrophage phenotype. The high expression of metal binding proteins in histiocytes of THRLBCL may be diagnostically useful, but a potential pathophysiological role remains to be identified.

  12. Unsupervised Feature Subset Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndberg-Madsen, Nicolaj; Thomsen, C.; Pena, Jose

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies filter and hybrid filter-wrapper feature subset selection for unsupervised learning (data clustering). We constrain the search for the best feature subset by scoring the dependence of every feature on the rest of the features, conjecturing that these scores discriminate some...... irrelevant features. We report experimental results on artificial and real data for unsupervised learning of naive Bayes models. Both the filter and hybrid approaches perform satisfactorily....

  13. DUAL AND DISTINCT ROLES FOR SPHINGOSINE KINASE 1 AND SPHINGOSINE 1 PHOSPHATE IN THE RESPONSE TO INFLAMMATORY STIMULI IN RAW MACROPHAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, Samar M.; Crellin, Heather G.; Wu, Bill; Melton, Jessica; Anelli, Viviana; Obeid, Lina M.

    2007-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) and its product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) have been implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes including growth regulation, protection from apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, and most recently as mediators of the TNF alpha inflammatory response. In this study we set out to examine the role of SK1/S1P in the RAW macrophage response to the potent inflammatory stimulus LPS. We show that LPS increases cellular levels of SK1 message and protein. Thi...

  14. Fluorescent activated cell sorting: an effective approach to study dendritic cell subsets in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Ammi, Rachid; Rombouts, Miche; Cools, Nathalie; Vercauteren, Sven R; De Roover, Dominique; Hendriks, Jeroen M H; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-02-01

    Different immune cell types are present within atherosclerotic plaques. Dendritic cells (DC) are of special interest, since they are considered as the 'center of the immuniverse'. Identifying inflammatory DC subtypes within plaques is important for a better understanding of the lesion pathogenesis and pinpoints their contribution to the atherosclerotic process. We have developed a flow cytometry-based method to characterize and isolate different DC subsets (i.e. CD11b(+), Clec9A(+) and CD16(+) conventional (c)DC and CD123(+) plasmacytoid (p)DC) in human atherosclerotic plaques. We revealed a predominance of pro-inflammatory CD11b(+) DC in advanced human lesions, whereas atheroprotective Clec9A(+) DC were almost absent. CD123(+) pDC and CD16(+) DC were also detectable in plaques. Remarkably, plaques from distinct anatomical locations exhibited different cellular compositions: femoral plaques contained less CD11b(+) and Clec9A(+) DC than carotid plaques. Twice as many monocytes/macrophages were observed compared to DC. Moreover, relative amounts of T cells/B cells/NK cells were 6 times as high as DC numbers. For the first time, fluorescent activated cell sorting analysis of DC subsets in human plaques indicated a predominance of CD11b(+) cDC, in comparison with other DC subsets. Isolation of the different subsets will facilitate detailed functional analysis and may have significant implications for tailoring appropriate therapy.

  15. Subset selection in regression

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Originally published in 1990, the first edition of Subset Selection in Regression filled a significant gap in the literature, and its critical and popular success has continued for more than a decade. Thoroughly revised to reflect progress in theory, methods, and computing power, the second edition promises to continue that tradition. The author has thoroughly updated each chapter, incorporated new material on recent developments, and included more examples and references. New in the Second Edition:A separate chapter on Bayesian methodsComplete revision of the chapter on estimationA major example from the field of near infrared spectroscopyMore emphasis on cross-validationGreater focus on bootstrappingStochastic algorithms for finding good subsets from large numbers of predictors when an exhaustive search is not feasible Software available on the Internet for implementing many of the algorithms presentedMore examplesSubset Selection in Regression, Second Edition remains dedicated to the techniques for fitting...

  16. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  17. Epistemically Robust Strategy Subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir B. Asheim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We define a concept of epistemic robustness in the context of an epistemic model of a finite normal-form game where a player type corresponds to a belief over the profiles of opponent strategies and types. A Cartesian product X of pure-strategy subsets is epistemically robust if there is a Cartesian product Y of player type subsets with X as the associated set of best reply profiles such that the set Y i contains all player types that believe with sufficient probability that the others are of types in Y − i and play best replies. This robustness concept provides epistemic foundations for set-valued generalizations of strict Nash equilibrium, applicable also to games without strict Nash equilibria. We relate our concept to closedness under rational behavior and thus to strategic stability and to the best reply property and thus to rationalizability.

  18. Protective role of spleen-derived macrophages in lung inflammation, injury, and fibrosis induced by nitrogen mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Gow, Andrew J; Hall, Leroy; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a vesicant that causes lung injury and fibrosis, accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies we analyzed the spleen as a source of these cells. Splenectomized (SPX) and sham control rats were treated intratracheally with NM (0.125 mg/kg) or PBS control. Macrophage responses were analyzed 1-7 days later. Splenectomy resulted in an increase in lung macrophages expressing CCR2, but a decrease in ATR-1α(+) cells, receptors important in bone marrow and spleen monocyte trafficking, respectively. Splenectomy was also associated with an increase in proinflammatory M1 (iNOS(+), CD11b(+)CD43(+)) macrophages in lungs of NM-treated rats, as well as greater upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression. Conversely, a decrease in CD11b(+)CD43(-) M2 macrophages was observed in SPX rats, with no changes in CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), or YM-1(+) M2 macrophages, suggesting distinct origins of M2 subpopulations responding to NM. Macrophage expression of M2 genes including IL-10, ApoE, PTX-2, PTX-3, 5-HT2α, and 5-HT7 was also reduced in NM-treated SPX rats compared with shams, indicating impaired M2 activity. Changes in lung macrophages responding to NM as a consequence of splenectomy were correlated with exacerbated tissue injury and more rapid fibrogenesis. These data demonstrate that the spleen is a source of a subset of M2 macrophages with anti-inflammatory activity; moreover, in their absence, proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages predominate in the lung, resulting in heightened pathology. Understanding the origin of macrophages and characterizing their phenotype after vesicant exposure may lead to more targeted therapeutics aimed at reducing toxicity and disease pathogenesis.

  19. The Role of Macrophages in Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben J. van der Bij

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages constitute a large proportion of the immune cell infiltrate, which is present in many tumors. Activation state of macrophages is greatly influenced by their environment, leading to different macrophage subsets with diverse functions. Although previously regarded as potent immune cells that are capable of destroying tumor cells, recent literature focuses on the ability of macrophages to promote tumor development due to secretion of mediators, like growth and angiogenic factors. It is now becoming increasingly clear that a complicated synergistic relationship exists between macrophages and malignant cells whereby tumor cells can affect macrophage phenotype, and vice versa. As such, macrophages and their contribution in cancer development are currently subject of debate.

  20. Human macrophages chronically exposed to LPS can be reactivated by stimulation with MDP to acquire an antimicrobial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Torres, Martha; Arellano, Monserrat; Juárez, Esmeralda

    2017-02-21

    Macrophages are important in host defense and can differentiate into functionally distinct subsets named classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated. In several inflammatory disorders, macrophages become tolerized to prevent deleterious consequences. This tolerization reduces the ability of macrophages to respond to bacterial components (e.g., LPS) maintaining a low level of inflammation but compromising the ability of macrophages to mount an effective immune response during subsequent pathogen encounters. In this study, we aimed to reactivate human monocyte-derived macrophages chronically exposed to LPS by re-stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP). We observed an undefined profile of cell surface marker expression during endotoxin tolerance and absence of TNFα production. Stimulating macrophages chronically exposed to LPS with LPS+MDP restored TNFα, production together with an increased production of IL1, IL6, IFNγ, IL4, IL5 and IL10. These results suggest that macrophages chronically exposed to LPS possess a mixed M1-M2 phenotype with sufficient antimicrobial and homeostatic potential.

  1. Characterizing primary human microglia: A comparative study with myeloid subsets and culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melief, J; Sneeboer, M A M; Litjens, M; Ormel, P R; Palmen, S J M C; Huitinga, I; Kahn, R S; Hol, E M; de Witte, L D

    2016-11-01

    The biology of microglia has become subject to intense study, as they are widely recognized as crucial determinants of normal and pathologic brain functioning. While they are well studied in animal models, it is still strongly debated what specifies most accurately the phenotype and functioning of microglia in the human brain. In this study, we therefore isolated microglia from postmortem human brain tissue of corpus callosum (CC) and frontal cortex (CTX). The cells were phenotyped for a panel of typical microglia markers and genes involved in myeloid cell biology. Furthermore, their response to pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli was assessed. The microglia were compared to key human myeloid cell subsets, including monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and several commonly used microglial cell models. Protein and mRNA expression profiles partly differed between microglia isolated from CC and frontal cortex and were clearly distinct from other myeloid subsets. Microglia responded to both pro- (LPS or poly I:C) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 or dexamethasone) stimuli. Interestingly, pro-inflammatory responses differed between microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, as the former responded more strongly to poly I:C and the latter more strongly to LPS. Furthermore, we defined a large phenotypic discrepancy between primary human microglia and currently used microglial cell models and cell lines. In conclusion, we further delineated the unique and specific features that discriminate human microglia from other myeloid subsets, and we show that currently used cellular models only partly reflect the phenotype of primary human microglia. GLIA 2016;64:1857-1868.

  2. Can modular psychological concepts like affect and emotion be assigned to a distinct subset of regional neural circuits?. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Herrmann, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    The proposed Quartet Theory of Human Emotions by Koelsch and co-workers [11] adumbrates evidence from various scientific sources to integrate and assign the psychological concepts of 'affect' and 'emotion' to four brain circuits or to four neuronal core systems for affect-processing in the brain. The authors differentiate between affect and emotion and assign several facultative, or to say modular, psychological domains and principles of information processing, such as learning and memory, antecedents of affective activity, emotion satiation, cognitive complexity, subjective quality feelings, degree of conscious appraisal, to different affect systems. Furthermore, they relate orbito-frontal brain structures to moral affects as uniquely human, and the hippocampus to attachment-related affects. An additional feature of the theory describes 'emotional effector-systems' for motor-related processes (e.g., emotion-related actions), physiological arousal, attention and memory that are assumed to be cross-linked with the four proposed affect systems. Thus, higher principles of emotional information processing, but also modular affect-related issues, such as moral and attachment related affects, are thought to be handled by these four different physiological sub-systems that are on the other side assumed to be highly interwoven at both physiological and functional levels. The authors also state that the proposed sub-systems have many features in common, such as the selection and modulation of biological processes related to behaviour, perception, attention and memory. The latter aspect challenges an ongoing discussion about the mind-body problem: To which degree do the proposed sub-systems 'sufficiently' cover the processing of complex modular or facultative emotional/affective and/or cognitive phenomena? There are current models and scientific positions that almost completely reject the idea that modular psychological phenomena are handled by a distinct selection of

  3. A unique dermal dendritic cell subset that skews the immune response toward Th2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Murakami

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC subsets in the skin and draining lymph nodes (LNs are likely to elicit distinct immune response types. In skin and skin-draining LNs, a dermal DC subset expressing macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin 2 (MGL2/CD301b was found distinct from migratory Langerhans cells (LCs or CD103(+ dermal DCs (dDCs. Lower expression levels of Th1-promoting and/or cross-presentation-related molecules were suggested by the transcriptome analysis and verified by the quantitative real-time PCR analysis in MGL2(+ dDCs than in CD103(+ dDCs. Transfer of MGL2(+ dDCs but not CD103(+ dDCs from FITC-sensitized mice induced a Th2-type immune response in vivo in a model of contact hypersensitivity. Targeting MGL2(+ dDCs with a rat monoclonal antibody against MGL2 efficiently induced a humoral immune response with Th2-type properties, as determined by the antibody subclass. We propose that the properties of MGL2(+ dDCs, are complementary to those of CD103(+ dDCs and skew the immune response toward a Th2-type response.

  4. TMEM119 marks a subset of microglia in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Kino, Yoshihiro; Asahina, Naohiro; Takitani, Mika; Miyoshi, Junko; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Yuko

    2016-02-01

    Microglia are resident myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), activated in the brains of various neurological diseases. Microglia are ontogenetically and functionally distinct from monocyte-derived macrophages that infiltrate the CNS under pathological conditions. However, a lack of specific markers that distinguish resident microglia from circulating blood-derived macrophages in human brain tissues hampers accurate evaluation of microglial contributions to the human brain pathology. By comparative analysis of five comprehensive microglial transcriptome datasets, we identified an evolutionarily conserved protein TMEM119 as the most promising candidate for human microglial markers. TMEM119 was expressed on immortalized human microglia, in which the expression levels were not elevated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-13 or TGFβ1. Notably, TMEM119 immunoreactivity was expressed exclusively on a subset of Iba1(+) CD68(+) microglia with ramified and amoeboid morphologies in the brains of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas Iba1(+) CD68(+) infiltrating macrophages do not express TMEM119 in demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis and necrotic lesions of cerebral infarction. TMEM119 mRNA levels were elevated in AD brains, although the protein levels were not significantly different between AD and non-AD cases by western blot and morphometric analyses. TMEM119-positive microglia did not consistently express polarized markers for M1 (CD80) or M2 (CD163, CD209) in AD brains. These results suggest that TMEM119 serves as a reliable microglial marker that discriminates resident microglia from blood-derived macrophages in the human brain. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Effects of ischemia on lung macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigul Moldobaeva

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis after pulmonary ischemia is initiated by reactive O(2 species and is dependent on CXC chemokine growth factors, and its magnitude is correlated with the number of lavaged macrophages. After complete obstruction of the left pulmonary artery in mice, the left lung is isolated from the peripheral circulation until 5-7 days later, when a new systemic vasculature invades the lung parenchyma. Consequently, this model offers a unique opportunity to study the differentiation and/or proliferation of monocyte-derived cells within the lung. In this study, we questioned whether macrophage subpopulations were differentially expressed and which subset contributed to growth factor release. We characterized the change in number of all macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, alveolar macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B- and mature lung macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B+ in left lungs from mice immediately (0 h or 24 h after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL. In left lung homogenates, only lung macrophages increased 24 h after LPAL (vs. 0 h; p<0.05. No changes in proliferation were seen in any subset by PCNA expression (0 h vs. 24 h lungs. When the number of monocytic cells was reduced with clodronate liposomes, systemic blood flow to the left lung 14 days after LPAL decreased by 42% (p<0.01 compared to vehicle controls. Furthermore, when alveolar macrophages and lung macrophages were sorted and studied in vitro, only lung macrophages secreted the chemokine MIP-2α (ELISA. These data suggest that ischemic stress within the lung contributes to the differentiation of immature monocytes to lung macrophages within the first 24 h after LPAL. Lung macrophages but not alveolar macrophages increase and secrete the proangiogenic chemokine MIP-2α. Overall, an increase in the number of lung macrophages appears to be critical for neovascularization in the lung, since clodronate treatment decreased their number and attenuated functional angiogenesis.

  6. Prediction based on mean subset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Brown, P. J.; Madsen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Shrinkage methods have traditionally been applied in prediction problems. In this article we develop a shrinkage method (mean subset) that forms an average of regression coefficients from individual subsets of the explanatory variables. A Bayesian approach is taken to derive an expression of how...... the coefficient vectors from each subset should be weighted. It is not computationally feasible to calculate the mean subset coefficient vector for larger problems, and thus we suggest an algorithm to find an approximation to the mean subset coefficient vector. In a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study...

  7. Genetically Distinct Subsets within ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyons, Paul A.; Rayner, Tim F.; Trivedi, Sapna; Holle, Julia U.; Watts, Richard A.; Jayne, David R. W.; Baslund, Bo; Brenchley, Paul; Bruchfeld, Annette; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Deloukas, Panos; Feighery, Conleth; Gross, Wolfgang L.; Guillevin, Loic; Gunnarsson, Iva; Harper, Lorraine; Hruskova, Zdenka; Little, Mark A.; Martorana, Davide; Neumann, Thomas; Ohlsson, Sophie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pusey, Charles D.; Salama, Alan D.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Savage, Caroline O.; Segelmark, Mrten; Stegeman, Coen A.; Tesar, Vladimir; Vaglio, Augusto; Wieczorek, Stefan; Wilde, Benjamin; Zwerina, Jochen; Rees, Andrew J.; Clayton, David G.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it i

  8. Genetically distinct subsets within ANCA-associated vasculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, Paul A; Rayner, Tim F; Trivedi, Sapna;

    2012-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single...

  9. Genetically distinct subsets within ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Paul A

    2012-07-19

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener\\'s granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single disease entity and what role ANCA plays in its pathogenesis. We investigated its genetic basis.

  10. Bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages have different inflammatory response to oxLDL and M1/M2 marker expression - implications for atherosclerosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Line S; Mogensen, Christina K; Rosendahl, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and can polarize into specific subsets, e.g. pro-inflammatory M1-like and re-modelling M2-like macrophages. To determine if peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) or bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) resembled aortic macrophages from ApoE-/- mice, their M1/M2 phenotype,...

  11. Prediction based on mean subset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Brown, P. J.; Madsen, Henrik;

    2002-01-01

    , it is found that the proposed mean subset method has superior prediction performance than prediction based on the best subset method, and in some settings also better than the ridge regression and lasso methods. The conclusions drawn from the Monte Carlo study is corroborated in an example in which prediction......Shrinkage methods have traditionally been applied in prediction problems. In this article we develop a shrinkage method (mean subset) that forms an average of regression coefficients from individual subsets of the explanatory variables. A Bayesian approach is taken to derive an expression of how...

  12. The Alternative Faces of Macrophage Generate Osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lampiasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of how osteoclasts are generated and whether they can be altered by inflammatory stimuli is a topic of particular interest for osteoclastogenesis. It is known that the monocyte/macrophage lineage gives rise to osteoclasts (OCs by the action of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL, which induce cell differentiation through their receptors, c-fms and RANK, respectively. The multinucleated giant cells (MGCs generated by the engagement of RANK/RANKL are typical OCs. Nevertheless, very few studies have addressed the question of which subset of macrophages generates OCs. Indeed, two main subsets of macrophages are postulated, the inflammatory or classically activated type (M1 and the anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated type (M2. It has been proposed that macrophages can be polarized in vitro towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype with the addition of granulocyte macrophage- (GM- CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Various inflammatory stimuli known to induce macrophage polarization, such as LPS or TNF-α, can alter the type of MGC obtained from RANKL-induced differentiation. This review aims to highlight the role of immune-related stimuli and factors in inducing macrophages towards the osteoclastogenesis choice.

  13. A broken krebs cycle in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-17

    Macrophages undergo metabolic rewiring during polarization but details of this process are unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Jha et al. (2015) report a systems approach for unbiased analysis of cellular metabolism that reveals key metabolites and metabolic pathways required for distinct macrophage polarization states.

  14. Macrophage dynamics are regulated by local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment in injured pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gassen, Naomi; Van Overmeire, Eva; Leuckx, Gunter; Heremans, Yves; De Groef, Sofie; Cai, Ying; Elkrim, Yvon; Gysemans, Conny; Stijlemans, Benoît; Van de Casteele, Mark; De Baetselier, Patrick; De Leu, Nico; Heimberg, Harry; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2015-05-01

    Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL) activates a healing response, encompassing β-cell neogenesis and proliferation. Macrophages (MΦs) were recently shown to promote β-cell proliferation after PDL, but they remain poorly characterized. We assessed myeloid cell diversity and the factors driving myeloid cell dynamics following acute pancreas injury by PDL. In naive and sham-operated pancreas, the myeloid cell compartment consisted mainly of two distinct tissue-resident MΦ types, designated MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) MΦs, the latter being predominant. MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) pancreas MΦs differed at the molecular level, with MHC-II(lo) MΦs being more M2-activated. After PDL, there was an early surge of Ly6C(hi) monocyte infiltration in the pancreas, followed by a transient MHC-II(lo) MΦ peak and ultimately a restoration of the MHC-II(hi) MΦ-dominated steady-state equilibrium. These intricate MΦ dynamics in PDL pancreas depended on monocyte recruitment by C-C chemokine receptor 2 and macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor as well as on macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor-dependent local MΦ proliferation. Functionally, MHC-II(lo) MΦs were more angiogenic. We further demonstrated that, at least in C-C chemokine receptor 2-KO mice, tissue MΦs, rather than Ly6C(hi) monocyte-derived MΦs, contributed to β-cell proliferation. Together, our study fully characterizes the MΦ subsets in the pancreas and clarifies the complex dynamics of MΦs after PDL injury. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Particulate Systems for Targeting of Macrophages: Basic and Therapeutic Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Parhamifar, Ladan; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2012-01-01

    and intracellular drug release processes can be optimized through modifications of the drug carrier physicochemical properties, which include hydrodynamic size, shape, composition and surface characteristics. Through such modifications together with understanding of macrophage cell biology, targeting may be aimed...... at a particular subset of macrophages. Advances in basic and therapeutic concepts of particulate targeting of macrophages and related nanotechnology approaches for immune cell modifications are discussed.Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  16. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Michael P.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Spencer, David E.; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Castellino, Francis J.; Weigert, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  17. Origin of CD8+ Effector and Memory T Cell Subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Stemberger; Michael Neuenhahn; Veit R.Buchholz; Dirk H.Busch

    2007-01-01

    It is well accepted that CD8+ T cells play a pivotal role in providing protection against infection with intracellular pathogens and some tumors. In many cases protective immunity is maintained for long periods of time (immunological memory). Over the past years, it has become evident that in order to fulfill these multiple tasks,distinct subsets of effector and memory T cells have to be generated. Until today, however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of subset differentiation and the timing of lineage fate decisions. In this context, it is of special importance to determine at which level of clonal expansion functional and phenotypical heterogeneity is achieved. Different models for T cell subset diversification have been proposed; these differ mainly in the time point during priming and clonal expansion (prior, during, or beyond the first cell division) when differentiation programs are induced. Recently developed single-cell adoptive transfer technology has allowed us to demonstrate that individual precursor cell still bears the full plasticity to develop into a plethora different T cell subsets. This observation targets the shaping of T cell subset differentiation towards factors that are still operative beyond the first cell division. These findings have important implications for vaccine development, as the modulation of differentiation patterns towards distinct subsets could become a powerful strategy to enhance the efficacy and quality of vaccines.

  18. Uptake by J774 macrophages of very-low-density lipoproteins isolated from apoE-deficient mice is mediated by a distinct receptor and stimulated by lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, W.L.; Sman van der - Beer, F. de; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Vark, L.C. van; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E-deficient mice display marked accumulation in the plasma of VLDL deficient in both apoE and apoBl00 but containing apoB48, apoA-1, apoCs, and apoA-IV. Since apoE-deficient mice develop severe atherosclerotic lesions with lipid-laden macrophages, we reasoned that the uptake of

  19. Clustering, Seriation, and Subset Extraction of Confusion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Michael J.; Steinley, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The study of confusion data is a well established practice in psychology. Although many types of analytical approaches for confusion data are available, among the most common methods are the extraction of 1 or more subsets of stimuli, the partitioning of the complete stimulus set into distinct groups, and the ordering of the stimulus set. Although…

  20. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, enhances the polarization of alternatively activated macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ruweka Fernando

    Full Text Available Macrophages are important innate immune cells that are associated with two distinct phenotypes: a pro-inflammatory (or classically activated subset with prototypic macrophage functions such as inflammatory cytokine production and bactericidal activity, and an anti-inflammatory (or alternatively activated (AAM subset linked with wound healing and tissue repair processes. In this study, we examined the effect of interlukein-6 on human and murine macrophage polarization. The results indicate that despite being commonly associated with pro-inflammatory functions and being implicated in the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of numerous inflammatory diseases, interleukin-6 can enhance the polarization of AAMs, based on increased expression of hallmark markers: arginase-1, Ym1 and CD206; this effect required the AAM differentiating cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13. Co-treatment of AAMs with IL-6 resulted in spontaneous release of IL-10, suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide production and inhibited cytokine production by activated CD4+ T cells - immunoregulatory features not observed in the 'parent' IL-4+IL-13-induced AAM. The effect of IL-6 required signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-3, was partially dependent on up-regulation of the IL4Rα chain, and was independent of autocrine IL-10. In the presence of IFNγ, IL-6 promoted the production of IL-1β and TNFα suggesting that this cytokine can enhance the phenotype to which a macrophage has committed. This finding may explain the pleiotrophic nature of IL-6, where it is associated with the perpetuation and enhancement of disease in inflammatory situations, but is also necessary for resolution of inflammation and adequate wound healing to occur in others. Thus, the potential benefit of IL-6 in promoting an AAM, with its' anti-inflammatory and wound healing ability, may need to be considered in immunotherapies aimed at in vivo modulation or inhibition of IL-6.

  1. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, enhances the polarization of alternatively activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Maria Ruweka; Reyes, Jose Luis; Iannuzzi, Jordan; Leung, Gabriella; McKay, Derek Mark

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are important innate immune cells that are associated with two distinct phenotypes: a pro-inflammatory (or classically activated) subset with prototypic macrophage functions such as inflammatory cytokine production and bactericidal activity, and an anti-inflammatory (or alternatively activated (AAM)) subset linked with wound healing and tissue repair processes. In this study, we examined the effect of interlukein-6 on human and murine macrophage polarization. The results indicate that despite being commonly associated with pro-inflammatory functions and being implicated in the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of numerous inflammatory diseases, interleukin-6 can enhance the polarization of AAMs, based on increased expression of hallmark markers: arginase-1, Ym1 and CD206; this effect required the AAM differentiating cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13. Co-treatment of AAMs with IL-6 resulted in spontaneous release of IL-10, suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide production and inhibited cytokine production by activated CD4+ T cells - immunoregulatory features not observed in the 'parent' IL-4+IL-13-induced AAM. The effect of IL-6 required signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3, was partially dependent on up-regulation of the IL4Rα chain, and was independent of autocrine IL-10. In the presence of IFNγ, IL-6 promoted the production of IL-1β and TNFα suggesting that this cytokine can enhance the phenotype to which a macrophage has committed. This finding may explain the pleiotrophic nature of IL-6, where it is associated with the perpetuation and enhancement of disease in inflammatory situations, but is also necessary for resolution of inflammation and adequate wound healing to occur in others. Thus, the potential benefit of IL-6 in promoting an AAM, with its' anti-inflammatory and wound healing ability, may need to be considered in immunotherapies aimed at in vivo modulation or inhibition of IL-6.

  2. Liver macrophages in healthy and diseased liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Knolle, Percy A

    2017-04-01

    Kupffer cells, the largest tissue resident macrophage population, are key for the maintenance of liver integrity and its restoration after injury and infections, as well as the local initiation and resolution of innate and adaptive immunity. These important roles of Kupffer cells were recently identified in healthy and diseased liver revealing diverse functions and phenotypes of hepatic macrophages. High-level phenotypic and genomic analysis revealed that Kupffer cells are not a homogenous population and that the hepatic microenvironment actively shapes both phenotype and function of liver macrophages. Compared to macrophages from other organs, hepatic macrophages bear unique properties that are instrumental for their diverse roles in local immunity as well as liver regeneration. The diverse and, in part, contradictory roles of hepatic macrophages in anti-tumor and inflammatory immune responses as well as regulatory and regenerative processes have been obscured by the lack of appropriate technologies to specifically target or ablate Kupffer cells or monocyte-derived hepatic macrophages. Future studies will need to dissect the exact role of the hepatic macrophages with distinct functional properties linked to their differentiation status and thereby provide insight into the functional plasticity of hepatic macrophages.

  3. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  4. B cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Perry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease.

  5. Macrophage phenotype modulation by CXCL4 in vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert Gleissner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During atherogenesis, blood monocytes transmigrate into the subendothelial space and differentiate towards macrophages and foam cells. The major driver of this differentiation process is macrophage colony-stimulation factor (M-CSF. M-CSF-induced macrophages are important promoters of atherogenesis as demonstrated in M-CSF and M-CSF receptor knock out mice. However, M-CSF is not the only relevant promoter of macrophage differentiation. The platelet chemokine CXCL4 prevents monocyte apoptosis and promotes macrophage differentiation in vitro. It is secreted from activated platelets and has effects on various cell types relevant in atherogenesis. Knocking out the Pf4 gene coding for CXCL4 in Apoe-/- mice leads to reduced atherogenesis. Thus, it seems likely that CXC4-induced macrophages may have specific pro-atherogenic capacities. We have studied CXC4-induced differentiation of human macrophages using gene chips, systems biology and functional in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Our data indicate that CXCL4-induced macrophages are distinct from both their M-CSF-induced counterparts and other known macrophage polarizations like M1 macrophages (induced by LPS and interferon-gamma or M2 macrophages (induced by interleukin-4. CXCL4-induced macrophages have distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, e.g. the complete loss of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp scavenger receptor CD163 which is necessary for effective hemoglobin clearance after plaque hemorrhage. Lack of CD163 is accompanied by the inability to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to Hb-Hp complexes.This review covers the current knowledge about CXCL4-induced macrophages, which based on their unique properties we have suggested to call these macrophages M4. CXCL4 may represent an important driver of macrophage heterogeneity within atherosclerotic lesions. Further dissecting its effects on macrophage differentiation may help to identify novel

  6. THE FEATURE SUBSET SELECTION ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yongguo; Li Xueming; Wu Zhongfu

    2003-01-01

    The motivation of data mining is how to extract effective information from huge data in very large database. However, some redundant and irrelevant attributes, which result in low performance and high computing complexity, are included in the very large database in general.So, Feature Subset Selection (FSS) becomes one important issue in the field of data mining. In this letter, an FSS model based on the filter approach is built, which uses the simulated annealing genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that convergence and stability of this algorithm are adequately achieved.

  7. Contributions of cell subsets to cytokine production during normal and impaired wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rita E; Koh, Timothy J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of different cell subsets to the production of cytokines and growth factors during normal and impaired wound healing. Cells were isolated from wounds of non-diabetic and diabetic mice and separated by magnetic sorting into neutrophils/T cells/B cells (NTB cell subset), monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Mp subset) and non-leukocytic cells including keratinocyte/fibroblast/endothelial cells (KFE subset). On both per cell and total contribution bases, the Mo/Mp subset was the dominant producer of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice and was a significant producer of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF)-A, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. The NTB subset was also a significant producer of TNF-α and IL-10 whereas the KFE subset contributed significant amounts of VEGF, IGF-1 and TGF-β1. Sustained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and impaired production of healing-associated factors were evident in each subset in diabetic mice. These data will be useful for further experimental and modeling studies on the role of cell subsets in wound healing as well as for designing therapeutic strategies for improving healing.

  8. Distinct Pattern of Human Vδ1 T Cells Recognizing MICA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqiang Li; Lianxian Cui; Wei He

    2005-01-01

    γδ T cells represent one unique recognition pattern, the limited recognition, which distinguishes from the specific recognition for αβ T cells and pattern recognition for macrophages. Vδ1 γδ T cell is the major subset of human γδT cells, which predominates in mucosal tissue including the intestinal epithelia. Presently, a few antigens that human Vδ1TCR can recognize have been identified. Among them, MHC class Ⅰ chain-related molecules A (MICA)have been studied most intensively. Besides Vδ1TCR, MICA is also the ligand of NKG2D, a C-type lectin-like activating immunoreceptor. In human, only Vδ1 cells can simultaneously express both types of receptors of MICA while NK cells, αβ T cells and other subsets of γδ T cells likewise express NKG2D. Although the precise mechanisms are still enigmatic, this distinct pattern of Vδ1 cells recognizing MICA predicts unique biological significance of Vδ1 cells in immune defense. Recent years, some progresses have been made in this issue. In this review we summarize the related reports and put forward some novel views based on our group's studies.

  9. Differential control of Helios+/− Treg development by monocyte subsets through disparate inflammatory cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Hui; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Control of Helios+/− Treg subset development is mediated through distinct cytokines and monocyte subpopulations.CD16+ monocytes inhibit Helios+ Treg proliferation through IL-12, whereas CD16− monocytes suppress Helios− Treg development through TNF-α.

  10. Mining Representative Subset Based on Fuzzy Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hongfang; FENG Boqin; L(U) Lintao

    2007-01-01

    Two new concepts-fuzzy mutuality and average fuzzy entropy are presented. Then based on these concepts, a new algorithm-RSMA (representative subset mining algorithm) is proposed, which can abstract representative subset from massive data.To accelerate the speed of producing representative subset, an improved algorithm-ARSMA(accelerated representative subset mining algorithm) is advanced, which adopt combining putting forward with backward strategies. In this way, the performance of the algorithm is improved. Finally we make experiments on real datasets and evaluate the representative subset. The experiment shows that ARSMA algorithm is more excellent than RandomPick algorithm either on effectiveness or efficiency.

  11. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eHoppstädter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth.We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: GM-CSF/LPS/IFN-gamma was used to generate primary human M1 cells and M-CSF/IL-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-gamma and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø 26 and 41 nm and microparticles (Ø 1.75 µm was quantified. At the concentration used (50 µg/ml, silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human monocyte-derived macrophages compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages (TAM obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue.In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but might also open up therapeutic perspectives allowing to specifically target M2

  12. Bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages have different inflammatory response to oxLDL and M1/M2 marker expression – implications for atherosclerosis research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisgaard, Line S.; Mogensen, Christina K.; Rosendahl, Alexander; Cucak, Helena; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Rasmussen, Salka E.; Pedersen, Tanja X.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and can polarize into specific subsets, e.g. pro-inflammatory M1-like and re-modelling M2-like macrophages. To determine if peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) or bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) resembled aortic macrophages from ApoE−/− mice, their M1/M2 phenotype, inflammatory status, and lipid metabolism signatures were compared. oxLDL accumulation was similar in PEMs and BMDMs. On protein expression level, BMDMs showed an M2-like CD206highCD11clow profile, while cholesterol loading led to enhanced CD11c expression and reduced MCP-1 secretion. In contrast, PEMs expressed low levels of CD206 and CD11c, and responded to cholesterol loading by increasing CD11c expression and MCP-1 secretion. mRNA expression of M1/M2 markers was higher in PEMS than BMDMs, while lipid metabolism genes were similarly expressed. Whole aorta flow cytometry showed an accumulation of M2-like CD206highCD11clow macrophages in advanced versus early atherosclerotic disease in ApoE−/− mice. In isolated lesions, mRNA levels of the M2 markers Socs2, CD206, Retnla, and IL4 were downregulated with increasing disease severity. Likewise, mRNA expression of lipid metabolism genes (SREBP2, ACSL1, SRB1, DGAT1, and cpt1a) was decreased in advanced versus early lesions. In conclusion, PEMs and BMDMs are phenotypically distinct and differ from macrophages in lesions with respect to expression of M1/M2 markers and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27734926

  13. Absence of a Classically Activated Macrophage Cytokine Signature in Peripheral Spondylarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Vandooren; T. Noordenbos; C. Ambarus; S. Krausz; T. Cantaert; N. Yeremenko; M. Boumans; R. Lutter; P.P. Tak; D. Baeten

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Peripheral spondylarthritis (SpA) is characterized by macrophages that express CD163, a marker of alternative activation (M2). The purpose of this study was to assess whether this differential infiltration with macrophage subsets was associated with a different local inflammatory milieu i

  14. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  15. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  16. Recursive Distinctioning

    CERN Document Server

    Isaacson, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Recursive distinctioning (RD) is a name coined by Joel Isaacson in his original patent document describing how fundamental patterns of process arise from the systematic application of operations of distinction and description upon themselves. Recursive distinctioning means just what it says. A pattern of distinctions is given in a space based on a graphical structure (such as a line of print or a planar lattice or given graph). Each node of the graph is occupied by a letter from some arbitrary alphabet. A specialized alphabet is given that can indicate distinctions about neighbors of a given node. The neighbors of a node are all nodes that are connected to the given node by edges in the graph. The letters in the specialized alphabet (call it SA) are used to describe the states of the letters in the given graph and at each stage in the recursion, letters in SA are written at all nodes in the graph, describing its previous state. The recursive structure that results from the iteration of descriptions is called ...

  17. Almost Chebyshev set with respect to bounded subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冲; 王兴华

    1997-01-01

    The uniqueness and existence of restricted Chebyshev center with respect to arbitrary subset are investigated. The concept of almost Chebyshev sets with respect to bounded subsets is introduced. It is proved that each closed subset in a reflexive locally uniformly convex (uniformly convex, respectively) Banach space is an almost Chebyshev subset with respect to compact convex subsets (bounded convex subsets and bounded subsets, respectively).

  18. A reassessment of IgM memory subsets in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors we performed high-throughput V-h sequencing of human B-cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD+CD27+ (“MZ”), IgD−CD27+(“memory”, including IgM (“IgM-only”), IgG and IgA) and IgD−CD27− cells (“double-negative”, including IgM, IgG and IgA). 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for Vh-gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and Vh/Jh usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin, for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency, and lower Vh4 and higher Jh6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (between MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The “IgM-only” subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27+ switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells, and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  19. The dysregulation of the monocyte/macrophage effector function induced by isopropanol is mediated by the defective activation of distinct members of the AP-1 family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Damien; Désy, Olivier; de Campos-Lima, Pedro O

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol is the second most common cause of short-chain alcohol acute intoxication. Nonethanolic short-chain alcohols mediate their immunomodulatory effect by interfering with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activation with or without additional activator protein-1 (AP-1) involvement. In the present study, we examined the immunomodulation induced by isopropanol in conditions that are not reliant on NFAT: the inflammatory cytokine response of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes. Our hypothesis was that isopropanol acute exposure would have an attenuated effect or no consequence in this setting. To our surprise, the impairment of AP-1 activation was sufficient to mediate a severe and dose-dependent phenotype in human monocytes in vitro at alcohol concentrations as low as 0.16% (or 26 mM). There were three outcomes: interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-8 were unaltered; IL-6 was upregulated; and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)/CCL2 were downregulated. The effector function of human monocyte-derived macrophages was also compromised. Our results showed that Toll-like receptor 4 early signaling was preserved, as isopropanol did not change the kinase activity of the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 in LPS-stimulated cells. The nuclear factor-κB signaling cascade and the p38/c-Jun N-terminal kinase modules of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway were alcohol insensitive. Conversely, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and, ultimately, of c-Fos and JunB were impaired. The alcohol-induced cytokine dysregulation was confirmed in a mouse model of isopropanol intoxication in which the production of TNF-α in response to LPS challenge was virtually abolished. The magnitude of this alcohol effect was sufficiently high to rescue animals from LPS-induced toxic shock. Our data contribute to the dismal body of information on the immunotoxicology of isopropanol, one of the most ubiquitous chemicals to which the general population

  20. A Csf1r-EGFP Transgene Provides a Novel Marker for Monocyte Subsets in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridans, Clare; Davis, Gemma M; Sauter, Kristin A; Lisowski, Zofia M; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Raper, Anna; Lefevre, Lucas; Young, Rachel; McCulloch, Mary E; Lillico, Simon; Milne, Elspeth; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2016-09-15

    Expression of Csf1r in adults is restricted to cells of the macrophage lineage. Transgenic reporters based upon the Csf1r locus require inclusion of the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element for expression. We have created Csf1r-EGFP transgenic sheep via lentiviral transgenesis of a construct containing elements of the mouse Fms-intronic regulatory element and Csf1r promoter. Committed bone marrow macrophage precursors and blood monocytes express EGFP in these animals. Sheep monocytes were divided into three populations, similar to classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes in humans, based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. All expressed EGFP, with increased levels in the nonclassical subset. Because Csf1r expression coincides with the earliest commitment to the macrophage lineage, Csf1r-EGFP bone marrow provides a tool for studying the earliest events in myelopoiesis using the sheep as a model.

  1. Proliferating Cellular Nuclear Antigen Expression as a Marker of Perivascular Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Brain perivascular macrophages are a major target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques and HIV infection in humans. Perivascular macrophages are distinct from parenchymal microglia in their location, morphology, expression of myeloid markers, and turnover in the CNS. In contrast to parenchymal microglia, perivascular macrophages are continuously repopulated by blood monocytes, which undergo maturation to macrophages on entering the central nervous system (CNS). ...

  2. Peripheral blood and milk leukocytes subsets of lactating Sarda ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Bonelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytes subpopulations in blood and milk of lactating Sarda ewes were investigated. Animals characterized by a SSC level <500×103cells/mL and a negative bacteriological examination were sampled in early, mid and late lactation. Milk differential cell count evidenced that macrophage represented the main population (42.8%±3.5 followed by lymphocytes (40.2%±3.4 and neutrophils (8,6%±2.1. Flow cytometry analysis showed that lymphocytes subsets in milk were quite different from blood. High CD8+ and low CD4+ lymphocytes percentages determined a CD4/CD8 ratio inversion in milk compared to blood (0.3%±0.03 vs 1.8%±0.08. CD8+ decreased while, conversely, CD4+ increased in late lactation. γδ T cells were more represented in milk (12.6%±1.3 than in blood (6.8%±0.3 and their proportions appeared similar throughout lactation in both compartments. IL-2 receptor was mainly expressed in milk on T cytotoxic lymphocytes. Data obtained in uninfected mammary glands could allow an early discrimination between physiological and pathological changes occurring in ewe milk. Further phenotypical and functional studies on milk leukocytes subsets might help to understand defense mechanisms of the ovine mammary gland against IMI.

  3. Some Properties of α-Subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Xi-qing; XU Yang; GU Xiu-mei

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the concept of α - subsets is introduced in a lattice implication algebra and some properties are discussed. Then we prove that an α- subset is a lattice ideal of L. In the end, we discuss the properties of annihilator.

  4. Subsets of configurations and canonical partition functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, J.; Bruckmann, F.; Kieburg, M.;

    2013-01-01

    We explain the physical nature of the subset solution to the sign problem in chiral random matrix theory: the subset sum over configurations is shown to project out the canonical determinant with zero quark charge from a given configuration. As the grand canonical chiral random matrix partition...

  5. A Submodularity Framework for Data Subset Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    evaluate novel data subset selection algorithms that are based on the framework of submodular functions, a class of mathematical functions that have...data selection to the problems of automatic speech recognition (ASR) and machine translation (MT). Data subset selection algorithms were used to

  6. Development of a synchronous subset of AADL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filali, Mamoun; Lawall, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We study the definition and the mapping of an AADL subset: the so called synchronous subset. We show that the data port protocol used for delayed and immediate connections between periodic threads can be interpreted in a  synchronous way. In this paper, we formalize this interpretation and study...

  7. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  8. Subsets of human natural killer cells and their regulatory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Binqing; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2014-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells have distinct functions as NKtolerant, NKcytotoxic and NKregulatory cells and can be divided into different subsets based on the relative expression of the surface markers CD27 and CD11b. CD27+ NK cells, which are abundant cytokine producers, are numerically in the minority in human peripheral blood but constitute the large population of NK cells in cord blood, spleen, tonsil and decidua tissues. Recent data suggest that these NK cells may have immunoregulatory properties under certain conditions. In this review, we will focus on these new NK cell subsets and discuss how regulatory NK cells may serve as rheostats or sentinels in controlling inflammation and maintaining immune homeostasis in various organs. PMID:24303897

  9. Macrophage polarisation: an immunohistochemical approach for identifying M1 and M2 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique M Barros

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn's disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a

  10. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced macrophage differentiation promotes regrowth in atrophied skeletal muscles and C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Frenette, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle injury and regeneration are closely associated with an inflammatory reaction that is usually characterized by sequential recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or macrophages. Selective macrophage depletion models have shown that macrophages are essential for complete regeneration of muscle fibers after freeze injuries, toxin injuries, ischemia-reperfusion, and hindlimb unloading and reloading. Although there is growing evidence that macrophages possess major myogenic capacities, it is not known whether the positive effects of macrophages can be optimized to stimulate muscle regrowth. We used in vivo and in vitro mouse models of atrophy to investigate the effects of stimulating macrophages with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on muscle regrowth. When atrophied soleus muscles were injected intramuscularly with M-CSF, we observed a 1.6-fold increase in macrophage density and a faster recovery in muscle force (20%), combined with an increase in muscle fiber diameter (10%), after 7 days of reloading, compared with PBS-injected soleus muscles. Furthermore, coculture of atrophied myotubes with or without bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and/or M-CSF revealed that the combination of BMDMs and M-CSF was required to promote myotube growth (15%). More specifically, M-CSF promoted the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype, which in turn decreased protein degradation and MuRF-1 expression by 25% in growing myotubes. These results indicate that specific macrophage subsets can be stimulated to promote muscle cell regrowth after atrophy.

  11. Ontogeny and Polarization of Macrophages in Inflammation: Blood monocytes versus tissue macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwitia eDey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of new information in recent years on the origin of macrophages in the steady-state and in the context of inflammation has opened up numerous new avenues of investigation and possibilities for therapeutic intervention. In contrast to the classical model of macrophage development, it is clear that tissue-resident macrophages can develop from yolk sac-derived erythromyeloid progenitors, fetal liver progenitors and bone marrow-derived monocytes. Under both homeostatic conditions and in response to pathophysiological insult, the contribution of these distinct sources of macrophages varies significantly between tissues. Furthermore, while all of these populations of macrophages appear to be capable of adopting the polarized M1/M2 phenotypes, their respective contribution to inflammation, resolution of inflammation and tissue repair remains poorly understood and is likely to be tissue- and disease-dependent. A better understanding of the ontology and polarization capacity of macrophages in homeostasis and disease will be essential for the development of novel therapies that target the inherent plasticity of macrophages in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disease.

  12. Subset selection circumvents the square root law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Scott; Yu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The square root law holds that acceptable embedding rate is sublinear in the cover size, specifically O(square root of n), in order to prevent detection as the warden's data and thus detector power increases. One way to transcend this law, at least in the i.i.d.case, is to restrict the cover to a chosen subset whose distribution is close to that of altered data. Embedding is then performed on this subset; this replaces the problem of finding a small enough subset to evade detection with the problem of finding a large enough subset that possesses a desired type distribution. We show that one can find such a subset of size asymptotically proportional to n rather than the square root of n. This works in the case of both replacement and tampering: Even if the distribution of tampered data depends on the distribution of cover data, one can find a fixed point in the probability simplex such that cover data of that distribution yields stego data of the same distribution. While the transmission of a subset is not allowed, this is no impediment: wet paper codes can be used, else in the worst case a maximal desirable subset can be computed from the cover by both sender and receiver without communication of side information.

  13. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin E Kara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H1/T(H2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  14. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  15. Innate-like functions of natural killer T cell subsets result from highly divergent gene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Samaniego-Castruita, Daniela; White, Brandie; Chawla, Ashu; Mock, Dennis; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the immune response that can be attributed in part to the existence of functional subsets of NKT cells. These subsets have been characterized only on the basis of the differential expression of a few transcription factors and cell-surface molecules. Here we have analyzed purified populations of thymic NKT cell subsets at both the transcriptomic level and epigenomic level and by single-cell RNA sequencing. Our data indicated that despite their similar antigen specificity, the functional NKT cell subsets were highly divergent populations with many gene-expression and epigenetic differences. Therefore, the thymus 'imprints' distinct gene programs on subsets of innate-like NKT cells that probably impart differences in proliferative capacity, homing, and effector functions.

  16. Variable and subset selection in PLS regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some useful methods for introductory analysis of variables and subsets in relation to PLS regression. We present here methods that are efficient in finding the appropriate variables or subset to use in the PLS regression. The general conclusion...... is that variable selection is important for successful analysis of chemometric data. An important aspect of the results presented is that lack of variable selection can spoil the PLS regression, and that cross-validation measures using a test set can show larger variation, when we use different subsets of X, than...

  17. Dynamic Aspects of Macrophage Polarizationduring Atherosclerosis Progression and Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePeled

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that macrophages in many contexts in vitro and in vivo display a spectrum of inflammatory features and functional properties. A convenient system to group together different subsets of macrophages has been the M1(inflammatory/M2(anti-inflammatory classification. In addition to other sites of inflammation, it is now established that atherosclerotic plaques contain both M1 and M2 macrophages. We review results made possible by a number of recent mouse models of atherosclerotic regression that, taken with other literature, have shown the M1/M2 balance in plaques to be dynamic, with M1 predominating in disease progression and M2 in regression. The regulation of the macrophage phenotype in plaques and the functional consequences of the M1 and M2 states in atherosclerosis will also be discussed.

  18. SUPPORTING AND SEPARATING SUBSETS FOR INVEX BODIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.K. EI-Sayied

    2008-01-01

    Invex bodies represent an important class of bodies which are considered as ageneralization of convex bodies. In this article, the author studies the supporting for thisclass of bodies as well as the separating subsets of two bodies.

  19. Curvatures for Parameter Subsets in Nonlinear Regression

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The relative curvature measures of nonlinearity proposed by Bates and Watts (1980) are extended to an arbitrary subset of the parameters in a normal, nonlinear regression model. In particular, the subset curvatures proposed indicate the validity of linearization-based approximate confidence intervals for single parameters. The derivation produces the original Bates-Watts measures directly from the likelihood function. When the intrinsic curvature is negligible, the Bates-Watts parameter-effec...

  20. Identification of a human CD8+ regulatory T cell subset that mediates suppression through the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.A.; Meijgaarden, K.E. van; Savage, N.D.; Boer, T. de; Triebel, F.; Wal, A. van der; Heer, E. de; Klein, M.R.; Geluk, A.; Ottenhoff, T.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) comprise multiple subsets and are important in controlling immunity and inflammation. However, the induction and mode of action of the various distinct Treg subsets remain ill defined, particularly in humans. Here, we describe a human CD8+ lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-

  1. A systems biology approach to the analysis of subset-specific responses to lipopolysaccharide in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Hancock

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are critical for regulating CD4 and CD8 T cell immunity, controlling Th1, Th2, and Th17 commitment, generating inducible Tregs, and mediating tolerance. It is believed that distinct DC subsets have evolved to control these different immune outcomes. However, how DC subsets mount different responses to inflammatory and/or tolerogenic signals in order to accomplish their divergent functions remains unclear. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS provides an excellent model for investigating responses in closely related splenic DC subsets, as all subsets express the LPS receptor TLR4 and respond to LPS in vitro. However, previous studies of the LPS-induced DC transcriptome have been performed only on mixed DC populations. Moreover, comparisons of the in vivo response of two closely related DC subsets to LPS stimulation have not been reported in the literature to date. We compared the transcriptomes of murine splenic CD8 and CD11b DC subsets after in vivo LPS stimulation, using RNA-Seq and systems biology approaches. We identified subset-specific gene signatures, which included multiple functional immune mediators unique to each subset. To explain the observed subset-specific differences, we used a network analysis approach. While both DC subsets used a conserved set of transcription factors and major signalling pathways, the subsets showed differential regulation of sets of genes that 'fine-tune' the network Hubs expressed in common. We propose a model in which signalling through common pathway components is 'fine-tuned' by transcriptional control of subset-specific modulators, thus allowing for distinct functional outcomes in closely related DC subsets. We extend this analysis to comparable datasets from the literature and confirm that our model can account for cell subset-specific responses to LPS stimulation in multiple subpopulations in mouse and man.

  2. ROS play a critical role in the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages and the occurrence of tumor-associated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Swati Choksi; Kun Chen; Yelena Pobezinskaya; Ilona Linnoila; Zheng-Gang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation to different types of macrophages determines their distinct functions.Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions similar to those of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages.We report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is critical for macrophage differentiation and that inhibition of superoxide (O2-) production specifically blocks the differentiation of M2 macrophages.We found that when monocytes are triggered to differentiate,O2-is generated and is needed for the biphasic ERK activation,which is critical for macrophage differentiation.We demonstrated that ROS elimination by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and other ROS inhibitors blocks macrophage differentiation.However,the inhibitory effect of ROS elimination on macrophage differentiation is overcome when cells are polarized to classically activated (M1),but not M2,macrophages.More importantly,the continuous administration of the ROS inhibitor BHA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models.Targeting TAMs by blocking ROS can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment.

  3. Improved Subset Autoregression: With R Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. McLeod

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The FitAR R (R Development Core Team 2008 package that is available on the Comprehensive R Archive Network is described. This package provides a comprehensive approach to fitting autoregressive and subset autoregressive time series. For long time series with complicated autocorrelation behavior, such as the monthly sunspot numbers, subset autoregression may prove more feasible and/or parsimonious than using AR or ARMA models. The two principal functions in this package are SelectModel and FitAR for automatic model selection and model fitting respectively. In addition to the regular autoregressive model and the usual subset autoregressive models (Tong 1977, these functions implement a new family of models. This new family of subset autoregressive models is obtained by using the partial autocorrelations as parameters and then selecting a subset of these parameters. Further properties and results for these models are discussed in McLeod and Zhang (2006. The advantages of this approach are that not only is an efficient algorithm for exact maximum likelihood implemented but that efficient methods are derived for selecting high-order subset models that may occur in massive datasets containing long time series. A new improved extended {BIC} criterion, {UBIC}, developed by Chen and Chen (2008 is implemented for subset model selection. A complete suite of model building functions for each of the three types of autoregressive models described above are included in the package. The package includes functions for time series plots, diagnostic testing and plotting, bootstrapping, simulation, forecasting, Box-Cox analysis, spectral density estimation and other useful time series procedures. As well as methods for standard generic functions including print, plot, predict and others, some new generic functions and methods are supplied that make it easier to work with the output from FitAR for bootstrapping, simulation, spectral density estimation and Box

  4. Intracellular survival and persistence of Chlamydia muridarum is determined by macrophage polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gracey

    Full Text Available Macrophages can display a number of distinct phenotypes, known collectively as polarized macrophages. The best defined of these phenotypes are the classically-activated, interferon gamma (IFNγ/LPS induced (M1 and alternatively-activated, IL-4 induced (M2 macrophages. The goal of this study is to characterize macrophage-Chlamydia interactions in the context of macrophage polarization. Here we use Chlamydia muridarum and murine bone-marrow derived macrophages to show Chlamydia does not induce M2 polarization in macrophages as a survival strategy. Unexpectedly, the infection of macrophages was silent with no upregulation of M1 macrophage-associated genes. We further demonstrate that macrophages polarized prior to infection have a differential capacity to control Chlamydia. M1 macrophages harbor up to 40-fold lower inclusion forming units (IFU than non-polarized or M2 polarized macrophages. Gene expression analysis showed an increase in 16sRNA in M2 macrophages with no change in M1 macrophages. Suppressed Chlamydia growth in M1 macrophages correlated with the induction of a bacterial gene expression profile typical of persistence as evident by increased Euo expression and decreased Omp1 and Tal expression. Observations of permissive Chlamydia growth in non-polarized and M2 macrophages and persistence in M1 macrophages were supported through electron microscopy. This work supports the importance of IFNγ in the innate immune response to Chlamydia. However, demonstration that the M1 macrophages, despite an antimicrobial signature, fail to eliminate intracellular Chlamydia supports the notion that host-pathogen co-evolution has yielded a pathogen that can evade cellular defenses against this pathogen, and persist for prolonged periods of time in the host.

  5. Distinct molecular phenotypes in male and female schizophrenia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M Ramsey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In schizophrenia, sex specific dimorphisms related to age of onset, course of illness and response to antipsychotic treatment may be mirrored by sex-related differences in the underlying molecular pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have carried out multiplex immunoassay profiling of sera from 4 independent cohorts of first episode antipsychotic naive schizophrenia patients (n = 133 and controls (n = 133 to identify such sex-specific illness processes in the periphery. The concentrations of 16 molecules associated with hormonal, inflammation and growth factor pathways showed significant sex differences in schizophrenia patients compared with controls. In female patients, the inflammation-related analytes alpha-1-antitrypsin, B lymphocyte chemoattractant BLC and interleukin-15 showed negative associations with positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS scores. In male patients, the hormones prolactin and testosterone were negatively associated with PANSS ratings. In addition, we investigated molecular changes in a subset of 33 patients before and after 6 weeks of treatment with antipsychotics and found that treatment induced sex-specific changes in the levels of testosterone, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, follicle stimulating hormone, interleukin-13 and macrophage-derived chemokine. Finally, we evaluated overlapping and distinct biomarkers in the sex-specific molecular signatures in schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that future studies should investigate the common and sex-specific aetiologies of schizophrenia, as the current findings suggest that different therapeutic strategies may be required for male and female patients.

  6. Macrophages Contribute to the Spermatogonial Niche in the Adult Testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony DeFalco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The testis produces sperm throughout the male reproductive lifespan by balancing self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs. Part of the SSC niche is thought to lie outside the seminiferous tubules of the testis; however, specific interstitial components of the niche that regulate spermatogonial divisions and differentiation remain undefined. We identified distinct populations of testicular macrophages, one of which lies on the surface of seminiferous tubules, in close apposition to areas of tubules enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia. These macrophages express spermatogonial proliferation- and differentiation-inducing factors, such as colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 and enzymes involved in retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis. We show that transient depletion of macrophages leads to a disruption in spermatogonial differentiation. These findings reveal an unexpected role for macrophages in the spermatogonial niche in the testis and raise the possibility that macrophages play previously unappreciated roles in stem/progenitor cell regulation in other tissues.

  7. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  8. Subset specification of central serotonergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marten P Smidt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The last decade the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT system has received enormous attention due to its role in regulation of behavior, exemplified by the discovery that increased 5-HT tone in the central nervous system is able to alleviate affective disorders. Here, we review the developmental processes, with a special emphasis on subset specification, leading to the formation of the 5-HT system in the brain. Molecular classification of 5-HT neuronal groups leads to the definition of two independent rostral groups positioned in rhombomere 1 and 2/3 and a caudal group in rhombomere 5-8. In addition, more disperse refinement of these subsets is present as shown by the selective expression of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor, indicating functional diversity between 5-HT subsets. The functional significance of the molecular coding differences is not well known and the molecular basis of described specific connectivity patterns remain to be elucidated. Recent developments in genetic lineage tracing models will provide these data and form a major step-up towards the full understanding of the importance of developmental programming and function of 5-HT neuronal subsets.

  9. Calibration with empirically weighted mean subset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2002-01-01

    In this article a new calibration method called empirically weighted mean subset (EMS) is presented. The method is illustrated using spectral data. Using several near-infrared (NIR) benchmark data sets, EMS is compared to partial least-squares regression (PLS) and interval partial least-squares r......In this article a new calibration method called empirically weighted mean subset (EMS) is presented. The method is illustrated using spectral data. Using several near-infrared (NIR) benchmark data sets, EMS is compared to partial least-squares regression (PLS) and interval partial least...... is obtained by calculating the weighted mean of all coefficient vectors for subsets of the same size. The weighting is proportional to SSgamma-omega, where SSgamma is the residual sum of squares from a linear regression with subset gamma and omega is a weighting parameter estimated using cross......-validation. This construction of the weighting implies that even if some coefficients will become numerically small, none will become exactly zero. An efficient algorithm has been implemented in MATLAB to calculate the EMS solution and the source code has been made available on the Internet....

  10. Feature subset selection based on relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Bell, David; Murtagh, Fionn

    In this paper an axiomatic characterisation of feature subset selection is presented. Two axioms are presented: sufficiency axiom—preservation of learning information, and necessity axiom—minimising encoding length. The sufficiency axiom concerns the existing dataset and is derived based on the following understanding: any selected feature subset should be able to describe the training dataset without losing information, i.e. it is consistent with the training dataset. The necessity axiom concerns the predictability and is derived from Occam's razor, which states that the simplest among different alternatives is preferred for prediction. The two axioms are then restated in terms of relevance in a concise form: maximising both the r( X; Y) and r( Y; X) relevance. Based on the relevance characterisation, four feature subset selection algorithms are presented and analysed: one is exhaustive and the remaining three are heuristic. Experimentation is also presented and the results are encouraging. Comparison is also made with some well-known feature subset selection algorithms, in particular, with the built-in feature selection mechanism in C4.5.

  11. Wound administration of M2-polarized macrophages does not improve murine cutaneous healing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J; de Winther, Menno P J; van der Hulst, Rene R W J; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds.

  12. The multiple roles of monocyte subsets in steady state and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Clinton S; Swirski, Filip K

    2010-08-01

    Monocytes participate importantly in immunity. Produced in the bone marrow and released into the blood, they circulate in blood or reside in a spleen reservoir before entering tissue and giving rise to macrophages or dendritic cells. Monocytes are more than transitional cells that adapt to a particular tissue environment indiscriminately. Accumulating evidence now indicates that monocytes are heterogeneous in several species and are themselves predetermined for particular function in the steady state and inflammation. Future therapeutics may harness this heterogeneity to target harmful functions while sparing those that are beneficial. Here, we review recent advances on the ontogeny and function of monocytes and their subsets in humans and mice.

  13. Differential Expression of CD163 on Monocyte Subsets in Healthy and HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Emma; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Westhorpe, Clare; Cameron, Paul U.; Brew, Bruce J.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Jaworowski, Anthony; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004), supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16− monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16− monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively), which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16− subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16− monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD163

  14. Differential expression of CD163 on monocyte subsets in healthy and HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Tippett

    Full Text Available CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004, supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16- monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively, which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16- subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16- monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD

  15. A hitchhiker's guide to myeloid cell subsets: practical implementation of a novel mononuclear phagocyte classification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eGuilliams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The classification of mononuclear phagocytes as either dendritic cells or macrophages has been mainly based on morphology, the expression of surface markers and assumed functional specialization. We have recently proposed a novel classification system of mononuclear phagocytes based on their ontogeny. Here we discuss the practical application of such a classification system through a number of prototypical examples we have encountered while hitchhiking from one subset to another, across species and between steady state and inflammatory settings. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of such a classification system and propose a number of improvements to move from theoretical concepts to concrete guidelines.

  16. Cholangiocarcinoma stem-like subset shapes tumor-initiating niche by educating associated macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raggi, Chiara; Correnti, Margherita; Sica, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    providing a rationale for a synergistic therapeutic strategy for CCA-disease. LAY SUMMARY: Immune plasticity represents an important hallmark of tumor outcome. Since cancer stem cells are able to manipulate stromal cells to their needs, a better definition of key deregulated immune subtype responsible...

  17. Macrophages support pathological erythropoiesis in polycythemia vera and β-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Casu, Carla; Gardenghi, Sara; Breda, Laura; Crielaard, Bart J; Guy, Ella; Marongiu, Maria Franca; Gupta, Ritama; Levine, Ross L; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Ebert, Benjamin L; Van Rooijen, Nico; Ghaffari, Saghi; Grady, Robert W; Giardina, Patricia J; Rivella, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Regulation of erythropoiesis is achieved by the integration of distinct signals. Among them, macrophages are emerging as erythropoietin-complementary regulators of erythroid development, particularly under stress conditions. We investigated the contribution of macrophages to physiological and pathological conditions of enhanced erythropoiesis. We used mouse models of induced anemia, polycythemia vera and β-thalassemia in which macrophages were chemically depleted. Our data indicate that macrophages contribute decisively to recovery from induced anemia, as well as the pathological progression of polycythemia vera and β-thalassemia, by modulating erythroid proliferation and differentiation. We validated these observations in primary human cultures, showing a direct impact of macrophages on the proliferation and enucleation of erythroblasts from healthy individuals and patients with polycythemia vera or β-thalassemia. The contribution of macrophages to stress and pathological erythropoiesis, which we have termed stress erythropoiesis macrophage-supporting activity, may have therapeutic implications.

  18. Endothelial progenitor cell subsets and preeclampsia: Findings and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Attar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular remodeling is an essential component of gestation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an important role in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. The results of studies measuring the number of EPCs in normal pregnancies and in preeclampsia have been highly controversial or even contradictory because of some variations in technical issues and different methodologies enumerating three distinct subsets of EPCs: circulating angiogenic cells (CAC, colony forming unit endothelial cells (CFU-ECs, and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs. In general, most studies have shown an increase in the number of CACs in the maternal circulation with a progression in the gestational age in normal pregnancies, while functional capacities measured by CFU-ECs and ECFCs remain intact. In the case of preeclampsia, mobilization of CACs and ECFCs occurs in the peripheral blood of pregnant women, but the functional capacities shown by culture of the derived colony-forming assays (CFU-EC and ECFC assays are altered. Furthermore, the number of all EPC subsets will be reduced in umbilical cord blood in the case of preeclampsia. As EPCs play an important role in the homeostasis of vascular networks, the difference in their frequency and functionality in normal pregnancies and those with preeclampsia can be expected. In this review, there was an attempt to provide a justification for these controversies.

  19. T-cell subsets in the germinal center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiscal, Roybel R; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2013-03-01

    T cells are known to migrate to B-cell-enriched follicles and germinal centers within secondary lymphoid organs to provide help to B cells. Cognate T:B interactions that take place at the T:B border and subsequently within germinal centers are essential for B-cell priming, differentiation into germinal center B cells, and selection of mutated cells into memory B cells or memory plasma cells. In recent years, different stages of maturation within B-cell helper T cells, collectively known as B-follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, as well as heterogeneity amid germinal center T cells are becoming clear. Indeed, germinal centers support not only bona fide Tfh cells but also CD4(+) and CD8(+) follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells that act to suppress germinal center responses and B-cell helper natural killer T cells. There is a growing need for more precise phenotypic and functional distinction of these specialized T-cell subsets. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the ontogeny, molecular identity, and functional relevance of the various subsets of germinal center T cells.

  20. Product-free subsets of profinite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bardestani, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Gowers in his paper on quasirandom groups studies a question of Babai and Sos asking whether there exists a constant $c > 0$ such that every finite group $G$ has a product-free subset of size at least $c|G|$. Answering the question negatively, he proves that for sufficiently large prime $p$, the group $\\mathrm{PSL}_2(\\mathbb{F}_p)$ has no product-free subset of size $cn^{8/9}$, where $n$ is the order of $\\mathrm{PSL}_2(\\mathbb{F}_p)$. We will consider the problem for compact groups and in particular for profinite groups $\\SL_k(\\ZZ_p)$ obtain lower and upper exponential bounds for the supremal measure of the product-free sets. The proof involves establishing a lower bound for the dimension of non-trivial representations of the finite groups $\\SL_k(\\Z{p^n})$.

  1. Macrophages Undergo M1-to-M2 Transition in Adipose Tissue Regeneration in a Rat Tissue Engineering Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijin; Xu, Fangfang; Wang, Zhifa; Dai, Taiqiang; Ma, Chao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yanpu

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are involved in the full processes of tissue healing or regeneration and play an important role in the regeneration of a variety of tissues. Although recent evidence suggests the role of different macrophage phenotypes in adipose tissue expansion, metabolism, and remodeling, the spectrum of macrophage phenotype in the adipose tissue engineering field remains unknown. The present study established a rat model of adipose tissue regeneration using a tissue engineering chamber. Macrophage phenotypes were assessed during the regenerative process in the model. Neo-adipose tissue was generated 6 weeks after implantation. Macrophages were obvious in the chamber constructs 3 days after implantation, peaked at day 7, and significantly decreased thereafter. At day 3, macrophages were predominantly M1 macrophages (CCR7+), and there were few M2 macrophages (CD206+). At day 7, the percentage of M2 macrophages significantly increased and remained stable at day 14. M2 macrophages became the predominant macrophage population at 42 days. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated transition of cytokines from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory, which was consistent with the transition of macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2. These results showed distinct transition of macrophage phenotypes from a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to an anti-inflammatory M2 in adipose tissue regeneration in our tissue engineering model. This study provides new insight into macrophage phenotype transition in the regeneration of adipose tissue.

  2. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  3. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  4. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  5. Molecular subsets in the gene expression signatures of scleroderma skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Milano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc, 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc, 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of 'intrinsic' genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001 and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs

  6. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  7. Genetic and genomic approaches to understanding macrophage identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher K

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and functions of diverse macrophage phenotypes in health and disease. Recent studies using genetic and genomic approaches suggest a relatively simple model of collaborative and hierarchical interactions between lineage-determining and signal-dependent transcription factors that enable selection and activation of transcriptional enhancers that specify macrophage identity and function. In addition, we have found that it is possible to use natural genetic variation as a powerful tool for advancing our understanding of how the macrophage deciphers the information encoded by the genome to attain specific phenotypes in a context-dependent manner. Here, I will describe our recent efforts to extend genetic and genomic approaches to investigate the roles of distinct tissue environments in determining the phenotypes of different resident populations of macrophages.

  8. Structure of the adult central complex in Drosophila: organization of distinct neuronal subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J M; Armstrong, J D

    2010-05-01

    The central complex (CX) is a defined set of neuropils located on the midline of the protocerebrum in several arthropods and has been implicated in a number of behaviors. To investigate the function of the CX further it is imperative to know the neuroarchitecture of this structure and to ensure all known neuron types conform to a common nomenclature system. Several types of CX neuron have been identified but it is not known if these exist singly or as components of isomorphic sets. We used an enhancer trap approach to study the adult structure, connectivity, and polarity of CX neurons in Drosophila. We observed several isomorphic sets of small-field neurons including pontine and fb-eb neurons, and also isomorphic sets of large-field neurons including R neurons and F neurons. We found that several types of large-field F neurons existed in isomorphic sets of approximately eight (four per hemisphere) and found evidence for small-field neuron types existing as isomorphic sets of 16. Small-field neurons were observed in clearly organized layers. This study provides a novel insight into CX structure and connectivity and provides a set of characterized enhancer trap lines that will be valuable for future study. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Extracellular mycobacterial DnaK polarizes macrophages to the M2-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael L Lopes

    Full Text Available Macrophages are myeloid cells that play an essential role in inflammation and host defense, regulating immune responses and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Depending on the microenvironment, macrophages can polarize to two distinct phenotypes. The M1 phenotype is activated by IFN-γ and bacterial products, and displays an inflammatory profile, while M2 macrophages are activated by IL-4 and tend to be anti-inflammatory or immunosupressive. It was observed that DnaK from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has immunosuppressive properties, inducing a tolerogenic phenotype in dendritic cells and MDSCs, contributing to graft acceptance and tumor growth. However, its role in macrophage polarization remains to be elucidated. We asked whether DnaK was able to modulate macrophage phenotype. Murine macrophages, derived from bone marrow, or from the peritoneum, were incubated with DnaK and their phenotype compared to M1 or M2 polarized macrophages. Treatment with DnaK leads macrophages to present higher arginase I activity, IL-10 production and FIZZ1 and Ym1 expression. Furthermore, DnaK increased surface levels of CD206. Importantly, DnaK-treated macrophages were able to promote tumor growth in an allogeneic melanoma model. Our results suggest that DnaK polarizes macrophages to the M2-like phenotype and could constitute a virulence factor and is an important immunomodulator of macrophage responses.

  10. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zhang

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo.

  11. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Suzana A.; Azad, Tej D.; Gholamin, Sharareh; Xu, Chelsea Y.; Liu, Jie; Achrol, Achal S.; Richard, Chase; Sommerkamp, Pia; Schoen, Matthew Kenneth; McCracken, Melissa N.; Majeti, Ravi; Weissman, Irving; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Cheshier, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo. PMID:27092773

  12. The role of HIV and monocytes/macrophages in adipose tissue biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikuma, Cecilia M; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Killebrew, Deirdre A; Libutti, Daniel E; Chow, Dominic C; Nakamoto, Beau K; Liang, Chin Yuan; Milne, Cris I P; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Barbour, Jason D; Shiramizu, Bruce T; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2014-02-01

    To assess the role of HIV and monocytes/macrophages in adipose tissue dysregulation. Cross-sectional study in 5 groups: HIV seronegative, HIV+ antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, HIV+ nonlipoatrophic on zidovudine- and/or stavudine-containing ART, HIV+ lipoatrophic on similar ART, and HIV+ on abacavir- or tenofovir-containing ART. HIV DNA in circulating monocyte subsets was quantitated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Biopsied subcutaneous fat was examined for macrophage content by CD68 staining. Isolated adipocytes and macrophages were cultured and the supernatant assayed for secretory products by Luminex multiplex cytokine technology. Sixty-nine subjects were enrolled. Lipoatrophic subjects had higher median HIV DNA levels (270.5 copies/10 cells) in circulating peripheral CD14CD16 co-expressing monocyte subsets compared with subjects who were ART-naive (25.0 copies), nonlipoatrophic (15.0 copies), or on abacavir/tenofovir (57.5 copies), P adipocytes and adipose macrophage content were marginal. Although adipocyte secretory products were similar, HIV-infected subjects had higher adipose macrophage-derived interleukin (IL)-12p40, IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte inflammatory protein 1 alpha and lower eotaxin and interferon gamma levels than HIV seronegative subjects (P adipose macrophage secretory products were comparable between subjects naive with ART versus those on ART. Circulating HIV-infected and proinflammatory CD14CD16 monocyte subsets contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV-associated lipoatrophy. Among HIV-infected individuals, macrophages, rather than adipocytes, are the primary source of low-grade inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue. HIV infection modifies these macrophages to a more proinflammatory phenotype, and these changes are not substantially mitigated by the use of ART.

  13. Monocyte subsets in myocardial infarction: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfvidsson, John; Ahlin, Fredrik; Vargas, Kris G; Thaler, Barbara; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-03-15

    Monocytes form an important part of the human innate immune system by taking part in inflammatory reactions. With time, monocytes have gained interest in the role they may play during the event of myocardial infarction (MI). The current paradigm suggests that monocytes consist of three subdivisions which differ in phenotypic and dynamic patterns after an MI. In the inflammation that ensues, the different subsets have been shown to have an impact on reparative processes and patient recovery. We searched Medline and Embase until April 5, 2016, for observational studies or clinical trials regarding monocyte functions and dynamics in MI. Apart from studies in humans, extensive work has been done in mice in an effort to understand the complex nature of monocyte dynamics. Animal models might add useful information on mapping these processes. The question still remains whether animal data can, to a certain degree, be extrapolated to monocyte functions during human MI. This review aims to summarize current available evidence on both mice and men with particular focus on the understanding of monocyte subsets dynamics and effects in human MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dense subsets of products of finite trees

    CERN Document Server

    Dodos, Pandelis; Tyros, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    We prove a "uniform" version of the finite density Halpern-L\\"{a}uchli Theorem. Specifically, we say that a tree $T$ is homogeneous if it is uniquely rooted and there is an integer $b\\geq 2$, called the branching number of $T$, such that every $t\\in T$ has exactly $b$ immediate successors. We show the following. For every integer $d\\geq 1$, every $b_1,...,b_d\\in\\mathbb{N}$ with $b_i\\geq 2$ for all $i\\in\\{1,...,d\\}$, every integer $k\\meg 1$ and every real $0<\\epsilon\\leq 1$ there exists an integer $N$ with the following property. If $(T_1,...,T_d)$ are homogeneous trees such that the branching number of $T_i$ is $b_i$ for all $i\\in\\{1,...,d\\}$, $L$ is a finite subset of $\\mathbb{N}$ of cardinality at least $N$ and $D$ is a subset of the level product of $(T_1,...,T_d)$ satisfying \\[|D\\cap \\big(T_1(n)\\times ...\\times T_d(n)\\big)| \\geq \\epsilon |T_1(n)\\times ...\\times T_d(n)|\\] for every $n\\in L$, then there exist strong subtrees $(S_1,...,S_d)$ of $(T_1,...,T_d)$ of height $k$ and with common level set such ...

  15. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  16. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Carpino

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production.

  17. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  18. Sensor Placement for Modal Parameter Subset Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Bernal, Dionisio; Damkilde, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The present paper proposes an approach for deciding on sensor placements in the context of modal parameter estimation from vibration measurements. The approach is based on placing sensors, of which the amount is determined a priori, such that the minimum Fisher information that the frequency...... responses carry on the selected modal parameter subset is, in some sense, maximized. The approach is validated in the context of a simple 10-DOF mass-spring-damper system by computing the variance of a set of identified modal parameters in a Monte Carlo setting for a set of sensor configurations, whose......). It is shown that the widely used Effective Independence (EI) method, which uses the modal amplitudes as surrogates for the parameters of interest, provides sensor configurations yielding theoretical lower bound variances whose maxima are up to 30 % larger than those obtained by use of the max-min approach....

  19. Dissimilarity-Based Sparse Subset Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhamifar, Ehsan; Sapiro, Guillermo; Sastry, S Shankar

    2016-11-01

    Finding an informative subset of a large collection of data points or models is at the center of many problems in computer vision, recommender systems, bio/health informatics as well as image and natural language processing. Given pairwise dissimilarities between the elements of a 'source set' and a 'target set,' we consider the problem of finding a subset of the source set, called representatives or exemplars, that can efficiently describe the target set. We formulate the problem as a row-sparsity regularized trace minimization problem. Since the proposed formulation is, in general, NP-hard, we consider a convex relaxation. The solution of our optimization finds representatives and the assignment of each element of the target set to each representative, hence, obtaining a clustering. We analyze the solution of our proposed optimization as a function of the regularization parameter. We show that when the two sets jointly partition into multiple groups, our algorithm finds representatives from all groups and reveals clustering of the sets. In addition, we show that the proposed framework can effectively deal with outliers. Our algorithm works with arbitrary dissimilarities, which can be asymmetric or violate the triangle inequality. To efficiently implement our algorithm, we consider an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) framework, which results in quadratic complexity in the problem size. We show that the ADMM implementation allows to parallelize the algorithm, hence further reducing the computational time. Finally, by experiments on real-world datasets, we show that our proposed algorithm improves the state of the art on the two problems of scene categorization using representative images and time-series modeling and segmentation using representative models.

  20. Lymphocytes subsets in children with febrile convulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Karaman, Sait; Caksen, Hüseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun; Yilmaz, Cahide; Atas, Bülent

    2007-07-01

    In this study, lymphocytes subsets including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were analyzed in children with febrile convulsion (FC) to determine whether there was the association of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of FC. The study includes 48 children with FC, and 55 healthy age matched control subjects, followed in Yüzüncü Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics between October 2003 and June 2004. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were examined in the study and control groups. The analyses were performed in the Hematology Laboratory, Yüzüncü Yil University Faculty of Medicine, with flow cytometer device (Coulter Epics XL2, Flow Cytometer). A total of 48 children [17 girls (35.5%) and 31 boys (64.5%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 22.20 +/- 13.75 months) with FC and 55 healthy children [28 girls (51%) and 27 boys (49%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 28.87 +/- 17.04 months) were included in the study. When compared with the control group, the study found significantly decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values in the study group (p .05). When comparing the children with and without positive family history for FC, the study did not find any difference for all CD values between the groups (p >.05). Similarly, there was not significant difference in CD values between the children with simple and complex FC (p >.05). The findings suggested that decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values might be responsible for the infections connected with FC or that they might be related to the pathogenesis of FC in some children.

  1. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition blocks M2 macrophage differentiation and suppresses metastasis in murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Rang Na

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are often associated with abundant macrophages that resemble the alternatively activated M2 subset. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and promote metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition is known to prevent breast cancer metastasis. This study hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition affects TAM characteristics potentially relevant to tumor cell metastasis. We found that the specific COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, inhibited human M2 macrophage differentiation, as determined by decreased CD14 and CD163 expressions and increased TNFα production. Several key metastasis-related mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, were inhibited in the presence of etodolac as compared to untreated M2 macrophages. Murine bone marrow derived M2 macrophages also showed enhanced surface MHCII IA/IE and CD80, CD86 expressions together with enhanced TNFα expressions with etodolac treatment during differentiation. Using a BALB/c breast cancer model, we found that etodolac significantly reduced lung metastasis, possibly due to macrophages expressing increased IA/IE and TNFα, but decreased M2 macrophage-related genes expressions (Ym1, TGFβ. In conclusion, COX-2 inhibition caused loss of the M2 macrophage characteristics of TAMs and may assist prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

  3. Age-dependent alterations of monocyte subsets and monocyte-related chemokine pathways in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trautwein Christian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental approaches have unraveled essential migratory and functional differences of monocyte subpopulations in mice. In order to possibly translate these findings into human physiology and pathophysiology, human monocyte subsets need to be carefully revisited in health and disease. In analogy to murine studies, we hypothesized that human monocyte subsets dynamically change during ageing, potentially influencing their functionality and contributing to immunosenescence. Results Circulating monocyte subsets, surface marker and chemokine receptor expression were analyzed in 181 healthy volunteers (median age 42, range 18-88. Unlike the unaffected total leukocyte or total monocyte counts, non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocytes significantly increased with age, but displayed reduced HLA-DR and CX3CR1 surface expression in the elderly. Classical CD14++CD16- monocyte counts did not vary dependent on age. Serum MCP-1 (CCL2, but not MIP1α (CCL3, MIP1β (CCL4 or fractalkine (CX3CL1 concentrations increased with age. Monocyte-derived macrophages from old or young individuals did not differ with respect to cytokine release in vitro at steady state or upon LPS stimulation. Conclusions Our study demonstrates dynamic changes of circulating monocytes during ageing in humans. The expansion of the non-classical CD14+CD16+ subtype, alterations of surface protein and chemokine receptor expression as well as circulating monocyte-related chemokines possibly contribute to the preserved functionality of the monocyte pool throughout adulthood.

  4. Mass Cytometry of the Human Mucosal Immune System Identifies Tissue- and Disease-Associated Immune Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Unen, Vincent; Li, Na; Molendijk, Ilse; Temurhan, Mine; Höllt, Thomas; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W; Mearin, M Luisa; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Koning, Frits

    2016-05-17

    Inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by abnormal immune responses and affect distinct locations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the role of several immune subsets in driving intestinal pathology has been studied, a system-wide approach that simultaneously interrogates all major lineages on a single-cell basis is lacking. We used high-dimensional mass cytometry to generate a system-wide view of the human mucosal immune system in health and disease. We distinguished 142 immune subsets and through computational applications found distinct immune subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal biopsies that distinguished patients from controls. In addition, mucosal lymphoid malignancies were readily detected as well as precursors from which these likely derived. These findings indicate that an integrated high-dimensional analysis of the entire immune system can identify immune subsets associated with the pathogenesis of complex intestinal disorders. This might have implications for diagnostic procedures, immune-monitoring, and treatment of intestinal diseases and mucosal malignancies.

  5. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  6. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  7. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death.

  8. Circulating TFH subset distribution is strongly affected in lupus patients with an active disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Le Coz

    Full Text Available Follicular helper T cells (TFH represent a distinct subset of CD4(+ T cells specialized in providing help to B lymphocytes, which may play a central role in autoimmune diseases having a major B cell component such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, TFH subsets that share common phenotypic and functional characteristics with TFH cells from germinal centers, have been described in the peripheral blood from healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of such populations in lupus patients. Circulating TFH cell subsets were defined by multicolor flow cytometry as TFH17 (CXCR3(-CCR6(+, TFH1 (CXCR3 (+ CCR6(- or TFH2 (CXCR3(-CCR6(- cells among CXCR5 (+ CD45RA(-CD4(+ T cells in the peripheral blood of 23 SLE patients and 23 sex and age-matched healthy controls. IL-21 receptor expression by B cells was analyzed by flow cytometry and the serum levels of IL-21 and Igs were determined by ELISA tests. We found that the TFH2 cell subset frequency is strongly and significantly increased in lupus patients with an active disease (SLEDAI score>8, while the TFH1 cell subset percentage is greatly decreased. The TFH2 and TFH1 cell subset frequency alteration is associated with the presence of high Ig levels and autoantibodies in patient's sera. Moreover, the TFH2 cell subset enhancement correlates with an increased frequency of double negative memory B cells (CD27(-IgD(-CD19(+ cells expressing the IL-21R. Finally, we found that IgE levels in lupus patients' sera correlate with disease activity and seem to be associated with high TFH2 cell subset frequency. In conclusion, our study describes for the first time the distribution of circulating TFH cell subsets in lupus patients. Interestingly, we found an increased frequency of TFH2 cells, which correlates with disease activity. Our results suggest that this subset might play a key role in lupus pathogenesis.

  9. Macrophage Polarization and Activation in Response to Implant Debris: Influence by “Particle Disease” and “Ion Disease”

    OpenAIRE

    Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Pajarinen, Jukka; Takakubo, Yuja; Gallo, Jiri; Nich, Christophe; TAKAGI, Michiaki; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages derive from human embryonic and fetal stem cells and from human bone marrow-derived blood monocytes. They play a major homeostatic role in tissue remodeling and maintenance facilitated by apoptotic “eat me” opsonins like CRP, serum amyloid P, C1q, C3b, IgM, ficolin, and surfactant proteins. Three subsets of monocytes, classic, intermediate, and nonclassic, are mobilized and transmigrate to tissues. Implant-derived wear particles opsonized by danger signals regulate macrophage prim...

  10. An alpha-helical cationic antimicrobial peptide selectively modulates macrophage responses to lipopolysaccharide and directly alters macrophage gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M G; Rosenberger, C M; Gold, M R; Finlay, B B; Hancock, R E

    2000-09-15

    Certain cationic antimicrobial peptides block the binding of LPS to LPS-binding protein and reduce the ability of LPS to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by macrophages. To gain a more complete understanding of how LPS activates macrophages and how cationic peptides influence this process, we have used gene array technology to profile gene expression patterns in macrophages treated with LPS in the presence or the absence of the insect-derived cationic antimicrobial peptide CEMA (cecropin-melittin hybrid). We found that CEMA selectively blocked LPS-induced gene expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The ability of LPS to induce the expression of >40 genes was strongly inhibited by CEMA, while LPS-induced expression of another 16 genes was relatively unaffected. In addition, CEMA itself induced the expression of a distinct set of 35 genes, including genes involved in cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, CEMA, a synthetic alpha-helical peptide, selectively modulates the transcriptional response of macrophages to LPS and can alter gene expression in macrophages.

  11. A Higher Frequency of CD14+ CD169+ Monocytes/Macrophages in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Li

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages can infiltrate into tumor microenvironment and regulate the progression of tumors. This study aimed at determining the frequency of different subsets of circulating monocytes and tumor infiltrating macrophages (TIMs in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC.The frequency of different subsets of circulating monocytes was characterized in 46 CRC patients and 22 healthy controls (HC by flow cytometry. The frequency of different subsets of macrophages was analyzed in TIMs from 30 tumor tissues and in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs from 12 non-tumor tissues. The concentrations of plasma cytokines and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA were determined. The potential association of these measures with the values of clinical parameters was analyzed.In comparison with that in the HC, the percentages of circulating CD14+ CD169+, CD14+ CD169+ CD163+ and CD14+ CD169+ CD206+ monocytes and TIMs CD14+ CD169+ as well as IL-10+ CD14+ CD169+, but not IL-12+ CD14+ CD169+ macrophages were significantly increased, accompanied by higher levels of plasma IL-10 in the CRC patients. The percentages of CD14+ CD169+ circulating monocytes and TIM macrophages were associated with the stage of disease and correlated positively with the levels of plasma IL-10 and CEA in CRC patients.Our data suggest that an increase in the frequency of CD14+ CD169+ cells may be associated with the development and progression of CRC and is concomitant rise of both, pro-tumor (M2-like, IL-10 producing and anti-tumor (M1-like, IL-12 producing monocytes and infiltrating macrophages. The frequency of CD14+ CD169+ circulating monocytes and infiltrating macrophages may serve as a biomarker for evaluating the pathogenic degrees of CRC.

  12. Injury-induced GR-1+ macrophage expansion and activation occurs independently of CD4 T-cell influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Fionnuala M; Tajima, Goro; Delisle, Adam J; Ikeda, Kimiko; Dolan, Sinead M; Hanschen, Marc; Mannick, John A; Lederer, James A

    2011-08-01

    Burn injury initiates an enhanced inflammatory condition referred to as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the two-hit response phenotype. Prior reports indicated that macrophages respond to injury and demonstrate a heightened reactivity to Toll-like receptor stimulation. Since we and others observed a significant increase in splenic GR-1 F4/80 CD11b macrophages in burn-injured mice, we wished to test if these macrophages might be the primary macrophage subset that shows heightened LPS reactivity. We report here that burn injury promoted higher level TNF-α expression in GR-1, but not GR-1 macrophages, after LPS activation both in vivo and ex vivo. We next tested whether CD4 T cells, which are known to suppress injury-induced inflammatory responses, might control the activation and expansion of GR-1 macrophages. Interestingly, we found that GR-1 macrophage expansion and LPS-induced TNF-α expression were not significantly different between wild-type and CD4 T cell-deficient CD4(-/-) mice. However, further investigations showed that LPS-induced TNF-α production was significantly influenced by CD4 T cells. Taken together, these data indicate that GR-1 F4/80 CD11b macrophages represent the primary macrophage subset that expands in response to burn injury and that CD4 T cells do not influence the GR-1 macrophage expansion process, but do suppress LPS-induced TNF-α production. These data suggest that modulating GR-1 macrophage activation as well as CD4 T cell responses after severe injury may help control the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the two-hit response phenotype.

  13. Activation of E-prostanoid 3 receptor in macrophages facilitates cardiac healing after myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Juan; Shen, Yujun; Chen, Guilin; Wan, Qiangyou; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Jing; Liu, Guizhu; Zuo, Shengkai; Tao, Bo; Yu, Yu; Wang, Junwen; Lazarus, Michael; Yu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct monocyte (Mo)/macrophage (Mp) subsets (Ly6Clow and Ly6Chigh) orchestrate cardiac recovery process following myocardial infarction (MI). Prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in the Mo/Mp-mediated inflammatory response, however, the role of its receptors in Mos/Mps in cardiac healing remains to be determined. Here we show that pharmacological inhibition or gene ablation of the Ep3 receptor in mice suppresses accumulation of Ly6Clow Mos/Mps in infarcted hearts. Ep3 deletion in Mos/Mps markedly attenuates healing after MI by reducing neovascularization in peri-infarct zones. Ep3 deficiency diminishes CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) expression and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in Mos/Mps by suppressing TGFβ1 signalling and subsequently inhibits Ly6Clow Mos/Mps migration and angiogenesis. Targeted overexpression of Ep3 receptors in Mos/Mps improves wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis. Thus, the PGE2/Ep3 axis promotes cardiac healing after MI by activating reparative Ly6Clow Mos/Mps, indicating that Ep3 receptor activation may be a promising therapeutic target for acute MI. PMID:28256515

  14. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  15. Large convexly independent subsets of Minkowski sums

    CERN Document Server

    Swanepoel, Konrad J

    2010-01-01

    Let $E_d(n)$ be the maximum number of pairs that can be selected from a set of $n$ points in $R^d$ such that the midpoints of these pairs are convexly independent. We show that $E_2(n)\\geq \\Omega(n\\sqrt{\\log n})$, which answers a question of Eisenbrand, Pach, Rothvo\\ss, and Sopher (2008) on large convexly independent subsets in Minkowski sums of finite planar sets, as well as a question of Halman, Onn, and Rothblum (2007). We also show that $\\lfloor\\frac{1}{3}n^2\\rfloor\\leq E_3(n)\\leq \\frac{3}{8}n^2+O(n^{3/2})$. Let $W_d(n)$ be the maximum number of pairwise nonparallel unit distance pairs in a set of $n$ points in some $d$-dimensional strictly convex normed space. We show that $W_2(n)=\\Theta(E_2(n))$ and for $d\\geq 3$ that $W_d(n)\\sim\\frac12\\left(1-\\frac{1}{a(d)}\\right)n^2$, where $a(d)\\in N$ is related to strictly antipodal families. In fact we show that the same asymptotics hold without the requirement that the unit distance pairs form pairwise nonparallel segments, and also if diameter pairs are considere...

  16. Generalized Subset Designs in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Izabella; Vikström, Ludvig; Hector, Gustaf; Johansson, Erik; Vikström, Conny; Trygg, Johan

    2017-06-20

    Design of experiments (DOE) is an established methodology in research, development, manufacturing, and production for screening, optimization, and robustness testing. Two-level fractional factorial designs remain the preferred approach due to high information content while keeping the number of experiments low. These types of designs, however, have never been extended to a generalized multilevel reduced design type that would be capable to include both qualitative and quantitative factors. In this Article we describe a novel generalized fractional factorial design. In addition, it also provides complementary and balanced subdesigns analogous to a fold-over in two-level reduced factorial designs. We demonstrate how this design type can be applied with good results in three different applications in analytical chemistry including (a) multivariate calibration using microwave resonance spectroscopy for the determination of water in tablets, (b) stability study in drug product development, and (c) representative sample selection in clinical studies. This demonstrates the potential of generalized fractional factorial designs to be applied in many other areas of analytical chemistry where representative, balanced, and complementary subsets are required, especially when a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors at multiple levels exists.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  18. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations...... in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia...... subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s)....

  19. Association of CD163+ macrophages and local production of soluble CD163 with decreased lymphocyte activation in spondylarthropathy synovitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeten, Dominique; Møller, Holger Jon; Delanghe, Joris

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Since CD163+ macrophages are selectively increased in spondylarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, we investigated the role of CD163+ macrophages in synovial inflammation. METHODS: Synovial biopsy samples from 26 SpA and 23 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were analyzed for macrophage...... and lymphocyte subsets. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were analyzed by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for soluble CD163 (sCD163) and by flow cytometry for lymphocyte activation. We also analyzed sCD163 in sera from 100 SpA patients, 23 RA patients, 20 healthy controls, and 20 SpA patients...... treated with infliximab. Polymorphism of haptoglobin (Hp), the CD163 ligand, was determined in 130 SpA and 23 RA patients. RESULTS: CD163+ macrophages, but not CD68+ macrophages, were significantly increased in SpA versus RA synovium and in HLA-B27+ versus HLA-B27- SpA. Despite similar lymphocyte numbers...

  20. Differential Gene Expression Profiles Reflecting Macrophage Polarization in Aging and Periodontitis Gingival Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, O A; Novak, M J; Kirakodu, S; Stromberg, A; Nagarajan, R; Huang, C B; Chen, K C; Orraca, L; Martinez-Gonzalez, J; Ebersole, J L

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has determined a phenotypic and functional heterogeneity for macrophage populations. This plasticity of macrophage function has been related to specific properties of subsets (M1 and M2) of these cells in inflammation, adaptive immune responses and resolution of tissue destructive processes. This investigation hypothesized that targeted alterations in the distribution of macrophage phenotypes in aged individuals, and with periodontitis would be skewed towards M1 inflammatory macrophages in gingival tissues. The study used a non-human primate model to evaluate gene expression profiles as footprints of macrophage variation in healthy and periodontitis gingival tissues from animals 3-23 years of age and in periodontitis tissues in adult and aged animals. Significant increases in multiple genes reflecting overall increases in macrophage activities were observed in healthy aged tissues, and were significantly increased in periodontitis tissues from both adults and aged animals. Generally, gene expression patterns for M2 macrophages were similar in healthy young, adolescent and adult tissues. However, modest increases were noted in healthy aged tissues, similar to those seen in periodontitis tissues from both age groups. M1 macrophage gene transcription patterns increased significantly over the age range in healthy tissues, with multiple genes (e.g. CCL13, CCL19, CCR7 and TLR4) significantly increased in aged animals. Additionally, gene expression patterns for M1 macrophages were significantly increased in adult health versus periodontitis and aged healthy versus periodontitis. The findings supported a significant increase in macrophages with aging and in periodontitis. The primary increases in both healthy aged tissues and, particularly periodontitis tissues appeared in the M1 phenotype.

  1. Functional activity of monocytes and macrophages in HTLV-1 infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila F Amorim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC, 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the

  2. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  3. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Stabel, Judith R; Laws, Elizabeth; D Cardieri, Maria Clara; Souza, Cleverson D

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  4. Quantum Distinction: Quantum Distinctiones!

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    10 pages; How many distinctions, in Latin, quantum distinctiones. We suggest approach of anthropic principle based on anthropic reference system which should be applied equally both in theoretical physics and in mathematics. We come to principle that within reference system of life subject of mathematics (that of thinking) should be equated with subject of physics (that of nature). For this reason we enter notions of series of distinctions, quantum distinction, and argue that quantum distinct...

  5. Functional role of monocytes and macrophages for the inflammatory response in acute liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning W Zimmermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Different etiologies such as drug toxicity, acute viral hepatitis B or acetaminophen poisoning can cause acute liver injury (ALI or even acute liver failure (ALF. Excessive cell death of hepatocytes in the liver is known to result in a strong hepatic inflammation. Experimental murine models of liver injury highlighted the importance of hepatic macrophages, so-called Kupffer cells, for initiating and driving this inflammatory response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-1-beta or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, CCL2 as well as activating other non-parenchymal liver cells, e.g. endothelial or hepatic stellate cells (HSC. Many of these proinflammatory mediators can trigger hepatocytic cell death pathways, e.g. via caspase activation, but also activate protective signaling pathways, e.g. via nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB. Recent studies in mice demonstrated that these macrophage actions largely depend on the recruitment of monocytes into the liver, namely of the inflammatory Ly6c+ (Gr1+ monocyte subset as precursors of tissue macrophages. The chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligand MCP-1/CCL2 promote monocyte subset infiltration upon liver injury. In contrast, the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and its ligand fractalkine (CX3CL1 are important negative regulators of monocyte infiltration by controlling their survival and differentiation into functionally diverse macrophage subsets upon injury. The recently identified cellular and molecular pathways for monocyte subset recruitment, macrophage differentiation and interactions with other hepatic cell types in the injured liver may therefore represent interesting novel targets for future therapeutic approaches in ALF.

  6. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  7. Arithmetic progressions in Salem-type subsets of the integers

    CERN Document Server

    Potgieter, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Given a subset of the integers of zero density, we define the weaker notion of fractional density of such a set. It is shown how this notion corresponds to that of the Hausdorff dimension of a compact subset of the reals. We then show that a version of a theorem of {\\L}aba and Pramanik on 3-term arithmetic progressions in subsets of the unit interval also holds for subsets of the integers with fractional density and satisfying certain Fourier-decay conditions.

  8. New model of macrophage acquisition of the lymphatic endothelial phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Hall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECPs contribute to new lymphatic vessel formation, but the mechanisms regulating their differentiation, recruitment, and function are poorly understood. Detailed characterization of M-LECPs is limited by low frequency in vivo and lack of model systems allowing in-depth molecular analyses in vitro. Our goal was to establish a cell culture model to characterize inflammation-induced macrophage-to-LECP differentiation under controlled conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Time-course analysis of diaphragms from lipopolysaccharide (LPS-treated mice revealed rapid mobilization of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages to the proximity of lymphatic vessels followed by widespread (∼50% incorporation of M-LECPs into the inflamed lymphatic vasculature. A differentiation shift toward the lymphatic phenotype was found in three LPS-induced subsets of activated macrophages that were positive for VEGFR-3 and many other lymphatic-specific markers. VEGFR-3 was strongly elevated in the early stage of macrophage transition to LECPs but undetectable in M-LECPs prior to vascular integration. Similar transient pattern of VEGFR-3 expression was found in RAW264.7 macrophages activated by LPS in vitro. Activated RAW264.7 cells co-expressed VEGF-C that induced an autocrine signaling loop as indicated by VEGFR-3 phosphorylation inhibited by a soluble receptor. LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophages also showed a 68% overlap with endogenous CD11b(+/VEGFR-3(+ LECPs in the expression of lymphatic-specific genes. Moreover, when injected into LPS- but not saline-treated mice, GFP-tagged RAW264.7 cells massively infiltrated the inflamed diaphragm followed by integration into 18% of lymphatic vessels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We present a new model for macrophage-LECP differentiation based on LPS activation of cultured RAW264.7 cells. This system designated here as the "RAW model" mimics

  9. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  10. Macrophages mediate cardioprotective cellular postconditioning in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Couto, Geoffrey; Liu, Weixin; Tseliou, Eleni; Sun, Baiming; Makkar, Nupur; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Arditi, Moshe; Marbán, Eduardo

    2015-08-03

    Ischemic injury in the heart induces an inflammatory cascade that both repairs damage and exacerbates scar tissue formation. Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) are a stem-like population that is derived ex vivo from cardiac biopsies; they confer both cardioprotection and regeneration in acute myocardial infarction (MI). While the regenerative effects of CDCs in chronic settings have been studied extensively, little is known about how CDCs confer the cardioprotective process known as cellular postconditioning. Here, we used an in vivo rat model of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury-induced MI and in vitro coculture assays to investigate how CDCs protect stressed cardiomyocytes. Compared with control animals, animals that received CDCs 20 minutes after IR had reduced infarct size when measured at 48 hours. CDCs modified the myocardial leukocyte population after ischemic injury. Specifically, introduction of CDCs reduced the number of CD68+ macrophages, and these CDCs secreted factors that polarized macrophages toward a distinctive cardioprotective phenotype that was not M1 or M2. Systemic depletion of macrophages with clodronate abolished CDC-mediated cardioprotection. Using both in vitro coculture assays and a rat model of adoptive transfer after IR, we determined that CDC-conditioned macrophages attenuated cardiomyocyte apoptosis and reduced infarct size, thereby recapitulating the beneficial effects of CDC therapy. Together, our data indicate that CDCs limit acute injury by polarizing an effector macrophage population within the heart.

  11. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  12. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (Pimmunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  13. Neutrophil Migration into the Infected Uroepithelium Is Regulated by the Crosstalk between Resident and Helper Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Zec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial defense against infections depends on the cooperation between distinct phagocytes of the innate immune system, namely macrophages and neutrophils. However, the mechanisms driving this cooperation are incompletely understood. In this study we describe the crosstalk between Ly6C+ and Ly6C− macrophage-subtypes and neutrophils in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. Ly6C− macrophages acted as tissue resident sentinels and attracted circulating phagocytes by chemokines. Ly6C+ macrophages produced tumor necrosis factor (TNF that licensed Ly6C− macrophages to release preformed CXCL2, which in turn caused matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 secretion by neutrophils to enable transepithelial migration.

  14. Role of alveolar macrophages in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross eVlahos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AMs represent a unique leukocyte population that responds to airborne irritants and microbes. This distinct microenvironment coordinates the maturation of long-lived AMs, which originate from fetal blood monocytes and self-renew through mechanisms dependent on GM-CSF and CSF-1 signaling. Peripheral blood monocytes can also replenish lung macrophages; however this appears to occur in a stimuli specific manner. In addition to mounting an appropriate immune response during infection and injury, AMs actively coordinate the resolution of inflammation through efferocytosis of apoptotic cells. Any perturbation of this process can lead to deleterious responses. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, there is an accumulation of airway macrophages that do not conform to the classic M1/M2 paradigm. There is a skewed transciptome profile that favors expression of wound healing M2 markers, which is reflective of a deficiency to resolve inflammation. Endogenous mediators that promote distinct macrophage phenotypes are discussed, as are the plausible mechanisms underlying why AMs fail to effectively resolve inflammation and restore normal lung homeostasis in COPD.

  15. Molecular marker differences relate to developmental position and subsets of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone M Smits

    Full Text Available The development of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA neurons located in the substantia nigra compacta (SNc and ventral tegmental area (VTA follow a number of stages marked by distinct events. After preparation of the region by signals that provide induction and patterning, several transcription factors have been identified, which are involved in specifying the neuronal fate of these cells. The specific vulnerability of SNc neurons is thought to root in these specific developmental programs. The present study examines the positions of young postmitotic mdDA neurons to relate developmental position to mdDA subset specific markers. MdDA neurons were mapped relative to the neuromeric domains (prosomeres 1-3 (P1-3, midbrain, and hindbrain as well as the longitudinal subdivisions (floor plate, basal plate, alar plate, as proposed by the prosomeric model. We found that postmitotic mdDA neurons are located mainly in the floorplate domain and very few in slightly more lateral domains. Moreover, mdDA neurons are present along a large proportion of the anterior/posterior axis extending from the midbrain to P3 in the diencephalon. The specific positions relate to some extent to the presence of specific subset markers as Ahd2. In the adult stage more of such subsets specific expressed genes are present and may represent a molecular map defining molecularly distinct groups of mdDA neurons.

  16. Macrophage plasticity in experimental atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Khallou-Laschet

    Full Text Available As in human disease, macrophages (MØ are central players in the development and progression of experimental atherosclerosis. In this study we have evaluated the phenotype of MØ associated with progression of atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE knockout (KO mouse model.We found that bone marrow-derived MØ submitted to M1 and M2 polarization specifically expressed arginase (Arg II and Arg I, respectively. This distinct arginase expression was used to evaluate the frequency and distribution of M1 and M2 MØ in cross-sections of atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice. Early lesions were infiltrated by Arg I(+ (M2 MØ. This type of MØ favored the proliferation of smooth muscle cells, in vitro. Arg II(+ (M1 MØ appeared and prevailed in lesions of aged ApoE KO mice and lesion progression was correlated with the dominance of M1 over the M2 MØ phenotype. In order to address whether the M2->M1 switch could be due to a phenotypic switch of the infiltrated cells, we performed in vitro repolarization experiments. We found that fully polarized MØ retained their plasticity since they could revert their phenotype. The analysis of the distribution of Arg I- and Arg II-expressing MØ also argued against a recent recruitment of M1 MØ in the lesion. The combined data therefore suggest that the M2->M1 switch observed in vivo is due to a conversion of cells already present in the lesion. Our study suggests that interventional tools able to revert the MØ infiltrate towards the M2 phenotype may exert an atheroprotective action.

  17. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimulatin

  18. Integrative Analysis Identifies Four Molecular and Clinical Subsets in Uveal Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, A Gordon; Shih, Juliann; Yau, Christina; Gibb, Ewan A; Oba, Junna; Mungall, Karen L; Hess, Julian M; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Walter, Vonn; Danilova, Ludmila; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Kucherlapati, Melanie; Kimes, Patrick K; Tang, Ming; Penson, Alexander; Babur, Ozgun; Akbani, Rehan; Bristow, Christopher A; Hoadley, Katherine A; Iype, Lisa; Chang, Matthew T; Cherniack, Andrew D; Benz, Christopher; Mills, Gordon B; Verhaak, Roel G W; Griewank, Klaus G; Felau, Ina; Zenklusen, Jean C; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Schoenfield, Lynn; Lazar, Alexander J; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Stern, Marc-Henri; Cebulla, Colleen M; Williams, Michelle D; Jager, Martine J; Coupland, Sarah E; Esmaeli, Bita; Kandoth, Cyriac; Woodman, Scott E

    2017-08-14

    Comprehensive multiplatform analysis of 80 uveal melanomas (UM) identifies four molecularly distinct, clinically relevant subtypes: two associated with poor-prognosis monosomy 3 (M3) and two with better-prognosis disomy 3 (D3). We show that BAP1 loss follows M3 occurrence and correlates with a global DNA methylation state that is distinct from D3-UM. Poor-prognosis M3-UM divide into subsets with divergent genomic aberrations, transcriptional features, and clinical outcomes. We report change-of-function SRSF2 mutations. Within D3-UM, EIF1AX- and SRSF2/SF3B1-mutant tumors have distinct somatic copy number alterations and DNA methylation profiles, providing insight into the biology of these low- versus intermediate-risk clinical mutation subtypes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. T-lymphocyte subsets in recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Klausen, B; Hougen, H P;

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral T-lymphocyte subsets: T-helper (OKT4) and T-suppressor (OKT8) cells were studied quantitatively in 20 patients with recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) in ulcerative, as well as inactive, stages of the disease. The figures were compared with T-lymphocyte subsets from matched control do...

  20. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Allen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization, via the malate-aspartate shuttle, as a predictor of whether OGDH is required for proliferation in 3D culture assays and for the growth of xenograft tumors. These findings highlight an anaplerotic role of aspartate and, more broadly, suggest that differential nutrient utilization patterns can identify subsets of cancers with distinct metabolic dependencies for potential pharmacological intervention.

  1. The Role of Microglial Subsets in Regulating Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Ruby Gribi of the San Francisco VA Flow Cytometry core, Dr. David Erle, Andrea Bar- czak, Rebecca Barbeau, and Joshua Pollack at the Sandler Asthma...Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 2005. 5: 953–964. 19 Geissmann, F., Gordon, S., Hume , D. A., Mowat, A. M. and Randolph, G. J...Goh, Y. P., Mwangi, J., David , T., Mukundan, L. et al., Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

  2. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O; Kirkeby, Svend

    2017-06-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal. They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hr. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep muscular plexus, mainly iba1(pos) cells were present, and were mostly CD169(neg) ; a few HO-1(pos) cells were present. A new subset of resident macrophages in the intestinal muscularis externa was discovered, identified as iba1(pos) CD169(neg) . HO-1 is constitutively present in most macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS-treatment results in an up-regulation of HO-1(pos) /CD169(neg) cells in serosa and at AP. Anat Rec, 300:1114-1122, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Ionized calcium‐binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO‐1 up‐regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Jan D.; Larsen, Jytte O.; Kirkeby, Svend

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal. They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota‐driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro‐inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hr. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium‐binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage marker) and heme oxygenase‐1 (HO‐1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. Results: iba1pos cells showed an overall higher density than CD169pos and HO‐1pos cells. Most HO‐1pos and iba1pos cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep muscular plexus, mainly iba1pos cells were present, and were mostly CD169neg; a few HO‐1pos cells were present. Conclusions: A new subset of resident macrophages in the intestinal muscularis externa was discovered, identified as iba1pos CD169neg. HO‐1 is constitutively present in most macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS‐treatment results in an up‐regulation of HO‐1pos/CD169neg cells in serosa and at AP. Anat Rec, 300:1114–1122, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:27860408

  4. Pharmacological effects of mitraphylline from Uncaria tomentosa in primary human monocytes: Skew toward M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, S; de la Puerta, R; Fernandez-Arche, A; Quilez, A M; Muriana, F J G; Garcia-Gimenez, M D; Bermudez, B

    2015-07-21

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willdenow ex Roemer & Schultes) DC. (Rubiaceae) is a Peruvian thorny liana, commonly known as "cat׳s claw", and traditionally used in folk medicine to deal with several inflammatory diseases. Mitraphylline (MTP) is the most abundant pentacyclic oxindolic alkaloid (POA) from U. Tomentosa and has been reported to modify the inflammatory response. Herein, we have sought to identify the mechanisms underlying this modulatory effect of MTP on primary human monocytes and its ability to regulate differentiation processes on human primary monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages. In vitro studies with human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages were performed. Monocytes and M0 macrophages were exposed to MTP (25μM) and LPS (100ng/mL). M0 macrophages were polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes in the absence or presence of MTP. The activation state of monocytes/macrophages was assessed by flow cytometry, gene expression and protein analysis of different specific markers. In human primary monocytes, the incubation of MTP for 24h reduced the number of classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) and intermediate (CD14(++)CD16(+)) subsets when compared to untreated or LPS-treated cells. MTP also reduced the chemotactic capacity of human primary monocytes. In addition, MTP promoted the polarization of M0 macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, the abrogation of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα, IL-6 or IL-1β, as well as the restoration of markers for M2 macrophages in LPS-treated M1 macrophages. Our results suggest that MTP may be a key modulator for regulating the plasticity of monocytes/macrophages and the attenuation of the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impacts of parturition and body condition score on glucose uptake capacity of bovine monocyte subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Melanie; Hussen, Jamal; Drong, Caroline; Meyer, Ulrich; von Soosten, Dirk; Frahm, Jana; Daenicke, Sven; Breves, Gerhard; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-15

    The peripartal period of dairy cows is associated with a higher incidence of infectious diseases like mastitis or metritis, particularly in high-yielding animals. The onset of lactation induces a negative energy balance and a shift of glucose distribution toward the udder. Glucose is used as primary fuel by monocytes which give rise to macrophages, key cells in the defense against pathogens. The aim of this study was to analyze whether animals with high or low body condition score (BCS) differ in composition and glucose uptake capacities of bovine monocyte subsets. Blood samples were taken from 27 dairy cows starting 42 days before parturition until day 56 after parturition. The cows were allocated to two groups according to their BCS. A feeding regime was applied, in which the BCS high group received higher amounts of concentrate before parturition and concentrate feeding was more restricted in the BCS high group after parturition compared with the BCS low group, to promote postpartal lipolysis and enhance negative energy balance in the BCS high group. Blood cell counts of classical (cM), intermediate (intM) and nonclassical monocytes (ncM) were increased at day 7 after calving. In the BCS low group intM numbers were significantly higher compared to the BCS high group at day 7 after parturition. Within the BCS low group cows suffering from mastitis or metritis showed significantly higher numbers of cM, intM and ncM at day 7 after parturition. Classical monocytes and intM showed similar glucose uptake capacities while values for ncM were significantly lower. Compared with antepartal capacities and irrespective of BCS and postpartal mastitis or metritis, glucose uptake of all monocyte subsets decreased after parturition. In conclusion, whereas glucose uptake capacity of bovine monocyte subsets is altered by parturition, it is not linked to the energy supply of the animals or to postpartal infectious diseases.

  6. Phenotypic, ultra-structural, and functional characterization of bovine peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Sei

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are multi-functional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets directly ex vivo, without further in vitro manipulation. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that three DC subsets could be identified. Bovine plasmacytoid DC were phenotypically identified by a unique pattern of cell surface protein expression including CD4, exhibited an extensive endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, efficiently internalized and degraded exogenous antigen, and were the only peripheral blood cells specialized in the production of type I IFN following activation with Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists. Conventional DC were identified by expression of a different pattern of cell surface proteins including CD11c, MHC class II, and CD80, among others, the display of extensive dendritic protrusions on their plasma membrane, expression of very high levels of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, efficient internalization and degradation of exogenous antigen, and ready production of detectable levels of TNF-alpha in response to TLR activation. Our investigations also revealed a third novel DC subset that may be a precursor of conventional DC that were MHC class II+ and CD11c-. These cells exhibited a smooth plasma membrane with a rounded nucleus, produced TNF-alpha in response to TLR-activation (albeit lower than CD11c+ DC, and were the least efficient in internalization/degradation of exogenous antigen. These studies define three bovine blood DC subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics which can be analyzed during immune responses to pathogens and vaccinations of cattle.

  7. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  8. Proliferating Cellular Nuclear Antigen Expression as a Marker of Perivascular Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kenneth; Schwartz, Annette; Corey, Sarah; Orandle, Marlene; Kennedy, William; Thompson, Brendon; Alvarez, Xavier; Brown, Charlie; Gartner, Suzanne; Lackner, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Brain perivascular macrophages are a major target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques and HIV infection in humans. Perivascular macrophages are distinct from parenchymal microglia in their location, morphology, expression of myeloid markers, and turnover in the CNS. In contrast to parenchymal microglia, perivascular macrophages are continuously repopulated by blood monocytes, which undergo maturation to macrophages on entering the central nervous system (CNS). We studied differences in monocyte/macrophages in vivo that might account for preferential infection of perivascular macrophages by SIV. In situ hybridization for SIV and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry demonstrated that SIV-infected and PCNA-positive cells were predominantly found in perivascular cuffs of viremic animals and in histopathological lesions that characterize SIV encephalitis (SIVE) in animals with AIDS. Multilabel techniques including double-label immunohistochemistry and combined in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed numerous infected perivascular macrophages that were PCNA-positive. Outside the CNS, SIV-infected, PCNA-expressing macrophage subpopulations were found in the small intestine and lung of animals with AIDS. While PCNA is used as a marker of cell proliferation it is also strongly expressed in non-dividing cells undergoing DNA synthesis and repair. Therefore, more specific markers for cell proliferation including Ki-67, topoisomerase IIα, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation were used which indicated that PCNA-positive cells within SIVE lesions were not proliferating. These observations are consistent with perivascular macrophages as terminally differentiated, non-dividing cells and underscores biological differences that could potentially define mechanisms of preferential, productive infection of perivascular macrophages in the rhesus macaque model of neuroAIDS. These studies

  9. The First Trimester Gravid Serum Regulates Procalcitonin Expression in Human Macrophages Skewing Their Phenotype In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Rami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Procalcitonin (PCT is one of the best diagnostic and prognostic markers in clinical practice, widely used to evaluate the evolution of bacterial infections. Although it is mainly produced by thyroid, during sepsis almost all the peripheral tissues are involved in PCT production. Parenchymal cells have been suggested as the main source of PCT expression; however the contribution of macrophages is not clear yet. In response to environmental cues, tissue macrophages acquire distinct functional phenotypes, ranging from proinflammatory (M1 to anti-inflammatory (M2 phenotype. Macrophages at the fetal-maternal interface show immunosuppressive M2-like activities required for the maintenance of immunological homeostasis during pregnancy. This study aims to clarify the ability to synthesise PCT of fully differentiated (M0, polarized (M1/M2 macrophages and those cultured either in the presence of first trimester gravid serum (GS or pregnancy hormones. We found out that M1 macrophages upregulate PCT expression following LPS stimulation compared to M0 and M2. The GS downregulates PCT expression in macrophages, skewing them towards an M2-like phenotype. This effect seems only partially mediated by the hormonal milieu. Our findings strengthen the key role of macrophages in counteracting inflammatory stimuli during pregnancy, suggesting PCT as a possible new marker of M1-like macrophages.

  10. The first trimester gravid serum regulates procalcitonin expression in human macrophages skewing their phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Damiano; La Bianca, Martina; Agostinis, Chiara; Zauli, Giorgio; Radillo, Oriano; Bulla, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is one of the best diagnostic and prognostic markers in clinical practice, widely used to evaluate the evolution of bacterial infections. Although it is mainly produced by thyroid, during sepsis almost all the peripheral tissues are involved in PCT production. Parenchymal cells have been suggested as the main source of PCT expression; however the contribution of macrophages is not clear yet. In response to environmental cues, tissue macrophages acquire distinct functional phenotypes, ranging from proinflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. Macrophages at the fetal-maternal interface show immunosuppressive M2-like activities required for the maintenance of immunological homeostasis during pregnancy. This study aims to clarify the ability to synthesise PCT of fully differentiated (M0), polarized (M1/M2) macrophages and those cultured either in the presence of first trimester gravid serum (GS) or pregnancy hormones. We found out that M1 macrophages upregulate PCT expression following LPS stimulation compared to M0 and M2. The GS downregulates PCT expression in macrophages, skewing them towards an M2-like phenotype. This effect seems only partially mediated by the hormonal milieu. Our findings strengthen the key role of macrophages in counteracting inflammatory stimuli during pregnancy, suggesting PCT as a possible new marker of M1-like macrophages.

  11. The Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde complexity of the macrophage response in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twum, Danielle Y F; Burkard-Mandel, Lauren; Abrams, Scott I

    2017-08-01

    Macrophages comprise a highly diverse cell population expressing a continuum of biologic activities dictated by exposure to a plethora of inflammatory cues. Moreover, in contrast to most other hematopoietic populations, macrophages can arise from multiple sites-namely, the bone marrow or yolk sac, adding to the complexity of macrophage biology during health and disease. Nonetheless, it is this very type of diversity that is indispensable for macrophages to respond effectively to pathologic insults. Most of the interest in macrophage biology has been devoted to bone marrow-derived populations, but it is now becoming clearer that tissue-resident populations, which arise from distinct hematopoietic compartments, serve critical roles in host defense, including protection against neoplastic disease. Depending on the inflammatory milieu, macrophages can behave as a "two-edged sword," playing either host-protective (i.e., antitumor) or host-destructive (i.e., protumor) roles. Accordingly, we review herein the mechanisms that instruct macrophage functional diversity within their microenvironments, with special emphasis on transcriptional regulation, which is less understood. Given their polarizing positions in disease processes, we will also provide an overview of strategies that target macrophages or their effector mechanisms for therapeutic purposes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Silencing CCR2 in Macrophages Alleviates Adipose Tissue Inflammation and the Associated Metabolic Syndrome in Dietary Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongkil Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue macrophage (ATM-mediated inflammation is a key feature contributing to the adverse metabolic outcomes of dietary obesity. Recruitment of macrophages to obese adipose tissues (AT can occur through the engagement of CCR2, the receptor for MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, which is expressed on peripheral monocytes/macrophages. Here, we show that i.p. administration of a rabies virus glycoprotein-derived acetylcholine receptor-binding peptide effectively delivers complexed siRNA into peritoneal macrophages and ATMs in a mouse model of high-fat diet-induced obesity. Treatment with siRNA against CCR2 inhibited macrophage infiltration and accumulation in AT and, therefore, proinflammatory cytokines produced by macrophages. Consequently, the treatment significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity profiles, and also alleviated the associated symptoms of hepatic steatosis and reduced hepatic triglyceride production. These results demonstrate that disruption of macrophage chemotaxis to the AT through cell-targeted gene knockdown strategies can provide a therapeutic intervention for obesity-related metabolic diseases. The study also highlights a siRNA delivery approach for targeting specific monocyte subsets that contribute to obesity-associated inflammation without affecting the function of other tissue-resident macrophages that are essential for host homeostasis and survival.

  13. The Reactive Oxygen Species in Macrophage Polarization: Reflecting Its Dual Role in Progression and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hor-Yue Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High heterogeneity of macrophage is associated with its functions in polarization to different functional phenotypes depending on environmental cues. Macrophages remain in balanced state in healthy subject and thus macrophage polarization may be crucial in determining the tissue fate. The two distinct populations, classically M1 and alternatively M2 activated, representing the opposing ends of the full activation spectrum, have been extensively studied for their associations with several disease progressions. Accumulating evidences have postulated that the redox signalling has implication in macrophage polarization and the key roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in tissue environment have provided the clue for the reasons of ROS abundance in certain phenotype. M1 macrophages majorly clearing the pathogens and ROS may be crucial for the regulation of M1 phenotype, whereas M2 macrophages resolve inflammation which favours oxidative metabolism. Therefore how ROS play its role in maintaining the homeostatic functions of macrophage and in particular macrophage polarization will be reviewed here. We also review the biology of macrophage polarization and the disturbance of M1/M2 balance in human diseases. The potential therapeutic opportunities targeting ROS will also be discussed, hoping to provide insights for development of target-specific delivery system or immunomodulatory antioxidant for the treatment of ROS-related diseases.

  14. Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens indirectly induce an M2 macrophage-like phenotype in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P N; Aldridge, A; Vukman, K V; Donnelly, S; O'Neill, S M

    2014-10-01

    The M2 subset of macrophages has a critical role to play in host tissue repair, tissue fibrosis and modulation of adaptive immunity during helminth infection. Infection with the helminth, Fasciola hepatica, is associated with M2 macrophages in its mammalian host, and this response is mimicked by its excretory-secretory products (FhES). The tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is another major source of immune-modulatory molecules; we have previously shown that FhTeg can modulate the activity of both dendritic cells and mast cells inhibiting their ability to prime a Th1 immune response. Here, we report that FhTeg does not induce Th2 immune responses but can induce M2-like phenotype in vivo that modulates cytokine production from CD4(+) cells in response to anti-CD3 stimulation. FhTeg induces a RELMα expressing macrophage population in vitro, while in vivo, the expression of Arg1 and Ym-1/2 but not RELMα in FhTeg-stimulated macrophages was STAT6 dependent. To support this finding, FhTeg induces RELMα expression in vivo prior to the induction of IL-13. FhTeg can induce IL-13-producing peritoneal macrophages following intraperitoneal injection This study highlights the important role of FhTeg as an immune-modulatory source during F. hepatica infection and sheds further light on helminth-macrophage interactions.

  15. Saliva initiates the formation of pro-inflammatory macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourgonabadi, Solmaz; Müller, Heinz-Dieter; Mendes, João Rui; Gruber, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Saliva can support oral wound healing, a process that requires a temporary inflammatory reaction. We have reported previously that saliva provokes a strong inflammatory response in oral fibroblasts. Bone marrow cells also give rise to macrophages, a heterogeneous subset of cell population involved in wound healing. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) induce activation of pro-(M1), and anti-(M2) inflammatory macrophages, respectively. Yet, the impact of saliva on programming bone marrow cells into either M1 or M2 macrophages remains unclear . Herein, we examined whether sterile saliva affects the in vitro process of macrophage polarization based on murine bone marrow cultures and RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. We report that sterile saliva, similar to lipopolysaccharides, provoked a robust activation of the M1 phenotype which is characterized by a strong increase of the respective genes IL-12 and IL-6, based on a real-time gene expression analysis, and for IL-6 with immunoassay. Arginase-1 and Ym1, both genes characteristic for the M2 phenotype, were not considerably modulated by saliva. Inhibition of TLR4 signaling with TAK-242, blocking NFκB signaling with Bay 11-7085, but also autoclaving saliva greatly reduced the development of the M1 phenotype. These data suggest that saliva activates the TLR4 dependent polarization into pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage traffic

  17. Computational visual distinctness metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Baena, J.; Toet, A.; Fdez-Vidal, X.R.; Garrido, A.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new computational visual distinctness metric based on principles of the early human visual system is presented. The metric is applied to quantify (1) the visual distinctness of targets in complex natural scenes and (2) the perceptual differences between compressed and uncompressed images. The new

  18. Macrophage polarization alters the expression and sulfation pattern of glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Denys, Agnès; Delos, Maxime; Sikora, Anne-Sophie; Carpentier, Mathieu; Julien, Sylvain; Pestel, Joël; Allain, Fabrice

    2015-05-01

    Macrophages are major cells of inflammatory process and take part in a large number of physiological and pathological processes. According to tissue environment, they can polarize into pro-inflammatory (M1) or alternative (M2) cells. Although many evidences have hinted to a potential role of cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the functions of macrophages, the effect of M1 or M2 polarization on the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides has not been investigated so far. GAGs are composed of repeat sulfated disaccharide units. Heparan (HS) and chondroitin/dermatan sulfates (CS/DS) are the major GAGs expressed at the cell membrane. They are involved in numerous biological processes, which rely on their ability to selectively interact with a large panel of proteins. More than 20 genes encoding sulfotransferases have been implicated in HS and CS/DS biosynthesis, and the functional repertoire of HS and CS/DS has been related to the expression of these isoenzymes. In this study, we analyzed the expression of sulfotransferases as a response to macrophage polarization. We found that M1 and M2 activation drastically modified the profiles of expression of numerous HS and CS/DS sulfotransferases. This was accompanied by the expression of GAGs with distinct structural features. We then demonstrated that GAGs of M2 macrophages were efficient to present fibroblast growth factor-2 in an assay of tumor cell proliferation, thus indicating that changes in GAG structure may contribute to the functions of polarized macrophages. Altogether, our findings suggest a regulatory mechanism in which fine modifications in GAG biosynthesis may participate to the plasticity of macrophage functions.

  19. Ontogeny and characterization of blood leukocyte subsets and serum proteins in piglets before and after weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Jensen, K.H.; Nielsen, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    Existing knowledge about the development of the porcine immune system was extended by phenotypic characterization of leukocyte subsets and with assessment of Mannan-Binding Lectin (MBL) and immunoglobulin concentrations in peripheral blood of healthy piglets. Single-color and/or double-color flow...... parameters seem to be affected at the time of weaning which took place at 45 weeks of age. Using principal component analysis, all analyzed variables - except one were grouped into 8 factors with distinct developmental profiles. Several of these factors revealed an apparent suppression, a steady state...

  20. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle J Lindenberg

    Full Text Available In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+CD141(+DC-SIGN(+ DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+ subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+ T cells, migration of immature CD14(+ DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  1. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G M; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Tijssen, Henk J; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Koenen, Hans J P M; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+)CD141(+)DC-SIGN(+) DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+) subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, migration of immature CD14(+) DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  2. Codings of separable compact subsets of the first Baire class

    CERN Document Server

    Dodos, Pandelis

    2008-01-01

    Let $X$ be a Polish space and $K$ a separable compact subset of the first Baire class on $X$. For every sequence $\\bs$ dense in $\\kk$, the descriptive set-theoretic properties of the set \\[ \\lbf=\\{L\\in[\

  3. Semilinear elliptic problems on unbounded subsets of the Heisenberg group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tintarev

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the applications of an abstract version of concentration compactness to minimax problems. In particular, we prove the existence of solutions to semilinear elliptic problems on unbounded subsets of the Heisenberg group.

  4. Reliability analysis and updating of deteriorating systems with subset simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Ronald; Thöns, Sebastian; Straub, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Bayesian updating of the system deterioration model. The updated system reliability is then obtained through coupling the updated deterioration model with a probabilistic structural model. The underlying high-dimensional structural reliability problems are solved using subset simulation, which...

  5. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is expressed by regulating metabolic thresholds of the host macrophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Mehrotra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen derives from its facile adaptation to the intracellular milieu of human macrophages. To explore this process, we asked whether adaptation also required interference with the metabolic machinery of the host cell. Temporal profiling of the metabolic flux, in cells infected with differently virulent mycobacterial strains, confirmed that this was indeed the case. Subsequent analysis identified the core subset of host reactions that were targeted. It also elucidated that the goal of regulation was to integrate pathways facilitating macrophage survival, with those promoting mycobacterial sustenance. Intriguingly, this synthesis then provided an axis where both host- and pathogen-derived factors converged to define determinants of pathogenicity. Consequently, whereas the requirement for macrophage survival sensitized TB susceptibility to the glycemic status of the individual, mediation by pathogen ensured that the virulence properties of the infecting strain also contributed towards the resulting pathology.

  6. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is expressed by regulating metabolic thresholds of the host macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Parul; Jamwal, Shilpa V; Saquib, Najmuddin; Sinha, Neeraj; Siddiqui, Zaved; Manivel, Venkatasamy; Chatterjee, Samrat; Rao, Kanury V S

    2014-07-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen derives from its facile adaptation to the intracellular milieu of human macrophages. To explore this process, we asked whether adaptation also required interference with the metabolic machinery of the host cell. Temporal profiling of the metabolic flux, in cells infected with differently virulent mycobacterial strains, confirmed that this was indeed the case. Subsequent analysis identified the core subset of host reactions that were targeted. It also elucidated that the goal of regulation was to integrate pathways facilitating macrophage survival, with those promoting mycobacterial sustenance. Intriguingly, this synthesis then provided an axis where both host- and pathogen-derived factors converged to define determinants of pathogenicity. Consequently, whereas the requirement for macrophage survival sensitized TB susceptibility to the glycemic status of the individual, mediation by pathogen ensured that the virulence properties of the infecting strain also contributed towards the resulting pathology.

  7. Ineffective oesophageal motility: Manometric subsets exhibit different symptom profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Horst Gunter Haack; Ross David Hansen; Allison Malcolm; John Edward Kellow

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the demographic and clinical features of different manometric subsets of ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM; defined as ≥30% wet swallows with distal contractile amplitude <30 mmHg), and to determine whether the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux differs between IOM subsets.METHODS: Clinical characteristics of manometric subsets were determined in 100 IOM patients (73 female, median age 58 years) and compared to those of 100 age-and gender-matched patient controls with oesophageal symptoms, but normal manometry. Supine oesophageal manometry was performed with an eight-channel DentSleeve water-perfused catheter, and an ambulatory pH study assessed gastrooesophageal reflux.RESULTS: Patients in the IOM subset featuring a majority of low-amplitude simultaneous contractions (LASC) experienced less heartburn (prevalence 26%), but more dysphagia (57%) than those in the IOM subset featuring low-amplitude propagated contractions (LAP; heartburn 70%, dysphagia 24%; both P≤0.01). LASC patients also experienced less heartburn and more dysphagia than patient controls (heartburn 68%, dysphagia 11%; both P<0.001). The prevalence of heartburn and dysphagia in IOM patients featuring a majority of non-transmitted sequences (NT) was 54% (P=0.04 vs LASC) and 36% (P<0.01 vs controls), respectively. No differences in age and gender distribution, chest pain prevalence, acid exposure time (AET) and symptom/reflux association existed between IOM subsets, or between subsets and controls.CONCLUSION: IOM patients with LASC exhibit a different symptom profile to those with LAP, but do not differ in gastro-oesophageal reflux prevalence. These findings raise the possibility of different pathophysiological mechanisms in IOM subsets, which warrants further investigation.

  8. Graph Polynomials: From Recursive Definitions To Subset Expansion Formulas

    CERN Document Server

    Godlin, Benny; Makowsky, Johann A

    2008-01-01

    Many graph polynomials, such as the Tutte polynomial, the interlace polynomial and the matching polynomial, have both a recursive definition and a defining subset expansion formula. In this paper we present a general, logic-based framework which gives a precise meaning to recursive definitions of graph polynomials. We then prove that in this framework every recursive definition of a graph polynomial can be converted into a subset expansion formula.

  9. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  10. Domino: Extracting, Comparing, and Manipulating Subsets across Multiple Tabular Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratzl, Samuel; Gehlenborg, Nils; Lex, Alexander; Pfister, Hanspeter; Streit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Answering questions about complex issues often requires analysts to take into account information contained in multiple interconnected datasets. A common strategy in analyzing and visualizing large and heterogeneous data is dividing it into meaningful subsets. Interesting subsets can then be selected and the associated data and the relationships between the subsets visualized. However, neither the extraction and manipulation nor the comparison of subsets is well supported by state-of-the-art techniques. In this paper we present Domino, a novel multiform visualization technique for effectively representing subsets and the relationships between them. By providing comprehensive tools to arrange, combine, and extract subsets, Domino allows users to create both common visualization techniques and advanced visualizations tailored to specific use cases. In addition to the novel technique, we present an implementation that enables analysts to manage the wide range of options that our approach offers. Innovative interactive features such as placeholders and live previews support rapid creation of complex analysis setups. We introduce the technique and the implementation using a simple example and demonstrate scalability and effectiveness in a use case from the field of cancer genomics. PMID:26356916

  11. Brown adipose tissue harbors a distinct sub-population of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasa Medrikova

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are critical determinants of both immune responses and metabolic control. Here we show that systemic ablation of Treg cells compromised the adaptation of whole-body energy expenditure to cold exposure, correlating with impairment in thermogenic marker gene expression and massive invasion of pro-inflammatory macrophages in brown adipose tissue (BAT. Indeed, BAT harbored a unique sub-set of Treg cells characterized by a unique gene signature. As these Treg cells respond to BAT activation upon cold exposure, this study defines a BAT-specific Treg sub-set with direct implications for the regulation of energy homeostasis in response to environmental stress.

  12. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  13. Extra-thymically induced T regulatory cell subsets: the optimal target for antigen-specific immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Johan; Wegner, Anja; Wraith, David C

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy aims to selectively restore tolerance to innocuous antigens in cases of autoimmune or allergic disease, without the need for general immune suppression. Although the principle of antigen-specific immunotherapy was discovered more than a century ago, its clinical application to date is limited, particularly in the control of autoimmunity. This has resulted mainly from a lack of in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanism. More recently, the differentiation of extra-thymically induced T regulatory (Treg) cell subsets has been shown to be instrumental in peripheral tolerance induction. Two main types of inducible Treg cells, interleukin-10-secreting or Foxp3+, have now been described, each with distinct characteristics and methods of therapeutic induction. It is crucial, therefore, to identify the suitability of either subset in the control of specific immune disorders. This review explores their natural function, the known mechanisms of therapeutic differentiation of either subset as well as their in vivo functionality and discusses new developments that may aid their use in antigen-specific immunotherapy, with a focus on autoimmune disease. PMID:25716063

  14. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  15. Differences in the composition of the human antibody repertoire by B cell subsets in the blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Szymanska eMroczek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The vast initial diversity of the antibody repertoire is generated centrally by means of a complex series of V (D J gene rearrangement events, variation in the site of gene segment joining, and TdT catalyzed N- region addition. Although the diversity is great, close inspection has revealed distinct and unique characteristics in the antibody repertoires expressed by different B cell developmental subsets. In order to illustrate our approach to repertoire analysis, we present an in-depth comparison of V (D J gene usage, hydrophobicity, length, DH reading frame, and amino acid usage between heavy chain repertoires expressed by immature, transitional, mature, memory IgD+, memory IgD-, and plasmacytes isolated from the blood of a single individual. Our results support the view that in both human and mouse the H chain repertoires expressed by individual, developmental B cell subsets appear to differ in sequence content. Sequencing of unsorted B cells from the blood is thus likely to yield an incomplete or compressed view of what is actually happening in the immune response of the individual. Our findings support the view that studies designed to correlate repertoire expression with diseases of immune function will likely require deep sequencing of B cells sorted by subset.

  16. Defining Mononuclear Phagocyte Subset Homology Across Several Distant Warm-Blooded Vertebrates Through Comparative Transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickaël; Moroldo, Marco; Foucras, Gilles; Salmon, Henri; Marty, Hélène; Quéré, Pascale; Bertho, Nicolas; Boudinot, Pierre; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenetically and functionally distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic, and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections. We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover, we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey.

  17. Dietary oleic acid increases m2 macrophages in the mesenteric adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Camell

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated fatty-acids as inflammatory regulators, suggesting that there may be a direct role for common dietary fatty-acids in regulating innate immune cells. In humans, a single high-fat meal increases systemic cytokines and leukocytes. In mice, short term high-fat feeding increases adipose tissue (AT leukocytes and alters the inflammatory profile of AT macrophages. We have seen that short term high fat feeding to C57BL/6J male mice increases palmitic and oleic acid within AT depots, but oleic acid increase is highest in the mesenteric AT (MAT. In vitro, oleic acid increases M2 macrophage markers (CD206, MGL1, and ARG1 in a murine macrophage cell line, while addition of palmitic acid is able to inhibit that increase. Three day supplementation of a chow diet, with oleic acid, induced an increase in M2 macrophage markers in the MAT, but not in the epididymal AT. We tested whether increases in M2 macrophages occur during short term ad lib feeding of a high fat diet, containing oleic acid. Experiments revealed two distinct populations of macrophages were altered by a three day high milk-fat diet. One population, phenotypically intermediate for F4/80, showed diet-induced increases in CD206, an anti-inflammatory marker characteristic of M2 macrophages intrinsic to the AT. Evidence for a second population, phenotypically F4/80(HICD11b(HI macrophages, showed increased association with the MAT following short term feeding that is dependent on the adhesion molecule, ICAM-1. Collectively, we have shown that short term feeding of a high-fat diet changes two population of macrophages, and that dietary oleic acid is responsible for increases in M2 macrophage polarization.

  18. Preferential macrophage recruitment and polarization in LPS-induced animal model for COPD: noninvasive tracking using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Sultana Shaik, Asma; Pureza, Mary Angeline; Alnafea, Mohammad; Halwani, Rabih

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of macrophages activity has raised increasing interest for diagnosis of chronic obstructive respiratory diseases (COPD), which make them attractive vehicles to deliver contrast agents for diagnostic or drugs for therapeutic purposes. This study was designed to monitor and evaluate the migration of differently polarized M1 and M2 iron labeled macrophage subsets to the lung of a LPS-induced COPD animal model and to assess their polarization state once they have reached the inflammatory sites in the lung after intravenous injection. Ex vivo polarized bone marrow derived M1 or M2 macrophages were first efficiently and safely labeled with amine-modified PEGylated dextran-coated SPIO nanoparticles and without altering their polarization profile. Their biodistribution in abdominal organs and their homing to the site of inflammation in the lung was tracked for the first time using a free-breathing non-invasive MR imaging protocol on a 4.7T magnet after their intravenous administration. This imaging protocol was optimized to allow both detection of iron labeled macrophages and visualization of inflammation in the lung. M1 and M2 macrophages were successfully detected in the lung starting from 2 hours post injection with no variation in their migration profile. Quantification of cytokines release, analysis of surface membrane expression using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry investigations confirmed the successful recruitment of injected iron labeled macrophages in the lung of COPD mice and revealed that even with a continuum switch in the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophages during the time course of inflammation a balanced number of macrophage subsets predominate.

  19. Defining mononuclear phagocyte subset homology across several distant warm-blooded vertebrates through comparative transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenically and functionally-distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections.We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey, indicating conservation of the genetic support for mononuclear phagocyte organization throughout jawed vertebrates but likely not in agnathans. Altogether this work provides molecular clues to the definition and functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets across vertebrates which shall be useful to rigorously identify these cells and to design universal strategies to manipulate them in many target species towards the goal to reach and maintain global health.

  20. Major role of adipocyte prostaglandin E2 in lipolysis-induced macrophage recruitment[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqian; Cifarelli, Vincenza; Sun, Shishuo; Kuda, Ondrej; Abumrad, Nada A.; Su, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induces accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which contribute to both local and systemic inflammation and modulate insulin sensitivity. Adipocyte lipolysis during fasting and weight loss also leads to ATM accumulation, but without proinflammatory activation suggesting distinct mechanisms of ATM recruitment. We examined the possibility that specific lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory properties are released from adipocytes undergoing lipolysis to induce macrophage migration. In the present study, we showed that conditioned medium (CM) from adipocytes treated with forskolin to stimulate lipolysis can induce migration of RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition to FFAs, lipolytic stimulation increased release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), reflecting cytosolic phospholipase A2 α activation and enhanced cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 expression. Reconstituted medium with the anti-inflammatory PGE2 potently induced macrophage migration while different FFAs and PGD2 had modest effects. The ability of CM to induce macrophage migration was abolished by treating adipocytes with the COX2 inhibitor sc236 or by treating macrophages with the prostaglandin E receptor 4 antagonist AH23848. In fasted mice, macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue coincided with increases of PGE2 levels and COX1 expression. Collectively, our data show that adipocyte-originated PGE2 with inflammation suppressive properties plays a significant role in mediating ATM accumulation during lipolysis. PMID:26912395

  1. Chlorogenic acid inhibits glioblastoma growth through repolarizating macrophage from M2 to M1 phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Nina; Zhou, Qin; Ji, Ming; Jin, Jing; Lai, Fangfang; Chen, Ju; Zhang, Mengtian; Jia, Jing; Yang, Huarong; Zhang, Jie; Li, Wenbin; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive tumor that is associated with distinctive infiltrating microglia/macrophages populations. Previous studies demonstrated that chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid, CHA), a phenolic compound with low molecular weight, has an anti-tumor effect in multiple malignant tumors. In the present study, we focused on the macrophage polarization to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-glioma response of CHA in vitro and in vivo. We found that CHA treatment increased the expression of M1 markers induced by LPS/IFNγ, including iNOS, MHC II (I-A/I-E subregions) and CD11c, and reduced the expression of M2 markers Arg and CD206 induced by IL-4, resulting in promoting the production of apoptotic-like cancer cells and inhibiting the growth of tumor cells by co-culture experiments. The activations of STAT1 and STAT6, which are two crucial signaling events in M1 and M2-polarization, were significantly promoted and suppressed by CHA in macrophages, respectively. Furthermore, In G422 xenograft mice, CHA increased the proportion of CD11c-positive M1 macrophages and decreased the distribution of CD206-positive M2 macrophages in tumor tissue, consistent with the reduction of tumor weight observed in CHA-treated mice. Overall these findings indicated CHA as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce glioma growth through promoting M1-polarized macrophage and inhibiting M2 phenotypic macrophage. PMID:28045028

  2. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  3. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  4. Transmissible endoplasmic reticulum stress from myocardiocytes to macrophages is pivotal for the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced viral myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yue, Yan; Sun, Tianle; Wu, Xuejie; Xiong, Sidong

    2017-01-01

    Infiltrating macrophages have been proven as a pivotal pathological inflammatory cell subset in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) induced viral myocarditis. However, the mechanisms underlying the initiation and promotion of macrophage pro-inflammatory responses are still blur. We previously reported that cardiac ER stress contributed to CVB3-induced myocarditis by augmenting inflammation. In this study, we focused on the influence of ER stress on the macrophage inflammatory responses in the viral myocarditis. We found that ER stress was robustly induced in the cardiac infiltrating macrophages from CVB3-infected mice, and robustly facilitated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, MCP-1 and IP-10). Consistently, adoptive transfer of ER stressed macrophages significantly worsened the viral myocarditis; while transfer of ER stress-inhibited macrophages obviously alleviated the myocarditis. To our surprise, this significantly activated ER stress was not directly caused by the virus stimulation, but was transferred from the CVB3-infected, ER stressed myocardiocytes via soluble molecules in a TLR2, 4-independent way. In the present study, we reported that the transmissible ER stress from the infected myocardiocytes to macrophages could augment the pro-inflammatory responses and promoted the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. Blocking ER stress transmission, instead of inhibiting its initiation, may represent novel therapeutic strategies against viral myocarditis. PMID:28176833

  5. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans.

  6. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Buchacher

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection

  7. Variance optimal sampling based estimation of subset sums

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Edith; Kaplan, Haim; Lund, Carsten; Thorup, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    From a high volume stream of weighted items, we want to maintain a generic sample of a certain limited size $k$ that we can later use to estimate the total weight of arbitrary subsets. This is the classic context of on-line reservoir sampling, thinking of the generic sample as a reservoir. We present a reservoir sampling scheme providing variance optimal estimation of subset sums. More precisely, if we have seen $n$ items of the stream, then for any subset size $m$, our scheme based on $k$ samples minimizes the average variance over all subsets of size $m$. In fact, the optimality is against any off-line sampling scheme tailored for the concrete set of items seen: no off-line scheme based on $k$ samples can perform better than our on-line scheme when it comes to average variance over any subset size. Our scheme has no positive covariances between any pair of item estimates. Also, our scheme can handle each new item of the stream in $O(\\log k)$ time, which is optimal even on the word RAM.

  8. The Distinctive Sensitivity to Microgravity of Immune Cell Subpopulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Haiying; Liu, Jing; Wang, Peng; Dong, Dandan; Shang, Peng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction in astronauts is well documented after spaceflights. Microgravity is one of the key factors directly suppressing the function of immune system. However, it is unclear which subpopulations of immune cells including innate and adaptive immune cells are more sensitive to microgravity We herein investigated the direct effects of modeled microgravity (MMg) on different immune cells in vitro. Mouse splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells were exposed to MMg for 16 hrs. The survival and the phenotypes of different subsets of immune cells including CD4+T cells, CD8+T cells, CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), B cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer cells (NK) were determined by flow cytometry. After splenocytes were cultured under MMg for 16h, the cell frequency and total numbers of monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+T cells were significantly decreased more than 70 %. MMg significantly decreased the cell numbers of CD8+ T cells, B cells and neutrophils in splenocytes. The cell numbers of CD4+T cells and NK cells were unchanged significantly when splenocytes were cultured under MMg compared with controls. However, MMg significantly increased the ratio of mature neutrophils to immature neutrophils in bone marrow and the cell number of DCs in splenocytes. Based on the cell survival ability, monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+Treg cells are most sensitive to microgravity; CD4+T cells and NK cells are resistant to microgravity; CD8+T cells and neutrophils are impacted by short term microgravity exposure. Microgravity promoted the maturation of neutrophils and development of DCs in vitro. The present studies offered new insights on the direct effects of MMg on the survival and homeostasis of immune cell subsets.

  9. Substance, Reality, and Distinctness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Hennig

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Descartes claims that God is a substance, and that mind and body are two different and separable substances. This paper provides some background that renders these claims intelligible. For Descartes, that something is real means it can exist in separation, and something is a substance if it does not depend on other substances for its existence. Further, separable objects are correlates of distinct ideas, for an idea is distinct (in an objective sense if its object may be easily and clearly separated from everything that is not its object. It follows that if our idea of God is our most distinct idea, as Descartes claims, then God must be a substance in the Cartesian sense of the term. Also, if we can have an idea of a thinking subject which does not in any sense refer to bodily things, and if bodily things are substances, then mind and body must be two different substances.

  10. The ischemic environment drives microglia and macrophage function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eFumagalli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cells of myeloid origin such as microglia and macrophages act at the crossroads of several inflammatory mechanisms during pathophysiology. Besides pro-inflammatory activity (M1 polarization, myeloid cells acquire protective functions (M2 and participate in the neuroprotective innate mechanisms after brain injury. Experimental research is making considerable efforts to understand the rules that regulate the balance between toxic and protective brain innate immunity. Environmental changes affects microglia/macrophage functions. Hypoxia can affect myeloid cell distribution, activity and phenotype. With their intrinsic differences, microglia and macrophages respond differently to hypoxia, the former depending on ATP to activate, the latter switching to anaerobic metabolism and adapting to hypoxia. Myeloid cell functions include homeostasis control, damage-sensing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis, all distinctive features of these cells. Specific markers and morphologies enable to recognize each functional state. To ensure homeostasis and activate when needed, microglia/macrophage physiology is finely tuned. Microglia are controlled by several neuron-derived components, including contact-dependent inhibitory signals and soluble molecules. Changes in this control can cause chronic activation or priming with specific functional consequences. Strategies such as stem cell treatment may enhance microglia protective polarization. This review presents data from the literature that has greatly advanced our understanding of myeloid cell action in brain injury. We discuss the selective responses of microglia and macrophages to hypoxia after stroke and review relevant markers with the aim of defining the different subpopulations of myeloid cells that are recruited to the injured site. We also cover the functional consequences of chronically active microglia and review pivotal works on microglia regulation that offer new therapeutic possibilities for acute

  11. The impact of surface chemistry modification on macrophage polarisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostam, Hassan M; Singh, Sonali; Salazar, Fabian; Magennis, Peter; Hook, Andrew; Singh, Taranjit; Vrana, Nihal E; Alexander, Morgan R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that have a central role in combating infection and maintaining tissue homeostasis. They exhibit remarkable plasticity in response to environmental cues. At either end of a broad activation spectrum are pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages with distinct functional and phenotypical characteristics. Macrophages also play a crucial role in orchestrating immune responses to biomaterials used in the fabrication of implantable devices and drug delivery systems. To assess the impact of different surface chemistries on macrophage polarisation, human monocytes were cultured for 6 days on untreated hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and hydrophilic O2 plasma-etched polystyrene (O2-PS40) surfaces. Our data clearly show that monocytes cultured on the hydrophilic O2-PS40 surface are polarised towards an M1-like phenotype, as evidenced by significantly higher expression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factors STAT1 and IRF5. By comparison, monocytes cultured on the hydrophobic PS surface exhibited an M2-like phenotype with high expression of mannose receptor (MR) and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and CCL18. While the molecular basis of such different patterns of cell differentiation is yet to be fully elucidated, we hypothesise that it is due to the adsorption of different biomolecules on these surface chemistries. Indeed our surface characterisation data show quantitative and qualitative differences between the protein layers on the O2-PS40 surface compared to PS surface which could be responsible for the observed differential macrophage polarisation on each surface.

  12. Optimal Orderings of k-subsets for Star Identification

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Joerg H; Simões, Luís F; Izzo, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Finding the optimal ordering of k-subsets with respect to an objective function is known to be an extremely challenging problem. In this paper we introduce a new objective for this task, rooted in the problem of star identification on spacecrafts: subsets of detected spikes are to be generated in an ordering that minimizes time to detection of a valid star constellation. We carry out an extensive analysis of the combinatorial optimization problem, and propose multiple algorithmic solutions, offering different quality-complexity trade-offs. Three main approaches are investigated: exhaustive search (branch and prune), goal-driven (greedy scene elimination, minimally intersecting subsets), and stateless algorithms which implicitly seek to satisfy the problem's goals (pattern shifting, base unrank). In practical terms, these last algorithms are found to provide satisfactory approximations to the ideal performance levels, at small computational costs.

  13. Depletion of alveolar macrophages in CD11c diphtheria toxin receptor mice produces an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Rana, Deepa; Steele, Shaun P; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in initiating the immune response to inhaled pathogens and have been shown to be the first cell type infected following intranasal inoculation with several pathogens, including Francisella tularensis. In an attempt to further dissect the role of alveolar macrophages in the immune response to Francisella, we selectively depleted alveolar macrophages using CD11c.DOG mice. CD11c.DOG mice express the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) under control of the full CD11c promoter. Because mice do not express DTR, tissue restricted expression of the primate DTR followed by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) has been widely used as a tool in immunology to examine the effect of acute depletion of a specific immune subset following normal development. We successfully depleted alveolar macrophages via intranasal administration of DT. However, alveolar macrophage depletion was accompanied by many other changes to the cellular composition and cytokine/chemokine milieu in the lung that potentially impact innate and adaptive immune responses. Importantly, we observed a transient influx of neutrophils in the lung and spleen. Our experience serves as a cautionary note to other researchers using DTR mice given the complex changes that occur following DT treatment that must be taken into account when analyzing data. PMID:26029367

  14. Beryllium increases the CD14(dim)CD16+ subset in the lung of chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Gillespie, May; Elliott, Jill; Wang, Jieru; Gottschall, Eva Brigitte; Mroz, Peggy M; Maier, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    CD14dimCD16+ and CD14brightCD16+ cells, which compose a minor population of monocytes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), have been implicated in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this phenotype was present as a subset of lung infiltrative alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the granulomatous lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The monocytes subsets was determined from PBMC cells and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from CBD, beryllium sensitized Non-smoker (BeS-NS) and healthy subjects (HS) using flow cytometry. The impact of smoking on the AMs cell phenotype was determined by using BAL cells from BeS smokers (BeS-S). In comparison with the other monocyte subpopulations, CD14dimCD16+ cells were at decreased frequency in PBMCs of both BeS-NS and CBD and showed higher HLA-DR expression, compared to HS. The AMs from CBD and BeS-NS demonstrated a CD14dimCD16+phenotype, while CD14brightCD16+ cells were found at increased frequency in AMs of BeS, compared to HS. Fresh AMs from BeS-NS and CBD demonstrated significantly greater CD16, CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR than HS and BeS-S. The expression of CD16 on AMs from both CBD and BeS-NS was downregulated significantly after 10μM BeSO4 stimulation. The phagocytic activity of AMs decreased after 10μM BeSO4 treatment in both BeS-NS and CBD, although was altered or reduced in HS and BeS-S. These results suggest that Be increases the CD14dimCD16+ subsets in the lung of CBD subjects. We speculate that Be-stimulates the compartmentalization of a more mature CD16+ macrophage phenotype and that in turn these macrophages are a source of Th1 cytokines and chemokines that perpetuate the Be immune response in CBD. The protective effect of cigarette smoking in BeS-S may be due to the low expression of co-stimulatory markers on AMs from smokers as well as the decreased phagocytic function.

  15. Beryllium increases the CD14(dimCD16+ subset in the lung of chronic beryllium disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available CD14dimCD16+ and CD14brightCD16+ cells, which compose a minor population of monocytes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, have been implicated in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this phenotype was present as a subset of lung infiltrative alveolar macrophages (AMs in the granulomatous lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD. The monocytes subsets was determined from PBMC cells and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells from CBD, beryllium sensitized Non-smoker (BeS-NS and healthy subjects (HS using flow cytometry. The impact of smoking on the AMs cell phenotype was determined by using BAL cells from BeS smokers (BeS-S. In comparison with the other monocyte subpopulations, CD14dimCD16+ cells were at decreased frequency in PBMCs of both BeS-NS and CBD and showed higher HLA-DR expression, compared to HS. The AMs from CBD and BeS-NS demonstrated a CD14dimCD16+phenotype, while CD14brightCD16+ cells were found at increased frequency in AMs of BeS, compared to HS. Fresh AMs from BeS-NS and CBD demonstrated significantly greater CD16, CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR than HS and BeS-S. The expression of CD16 on AMs from both CBD and BeS-NS was downregulated significantly after 10μM BeSO4 stimulation. The phagocytic activity of AMs decreased after 10μM BeSO4 treatment in both BeS-NS and CBD, although was altered or reduced in HS and BeS-S. These results suggest that Be increases the CD14dimCD16+ subsets in the lung of CBD subjects. We speculate that Be-stimulates the compartmentalization of a more mature CD16+ macrophage phenotype and that in turn these macrophages are a source of Th1 cytokines and chemokines that perpetuate the Be immune response in CBD. The protective effect of cigarette smoking in BeS-S may be due to the low expression of co-stimulatory markers on AMs from smokers as well as the decreased phagocytic function.

  16. Macrophage responsiveness to light therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.; Bolton, P.; Dyson, M.; Harvey, W.; Diamantopoulos, C. (United Medical School, London (England))

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages are a source of many important mediators of wound repair. It was the purpose of this study to see if light could stimulate the release of these mediators. In this study an established macrophage-like cell line (U-937) was used. The cells were exposed in culture to the following wavelengths of light: 660 nm, 820 nm, 870 nm, and 880 nm. The 820-nm source was coherent and polarised, and the others were non-coherent. Twelve hours after exposure the macrophage supernatant was removed and placed on 3T3 fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed over a 5-day period. The results showed that 660-nm, 820-nm, and 870-nm wavelengths encouraged the macrophages to release factors that stimulated fibroblast proliferation above the control levels, whereas the 880-nm wavelength either inhibited the release of these factors or encouraged the release of some inhibitory factors of fibroblast proliferation. These results suggest that light at certain wavelengths may be a useful therapeutic agent by providing a means of either stimulating or inhibiting fibroblast proliferation where necessary. At certain wavelengths coherence is not essential.

  17. Tumor-associated macrophages as an emerging target against tumors: Creating a new path from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinushi, Masahisa; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a critical component of tumor microenvironments, which affect tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis, immune suppression, metastasis and chemoresistance. There is emerging evidence that many anticancer modalities currently used in the clinic have unique and distinct properties that modulate the recruitment, polarization and tumorigenic activities of macrophages in the tumor microenvironments. Educated tumor-associated macrophages significantly impact the clinical efficacies of and resistance to these anticancer modalities. Moreover, the development of drugs targeting tumor-associated macrophages, especially c-Fms kinase inhibitors and humanized antibodies targeting colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, are in early clinical stages and show promising benefit for cancer patients. These experimental and clinical findings prompted us to further evaluate the potential targets that exhibit tumorigenic and immunosuppressive potential in a manner specific for tumor associated macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential...... mechanism inducing the CD163 expression in tumor cells. A high CD163 mRNA expression (n = 87) was significantly associated with a poor 13-year overall survival (log-rank test, χ(2) = 8.931; p = 0.0028). Moreover, CD163 mRNA expression was significantly increased in muscle invasive (T2-T4), p = 0.......017, and aggressive (grade III/IV) cancers (p = 0.015). The expression strongly correlated with local expression of IL-6 (r = 0.72; p CD163 expression in vitro. CD163 immunostaining (n = 46) confirmed the association between dense TAM infiltration...

  19. On the size of the subset partial order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim

    2012-01-01

    Given a family of k sets with cardinalities S 1,S 2,⋯, S k and N=Σ k i=1S i, we show that the size of the partial order graph induced by the subset relation (called the subset graph) is O(Σ si≤B 2si+N/lgN·Σ si>Blg(s i/B)), 2 where B=lg(N/lg 2N). This implies a simpler proof to the O(N 2/lg 2N...

  20. A community study of T lymphocyte subsets and malaria parasitaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I M; Aaby, P; Whittle, H

    1994-01-01

    In a community survey of 312 children aged 3-6 years in urban Guinea-Bissau, we examined Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia and T cell subsets. 183 children (59%) had parasites in their blood, 13 had fever > or = 37.5 degrees C, and 9 (3%) had fever and a parasite density > 5000/microL (clinical...... parasites (P = 0.024), whereas there was no association with CD8 cell percentage or the CD4/CD8 ratio. Asymptomatic parasitaemia may be an important confounder in general community studies of T cell subsets in the tropics....

  1. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  2. Macrophages and lymphocytes differentially modulate the ability of RANTES to inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eleanore; Amella, Carol A; Pompucci, Lorena; Franchin, Giovanni; Sherry, Barbara; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2003-11-01

    The beta-chemokines MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES inhibit HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells by inhibiting interactions between the virus and CCR5 receptors. However, while beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes is well documented, conflicting results have been obtained using primary macrophages as the virus target. Here, we show that the beta-chemokine RANTES inhibits virus entry into both cellular targets of the virus, lymphocytes and macrophages. However, while virus entry is inhibited at the moment of infection in both cell types, the amount of virus progeny is lowered only in lymphocytes. In macrophages, early-entry restriction is lost during long-term cultivation, and the amount of virus produced by RANTES-treated macrophages is similar to the untreated cultures, suggesting an enhanced virus replication. We further show that at least two distinct cellular responses to RANTES treatment in primary lymphocytes and macrophages contribute to this phenomenon. In lymphocytes, exposure to RANTES significantly increases the pool of inhibitory beta-chemokines through intracellular signals that result in increased production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, thereby amplifying the antiviral effects of RANTES. In macrophages this amplification step does not occur. In fact, RANTES added to the macrophages is efficiently cleared from the culture, without inducing synthesis of beta-chemokines. Our results demonstrate dichotomous effects of RANTES on HIV-1 entry at the moment of infection, and on production and spread of virus progeny in primary macrophages. Since macrophages serve as a reservoir of HIV-1, this may contribute to the failure of endogenous chemokines to successfully eradicate the virus.

  3. Boron Induces Lymphocyte Proliferation and Modulates the Priming Effects of Lipopolysaccharide on Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, Indusmita; Ali, Shakir

    2016-01-01

    Chemical mediators of inflammation (CMI) are important in host defense against infection. The reduced capacity of host to induce the secretion of these mediators following infection is one of the factors in host susceptibility to infection. Boron, which has been suggested for its role in infection, is reported in this study to increase lymphocyte proliferation and the secretion of CMI by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peritoneal macrophages in BALB/c mice. Boron was administered to mice orally as borax at different doses for 10 consecutive days, followed by the stimulation of animals with ovalbumin and isolation of splenocytes for proliferation assay. The lymphocyte subsets were determined by flow cytometry in spleen cell suspension. The mediators of inflammation, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO), were measured in culture supernatant of LPS-primed macrophages isolated from borax treated mice. TNF and ILs were measured by ELISA. NO was determined by Griess test. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in macrophages was studied by confocal microscopy. Results showed a significant increase in T and B cell populations, as indicated by an increase in CD4 and CD19, but not CD8, cells. Boron further stimulated the secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, NO and the expression of iNOS by the LPS-primed macrophages. The effect was dose dependent and most significant at a dose level of 4.6 mg/kg b. wt. Taken together, the study concludes that boron at physiological concentration induces lymphocyte proliferation and increases the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by the LPS-primed macrophages, more specifically the M1 macrophages, possibly acting through Toll-like receptor. The study implicates boron as a regulator of the immune and inflammatory reactions and macrophage polarization, thus playing an important role in augmenting host defense against infection, with possible role in cancer and other diseases.

  4. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Bannantine

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  5. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Gondorf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s. and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases

  6. Boron Induces Lymphocyte Proliferation and Modulates the Priming Effects of Lipopolysaccharide on Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indusmita Routray

    Full Text Available Chemical mediators of inflammation (CMI are important in host defense against infection. The reduced capacity of host to induce the secretion of these mediators following infection is one of the factors in host susceptibility to infection. Boron, which has been suggested for its role in infection, is reported in this study to increase lymphocyte proliferation and the secretion of CMI by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages in BALB/c mice. Boron was administered to mice orally as borax at different doses for 10 consecutive days, followed by the stimulation of animals with ovalbumin and isolation of splenocytes for proliferation assay. The lymphocyte subsets were determined by flow cytometry in spleen cell suspension. The mediators of inflammation, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO, were measured in culture supernatant of LPS-primed macrophages isolated from borax treated mice. TNF and ILs were measured by ELISA. NO was determined by Griess test. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in macrophages was studied by confocal microscopy. Results showed a significant increase in T and B cell populations, as indicated by an increase in CD4 and CD19, but not CD8, cells. Boron further stimulated the secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, NO and the expression of iNOS by the LPS-primed macrophages. The effect was dose dependent and most significant at a dose level of 4.6 mg/kg b. wt. Taken together, the study concludes that boron at physiological concentration induces lymphocyte proliferation and increases the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by the LPS-primed macrophages, more specifically the M1 macrophages, possibly acting through Toll-like receptor. The study implicates boron as a regulator of the immune and inflammatory reactions and macrophage polarization, thus playing an important role in augmenting host defense against infection, with possible role in cancer and other diseases.

  7. Macrophages in Tissue Repair, Regeneration, and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas A; Vannella, Kevin M

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. After tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, such that uncontrolled production of inflammatory mediators and growth factors, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contribute to a state of persistent injury, and this could lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound-healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue-regenerating phenotypes after injury, and we highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically.

  8. Alveolar Macrophage Polarisation in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Almatroodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer is multifaceted and conflicting. Alveolar macrophage secretion of proinflammatory cytokines has been found to enhance antitumour functions, cytostasis (inhibition of tumour growth, and cytotoxicity (macrophage-mediated killing. In contrast, protumour functions of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer have also been indicated. Inhibition of antitumour function via secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 as well as reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and reduction of mannose receptor expression on alveolar macrophages may contribute to lung cancer progression and metastasis. Alveolar macrophages have also been found to contribute to angiogenesis and tumour growth via the secretion of IL-8 and VEGF. This paper reviews the evidence for a dual role of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer progression.

  9. [Lymphocyte subsets, dendritic cells and cytokine profiles in mice with melanoma treated with Uncaria tomentosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Requena, Iván; Núñez, César; Alvárez, Yubell; Kahn, Laura; Aguilar, José

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the immunomodulatory effect on lymphocyte subsets, dendritic cells (DC), Th1 / Th2 / Th17 and inflammatory cytokines on systemic level and/or in the tumor microenvironment of mice with or without melanoma. Peripheral blood and/or primary tumors samples were obtained of mice with B16 melanoma treated or not with a hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa (UT) with 5.03% of pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (UT-POA) obtained from the bark of the plant. All cell assays and cytokine measurements were performed by flow cytometry. UT-POA systemically increased CD4/CD8a relation while cell activation was inversely proportional; increased the proportion of DCm; induced a pro-inflammatory Th1 profile and reduced Th17 response. TNF-α and IL-17A positively and negatively correlated with CD4/CD8a relation. The increase of Th1 (TNF-α) may result in the increase of CD4 or M1 macrophage activation. Although UT-POA shows increased DCm, is not dose-dependent. Th17(IL-17A) decreased can support the function of CD8a lymphocytes. UT-POA shows better systemic immunomodulatory effects than intratumoral.

  10. Modelling subset multivariate ARCH model via the AIC principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of identifying a parsimonious subset multivariate ARCH model based on the AIC principle. The proposed approach can reduce the number of parameters in the final ARCH specification and allows for non-constant correlations between the components. Some simulation results illustrate the viability of the proposed procedure.

  11. Directed Subset Feedback Vertex Set is Fixed-Parameter Tractable

    CERN Document Server

    Chitnis, Rajesh; Hajiaghayi, MohammadTaghi; Marx, Dániel

    2012-01-01

    Given a graph $G$ and an integer $k$, the \\textsc{Feedback Vertex Set} (\\textsc{FVS}) problem asks if there is a vertex set $T$ of size at most $k$ that hits all cycles in the graph. Bodlaender (WG '91) gave the first fixed-parameter algorithm for \\textsc{FVS} in undirected graphs. The fixed-parameter tractability status of \\textsc{FVS} in directed graphs was a long-standing open problem until Chen et al. (STOC '08) showed that it is fixed-parameter tractable by giving an $4^{k}k!n^{O(1)}$ algorithm. In the subset versions of this problems, we are given an additional subset $S$ of vertices (resp. edges) and we want to hit all cycles passing through a vertex of $S$ (resp. an edge of $S$). Indeed both the edge and vertex versions are known to be equivalent in the parameterized sense. Recently the \\textsc{Subset Feedback Vertex Set} in undirected graphs was shown to be FPT by Cygan et al. (ICALP '11) and Kakimura et al. (SODA '12). We generalize the result of Chen et al. (STOC '08) by showing that \\textsc{Subset...

  12. Poincare series of subsets of affine Weyl groups

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanath, Sankaran

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we identify a natural class of subsets of affine Weyl groups whose Poincare series are rational functions. This class includes the sets of minimal coset representatives of reflection subgroups. As an application, we construct a generalization of the classical length-descent generating function, and prove its rationality.

  13. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  14. Combinatorial Identities Via Phi Functions and Relatively Prime Subsets

    CERN Document Server

    Bachraoui, Mohamed El

    2010-01-01

    Let $n$ be a positive integer and let $A$ be nonempty finite set of positive integers. We say that $A$ is relatively prime if $\\gcd(A) =1$ and that $A$ is relatively prime to $n$ if $\\gcd(A,n)=1$. In this work we count the number of nonempty subsets of $A$ which are relatively prime and the number of nonempty subsets of $A$ which are relatively prime to $n$. Related formulas are also obtained for the number of such subsets having some fixed cardinality. This extends previous work for the cases where $A$ is an interval or a set in arithmetic progression. Applications include: a) An exact formula is obtained for the number of elements of $A$ which are co-prime to $n$; note that this number is $\\phi(n)$ if $A=[1,n]$. b) Algebraic characterizations are found for a nonempty finite set of positive integers to have elements which are all pairwise co-prime and consequently a formula is given for the number of nonempty subsets of $A$ whose elements are pairwise co-prime. c) We provide combinatorial formulas involving ...

  15. RECEIVE ANTENNA SUBSET SELECTION BASED ON ORTHOGONAL COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Peng; Liu Ju; Gu Bo; Zhang Wei

    2007-01-01

    A new receive antenna subset selection algorithm with low complexity for wireless Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) systems is proposed, which is based on the orthogonal components of the channel matrix. Larger capacity is achieved compared with the existing antenna selection methods. Simulation results of quasi-static flat fading channel demonstrate the significant performance of the proposed selection algorithm.

  16. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important for interna......CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important...... for internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...

  17. Distinct gene subsets in pterygia formation and recurrence: dissecting complex biological phenomenon using genome wide expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Leonard PK

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pterygium is a common ocular surface disease characterized by fibrovascular invasion of the cornea and is sight-threatening due to astigmatism, tear film disturbance, or occlusion of the visual axis. However, the mechanisms for formation and post-surgical recurrence of pterygium are not understood, and a valid animal model does not exist. Here, we investigated the possible mechanisms of pterygium pathogenesis and recurrence. Methods First we performed a genome wide expression analysis (human Affymetrix Genechip, >22000 genes with principal component analysis and clustering techniques, and validated expression of key molecules with PCR. The controls for this study were the un-involved conjunctival tissue of the same eye obtained during the surgical resection of the lesions. Interesting molecules were further investigated with immunohistochemistry, Western blots, and comparison with tear proteins from pterygium patients. Results Principal component analysis in pterygium indicated a signature of matrix-related structural proteins, including fibronectin-1 (both splice-forms, collagen-1A2, keratin-12 and small proline rich protein-1. Immunofluorescence showed strong expression of keratin-6A in all layers, especially the superficial layers, of pterygium epithelium, but absent in the control, with up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of the cell adhesion molecule CD24 in the pterygium epithelium. Western blot shows increased protein expression of beta-microseminoprotein, a protein up-regulated in human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Gene products of 22 up-regulated genes in pterygium have also been found by us in human tears using nano-electrospray-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry after pterygium surgery. Recurrent disease was associated with up-regulation of sialophorin, a negative regulator of cell adhesion, and never in mitosis a-5, known to be involved in cell motility. Conclusion Aberrant wound healing is therefore a key process in this disease, and strategies in wound remodeling may be appropriate in halting pterygium or its recurrence. For patients demonstrating a profile of 'recurrence', it may be necessary to manage as a poorer prognostic case and perhaps, more adjunctive treatment after resection of the primary lesion.

  18. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    acid metabolic process, lipid metabolic process and sterol biosynthetic process, are enriched and downregulated in a portion of fibroproliferative 8...Foundation Workshop, San Francisco, CA  4/13  Michael L. Whitfield, PhD "P50 Core:  A focus on Next Generation Generation sequencing methods in  SSc‐ PAH ...mixture was added to remove lipids . The homogenate mixture was shaken and then centrifuged to separate the phases. The organic and aqueous phases were

  19. Two distinct interneuron circuits in human motor cortex are linked to different subsets of physiological and behavioral plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Masashi; Galea, Joseph M; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Paolo; Ziemann, Ulf; Rothwell, John C

    2014-09-17

    How does a single brain region participate in multiple behaviors? Here we argue that two separate interneuron circuits in the primary motor cortex (M1) contribute differently to two varieties of physiological and behavioral plasticity. To test this in human brain noninvasively, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of M1 hand area to activate two independent sets of synaptic inputs to corticospinal neurons by changing the direction of current induced in the brain: posterior-to-anterior current (PA inputs) and anterior-to-posterior current (AP inputs). We demonstrate that excitability changes produced by repetitive activation of AP inputs depend on cerebellar activity and selectively alter model-based motor learning. In contrast, the changes observed with repetitive stimulation of PA inputs are independent of cerebellar activity and specifically modulate model-free motor learning. The findings are highly suggestive that separate circuits in M1 subserve different forms of motor learning.

  20. Deconstruction of O-glycosylation-GalNAc-T isoforms direct distinct subsets of the O-glycoproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine T; Joshi, Hiren J; Kong, Yun;

    2015-01-01

    GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is found on most proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway in metazoan cells. The O-glycoproteome is regulated by up to 20 polypeptide GalNAc-Ts and the contributions and biological functions of individual GalNAc-Ts are poorly understood. Here, we used a zinc-...

  1. Some effects of non-surgical therapy on gingival inflammatory cell subsets in patients with adult and early-onset periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinfelder, JW; Lange, DE; Bocker, W

    2000-01-01

    Background: Limited information is available to determine if there is a distinction in local cellular immunity between adult and early-onset periodontitis. Furthermore, the effect of scaling and root planing on various lymphocyte subsets is sparsely described. Methods: Clinical measurements were

  2. Some effects of non-surgical therapy on gingival inflammatory cell subsets in patients with adult and early-onset periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinfelder, JW; Lange, DE; Bocker, W

    2000-01-01

    Background: Limited information is available to determine if there is a distinction in local cellular immunity between adult and early-onset periodontitis. Furthermore, the effect of scaling and root planing on various lymphocyte subsets is sparsely described. Methods: Clinical measurements were rec

  3. Induction of Golli-MBP Expression in CNS Macrophages During Acute LPS-Induced CNS Inflammation and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey L. Papenfuss

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are the tissue macrophages of the CNS. Microglial activation coupled with macrophage infiltration is a common feature of many classic neurodegenerative disorders. The absence of cell-type specific markers has confounded and complicated the analysis of cell-type specific contributions toward the onset, progression, and remission of neurodegeneration. Molecular screens comparing gene expression in cultured microglia and macrophages identified Golli-myelin basic protein (MBP as a candidate molecule enriched in peripheral macrophages. In situ hybridization analysis of LPS/IFNg and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE–induced CNS inflammation revealed that only a subset of CNS macrophages express Golli-MBP. Interestingly, the location and morphology of Golli-MBP+ CNS macrophages differs between these two models of CNS inflammation. These data demonstrate the difficulties of extending in vitro observations to in vivo biology and concretely illustrate the complex heterogeneity of macrophage activation states present in region- and stage-specific phases of CNS inflammation. Taken altogether, these are consistent with the emerging picture that the phenotype of CNS macrophages is actively defined by their molecular interactions with the CNS microenvironment.

  4. Exercise and Adipose Tissue Macrophages: New Frontiers in Obesity Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Goh, Kian Peng; Abbasi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem in the twenty-first century. Mutations in genes that regulate substrate metabolism, subsequent dysfunction in their protein products, and other factors, such as increased adipose tissue inflammation, are some underlying etiologies of this disease. Increased inflammation in the adipose tissue microenvironment is partly mediated by the presence of cells from the innate and adaptive immune system. A subset of the innate immune population in adipose tissue include macrophages, termed adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which are central players in adipose tissue inflammation. Being extremely plastic, their responses to diverse molecular signals in the microenvironment dictate their identity and functional properties, where they become either pro-inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2). Endurance exercise training exerts global anti-inflammatory responses in multiple organs, including skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. The purpose of this review is to discuss the different mechanisms that drive ATM-mediated inflammation in obesity and present current evidence of how exercise training, specifically endurance exercise training, modulates the polarization of ATMs from an M1 to an M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype.

  5. Interaction of glucocorticoids with macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Foley, R.; Munck, A.

    1978-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system plays a central role in mediating host responses in inflammation. Glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory actions that may be of considerable importance in the therapeutic effects of these agents in chronic inflammation; it is possible that some of these effects are mediated through direct hormonal action on macrophages. Although the site of action of the glucocorticoids on macrophages has not been established, it has been shown that in many other glucocorticoid target systems the effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by specific macromolecular binding proteins, referred to as receptors. In this study we have established that monocytes and macophages contain saturable glucocorticoid-binding proteins, with specificity of binding for cortisol, corticosterone, and related synthetic steroids such as dexamethasone, and that they have dissociation constants for binding within physiological ranges.

  6. Integrated Transcriptomics Establish Macrophage Polarization Signatures and have Potential Applications for Clinical Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matheus; De Bastiani, Marco A.; Parisi, Mariana M.; Guma, Fátima T. C. R.; Markoski, Melissa M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Kaplan, Mark H.; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia M.; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence defines macrophages (Mφ) as plastic cells with wide-ranging states of activation and expression of different markers that are time and location dependent. Distinct from the simple M1/M2 dichotomy initially proposed, extensive diversity of macrophage phenotypes have been extensively demonstrated as characteristic features of monocyte-macrophage differentiation, highlighting the difficulty of defining complex profiles by a limited number of genes. Since the description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing, the generation of a simple and reliable framework to categorize major Mφ phenotypes in the context of complex clinical conditions would be extremely relevant to unravel different roles played by these cells in pathophysiological scenarios. In the current study, we integrated transcriptome data using bioinformatics tools to generate two macrophage molecular signatures. We validated our signatures in in vitro experiments and in clinical samples. More importantly, we were able to attribute prognostic and predictive values to components of our signatures. Our study provides a framework to guide the interrogation of macrophage phenotypes in the context of health and disease. The approach described here could be used to propose new biomarkers for diagnosis in diverse clinical settings including dengue infections, asthma and sepsis resolution. PMID:26302899

  7. Macrophages support pathological erythropoiesis in Polycythemia Vera and Beta-Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Casu, Carla; Gardenghi, Sara; Breda, Laura; Crielaard, Bart J.; Guy, Ella; Marongiu, Maria Franca; Gupta, Ritama; Levine, Ross L.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Ghaffari, Saghi; Grady, Robert W.; Giardina, Patricia J.; Rivella, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of erythropoiesis is achieved by integration of distinct signals. Among these, macrophages are emerging as erythropoietin-complementary regulators of erythroid development, particularly under stress conditions. We investigated the contribution of macrophages for physiological and pathological conditions of enhanced erythropoiesis. We utilized mouse models of induced anemia, Polycythemia vera and β-thalassemia in which macrophages were chemically depleted. Our data indicate that macrophages contribute decisively for recovery from induced anemia as well as the pathological progression of Polycythemia vera and β-thalassemia by modulating erythroid proliferation and differentiation. We validated these observations in primary human cultures, showing a critical direct impact of macrophages on proliferation and enucleation of erythroblasts from healthy individuals and Polycythemia vera or β-thalassemic patients. In summary, we identify a new mechanism that we named “Stress Erythropoiesis Macrophage-supporting Activity” (SEMA) that contributes to the pathophysiology of these disorders and will have critical scientific and therapeutic implications in the near future. PMID:23502961

  8. Changes in Macrophage Gene Expression Associated with Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemencia Ovalle-Bracho

    Full Text Available Different Leishmania species cause distinct clinical manifestations of the infectious disease leishmaniasis. It is fundamentally important to understand the mechanisms governing the interaction between Leishmania and its host cell. Little is known about this interaction between Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis and human macrophages. In this study, we aimed to identify differential gene expression between non-infected and L. (V braziliensis-infected U937-derived macrophages. We deployed a whole human transcriptome microarray analysis using 72 hours post-infection samples and compared those samples with their non-infected counterparts. We found that 218 genes were differentially expressed between infected and non-infected macrophages. A total of 71.6% of these genes were down-regulated in the infected macrophages. Functional enrichment analyses identified the steroid and sterol/cholesterol biosynthetic processes between regulatory networks down-regulated in infected macrophages. RT-qPCR further confirmed this down-regulation in genes belonging to these pathways. These findings contrast with those from studies involving other Leishmania species at earlier infection stages, where gene up-regulation for this metabolic pathway has been reported. Sterol biosynthesis could be an important biological process associated with the expression profile of macrophages infected by L. (V. braziliensis. Differential transcriptional results suggest a negative regulation of the genetic regulatory network involved in cholesterol biosynthesis.

  9. Reduced Il17a expression distinguishes a Ly6c(lo)MHCII(hi) macrophage population promoting wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Hodgson, Samantha S; Hollier, Brett; Combadiere, Christophe; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are the main components of inflammation during skin wound healing. They are critical in wound closure and in excessive inflammation, resulting in defective healing observed in chronic wounds. Given the heterogeneity of macrophage phenotypes and functions, we here hypothesized that different subpopulations of macrophages would have different and sometimes opposing effects on wound healing. Using multimarker flow cytometry and RNA expression array analyses on macrophage subpopulations from wound granulation tissue, we identified a Ly6c(lo)MHCII(hi) "noninflammatory" subset that increased both in absolute number and proportion during normal wound healing and was missing in Ob/Ob and MYD88-/- models of delayed healing. We also identified IL17 as the main cytokine distinguishing this population from proinflammatory macrophages and demonstrated that inhibition of IL17 by blocking Ab or in IL17A-/- mice accelerated normal and delayed healing. These findings dissect the complexity of the role and activity of the macrophages during wound inflammation and may contribute to the development of therapeutic approaches to restore healing in chronic wounds.

  10. Immunosenescence of microglia and macrophages: impact on the ageing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawji, Khalil S; Mishra, Manoj K; Michaels, Nathan J; Rivest, Serge; Stys, Peter K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-03-01

    Ageing of the central nervous system results in a loss of both grey and white matter, leading to cognitive decline. Additional injury to both the grey and white matter is documented in many neurological disorders with ageing, including Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. Accompanying neuronal and glial damage is an inflammatory response consisting of activated macrophages and microglia, innate immune cells demonstrated to be both beneficial and detrimental in neurological repair. This article will propose the following: (i) infiltrating macrophages age differently from central nervous system-intrinsic microglia; (ii) several mechanisms underlie the differential ageing process of these two distinct cell types; and (iii) therapeutic strategies that selectively target these diverse mechanisms may rejuvenate macrophages and microglia for repair in the ageing central nervous system. Most responses of macrophages are diminished with senescence, but activated microglia increase their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines while diminishing chemotactic and phagocytic activities. The senescence of macrophages and microglia has a negative impact on several neurological diseases, and the mechanisms underlying their age-dependent phenotypic changes vary from extrinsic microenvironmental changes to intrinsic changes in genomic integrity. We discuss the negative effects of age on neurological diseases, examine the response of senescent macrophages and microglia in these conditions, and propose a theoretical framework of therapeutic strategies that target the different mechanisms contributing to the ageing phenotype in these two distinct cell types. Rejuvenation of ageing macrophage/microglia may preserve neurological integrity and promote regeneration in the ageing central nervous system.

  11. Characterization of a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Shorey, J M; Gibran, N S; Simpson, P J; Huber, G L

    1982-04-01

    A postlavage in situ subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages (PM), biochemically distinct from the lavaged population, has recently been isolated from rats. After exhaustive bronchopulmonary lavage to extract the free lung cells, the lungs were excised, homogenized, and filtered, and the resultant cell suspension was allowed to form a monolayer on plastic Petri dishes. Electron microscopic morphometry failed to indicate any morphologic differences in the two populations. The postlavage in situ PM were more active metabolically during phagocytosis of zymosan particles or stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than the corresponding lavage population, as evidenced by greater superoxide generation. Macrophages prepared by either method became more avidly phagocytic when incubated with cell-free medium isolated in the preparation of the situ population. Peroxidase, an enzyme absent from the granules of PM separated by lavage techniques, was found in a granule-rich fraction of the in situ macrophage. Catalase activity was found in similar amounts in both supernatants and granule-rich fractions of both populations. The results support the concept of subpopulations of PM and suggest that these subpopulations are distinguished by their biochemical properties and their functional abilities.

  12. Altered distribution of natural killer cell subsets identified by CD56, CD27 and CD70 in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanji, Kehmia; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; Mantegani, Paola; Fortis, Claudio; Berg, Louise; Kärre, Klas; Travi, Giovanna; Tassandin, Chiara; Lopalco, Lucia; Rethi, Bence; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chiodi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) (CD3− CD56+) cells can be divided into two functionally distinct subsets, CD3− CD56dim and CD3− CD56bright. We analysed the distribution of NK cell subsets in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection, to determine if HIV infection stage may influence the subset distribution. In primary infection, contrary to chronic infection, the CD3− CD56dim subset was expanded compared to healthy controls. We also studied the effect of antiretroviral therapy administered early in infection and found that NK cell subset distribution was partially restored after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy in primary infection, but not normalized. Recently, NK cells have been divided into CD27− and CD27+ subsets with different migratory and functional capacity and CD27-mediated NK cell activation has been described in mice. We therefore investigated whether CD27 and/or CD70 (CD27 ligand) expression on NK cells, and thus the distribution of these novel NK subsets, was altered in HIV-1-infected patients. We found up-regulated expression of both CD27 and CD70 on NK cells of patients, resulting in higher proportions of CD27high and CD70high NK cells, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in chronic infection. Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that the high interleukin-7 levels found during HIV-1 infection may participate in up-regulation of CD70 on NK cell subsets. Imbalance of NK cell subsets and up-regulated expression of CD27 and CD70 initiated early in HIV-1 infection may indicate NK cell activation and intrinsic defects initiated by HIV-1 to disarm the innate immune response to the virus. PMID:17627773

  13. Identification of multiple subsets of ventral interneurons and differential distribution along the rostrocaudal axis of the developing spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Francius

    Full Text Available The spinal cord contains neuronal circuits termed Central Pattern Generators (CPGs that coordinate rhythmic motor activities. CPG circuits consist of motor neurons and multiple interneuron cell types, many of which are derived from four distinct cardinal classes of ventral interneurons, called V0, V1, V2 and V3. While significant progress has been made on elucidating the molecular and genetic mechanisms that control ventral interneuron differentiation, little is known about their distribution along the antero-posterior axis of the spinal cord and their diversification. Here, we report that V0, V1 and V2 interneurons exhibit distinct organizational patterns at brachial, thoracic and lumbar levels of the developing spinal cord. In addition, we demonstrate that each cardinal class of ventral interneurons can be subdivided into several subsets according to the combinatorial expression of different sets of transcription factors, and that these subsets are differentially distributed along the rostrocaudal axis of the spinal cord. This comprehensive molecular profiling of ventral interneurons provides an important resource for investigating neuronal diversification in the developing spinal cord and for understanding the contribution of specific interneuron subsets on CPG circuits and motor control.

  14. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Denise F.; Kieu, Hung T.; Castillo, Luis D.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease. PMID:28095513

  15. Functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets in regulating T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn E. Clausen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a heterogeneous family of professional antigen presenting cells (APC classically recognized as most potent inducers of adaptive immune responses. In this respect, Langerhans cells (LC have long been considered to be prototypic immunogenic DC in the skin. More recently this view has considerably changed. The generation of in vivo cell ablation and lineage tracing models revealed the complexity of the skin DC network and, in particular, established the existence of a number of phenotypically distinct Langerin+ and negative DC populations in the dermis. Moreover, by now we appreciate that DC also exert important regulatory functions and are required for the maintenance of tolerance towards harmless foreign and self-antigens. This review summarizes our current understanding of the skin-resident DC system in the mouse and discusses emerging concepts on the functional specialization of the different skin DC subsets in regulating T cell responses. Special consideration is given to antigen cross-presentation as well as immune reactions towards contact sensitizers, cutaneous pathogens and tumors. These studies form the basis for the manipulation of the human counterparts of the murine DC subsets to promote immunity or tolerance for the treatment of human disease.

  16. Implementing Modifed Burg Algorithms in Multivariate Subset Autoregressive Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alexandre Trindade

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The large number of parameters in subset vector autoregressive models often leads one to procure fast, simple, and efficient alternatives or precursors to maximum likelihood estimation. We present the solution of the multivariate subset Yule-Walker equations as one such alternative. In recent work, Brockwell, Dahlhaus, and Trindade (2002, show that the Yule-Walker estimators can actually be obtained as a special case of a general recursive Burg-type algorithm. We illustrate the structure of this Algorithm, and discuss its implementation in a high-level programming language. Applications of the Algorithm in univariate and bivariate modeling are showcased in examples. Univariate and bivariate versions of the Algorithm written in Fortran 90 are included in the appendix, and their use illustrated.

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity and subset definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peranzoni, Elisa; Zilio, Serena; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Zanovello, Paola; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are defined in mice on the basis of CD11b and Gr-1 marker expression and the functional ability to inhibit T lymphocyte activation. Nevertheless the term 'heterogeneous' remains the first, informal feature commonly attributed to this population. It is clear that CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells are part of a myeloid macropopulation, which comprises at least two subsets of polymorphonuclear and monocytic cells with different immunosuppressive properties. While recent literature shows substantial agreement on the immunoregulatory property of the monocytic MDSC subset, there is still contrasting evidence on the role of the granulocytic fraction. Moreover, this dichotomy holds true for human MDSCs. We attempt here to summarize conflicting findings in the field and provide some possible, unifying explanations.

  18. Variable selection with stepwise and best subset approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-04-01

    While purposeful selection is performed partly by software and partly by hand, the stepwise and best subset approaches are automatically performed by software. Two R functions stepAIC() and bestglm() are well designed for stepwise and best subset regression, respectively. The stepAIC() function begins with a full or null model, and methods for stepwise regression can be specified in the direction argument with character values "forward", "backward" and "both". The bestglm() function begins with a data frame containing explanatory variables and response variables. The response variable should be in the last column. Varieties of goodness-of-fit criteria can be specified in the IC argument. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) usually results in more parsimonious model than the Akaike information criterion.

  19. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-10-22

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines.

  20. Enhancement of NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents by gp120-treated macrophages: Implications for HIV-1-associated neuropathology

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jianming; Hu, Dehui; Xia, Jianxun; Liu, Jianuo; Zhang, Gang; Gendelman, Howard E; Nawal M. Boukli; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of prior studies has linked HIV-1-infected and immune activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; blood borne macrophages and microglia) to neuronal dysfunction. These are modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists and supporting their relevance for HIV-1-associated nervous system disease. The role of NMDAR subsets in HIV-1-induced neuronal injury, nonetheless, is poorly understood. To this end, we investigated conditioned media from HIV-1gp120-treated human mon...

  1. New Data on Human Macrophages Polarization by Hymenolepis diminuta Tapeworm—An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Basałaj, Katarzyna; Strojny, Barbara; Młocicki, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Helminths and their products can suppress the host immune response to escape host defense mechanisms and establish chronic infections. Current studies indicate that macrophages play a key role in the immune response to pathogen invasion. They can be polarized into two distinct phenotypes: M1 and M2. The present paper examines the impact of the adult Hymenolepis diminuta (HD) tapeworm and its excretory/secretory products (ESP) on THP-1 macrophages. Monocytes were differentiated into macrophages and cultured with a living parasite or its ESP. Our findings indicate that HD and ESP have a considerable impact on human THP-1 macrophages. Macrophages treated with parasite ESP (with or without LPS) demonstrated reduced expression of cytokines (i.e., IL-1α, TNFα, TGFβ, IL-10) and chemokines (i.e., IL-8, MIP-1α, RANTES, and IL-1ra), while s-ICAM and CxCL10 expression rose after ESP stimulation. In addition, inflammatory factor expression rose significantly when macrophages were exposed to living parasites. Regarding induced and repressed pathways, significant differences were found between HD and ESP concerning their influence on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, STAT2, STAT3, AMPKα1, Akt 1/2/3 S473, Hsp60, and Hck. The superior immunosuppressive properties of ESP compared to HD were demonstrated with lower levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23, and IL-12p70 following stimulation. The presence of HD and its ESP were found to stimulate mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes. Our findings indicate new molecular mechanisms involved in the response of human macrophages to tapeworm infection, this could be a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms underlying the processes of immune regulation during cestodiasis. PMID:28265273

  2. Subset Feature Learning for Fine-Grained Category Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Zongyuan; McCool, Christopher; Sanderson, Conrad; Corke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-grained categorisation has been a challenging problem due to small inter-class variation, large intra-class variation and low number of training images. We propose a learning system which first clusters visually similar classes and then learns deep convolutional neural network features specific to each subset. Experiments on the popular fine-grained Caltech-UCSD bird dataset show that the proposed method outperforms recent fine-grained categorisation methods under the most difficult sett...

  3. Subset Simulation Method for Rare Event Estimation: An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed introductory description of Subset Simulation, an advanced stochastic simulation method for estimation of small probabilities of rare failure events. A simple and intuitive derivation of the method is given along with the discussion on its implementation. The method is illustrated with several easy-to-understand examples. For demonstration purposes, the MATLAB code for the considered examples is provided. The reader is assumed to be familiar only with elementary...

  4. Torsion Points on an Algebraic Subset of an Affine Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Hironaka, E

    1996-01-01

    Work of Laurent and Sarnak, following a conjecture of Lang, shows that the number of torsion points of order n on an algebraic subset of an affine complex torus is polynomial periodic. In this paper, we find bounds on the degree and period of this number as a function of n. Some examples, including the number of n torsion points on Fermat curves, are computed to illustrate the methods.

  5. Differentiable structure of ω-subsets of symplectic groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study the differentiable structure of theω-subset of Sp(2n), which is formed by all matrices in Sp(2n) possessing ω as an eigenvalue, for ω on the unit circle in the complex plane. Based on this result the ω-index theory parametrized by all ω on the unit circle for arbitrary symplectic paths is defined.

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Porse, Bo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONBone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) are primary macrophage cells, derived from bone marrow cells in vitro in the presence of growth factors. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a lineage-specific growth factor that is responsible for the proliferation and differentiation...... of committed myeloid progenitors into cells of the macrophage/monocyte lineage. Mice lacking functional M-CSF are deficient in macrophages and osteoclasts and suffer from osteopetrosis. In this protocol, bone marrow cells are grown in culture dishes in the presence of M-CSF, which is secreted by L929 cells...... and is used in the form of L929-conditioned medium. Under these conditions, the bone marrow monocyte/macrophage progenitors will proliferate and differentiate into a homogenous population of mature BMMs. The efficiency of the differentiation is assessed using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS...

  7. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Diani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis.

  8. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis. PMID:27595115

  9. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings.

  10. Lymphocyte subset reference intervals in blood donors from northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEX J.L. TORRES

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reference intervals for leukocytes and lymphocytes currently used by most clinical laboratories present limitations as they are primarily derived from individuals of North American and European origin. The objective this study was to determine reference values for peripheral blood B lymphocytes, T lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD8+, naïve, memory, regulatory, TCRαβ and TCRγδ+ and NK cells from blood donors in Salvador-Bahia, Brazil. Results: The proportion of included male subjects was 73.7% and the median ages of males (34 and females (35 were found to be similar. Absolute counts total lymphocytes subsets to both gender was 1,956 (1,060-4,186 cells and relative values 34%. The T CD4+ and T CD8+ lymphocytes relative values was 51% (20-62 and 24% (9-28, respectively. The most statistically significant finding observed was a higher percentage of B lymphocytes (p=0.03 in females. Commonly cited subset reference intervals were found to be consistent with values in several populations from different geographic areas.

  11. Minimum Bayesian error probability-based gene subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Yu, Tian; Wei, Jin-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Sifting functional genes is crucial to the new strategies for drug discovery and prospective patient-tailored therapy. Generally, simply generating gene subset by selecting the top k individually superior genes may obtain an inferior gene combination, for some selected genes may be redundant with respect to some others. In this paper, we propose to select gene subset based on the criterion of minimum Bayesian error probability. The method dynamically evaluates all available genes and sifts only one gene at a time. A gene is selected if its combination with the other selected genes can gain better classification information. Within the generated gene subset, each individual gene is the most discriminative one in comparison with those that classify cancers in the same way as this gene does and different genes are more discriminative in combination than in individual. The genes selected in this way are likely to be functional ones from the system biology perspective, for genes tend to co-regulate rather than regulate individually. Experimental results show that the classifiers induced based on this method are capable of classifying cancers with high accuracy, while only a small number of genes are involved.

  12. Dexamethasone palmitate ameliorates macrophages-rich graft-versus-host disease by inhibiting macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nishiwaki

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration of skin GVHD lesions correlates directly with disease severity, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear and GVHD with many macrophages is a therapeutic challenge. Here, we characterize the macrophages involved in GVHD and report that dexamethasone palmitate (DP, a liposteroid, can ameliorate such GVHD by inhibiting macrophage functions. We found that host-derived macrophages could exacerbate GVHD in a mouse model through expression of higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IFN-γ, and lower levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 than resident macrophages in mice without GVHD. DP significantly decreased the viability and migration capacity of primary mouse macrophages compared to conventional dexamethasone in vitro. DP treatment on day 7 and day 14 decreased macrophage number, and attenuated GVHD score and subsequent mortality in a murine model. This is the first study to provide evidence that therapy for GVHD should be changed on the basis of infiltrating cell type.

  13. Macrophage-mediated tumor cytotoxicity: role of macrophage surface sialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D J

    1983-02-01

    Cell surface sialic acid levels were compared for monocytes and macrophages obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Equal quantities of sialic acid were found on the monocytes obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Approximately 60% more cell surface sialic acid was found on the macrophages from breast cancer patients than was found on the macrophages from normal volunteers. In order to determine whether cell surface sialic acid had any effect on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, macrophages were pretreated with neuraminidase (NANAse) prior to co-cultivation with tumor cells. The normal macrophages, after neuraminidase treatment, no longer retained their ability to kill tumor cells. However, when macrophages from breast cancer patients were treated with NANAse, no difference was observed in the ability of untreated and NANAse treated macrophages to kill tumor cells.

  14. DMPD: Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18226603 Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. Hamilton RF Jr, Thaku...l) Show Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. PubmedID 18226603 Title Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar

  15. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  16. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  17. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Tordjman, Joan; Møller, Holger Jon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Macrophages play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a specific marker of macrophage activation. We aimed to measure sCD163 in morbidly obese patients with varying degrees of NAFLD before and after bariatric surgery (BS...... (NAS), Kleiner fibrosis score, and the fatty liver inhibition of progression (FLIP) algorithm. In a subset, CD163 immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CD163 mRNA were performed. RESULTS: sCD163 was higher in patients with NAS ≥ 5 compared with those with NAS ... decreased after BS and was greatly reduced after 12 months, more rapidly so in patients with NAS ≥ 5 (P alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) according to the FLIP algorithm (P = 0.03). Immunohistochemistry showed CD163-positive macrophages aligning fat-laden hepatocytes and forming...

  18. M1- and M2-type macrophage responses are predictive of adverse outcomes in human atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica De Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1 to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2 phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analysed by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis.Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater haemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications and haemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localised to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/ MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1

  19. Touch communicates distinct emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertenstein, Matthew J; Keltner, Dacher; App, Betsy; Bulleit, Brittany A; Jaskolka, Ariane R

    2006-08-01

    The study of emotional signaling has focused almost exclusively on the face and voice. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether people can identify emotions from the experience of being touched by a stranger on the arm (without seeing the touch). In the 3rd study, they investigated whether observers can identify emotions from watching someone being touched on the arm. Two kinds of evidence suggest that humans can communicate numerous emotions with touch. First, participants in the United States (Study 1) and Spain (Study 2) could decode anger, fear, disgust, love, gratitude, and sympathy via touch at much-better-than-chance levels. Second, fine-grained coding documented specific touch behaviors associated with different emotions. In Study 3, the authors provide evidence that participants can accurately decode distinct emotions by merely watching others communicate via touch. The findings are discussed in terms of their contributions to affective science and the evolution of altruism and cooperation. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Bringing distinctive TV drama?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Majbritt; Raats, Tim

    roles of PSB. (2) Comparing public service media strategies for TV drama financing and distribution in two markets: the Flemish (i.e. Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) and the Danish market. Both cases are characterized by huge popularity of domestic tv drama and both markets are non......-Anglophone with a limited market size and hence, theoretically, limited capacity for production and export. Both cases furthermore show a crucial role of the public broadcasters as part of developing and sustaining tv drama in those markets. However, the underlying policy impetus reflect clearly different views on TV drama...... strategies, with policymakers employing TV drama in Flanders as a driver for a ‘healthy’ independent production sector (especially in VRT’s most recent management contract) and DR drama clearly driven by distinct public service characteristics. Having the said that, the latter case in recently proved its...

  1. DMPD: Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14698033 Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. Valledor AF, Ricote M. Biochem ...Pharmacol. 2004 Jan 15;67(2):201-12. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear receptor signaling in macrop...hages. PubmedID 14698033 Title Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. Authors Valledor AF, Ricote M. Pub

  2. DMPD: Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11073096 Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Jones GE. J Leu...koc Biol. 2000 Nov;68(5):593-602. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cellular signaling in macrophage migration... and chemotaxis. PubmedID 11073096 Title Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Autho

  3. DMPD: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14620137 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses to...microbes. Calandra T. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(9):573-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage migration... inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. PubmedID 14620137 Title Macrophage migration

  4. DMPD: Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18251777 Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. Naito M. Pa...thol Int. 2008 Mar;58(3):143-55. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage differentiation and function in health... and disease. PubmedID 18251777 Title Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease

  5. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko ...tml) (.csml) Show Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. PubmedID 17056121 Titl...e Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Authors Has

  6. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...(.csml) Show Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title ...Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Authors Co

  7. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  8. DMPD: Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18388328 Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Kockx ...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. PubmedID 18388...328 Title Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Aut

  9. DMPD: Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11841920 Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. Tsukamoto H. Fr...ee Radic Biol Med. 2002 Feb 15;32(4):309-13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expres...sion. PubmedID 11841920 Title Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha express

  10. Increased expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 and leptin in resident macrophages characterises atherosclerotic plaque rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Santibanez-Koref, M.; Polvikoski, T.; Birchall, D.; Mendelow, A.D.; Keavney, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Resident macrophages play an important role in atheromatous plaque rupture. The macrophage gene expression signature associated with plaque rupture is incompletely defined due to the complex cellular heterogeneity in the plaque. We aimed to characterise differential gene expression in resident plaque macrophages from ruptured and stable human atheromatous lesions. Methods and results We performed genome-wide expression analyses of isolated macrophage-rich regions of stable and ruptured human atherosclerotic plaques. Plaques present in carotid endarterectomy specimens were designated as stable or ruptured using clinical, radiological and histopathological criteria. Macrophage-rich regions were excised from 5 ruptured and 6 stable plaques by laser micro-dissection. Transcriptional profiling was performed using Affymetrix microarrays. The profiles were characteristic of activated macrophages. At a false discovery rate of 10%, 914 genes were differentially expressed between stable and ruptured plaques. The findings were confirmed in fourteen further stable and ruptured samples for a subset of eleven genes with the highest expression differences (p < 0.05). Pathway analysis revealed that components of the PPAR/Adipocytokine signaling pathway were the most significantly upregulated in ruptured compared to stable plaques (p = 5.4 × 10−7). Two key components of the pathway, fatty-acid binding-protein 4 (FABP4) and leptin, showed nine-fold (p = 0.0086) and five-fold (p = 0.0012) greater expression respectively in macrophages from ruptured plaques. Conclusions We found differences in gene expression signatures between macrophages isolated from stable and ruptured human atheromatous plaques. Our findings indicate the involvement of FABP4 and leptin in the progression of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture, and suggest that down-regulation of PPAR/adipocytokine signaling within plaques may have therapeutic potential. PMID:23122912

  11. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  12. IRF5:RelA Interaction Targets Inflammatory Genes in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Saliba

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 (IRF5 plays a major role in setting up an inflammatory macrophage phenotype, but the molecular basis of its transcriptional activity is not fully understood. In this study, we conduct a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of IRF5 recruitment in macrophages stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide and discover that IRF5 binds to regulatory elements of highly transcribed genes. Analysis of protein:DNA microarrays demonstrates that IRF5 recognizes the canonical IRF-binding (interferon-stimulated response element [ISRE] motif in vitro. However, IRF5 binding in vivo appears to rely on its interactions with other proteins. IRF5 binds to a noncanonical composite PU.1:ISRE motif, and its recruitment is aided by RelA. Global gene expression analysis in macrophages deficient in IRF5 and RelA highlights the direct role of the RelA:IRF5 cistrome in regulation of a subset of key inflammatory genes. We map the RelA:IRF5 interaction domain and suggest that interfering with it would offer selective targeting of macrophage inflammatory activities.

  13. Flow cytometry of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytes: alterations of blood/CSF ratios of lymphocyte subsets in inflammation disorders of human central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, T O; Albrecht, J; Zöfel, P

    1999-03-01

    Flow cytometry was adapted to measure lymphocytes in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The method was sufficiently precise, reproducible and accurate despite low cell counts. In lumbar CSF of controls with 500 to 3500 (10(3)/l) leukocytes, lymphocyte counts correlated with those in corresponding venous blood: blood/CSF ratios of approximately 2000 : 1 were found for total T cells (CD3+) and CD3+ HLA-DR-, CD3+4+, CD3+8+ subsets, ratios were increased for the lymphocyte subsets CD3+ HLA-DR+ blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers) to blood lymphocyte subsets which favor the transfer of T subsets. Correlation of the subset ratios to the CD3+ ratio indicates distinct barrier properties which changed differently with acute and subacute inflammations and neuroimmunological diseases of central nervous system (CNS) in lumbar or ventricular CSF, but not with simple protein barrier disturbance. HLA DR+ T ratios were higher than HLA DR- T ratios only with controls and some neuroimmunological diseases. Lymphocyte barrier characteristics were related to protein leakage situated at the same barriers, indicating for the lymphocyte subsets selective transfer routes in control subjects and non-selective routes in patients with CNS inflammation where altered ratios revealed a mixture of both routes.

  14. Stimulation of neoplastic mouse lung cell proliferation by alveolar macrophage-derived, insulin-like growth factor-1 can be blocked by inhibiting MEK and PI3K activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkinson Alvin M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, lung cancer kills more people than breast, colon and prostate cancer combined. Alterations in macrophage number and function during lung tumorigenesis suggest that these immune effector cells stimulate lung cancer growth. Evidence from cancer models in other tissues suggests that cancer cells actively recruit growth factor-producing macrophages through a reciprocal signaling pathway. While the levels of lung macrophages increase during tumor progression in mouse models of lung cancer, and high pulmonary macrophage content correlates with a poor prognosis in human non-small cell lung cancer, the specific role of alveolar macrophages in lung tumorigenesis is not clear. Methods After culturing either an immortalized lung macrophage cell line or primary murine alveolar macrophages from naïve and lung-tumor bearing mice with primary tumor isolates and immortalized cell lines, the effects on epithelial proliferation and cellular kinase activation were determined. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 was quantified by ELISA, and macrophage conditioned media IGF-1 levels manipulated by IL-4 treatment, immuno-depletion and siRNA transfection. Results Primary macrophages from both naïve and lung-tumor bearing mice stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The lungs of tumor-bearing mice contained 3.5-times more IGF-1 than naïve littermates, and media conditioned by freshly isolated tumor-educated macrophages contained more IGF-1 than media conditioned by naïve macrophages; IL-4 stimulated IGF-1 production by both macrophage subsets. The ability of macrophage conditioned media to stimulate neoplastic proliferation correlated with media IGF-1 levels, and recombinant IGF-1 alone was sufficient to induce epithelial proliferation in all cell lines evaluated. Macrophage-conditioned media and IGF-1 stimulated lung tumor cell growth in an additive manner, while EGF had no effect. Macrophage-derived factors increased p-Erk1/2, p

  15. Targeting of macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin (MGL) induces DC signaling and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Zizzari, Ilaria G; Rughetti, Aurelia;

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) sense the microenvironment through several types of receptors recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In particular, C-type lectins, expressed by distinct subsets of DCs, recognize and internalize specific carbohydrate antigen in a Ca(2+) -dependent manner. Targe...

  16. Study of changes in cellular surface glycoproteins of alveolar macrophages in fibrotic lung disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J McClure

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The respiratory system is both a route of entry and exit for toxins and injurious agents, as well as being a target for chemical substances and pathogens. Therefore, an understanding of the structure and function of the migratory cell populations of pulmonary tissues including alveolar macrophages is central in a number of important disease processes. This study aimed to identify and specify the glycotypes of alveolar macrophages in fibrotic lung disorders. Methods: Sections of paraffin-embedded tissue from 40 cases in both normal human lung and fibrotic lung disorders were studied by immunohistology and by lectin histochemistry with a panel of 27 biotinylated lectins. Results: The findings of this study showed that ten lectins (AHA, PTL-II, AAA, , LTA, UEA-I, BSA-1B4, VVA, SBA, DBA, PTL-I did not bind to the alveolar macrophages in any of the cases, whereas 17 lectins (GNA, NPA, HHA, l-PHA, e-PHA, LCA, PSA, ConA, LEA, PAA, s-WGA, ECA, MPA,HPA, WFA, SNA, MAA( bound from moderately to strongly. In contrast, in fibrotic lung disorders some glycans were somewhat more marked or changed. Conclusion: Glycans terminating in -galactose, terminal Gal1,3GalNAc and subsets of GalNAc also appeared in alveolar macrophages of fibrotic lung disorders. L-fucosylated and terminal -linked galactosyl glycans were also detected in diseases states. Subsets of N-glycans were either changed minimally or not at all.

  17. Immature monocytes recruited to the ischemic mouse brain differentiate into macrophages with features of alternative activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Mur, Francesc; Pérez-de-Puig, Isabel; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Urra, Xabier; Justicia, Carles; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Acute stroke induces a local inflammatory reaction causing leukocyte infiltration. Circulating monocytes are recruited to the ischemic brain and become tissue macrophages morphologically indistinguishable from reactive microglia. However, monocytes are a heterogeneous population of cells with different functions. Herein, we investigated the infiltration and fate of the monocyte subsets in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by permanent occlusion of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery. We separated two main subtypes of CD11b(hi) monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers Ly6C and CD43. Using adoptive transfer of reporter monocytes and monocyte depletion, we identified the pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo)CCR2(+) subset as the predominant monocytes recruited to the ischemic tissue. Monocytes were seen in the leptomeninges from where they entered the cortex along the penetrating arterioles. Four days post-ischemia, they had invaded the infarcted core, where they were often located adjacent to blood vessels. At this time, Iba-1(-) and Iba-1(+) cells in the ischemic tissue incorporated BrdU, but BrdU incorporation was rare in the reporter monocytes. The monocyte phenotype progressively changed by down-regulating Ly6C, up-regulating F4/80, expressing low or intermediate levels of Iba-1, and developing macrophage morphology. Moreover, monocytes progressively acquired the expression of typical markers of alternatively activated macrophages, like arginase-1 and YM-1. Collectively, the results show that stroke mobilized immature pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo) monocytes that acutely infiltrated the ischemic tissue reaching the core of the lesion. Monocytes differentiated to macrophages with features of alternative activation suggesting possible roles in tissue repair during the sub-acute phase of stroke.

  18. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, CHENGGONG; LIAO, QIANDE; HU, YIHE; ZHONG, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25452811

  19. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggong; Liao, Qiande; Hu, Yihe; Zhong, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  20. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05. The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01. In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  1. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition.

  2. Macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and metabolic diseases: critical role of cholesteryl ester mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shobha

    2011-03-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia, including low HDL levels, is the major contributor of residual risk of cardiovascular disease that remains even after aggressive statin therapy to reduce LDL-cholesterol. Currently, distinction is not made between HDL-cholesterol and HDL, which is a lipoprotein consisting of several proteins and a core containing cholesteryl esters (CEs). The importance of assessing HDL functionality, specifically its role in facilitating cholesterol efflux from foam cells, is relevant to atherogenesis. Since HDLs can only remove unesterified cholesterol from macrophages while cholesterol is stored as CEs within foam cells, intracellular CE hydrolysis by CE hydrolase is vital. Reduction in macrophage lipid burden not only attenuates atherosclerosis but also reduces inflammation and linked pathologies such as Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Targeting reduction in macrophage CE levels and focusing on enhancing cholesterol flux from peripheral tissues to liver for final elimination is proposed.

  3. On filling families of finite subsets of the Cantor set

    CERN Document Server

    Dodos, Pandelis

    2008-01-01

    Let $\\ee>0$ and $\\fff$ be a family of finite subsets of the Cantor set $\\ccc$. Following D. H. Fremlin, we say that $\\fff$ is $\\ee$-filling over $\\ccc$ if $\\fff$ is hereditary and for every $F\\subseteq\\ccc$ finite there exists $G\\subseteq F$ such that $G\\in\\fff$ and $|G|\\geq\\ee |F|$. We show that if $\\fff$ is $\\ee$-filling over $\\ccc$ and $C$-measurable in $[\\ccc]^{<\\omega}$, then for every $P\\subseteq\\ccc$ perfect there exists $Q\\subseteq P$ perfect with $[Q]^{<\\omega}\\subseteq\\fff$. A similar result for weaker versions of density is also obtained.

  4. Cytokine-producing T cell subsets in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre

    2000-01-01

    Leishmania specific Th1/Th2 cells have been identified in humans as well as in mice. There is a correlation between the clinical outcome of the infection and the cytokine response profile. Generally, the production of Th2 cytokines leads to severe infection, whereas the production of Th1 cytokine...... cells mutually down-regulate each other. However, the presence of antigen specific regulatory T cell subsets may provide an environment that allows the presence of both Th1 and Th2 cells....

  5. A novel cell subset:Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells(IKDCs).IKDCs not only secret type I and type II interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-II molecules to present antigens.Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  6. Feature Subset Selection by Estimation of Distribution Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2002-01-17

    This paper describes the application of four evolutionary algorithms to the identification of feature subsets for classification problems. Besides a simple GA, the paper considers three estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs): a compact GA, an extended compact GA, and the Bayesian Optimization Algorithm. The objective is to determine if the EDAs present advantages over the simple GA in terms of accuracy or speed in this problem. The experiments used a Naive Bayes classifier and public-domain and artificial data sets. In contrast with previous studies, we did not find evidence to support or reject the use of EDAs for this problem.

  7. Immunity to pathogens taught by specialized human dendritic cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens A. E. Geginat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APC that have a key role in immune responses, because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and up-regulate MHC molecules and co-stimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. It is now well established that DC are not a homogeneous population, but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DC (pDC rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent anti-viral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDC are not particularly potent APC and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T-cells. In contrast, myeloid DC (mDC are very potent APC and possess the unique capacity to prime naïve T-cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of myeloid DC with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α+ mDC capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α- mDC preferentially prime CD4+ T-cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3+ mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α+ mDC, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several relevant toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggests specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the

  8. A maximum feasible subset algorithm with application to radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman

    1999-01-01

    inequalities. Special classes of this problem are of interest in a variety of areas such as pattern recognition, machine learning, operations research, and medical treatment planning. This problem is generally solvable in exponential time. A heuristic polynomial time algorithm is presented in this paper......Consider a set of linear one sided or two sided inequality constraints on a real vector X. The problem of interest is selection of X so as to maximize the number of constraints that are simultaneously satisfied, or equivalently, combinatorial selection of a maximum cardinality subset of feasible...

  9. Individual discriminative face recognition models based on subsets of features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Gomez, David Delgado; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    of the face recognition problem. The elastic net model is able to select a subset of features with low computational effort compared to other state-of-the-art feature selection methods. Furthermore, the fact that the number of features usually is larger than the number of images in the data base makes feature...... selection techniques such as forward selection or lasso regression become inadequate. In the experimental section, the performance of the elastic net model is compared with geometrical and color based algorithms widely used in face recognition such as Procrustes nearest neighbor, Eigenfaces, or Fisher...

  10. In vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia show discrepancy in therapeutic effects of M2 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Desestret

    Full Text Available THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE FOLLOWING ISCHEMIC STROKE IS DOMINATED BY INNATE IMMUNE CELLS: resident microglia and blood-derived macrophages. The ambivalent role of these cells in stroke outcome might be explained in part by the acquisition of distinct functional phenotypes: classically (M1 and alternatively activated (M2 macrophages. To shed light on the crosstalk between hypoxic neurons and macrophages, an in vitro model was set up in which bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured with hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. The results showed that macrophages provided potent protection against neuron cell loss through a paracrine mechanism, and that they expressed M2-type alternative polarization. These findings raised the possibility of using bone marrow-derived M2 macrophages in cellular therapy for stroke. Therefore, 2 million M2 macrophages (or vehicle were intravenously administered during the subacute stage of ischemia (D4 in a model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Functional neuroscores and magnetic resonance imaging endpoints (infarct volumes, blood-brain barrier integrity, phagocytic activity assessed by iron oxide uptake were longitudinally monitored for 2 weeks. This cell-based treatment did not significantly improve any outcome measure compared with vehicle, suggesting that this strategy is not relevant to stroke therapy.

  11. Macrophage diversity in renal injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricardo, Sharon D.; van Goor, Harry; Eddy, Allison A.

    2008-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages can determine the outcome of the immune response and whether this response contributes to tissue repair or mediates tissue destruction. In addition to their important role in immune-mediated renal disease and host defense, macrophages play a fundamental role in tissue re

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  13. Mycobacteria, metals, and the macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyrolles, Olivier; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here, we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies.

  14. In vivo inhibition of c-MYC in myeloid cells impairs tumor-associated macrophage maturation and pro-tumoral activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar M Pello

    Full Text Available Although tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are involved in tumor growth and metastasis, the mechanisms controlling their pro-tumoral activities remain largely unknown. The transcription factor c-MYC has been recently shown to regulate in vitro human macrophage polarization and be expressed in macrophages infiltrating human tumors. In this study, we exploited the predominant expression of LysM in myeloid cells to generate c-Myc(fl/fl LysM(cre/+ mice, which lack c-Myc in macrophages, to investigate the role of macrophage c-MYC expression in cancer. Under steady-state conditions, immune system parameters in c-Myc(fl/fl LysM(cre/+ mice appeared normal, including the abundance of different subsets of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, precursors and circulating cells, macrophage density, and immune organ structure. In a model of melanoma, however, TAMs lacking c-Myc displayed a delay in maturation and showed an attenuation of pro-tumoral functions (e.g., reduced expression of VEGF, MMP9, and HIF1α that was associated with impaired tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and limited tumor growth in c-Myc(fl/fl LysM(cre/+ mice. Macrophage c-Myc deletion also diminished fibrosarcoma growth. These data identify c-Myc as a positive regulator of the pro-tumoral program of TAMs and suggest c-Myc inactivation as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Interaction of the European genotype porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV with sialoadhesin (CD169/Siglec-1 inhibits alveolar macrophage phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Baere Miet I

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an arterivirus that shows a restricted in vivo tropism for subsets of porcine macrophages, with alveolar macrophages being major target cells. The virus is associated with respiratory problems in pigs of all ages and is commonly isolated on farms with porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC. Due to virus-induced macrophage death early in infection, PRRSV hampers the innate defence against pathogens in the lungs. In addition, the virus might also directly affect the antimicrobial functions of macrophages. This study examined whether interaction of European genotype PRRSV with primary alveolar macrophages (PAM affects their phagocytic capacity. Inoculation of macrophages with both subtype I PRRSV (LV and subtype III PRRSV (Lena showed that the virus inhibits PAM phagocytosis. Similar results were obtained using inactivated PRRSV (LV, showing that initial interaction of the virion with the cell is sufficient to reduce phagocytosis, and that no productive infection is required. When macrophages were incubated with sialoadhesin- (Sn or CD163-specific antibodies, two entry mediators of the virus, only Sn-specific antibodies downregulated the phagocytic capacity of PAM, indicating that interaction with Sn, but not CD163, mediates the inhibitory effect of PRRSV on phagocytosis. In conclusion, this study shows that European genotype PRRSV inhibits PAM phagocytosis in vitro, through the interaction with its internalization receptor Sn. If similar events occur in vivo, this interaction may be important in the development of PRDC, as often seen in the field.

  16. Brucella discriminates between mouse dendritic cell subsets upon in vitro infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Alexia; Gagnaire, Aurélie; Degos, Clara; de Chastellier, Chantal; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide re-emerging zoonosis. Brucella has been shown to infect and replicate within Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) in vitro grown bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). In this cell model, Brucella can efficiently control BMDC maturation. However, it has been shown that Brucella infection in vivo induces spleen dendritic cells (DC) migration and maturation. As DCs form a complex network composed by several subpopulations, differences observed may be due to different interactions between Brucella and DC subsets. Here, we compare Brucella interaction with several in vitro BMDC models. The present study shows that Brucella is capable of replicating in all the BMDC models tested with a high infection rate at early time points in GMCSF-IL15 DCs and Flt3l DCs. GMCSF-IL15 DCs and Flt3l DCs are more activated than the other studied DC models and consequently intracellular bacteria are not efficiently targeted to the ER replicative niche. Interestingly, GMCSF-DC and GMCSF-Flt3l DC response to infection is comparable. However, the key difference between these 2 models concerns IL10 secretion by GMCSF DCs observed at 48 h post-infection. IL10 secretion can explain the weak secretion of IL12p70 and TNFα in the GMCSF-DC model and the low level of maturation observed when compared to GMCSF-IL15 DCs and Flt3l DCs. These models provide good tools to understand how Brucella induce DC maturation in vivo and may lead to new therapeutic design using DCs as cellular vaccines capable of enhancing immune response against pathogens.

  17. Distinct immune response induced by peptidoglycan derived from Lactobacillus sp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sun; Yong-Hui Shi; Guo-Wei Le; Xi-Yi Ma

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the distinct immune responses induced by Lactobacillus peptidoglycan (PG).METHODS: BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with PG once a day for three consecutive days. Peritoneal macrophage and splenocyte mRNA was extracted and the gene expression profile was studied using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus PG on colon tumor tissue were studied in vitro and in vivo.RESULTS: The gene expression profiles revealed that the TLR-NF-κB and Jak-STAT signaling pathways were highly activated. An inflammatory phenotype was induced when peritoneal macrophages were initially exposed to Lactobacillus PG and switched to a more complex phenotype when BALB/c mice were treated with three doses of Lactobacillus PG. A protective physiological inflammatory response was induced after three consecutive days of PG treatment. It was tending toward Th1 dominant immune response. Lactobacillus PG also appeared to induce a significantin vivo anti-colon tumor effect.CONCLUSION: Lactobacillus PG is responsible for certain immune responses induced by Lactobacilli. Anti-tumor effects of Lactobacilli are likely to attribute to the activation of macrophages by PG expressed on the bacterial cell surface.

  18. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  19. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren K; Weis, Nina

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a new macrophage-specific serum marker. This study investigated sCD163 and other markers of macrophage activation (neopterin, ferritin, transcobalamin, and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor [suPAR]) as prognostic factors in patients with pneumoc......OBJECTIVE: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a new macrophage-specific serum marker. This study investigated sCD163 and other markers of macrophage activation (neopterin, ferritin, transcobalamin, and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor [suPAR]) as prognostic factors in patients...... on the probability of survival when sCD163 and CRP were known (p = .25). CONCLUSIONS: Macrophage marker response in pneumococcal bacteremia was compromised in old age. In patients disease outcome....

  20. A Hybrid Feature Subset Selection using Metrics and Forward Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fathima Bibi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to design a Feature Subset Selection Technique that speeds up the Feature Selection (FS process in high dimensional datasets with reduced computational cost and great efficiency. FS has become the focus of much research on decision support system areas for which data with tremendous number of variables are analyzed. Filters and wrappers are proposed techniques for the feature subset selection process. Filters make use of association based approach but wrappers adopt classification algorithms to identify important features. Filter method lacks the ability of minimization of simplification error while wrapper method burden weighty computational resource. To pull through these difficulties, a hybrid approach is proposed combining both filters and wrappers. Filter approach uses a permutation of ranker search methods and a wrapper which improves the learning accurateness and obtains a lessening in the memory requirements and finishing time. The UCI machine learning repository was chosen to experiment the approach. The classification accuracy resulted from our approach proves to be higher.

  1. A subset of interneurons required for Drosophila larval locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Long, Hong; Thomas, John B

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to define the neural circuits generating locomotor behavior have produced an initial understanding of some of the components within the spinal cord, as well as a basic understanding of several invertebrate motor pattern generators. However, how these circuits are assembled during development is poorly understood. We are defining the neural circuit that generates larval locomotion in the genetically tractable fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to study locomotor circuit development. Forward larval locomotion involves a stereotyped posterior-to-anterior segmental translocation of body wall muscle contraction and is generated by a relatively small number of identified muscles, motor and sensory neurons, plus an unknown number of the ~270 bilaterally-paired interneurons per segment of the 1st instar larva. To begin identifying the relevant interneurons, we have conditionally inactivated synaptic transmission of interneuron subsets and assayed for the effects on locomotion. From this screen we have identified a subset of 25 interneurons per hemisegment, called the lateral locomotor neurons (LLNs), that are required for locomotion. Both inactivation and constitutive activation of the LLNs disrupt locomotion, indicating that patterned output of the LLNs is required. By expressing a calcium indicator in the LLNs, we found that they display a posterior-to-anterior wave of activity within the CNS corresponding to the segmental translocation of the muscle contraction wave. Identification of the LLNs represents the first step toward elucidating the circuit generating larval locomotion.

  2. Niacin-respondent subset of schizophrenia – a therapeutic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X J; Jiang, G S

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that niacin deficiency manifests with several psychiatric manifestations. Also historically evidence has accumulated that niacin augmentation can be used for treatment of schizophrenia. However, the etiopathological associations between niacin deficiency and schizophrenia as well as the mechanism of action of niacin in its treatment. More importantly, the subgroups of schizophrenia which will respond to niacin augmentation has never been highlighted in the literature. In this article, we review three of the mechanisms in which niacin deficiency could lead to schizophrenic symptoms: (1) Niacin deficiency neurodegeneration (2) Membrane phospholipid deficiency hypothesis and (3) Adrenochrome hypothesis. We will further move towards the clinical as well as treatment related associations as reviewed from the literature. Here, we propose a model that a subset of schizophrenia can respond to niacin augmentation therapy better than other subsets because these patients have contributions in their psychotic manifestations from the neural degeneration resulting from niacin deficiency. We present a short description of our case report which showed rapid improvement in schizophrenic psychotic symptoms subsequent to administration of niacin as an augmentation therapy. We, thus, propose that niacin deficiency is a contributory factor in schizophrenia development in some patients and symptom alleviation in these patients will benefit from niacin augmentation, especially in some particular psychotic features.

  3. Monocyte Subsets in Schistosomiasis Patients with Periportal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamille Souza Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major issue with Schistosoma mansoni infection is the development of periportal fibrosis, which is predominantly caused by the host immune response to egg antigens. Experimental studies have pointed to the participation of monocytes in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to characterize the subsets of monocytes in individuals with different degrees of periportal fibrosis secondary to schistosomiasis. Monocytes were classified into classical (CD14++CD16−, intermediate (CD14++CD16+, and nonclassical (CD14+CD16++. The expressions of monocyte markers and cytokines were assessed using flow cytometry. The frequency of classical monocytes was higher than the other subsets. The expression of HLA-DR, IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β was higher in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis as compared to other groups. Although no differences were observed in receptors expression (IL-4R and IL-10R between groups of patients, the expression of IL-12 was lower in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis, suggesting a protective role of this cytokine in the development of fibrosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the three different monocyte populations participate in the immunopathogenesis of periportal fibrosis, since they express high levels of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines and low levels of regulatory markers.

  4. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  5. Preferential magnetic nanoparticle uptake by bone marrow derived macrophages sub-populations: effect of surface coating on polarization, toxicity, and in vivo MRI detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Faraj, Achraf, E-mail: aalfaraj@ksu.edu.sa [College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Molecular and Cellular Imaging Lab, Department of Radiological Sciences (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-07-15

    Noninvasive imaging of macrophages activity has raised increasing interest for diagnosis of different diseases, which make them attractive vehicles to deliver contrast agents or drugs for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol functionalization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their further surface modification with carboxylic groups on bone marrow-derived M1 and M2 macrophages phenotype, labeling efficiency, uptake mechanism, biocompatibility, and their in vivo MR detection was assessed. An enhanced labeling efficiency was observed for carboxylic surface-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) compared to PEGylated SPIO and to a higher extent to plain SPIO along with a higher uptake by M2 subsets. Magnetic nanoparticles were found located in the periphery of the vesicles dispersed in the cytoplasm in TEM. Investigation of the labeling mechanism by inhibiting different uptake pathways revealed that endocytosis via scavenger receptor A, a process known to be clathrin mediated, plays a central role in the cellular uptake kinetics of both macrophages subpopulations. Biocompatibility evaluation showed no variation in cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential with a low release of ROS. Flow cytometry and measurement of iNOS and Arginase 1 activity as marker of M1 and M2 macrophages polarization confirmed that magnetic labeling of macrophages subsets did not affect their polarization. In addition, no variation was observed in the biodistribution of magnetic iron oxide-labeled M1 and M2 macrophages subsets when monitored using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging with a better detection for the enhanced SPIO-PEG-COOH-labeled cells.

  6. Prostaglandin E2 in tick saliva regulates macrophage cell migration and cytokine profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that suppress the host’s immune and inflammatory responses by secreting immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory molecules in their saliva. In previous studies we have shown that tick salivary gland extract (SGE) and saliva from Dermacentor variabilis have distinct effects on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated IC-21 macrophage and NIH3T3-L1 fibroblast migration. Since tick saliva contains a high concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent modulator of inflammation, we used a PGE2 receptor antagonist to evaluate the role of PGE2 in the different migratory responses induced by saliva and its impact on macrophage cytokine profile. Methods Adult ticks were fed on female New Zealand white rabbits for 5-8 days. Female ticks were stimulated with dopamine/theophylline to induce salivation and saliva was pooled. Competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA) were used to measure saliva PGE2 content and the changes in macrophage intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. The effects of tick saliva on macrophage and fibroblast migration were assessed in the absence and presence of the PGE2 receptor antagonist, AH 6809, using blind well chamber assays. A cytokine antibody array was used to examine the effects of tick saliva on macrophage cytokine secretion. Statistical significance was determined by one-way ANOVA; Student Newman-Kuels post-test was used for multiple comparisons. Results The saliva-induced increase in PDGF-stimulated macrophage migration was reversed by AH 6809. The inhibition of PDGF-stimulated fibroblast migration by saliva was also antagonist-sensitive. Tick saliva induced macrophages to secrete copious amounts of PGE2, and conditioned medium from these cells caused an AH 6809-sensitive inhibition of stimulated fibroblast migration, showing that macrophages can regulate fibroblast activity. We show that tick saliva decreased the secretion of the pro

  7. Interactions between macrophage/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes in surgical sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of Kupffer cell/macrophage interactions with hepatocytes in modulating liver function during infections using direct in vitro cocultivation of rat macrophages or Kupffer cells with rat hepatocytes. Protein synthesis was assayed as a sensitive indicator of integrated hepatocellular function by measuring {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into hepatocyte protein. Septic stimuli such as lipoploysaccharide and killed bacteria were added to cocultures of hepatocytes and macrophages or Kupffer cells and the responses compared to hepatocytes alone. Information about the types of proteins synthesized by hepatocytes under various culture conditions was determined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. These experiments showed that septic stimuli alter the amount and type of protein synthesized by hepatocytes and had no direct effect on hepatocytes in the absence of macrophages or Kupffer cells. The mediator(s) appears to be a heat labile, soluble monokine(s) which is distinct from interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor. The important role of Kupffer cells/macrophages in mediating alterations in hepatocellular function in sepsis may ultimately improve patient care.

  8. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts (OCs originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (Rαhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs but lacked granulocyte (GR-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  9. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanling; Zijl, Sebastiaan; Wang, Liqin; de Groot, Daniel C; van Tol, Maarten J; Lankester, Arjan C; Borst, Jannie

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts (OCs) originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM) by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+) BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3(+) cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (R)α(high) subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rα(high) cells also generated macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) but lacked granulocyte (GR)-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rα(low) subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP) and gave rise to the IL3Rα(high) subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP). Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+)FLT3(+) IL3Rα(low) and IL3Rα(high) subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  10. Phosphatidylserine receptor Tim-4 is essential for the maintenance of the homeostatic state of resident peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kit; Valdez, Patricia A; Tan, Christine; Yeh, Sherry; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2010-05-11

    Tim-4 is a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor that is expressed on various macrophage subsets. It mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by peritoneal macrophages. The in vivo functions of Tim-4 in phagocytosis and immune responses, however, are still unclear. In this study, we show that Tim-4 quickly forms punctate caps on contact with apoptotic cells, in contrast to its normal diffused expression on the surface of phagocytes. Despite its expression in marginal zone and tingible body macrophages, Tim-4 deficiency only minimally affects outcomes of several acute immune challenges, including the trapping of apoptotic cells in the marginal zone, the clearance apoptotic cells by tingible body macrophages, and the formation of germinal centers and elicitation of antibody responses against sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). In addition, Tim-4(-/-) resident peritoneal macrophages (rPMs) phagocytose necrotic cells and other opsonized targets normally. However, their ability to bind and engulf apoptotic cells is significantly compromised both in vitro and in vivo. Most importantly, Tim-4 deficiency results in increased cellularity in the peritoneum. Resting rPMs produce higher TNF-alpha in culture. Their response to LPS, on the contrary, is dampened. Our data support an indispensible role of Tim-4 in maintaining the homeostasis of rPMs.

  11. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Tordjman, Joan; Møller, Holger Jon; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Poitou, Christine; Bedossa, Pierre; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Clement, Karine; Grønbaek, Henning

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a specific marker of macrophage activation. We aimed to measure sCD163 in morbidly obese patients with varying degrees of NAFLD before and after bariatric surgery (BS). Demographic, clinical, and biochemical data, and plasma sCD163 measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, of 196 patients were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months after BS leading to significant weight loss. Peroperative liver biopsies were assessed for the NAFLD Activity Score (NAS), Kleiner fibrosis score, and the fatty liver inhibition of progression (FLIP) algorithm. In a subset, CD163 immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CD163 mRNA were performed. sCD163 was higher in patients with NAS ≥ 5 compared with those with NAS CD163-positive macrophages aligning fat-laden hepatocytes and forming microgranulomas in patients with NASH. CD163 mRNA expression did not vary with NAS. sCD163 increased in parallel with the severity of NAFLD in morbid obesity, indicating macrophage activation. BS reduced sCD163 even in patients with severe liver injury and fibrosis, suggesting full reversibility of macrophage activation associated with improved insulin sensitivity. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Renal cell carcinoma with t(6:11 (p21;q12. A case report highlighting distinctive immunohistologic features of this rare tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjeet Kaur Arneja

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Knowledge of distinctive morphological and immuno-histochemical features of this tumor can help in establishing a diagnosis of this rare subset of translocation associated RCC on routine hematoxylin and eosin (H and E staining and immunophenotyping.

  13. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  14. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  15. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  16. Changes in T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulu Miao; Mingxia Zhang; Yulin Nie; Wan Zhao; Bin Huang; Zhengming Jiang; Shaoxiong Yu; Zhibin Huang; Hongjin Fu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides local changes of cranial parenchymal cells, hemorrhage, etc., severe traumatic brain injuries also cause the changes of total body fluid and various functions, and the changes of lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets should be paid more attention to.OBJECTIVE: To reveal the changing laws of T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury, and compare with mild to moderate brain injury.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City;Central Laboratory of Shenzhen Hospital of Prevention and Cure for Chronic Disease.PARTICIPANTS: All the subjects were selected from the Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City from August 2002 to August 2005. Thirty patients with severe brain injury, whose Glasgow coma score (GCS) was ≤ 8 points, were taken as the experimental group, including 21 males and 9 females, aging 16 - 62 years. Meanwhile, 30 patients with mild traumatic brain injury were taken as the control group (GCS ranged 14 - 15 points), including 18 males and 12 females, aging 15 - 58 years. All the subjects were in admission at 6 hours after injury, without disease of major organs before injury.Informed consents were obtained from all the patients or their relatives.conditions of pulmonaryinfections were observed at 4 days after injury. The differences of measurement data were compared with the t test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of T lymphocytes subsets at 1 - 14 days after severe and mild or moderate traumatic injury.RESULTS: Finally, 28 and 25 patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury, whereas 25 and 21 patients with severe traumatic brain injury were analyzed at 7 and 14 days respectively, and the missed ones CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8 began to decrease, whereas CD8 increased in the experimental group, which were very significantly different from those in the control group (t =2.77 - 3.26, P < 0

  17. mIL-2R, T cell subsets & hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Pin Li; Ke-Xia Wang; Jian Wang; Bo-Rong Pan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the levels of membrane interleukin-2 receptor(mIL-2R ) and T cell subsets in peripheral bloodmononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with hepatitis Cand their role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C.METHODS: The levels of mlL-2R and T cells subsets in PBMCWere detected by biotin- streptstividin (BSA) technique beforeand after stimulation with PHA in 203 patients with hepatitis Cwith HCV-RNA( + ), anti-HCV( + ), anti-HCV(-).RESULTS: The total expressive levels of mlL-2R before andafter stimulation with PHA(0.03 ± 0.01, 0.03 ± 0.02, 0.04 ± 0.02, 0.36±0.03), and Tcell subsets in PBMC (0.62±0.06,0.37 ± 0.05, 0.35 ± 0.07) were all lower in patients withhepatitis C than those in normal controls (0.66 ± 0.07, 0.41± 0.06, 0.31 ± 0.05, P < 0.01 ). Among the patients, thelevels of mlL-2R were lower in silence than those in situationof PHA inducting (P< 0.01). However, the levels of mlL-2Rwere similar in acute hepatitis C to that in chronic hepatitis C(P>0.05). The levels of CD3+, CD4+, CD4 +/CD8+ Were lov erand CD8 + was higher in patients with acute and chronichepatitis C with anti-HCV( + ) than those in normal controls (0.62±0.06, 0.37±0.05, 0.35±0.07, 1.18±0.30, 0.61±0.07, 0.37±0.05, 1.39±0.33, 0.31±0.05, P<0.05-P<0.01).CONCLUSION: The cellular immunity is obviously changed inpatients with hepatitis C. The levels of mlL-2R end activationof T cells am closely associated with chronicity of hepatitis C.

  18. Modulation of macrophage activation state protects tissue from necrosis during critical limb ischemia in thrombospondin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bréchot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages, key regulators of healing/regeneration processes, strongly infiltrate ischemic tissues from patients suffering from critical limb ischemia (CLI. However pro-inflammatory markers correlate with disease progression and risk of amputation, suggesting that modulating macrophage activation state might be beneficial. We previously reported that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is highly expressed in ischemic tissues during CLI in humans. TSP-1 is a matricellular protein that displays well-known angiostatic properties in cancer, and regulates inflammation in vivo and macrophages properties in vitro. We therefore sought to investigate its function in a mouse model of CLI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a genetic model of tsp-1(-/- mice subjected to femoral artery excision, we report that tsp-1(-/- mice were clinically and histologically protected from necrosis compared to controls. Tissue protection was associated with increased postischemic angiogenesis and muscle regeneration. We next showed that macrophages present in ischemic tissues exhibited distinct phenotypes in tsp-1(-/- and wt mice. A strong reduction of necrotic myofibers phagocytosis was observed in tsp-1(-/- mice. We next demonstrated that phagocytosis of muscle cell debris is a potent pro-inflammatory signal for macrophages in vitro. Consistently with these findings, macrophages that infiltrated ischemic tissues exhibited a reduced postischemic pro-inflammatory activation state in tsp-1(-/- mice, characterized by a reduced Ly-6C expression and a less pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile. Finally, we showed that monocyte depletion reversed clinical and histological protection from necrosis observed in tsp-1(-/- mice, thereby demonstrating that macrophages mediated tissue protection in these mice. CONCLUSION: This study defines targeting postischemic macrophage activation state as a new potential therapeutic approach to protect tissues from necrosis and promote tissue

  19. Thymic shared antigen-1. A novel thymocyte marker discriminating immature from mature thymocyte subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, D I; Masciantonio, M; Tucek, C L; Malin, M A; Boyd, R L; Hugo, P

    1992-04-01

    In a previous study, we raised a mAb (MTS 35) reacting with a plasma membrane Ag expressed on both cortical thymocytes and a subset of thymic medullary epithelial cells. In view of the shared expression of this molecule, we have defined it as thymic shared Ag-1 (TSA-1). Considering its selective reactivity with cortical, but not medullary thymocytes, the relevance of TSA-1 as a marker of immature T cells was investigated in detail in this study, using multicolor flow cytometric analysis. TSA-1 was found on all immature thymocyte subsets (CD3-4-8-, CD3-4+8-, CD3-4-8+, CD3-4+8+, CD3low4+8+). Conversely, CD3high4+8- and CD3high4-8+ thymocytes, early thymic migrants and peripheral T cells were TSA-1-. More refined gating and analysis of the transitional CD3intermediate/high4+8+ thymocytes, proposed candidates for negative selection, demonstrated that approximately one half were TSA-1-. In fact, there was a directly inverse relationship between TSA-1 and CD3 expression on thymocytes. In the periphery, TSA-1 was detected on B lymphocytes. TSA-1 is PI-linked and has a molecular mass of 17 kDa nonreduced, or 12 to 13 kDa reduced. Through cross-correlation analysis, this molecule was distinct from H-2K, PNA-R, CD5, CD11a/18, Thy-1, HSA, Ly6A/E, Ly6C, ThB, CD25, CD44. Hence TSA-1 appears to be a unique marker which exquisitely separates mature from immature thymocytes.

  20. Circulating Lymphocyte Subsets 
in Patients with Lung Cancer and Their Prognostic Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LUO

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is one of the most common malignancies. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the change of lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients and the survival rate. Methods Flow cytometry was used to measure the percentages of lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, CD19+, CD25+, CD44+, and NK cells in peripheral blood obtained from 221 patients with primary lung cancer without any treatment and from 96 healthy blood donors as the control group. The result was combined with clinical and follow-up data and statistical analysis was conducted. Results The levels of CD3+ and CD8+ in the patient group are significantly lower compared with the control group, whereas the levels of CD4+/CD8+, CD19+, CD25+, CD44+, and NK cells are significantly higher (P<0.05. CD8+ is significantly higher in the small cell lung cancer (SCLC group compared with the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC group. However, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ are lower in SCLC (P<0.05. There were no significant differences in different stages and differentiation (P>0.05 in the NSCLC group. The level of CD3+ was significantly higher compared with the pre-chemotherapy group, but NK cell, CD19+, and CD44+ were distinctly lower in the post-chemotherapy group (P<0.05. More survival opportunities will be obtained for patients with no increase in CD44+ after chemotherapy (P=0.021, but the other three indices have no obvious influence on survival. Conclusion Widespread changes of lymphocyte occur in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer. There is a significant correlation between the change of CD44+ and the prognosis after chemotherapy.

  1. Identification of new hematopoietic cell subsets with a polyclonal antibody library specific for neglected proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Moro

    Full Text Available The identification of new markers, the expression of which defines new phenotipically and functionally distinct cell subsets, is a main objective in cell biology. We have addressed the issue of identifying new cell specific markers with a reverse proteomic approach whereby approximately 1700 human open reading frames encoding proteins predicted to be transmembrane or secreted have been selected in silico for being poorly known, cloned and expressed in bacteria. These proteins have been purified and used to immunize mice with the aim of obtaining polyclonal antisera mostly specific for linear epitopes. Such a library, made of about 1600 different polyclonal antisera, has been obtained and screened by flow cytometry on cord blood derived CD34+CD45dim cells and on peripheral blood derived mature lymphocytes (PBLs. We identified three new proteins expressed by fractions of CD34+CD45dim cells and eight new proteins expressed by fractions of PBLs. Remarkably, we identified proteins the presence of which had not been demonstrated previously by transcriptomic analysis. From the functional point of view, looking at new proteins expressed on CD34+CD45dim cells, we identified one cell surface protein (MOSC-1 the expression of which on a minority of CD34+ progenitors marks those CD34+CD45dim cells that will go toward monocyte/granulocyte differentiation. In conclusion, we show a new way of looking at the membranome by assessing expression of generally neglected proteins with a library of polyclonal antisera, and in so doing we have identified new potential subsets of hematopoietic progenitors and of mature PBLs.

  2. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  3. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Hume

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. In large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues, it is possible to identify sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, they include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and those associated with endocytosis. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter gene expression to produce activated macrophages that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx, and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as classical and alternative or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS. This response is reviewed herein. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals and in other species such as pigs. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage activation requires the development of new analytical tools, and ways of presenting information in an

  4. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiou, K. N.; Karakos, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination. PMID:21369396

  5. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented...... in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  6. Plasticity of T helper cell subsets: Implications in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avaneendra Talwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T helper (Th cells have an important role in host defence as well in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Th cells differentiate from naive cells into various subsets, each of which is associated with a set of inducing and effector cytokines. Previously, it was thought that this differentiation was an irreversible event. Recent evidence suggest that even differentiated Th cells, retain the flexibility to transform from one lineage to another, a phenomenon referred to as plasticity. This plasticity is thought to be brought about by epigenetic modifications that are regulated by external and internal signals in the micro-environment of these cells. The factors and mechanisms which affect the plasticity of these cells and their potential role in the etio-pathogenesis of periodontal disease has been described in this article.

  7. On curves contained in convex subsets of the plane

    CERN Document Server

    Coppersmith, Don; Ravsky, Alex

    2012-01-01

    If K' and K are convex bodies of the plane such that K' is a subset of K then the perimeter of K' is not greater than the perimeter of K. We obtain the following generalization of this fact. Let K be a convex compact body of the plane with the perimeter p and the diameter d and r>1 be an integer. Let s be the smallest number such that for any curve of length greater than s contained in K there is a straight line intersecting the curve at least in r+1 different points. Then s=rp/2 if r is even and s=(r-1)p/2+d if r is odd.

  8. The semigroup of nonempty finite subsets of rationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Spake

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Let Q be the additive group of rational numbers and let ℛ be the additive semigroup of all nonempty finite subsets of Q. For X∈ℛ, define AX to be the basis of 〈X−min(X〉 and BX the basis of 〈max(X−X〉. In the greatest semilattice decomposition of ℛ, let (X denote the archimedean component containing X. In this paper we examine the structure of ℛ and determine its greatest semilattice decomposition. In particular, we show that for X,Y∈ℛ, (X=(Y if and only if AX=AY and BX=BY. Furthermore, if X is a non-singleton, then the idempotent-free (X is isomorphic to the direct product of a power joined subsemigroup and the group Q.

  9. T-lymphocyte subsets, thymic size and breastfeeding in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, Helle; Lisse, Ida M

    2004-01-01

    We followed the changes in concentration of T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ cells) in peripheral blood and thymus size during infancy. Previous studies have found increased thymus size in breastfed infants. The present study analyzed the association between breastfeeding and the number of CD4......+ and CD8+ cells. Two different populations of infants between birth and 1 year of age were examined. Study Group I: infants with a variable duration of breastfeeding. Study Group II: long-term breastfed infants. In both groups a correlation was found between CD8+ cells and the thymic index at 10 months...... to 10 months of age; and a positive correlation between the number of breastfeedings per day at 8 months of age, and an increase in CD4+ cells from 8 to 10 months of age (p Breastfeeding might have both a current and long...

  10. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Stamatiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  11. Bifidobacterium infantis attenuates colitis by regulating T cell subset responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Yuan, Kai-Tao; Yu, Li; Meng, Qing-Hong; Chung, Peter Chee-Keung; Yang, Ding-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) on the T cell subsets and in attenuating the severity of experimental colitis in mice. METHODS: Normal BALB/c mice were fed different doses of B. infantis for 3 wk, and T cell subsets and related cytokine profiles in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were detected by flow cytometry and real-time RT-PCR. Colitis was induced by administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice. Before colitis induction, mice were fed high dose B. infantis for 3 wk. Cytokine profiles in MLNs and histological changes of colonic tissue were examined 6 d after colitis induction. RESULTS: No significant change in cytokine profiles was observed in normal mice fed low dose B. infantis. However, Th1-related cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12p40), Th17-related transcription factor and cytokines (RORγt, IL-21, IL-23), regulatory T cell (Treg)-related transcription factor and cytokines (Foxp3, IL-10) were increased in normal mice fed high dose B. infantis. Furthermore, flow cytometry assay showed B. infantis increased the numbers of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and Th17 cells in MLNs. Colitis was successfully induced by TNBS in mice, characterized by colonic inflammation and aberrant Th1 and Th17 responses. Feeding high dose B. infantis for 3 wk before colitis induction decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration and goblet cell depletion and restored the intestinal epithelium. In addition, B. infantis feeding reduced Th1-related cytokines (T-bet, IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th17-related cytokines (IL-12p40, RORγt, IL-17A, IL-21 and IL-23), and increased Treg-related molecules (Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-β) in colitis mice. CONCLUSION: B. infantis effectively attenuates TNBS-induced colitis by decreasing Th1 and Th17 responses and increasing Foxp3+ Treg response in the colonic mucosa. PMID:25561798

  12. Thermal hypersensitivity in a subset of irritable bowel syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiQi Zhou; Roger B Fillingim; Joseph L Riley III; G Nicholas Verne

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To characterize thermal hypersensitivity in patients with constipation- and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: Thermal pain sensitivity was tested among patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) and constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS) compared to healthy subjects. A total of 42 patients (29 female and patients (16 female and eight male; mean age 32.5participated in the study. Thermal stimuli were delivered using a Medoc Thermal Sensory Analyzer with a 3 cm heat pain tolerance (HPTo) were assessed on the left ventral forearm and left calf using an ascending method of limits. The Functional Bowel Disease Severity Index (FBDSI) was also obtained for all subjects. RESULTS: Controls were less sensitive than C-IBS and D-IBS (both at P < 0.001) with no differences between C-IBS and D-IBS for HPTh and HPTo. Thermal hyperalgesia was present in both groups of IBS patients relative to controls, with IBS patients reporting significantly lower pain threshold and pain tolerance at both test sites. Cluster analysis revealed the presence of subgroups of IBS patients based on thermal hyperalgesia. One cluster (17% of the sample) showed a profile of heat pain sensitivity very similar to that of healthy controls; a second cluster (47% of the sample) showed moderate heat pain sensitivity; and a third cluster (36% of the sample) showed a very high degree of thermal hyperalgesia.CONCLUSION: A subset of IBS patients had thermal hypersensitivity compared to controls, who reported significantly lower HPTh and HPTo. All IBS patients had a higher score on the FBDSI than controls. Interestingly, the subset of IBS patients with high thermal sensitivity (36%) had the highest FBDSI score compared to the other two groups of IBS patients.

  13. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  14. Tachykinins stimulate a subset of mouse taste cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Grant

    Full Text Available The tachykinins substance P (SP and neurokinin A (NKA are present in nociceptive sensory fibers expressing transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1. These fibers are found extensively in and around the taste buds of several species. Tachykinins are released from nociceptive fibers by irritants such as capsaicin, the active compound found in chili peppers commonly associated with the sensation of spiciness. Using real-time Ca(2+-imaging on isolated taste cells, it was observed that SP induces Ca(2+ -responses in a subset of taste cells at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. These responses were reversibly inhibited by blocking the SP receptor NK-1R. NKA also induced Ca(2+-responses in a subset of taste cells, but only at concentrations in the high nanomolar range. These responses were only partially inhibited by blocking the NKA receptor NK-2R, and were also inhibited by blocking NK-1R indicating that NKA is only active in taste cells at concentrations that activate both receptors. In addition, it was determined that tachykinin signaling in taste cells requires Ca(2+-release from endoplasmic reticulum stores. RT-PCR analysis further confirmed that mouse taste buds express NK-1R and NK-2R. Using Ca(2+-imaging and single cell RT-PCR, it was determined that the majority of tachykinin-responsive taste cells were Type I (Glial-like and umami-responsive Type II (Receptor cells. Importantly, stimulating NK-1R had an additive effect on Ca(2+ responses evoked by umami stimuli in Type II (Receptor cells. This data indicates that tachykinin release from nociceptive sensory fibers in and around taste buds may enhance umami and other taste modalities, providing a possible mechanism for the increased palatability of spicy foods.

  15. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  16. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  17. The CD44(high tumorigenic subsets in lung cancer biospecimens are enriched for low miR-34a expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K Basak

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity is an integral part of cancer development and progression. Progression can be associated with emergence of cells that exhibit high phenotypic plasticity (including "de-differentiation" to primitive developmental states, and aggressive behavioral properties (including high tumorigenic potentials. We observed that many biomarkers that are used to identify Cancer Stem Cells (CSC can label cell subsets in an advanced clinical stage of lung cancer (malignant pleural effusions, or MPE. Thus, CSC-biomarkers may be useful for live sorting functionally distinct cell subsets from individual tumors, which may enable investigators to hone in on the molecular basis for functional heterogeneity. We demonstrate that the CD44(hi (CD44-high cancer cell subsets display higher clonal, colony forming potential than CD44(lo cells (n=3 and are also tumorigenic (n=2/2 when transplanted in mouse xenograft model. The CD44(hi subsets express different levels of embryonal (de-differentiation markers or chromatin regulators. In archived lung cancer tissues, ALDH markers co-localize more with CD44 in squamous cell carcinoma (n=5/7 than Adeno Carcinoma (n=1/12. MPE cancer cells and a lung cancer cell line (NCI-H-2122 exhibit chromosomal abnormalities and 1p36 deletion (n=3/3. Since miR-34a maps to the 1p36 deletion site, low miR-34a expression levels were detected in these cells. The colony forming efficiency of CD44(hi cells, characteristic property of CSC, can be inhibited by mir-34a replacement in these samples. In addition the highly tumorigenic CD44(hi cells are enriched for cells in the G2 phase of cell cycle.

  18. NF-kappaB Activity in Macrophages Determines Metastatic Potential of Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    inflammation, neonatal sepsis , and chronic lung disease: a 13-year hospital cohort study. Pe- diatrics 123: 1314–1319. 8. Paananen, R., A. K. Husa, R... neonatal period. The inducible cIKKb transgene allows macrophage activation at distinct stages of lung development, as compared with postnatal rodent...Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. 2010. Neonatal outcomes of extremely preterm infants from

  19. Characterization of lymphocyte subsets over a 24-hour period in Pineal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (PALT in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNulty John A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeostatic trafficking of lymphocytes in the brain has important relevance to the understanding of CNS disease processes. The pineal gland of the chicken contains large accumulations of lymphocytes that suggest an important role related to homeostatic circadian neuro-immune interactions. The purpose of this initial study was to characterize the lymphocyte subsets in the pineal gland and quantitate the distribution and frequency of lymphocyte phenotypes at two time points over the 24-hour light:dark cycle. Results PALT comprised approximately 10% of the total pineal area. Image analysis of immunocytochemically stained sections showed that the majority of lymphocytes were CD3+ (80% with the remaining 20% comprising B-cells and monocytes (Bu-1+, which tended to distribute along the periphery of the PALT. T-cell subsets in PALT included CD4+ (75–80%, CD8+ (20–25%, TCRαβ/Vβ1+ (60%, and TCRγδ+ (15%. All of the T-cell phenotypes were commonly found within the interfollicular septa and follicles of the pineal gland. However, the ratios of CD8+/CD4+ and TCRγδ+/TCRαβ/Vβ1+ within the pineal tissue were each 1:1, in contrast to the PALT where the ratios of CD8+/CD4+ and TCRγδ+/TCRαβ/Vβ1+ each approximated 1:4. Bu-1+ cells were only rarely seen in the pineal interstitial spaces, but ramified Bu-1+ microglia/macrophages were common in the pineal follicles. Effects of the 24-h light:dark cycle on these lymphocyte-pineal interactions were suggested by an increase in the area of PALT, a decline in the density of TCRαβ/Vβ1+ cells, and a decline in the area density of Bu-1+ microglia at the light:dark interphase (1900 h compared to the dark:light interphase (0700 h. Conclusion The degree of lymphocyte infiltration in the pineal suggests novel mechanisms of neuro-immune interactions in this part of the brain. Our results further suggest that these interactions have a temporal component related to the 24-hour light

  20. Macrophage Polarization in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Weighing Down our Understanding of Macrophage Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Kraakman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes are now recognized as chronic pro-inflammatory diseases. In the last decade, the role of the macrophage in particular has become increasingly implicated in their pathogenesis. Abundant literature now establishes that monocytes get recruited to peripheral tissues (ie pancreas, liver and adipose tissue to become resident macrophages and contribute to local inflammation, development of insulin resistance or even pancreatic dysfunction. Furthermore, an accumulation of evidence has established an important role for macrophage polarisation in the development of metabolic diseases. The general view in obesity is that there is an imbalance in the ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, with M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages being enhanced compared with M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages being down-regulated, leading to chronic inflammation and the propagation of metabolic dysfunction. However, there is emerging evidence revealing a more complex scenario with the spectrum of macrophage states exceeding well beyond the M1/M2 binary classification and confused further by human and animal models exhibiting different macrophage profiles. In this review we will discuss the recent findings regarding macrophage polarization in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Resident alveolar macrophages are susceptible to and permissive of Coxiella burnetii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Calverley

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a zoonotic disease with potentially life-threatening complications in humans. Inhalation of low doses of Coxiella bacteria can result in infection of the host alveolar macrophage (AM. However, it is not known whether a subset of AMs within the heterogeneous population of macrophages in the infected lung is particularly susceptible to infection. We have found that lower doses of both phase I and phase II Nine Mile C. burnetii multiply and are less readily cleared from the lungs of mice compared to higher infectious doses. We have additionally identified AM resident within the lung prior to and shortly following infection, opposed to newly recruited monocytes entering the lung during infection, as being most susceptible to infection. These resident cells remain infected up to twelve days after the onset of infection, serving as a permissive niche for the maintenance of bacterial infection. A subset of infected resident AMs undergo a distinguishing phenotypic change during the progression of infection exhibiting an increase in surface integrin CD11b expression and continued expression of the surface integrin CD11c. The low rate of phase I and II Nine Mile C. burnetii growth in murine lungs may be a direct result of the limited size of the susceptible resident AM cell population.

  2. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Steiniche, Torben; Borre, Michael; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-11-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential mechanism inducing the CD163 expression in tumor cells. A high CD163 mRNA expression (n = 87) was significantly associated with a poor 13-year overall survival (log-rank test, χ(2) = 8.931; p = 0.0028). Moreover, CD163 mRNA expression was significantly increased in muscle invasive (T2-T4), p = 0.017, and aggressive (grade III/IV) cancers (p = 0.015). The expression strongly correlated with local expression of IL-6 (r = 0.72; p CD163 expression in vitro. CD163 immunostaining (n = 46) confirmed the association between dense TAM infiltration and histologically advanced disease. In 39% of the biopsies, CD163 immunoreactivity was also observed in tumor cells, and CD163-expressing metastatic cells were identified in lymph node biopsies (n = 8). Bladder cancer cell lines did not express CD163; however, when cocultured with macrophages the bladder cancer cell expression of CD163 was significantly induced in an IL-6/IL-10 independent manner. In conclusion, we show a strong association between CD163 mRNA expression in bladder cancer biopsies and poor patient outcome. CD163 expression was not confined to the infiltrating TAMs, but was also expressed by a significant portion of the malignant cells in both tumors and lymph nodes. CD163 expressing tumor cells may constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells with a phenotypic shift associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased metastatic activity induced by TAMs. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  3. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  4. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  5. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  6. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  7. Dakin Solution Alters Macrophage Viability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-18

    crobial for wound care. DS has been shown to be toxic to host cells, but effects on immune cells are not well documented. Materials and methods: DS at 0.5...characterize the impact of DS on macrophage viability and function in vitro. 2. Materials and methods 2.1. Cell lines and reagents Murine macrophages...strainer to separate conidia from mycelium , and stored in DMEM at 4C. 2.3. Cellular viability assays Effect of DS on cellular viability was

  8. Lack of RNase L attenuates macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown.Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were generated from RNase L(+/+and (-/- mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays.Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2. Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions.

  9. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and g...

  10. Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0408 TITLE: Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jacqueline D. Jones...0408 Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...efferocytosis. The translation of this functional role during pathophysiological states such as tumor metastasis to the skeleton is unknown. The purpose of this

  11. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  12. Persistence of avian oncoviruses in chicken macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzolo, L; Moscovici, C; Moscovici, M G

    1979-01-01

    Inoculation of avian oncoviruses into 1- to 2-month old chickens led to a rapid production of antiviral humoral antibodies. Under these conditions it was found that avian leukosis viruses are sequestered in macrophages of peripheral blood, in which they can persist for a long period of time (up to about 3 years). In contrast, avian sarcoma viruses were never found in macrophages from chickens during the progression of sarcomas or after regression of the tumors. PMID:217827

  13. Bifunctional effect of E2 on macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinHONG; QuanZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Our previous study showed that the effect of 1713-estradiol(E2) on macrophage does not strengthen when concentrationincreased. So the effect of E2 on cytokines, intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and morphological change of macrophages at differentconcentrations were studied. METHODS: TNF-α was measured by MTT via L929 cell. Nitrate and nitrite level(NO) wasmeasured by the method of Griess. [Ca2+]i was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy(LSCM). Fluorescent microscopy

  14. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests.

  15. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  16. Modulation of Macrophage Efferocytosis in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlynn R Korns

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A critical function of macrophages within the inflammatory milieu is the removal of dying cells by a specialized phagocytic process called efferocytosis (to carry to the grave. Through specific receptor engagement and induction of downstream signaling, efferocytosing macrophages promote resolution of inflammation by i efficiently engulfing dying cells, thus avoiding cellular disruption and release of inflammatory contents, and ii producing anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10 and TGF-β that dampen pro-inflammatory responses. Evidence suggests that plasticity in macrophage programming, in response to changing environmental cues, modulates efferocytic capability. Essential to programming for enhanced efferocytosis is activation of the nuclear receptors PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR and possibly RXRα. Additionally, a number of signals in the inflammatory milieu, including those from dying cells themselves, can influence efferocytic efficacy either by acting as immediate inhibitors/enhancers or by altering macrophage programming for longer-term effects. Importantly, sustained inflammatory programming of macrophages can lead to defective apoptotic cell clearance and is associated with development of autoimmunity and other chronic inflammatory disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the multiple factors that modulate macrophage efferocytic ability and highlights emerging therapeutic targets with significant potential for limiting chronic inflammation.

  17. The roles of blood-derived macrophages and resident microglia in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted Intracortical microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Sunil, Smrithi; Black, James; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Haung, Alex Y.; Miller, Robert H.; Selkirk, Stephen M.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages have both been implicated to play a dominant role in mediating the neuroinflammatory response affecting implanted intracortical microelectrodes. However, the distinction between each cell type has not been demonstrated due to a lack of discriminating cellular markers. Understanding the subtle differences of each cell population in mediating neuroinflammation can aid in determining the appropriate therapeutic approaches to improve microelectrode performance. Therefore, the goal of this study is to characterize the role of infiltrating blood-derived cells, specifically macrophages, in mediating neuroinflammation following intracortical microelectrode implantation. Interestingly, we found no correlation between microglia and neuron populations at the microelectrode-tissue interface. On the other hand, blood-borne macrophages consistently dominated the infiltrating cell population following microelectrode implantation. Most importantly, we found a correlation between increased populations of blood-derived cells (including the total macrophage population) and neuron loss at the microelectrode-tissue interface. Specifically, the total macrophage population was greatest at two and sixteen weeks post implantation, at the same time points when we observed the lowest densities of neuronal survival in closest proximity to the implant. Together, our results suggest a dominant role of infiltrating macrophages, and not resident microglia, in mediating neurodegeneration following microelectrode implantation. PMID:24973296

  18. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  19. Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Normal and Diabetic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Kimball, Andrew S; Jacobs, Benjamin N; Kunkel, Steven L; Gallagher, Katherine A

    2017-07-01

    The healing of cutaneous wounds is dependent on the progression through distinct, yet overlapping phases of wound healing, including hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and resolution/remodeling. The failure of these phases to occur in a timely, progressive fashion promotes pathologic wound healing. The macrophage (MΦ) has been demonstrated to play a critical role in the inflammatory phase of tissue repair, where its dynamic plasticity allows this cell to mediate both tissue-destructive and -reparative functions. The ability to understand and control both the initiation and the resolution of inflammation is critical for treating pathologic wound healing. There are now a host of studies demonstrating that metabolic and epigenetic regulation of gene transcription can influence MΦ plasticity in wounds. In this review, we highlight the molecular and epigenetic factors that influence MΦ polarization in both physiologic and pathologic wound healing, with particular attention to diabetic wounds. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Enhancer Turnover Is Associated with a Divergent Transcriptional Response to Glucocorticoid in Mouse and Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Alasdair W; Young, Robert S; Hume, David A; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-01-15

    Phenotypic differences between individuals and species are controlled in part through differences in expression of a relatively conserved set of genes. Genes expressed in the immune system are subject to especially powerful selection. We have investigated the evolution of both gene expression and candidate enhancers in human and mouse macrophages exposed to glucocorticoid (GC), a regulator of innate immunity and an important therapeutic agent. Our analyses revealed a very limited overlap in the repertoire of genes responsive to GC in human and mouse macrophages. Peaks of inducible binding of the GC receptor (GR) detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq correlated with induction, but not repression, of target genes in both species, occurred at distal regulatory sites not promoters, and were strongly enriched for the consensus GR-binding motif. Turnover of GR binding between mice and humans was associated with gain and loss of the motif. There was no detectable signal of positive selection at species-specific GR binding sites, but clear evidence of purifying selection at the small number of conserved sites. We conclude that enhancer divergence underlies the difference in transcriptional activation after GC treatment between mouse and human macrophages. Only the shared inducible loci show evidence of selection, and therefore these loci may be important for the subset of responses to GC that is shared between species.

  1. Human Macrophage Response to L. (Viannia) panamensis: Microarray Evidence for an Early Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ricardo; Ettinger, Nicholas A.; Tikhonova, Irina; Alexander, Neal D.; Valderrama, Liliana; Hager, Janet; Wilson, Mary E.; Lin, Aiping; Zhao, Hongyu; Saravia, Nancy G.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous findings indicate that susceptibility to Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis infection of monocyte-derived macrophages from patients and asymptomatically infected individuals were associated with the adaptive immune response and clinical outcome. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the basis for this difference we examined differential gene expression of human monocyte-derived macrophages following exposure to L. (V.) panamensis. Gene activation profiles were determined using macrophages from healthy volunteers cultured with or without stationary phase promastigotes of L. (V.) panamensis. Significant changes in expression (>1.5-fold change; p<0.05; up- or down-regulated) were identified at 0.5, 4 and 24 hours. mRNA abundance profiles varied over time, with the highest level of activation occurring at earlier time points (0.5 and 4 hrs). In contrast to observations for other Leishmania species, most significantly changed mRNAs were up- rather than down-regulated, especially at early time points. Up-regulated transcripts over the first 24 hours belonged to pathways involving eicosanoid metabolism, oxidative stress, activation of PKC through G protein coupled receptors, or mechanism of gene regulation by peroxisome proliferators via PPARα. Additionally, a marked activation of Toll-receptor mediated pathways was observed. Comparison with published microarray data from macrophages infected with L. (Leishmania) chagasi indicate differences in the regulation of genes involved in signaling, motility and the immune response. Conclusions Results show that the early (0.5 to 24 hours) human monocyte-derived macrophage response to L. (Viannia) panamensis is not quiescent, in contrast to published reports examining later response times (48–96 hours). Early macrophage responses are important for the developing cellular response at the site of infection. The kinetics and the mRNA abundance profiles induced by L. (Viannia) panamensis illustrate the

  2. Leukocyte subsets and neutrophil function after short-term spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C. F.; Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Jones, M. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte subpopulations and function after spaceflight have been observed but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not well defined. This study investigated the effects of short-term spaceflight (8-15 days) on circulating leukocyte subsets, stress hormones, immunoglobulin levels, and neutrophil function. At landing, a 1.5-fold increase in neutrophils was observed compared with preflight values; lymphocytes were slightly decreased, whereas the results were variable for monocytes. No significant changes were observed in plasma levels of immunoglobulins, cortisol, or adrenocorticotropic hormone. In contrast, urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol were significantly elevated at landing. Band neutrophils were observed in 9 of 16 astronauts. Neutrophil chemotactic assays showed a 10-fold decrease in the optimal dose response after landing. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was increased both before and after spaceflight. At landing, the expression of MAC-1 was significantly decreased while L-selectin was significantly increased. These functional alterations may be of clinical significance on long-duration space missions.

  3. PRODH mutations and hyperprolinemia in a subset of schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Hélène; Raux, Grégory; Thibaut, Florence; Hecketsweiler, Bernadette; Houy, Emmanuelle; Demilly, Caroline; Haouzir, Sadeq; Allio, Gabrielle; Fouldrin, Gael; Drouin, Valérie; Bou, Jacqueline; Petit, Michel; Campion, Dominique; Frébourg, Thierry

    2002-09-15

    The increased prevalence of schizophrenia among patients with the 22q11 interstitial deletion associated with DiGeorge syndrome has suggested the existence of a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia within the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region (DGCR) on 22q11. Screening for genomic rearrangements of 23 genes within or at the boundaries of the DGCR in 63 unrelated schizophrenic patients and 68 unaffected controls, using quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments (QMPSF), led us to identify, in a family including two schizophrenic subjects, a heterozygous deletion of the entire PRODH gene encoding proline dehydrogenase. This deletion was associated with hyperprolinemia in the schizophrenic patients. In addition, two heterozygous PRODH missense mutations (L441P and L289M), detected in 3 of 63 schizophrenic patients but in none among 68 controls, were also associated with increased plasma proline levels. Segregation analysis within the two families harboring respectively the PRODH deletion and the L441P mutation showed that the presence of a second PRODH nucleotide variation resulted in higher levels of prolinemia. In two unrelated patients suffering from severe type I hyperprolinemia with neurological manifestations, we identified a homozygous L441P PRODH mutation, associated with a heterozygous R453C substitution in one patient. These observations demonstrate that type I hyperprolinemia is present in a subset of schizophrenic patients, and suggest that the genetic determinism of type I hyperprolinemia is complex, the severity of hyperprolinemia depending on the nature and number of hits affecting the PRODH locus.

  4. Bayesian Subset Modeling for High-Dimensional Generalized Linear Models

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a new prior setting for high-dimensional generalized linear models, which leads to a Bayesian subset regression (BSR) with the maximum a posteriori model approximately equivalent to the minimum extended Bayesian information criterion model. The consistency of the resulting posterior is established under mild conditions. Further, a variable screening procedure is proposed based on the marginal inclusion probability, which shares the same properties of sure screening and consistency with the existing sure independence screening (SIS) and iterative sure independence screening (ISIS) procedures. However, since the proposed procedure makes use of joint information from all predictors, it generally outperforms SIS and ISIS in real applications. This article also makes extensive comparisons of BSR with the popular penalized likelihood methods, including Lasso, elastic net, SIS, and ISIS. The numerical results indicate that BSR can generally outperform the penalized likelihood methods. The models selected by BSR tend to be sparser and, more importantly, of higher prediction ability. In addition, the performance of the penalized likelihood methods tends to deteriorate as the number of predictors increases, while this is not significant for BSR. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  5. Zone diagrams in compact subsets of uniformly convex normed spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kopecká, Eva; Reich, Simeon

    2010-01-01

    A zone diagram is a relatively new concept which has emerged in computational geometry and is related to Voronoi diagrams. Formally, it is a fixed point of a certain mapping, and neither its uniqueness nor its existence are obvious in advance. It has been studied by several authors, starting with T. Asano, J. Matousek and T. Tokuyama, who considered the Euclidean plane with singleton sites, and proved the existence and uniqueness of zone diagrams there. In the present paper we prove the existence of zone diagrams with respect to finitely many pairwise disjoint compact sites contained in a compact and convex subset of a uniformly convex normed space. The proof is based on the Schauder fixed point theorem, the Curtis-Schori theorem regarding the Hilbert cube, and on recent results concerning the characterization of Voronoi cells as a collection of line segments and their geometric stability with respect to small changes of the corresponding sites. Along the way we obtain the continuity of the Dom mapping as wel...

  6. NK cell subset redistribution during the course of viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eLugli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 as well as cytomegalovirus (CMV infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment.

  7. Alteration of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslawa Pietruczuk; Milena I Dabrowska; Urszula Wereszczynska-Siemiatkowska; Andrzej Dabrowski

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: Twenty patients with mild AP (M-AP) and 15 with severe AP (S-AP) were included in our study. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were examined at d 1-3, 5,10 and 30 by means of flow cytometry.RESULTS: A significant depletion of circulating lymphocytes was found in AP. In the early AP, the magnitude of depletion was similar for T- and B- lymphocytes. In the late course of S-AP, B-lymphocytes were much more depleted than T-lymphocytes. At d 10, strong shift in the CD7+/CD19+ ratio implicating predominance of Tover B-lymphocytes in S-AP was found. Among T-lymphocytes, the significant depletion of the CD4+ population was observed in M-AP and S-AP, while CD8+ cells were in the normal range. Lymphocytes were found to strongly express activation markers: CD69, CD25, CD28,CD38 and CD122. Serum interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5,IL-10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) levels were significantly increased in both forms of AP. The magnitude of elevation of cytokines known to be produced by Th2 was much higher than cytokines produced by Th1 cells.CONCLUSION: AP in humans is characterized by significant reduction of peripheral blood T- and B-lymphocytes.

  8. Optimal Features Subset Selection and Classification for Iris Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The selection of the optimal features subset and the classification have become an important issue in the field of iris recognition. We propose a feature selection scheme based on the multiobjectives genetic algorithm (MOGA to improve the recognition accuracy and asymmetrical support vector machine for the classification of iris patterns. We also suggest a segmentation scheme based on the collarette area localization. The deterministic feature sequence is extracted from the iris images using the 1D log-Gabor wavelet technique, and the extracted feature sequence is used to train the support vector machine (SVM. The MOGA is applied to optimize the features sequence and to increase the overall performance based on the matching accuracy of the SVM. The parameters of SVM are optimized to improve the overall generalization performance, and the traditional SVM is modified to an asymmetrical SVM to treat the false accept and false reject cases differently and to handle the unbalanced data of a specific class with respect to the other classes. Our experimental results indicate that the performance of SVM as a classifier is better than the performance of the classifiers based on the feedforward neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, and the Hamming and the Mahalanobis distances. The proposed technique is computationally effective with recognition rates of 99.81% and 96.43% on CASIA and ICE datasets, respectively.

  9. Optimal Features Subset Selection and Classification for Iris Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabir Bhattacharya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The selection of the optimal features subset and the classification have become an important issue in the field of iris recognition. We propose a feature selection scheme based on the multiobjectives genetic algorithm (MOGA to improve the recognition accuracy and asymmetrical support vector machine for the classification of iris patterns. We also suggest a segmentation scheme based on the collarette area localization. The deterministic feature sequence is extracted from the iris images using the 1D log-Gabor wavelet technique, and the extracted feature sequence is used to train the support vector machine (SVM. The MOGA is applied to optimize the features sequence and to increase the overall performance based on the matching accuracy of the SVM. The parameters of SVM are optimized to improve the overall generalization performance, and the traditional SVM is modified to an asymmetrical SVM to treat the false accept and false reject cases differently and to handle the unbalanced data of a specific class with respect to the other classes. Our experimental results indicate that the performance of SVM as a classifier is better than the performance of the classifiers based on the feedforward neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, and the Hamming and the Mahalanobis distances. The proposed technique is computationally effective with recognition rates of 99.81% and 96.43% on CASIA and ICE datasets, respectively.

  10. Immunophenotype of normal and myelomatous plasma cell subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eRobillard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cells are essentially characterized by the co-expression of CD138 and CD38, which allows their identification in flow cytometry in bone marrow, peripheral blood or cell suspensions from tissues. These terminally differentiated B-cells may lose the expression of surface CD19 and that of CD20 while retaining CD27. When malignant, they can gain a number of other markers such as CD28, CD33, CD56 or CD117 and lose CD27. Moreover, since each plasma cell is only able to produce a single type of immunoglobulins, they display isotypic restriction and clonal malignant plasma cells can be further characterized by their homogeneous expression of either kappa or lambda light chains. In multiple myeloma (MM, such plasma cell clones produce the immunoglobulin identified in plasma as an abnormal peak. In the bone marrow where they essentially accumulate, these plasma cells may however display various immunophenotypes. The latter were explored in a two-way approach. Firstly the various subsets delineated by the selective or common expression of CD19 together with combined CD56/CD28 were explored in normal and MM bone marrow. Then other aberrant markers’ expression was investigated, i.e. CD20, CD27, CD33, CD56, CD117. These data were compared to literature information. They underline the vast heterogeneity of MM plasma cells possibly accounting for the various answers to therapy of MM patients.

  11. Real Time Immunophenotyping of Leukocyte Subsets Early after Double Cord Blood Transplantation Predicts Graft Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqiang; Nicoud, Ian; Blake, Joseph; Oliver, David; Cox, Emily; Heimfeld, Shelly; Milano, Filippo; Imren, Suzan; Delaney, Colleen

    2017-03-01

    Cord blood transplantation (CBT) recipients are at increased risk for delayed engraftment and primary graft failure, complications that are often indistinguishable early post-transplantation. Current assays fail to accurately identify recipients with slow hematopoietic recovery and distinguish them from those with pending graft failure. To address this, we prospectively examined the kinetics of immune cell subset recovery in the peripheral blood of 39 patients on days +7 and +14 after double-unit CBT (dCBT) by multiparametric flow cytometry analysis, which we term real-time immunophenotyping (RTIP). RTIP analysis at day +14 revealed distinctive patterns of reconstitution and, importantly, identified patients with slow hematopoietic recovery who went on to engraft. Strikingly, higher absolute numbers of circulating monocytes and natural killer cells at day +14 were predictive of engraftment, but only the absolute number of circulating monocytes was significantly correlated with time to engraftment. This is the first evidence that RTIP on patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells earl