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Sample records for distillation concentrates calcination

  1. Membrane distillation for milk concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moejes, S.N.; Romero Guzman, Maria; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Barrera, K.H.; Feenstra, L.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an emerging technology to concentrate liquid products while producing high quality water as permeate. Application for desalination has been studied extensively the past years, but membrane distillation has also potential to produce concentrated food products like

  2. Volatility of ruthenium during vitrification operations on fission products. part 1. nitric solutions distillation concentrates calcination. part 2. fixation on a steel tube. decomposition of the peroxide; Volatilite du ruthenium au cours des operations de vitrification des produits de fission. 1. partie distillation des solutions nitriques calcination des concentrats 2. partie fixation sur un tube d'acier decomposition du peroxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortins de Bettencourt, A; Jouan, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    During vitrification of fission product solutions, a high percentage of the ruthenium initially present in these solutions in the form of nitrosyl-ruthenium nitrates is volatilized with the production of the peroxide which itself is decomposed to ruthenium dioxide. The aim of this work has been to study the volatility of the ruthenium during the vitrification processes. During the distillation of the nitric solutions, we have studied in particular the influence on the volatility of the temperature , of the chemical form in which the ruthenium is introduced, of the bubbling of a gas through the solution, of the nitric concentration and of the nitrate concentration. During the calcination, we have observed the influence of the temperature, of the time, of the flow rate and of the nature of the carrier gas, as well as of the action of the ruthenium bi-oxide and the iron oxide on the volatility of the ruthenium. Part 2. This report deals with the study of the thermal decomposition of ruthenium peroxide, RuO{sub 4}, and its deposition on steel tubing. After a brief bibliographic review of the various properties of this substance, a study is made, in the first part, of its deposition on a steel tube. In order to do this, we pass a gas current containing RuO{sub 4} marked with {sup 106}Ru through a stainless steel tube subjected to a temperature gradient which decreases in the direction of the gas flow. The temperature at which RuO{sub 4} is deposited or is fixed on the tube is determined and the influence of the flow rate on this deposit is studied. In the second part, an attempt has been made to study by a static method the kinetics of the decomposition reaction of ruthenium peroxide to give the dioxide: RuO{sub 4} {yields} RuO{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. To do this, we have tried to introduce gaseous RuO{sub 4} into a container placed in an electric oven, and to follow the reaction by {gamma} counting. (author) [French] Au cours de la vitrification des solutions de produits de

  3. Volatility of ruthenium during vitrification operations on fission products. part 1. nitric solutions distillation concentrates calcination. part 2. fixation on a steel tube. decomposition of the peroxide; Volatilite du ruthenium au cours des operations de vitrification des produits de fission. 1. partie distillation des solutions nitriques calcination des concentrats 2. partie fixation sur un tube d'acier decomposition du peroxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortins de Bettencourt, A.; Jouan, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    During vitrification of fission product solutions, a high percentage of the ruthenium initially present in these solutions in the form of nitrosyl-ruthenium nitrates is volatilized with the production of the peroxide which itself is decomposed to ruthenium dioxide. The aim of this work has been to study the volatility of the ruthenium during the vitrification processes. During the distillation of the nitric solutions, we have studied in particular the influence on the volatility of the temperature , of the chemical form in which the ruthenium is introduced, of the bubbling of a gas through the solution, of the nitric concentration and of the nitrate concentration. During the calcination, we have observed the influence of the temperature, of the time, of the flow rate and of the nature of the carrier gas, as well as of the action of the ruthenium bi-oxide and the iron oxide on the volatility of the ruthenium. Part 2. This report deals with the study of the thermal decomposition of ruthenium peroxide, RuO{sub 4}, and its deposition on steel tubing. After a brief bibliographic review of the various properties of this substance, a study is made, in the first part, of its deposition on a steel tube. In order to do this, we pass a gas current containing RuO{sub 4} marked with {sup 106}Ru through a stainless steel tube subjected to a temperature gradient which decreases in the direction of the gas flow. The temperature at which RuO{sub 4} is deposited or is fixed on the tube is determined and the influence of the flow rate on this deposit is studied. In the second part, an attempt has been made to study by a static method the kinetics of the decomposition reaction of ruthenium peroxide to give the dioxide: RuO{sub 4} {yields} RuO{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. To do this, we have tried to introduce gaseous RuO{sub 4} into a container placed in an electric oven, and to follow the reaction by {gamma} counting. (author) [French] Au cours de la vitrification des solutions de produits de

  4. Calcination of the cerium concentrate to be cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyanti; MV Purwani

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of the cerium concentrate to be cerium oxide has done. The cerium concentrate were obtained from the Ce making process wear KBrO_3 and without using KBrO_3. The calcination were done with a variation of time 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours with the temperature variations of 700, 800 and 900°C. The easiest calcination of Ce concentrates to be CeO_2 containing majority of Ce(OH)_4 and contains least impurities as Th(OH)_4, (NH_4)_2Y(NO_3), H_4N_5O_1_2La, H_1_2N_3NdO_1_5 and N_3O_9Sm. On the calcination of Ce concentrates process results without using KBrO_3 1, the calcination temperature 900°C was obtained CeO_2 content of 73.53% for calcination time of 4 hours, has little difference when compared with the predictions and calculation result of complete calcination was equal 73.84%. (author)

  5. The nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.; Suleymani, M.; Borudzherdi, A.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan. The obtaining of boric acid from pre backed danburite concentrate by decomposition of nitric acid was studied. The chemical composition of danburite concentrate was determined. The laboratory study of danburite leaching by nitric acid was conducted. The influence of temperature, process duration, nitric acid concentration on nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit was studied as well. The optimal conditions of nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit, including temperature, process duration, nitric acid concentration and particle size were proposed.

  6. Development of Concentration and Calcination Technology For High Level Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    The concentrated medium and high-level liquid radio chemicals effluents contain nitric acid, water along with the dissolved chemicals including the nitrates of the radio nuclides. High level liquid waste contain mainly nitrates of cesium, strontium, cerium, zirconium, chromium, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, pickle, iron etc. and other fission products. This concentrated solution requires further evaporation, dehydration, drying and decomposition in temperature range of 150 to 700 deg. C. The addition of the calcined solids in vitrification pot, instead of liquid feed, helps to avoid low temperature zone because the vaporization of the liquid and decomposition of nitrates do not take place inside the melter. In our work Differential and thermo gravimetric studies has been carried out in the various stages of thermal treatment including drying, dehydration and conversion to oxide forms. Experimental studies were done to characterize the chemicals present in high-level radioactive waste. A Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner was used for development of the process because this is amenable for continuous operation and moderately good heat transfer can be achieved inside the kiln. This also has minimum secondary waste and off gases generation. The Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner Demonstration facility system was designed and installed for the demonstration of calcination process. The Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner is a slowly rotating slightly inclined horizontal tube that is externally heated by means of electric resistance heating. The liquid feed is sprayed onto the moving bed of metal balls in a slowly rotating calciner by a peristaltic type-metering pump. The vaporization of the liquid occurs in the pre-calcination zone due to counter current flow of hot gases. The dehydration and denitration of the solids occurs in the calcination zone, which is externally heated by electrical furnace. The calcined powder is cooled in the post calcination portion. It has been demonstrated that the

  7. The leaching of base minerals from the calcines produced by the roasting of pyrite concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, M.J.; Filmer, A.O.

    1985-01-01

    A number of gold and uranium plants in South Africa concentrate the pyrite in the ore residue by flotation and roast the concentrate for the production of sulphuric acid. The calcine produced, which is predominantly hematite, is generally subjected to cyanidation for the recovery of gold and silver. The calcines often contain economically significant quantities of copper, nickel , cobalt and uranium. Prior treatment of the calcine for the recovery of these metals would be desirable in terms of the value of the products. Several processes for the leaching of the base metals from plant calcines have been investigated, and an important general conclusion is that an adequate recovery of the base metals requires that a large proportion of the iron should also be extracted. This observation led to a more extensive investigation of the kinetics of leaching of various iron oxides. The application of electrochemical theory and techniques resulted in a fuller understanding of the various factors that govern the rate of leaching of iron oxides. As a result of this fundamental work, alternative treatment schemes that should yield more efficient extraction from calcines were suggested. Several of these possibilities were investigated, and the most promising were found to require reducing conditions during the leach, or prior partial reduction of the calcine to magnetite or wustite

  8. 3.6. The kinetics of sulfuric acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of borosilicate ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to kinetics of sulfuric acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of borosilicate ore. The experimental data of kinetics of extraction of boron oxide from danburite at sulfuric acid decomposition were obtained at 20-90 deg C temperature range and process duration 15-90 minutes. The flowsheet of obtaining of boric acid from borosilicate ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit by sulfuric acid method was proposed.

  9. Mobile calcination and cementation unit for solidification of concentrated radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Skaba, V.; Skvarenina, R.; Ditl, P.

    1985-01-01

    Mobile experimental unit MESA-1 was developed and manufactured for processing radioactive concentrates by direct cementation. The unit is mainly designed for processing low-level liquid wastes from nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations, in which the level of radioactivity does not exceed 10 10 Bq/m 3 , the salt content of liquid solutions does not exceed 500 kg/m 3 and the maximum amount of boric acid is 130 kg/m 3 . The equipment is built into three modules which may be assembled and dismantled in a short time and transported separately. The unit without the calciner module was tested in non-radioactive mode and in operation with actual radioactive wastes from the V-1 nuclear power plant. The course and results of the tests are described in detail. All project design values were achieved, a total of 18 dm 3 model solutions were processed and 1 m 3 of actual wastes with a salt content of 450 kg/m 3 . The test showed that with regard to the radiation level reached it will be necessary in the process of calcination to increase the shielding of certain exposed points. The calciner module is being assembled for completion. (Z.M.)

  10. Processing of concentrated radioactive wastes into cement and bitumens following calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Ditl, P.; Prikryl, P.

    1985-01-01

    A brief characteristic is presented of the most frequently used processes of solidification of liquid radioactive wastes, viz., bituminization, cementation and their combination with calcination. The effect of individual parameters is assessed on the choice of the type of solidification process as is their importance in the actual process, in temporary storage, during transportation and under conditions of long-term storage. It has been found that a combination of the procedures could lead to a modular system of methods and equipment. This would allow to approach optimal solidification of wastes in the present period and to establish a research reserve for the development of more modern, economically advantageous and safer procedures. A rough estimate is made of the costs of the solidification of 1 m 3 of radioactive concentrate from the V-1 power plant at a production of 380 m 3 /year, this for the cementation-calcination and bituminization-calcination procedures. The said rough economic analysis only serves to identify the major operating components which have the greatest effect on the economic evaluation of the solidification procedures. (Z.M.)

  11. Effect of metal ratio and calcination temperature of chromium based mixed oxides catalyst on FAME density from palm fatty acid distillate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Z.; Fatimah, S.; Shahar, S.; Noor, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    Mixed oxides chromium based catalysts were synthesized via sol-gel method for the esterification of palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) to produce fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). The reactions were conducted in a batch reactor at reaction temperature of 160 °C for 4 h and methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 3:1. The effects of catalyst preparation conditions which are the mixed metal ratio and calcination temperature were studied. The various metal ratio of Cr:Mn (1:0, 0:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) and Cr:Ti (0:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) resulted in FAME density ranges from 1.041 g/cm3 to 0.853 g/cm3 and 1.107 g/cm3 to 0.836 g/cm3, respectively. The best condition catalyst was found to be Cr:Ti metal ratio of 1:2 and Cr:Mn metal ratio of 1:1. The calcination temperature of the mixed oxides between 300 °C to 700°C shows effect on the FAME density obtained in the reaction. The calcination at 500°C gave the lowest FAME density of 0.836 g/cm3 and 0.853 g/cm3 for Cr:Ti and Cr:Mn mixed oxides, respectively. The density of FAME is within the value range of the biodiesel fuel property. Thus, mixed oxides of Cr-Ti and Cr-Mn have good potentials as heterogeneous catalyst for FAME synthesis from high acid value oils such as PFAD.

  12. THE EFFECT OF DISTILLATE STORING DISTILLED FROM FRUCTOSE SYRUPS TOWARD ITS ACETALDEHYDE CONCENTRATION MEASURED BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Monica Sianita Basukiwardojo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetaldehyde is a compound of aldehyde group that is very volatile and toxic. This compound can be found in fructose syrups used in carbonate beverages. The syrups had been distilled then analysed using gas chromatography. The concentration of acetaldehyde was 289.78 g/g in the distillates kept for one week, 295.30 g/g in those kept for two weeks, 429.45 g/g in those kept for three weeks, and 449.38 g/g in those kept for four weeks. The optimum column temperature was programmed with initial temperature of 40 oC held on for four minutes, then increasing by 40 oC/minute to 200 oC. It can be concluded that the longer the distillates have been kept, the greater the concentration of acetaldehyde in the distillates. A further research to investigate the present of microbe in the distillates and the effect of pH should be conducted   Keywords: acetaldehyde, fructose syrup, distillates, gas chromatography.

  13. Use of extractive distillation to produce concentrated nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.C.; Griffin, T.P.; Irwin, C.F.

    1981-04-01

    Concentrated nitric acid (> 95 wt %) is needed for the treatment of off-gases from a fuels-reprocessing plant. The production of concentrated nitric acid by means of extractive distillation in the two-pot apparatus was studied to determine the steady-state behavior of the system. Four parameters, EDP volume (V/sub EDP/) and temperature (T/sub EDP/), acid feed rate, and solvent recycle, were independently varied. The major response factors were percent recovery (CPRR) and product purity (CCP). Stage efficiencies also provided information about the system response. Correlations developed for the response parameters are: CPRR = 0.02(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) + 53.5; CCP = -0.87 (T/sub EDP/ - 140 0 C) + 81; eta/sub V,EDP/ = 9.1(F/sub feed/ - 11.5 cc/min) - 0.047(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) - 2.8(F/sub Mg(NO 3 ) 2 / - 50 cc/min) + 390; and eta/sub L,EDP/ = 1.9(T/sub EDP/ - 140 0 C) + 79. A computer simulation of the process capable of predicting steady-state conditions was developed, but it requires further work

  14. Improvement of Gold Leaching from a Refractory Gold Concentrate Calcine by Separate Pretreatment of Coarse and Fine Size Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A total gold extraction of 70.2% could only be reached via direct cyanidation from a refractory As-, S- and C-bearing gold concentrate calcine, and the gold extraction varied noticeably with different size fractions. The reasons for unsatisfactory gold extraction from the calcine were studied through analyses of chemical composition, chemical phase and SEM-EDS of different sizes of particles. It was found that a significant segregation of compositions occurred during the grinding of gold ore before flotation. As a result, for the calcine obtained after oxidative roasting, the encapsulation of gold by iron oxides was easily engendered in finer particles, whilst in coarser particles the gold encapsulation by silicates was inclined to occur likely due to melted silicates blocking the porosity of particles. The improvement of gold leaching from different size fractions was further investigated through pretreatments with alkali washing, acid pickling or sulfuric acid curing-water leaching. Finally, a novel process was recommended and the total gold extraction from the calcine could be increased substantially to 93.6% by the purposeful pretreatment with alkali washing for the relatively coarse size fraction (+37 μm and sulfuric acid curing–water leaching for the fine size fraction (−37 μm.

  15. To study the effect of dopant NiO concentration and duration of calcinations on structural and optical properties of MgO-NiO nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rkkaushik06@gmail.com [Deptt. of Physics, M.D. University, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Deptt. of Physics,Vaish College of Engineering, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Praveen,; Sharma, Ashwani; Parmar, R.; Dahiya, S. [Deptt. of Physics, M.D. University, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Kishor, N. [Deptt. of Physics, Central University of Haryana (India)

    2016-05-06

    In present work Magnesium oxide (MgO) samples were doped with different concentration of Transition metal Nickel Oxide(NiO) by using Chemical co-precipitation method. The doping levels were varied from NiO (5%, 10%, 15%) and all the samples were calcined at 600°C for 4hrs and 8hrs respectively. Structural analysis of these calcined materials is carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques which reveals that average crystalline sizes are in nano region i.e. 21.77nm-31.13 nm and tabulated in table 1. The powder of calcined samples were also characterized by using various other techniques i.e. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Visible spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) etc. The effects of dopant concentration, calcined temperature, calcinations duration on samples were studied and also investigate the effect of varying dopant concentration on morphology and optical properties of calcined nanomaterials. From results it was observed that the crystallite size of nanocomposites increases with increases dopant concentration or increases calcinations duration. The optical band gap decreases with increases sintering time and increase with increases dopant concentrations. TEM results coincide with XRD results and show that particles are polycrystalline in nature. FTIR spectra show that for all samples particles are pure in composition and transmission rate increases with calcinations duration.

  16. Membrane distillation with porous metal hollow fibers for the concentration of thermo-sensitive solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, Sushumna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents an original approach for the concentration of thermo-sensitive solutions: the Sweep Gas Membrane Distillation (SGMD) process. A new membrane contactor with metallic hollow fibers has been designed and allows the distillation process to be operational at low temperature. Heat is

  17. DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF MULTIEFFECT DISTILLER/EVAPORATOR USING SCHEFFLER SOLAR CONCENTRATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJAY CHANDAK

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Authors designed and experimented with multistage evaporation system for production of distilled water. Two Scheffler concentrators of 16 sqm each were used for generating steam in the first stage at 8 bar pressure and the pressure is gradually brought down to 1 bar, in four stage distillation unit. Total yield obtained in the project was 2.3 times that of single stage distillation. Temperature drop in every subsequent stage was designed to 25 degree centigrade. Heat of condensation in the last stage and also sensible heat of the condensate in all the stages were used for preheating of water in the next batch. The system has great potential in food processing industry for applications of juice thickening, sauces, jams, salt concentrating systems and distilled water applications, desalination etc. Results of the project are very encouraging for commercial scale application.

  18. Performance assessment of CO2 capture with calcination carbonation reaction process driven by coal and concentrated solar power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xuelei; Liu, Yingguang

    2014-01-01

    Calcination carbonation reaction (CCR) process is regarded as a promising option for pulverized coal power plant to mitigate CO 2 emission. In this paper, concentrated solar power (CSP) substitutes for coal to supply part of the calcination energy in order to reduce the fossil fuel consumption associated with the calciner. A CCR process driven by coal and CSP is examined from the perspective of energy efficiency. This paper focuses on the parameters of heat recovery efficiency, CSP capacity, compression energy, air separation energy and recycled energy to determine the contribution of each to the overall energy penalty. In addition, the effects of heat recovery efficiency, CSP capacity, purge percentage and CO 2 capture efficiency on the co-driven case are analyzed through a sensitivity analysis. The results indicate that the thermal efficiency of integrating CCR co-driven process into an ultra-supercritical 1019 MW power plant is 35.37%, which means that the overall efficiency penalty is 9.63 percentage points. Moreover, the co-driven case reduces the fossil fuel consumption and the mass flow rate of fresh sorbent and circulation solids compared with coal-driven case. Increasing heat recovery efficiency and CSP efficiency can improve the co-driven case performance. - Highlights: • We examine a CCR process driven by coal and concentrated solar power simultaneously. • The contributors to the overall energy penalty are quantitatively identified. • Obvious coal-saving effect has been found in the co-driven system. • A sensitivity analysis is conducted to find the impact of key parameters

  19. Leaching properties and chemical compositions of calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Paige, B.E.; Rhodes, D.W.; Wilding, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    No significant chemical differences were determined between retrieved and fresh calcine based on chemical and spectrochemical analyses. Little can be derived from the amounts of the radioisotopes present in the retrieved calcine samples other than the ratios of strontium-90 to cesium-137 are typical of aged fission product. The variations in concentrations of radionuclides within the composite samples of each bin also reflect the differences in compositions of waste solutions calcined. In general the leaching characteristics of both calcines by distilled water are similar. In both materials the radionuclides of cesium and strontium were selectively leached at significant rates, although cesium leached much more completely from the alumina calcine than from the zirconia calcine. Cesium and strontium are probably contained in both calcines as nitrate salts and also as fluoride salts in zirconia calcine, all of which are at least slightly soluble in water. Radionuclides of cerium, ruthenium, and plutonium in both calcines were highly resistant to leaching and leached at rates similar to or less than those of the matrix elements. These elements exist as polyvalent metal ions in the waste solutions before calcination and they probably form insoluble oxides and fluorides in the calcine. The relatively slow leaching of nitrate ion from zirconia calcine and radiocesium from both calcines suggests that the calcine matrix in some manner prevents complete or immediate contact of the soluble ions with water. Whether radiostrontium forms slightly fluoride salts or forms nitrate salts which are protected in the same manner as radiocesium is unknown. Nevertheless, selective leaching of cesium and strontim is retarded in some manner by the calcine matrix

  20. Pear distillates from pear juice concentrate: effect of lees in the aromatic composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llobodanin, L; Achaerandio, I; Ferrando, M; Güell, C; López, F

    2007-05-02

    Pear juice obtained from pear concentrate was fermented at room temperature using Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BDX, ENOFERM, France) as the fermentation microorganism. During the fermentation process, total sugars were measured. High performance liquid chromatography analyses were used to monitor the fermentation process and to characterize the pear wine. The pear wine obtained was distilled with its lees using three different equipments: a glass alembic (a glass pot still coupled to a glass column), a copper alembic, and a glass alembic with the addition of 5 g/L of copper shavings to the pot still. The same distillations were repeated with the wine without its lees (separated by decanting). Several distillation fractions were collected, up to a total of 500 mL of distillate. Gas chromatography was used to identify and quantify the volatile compounds in each fraction, and the methanol and ethanol contents. Based on these results, the heart fraction was defined. ANOVA tests were performed on the heart fractions to determine quantitative differences between some volatile compounds depending on the equipment used and the presence or absence of the wine lees. From this series of ANOVA tests, it can be concluded that the concentrations of the compounds that are considered to have a negative effect on the quality of the distillates (methanol, ethyl acetate, furfural) decrease or do not change when they are distilled in the presence of lees and in the copper alembic. In addition, the concentrations of the positive compounds (ethyl decanoate and ethyl-2-trans-4-cis-decadienoate) increase in the presence of lees for all of the equipment tested. So, it can be assumed that the distillation of pear wine with its lees in copper alembic leads to a better quality product.

  1. The Effect of Kaffir Lime Leaves Distillation Residue Oleoresin Concentration on Active Paper Packaging Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawiji; Utami, R.; Ulum, S.; Khasanah, L. U.; Manuhara, G. J.; Atmaka, W.

    2018-03-01

    Oleoresin of kaffir lime leaves distillation residue still contains some active compounds such as Citronellal, β-Citronellol, and Linalool which potential to incorporated on the active paper packaging. The purposes of this study were to determine the effect of kaffir lime leaves distillation residue oleoresin concentration on the physical characteristics, sensory characteristics, and antimicrobial activity of the active paper packaging incorporated with kaffir lime leaves distillation residue oleoresin and to determine the functional groups of active paper packaging. The concentration of kaffir lime leaves distillation residue oleoresin were varied at 0%, 2%, 4% and 6%. The result showed that the addition of kaffir lime leaves distillation residue oleoresin increased the thickness and moisture content of the paper and decreased the tensile strengths and folding endurances of active paper packaging. The microbial inhibition tends to increase along with the higher oleoresin concentration addition. Aromatic CH group were found at a wavelength of 897.90 cm-1 of on paper packaging with 2% oleoresin indicated as functional aromatic functional group allegedly obtained from the kaffir lime leaves oleoresin.

  2. Optimal Operation and Stabilising Control of the Concentric Heat-Integrated Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Skogestad, Sigurd; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2016-01-01

    A systematic control structure design method is applied on the concentric heat integrated distillation column (HIDiC) separating benzene and toluene. A degrees of freedom analysis is provided for identifying potential manipulated and controlled variables. Optimal operation is mapped and active...

  3. Spray calcination of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine; operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of all commercial fuel reprocessor high-level liquid wastes and mixed high and intermediate-level wastes have been demonstrated. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Thus waste generated during plant startup and shutdown can be blended with normal waste and calcined. Spray calcination of ILLW has also been demonstrated. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant scale equipment. The 6 mm (0.25 inch) orifice and ceramic tip offer freedom from plugging and erosion thus nozzle replacement should be required only after several months operation. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h (20 gal/h) has been demonstrated in pilot scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. Since such a small amount of radionuclides escape the calciner the volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. The noncondensable off-gas volume is also low, less than 0.5 m 3 /min (15 scfm) for a liquid feedrate of 75 l/hr (20 gal/hr). Calcine holdup in the calciner is less than 1 kg, thus the liquid feedrate is directly relatable to calcine flowrate. The calcine produced is very fine and reactive. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated wall spray calciner has been demonstrated while processing actual high-level waste. During these operations radionuclide volatilization from the calciner was acceptably low. 8 figures

  4. 2.4. The kinetics of hydrochloric-acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of boron raw material of Ak-Arkhar Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to kinetics of hydrochloric-acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of boron raw material of Ak-Arkhar Deposit. The experimental data of dependence of hydrochloric-acid decomposition of calcined boron raw material for boron oxide extraction on temperature (20-80 deg C) and process duration (15-60 min) were considered. It was defined that at temperature increasing the boron oxide extraction from borosilicate raw material increases from 24.1 till 86.8%. The constants of decomposition rate of boron raw material were calculated.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulations of Concentration and Temperature Polarization in Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jincheng; Tilton, Nils

    2017-11-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is a method of desalination with boundary layers that are challenging to simulate. MD is a thermal process in which warm feed and cool distilled water flow on opposite sides of a hydrophobic membrane. The temperature difference causes water to evaporate from the feed, travel through the membrane, and condense in the distillate. Two challenges to MD are temperature and concentration polarization. Temperature polarization represents a reduction in the transmembrane temperature difference due to heat transfer through the membrane. Concentration polarization describes the accumulation of solutes near the membrane. These phenomena reduce filtration and lead to membrane fouling. They are difficult to simulate due to the coupling between the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields on the membrane. Unsteady regimes are particularly challenging because noise at the outlets can pollute the near-membrane flow fields. We present the development of a finite-volume method for the simulation of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport in MD systems. Using the method, we perform a parametric study of the polarization boundary layers, and show that the concentration boundary layer shows self-similar behavior that satisfies power laws for the downstream growth. Funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

  6. Measurement of the tritium concentration in the fractionated distillate from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Robert; Eddy, Teresa; Kuhne, Wendy; Jannik, Tim; Brandl, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The current study investigates the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process, distinguishing it from and extending previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.04 ± 0.036, 1.05 ± 0.026, and 1.07 ± 0.038, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples where the first 5 mL are discarded, the tritium concentration could be underestimated by 4-7%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A mineralogical investigation of a refractory gold ore, and of a sulphide concentrate and calcined tailing from that ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    This report covers an investigation into the manner of occurrence of gold in an old mine dump of calcined tailings at the Fairview Mine. Previous investigations had not revealed the whereabouts of the gold still present in this dump, which amounts to between 10 and 12p.p.m. In the present investigation, in which heavy-liquid separation was combined with X-ray, microscope, and electron-microprobe investigations, it was found that a significant proportion of the gold is adsorbed on carbon, and that a smaller proportion is present in pyrite that escaped complete calcination. An enigma is the occurrence of ferrosilicon, some of which contains gold. Although this study produced new information, a more detailed quantitative investigation is required in which an image analyser should be used to provide reliable quantitative data

  8. Operation of a 25 kWth Calcium Looping Pilot-plant with High Oxygen Concentrations in the Calciner.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Erans, M.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, 25 OCT (2017), č. článku e56112. ISSN 1940-087X Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2014-00007 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : calcium looping * CO2 capture * oxy- fuel calcination Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuel s Impact factor: 1.232, year: 2016

  9. Water solar distiller productivity enhancement using concentrating solar water heater and phase change material (PCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miqdam T. Chaichan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates usage of thermal energy storage extracted from concentrating solar heater for water distillation. Paraffin wax selected as a suitable phase change material, and it was used for storing thermal energy in two different insulated treasurers. The paraffin wax is receiving hot water from concentrating solar dish. This solar energy stored in PCM as latent heat energy. Solar energy stored in a day time with a large quantity, and some heat retrieved for later use. Water’s temperature measured in a definite interval of time. Four cases were studied: using water as storage material with and without solar tracker. Also, PCM was as thermal storage material with and without solar tracker.The system working time was increased to about 5 h with sun tracker by concentrating dish and adding PCM to the system. The system concentrating efficiency, heating efficiency, and system productivity, has increased by about 64.07%, 112.87%, and 307.54%, respectively. The system working time increased to 3 h when PCM added without sun tracker. Also, the system concentrating efficiency increased by about 50.47%, and the system heating efficiency increased by about 41.63%. Moreover, the system productivity increased by about 180%.

  10. Membrane distillation for wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate treatment with water reuse potential

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-11-29

    Membrane distillation (MD) was evaluated as a treatment option of wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate (WWROC) discharged from wastewater reclamation plants (WRPs). A direct contact MD (DCMD), at obtaining 85% water recovery of WWROC showed only 13–15% flux decline and produced good quality permeate (10–15 µS/cm, 99% ion rejection) at moderate feed temperature of 55 °C. Prevalent calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition on the MD membrane occurred in treating WWROC at elevated concentrations. The combination of low salinity and loose CaCO3 adhesion on the membrane did not significantly contribute to DCMD flux decline. Meanwhile, high organic content in WWROC (58–60 mg/L) resulted in a significant membrane hydrophobicity reduction (70% lower water contact angle than virgin membrane) attributed to low molecular weight organic adhesion onto the MD membrane. Granular activated carbon (GAC) pretreatment helped in reducing organic contents of WWROC by 46–50%, and adsorbed a range of hydrophobic and hydrophilic micropollutants. This ensured high quality water production by MD (micropollutants-free) and enhanced its reuse potential. The MD concentrated WWROC was suitable for selective ion precipitation, promising a near zero liquid discharge in WRPs.

  11. Membrane distillation for wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate treatment with water reuse potential

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri; Jeong, Sanghyun; Choi, Youngkwon; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2016-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) was evaluated as a treatment option of wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate (WWROC) discharged from wastewater reclamation plants (WRPs). A direct contact MD (DCMD), at obtaining 85% water recovery of WWROC showed only 13–15% flux decline and produced good quality permeate (10–15 µS/cm, 99% ion rejection) at moderate feed temperature of 55 °C. Prevalent calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition on the MD membrane occurred in treating WWROC at elevated concentrations. The combination of low salinity and loose CaCO3 adhesion on the membrane did not significantly contribute to DCMD flux decline. Meanwhile, high organic content in WWROC (58–60 mg/L) resulted in a significant membrane hydrophobicity reduction (70% lower water contact angle than virgin membrane) attributed to low molecular weight organic adhesion onto the MD membrane. Granular activated carbon (GAC) pretreatment helped in reducing organic contents of WWROC by 46–50%, and adsorbed a range of hydrophobic and hydrophilic micropollutants. This ensured high quality water production by MD (micropollutants-free) and enhanced its reuse potential. The MD concentrated WWROC was suitable for selective ion precipitation, promising a near zero liquid discharge in WRPs.

  12. Non-thermal Production of Natural betalain Colorant Concentrate from Red Beet Extract by Using the Osmotic Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Amirasgari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Red beet extract concentrate can be used as a natural colorant in food products; however, destructive effects of thermal methods to produce juice concentrate decrease nutritional value in the final product. Materials and Methods: In this study, red beet extract was concentrated using osmotic distillation method, and the best pretreatment was evaluated to increase the efficiency of the concentration process. Also changes in some physicochemical properties such as betacyanins and betaxanthins contents, total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red beet juice were evaluated by both the membrane and thermal concentration methods. Results: The results showed that the best concentration efficiency was obtained after pretreatment of the fresh juice with centrifugation at 1699 G for 17 min. Evaluation of the effect of both the membrane and thermal concentration processes on the physicochemical properties of juice showed that the membrane method did not change betacyanin and betaxanthin contents, total phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity of the red beet extract. However, these properties decreased with the thermal concentration method by 26, 15, 11 and 13%, respectively. Conclusions: According to the results, osmotic distillation can produce red beet concentrate with more nutritional value than the concentrate produced with thermal method. Keywords: Membrane, Natural betalain colorant, Osmotic distillation, Red beet

  13. Calcine production and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, B.R.; Hogg, G.W.; Berreth, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The process technology related to calcination of power reactor wastes is summarized. The primary calcination processes developed are spray calcination, fluidized-bed calcination, and rotary kiln calcination. Calcines from the spray calciner and rotary kiln are fed directly to a glassification process. The fluidized-bed product can either be fed to a waste form conversion process or stored. The major process steps for calcinations are feed preparation, calcination and product handling, and off-gas cleanup. Feed systems for the three processes are basically similar. Gravity flow and pump pressurized systems have been used successfully. The major problems are fatigue failure of feed valve bellows, plugging by undissolved solids, and calibration of flowmeters. Process heat input is by electrical resistance heating for the spray and rotary kiln calciners and in-bed combustion or in-bed heat exchange for the fluidized-bed system. Low-melting solids which can cause scaling or solids agglomeration in any of the processes is a major calcination problem; however, feed blending, process operating conditions, and equipment design have successfully controlled solids agglomeration. Primary off-gas cleanup devices for particulates are cyclones, sintered metal filters, venturi scrubbers, and HEPA filters. Scrubbers, condensers, and solid adsorbents are used successfully for volatile ruthenium removal. The years of pilot-plant and plant-scale calcination testing and operation of the three systems have shown that reactor wastes can be calcined safely and practically. 11 figures, 2 tables

  14. Effect of condensed corn distillers solubles concentration on lactation performance of Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M E; Forbes, S; Moreira, V R; Blouin, D C; Han, K J

    2015-03-01

    Forty-eight Holstein cows (32 multiparous and 16 primiparous) in mid to late lactation averaging 219±71 days in milk and 30.5±6.6 kg/d of 3.5% fat-corrected milk were used in a 56-d completely randomized design experiment to evaluate condensed corn distillers solubles (CCDS) inclusion in high-fiber total mixed rations (TMR). Inclusion rates evaluated were 0, 6.6, 13.2, and 19.8% CCDS as a percentage of dry matter (DM). Distiller solubles substituted for soybean meal, corn grain, and whole cottonseed such that diets were similar in protein (16.6%) and fat (4.50%). Water was added to 0, 6.6, and 13.2% CCDS treatments so that final TMR DM concentrations (47.8%) were similar across diets. The forage portion of the diet was kept constant at 19.6% annual ryegrass hay and 26.0% sorghum baleage. Diet in vitro true digestibility tended to increase as CCDS addition increased, but neutral detergent fiber digestibility trended lower in CCDS diets. Percent P (0.39, 0.55, 0.69, and 0.73%) and S (0.32, 0.35, 0.39, and 0.42%) in TMR increased as CCDS concentration increased. Milk yield (23.5, 24.7, 25.5, and 24.8 kg/d of 3.5% fat-corrected milk) was similar for control and CCDS diets. Milk fat (3.88, 3.73, 3.78, and 3.68%), protein (3.28, 3.27, 3.31, and 3.31%), and lactose (4.61, 4.66, 4.69, and 4.77) percentages were similar across diets. Milk urea nitrogen (16.60, 15.58, 15.43, and 14.75 mg/dL) declined with increasing CCDS addition. Animal activity, body weight, body condition scores, and locomotion scores were not influenced by CCDS. Day 28 poststudy locomotion scores were similar across diets. Ruminal acetate concentrations did not differ among diets, but propionate and butyrate concentrations were elevated in rumen fluid of cows receiving 19.6% CCDS. Although rumen fluid pH values were similar (6.5, 6.4, 6.3, and 6.2), the two highest CCDS diets exhibited depressed acetate:propionate ratios relative to controls. The results from this study indicate that CCDS may be

  15. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO 3 Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90 degrees C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO 4 ) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated

  16. Concentration of phenolic acids and flavonoids in aronia melanocarpa (choke berry) juice by osmotic membrane distillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Christensen, Knud Villy; Horn, Vibeke G

    2009-01-01

    melanocarpa is among the red fruits with the highest content of antioxidants [2] and has gained must interest due to the content of phenolic acids, procyanidins and polyphenolic compounds as anthocyanins [3]. In this study, osmotic membrane distillation (OMD) has been tested for the concentration of not only...... sugars, but in particular potentially bioactive components such as phenolic acids and flavonoids. OMD is carried out on 37 kg aronia juice at 30°C and the juice is concentrated from 12 wt% to 74 wt% dry matter. The juice is filtered to remove kernels, peel residues etc before concentration by OMD...

  17. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO 3 ) 3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines

  18. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  19. Distilling tar; distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brash, P; Young, W

    1866-09-17

    The tarry residue, which separates on treating crude shale oil with sulfuric acid, is redistilled, in the manner described in Specification No. 1278, A.D. 1866, together with shale. Previous to the distillation, the acid is neutralized with lime, or may be separated by blowing steam into the tar and adding salt. The purified tar thus obtained is absorbed by ashes, or is mixed with lime or other alkaline matter, or the shale may be mixed with lime and distilled with the tar, which is allowed to flow over and through the shale during the process. The tar obtained in the purification of natural paraffin may be similarly utilized.

  20. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.; McElroy, J.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form involves calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix

  1. Concentration of paramagnetic centres at low-temperature thermal destruction of asphaltenes of heavy petroleum distillates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolomatov M.U., Rodionov A.A., Gafurov M.R., Petrov A.V., Biktagirov T.B., Bakhtizin R.Z., Makarchikov S.O., Khairudinov I.Z., Orlinskii S.B.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes of paramagnetic centers (PC concentration in dispersed petroleum systems were studied in the process of low-temperature thermolysis. The kinetic model of PC concentration dynamics based on the processes of unpaired electrons formation during singlet-triplet transitions, weak chemical bonds dissociation and recombination of free radicals is proposed.

  2. Fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    A unique way to convert radioactive scrap into useful nuclear fuel products was developed for the Department of Energy at Hanford. An advanced, fluidized bed calciner is used to convert metallic nitrate scrap or waste solutions into benign, solid and gaseous products. There are broad potential applications of this concept beyond those in the nuclear industry

  3. Distillation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecny, C.

    1975-01-01

    Two main methods of separation using the distillation method are given and evaluated, namely evaporation and distillation in carrier gas flow. Two basic apparatus are described for illustrating the methods used. The use of the distillation method in radiochemistry is documented by a number of examples of the separation of elements in elemental state, volatile halogenides and oxides. Tables give a survey of distillation methods used for the separation of the individual elements and give conditions under which this separation takes place. The suitability of the use of distillation methods in radiochemistry is discussed with regard to other separation methods. (L.K.)

  4. Dry distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1939-11-30

    To heat rapidly, and prevent agglutination of carbonaceous material duriing distillation of shale, a furnace of the tunnel type has four compartments (the preheating chamber, the distillation chamber proper, and two cooling chambers). Waggons, which convey the material through the distilling chamber, have perforated bottoms. Above the waggons in the distilling chamber are three heating sections having pipes which pass through the sections and communicate with the distilling chamber. Fans cause the distillation gases to circulate through the material and the pipes. The heating gases from three fire boxes are introduced into the oven, and circulate around pipes and are drawn to the discharge apertures by the fans. The heating gases introduced at two points travel in the direction of the material being treated, while the gases introduced at a third point travel in counter flow thereto. Gas is discharged by two pipes. Trucks carrying treated material are passed to two cooling chambers.

  5. Shale distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanding, F H

    1946-08-29

    A continuous method of distilling shale to produce valuable hydrocarbon oils is described which comprises providing a fluidized mass of the shale in a distillation zone, withdrawing hydrocarbon vapors from the zone, mixing fresh cold shale with the hydrocarbon vapors to quench the same, whereby the fresh shale is preheated, recovering hydrocarbon vapors and product vapors from the mixture and withdrawing preheated shale from the mixture and charging it to a shale distillation zone.

  6. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-07-05

    A process and apparatus for the destructive distillation at low temperature of mineral or organic material particularly oil shale, is given in which the process comprises distilling the material in a horizontal gaseous stream, subjecting the hot residues to the action of a gaseous stream containing a predetermined amount of oxygen so as to burn, at least partly, the carbon-containing substances, and the process uses the gases from this combustion for the indirect heating of the gases serving for the distillation.

  7. Distilling shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyl, G E

    1917-02-06

    The yield of oil obtained by distilling shale is increased by first soaking the shale with about 10 percent of its volume of a liquid hydrocarbon for a period of 24 hours or longer. Distillation is carried on up to a temperature of about 220/sup 0/C., and a further 10 percent of hydrocarbon is then added and the distillation continued up to a temperature of about 400/sup 0/C.

  8. Fouling in Membrane Distillation, Osmotic Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Laqbaqbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Various membrane separation processes are being used for seawater desalination and treatment of wastewaters in order to deal with the worldwide water shortage problem. Different types of membranes of distinct morphologies, structures and physico-chemical characteristics are employed. Among the considered membrane technologies, membrane distillation (MD, osmotic distillation (OD and osmotic membrane distillation (OMD use porous and hydrophobic membranes for production of distilled water and/or concentration of wastewaters for recovery and recycling of valuable compounds. However, the efficiency of these technologies is hampered by fouling phenomena. This refers to the accumulation of organic/inorganic deposits including biological matter on the membrane surface and/or in the membrane pores. Fouling in MD, OD and OMD differs from that observed in electric and pressure-driven membrane processes such electrodialysis (ED, membrane capacitive deionization (MCD, reverse osmosis (RO, nanofiltration (NF, ultrafiltration (UF, microfiltration (MF, etc. Other than pore blockage, fouling in MD, OD and OMD increases the risk of membrane pores wetting and reduces therefore the quantity and quality of the produced water or the concentration efficiency of the process. This review deals with the observed fouling phenomena in MD, OD and OMD. It highlights different detected fouling types (organic fouling, inorganic fouling and biofouling, fouling characterization techniques as well as various methods of fouling reduction including pretreatment, membrane modification, membrane cleaning and antiscalants application.

  9. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, T

    1862-03-03

    Apparatus for the primary distillation of shale or other bituminous minerals in large quantity is constructed as follows:--An annular retort chamber is heated by two or more furnaces, one of which communicates with a central or internal vertical flue, and the others with external or encircling flues preferably disposed in zig-zag, helical or other tortuous course; or the gases pass up the external flues and down the internal flue or flues. The retort chamber may be divided by partitions, or there may be two or more separate chambers disposed concentrically or otherwise with intermediate flues. A pipe or pipes are provided to carry away volatile matters, and valved hoppers are arranged at the top of the retort chamber. The refuse or waste passes off by discharge tubes between the furnaces, and the mouths of these tubes dip into water tanks. The bottom of the retort chamber is funnel-shaped at the discharging points. The apparatus is preferably cylindrical, but may be triangular, square, or polygonal, and may be inclined or horizontal instead of vertical.

  10. Distilling shale and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, H; Young, G

    1923-01-09

    In a process of recovering oil from shale or coal the material is ground and may be subjected to a cleaning or concentrating process of the kind described in Specification 153,663 after which it is distilled in a furnace as described in Specification 13,625/09 the sections of the furnace forming different temperature zones, and the rate of the passage of the material is regulated so that distillation is complete with respect to the temperature of each zone, the whole distillation being accomplished in successive stages. The vapors are taken off at each zone and superheated steam may be passed into the furnace at suitable points and the distillation terminated at any stage of the process.

  11. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  12. Performance and Fouling Study of Asymmetric PVDF Membrane Applied in the Concentration of Organic Fertilizer by Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes using membrane distillation (MD as an alternative to the conventional multi-stage flushing (MSF process to concentrate a semi-product of organic fertilizer. By applying a unique asymmetric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF membrane, which was specifically designed for MD applications using a nonsolvent thermally induced phase separation (NTIPS method, the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD performance was investigated in terms of its sustainability in permeation flux, fouling resistance, and anti-wetting properties. It was found that the permeation flux increased with increasing flow rate, while the top-surface facing feed mode was the preferred orientation to achieve 25% higher flux than the bottom-surface facing feed mode. Compared to the commercial polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membrane, the asymmetric PVDF membrane exhibited excellent anti-fouling and sustainable flux, with less than 8% flux decline in a 15 h continuous operation, i.e., flux decreased slightly and was maintained as high as 74 kg·m−2·h−1 at 70 °C. Meanwhile, the lost flux was easily recovered by clean water rinsing. Overall 2.6 times concentration factor was achieved in 15 h MD operation, with 63.4% water being removed from the fertilizer sample. Further concentration could be achieved to reach the desired industrial standard of 5x concentration factor.

  13. Development and evaluation of alumina calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, I.J.

    2000-01-01

    transformation temperature to α-alumina by approximately 300 deg. C. Other additions had little effect on the transformation temperature although a reduction in grain size was seen with aluminium chloride. It was found that good mixing of the alumina fluoride was essential to obtain reliable and reproducible results. This is due to the small amounts of additive that are needed and the sensitivity of the process to concentration variations. Mineralisation of a range of gibbsites showed that the presence of sodium in the starting material was crucial in reducing the calcination temperature. This led to the conclusion that the sodium and fluoride react to form a liquid phase. The presence of a liquid phase increases the mobility of the aluminium and oxygen atoms resulting in a reduction of the transformation temperature. Fluoride additions to the gibbsites with different morphologies showed that the presence of sodium was the governing factor in reduction of the transformation temperature. Milling of the starting materials showed that there was a small reduction in the transformation temperature between some of the phases. The energy involved in milling leads to activation of the gibbsite. This activation takes the form of a reduction in the grain size and in a reduction of the crystallinity seen in the XRD pattern. Fluoride additions during the calcination of sapphire with a standard gibbsite powder showed preferential grain growth. It was possible to initiate growth of small plate-like crystals on the polished surface of a piece of sapphire parallel to the basal plane. Crystal growth was also seen in scratches on a polished surface perpendicular to the basal plane. (author)

  14. Alternative calcination development status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    The Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel and (INEEL) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, dated June 1, 1995, specifies that high-level waste stored in the underground tanks at the ICPP continue to be calcined while other options to treat the waste are studied. Therefore, the High-Level Waste Program has funded a program to develop new flowsheets to increase the liquid waste processing rate. Simultaneously, a radionuclide separation process, as well as other options, are also being developed, which will be compared to the calcination treatment option. Two alternatives emerged as viable candidates; (1) elevated temperature calcination (also referred to as high temperature calcination), and (2) sugar-additive calcination. Both alternatives were determined to be viable through testing performed in a lab-scale calcination mockup. Subsequently, 10-cm Calciner Pilot Plant scoping tests were successfully completed for both flowsheets. The results were compared to the standard 500 C, high-ANN flow sheet (baseline flowsheet). The product and effluent streams were characterized to help elucidate the process chemistry and to investigate potential environmental permitting issues. Several supplementary tests were conducted to gain a better understanding of fine-particles generation, calcine hydration, scrub foaming, feed makeup procedures, sugar/organic elimination, and safety-related issues. Many of the experiments are only considered to be scoping tests, and follow-up experiments will be required to establish a more definitive understanding of the flowsheets. However, the combined results support the general conclusion that flowsheet improvements for the NWCF are technically viable

  15. Shale distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanding, F H

    1948-08-03

    A continuous method of distilling shale to produce valuable hydrocarbon oils is described, which comprises providing a fluidized mass of the shale in a distillation zone, withdrawing hydrocarbon vapors containing shale fines from the zone, mixing sufficient fresh cold shale with the hydrocarbon vapors to quench the same and to cause condensation of the higher boiling constituents thereof, charging the mixture of vapors, condensate, and cold shale to a separation zone where the shale is maintained in a fluidized condition by the upward movement of the hydrocarbon vapors, withdrawing condensate from the separation zone and recycling a portion of the condensate to the top of the separation zone where it flows countercurrent to the vapors passing therethrough and causes shale fines to be removed from the vapors by the scrubbing action of the condensate, recovering hydrocarbon vapors and product vapors from the separation zone, withdrawing preheated shale from the separation zone and charging it to a shale distillation zone.

  16. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, T

    1863-09-14

    Shales and other bituminous minerals are distilled in horizontal retorts arranged side by side and with furnaces beneath their front ends. The furnace gases pass, preferably through a brickwork grating, into spaces between the retorts and beneath a horizontal partition towards the back ends. They return above the partition to the front of the retorts, and finally enter a horizontal flue leading to a chimney. The front end of each retort is fitted with a hopper for charging and with a door for discharging. The products of distillation pass through perforated partitions inside the retorts and are conveyed away by pipes at the back.

  17. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, R

    1884-04-04

    In obtaining paraffin by distillation of shales, etc., containing sulfur, the steam used for heating is charged with ammonia or ammonium carbonate in suspension. This prevents the sulfur from decomposing the paraffin. The ammonia, etc., may also be used alone or in solution in water.

  18. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, C A

    1906-05-22

    The invention relates to an apparatus in which the destructive distillation or coking of coal, peat, shale, etc., is carried out by means of a current of hot gases at a temperature of 700--800/sup 0/F., as described in Specification No. 11,925, A.D. 1906.

  19. Fixation of calcined waste by bituminization or cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Kyrs, M.; Ditl, P.

    1983-01-01

    The overall concept is given of the combination of calcination with fixation into bitumen, cement etc. The design is shown of a calciner with the capacity of 10 L/h which was tested on real radioactive wastes for 2000 h. The geometrical and operating parameters of the apparatus have been optimized based on a statistical evaluation of the experiments. Wastes containing nitrates are calcined at 300-550 deg. C, yielding oxides. Wastes containing sulphates, carbonates, KMnO 4 , or borates are calcined at 150-330 deg. C, yielding soluble salts. The content of H 3 BO 4 and Na 2 B 4 O 7 and in some cases of sulphates in the calcinate retards hardening of the mixture with cement. Nitrates and detergents also interfere. The effect of the above components on the products mixed with bitumen is much less. Detergents can be decomposed at 200-300 deg. C; organic acids can be reacted with A1 salts to form insoluble substances lowering the leaching rate of Sr and Cs; small amounts of SiO 2 eliminate the effect of borates on cement hardening. The drawbacks of bituminization with bitumen emulsions are the complicated preparation of the emulsion, higher leaching rate of the product and low stability of the emulsion against breaking. The leachability was determined (1-50 days) of different products containing LWR wastes: 33% of concentrated waste in cement of calcination product stabilized with PVA exhibit approx. 8x10 - 3 g/cm 2 per day, 33% of calcine in cement approx. 3x10 - 3 ; 40% concentrate fixed with bitumen emulsion approx. 9x10 - 4 ; 50% calcine stabilized with PVA in bitumen, pilot-plant scale approx. 2x10 - 5 ; the same but on a laboratory scale approx. 1.10 - 5 . (author)

  20. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, A; Renfrewshire, I; Black, W

    1889-06-14

    The invention relates to a method of, and apparatus for, distilling shale, coal, or other oil or tar-yielding minerals, to obtain gases, liquids, or other products. The distillation is effected in vertical retorts by the combustion of the partially spent material in the lower part of the retorts, to which steam and air are admitted. The retorts are built of firebrick, and provided with iron casings. They are fed through hoppers and discharged through the openings. The discharging is facilitated by a cone, or its equivalent, in the base of each retort. Steam and air are admitted through the pipes. The interior may be viewed through holes. The products are taken off from the space around the hopper.

  1. Distilling shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, J; Armour, H

    1889-05-07

    The invention relates to retorts and accessory apparatus for distilling shale or other oil-yielding minerals. A series of long vertical retorts, composed of fire-brick or similar refractory material, are arranged in two rows in a bench, being divided into groups of four by transverse vertical partitions. The retorts are surmounted by metal casings or hoppers into which the fresh mineral is charged, and from which the distillate passes off through lateral pipes. Any uncondensed gases from the retorts may be passed into the flues surrounding them by the pipe and burned. The products of combustion from a furnace pass through a series of horizontal flues, being compelled to pass completely round each retort before entering the flue above. The products from two or more sets pass from the upper flues into flues running along the top of the bench, and return through a central flue to the chimney.

  2. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquhart, D

    1882-08-19

    Manufacture of ammonia and purification of shale oils are described. In the distillation of shales, increase of ammonia is obtained and the oils are less contaminated by sulfur, by mixing a small proportion, about two to three percent, of lime or slaked line with the shale. The same process is used with other carbonaceous substances containing nitrogen, such as peat, coal, or the like; but a smaller proportion of lime is used than in the former case, and the lime is slaked with caustic soda solution. When slack or waste coal or other carbonaceous substances are distilled by heated air or gases arising from imperfect combustion, as in furnaces on the gas producer principle, slaked lime is added to the slack or other material.

  3. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosden, S; Cosden, J S

    1937-09-08

    A means and process are described for the destructive distillation of solid carbonaceous materials in which the process comprises charging the material, in a finely divided condition into a stream of hot combustion gases, and allows the hot gases to act pyrolytically on the organic compounds contained in the material, separating the volatile liberated constituents from residuary constituents. Hot reaction gases are generated by fuel ignition means in a generator and are immediately intermingled with comminuted carbonaceous material from a hopper, in a narrow conduit. The mixture of material and reaction fluid is then passed through an elongated confined path, which is exteriorly heated by the combustion chamber of the furnace, where the destructive distillation is effected. Volatile and solid constituents are separated in the chamber, and the volatile constituents are fractionated and condensed.

  4. Distilling oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leffer, L G

    1912-01-29

    In a process for converting heavy hydrocarbons, such as petroleum or shale oil, into light hydrocarbons by distilling under the pressure of an inert gas, the operation is conducted at a temperature not exceeding 410/sup 0/C and under an accurately regulated pressure, the gas being circulated through the still and the condenser by means of a pump. The oil in the still may be agitated by stirring vanes or by blowing the gas through it. Hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, or gases generated in the distillation may be used as pressure media; the gas is heated before its admission to the still. A pressure of from 11 to 12 atmospheres is used in treating gas oil. Specification 10,277/89 is referred to.

  5. Distilling shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, L

    1922-07-21

    In the distillation of shale and similar materials the shale is ground and briquetted and the briquettes are placed in a retort so that air passages are left between them, after which they are uniformly and slowly heated to at least 700/sup 0/C, the air passages facilitating the escape of the oil vapors, and the slow heating preventing fusion of the flux forming constituents. After the bitumen has been driven off, air is passed into the retort and heating continued to about 1050/sup 0/C, the result being a porous product suitable for insulating purposes or as a substitute for kieselguhr. The ground shale may be mixed prior to distillation with peat, sawdust, or the like, and with substances which yield acids, such as chlorides, more particularly magnesium chloride, the acids acting on the bitumen.

  6. Distilling coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blythe, F C

    1914-09-14

    In the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, heavy hydrocarbon oil, such as petroleum, kerosine, shale oil, and heavy tar oil, obtained in some cases during the process, is added to the coal, which is then distilled under pressure and at a comparatively low temperature regulated so as to produce a large proportion of hydrocarbon oils and a small proportion of permanent gas. In one method, about 5 to 10 parts of hydrocarbon oil are mixed with 100 parts of crushed or ground coal, and the mixture is heated in a closed vessel, provided in some cases with an agitator, under a pressure of about 60 lb/in/sup 2/, and the temperature may be gradually raised to 350/sup 0/C and then to about 500/sup 0/C. The heating may be by means of superheated steam with or without external heat.

  7. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J M

    1884-06-03

    The invention relates to retorts for the destructive distillation of shale, dross, and other carbonaceous or oleaginous materials, and for the distillation and carbonization of sawdust, shavings, tan bark, and the like. The material is fed from a trapped hopper on a series of trays or casings of cast iron or other material, separated by flue spaces and arranged in a tier round a vertical rotating shaft passing through tubular pieces cast on the casings. The shaft is fitted with arms which carry stirring-blades so disposed that the material is shifted from side to side and slowly fed towards the ducts through which it passes to the casing next below, and is finally withdrawn from the apparatus by a pipe, which may be trapped or otherwise. Furnace gases are admitted through openings in the enclosing brickwork having settings to support the casings, the lowermost of which may be fitted below the inlet for furnace gases and their contents cooled by the circulation of cold water round them. The gaseous or volatile products of distillation pass to a condenser by means of openings and the pipe, which may be formed in sections to obtain access to the casings, or doors may be provided for this purpose. The ducts may be arranged alternately at the edge and center of the casings, which may be jacketed, and heated air or steam may be employed instead of furnace gases. Means may also be provided for admitting superheated steam into one or more of the casings.

  8. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W

    1877-03-29

    The method consists in agitating or circulating the distillation products inside the retort by means of jets of gas, steam, or vapor, or by means of reciprocating pistons; condensing certain of the heavy hydrocarbons; sealing or luting the doors of retorts or distilling-vessels; and conducting the distillation for the manufacture of oil so that the charging or discharging doors may be fitted with self-sealing lids. Several arrangements are shown and described; a single horizontal retort is divided into two compartments by a perforated plate which supports the coal, shale, or other bituminous substance, beneath which a piston is reciprocated or a jet of steam, gas, or vapor injected; a vertical retort is fitted with a central tube into which steam, gas, or vapor is injected, or it may be divided into two compartments and the jet injected into one of these; a pair of vertical retorts are connected by a horizontal passage at the top and bottom, and into the upper one steam, gas, or vapor is injected, or the lower one is fitted with a piston.

  9. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, A V

    1856-04-22

    In order to obtain, at the first distillation, from coal, shale, and bituminous substances an oil sufficiently pure for illuminating and other purposes, the material broken into very small pieces and placed on the bottom of the retort, is evenly covered with common sand, about four times greater in weight than the weight of the coal. The coal and sand are then gradually raised to a temperature of 212/sup 0/F. Steam containing carbonaceous impurities first passes to the condenser, and subsequently oil, which rises to the surface of the water in the receiving-vessel. When some bituminous substances are employed, the temperature, after oil ceases to come over, may be gradually raised until the oil produced ceases to be pure. Most kinds of clay and earth, chalk, gypsum, black oxide of manganese, plumbago, or charcoal may be used separately, in combination, or with added chemicals, instead of sand as the medium for filtering the gas or vapor from which the oil is formed. Either the oil obtained by the first distillation or oils obtained by other means may be rectified by distilling with sand.

  10. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1915-07-03

    Oils are extracted from coal, lignite, shale, boghead, butumen, asphalt, tar, pitch, etc., by distillation at a low temperature, which may be 300 to 425/sup 0/CC, solvent oils or vapors being circulated during the heating which may be conducted with or without increased or reduced pressure. The solvent oils and the extracted oils are recovered in condensers, etc., last traces being expelled from the material by a current of water vapor. The uncondensed gases may be used for heating, and the solid residue may be used for the production of gas and coke, or may be briquetted.

  11. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dow, P

    1884-09-11

    The invention has for its object to regulate the temperature at any point of vertical retorts in which steam or steam and air are employed for the distillation of shale, coal, and other substances. Vertical steam pipes at the exterior of each retort and connected with main pipes have a series of branches at different levels and furnished with regulating-valves or cocks. The admission of air is similarly regulated and spy-holes with shutters blocked or sealed against the escape of such products by the fuel intake at one end of the conduit and the congested masses of coke discharged at the other.

  12. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennie, G

    1875-11-12

    For distilling shale, or other oil-yielding minerals, two or more, preferably four, vertical retorts are mounted in a brickwork oven and are heated in the first place by coal, coke or other fuel on a grate. The spent material from the retorts is discharged from one or more in turn on to the grate and is used, together with additional fuel if necessary, to maintain the heat of the retorts. The retorts are charged by means of hoppers and lids and are discharged by means of movable bottoms actuated by rods and levers acting in combination with outlet valves. The retorts are tapered from the bottom upwards.

  13. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W; Brash, P

    1866-05-04

    In the distillation of oil from coal, shale, etc., hydrocarbon vapors which are condensed only with difficulty, and are of small value, are reheated and sent back into the retorts. A jet of steam, or a forcing or exhausting apparatus, may be used for this purpose, and the vapors are passed under false bottoms with which the retorts are preferably provided. In the rectification of the oils, a producer known as still bottoms results which, when redistilled, gives rise to vapors condensable only with difficulty. These vapors may be passed back into the still, or may be mixed and heated, in a separate vessel, with the vapors coming from the still.

  14. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medlrum, E

    1869-02-06

    The invention relates to the decomposition of the liquids with high boiling points, and the solids with low melting points, left in the purification of paraffin oil obtained from coal or shale. The liquids or melted solids, or their vapors, are passed through a heated iron tube or retort and c., which may be packed with broken stones, spent shale, and c. The temperature is regulated between 700/sup 0/F and a low red heat. The condensed products consist of a mixture of light and heavy oils, which may be separated by distillation. The heavier residues may be again passed through the decomposing apparatus.

  15. Distilling hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataafsche, N V; de Brey, J H.C.

    1918-10-30

    Hydrocarbons containing a very volatile constituent and less volatile constituents, such as casing-head gases, still gases from the distillation of crude petroleum and bituminous shale are separated into their constituents by rectification under pressure; a pressure of 20 atmospheres and limiting temperatures of 150/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C are mentioned as suitable. The mixture may be subjected to a preliminary treatment consisting in heating to a temperature below the maximum rectification temperature at a pressure greater than that proposed to be used in the rectification.

  16. In vitro studies evaluating leaching of mercury from mine waste calcine using simulated human body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almadén, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute primary ore or compounds formed during Hg retorting. Elevated leachate Hg concentrations were found during calcine leaching using a simulated gastric fluid (as much as 6200 μg of Hg leached/g sample). Elevated Hg concentrations were also found in calcine leachates using a simulated lung fluid (as much as 9200 μg of Hg leached/g), serum-based fluid (as much as 1600 μg of Hg leached/g), and water of pH 5 (as much as 880 μg of Hg leached/g). The leaching capacity of Hg is controlled by calcine mineralogy; thus, calcines containing soluble Hg compounds contain higher leachate Hg concentrations. Results indicate that ingestion or inhalation of Hg mine-waste calcine may lead to increased Hg concentrations in the human body, especially through the ingestion pathway.

  17. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H; Laing, B

    1927-12-23

    Oil bearing solids such as coal, tar sands, oil shales, or the like, are distilled in a current of hot gas and are first preheated to a temperature above that at which the heaviest oil fractions in the vapors are liable to condense, for example 100 to 250/sup 0/C, according to the volume of gas passing through the retort, temperature being in inverse proportion to the quantity of oxygen containing constituents in the charge. When the distillation takes place in a controlled volume of hot inert gas of 45,000 cubic feet per ton and the volume of oil recovered is about 20 gallons per ton, the material is preheated to 200 to 250/sup 0/C, when the volume of gas used is 100,000 cubic feet the preheating temperature is 150/sup 0/C. The temperatures of the retort dust extractor etc. do not fall below 100 to 150/sup 0/C until actual condensation of the oil vapor is desired. Specification 287,381 is referred to, and Specification 287,037 also is referred to in the Provisional Specification.

  18. Shale distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacomini, V V

    1938-06-07

    To produce valuable oils from shale by continuous distillation it is preheated by a heated fluid and introduced into a distilling retort from which the oil vapours and spent material are separately removed and the vapours condensed to recover the oil. The shale is preheated to 400 to 500/sup 0/F in the hopper by combustion gases from a flue and is fed in measured quantities to a surge drum, a loading chamber and surge drum, the latter two being connected to a steam pipe which equalises the pressure thereon. The material passes by two screw conveyors to a retort with deflector bars to scatter the material so that lean hot cycling gas flowing through a pipe is spread out as it makes its way upwardly through the shale and heats the oil so that it is driven off as vapour, collected in the lean gas and carried off through an outlet pipe. A measuring valve is provided at the bottom of a retort and cutter knives cut the spent shale and distribute cooling water thereto. The gases travel through heat exchangers and a condenser to an accumulator where the cycling gas is separated from the vapours, passed to compression, and preheated in a gas exchanger and spiral coils before it is returned to the retort. The oil passes to a storage tank by way of a unit tank in which oil vapours are recovered. Water is collected by a pipe in the tank bottom and returned by shaft to a retort.

  19. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W

    1881-04-12

    Destructive distillation of shale for the manufacture of mineral oil and ammonia is described. The retorts are arranged in benches, each retort being placed over its own combustion chamber into which the spent shale is discharged and consumed in heating the next charge as described in Specification No. 1578, A. D. 1880. Two forms of retorts are shown, each consisting of two retorts placed above and communicating with one another, the upper being employed to distill the oil at a low red heat, and the lower to eliminate the nitrogen in the form of ammonia at a much higher temperature. The retorts are divided by a sliding damper and have an outlet for the passage of the products placed at the junction. The retorts have an outlet at the top for the escape of the products. Each retort has an opening closed by a cover for charging and a door for discharging. The products of combustion from the combustion chambers pass through ports to a chamber surrounding the lower retorts and thence through ports in the division wall controlled by dampers into the chamber surrounding the upper retorts, whence they pass through flues to the chimney. Around the bottom of each retort are openings communicating with a chamber to which steam is admitted through a valve from a pipe preferably placed in a coil in the flue.

  20. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrom, W A; Bennett, J A.B.

    1884-02-22

    Effecting the separation of the various products of the distillation of coal, shale, etc., by taking advantage of the graduated temperature of successive portions of the length of mechanical retorts is described. The substances entering from the hopper are gradually heated in their progress and give off a series of products in their order of volatilization, which pass from openings in the retort through a series of ascension pipes into collecting-vessels. The vessels are designed to contain different portions of the distillate and are sealed against the escape of uncondensed vapor or gas by the condensed liquid. Each of the ascension pipes communicates above its vessel with a common pipe to convey away permanent gases. The flues for heating the retort may be so arranged as to give the greatest heat at the end farthest from the point of entrance, or the stages of heat may be self-regulated by the time necessary for the material to acquire heat as it travels. If necessary the pipes may be fitted with refrigerating-appliances.

  1. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitting, E K

    1882-08-09

    The broken-up shale is placed in cast-iron retorts, heated externally, having exit tubes placed at a low level. Each retort is provided with a steam-pipe with a regulating-cock outside, the pipe being carried around the walls of the retort in a spiral or zig-zag way to ensure superheating of the steam, perforations being made in the pipe to allow exit for the steam into the retort. The steam, which may if desired be superheated before entrance, is passed into the retort when the latter has attained a temperature of from 210 to 250/sup 0/C and the passage is continued while the temperature rises, as long as distillation goes on. The exit pipe to the retort leads to a condenser of much condensing-surface, provided with a drag obtained by an exhausting steam jet or otherwise. The distilled products consist of tar, oils, wax, ammoniacal water (stated to be in greater proportion through the use of the process), and lighting and heating gas. The latter gas goes through a scrubber to a gasholder. The carbonaceous residue in the retort is discharged when cooled below a red heat, into sheet-iron cylinders, with tightly fitting lids, to avoid as far as possible contact with the atmosphere.

  2. New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm

  3. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennent, R B

    1886-12-02

    The invention has reference to an improved construction or mode of building, arranging, and combining the parts of gas-heated retorts for the distillation of shale and other minerals, which by the improved mode and means comprised therein of heating the retorts by the gases, combined with highly heated air and the use of superheated steam in the retorts, and the utilization of the heat of the escaping waste gases for the superheating of the steam, and the raising of steam in boilers for motive power and other purposes. The retorts are erected in transverse pairs, each retort having its surrounding flame flues heating the air for each pair and with steam superheating chambers and pipes between for each pair heated by the escaping gases from the retorts.

  4. Destructive, distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, J

    1882-10-23

    The apparatus employed resembles a reverberatory furnace, having a brickwork chamber with pipes or passages leading from the bottom, through which gases and vapors, arising from destructive distillation or heating of the materials with which the chamber is charged to a certain depth, are drawn by suction produced by a fan or blower. The materials are heated from above by firegates admitted from a separate furnace or fireplace. When shale is thus treated, to obtain burning gas, oil, and ammonia, the suction may be so regulated as to give preponderance to whichever product is desired, the depth of material treated being also concerned in the result. The process is applicable also in the treatment of coal pit refuse, sawdust, peat, and other matters, to obtain volatile products; in burning limestone to obtain carbon dioxide; and in roasting ores. Reference is made to a former Specification for coking coal, No. 1947, A. D. 1882.

  5. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, A

    1863-11-12

    To obtain hydrocarbons, coal, shale, or other bituminous substance is distilled in an annular retort. The outer surface is heated by an arrangement of furnaces and flues, and the inner surface has a number of small openings through which the evolved hydrocarbons pass. The inner chamber is cooled by cold air or water pipes to condense the hydrocarbon which is then run off to purifying-apparatus. In a modification, the retort is heated from the inside, the hydrocarbon being condensed in an outer case. Another form of retort consists of a narrow flat chamber, heated from one side and with a cooled condensing-chamber on the other; or two retorts may be used, with one condensing-chamber between them.

  6. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinjes, J F

    1867-03-12

    The invention relates to means for conveying the material through rotary retorts for distilling shale or the like. The retort is fitted with longitudinal ribs which lift the material and allow it to fall again as the retort rotates. Inclined deflecting plates attached to a fixed shaft cause the material as it falls to be gradually fed towards the discharge end of the retort. By means of the handle, which can be fixed in angular position by a pin entering holes in a quadrant, the angle of the plates may be adjusted and the rate of feed may be thus regulated. Or the plates may be hinged on the shaft or to the inside of the retort, and the angle is then adjusted by a longitudinal rod moved by a handwheel and nut. A similar arrangement may be applied to retorts with an oscillating motion.

  7. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, H; McAlley, R

    1871-05-18

    Shale or clay is coked or carbonized by the action of heat in retorts in the same way that coal is coked or by any of the methods used for coking or carbonizing coal, ironstone, or wood. Clay or shale, which is poor in carbon, is mixed or ground with coal, moss, peat, or earth mold, oil, tar, or other carbonaceous matter, shale, or the coke of certain kinds of coal after having been used in the manufacture of gas or oil by distillation. The mixture is coked or carbonized or the coke may be used alone and submitted to further coking or carbonization. The volatile hydrocarbons may be used in carbonizing or assisting to carbonize the shale by being burned beneath the retorts or they may be condensed along with sulfur, ammonia, etc., and kept for after use.

  8. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenshields, J

    1870-01-13

    In distilling shale or other carbonaceous substances to obtain oil, paraffin, ammonium salts, etc., sulfuric or other acid is added to the material, in the still or before treatment. The shale is first reduced to a fine powder. Acid tar from the treatment of oils may be used instead of acid. Hydrogen is sometimes passed into the still, or iron or other metal is mixed with the shale to generate hydrogen in the still. A figure is included which shows the condenser for paraffin and heavy oils, consisting of an iron cylinder connected with the still by a short pipe and surmounted by a long pipe communicating with other condensers. The pipe projects into the cylinder and perforated plates or baffles are fixed across the central portion of the cylinder. The condensed oils are drawn off by a pipe.

  9. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, G

    1865-05-16

    A retort for the destructive distillation of coal, shale, whereby hydrocarbons are produced, is described. The vertical retort is provided with a charging door, a discharging door, an outlet leading to the condensing plant, an inclined bottom, and a perforated cage to facilitate the escape of the vapor and to regulate the amount of materials operated upon in the retort. The upper part of the cage is conical to deflect the materials fed in by the door and the lower part is also slightly conical to facilitate emptying the retort. The bottom may incline from both back and front, and also from the sides to the center. The apparatus is heated from below, and the flues pass all round the lower part of the retort.

  10. Fluidized-bed calcination of simulated commercial high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeby, W.A.

    1975-11-01

    Work is in progress at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to verify process flowsheets for converting simulated commercial high-level liquid wastes to granular solids using the fluidized-bed calcination process. Primary emphasis in the series of runs reported was to define flowsheets for calcining simulated Allied-General Nuclear Services (AGNS) waste and to evaluate product properties significant to calcination, solids storage, or post treatment. Pilot-plant studies using simulated high-level acid wastes representative of those to be produced by Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) are also included. Combined AGNS high-level and intermediate-level waste (0.26 M Na in blend) was successfully calcined when powdered iron was added (to result in a Na/Fe mole ratio of 1.0) to the feed to prevent particle agglomeration due to sodium nitrate. Long-term runs (approximately 100 hours) showed that calcination of the combined waste is practical. Concentrated AGNS waste containing sodium at concentrations less than 0.2 M were calcined successfully; concentrated waste containing 1.13 M Na calcined successfully when powdered iron was added to the feed to suppress sodium nitrate formation. Calcination of dilute AGNS waste by conventional fluid-bed techniques was unsuccessful due to the inability to control bed particle size--both particle size and bed level decreased. Fluid-bed solidification of AGNS dilute waste at conditions in which most of the calcined solids left the calciner vessel with the off-gas was successful. In such a concept, the steady-state composition of the bed material would be approximately 22 wt percent calcined solids deposited on inert particles. Calcination of simulated NFS acid waste indicated that solidification by the fluid-bed process is feasible

  11. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W; Neilson, A; Young, A

    1876-10-09

    The invention relates to modifications of the retort apparatus, described in Specification No. 2487, A.D. 1872, for the destructive distillation of shale and other bituminous substances. The retorts instead of being worked continuously are completely filled and completely discharged in turn. They are made oblong in cross-section in order to present the material in thin layers and cause it to be acted upon more rapidly and economically. The retorts can thus be heated solely by the combustion of the carbonaceus matter contained in the discharged residues or with a small amount of coal in addition. Each retort is contracted at the bottom and is fitted with a box or chest having a hole in it corresponding to the opening in the retort and a sliding plate of iron, firebrick, or other suitable material, which can be operated by a rod passing through the front of the box, for opening or closing the retort. Underneath the box and over the combustion chamber are placed fireclay blocks leaving an opening, which can be closed by another plate of firebrick or the like. When distillation commences, the gases and vapors in the retort are drawn off through a pipe and a main by an exhauster. In order to prevent air from entering the retort or hydrocarbon vapor from being puffed back by the action of the wind, the gas which remains after the condensation of the oils is forced back into the box between the plates and part of it enters the retort and part the combustion chamber. In order to avoid the liability of the oil being carried past the condensers by the action of the gas, steam may be used as a substitute for the gas or mixed with it in large proportions, a steam jet being used to force the gas into the main supplying the boxes.

  12. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W

    1875-09-07

    The invention relates to apparatus for absorbing and recovering volatile hydrocarbons from gases resulting from the distillation of coal, shale, and the like for the production of mineral oil, or from the coking of coal, charring of wood, and like operations. The apparatus is adapted for the repeated use of the same quantity of absorbent. The gases are passed by pipes through a coke tower down which is allowed to flow a stream of mineral oil or a fatty oil such as rape, olive, lard, tallow, and fish oils. The oil is supplied by a pipe and distributed by a plate which is held up against the opening of the pipe by a spring. The oil absorbs the volatile hydrocarbons contained in the gas and is drawn off by a pipe and passed through a tubular heat-exchanging apparatus, and thence by a pipe to a still formed at the bottom of the coke tower and constructed with a number of trays on the principle of the coffey still. The still is heated by a fire or by admitting the exhaust steam from an engine driving a fan, which draws the gases through the coke tower. The stream is admitted by a pipe and distributed by a perforated disk. Live steam may also be admitted if necessary by a pipe. The volatile oils are distilled off through a pipe to a coil condenser, and flow thence into a tank for separating any condensed water. This tank is covered preferably by a glass plate to allow inspection. The oil remaining in the still flows by a pipe to the heat-exchanger, in which it gives up heat to the oil flowing from the coke tower. It then flows by a pipe through a tubular cooler, cooled by water circulation, and thence to a store tank from which it is again pumped to the top of the coke tower.

  13. Low-temperature thermal decomposition of heavy petroleum distillates: interconnection between the electrical properties and concentration of paramagnetic centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolomatov, M.; Gafurov, M.; Rodionov, A.; Mamin, G.; González, L. Miquel; Vakhin, A.; Petrov, A.; Bakhtizin, R.; Khairudinov, I.; Orlinskii, S.

    2018-05-01

    Changes of paramagnetic centers (PC) concentration in petroleum dispersed systems (PDS) are studied in the process of low-temperature thermolysis. Complex investigation of physicochemical, rheological and electrophysical properties of high-boiling oil fractions is performed. Based on the analysis of the experimental results it can be concluded that the PDS under investigation can be regarded as amorphous broadband organic semiconductors for which PC plays a role of dopant. It shows the perspectives of the asphaltenes usage as a basis for the photovoltaic devices.

  14. Summary of Waste Calcination at INTEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Barry Henry; Newby, Bill Joe

    2000-10-01

    Fluidized-bed calcination at the Idaho Nuclear Technologies and Engineering Center (INTEC, formally called the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been used to solidify acidic metal nitrate fuel reprocessing and incidental wastes wastes since 1961. A summary of waste calcination in full-scale and pilot plant calciners has been compiled for future reference. It contains feed compositions and operating conditions for all the processing campaigns for the original Waste Calcining Facility (WCF), the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) started up in 1982, and numerous small scale pilot plant tests for various feed types. This summary provides a historical record of calcination at INTEC, and will be useful for evaluating calcinability of future wastes.

  15. The use of artificial neural network modeling to represent the process of concentration by molecular distillation of omega-3 from squid oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi, P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of omega-3 compounds obtained for the esterification of squid oil by molecular distillation was carried out in two stages. This operation can process these thermolabile and high molecular weight components at very low temperatures. Given the mathematical complexity of the theoretical model, artificial neural networks (ANN have provided an alternative to a classical computing analysis. The objective of this study was to create a predictive model using artificial neural network techniques to represent the concentration process of omega-3 compounds obtained from squid oil using molecular distillation. Another objective of this study was to analyze the performance of two different alternatives of ANN modeling; one of them is a model that represents all variables in the process and the other is a global model that simulates only the input and output variables of the process. The alternative of the ANN global model showed the best fit to the experimental data.La concentración de compuestos omega-3, obtenidos de la esterificación de aceite de calamar, por destilación molecular fue llevada a cabo en dos etapas. Esta operación permite procesar componentes termolábiles y de alto peso molecular a muy bajas temperaturas. Dada la alta complejidad de los modelos teóricos, las redes neuronales artificiales (RNA conforman una alternativa al análisis computacional clásico. El objetivo de este estudio fue crear un modelo predictivo usando modelos de redes neuronales artificiales para representar el proceso de concentración de compuestos omega-3 obtenidos del aceite de calamar por destilación molecular. Otro objetivo de este estudio fue analizar el desenvolvimiento de dos alternativas de modelos RNA; uno de ellos es un modelo que representa todas las variables en el proceso y otro es un modelo global que simula solo las variables de entrada y de salida del proceso. La alternativa de un modelo RNA global mostró el mejor ajuste de los

  16. Distilling shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justice, P M

    1917-09-19

    Light paraffin oils and other oils for motors are obtained from shale, and benzene, toluene, and solvent naphtha are obtained from coal by a process in which the coal or shale is preferably powered to pass through a mesh of 64 to the inch and is heated with a mixture of finely ground carbonate or the like which under the action of heat gives off carbonic acid, and with small iron scrap or its equivalent which is adapted to increase the volume of hydrocarbons evolved. The temperature of the retort is maintained between 175 and 800/sup 0/C., and after all the vapors are given off at the higher temperature a fine jet of water may be injected into the retort and the temperature increased. The produced oil is condensed and purified by fractional distillation, and the gas formed is stored after passing it through a tower packed with coke saturated with a non-volatile oil with recovery of an oil of light specific gravity which is condensed in the tower. The residuum from the still in which the produced oil is fractionated may be treated with carbonate and iron, as in the first stage of the process, and the distillate therefrom passed to a second retort containing manganese dioxide and iron scrap preferably in the proportion of one part or two. The mixture, e.g., one containing shale or oil with six to thirteen percent of oxygen, to which is added three to eight per cent of carbonate, and from one and a half to four per cent of scrap iron, is conveyed by belts and an overhead skip to a hopper of a retort in a furnace heated by burners supplied with producer gas. The retort is fitted with a detachable lid and the vapors formed are led by a pipe to a vertical water-cooled condenser with a drain-cock which leads the condensed oils to a tank, from which a pipe leads to a packed tower for removing light oils and from which the gas passes to a holder.

  17. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval from Binsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Lee Orville; Mohr, Charles Milton; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak concentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  18. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W; Fyfe, J

    1897-06-03

    Improvements in retorts of the class described in Specification No. 1377, A. D. 1882, for the destructive distillation of shale are disclosed. The retorts are provided with enlarged multiple hoppers for the reception of the fresh shale, and with enlarged chambers for the reception of the exhausted shale. The hoppers are built up of steel plates, and are bolted at the bottom to flanges on the upper ends of the retorts so as to permit of differential expansion. The shale is fed continuously into the retorts by rods or chains carried by a rocking shaft, or by a slit tube attached to a rocking shaft, and in connection with the hydraulic main. The spent shale is discharged into the receiving chambers by means of a series of prongs extending through a grating and carried by a rocking shaft actuated by levers engaging with reciprocating bars. In an alternative arrangement, the pronged rocking shafts are replaced by worms or screws formed into one half with a right-hand thread and the other half with a left-hand thread.

  19. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinjes, J F

    1866-03-13

    Continuous distillation of shale, boghead coal, or other noncaking bituminous material is effected in one or more rotating or oscillating horizontal retorts constructed to advance the charge. In the former case, internal spiral ribs or projections are provided. In the latter case, the retort is subdivided by annular flanges provided each with an opening, and a series of double inclined projections is disposed opposite the openings. An apparatus is shown in which the material is fed continuously from a hopper, and is advanced through upper and lower oscillating retorts, provided with annular flanges, double inclined projections, and longitudinal ribs or ledges. The retorts are supported on antifriction rollers. The retort is oscillated by means of a mangle wheel and a pinion on a shaft connected by a universal joint to a driving-shaft. The retort is oscillated from the retort by means of a chain connection. The retort is situated in a chamber separated by perforated brickwork from the actual furnace chamber, so that it is subjected to a lower temperature than the retort. The hopper delivers to crushing-rollers in a lower hopper which delivers to a shoot controlled by a sliding door. A hook on the retort is connected by a pipe to the retort, and a pipe leads from the hood to a condenser. A hood at the delivery end of the retort is connected by a pipe to an airtight cooler for the residue, which is discharged through doors into a truck of other receiver.

  20. Distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, A

    1865-10-04

    To prevent oil distilled from coal, shale, or other minerals from being condensed and burnt in the retort, the oil is drawn off from the bottom of the retort. In order that the oil may be drawn off free from dirt and dust, the vertical retort is made of greater diameter at the bottom than at the top, and a vessel containing water is placed at the bottom. Within the retort is a cylinder built up of spaced rings, between which the oil percolates to the interior of the cylinder, whence it is drawn off through a pipe near its lower end. Externally, the rings present a smooth surface which offers no obstruction to the descent of the coal, and the passing of dust and dirt to the interior of the cylinder is prevented by making the lower edge of each ring overlap the upper edge of the ring below it. The cylinder may be replaced by a square, or other casing, and may be cast in one piece.

  1. Fluidized bed system for calcination of high level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, D P; Prasad, T L; Yadgiri, N K; Theyyunni, T K [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    During the operation of nuclear facilities significant quantities of radiochemical liquid effluents of different concentrations and varying chemical compositions are generated. These effluents contain activated radionuclides, corrosion products and fission products. The advantage of feeding the waste in solid form into the vitrifying equipment are multifold. Efforts are therefore made in many countries to calcine the high level waste, and obtain waste in the oxide form before the same is mixed with glass forming additives and fed into the melter unit. An experimental rig for fluidized bed calcination is constructed for carrying out the detailed investigation of this process, in order to adopt the same for plant scale application. To achieve better gas-solid contact and avoid raining down of solids, a distributor of bubble cap type was designed. A review of existing experience at various laboratories and design of new experimental facility for development of calciners are given. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 concentration having average regression coefficient of 0.99. The temperature dependent terms were found using Arrhenius law and it was observed that the reaction temperature has a direct effect on the rate of reaction.

  3. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  4. Destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hislop, G R

    1882-11-03

    Relates to apparatus for the treatment of cannel or common coal, shale, dross, peat, wood, and similar carbonaceous materials and ironstones for the purpose of obtaining gas, ammonia, and oil. A series of horizontal retorts are built into an arched chamber, and are supported by open arches. A series of vertical retorts in a chamber are situated beneath and in front of the retorts, so that the contents of the latter may easily be discharged into them. The carbonaceous material is first subjected to distillation in the retorts, the products passing by pipes to a hydraulic main where the coal tar and mineral oil are collected in the usual way. The gas is passed through oxide of iron and of lime if to be used for illuminating purposes, and through the former only, if to be used solely for heating purposes. The lower ends of the retorts are closed by doors, or may be sealed by water. They are preferably oblong in section and are surrounded by heating-flues, and each preferably contains the spent material from two of the primary retorts. They discharge their contents into a chamber at the bottom, from which they are withdrawn through a door. When the coke has been transferred from the horizontal to the vertical retorts the latter are closed by suitable covers, and the former are recharged with raw material. Superheated steam is introduced into the lower ends of the vertical retorts in order to facilitate the production of ammonia, which, together with the gases generated pass by a pipe to a main.

  5. Calcination under negative atmosphere for SYNROC preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambashta, R.D.; Wattal, P.K.; Govindankutty, K.V.

    2006-01-01

    SYNROC-C is a ceramic waste formulation designed to immobilise reprocessing waste from fast breeder reactor. This formulation is capable of incorporating noble metals, other fission products, corrosion products and activation products in its multiphase assemblage. Calcination is an important step of SYNROC preparation for decomposition of nitrates of the radioactive waste and conversion to oxide precursors. This paper presents a comparison between properties of calcine prepared under different calcination procedures to obtain product suitable for compaction

  6. Determination of methanol in Iranian herbal distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Kobra; Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Azar-Khiavi, Kamal Razavi; Moghaddam, Zohreh Samie; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2016-06-01

    Herbal distillates have been used as beverages, for flavoring, or as phytomedicines in many countries for a long time. Recently, the occurrence of blindness after drinking herbal distillates has created concerns in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of methanol in herbal distillates produced in Iran. Eighty-four most commonly used herbal distillates purchased from herbal distillate factories were analyzed for methanol contents by gas chromatography and flame ionization detection, with ethanol as internal standard. In 15 herbal distillates, the methanol concentration was below the limit of quantitation. The methanol concentrations in all samples ranged from 43 to 277 mg/L. Forty-five samples contained methanol in excess of the Iranian standard. The maximum concentration was found in an herbal distillate of Mentha piperita (factory E) (277±12), and the minimum in a distillate of Carum carvi (factory B) (42.6 ± 0.5). Since the 45 Iranian herbal distillates containing methanol levels were beyond the legal limits according to the Iranian standard, it seems necessary to monitor the amount of methanol and give a warning to watch out for the latent risk problem of methanol uptake, and establish a definitive relationship between the degree of intoxication observed and the accumulation of methanol in the blood.

  7. Distilling hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tausz, J

    1924-07-16

    Hydrocarbon oils such as petroleum, shale oils, lignite or coal tar oils are purified by distilling them and collecting the distillate in fractions within narrow limits so that all the impurities are contained in one or more of the narrow fractions. In distilling ligroin obtained by destructive distillation of brown coal, it is found that the coloring and resin-forming constituents are contained in the fractions distilling over at 62 to 86/sup 0/C and 108/sup 0/C. The ligroin is purified, therefore, by distillating in an apparatus provided with an efficient dephlegmotor and removing these two fractions. The distillation may be carried out wholly or in part under reduced pressure, and fractions separated under ordinary pressure may be subsequently distilled under reduced pressure. The hydrocarbons may be first separated into fractions over wider limits and the separate fractions be subjected to a further fractional distillation.

  8. Dissolution of two NWCF calcines: Extent of dissolution and characterization of undissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the dissolution characteristics of two NWCF calcine types. A two-way blended calcine made from 4 parts nonradioactive aluminum nitrate and one part WM-102 was studied to determine the extent of dissolution for aluminum-type calcines. A two-way blend of 3.5 parts fluorinel waste from WM-187 and 1 part sodium waste from WM-185 was used to determine the extent of dissolution for zirconium-type calcines. This study was necessary to develop suitable aqueous separation flowsheets for the partitioning of actinides and fission products from ICPP calcines and to determine the disposition of the resulting undissolved solids (UDS). The dissolution flowsheet developed by Herbst was used to dissolve these two NWCF calcine types. Results show that greater than 95 wt% of aluminum and zirconium calcine types were dissolved after a single batch contact with 5 M HNO 3 . A characterization of the UDS indicates that the weight percent of TRU elements in the UDS resulting from both calcine type dissolutions increases by approximately an order of magnitude from their concentrations prior to dissolution. Substantial activities of cesium and strontium are also present in the UDS resulting from the dissolution of both calcine types. Multiple TRU, Cs, and Sr analyses of both UDS types show that these solids are relatively homogeneous. From this study, it is estimated that between 63.5 and 635 cubic meters of UDS will be generated from the dissolution of 3800 M 3 of calcine. The significant actinide and fission product activities in these UDS will preclude their disposal as low-level waste. If the actinide and fission activity resulting from the UDS is the only considered source in the dissolved calcine solutions, an estimated 99.9 to 99.99 percent of the solids must be removed from this solution for it to meet non-TRU Class A low-level waste

  9. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  10. Experimental and modeling study of flash calcination of kaolinite rich clay particles in a gas suspension calciner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    gas suspension calciner, with the aim to derive useful guidelines on smart calcination for obtaining products of the best pozzolanic properties. Calcination tests are performed in the calciner under six different operation conditions. The raw feed and the calcined clay samples are all characterized...

  11. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  12. XANES analysis of dried and calcined bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, Jayapradhi; Gialanella, Stefano; Aswath, Pranesh B.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of dried and calcined bones from chicken, bovine, deer, pig, sheep and chamois was examined using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The oxygen K-edge absorption edge indicates that the surface of dried bone has a larger proportion of carbonate than the interior that is made up of phosphates. The phosphorus L and K edge clearly indicate that pyrophosphates, α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and hydrogen phosphates of Ca do not exist in either the dried bone or calcined bone and phosphorus exists as either β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) or hydroxyapatite, both in the dried and calcined conditions. The Ca K-edge analysis indicates that β-TCP is the likely form of phosphate in both the dried and calcined conditions. - Highlights: • For the first time bones of five different species of vertebrates have been compared in both the dried and calcined states. • O, P and Ca edges detail the local coordination of these atoms in dried and calcined bone. • O K-edge shows that the surface of bone has more CO 3 while the interior has more PO 4 . • P and Ca edges eliminate the presence of pyrophosphates and confirmed the presence of HA and β-TCP. • The stability of these phosphates on calcination has been examined using XANES

  13. XANES analysis of dried and calcined bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Jayapradhi [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington (United States); Gialanella, Stefano [Materials Science and Industrial Technology Department, University of Trento (Italy); Aswath, Pranesh B., E-mail: aswath@uta.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The structure of dried and calcined bones from chicken, bovine, deer, pig, sheep and chamois was examined using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The oxygen K-edge absorption edge indicates that the surface of dried bone has a larger proportion of carbonate than the interior that is made up of phosphates. The phosphorus L and K edge clearly indicate that pyrophosphates, α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and hydrogen phosphates of Ca do not exist in either the dried bone or calcined bone and phosphorus exists as either β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) or hydroxyapatite, both in the dried and calcined conditions. The Ca K-edge analysis indicates that β-TCP is the likely form of phosphate in both the dried and calcined conditions. - Highlights: • For the first time bones of five different species of vertebrates have been compared in both the dried and calcined states. • O, P and Ca edges detail the local coordination of these atoms in dried and calcined bone. • O K-edge shows that the surface of bone has more CO{sub 3} while the interior has more PO{sub 4}. • P and Ca edges eliminate the presence of pyrophosphates and confirmed the presence of HA and β-TCP. • The stability of these phosphates on calcination has been examined using XANES.

  14. Refining shale-oil distillates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altpeter, J

    1952-03-17

    A process is described for refining distillates from shale oil, brown coal, tar, and other tar products by extraction with selective solvents, such as lower alcohols, halogen-hydrins, dichlorodiethyl ether, liquid sulfur dioxide, and so forth, as well as treating with alkali solution, characterized in that the distillate is first treated with completely or almost completely recovered phenol or cresotate solution, the oil is separated from the phenolate with solvent, for example concentrated or adjusted to a determined water content of lower alcohol, furfural, halogen-hydrin, dichlorodiethyl ether, liquid sulfur dioxide, or the like, extracted, and the raffinate separated from the extract layer, if necessary after distillation or washing out of solvent, and freeing with alkali solution from residual phenol or creosol.

  15. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a open-quotes Settlement Agreementclose quotes (or open-quotes Batt Agreementclose quotes) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed

  16. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  17. New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. E. Archibald

    1999-01-01

    This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF

  18. Activity and structure of calcined coal gangue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Chenchen; Li Dongxu; Wang Xiaojun; Li Zongjin [Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-12-15

    Coal gangue was activated by means of calcination in seven temperature ranges. Systematic research was made about activation mechanism and structural evolution. The glycerin-ethanol method, SEM, MIP and XRD were used to determine the variation of structure and activation of coal gangue during calcination. The experimental results show that because of heat treatment in the range of calcination temperatures, mineral composition and microstructure of coal gangue are changed. In addition, its activity is improved. The amount of lime absorbed by the sample calcined at 700{sup o}C is 2-4 times that by uncalcined coal gangue in the course of hydration. When NaOH is added to coal gangue-lime system, the hydration reaction rate of the system is increased and the microstructure of hydrating samples of coal gangue is improved.

  19. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 0 C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving, cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means

  20. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  1. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.D.; Berry, S.M.; Galloway, K.J.; Langenwalter, T.A.; Lopez, D.A.; Noakes, C.M.; Peterson, H.K.; Pope, M.I.; Turk, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase

  2. Properties of radioactive calcine retrieved from the second calcined solids storage facility at ICPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Pomiak, G.S.; Wade, E.L.

    1979-03-01

    The chemical and physical properties of radioactive alumina and zirconia calcine samples retrieved from the storage bins at ICPP were measured. Chemical properties measured include chemical composition, crystalline structure, and radiochemical composition. The physical properties measured and reported include density, size distribution, relative attrition, solubility in 8 M HNO 3 , thermal stability, and flow characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of the retrieved calcine after the 10 to 12 years of storage are very similar to freshly prepared simulated calcine

  3. [Infrared spectral analysis for calcined borax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Ren, Li-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Bo-Tao

    2011-08-01

    To valuate the quality of calcined borax which is sold in the market, 18 samples of calcined borax were studied using the Fourier transform infrared, and samples with different water content were selected and analyzed. Then, the results of analysis were used to evaluate the quality of calcined borax. Results show that the infrared spectra of calcined borax include OH vibration, BO3(-3) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration absorption bands. The position and width of OH vibration absorption band depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, the wider the absorption band. The number of BO3(3-) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration bands also depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, and the stronger the hydrogen bond and the lower the symmetry of B atoms, the more the number of infrared absorption peaks. It was concluded that because the quality of calcined borax has direct correlation with water content, the infrared spectroscopy is an express and objective approach to quality analysis and evaluation of calcined borax.

  4. Solar power water distillation unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, Kamran; Khan, Muhammad Muzammil; Ateeq, Ijlal Shahrukh; Omair, Syed Muhammad; Ahmer, Muhammad; Wajid, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Clean drinking water is the basic necessity for every human being, but about 1.1 billion people in the world lacked proper drinking water. There are many different types of water purification processes such as filtration, reverse osmosis, ultraviolet radiation, carbon absorption, but the most reliable processes are distillation and boiling. Water purification, such as distillation, is especially important in regions where water resources or tap water is not suitable for ingesting without boiling or chemical treatment. In design project It treats the water by combining different methods such as Filtration, Distillation and a technique called concentrated solar power (CSP). Distillation is literally the method seen in nature, whereby: the sun heats the water on the earth's surface, the water is turned into a vapor (evaporation) and rises, leaving contaminants behind, to form clouds. As the upper atmosphere drops in temperature the vapors cool and convert back to water to form water. In this project distillation is achieved by using a parabolic mirror which boils water at high temperature. Filtration is done by sand filter and carbon filter. First sand filter catches the sand particles and the carbon filter which has granules of active carbon is used to remove odor dissolved gases from water. This is the Pre-treatment of water. The filtered water is then collected in a water container at a focus of parabolic mirror where distillation process is done. Another important feature of designed project is the solar tracking of a parabolic mirror which increases the efficiency of a parabolic mirror [1],[2].

  5. Calcination of calcium acetate and calcium magnesium acetate: effect of the reacting atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J.; Diego, L.F. de; Garcia-Labiano, F. [Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Energy and Environment

    1999-04-01

    The calcination process of the calcium acetate (CA) and calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) was investigated as a previous step for coal gas desulfurisation during sorbent injection at high temperatures because the excellent results demonstrated by these sorbents as sulfur removal agents both in combustion and gasification processes. As pore structure developed during calcination is one of the most important characteristics of the sorbent related with the later reaction with the gaseous pollutants, several calcination tests were conducted in a drop tube reactor at temperatures from 700{degree}C to 1100{degree}C, and residence times from 0.8 to 2.4 s. Four different gas atmospheres were used for comparative purposes: inert, oxidising, reducing, and non-calcining (pure CO{sub 2}). Despite the advantage of the high porous cenospheric structure developed by these sorbents during their injection at high temperature, calcination of the CaCO{sub 3} was not complete even at the longest residence time, 2.4 s, and the highest temperature, 1100{degree}C, tested. An important effect of the reacting atmosphere on the calcination conversion and on the sorbent pore structure was detected. The CO{sub 2} concentration around the particle, both that fed in the reacting gases or that generated by organic material combustion, seems to be responsible for the final calcination conversions obtained in each case, also affecting the sintering suffered by the sorbents. 19 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Stop Smoking—Tube-In-Tube Helical System for Flameless Calcination of Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Haneklaus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral calcination worldwide accounts for some 5–10% of all anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions per year. Roughly half of the CO2 released results from burning fossil fuels for heat generation, while the other half is a product of the calcination reaction itself. Traditionally, the fuel combustion process and the calcination reaction take place together to enhance heat transfer. Systems have been proposed that separate fuel combustion and calcination to allow for the sequestration of pure CO2 from the calcination reaction for later storage/use and capture of the combustion gases. This work presents a new tube-in-tube helical system for the calcination of minerals that can use different heat transfer fluids (HTFs, employed or foreseen in concentrated solar power (CSP plants. The system is labeled ‘flameless’ since the HTF can be heated by other means than burning fossil fuels. If CSP or high-temperature nuclear reactors are used, direct CO2 emissions can be divided in half. The technical feasibility of the system has been accessed with a brief parametric study here. The results suggest that the introduced system is technically feasible given the parameters (total heat transfer coefficients, mass- and volume flows, outer tube friction factors, and –Nusselt numbers that are examined. Further experimental work will be required to better understand the performance of the tube-in-tube helical system for the flameless calcination of minerals.

  7. Improvement of solar ethanol distillation using ultrasonic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaruwat Jareanjit

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a study on the use of ultrasonic waves in solar ethanol distillation to investigate the performance of ultrasonic waves at a frequency of 30 kHz and at 100 Watts that were installed in the inlet area of a 10-litre distillation tank. Based on the non-continuous distillation process (batch distillation, the experiment demonstrated that using ultrasonic waves in solar ethanol distillation caused the average concentration of hourly distilled ethanol to be higher than that of a normal system (solar ethanol distillation without ultrasonic wave at the same or higher distillation rate and hourly distillation volume. The ultrasonic wave was able to enhance the separation of ethanol from the solution (water-ethanol mixture through solar distillation. The amount of pure ethanol product from each distilled batch was clearly larger than the amount of product obtained from a normal system when the initial concentration of ethanol was lower than 50%v/v (% by volume, where an average of approximately 40% and 20% are obtained for an initial ethanol concentration of 10%v/v and 30%v/v, respectively. Furthermore, the distillation rate varied based on the solar radiation value.

  8. Quantitative analysis of calcined fertilizers by X-ray diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekinski, E.

    1987-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction pattern method for quantitative analyses of phosphate fertilizers obtained by calcination of a misture of Anitapolis phosphate concentrate and sodium carbonate is described. The method consists in plotting a calibration curve, using spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) as internal standard, of the phases that were formed by calcination, sintetized in laboratory. The tests conducted in order to avail the method accuracy showed good correlation between the obtained data and the real values. (author) [pt

  9. Distilling hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, J E

    1923-03-19

    In distilling mineral oils such as petroleum, shale oil, distillates and topped or residual oils, particularly to obtain lubricating oils, the distillation is carried out under reduced pressures below an absolute pressure of 25 mm. of mercury and preferably below about 5 mm. of mercury, and the distillate is collected in fractions determined by the physical characteristics, such as viscosity, flash point, fire point, etc. Superheated steam may be passed through the liquid during distillation. A horizontal cylindrical still provided with cross braces and peripheral ribs interrupted at the base is connected through a condensing coil immersed in a steam chest and a baffled chamber with distillate receiver and is evacuated by a pump. Steam from a boiler and superheater is injected into the still through a perforated pipe. Steam and light oil vapors passing from the chamber are condensed in a coil.

  10. Sodium distiller II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.C.; Castro, P.M. e; Torres, A.R.; Correa, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A sodium distiller allows the evaluation of the sodium purity, contained in plants and circuits of Fast Reactors. The sodium distillers of the IEN Reactor's Department was developed initially as a prototype, for the testing of the distillation process and in a second step, as a equipment dedicated to attendance the operation of these circuits. This last one was build in stainless steel, with external heat, rotating crucible of nickel for four samples, purge system for pipe cleaning and a sight glass that permits the observation of the distillation during all the operation. The major advantage of this equipment is the short time to do a distillation operation, which permits its routine utilization. As a consequence of the development of the distillers and its auxiliary systems an important amount of new information was gathered concerning components and systems behaviour under high temperature, vacuum and sodium. (author)

  11. Multipartite nonlocality distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Li-Yi; Wu, Keng-Shuo

    2010-01-01

    The stronger nonlocality than that allowed in quantum theory can provide an advantage in information processing and computation. Since quantum entanglement is distillable, can nonlocality be distilled in the nonsignalling condition? The answer is positive in the bipartite case. In this article the distillability of the multipartite nonlocality is investigated. We propose a distillation protocol solely exploiting xor operations on output bits. The probability-distribution vectors and matrix are introduced to tackle the correlators. It is shown that only the correlators with extreme values can survive the distillation process. As the main result, the amplified nonlocality cannot maximally violate any Bell-type inequality. Accordingly, a distillability criterion in the postquantum region is proposed.

  12. Distillation of bituminous shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, M

    1875-02-16

    The retort with its accessories constitutes a distillation apparatus for shale composed of a cylindrical, vertical, fixed, tubular, and of ring form metal retort. Also it is comprised of a special hearth of large dimensions in the form of a circular pocket receiving from the retort as heating agent the distilled shale and emitting by radiation the heat that makes the distillation apparatus for the shale act.

  13. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  14. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw; Amy, Gary; Chunggaze, Mohammed; Al-Ghasham, Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  15. Characterization of norm sources in petroleum coke calcining processes - 16314

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Ian S.; Halter, Donald A.; Fruchtnicht, Erich H.; Arno, Matthew G.; Haumann, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum coke, or 'petcoke', is a waste by-product of the oil refining industry. The majority of petcoke consumption is in energy applications; catalyst coke is used as refinery fuel, anode coke for electricity conduction, and marketable coke for heating cement kilns. Roskill has predicted that long-term growth in petroleum coke production will be maintained, and may continue to increase slightly through 2012. Petcoke must first be calcined to drive off any undesirable petroleum by-products that would shorten the coke product life cycle. As an example, the calcining process can take place in large, rotary kilns heated to maximum temperatures as high as approximately 1400-1540 deg. C. The kilns and combustion/settling chambers, as well as some cooler units, are insulated with refractory bricks and other, interstitial materials, e.g., castable refractory materials, to improve the efficiency of the calcining process. The bricks are typically made of 70-85-percent bauxite, and are slowly worn away by the calcining process; bricks used to line the combustion chambers wear away, as well, but at a slower rate. It has been recognized that the refractory materials contain slight amounts of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from the uranium- and thorium-decay series. Similarly, low levels of NORM could be present in the petcoke feed stock given the nature of its origin. Neither the petcoke nor the refractory bricks represent appreciable sources of radiation or radioactive waste. However, some of the demolished bricks that have been removed from service because of the aforementioned wearing process have caused portal alarms to activate at municipal disposal facilities. This has lead to the current investigation into whether there is a NORM concentrating mechanism facilitated by the presence of the slightly radioactive feed stock in the presence of the slightly radioactive refractory materials, at calcining-zone temperatures. Research conducted to date has been

  16. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  17. Recovery of gold and uranium from calcines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey-Goldblatt, E.

    1981-10-06

    The invention concerns the recovery of non-ferrous metals, such as gold, uranium or the like from iron oxide containing calcines which have the non-ferrous metal present in solid solution and/or encapsulated within the iron oxide. The calcine is reacted, while stirring vigorously, with sulphuric acid or another strong inorganic acid to cause the iron to form the ferric salt. The material obtained is mixed with water and the liquid and solid phases are separated from each other. The non-ferrous metal is then obtained from at least one of these phases by leaching, or the like.

  18. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  19. Remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for the new waste calcining facility calciner vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.D.; Carter, J.A.; May, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    The development and testing of remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for calcination of liquid radioactive wastes in the calciner vessel of the New Waste Calcining Facility being built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is described. A complete fuel nozzle assembly was fabricated and tested at the Remote Maintenance Development Facility to evolve design refinements, identify required support equipment, and develop handling techniques. The design also provided for remote replacement of the nozzle support carriage and adjacent feed and fuel pipe loops using two pairs of master-slave manipulators

  20. Aromatically enhanced pear distillates from blanquilla and conference varieties using a packed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Garay, Yanine; García-Llobodanin, Laura; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López-Vázquez, Cristina; Orriols, Ignacio; López, Francisco

    2013-05-22

    Pear distillates are generally produced from the Bartlett variety because of its rich aroma. In this study, a chemical and sensorial comparative examination of pear distillates from the three main varieties grown in Spain (Bartlett, Blanquilla, and Conference) using two distillation systems (copper Charentais alembic and packed column) was undertaken. Volatile compounds were identified by gas chromatography to differentiate the spirits according to pear variety and distillation method. The Bartlett distillates from both distillation systems possessed higher ethyl ester and acetate and lower cis-3-hexen-1-ol and 1-hexanol concentrations. Despite these differences, a sensory analysis panel could distinguish only the Bartlett alembic distillate from the alembic distillates of the other varieties. In contrast, the panel rated the packed-column distillates equally. Therefore, less aromatic pear varieties can be used to produce distillates with aromatic characteristics similar to those of the Bartlett variety if a suitable distillation process is used.

  1. Formulation Efforts for Direct Vitrification of INEEL Blend Calcine Waste Simulate: Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Reamer, I. A.

    2001-03-30

    This report documents the results of glass formulation efforts for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) high level waste (HWL) calcine. Two waste compositions were used during testing. Testing started by using the Run 78 calcine composition and switched to simulated Blend calcine composition when it became available. The goal of the glass formulation efforts was to develop a frit composition that will accept higher waste loading that satisfies the glass processing and product acceptance constraints. 1. Melting temperature of 1125 ? 25?C 2. Viscosity between 2 and 10 Pa?s at the melting temperature 3. Liquidus temperature at least 100?C below the melting temperature 4. Normalized release of B, Li and Na each below 1 g/m2 (per ASTM C 1285-97) Glass formulation efforts tested several frit compositions with variable waste loadings of Run 78 calcine waste simulant. Frit 107 was selected as the primary candidate for processing since it met all process and performance criteria up to 45 mass% waste loading. When the simulated Blend calcine waste composition became available Frits 107 and 108 compositions were retested and again Frit 107 remained the primary candidate. However, both frits suffered a decrease in waste loading when switching from the Run 78 calcine to simulated Blend calcine waste composition. This was due to increase concentrations of both F and Al2O3 along with a decrease in CaO and Na2O in the simulate Blend calcine waste all of which have strong impacts on the glass properties that limit waste loading of this type of waste.

  2. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  3. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward

  4. Low temperature destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-07-05

    A process is given and apparatus is described for the destructive distillation at low temperature of coal, oil shale, and the like by subjection to the action of a stream of hot gases or superhearted steam, flowing in a closed circuit. Subsequent treatment of the distillation residues with a gas stream containing oxygen results in combustion of the carbon-containing material therein brings to a high temperature the solid residue, in which the process comprises subsequently contacting the hot solid residue with the fluid stream effecting the distillation.

  5. Low temperature distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1937-07-21

    To distil mineral or organic material, the material is heated by means of a hot gas entering into contact with and traversing the material in a horizontal direction. The vertical retort is charged with material from the hopper and hot gases from the furnace after traversing the boiler enter the preheating zone, pass through the slots and charge therein and are educted through connection by the blower. The charge passes downwardly to the distillation zone wherein hot gases from the heater are passed via pipe and slots through the chambers and to the pipe controlled by the dampers. These gases are recycled by the fan through the heater and chamber, that portion of the gases corresponding to the amount of vapours evolved from the distillation being evacuated via the pipe to the condensing plant not shown. Steam and/or a limited quantity of water may be admitted to the distillation zone.

  6. Destructive distillation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1932-09-08

    A process of destructive distillation of distillable carbonaceous material under pressure is described, consisting of regulating the temperature by introducing the carbonaceous materials to a point where the reaction of hydrogenation has begun but has not stopped, by placing it in indirect heat-exchange with a cooling agent at a critical temperature below the reaction temperature, the agent being under pressure and introduced in the liquid state. Water is used as the cooling agent.

  7. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Research Institute for Chemical Technology, P.M. B 1052, Zaria, ... calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 ... Keywords: Jakura, limestone, calcination, kinetics, power law model.

  8. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-01-01

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  9. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  10. A comparative evaluation of nitrogen compounds in petroleum distillates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dheer; Chopra, Anju; Patel, Mitra Bhanu; Sarpal, Amarjit Singh [Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Faridabad (India). Research and Development Centre

    2011-07-15

    Although the concentration of nitrogen compounds in crude oil is relatively low, they can become more concentrated in petroleum distillates and poison the catalysts used in refining processes. They cause undesirable deposits, color formation and odor in products; they also contribute to air pollution and some are highly carcinogenic. The poisoned catalyst becomes deactivated for hydrodesulfurization and unable to remove sulfur from middle distillates. In order to understand the effect on catalytic processes, it is desirable to identify the nitrogen compounds in various petroleum distillates. This paper compares the nitrogen species profiles in different petroleum distillates using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector. In addition, four different petroleum distillate samples from different refineries were analyzed to find the variation in their nitrogen profiles. The nitrogen compounds in petroleum distillate samples were identified as anilines, quinolines, indoles, and carbazoles and their alkyl derivatives. Quantitation was carried out against known reference standards. The quantitative data were compared to the total nitrogen content determined by elemental analysis. (orig.)

  11. Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate usingcalcined duck eggshell as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xiulian; Duan, Xiuli; You, Qinghong; Dai, Chunhua; Tan, Zhongbiao; Zhu, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Calcined DES was used as catalyst for biodiesel production from SODD. • The obtained CaO was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and the optimal calcination temperature was 900 °C. • The biodiesel yield was 94.6% at the optimal transesterification conditions. • The biodiesel yield was above 80% after five times usage. - Abstract: Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate (SODD) using calcined duck eggshell (DES) as catalyst was studied. An inexpensive and environment-friendly catalyst was prepared from waste DES which is a source of calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate could be changed to calcium oxide (CaO) under high temperatures. The obtained CaO was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectra (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF was used to determine the elemental composition of the catalyst. BET analysis was performed to determine specific surface area, pore volume and particle size of the catalysts. Results showed that at 800 °C and 900 °C the calcium carbonate in DES was changed to CaO. The pre-esterification of SODD was conducted under the following conditions: H_2SO_4 concentration (v/w, based on oil weight) 1.5%, methanol to oil molar ratio 12:1, reaction time 120 min and reaction temperature 60 °C. Thephytosterols were removed by cooling down step by stepand temperature steps were 15 °C, 5 °C, −5 °C. The process of biodiesel production from pre-esterified SODD using the obtained CaO as catalyst was studied and the optimal conditions were: calcination temperature of 900 °C, catalyst amount of 10 wt.%, methanol to oil ratio of 10:1, reaction temperature of 60 °C and reaction time of 80 min and the biodiesel yield was 94.6% at these conditions. The reusability of the DES-derived catalyst was tested and the results showed that the biodiesel yield was above 80% after five times usage and was lower than 60% after 8 times usage.

  12. Destructive distillation: oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J; Glover, S

    1918-01-31

    Canned and other coals are destructively distilled in continuously operated vertical retorts which at their upper portions are maintained at temperatures suitable for low temperature oil distillation such as about 700/sup 0/C, and at their lower portions the temperature is higher and such as to be suitable for the production of gas, e.g., about 1400/sup 0/C. Superheated steam is introduced into the lower portion of the retort, preferably by means of the arrangement described in Specification 120,458, and this is converted into blue water gas which assists the distillation in the center of the coal charge. The retorts are preferably such as are described in Specifications 2663/07 and 7757/14.

  13. Distilling hydrocarbons, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C

    1917-11-23

    In the fractional or destructive distillation of hydrocarbon oils or other liquids, the pressure in the still is raised and lowered alternately. The still is closed to raise the pressure, and is opened to lower the pressure rapidly solely by expansion of the vapors. The operation is effected without intermittent cooling, except such as may occur during the lowering of the pressure. In distilling hydrocarbon oil, pressure steam is blown into the oil until the pressure reaches 5 lb/in./sup 2/. The vapor outlet is then opened until the pressure falls to 2 lb/in./sup 2/, whereupon the vapor outlet is closed and steam is again admitted. The operation is continued until the steam, which is of 20 lb pressure, no longer effects distillation; after this stage, superheated steam is used.

  14. Fractional distillation of oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L D

    1931-10-31

    A method of dividing oil into lubricating oil fractions without substantial cracking by introducing the oil in a heated state into a fractionating column from which oil fractions having different boiling points are withdrawn at different levels, while reflux liquid is supplied to the top of the column, and additional heat is introduced into the column by contacting with the oil therein a heated fluid of higher monlecular weight than water and less susceptible to thermal decomposition than is the highest boiling oil fraction resulting from the distillation, or of which any products produced by thermal decomposition will not occur in the highest boiling distillate withdrawn from the column.

  15. Distilling carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumble, M J

    1925-06-29

    Carbonaceous materials such as coal, oil shale, peat, or wood are destructively distilled while being subjected to the action of superheated steam and hydrogen, the latter being provided by dissociating a part of the superheated steam. The materials are charged into a retort heated by a burner and superheated steam and hydrogen are passed in by a pipe and nozzles. The distillates enter a dust extractor through openings and escape through openings shielded by cones into an outlet pipe leading to condensers. The dust which settles in the bottom of the apparatus is periodically removed.

  16. Distilling coal, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J

    1917-12-21

    Coals of various kinds such as shales, bitumens, and oil sand, peat, etc. are distilled at 350 to 450/sup 0/C and in the presence of vapors and gases obtained by cracking hydrocarbon oils, or the gases obtained by separating the condensable hydrocarbons therefrom, and, if desired, with the addition of superheated steam. The hydrocarbons are properly cracked by passing through molten lead as described in Specification 116,304. According to the Provisional Specification, superheated steam alone may be used to effect the distillation.

  17. Flash calcination of kaolinite rich clay and impact of process conditions on the quality of the calcines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Use of properly calcined kaolinite rich clay (i.e., metakaolin) to offset part of CO2-intensive clinkers not only reduces CO2 footprint from cement industry but also improves the performance of concrete. However, calcination under inappropriately high temperatures or long retention times may...... suspension calciner. The model is validated by the experimental data (e.g., the degree of dehydroxylation and the density of the calcines). Based on the model, the impacts of process conditions and feed properties on the quality of the calcination products are thoroughly examined....

  18. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  19. Design of a hot pilot plant facility for demonstration of the pot calcination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckham, J A

    1962-01-01

    A facility was designed for demonstration of the pot calcination process with wastes from processing aluminum alloy fuels, Darex or electrolytic processing of stainless-steel fuels, and Purex processes. This facility will also permit determination of procedures required for economical production of low-porosity, relatively nonleachable materials by addition of suitable reagents to the wastes fed to the calciner. The process consists of concentration by evaporation and thermal decomposition in situ in pots which also serve as the final disposal containers. This unit permits determination of pot loading and density, leachability, melting point, volatile material content, heat release, and thermal conductivity of the calcine. Also to be determined are transient calcine temperature distributions, fission product behavior during calcination, deentrainment obtained in the various parts of the system, decontamination achieved on all liquid and gaseous effluent streams, need for venting of stored pots, optimum means of remotely sealing the pots, and methods required for production of a minimum volume of noncondensable off-gas. This facility will employ nominal full-scale pots 8 and 12 in. in diameter and 8 ft long. A unique evaporator design was evolved to permit operation either with close-coupled continuous feed preparation or with bath feed preparation. Provisions were made to circumvent possible explosions due to organic material in feed solutions and other suspected hazards.

  20. Vacuum distilling vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reik, H

    1928-12-27

    Vacuum distilling vessel for mineral oil and the like, characterized by the ring-form or polyconal stiffeners arranged inside, suitably eccentric to the casing, being held at a distance from the casing by connecting members of such a height that in the resulting space if necessary can be arranged vapor-distributing pipes and a complete removal of the residue is possible.

  1. Distilling bituminous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, C N; Hayden, H P

    1926-12-28

    Bituminous materials such as heavy asphaltic residues from petroleum distillation or natural bitumens such as gilsonite, grahamite, etc. are distilled in presence of a carrier consisting of pieces of inert refractory material and by the heat generated by combustion of the coke which remains on the carrier after distillation. A vertical cylindrical retort, in which a wood and coal fire is first made, is charged with an inert refractory substance such as pumice stone, broken firebrick, burnt fire clay, carborundum, ash, etc. mixed with a bituminous substance, which, if fusible, may be melted and added in a rotary drum. The mixture passes downwards through the retort, first through regions in which the hydrocarbons are distilled and cracked and then through a region in which the remaining carbon is burnt by a limited supply of air and steam admitted through a grate. The inert material is discharged through a water seal and used again. Vapors, withdrawn from the retort though an outlet, pass through a heat intercharger and separator and are treated with a spray of sulfuric acid to separate ammonia in a scrubber, with water sprays to condense oil in scrubbers, and with oil in a scrubber.

  2. The increase performance BMF-14 calcination unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triyono

    2013-01-01

    The heating element of performance increase BMF-14 calcination unit has been installed. The activity includes: installation and function test heating element step by step. The main component includes: kanthal heating element type with size long 58,2 cm diameter 0,9 cm slot total 28, flexible cable resists heat 30 Amperes, band cable heat resists and flexible clamp. The heating elements installation includes from 3 groups and every groups have 4 heating elements to connectly series. Every group connecting to every phase RST and neutral for getting electric voltage 380 Volts follow contact relay 3 phases to controlling by digital temperature control. The resulting installation of heating element in the BMF-14 calcination unit showed that: BMF-14 calcination unit can be again of the setting temperature step by step. In the step I get optimal temperature 560 °C test time 1068 minutes with rate velocity heat 0 to 18,0 °C/minutes with current between 5,8 to 6,4 Amperes voltage 103 to 123 Volts (phase R and T). In the step II gets optimal temperature 600 °C test time 265 minutes getting rate velocity heat 0 to 40,3 °C/minutes with current 3,8 to 8,5 Amperes voltage 76 to 142 Volts (phase RST). In the step III gets optimal temperature 1000 °C test time 107 minutes getting rate velocity heat 0 to 53,5 °C/minutes with current 9,7 to 12,5 Amperes voltage 215 to 225 Volts (phase RST). (author)

  3. Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility

  4. Distilling shale and the like

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, H T.P.

    1922-02-23

    In distilling shale or like bituminous fuels by internal heating with hot gas obtained by the gasifying of the shale residues with air or steam or a mixture of these, the amount and temperature of the gaseous distilling medium is regulated between the gasifying and the distilling chambers, by the introduction of cold gas or air.

  5. Distillation with labelled transition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Geoffrey William; Jones, Neil

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an improved basis for the " distillation" program transformation. It is known that superlinear speedups can be obtained using distillation, but cannot be obtained by other earlier automatic program transformation techniques such as deforestation, positive supercompilation...... and partial evaluation. We give distillation an improved semantic basis, and explain how superlinear speedups can occur....

  6. Design and development of a rotary calciner for radiochemical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, D.P.; Sutar, V.D.; Sengar, P.B.S.

    1997-01-01

    Present experience and knowledge in handling of radioactive waste has led to identification of major thrust areas in the development of the treatment processes. In order to reduce evaporation and volatility losses in the vitrification facility, it is advantageous to carry out evaporation and calcination steps in another equipment like rotary calciner. Efforts have been directed for the engineering development of a Rotary Ball Kiln calciner. This paper highlights the important design features of the Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner for the radioactive waste. In this work, an attempt has been made to systematically evaluate the influence of process and design parameters. The results obtained on calcination will provide a design basis and rational methodology for the optimum utilization of these processes and equipment for volume reduction and calcination of the liquid waste

  7. Calcinating petroleum coke in a furnace with a rotating hearth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, M M; Ezhov, B M; Galeeva, Z G; Goriunov, V S; Karpinskaia, N N; Zaitseva, S A

    1980-01-01

    A scheme is described for an industrial device with a bottom furnace for calcinating coke from slow coking. The consumption and operational indicators of the process during the calcination of standard and needle cokes are given, together with data on the quality of dry and calcinated cokes under different conditions. The basic drawbacks in the operation of the device are described, and measures are proposed for increasing its operational effectiveness.

  8. Pilot-plant development of a Rover waste calcination flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birrer, S.A.

    1978-04-01

    Results of eight runs, six using the 10-cm dia and two using the 30-cm dia pilot-plant calciners, in which simulated first-cycle Rover waste was calcined, are described. Results of the tests showed that a feed blend consisting of one volume simulated first-cycle Rover waste and one or two volumes simulated first-cycle zirconium waste could not be successfully calcined. 5 figs., 8 tables

  9. Microwave heating application in calcination and SYNROC formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambashta, R.D.; Wattal, P.K.; Malav, R.K.; Mallik, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave for calcination of titanate based ceramic wasteform (SYNROC) is being reported for the first time in this paper. Although major constituents in SYNROC were non microwave active, the combination with microwave active constituents rendered the mixture calcinable. Calcine was sintered at 1150 degC under hot uniaxial conditions at an applied pressure of ∼30 MPa. XRD shows presence of major phases of SYNROC in the compacted sample. (author)

  10. Effect of calcination routes on phase formation of BaTiO3 and their electronic and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Supriyo; Choudhary, R. J.; Tripathi, M.; Phase, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the phase formation and correlation between electronic and magnetic properties of oxygen deficient BaTiO3 ceramics, synthesized by solid state reaction method, following different calcination paths. The phase analysis divulge that a higher calcination temperature above 1000° C is favored for tetragonal phase formation than the cubic phase. The core level X-ray photo electron spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of oxygen vacancies and oxygen vacancy mediated Ti3+ states. As the calcination temperature and calcination time increases these oxygen vacancies and hence Ti3+ concentrations reduce in the sample. The temperature dependent magnetization curves suggest unexpected magnetic ordering, which may be due to the presence of unpaired electron at the t2g state (d1) of nearest-neighbor Ti atoms. In magnetization vs magnetic field isotherms, the regular decrease of saturation moment value with increasing calcination temperature and calcination time, can be discussed considering the amount of oxygen deficiency induced Ti3+ concentrations, present in the sample.

  11. Product removal and solids transport from fluidized-bed calciners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmett, E.S.; Munger, D.H.

    1978-09-01

    Methods of removing the solid product from pilot-plant and production fluidized-bed calciners, and transporting product to underground storage vaults are reported here. Testing of dense-phase solids transport systems in test loops during development of a 15-cm-diam. and 30-cm-diam. calciner are described. A lean-phase solid transport system is used with the Waste Calcining Facility. The results of some recent tests done in a lean-phase transport system connected to the 30-cm-diam. calciner are included in this report

  12. Renormalizing Entanglement Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waeldchen, Stephan; Gertis, Janina; Campbell, Earl T.; Eisert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement distillation refers to the task of transforming a collection of weakly entangled pairs into fewer highly entangled ones. It is a core ingredient in quantum repeater protocols, which are needed to transmit entanglement over arbitrary distances in order to realize quantum key distribution schemes. Usually, it is assumed that the initial entangled pairs are identically and independently distributed and are uncorrelated with each other, an assumption that might not be reasonable at all in any entanglement generation process involving memory channels. Here, we introduce a framework that captures entanglement distillation in the presence of natural correlations arising from memory channels. Conceptually, we bring together ideas from condensed-matter physics—ideas from renormalization and matrix-product states and operators—with those of local entanglement manipulation, Markov chain mixing, and quantum error correction. We identify meaningful parameter regions for which we prove convergence to maximally entangled states, arising as the fixed points of a matrix-product operator renormalization flow.

  13. Hoizontal retort for distilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, F; Papineau, W

    1854-12-15

    Improvements are disclosed in distilling peaty, schistose, bituminous and vegetable matters. These are arranging a retort in a horizontal position or so little inclined as not to permit matters charged at one end of the retort to fall readily to the other by gravity. The retort is heated externally by a fire at one end, near which end the spent products are discharged without opening the retort, which is done by the aid of two valves or slides, one being at all times closed when discharging products. The other end of the retort is provided with a divided hopper with two valves or slides, one of which is kept closed when the other is open, in order to charge the retort. Within is an endless chain carrying rakes so as to move the matters from the feeding to the discharging end. There are outlets for the distilled products furnished with condensers.

  14. Distillation apparatus for solid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurmann, F

    1860-06-26

    The distillation room is continuously charged by the charging mechanism with the material to be distilled. The distillation products pass into the chamber, where they are drawn out through the tube for purifying. The distillation residue is finally pushed out by the fresh material from the room and falls in the common room, from which it is removed through the air-tight door. In the canals enclosing the room heating gas circulates, which carries to the room the heat necessary for the distillation.

  15. Distillation, destructive: gas retorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G; Buchanan, J

    1872-06-12

    Retorts used in the distillation of coal, cannel, shale, or other minerals are discharged by means of a joint metal bar or a chain inserted prior to or with the charge, and fitted with a plate or series of plates preferably with the back plate the largest. The rod or chain is formed with a hook, loop, or coupling for withdrawal, preferably by a steam windlass running on rails.

  16. Distilling carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, C A

    1924-04-15

    In apparatus of the kind set forth for distilling solid carbonaceous materials, a rotary retort in the form of a tubular, hollow cylindrical, or other similar hollow body, of small diameter, having a thin wall is provided to which the heat is applied externally, with means operative within it adapted, not only for cleaning the internal wall of the retort but also for distributing the heat throughout the mass of materials under treatment, substantially as described.

  17. Use of the azeotropic distillation technique in the synthesis of zirconium post ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ussui, V.; Lazar, D.R.R.; Menezes, F.; Menezes, C.A.B.; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1996-01-01

    The azeotropic distillation technique has been used for treatment of coprecipitated zirconium and yttrium hydroxides, in order to synthesize weak agglomerated powders. Experiments were performed by preparing suspensions of this precipitate with organic solvents as toluene, isopropanol, butanol and ethanol, which were submitted to the distillation, to remove all the liquid phase. The obtained powders after drying and calcination, have been characterized by granulometric distribution and specific surface area determination. The densities of the ceramic bodies, obtained by pressing and sintering at 1500 deg C during 1 hour, have also been evaluated. (author)

  18. Distilling solid carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H; Laing, B

    1926-12-04

    In the distillation of solid carbonaceous materials with by-product recovery by direct heating with a gas such as water gas, producer gas, or combustion gas which is passed in counter-flow to the materials, the volume of the gas used is such as to lower the vapor tension of the volatiles to enable the oil vapor to be liberated at temperatures not exceeding 450 to 500/sup 0/C and so that the gaseous mixture may be cooled to from 80 to 100/sup 0/C without causing the highest boiling oil fraction to condense. Coking coals may be subjected to a preliminary heat treatment with gases containing an oxygen content of from 2 to 8 percent to reduce their coking properties, and oxygen may be added to the heating gases to assist the polymerization of resinous bodies. Lubricating oil may be obtained by treating the primary oil with caustic soda to remove tar acids, refining the residue with sulfuric acid, distilling off 25 percent of the refined oil and passing the remainder through a filter press at -5/sup 0/C to extract the paraffin wax. The residue of wax-free oil is distilled to yield a lubricating oil which at normal temperatures has a static coefficient of friction of from .1 to .185. Other specifications are referred to.

  19. Distillation of bituminous substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    du Buisson, M A.B.B.

    1845-06-23

    New and improved methods are described for the distillation of bituminous schistus and other bituminous substances, as well as for the purification, rectification, and preparation necessary for the employment of the productions obtained by such distillation for various useful purposes. This invention consists, first, in the arrangement and construction of furnace or apparatus for the distillation of schistus, and (any) other bituminous rocks. This furnace is made of circular brick-work, and is provided with the requisite number of fires placed round the circumference. The retort is of a conical or funnel shape, and when ready for use, has the appearance of one inverted cone being placed within a larger cone, in such a manner as to leave a space between the two cones for the reception of the schistus. Both cones are capable of being closed at their apexes, and their mouths, which are placed upwards, are connected together, and hermetically closed by a flat ring. The flame draft is caused to impinge against the lower portion of the outer cone and ascending, turns over the upper edge and descends within the inner cone to the mouth of the chimney, which is placed in the interior, and as low as may be convenient. A third cone is so placed within the inner cone as to cause the flame draft, in its descent, to bind against the surface of the retort.

  20. An Assessment of Using Vibrational Compaction of Calcined HLW and LLW in DWPF Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Yun-Bo; Amme, Robert C.; Shayer, Zeev

    2008-01-01

    both of them) of applying the vibrational forces? 2) What is best mode of operation: first fill the canister with calcined waste and then vibrate it and refill it again, or apply vibrational forces during the filling process. By optimum or best we mean less creation of stress/strain forces during the volume reduction vibration process. Lessons learnt: This preliminary study shows that; 1) The maximum stress concentration always occurs in the canister wall, however its location varies and depends on the loading condition, and vibration process. 2) The proposed vibrational process would not cause any damages to the granulated calcined waste. 3) The first natural frequency of the longitudinal vibration of the canister is around 400 Hz, which is far away from the applied vibrational frequencies and from possibility of resonance phenomena that may cause damage to the canister 4) The relationship between the maximum internal stress and the frequency of the applied load is not parabolic. 5) The mechanical properties of the granulated calcined nuclear waste have small impact on the internal stress of the canister. Finally, the calculated data suggested that applying vibrational forces will keep the entire canister whole without any indication of development defects, and will have significant economical benefits of handling HLW and LLW in calcined forms, from waste manipulation, storage and transportation

  1. SYNROC production using a fluid bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, F.J.; Grens, J.Z.; Ryerson, F.J.; Hoenig, C.L.; Bazan, F.; Campbell, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    SYNROC is a titanate-based ceramic developed for immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes in solid form. Fluid-bed SYNROC production permits slurry drying, calcining and redox to be carried out in a single unit. We present results of studies from two fluid beds; the Idaho Exxon internally-heated unit and the externally-heated unit constructed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. Bed operation over a range of temperature, feed rate, fluidizing rate and redox conditions indicate that high density, uniform particle-size SYNROC powders are produced which facilitate the densification step and give HUP parts with dense, well-developed phases and good leaching characteristics. 3 figures, 3 tables

  2. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO2 intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model...

  3. Mission Need Statement: Calcine Disposition Project Major Systems Acquisition Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. T. Beck

    2007-01-01

    This document identifies the need to establish the Calcine Disposition Project to determine and implement the final disposition of calcine including characterization, retrieval, treatment (if necessary), packaging, loading, onsite interim storage pending shipment to a repository or interim storage facility, and disposition of related facilities

  4. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...

  5. Practical results of the MESA 1 line calcinator trial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Skaba, V.; Zahalka, F.; Vild, J.; Kulovany, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mobile calcination and cementation unit MESA 1 was designed and built by UJV Rez in cooperation with many enterprises, mainly with the Kralovopolske Strojirny Brno. This facility for direct fixation of liquid radioactive wastes was experimentally tested using model non-radioactive solutions and model and actual wastes from the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power plant. The calciner was run in trial operation at the Kralovopolske SAtrojirny Brno. A total of 1.3 m 3 of model solutions was processed into 180 kg of calcinate. The fixation of the calcinate in cement, the times of solidification and of hardening and the moisture content of concrete blocks were studied. The application was also tested of the calciner in drying ion exchangers from WWER-440 prior to their bituminization. Following the despatch of the cementation module to the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the direct calcination module was tested at Dukovany together with an auxiliary module which makes possible self-contained calciner operation. Model non-radioactive solutions from the Dukovany nuclear power plant were treated containing H 3 BO 3 and NaNO 3 as main components. The usability in actual conditions of the mobile calcination and cementation unit for radioactive wastes was tested in a total of about 70 operating hours. (E.S.). 2 figs., 2 refs

  6. Properties of Formula 127 glass prepared with radioactive zirconia calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Pavlica, D.A.; Cole, H.S.

    1982-09-01

    Formula 127 glass has been developed to immobilize ICPP zirconia calcine. This glass has been prepared remotely on a laboratory scale basis with actual radioactive zirconia calcine retrieved after ten years of storage from Bin Set 2. The aqueous leachability of the glass produced was investigated and compared through application of the MCC-1, MCC-2 and Soxhlet leach tests with that of Formula 127 glass prepared with simulated calcine. The solid state properties of the glasses prepared with actual and simulated calcines were also measured by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX). Based on the application of these leaching tests and analysis techniques the properties measured in this study are similar for 127 glass prepared with either simulated or radioactive calcine. 13 figures, 16 tables

  7. Distilling coal, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, W P

    1906-01-11

    Substances containing hydrocarbons, such as cannel coal, lignite, and shale, are destructively distilled by dividing the charge into small bodies confined in an air-tight chamber through which the products of combustion from a contiguous furnace are passed, the furnace serving also to heat the chamber. The temperature is kept below red heat so that the initial products, such as vapors of heavy oils, paraffin, waxes, naphthas, phenols, and cresols, are not decomposed and there is no formation of gaseous products such as naphthalene and benzol. The operation is of short duration, and large amounts of good coke are produced.

  8. Phosphorous removal from aqueous solution can be enhanced through the calcination of lime sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal Krishna, K C; Niaz, Mohamed R; Sarker, Dipok C; Jansen, Troy

    2017-09-15

    Water treatment plants generate an enormous amount of the sludge which is normally treated as waste. In the recent past, many investigations have been focused on developing an economical adsorbent using water treatment sludge to remove phosphorous (P) from aqueous solutions. However, the great extents of the studies have been limited in the use of alum- and iron-based sludges. This study, therefore, investigated the P removal performance of the calcined lime sludge. Calcined lime sludge at 700 °C significantly enhanced the P removal efficiency whereas marginal improvement was noted when the sludge calcined at 400 °C was tested. With increase P removal efficiency, final pH values of the solution also significantly increased. P removal efficiency of the calcined sludge decreased with increasing the initial P concentrations. However, the removal efficiency could be improved by increasing the weight of the sludge. Further analysis demonstrated that P removal trend followed both pseudo-second order and diffusion-chemisorption kinetics signifying the P removal is potentially due to a multi-mechanistic reaction in which, the process is controlled by intra-particle diffusion followed by chemisorptions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Refreshment topics II: Design of distillation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojević Svetomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For distillation column design it is necessary to define all the variable parameters such as component concentrations in different streams temperatures, pressures, mass and energy flow, which are used to represent the separation process of some specific system. They are related to each other according to specific laws, and if the number of such parameters exceeds the number of their relationships, in order to solve a problem some of them must be specified in advance or some constraints assumed for the mass balance, the balance of energy, phase equilibria or chemical equilibria. Knowledge of specific elements which are the constituents of a distillation unit must be known to define the number of design parameters as well as some additional apparati also necessary to realize the distilation. Each separate apparatus might be designed and constructed only if all the necessary and variable parameters for such a unit are defined. This is the right route to solve a distilation unit in many different cases. The construction of some distillation unit requires very good knowledge of mass, heat and momentum transfer phenomena. Moreover, the designer needs to know which kind of apparatus will be used in the distillation unit to realize a specific production process. The most complicated apparatus in a rectification unit is the distillation column. Depending on the complexity of the separation process one, two or more columns are often used. Additional equipment are heat exchangers (reboilers, condensers, cooling systems, heaters, separators, tanks for reflux distribution, tanks and pumps for feed transportation, etc. Such equipment is connected by pipes and valves, and for the normal operation of a distillation unit other instruments for measuring the flow rate, temperature and pressure are also required. Problems which might arise during the determination and selection of such apparati and their number requires knowledge of the specific systems which must

  10. Distillation with Sublogarithmic Overhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Matthew B.; Haah, Jeongwan

    2018-02-01

    It has been conjectured that, for any distillation protocol for magic states for the T gate, the number of noisy input magic states required per output magic state at output error rate ɛ is Ω [log (1 /ɛ )] . We show that this conjecture is false. We find a family of quantum error correcting codes of parameters ⟦ ∑ i =w +1 m (m i ),∑ i =0 w (m i ),∑ i =w +1 r +1 (r +1 i )⟧ for any integers m >2 r , r >w ≥0 , by puncturing quantum Reed-Muller codes. When m >ν r , our code admits a transversal logical gate at the ν th level of Clifford hierarchy. In a distillation protocol for magic states at the level ν =3 (T gate), the ratio of input to output magic states is O (logγ(1 /ɛ )) , where γ =log (n /k )/log (d )<0.678 for some m , r , w . The smallest code in our family for which γ <1 is on ≈258 qubits.

  11. Distilling solid carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H; Laing, B

    1926-12-04

    In a process of distilling solid carbonaceous materials with by-product recovery, the time factor and the temperature gradient during the distillation period are so controlled that a temperature difference exceeding 150/sup 0/C is avoided between the temperatures at the center and periphery of any suitable size of material or thickness of fuel bed. The material is heated by direct contact with an inert gas, such as water gas, producer gas, or combustion gases, which is passed in counterflow to the material and whose volume is such as to lower the vapor tension or partial pressure of the volatilizable oils and to withdraw the oils without cracking of the oil vapors. The material may be subjected to a preliminary heat treatment by gases containing 2 to 3 percent of free oxygen to reduce its coking properties, and free oxygen may be added either to the heating gases during the heat treatment, or to the retort and heating gases and vapors to polymerize resinous bodies prior to condensation or during condensation and while the oils are still wholly or partially in the vapor state.

  12. Distilling carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrow, J R

    1921-04-16

    To obtain an increased yield of by-products such as oils, ammonia, and gas from coal, oil shale, wood, peat, and the like by low and medium temperature processes, the requisite quantity of hot producer gas from a gas producer, is caused to travel, without ignition, through the material as it passes in a continuous manner through the retort so that the sensible heat of the producer gas is utilized to produce distillation of the carbonaceous material, the gases passing to a condenser, absorption apparatus, and an ammonia absorber respectively. In a two-stage method of treatment of materials such as peat or the like, separate supplies of producer gas are utilized for a preliminary drying operation and for the distillation of the material, the drying receptacle and the retort being joined together to render the process continuous. The gas from the drying receptacle may be mixed with the combined producer and retort gas from the retort, after the hydrocarbon oils have deen removed therefrom.

  13. Distilling carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ironside, T G

    1921-09-01

    In the distillation of carbonaceous material such as shale, coal, lignite, wood or liquid hydrocarbons, the material is mixed with a heated granular substance such as sand which supplies the necessary heat. The shale or the like, which may be preheated, is fed from a hopper by a worm conveyer to a tube leading into a retort, and the heated granular material such as sand is supplied from a jacketed container through a tube. On the lower end of a rotary shaft are radial arms to which are fixed angularly disposed blades which serve to mix the shale and hot sand and deliver the residue to a central discharge pipe closed at the bottom by a conical valve which opens when the weight of the superimposed material is sufficient. The distillates are taken off by an outlet. Steam vapor or gas may be supplied to the retort, preferably through a hollow shaft leading to hollow stirrers perforated to permit of the gas passing into the material. The retort may be externally heated by hot gases in the space surrounding the retort, and the latter may be divided by horizontal floors so that the material is caused to funnel from the periphery to the center of the floor, then through a central opening on to the floor next below, and from the center to the periphery of this floor, and so on.

  14. Retorts; distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, A C

    1869-11-09

    Relates to retorts for distilling shale or other purposes. Each retort has a mouthpiece, which projects into a water trough, having a curved bottom, and sides rising up to ridges, from which extend shoots. Attached to links is the reciprocating discharge bar, actuated from a steam engine, etc., which, through worm-wheel gearing and a shaft, imparts an intermittent motion to a pawl which propels a ratchet-wheel, which is prevented from turning backward by a catch, and drives a rotary shaft, the motion being transmitted to a bar through a crank and rod. The bar, in rising, pushes the residue from the retort out of the trough, over the ridges, and down the shoots into the truck, etc. The vertical retort is made in two lengths, at the joint between which is held the flange of the shell, joined to, or cast with, the part of the retort and forming a jacket into which steam or other vapor or gas is introduced by a pipe. The steam, etc., circulates through an external spiral rib of the shell and issues from the bottom of the shale among the shale, etc., being distilled.

  15. Qutrit magic state distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, Hussain; Browne, Dan E; Campbell, Earl T

    2012-01-01

    Magic state distillation (MSD) is a purification protocol that plays an important role in fault-tolerant quantum computation. Repeated iteration of the steps of an MSD protocol generates pure single non-stabilizer states, or magic states, from multiple copies of a mixed resource state using stabilizer operations only. Thus mixed resource states promote the stabilizer operations to full universality. MSD was introduced for qubit-based quantum computation, but little has been known concerning MSD in higher-dimensional qudit-based computation. Here, we describe a general approach for studying MSD in higher dimensions. We use it to investigate the features of a qutrit MSD protocol based on the five-qutrit stabilizer code. We show that this protocol distils non-stabilizer magic states, and identify two types of states that are attractors of this iteration map. Finally, we show how these states may be converted, via stabilizer circuits alone, into a state suitable for state-injected implementation of a non-Clifford phase gate, enabling non-Clifford unitary computation. (paper)

  16. Chemical profile of sugarcane spirits produced by double distillation methodologies in rectifying still

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ricardo Alcarde

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the chemical profile of sugarcane spirits produced by different double distillation methodologies in rectifying still. Fermented sugarcane juice was distilled in rectifying still according to three double distillation methodologies: the methodology used for cognac production; the methodology used for whisky production; and the 10-80-10 percentage composition methodology, referring to the volumes of head, heart and tail of the distillate fractions from the second distillation. For comparison purposes, a simple distilled spirit was also produced. The distillates were analyzed for concentrations of ethanol, copper, volatile acidity, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural, aldehydes, esters, methanol and higher alcohols. The spirits were also evaluated on the sensory attributes of aroma, taste and preference. Compared to simple distillation, double distillation improved the chemical quality of the spirits, since it has reduced the concentrations of acids, aldehydes, esters, methanol, higher alcohols and, consequently, their coefficient of congeners. Regardless of the methodology employed, the double distillation improved the sensory quality of the spirits since they obtained higher sensory acceptance in relation to spirits produced by simple distillation. Among double distilled spirits, the one produced according to whisky methodology obtained the best scores from appraisers on the aroma and flavor parameters and it was also the most preferred.

  17. Energy saving plan for lime calcining kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Lime calcining kilns operating in China are of old type, consuming more heat energy by 30% or more than the latest type kilns. For the purpose of the COP3 joint implementation, a renewal plan was discussed taking up Benxi Steel Group Company as the object. The new type kiln is a parallel flow energy regenerating (Maerz) kiln. It has as high thermal efficiency as 900 kcal/kg of product. Annual fuel conservation as converted into crude oil will be 7.49x10{sup 3} tons, annual fuel cost reduction will be 101,200,000 yuan, and annual reduction in CO2 emission will be 23,200 tons. The estimated cost required for the project will be 991 million yen, or 66,070,000 yuan if the exchange rate is assumed to be 15 yen to one yuan. The profitability was discussed based on using bank loans and the special environmental yen loan. The investment recovering period was calculated as 7.9 years. This provides no realizability as a project on the business base. However, China strongly desires renewal of the facilities because of discharge of dust from old type facilities, and inferior quality of lime products. The project could be a candidate without doubt if the CDM system will have been established. (NEDO)

  18. Calcination/dissolution testing for Hanford Site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, S.A.; Delegard, C.H.; McLaughlin, D.F.; Danielson, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Thermal treatment by calcination offers several benefits for the treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes, including the destruction of organics and ferrocyanides and an hydroxide fusion that permits the bulk of the mostly soluble nonradioactive constituents to be easily separated from the insoluble transuranic residue. Critical design parameters were tested, including: (1) calciner equipment design, (2) hydroxide fusion chemistry, and (3) equipment corrosion. A 2 gal/minute pilot plant processed a simulated Tank 101-SY waste and produced a free flowing 700 C molten calcine with an average calciner retention time of 20 minutes and >95% organic, nitrate, and nitrite destruction. Laboratory experiments using actual radioactive tank waste and the simulated waste pilot experiments indicate that 98 wt% of the calcine produced is soluble in water, leaving an insoluble transuranic fraction. All of the Hanford Site tank wastes can benefit from calcination/dissolution processing, contingent upon blending various tank waste types to ensure a target of 70 wt% sodium hydroxide/nitrate/nitrite fluxing agent. Finally, corrosion testing indicates that a jacketed nickel liner cooled to below 400 C would corrode <2 mil/year (0.05 mm/year) from molten calcine attack

  19. 27 CFR 27.40 - Distilled spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS IMPORTATION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER Tax On Imported Distilled Spirits, Wines, and Beer Distilled Spirits § 27.40 Distilled spirits. (a) A tax is imposed on all... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distilled spirits. 27.40...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Starter distillate. 184.1848 Section 184.1848 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1848 Starter distillate. (a) Starter distillate (butter starter distillate) is a steam distillate of the culture of any or all of the following species of bacteria grown on...

  1. Assessment of soda ash calcination treatment of Turkish trona ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezer Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trona is relatively rare, non-metallic mineral, Na2CO3 · NaHCO3 · 2H2O. The pure material contains 70.3% sodium carbonate and by calcination the excess CO2 and water can be driven off, yielding natural soda ash. The terms soda ash and sodium carbonate are used interchangeably. Trona calcining is a key process step in production of soda ash (sodium carbonate anhydrate from the relatively cheap trona ore. The calcination reaction may proceeds in a sequence of steps. Depending on the conditions, it may result in formation of either sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na2CO3 · H2O, sodium sesquicarbonate or weigschederite (Na2CO3 · 3NaHCO3. The Beypazarı Turkish trona deposit is the second largest deposit in the world with the content of 84% trona. The decomposition of trona appeared to be a single stage process across the temperature range studied (150-200 °C with the representative samples of different size fractions in the draught up metallurgical furnace. The optimum particle size and calcination time were −6.35 mm and 30 minutes, respectively, at calcination temperature of 175 °C in a metallurgical furnace. Microwave-induced dry calcination of trona was possible and 5 minutes of calcination time at a power level of 900 was sufficient for complete calcination of −6.35 mm feed. This includes short time calcinations with the goal of improving economics and simplifying the thermal process.

  2. Evaluation of sulfonated carbon as catalyst in reactive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orjuela, Alvaro; Civetta, Nicolas; Rivera, Jairo; Boyaca, Alejandro; Diaz, Jesus

    2004-01-01

    A packed bed using sulfonated coal catalytic pellets was prepared using a Colombian anthracitic coal. Such pellets were introduced in a semi batch distillation column to which acetic acid and ethanol were fed in order to determine experimentally the feasibility of obtaining ethyl acetate by reactive distillation operation. The carbonaceous catalytic packing was characterized by total exchange capacity, potentiometric titration and BET area. Experimental tests were carried out using three acid/alcohol ratios. Results of such process are shown by reaction conversion and concentration in distillate and bottom products. The sulfonated coal showed catalytic activity in this esterification reaction, with conversions between 29-45%

  3. Distilling oils, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, W G

    1913-08-13

    Oils and other products are distilled continuously from materials containing or charged with hydrocarbons, such as coal, shale, absorbent materials containing oil, or metal turnings covered with oil, in a vertical or inclined combustion chamber supplied continuously or intermittently with a small quantity of air, and continuously with a large quantity of gases from the condenser admitted below the combustion zone. If desired, steam may also be supplied to the combustion chamber. In the apparatus shown are the combustion chamber, the air inlet, the gas-inlet pipe, the gas-outlet pipe, the condenser, and a mechanical separator which preferably also acts as a fan. A pair of slides is provided at the bottom of the combustion chamber to discharge the residue without admitting air, or a water seal may be used.

  4. Distilling oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crozier, R H

    1923-04-18

    In the fractional distillation of oils from oil shale and similar materials the charge is passed continuously through a vertical retort heated externally by hot combustion gases in flues and internally by the passage of these gases through flues passing through the retort so that zones of increasing temperature are maintained. A vapor trap is provided in each zone having an exit pipe leading through a dust trap to a condenser. The bottoms of the conical vapor traps are provided with annular passages perforated to permit of steam being sprayed into the charge to form screens which prevent the vapors in different zones from mingling, and steam may also be introduced through perforations in an annular steam box. Dampers are provided to control the passage of the heating gases through the flues independently.

  5. Coal distillation plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overton, P C

    1937-05-20

    To fractionally condense the vapours derived from the distillation of coal or shale, an apparatus comprises a low temperature carbonisation retort having a plurality of differently heating zones therein which connect with a manifold in which said gas oil vapours can expand. A dephlegmator, cold water jacketted and centrally air heated, causes the heavier matters of the vapours to settle out and the lighter oil gas vapours are conveyed to the bottom of an electrically operated fractionating apparatus comprising a column furnished with a plurality of compartments each heated by electrical elements connected to source of current by lead wires. Annular launders in the compartments collect the derived liquids at the various levels and deliver same by pipes to separate sump while pipe at head of column draws off incondensible gases for return to retort.

  6. Alkali cyanides; destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, J C

    1925-12-02

    The destructive distillation of carbonaceous substances can be accomplished by heating them in a bath of molten alkali and cyanide. Liquid hydrocarbons are produced. The separation of the cyanide from the coke or carbonaceous residues by filtration leaves a substantial quantity of cyanide absorbed by the carbon. A feasible method for removal has been developed by mixing the mixture of cyanide and coke with sodium carbonate or other alkali in the molten state, then treating this substance with nitrogen with or without ammonia to convert most of the carbon to cyanide. The carbonaceous material may be mixed with a liquid hydrocarbon such as petroleum, shale oil, or heavy tar oil, heated, and introduced below the surface of the liquid cyanide which partially decomposes and hydrogenates the coal to increase the yield of hydrocarbons. Dry ammonia may be bubbled through the reaction mixture to effect agitation and to form more cyanide.

  7. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during the pastdecades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Varioustechniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packedbed, dividing-wall columns...

  8. Efecto de la concentración de SO2 en las reacciones de calcinación y sulfatación de calcáreos en reactores de lecho fluidizado. // Effect of the SO2 concentration in the calcinations and sulfatation reactions in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Lindo Samaniego

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fue realizado un estudio sobre el efecto de las concentraciones de SO2 en la absorción por calcáreo en hornos de LechoFluidizado. Para observar la influencia del SO2 en los parámetros de diferentes procesos físicos y químicos fueron creadosambientes para cuatro concentraciones diferentes de SO2 : 500, 1000, 2000 y 4000 ppm. Se utilizaron dos tipos decalcáreos: Dolimitico-DP y el Calcítico-CI. El Lecho Fluidizado Burbujeante utilizado tiene 160 mm de diámetro interno yfue fluidizado con aire a la temperatura de 850 °C, con una concentración de SO2 deseada. Como material del lecho fueutilizada la arena de cuarzo (99,9% con diámetro de 385 μm y de masa aproximadamente 3,0 kg. El calcáreo fueadicionado en dosificación de 50 g con el reactor ya pre-calentado. Las variaciones de las concentraciones de SO2, CO2,CO, O2 y las descargas, fueron monitoreadas continuamente a la salida del ciclón que fue utilizado para la retención de lapartícula fina. Para esos dados se desarrolló un programa en LabView. El modelo matemático escogido posibilitó ladeterminación de la conversión.Palabras claves: Lecho fluidizado, dióxido de azufre, absorción de azufre, calcáreo , reactor de lechofluidizado.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract.A Study of the effect of the concentrations of SO2 in its absorption by limestones in fluidized bed furnaces wasconducted. For the determination of the SO2 influence on the different physical and chemical parameters of process,such as calcinations and sulfatation four different atmospheres were used in the reator with concentrations of SO2 of500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 ppm. Two types of limestones were used: Dolomite-DP and Calcitic-CI. The bench scalebubbling fluidized bed reactor had a 160 mm internal diameter and was fluidized with air at 850 °C containing therequired concentration of SO2. Bed material was quartz sand (99,9% , with 385 μm diameter and approximately

  9. Study of as-synthesized and calcined hydrocalumites as possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ments. Finally, these solids were tested as antacids by using a synthetic gastric juice. Results showed that calcined samples were able to neutralize the synthetic gastric juice in more extension as an as-synthesized ..... D 2010 Appl. Clay Sci.

  10. Effect of calcination conditions of pork bone sludge on behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... bone sludge from meat plant via two essentially different calcination methods using ... tissue and suitability for further investigations intended for medical grafting. ... The Alfred Meissner Higher School of Dental Engineering and Humanities, ...

  11. CSER 99-001: PFP LAB Dentirating calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, E.M.; DOBBIN, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation report was prepared for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) laboratory denigrating calciner, located in Glovebox 188-1, that converts Pu(NO 3 ) 4 solutions to the high fired stable oxide PuO 2 . Fissile mass limits and volume limits are set for the glovebox for testing operations and training operators using only nitric acid feed to a plutonium oxide bed in the calciner

  12. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Testing activation on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan for the Prototype vertical Denitration Calciner has been developed for this process

  13. Recovery of acetic acid from waste streams by extractive distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiral, H; Yildirim, M Ercengiz

    2003-01-01

    Wastes have been considered to be a serious worldwide environmental problem in recent years. Because of increasing pollution, these wastes should be treated. However, industrial wastes can contain a number of valuable organic components. Recovery of these components is important economically. Using conventional distillation techniques, the separation of acetic acid and water is both impractical and uneconomical, because it often requires large number of trays and a high reflux ratio. In practice special techniques are used depending on the concentration of acetic acid. Between 30 and 70% (w/w) acetic acid contents, extractive distillation was suggested. Extractive distillation is a multicomponent-rectification method similar in purpose to azeotropic distillation. In extractive distillation, to a binary mixture which is difficult or impossible to separate by ordinary means, a third component termed an entrainer is added which alters the relative volatility of the original constituents, thus permitting the separation. In our department acetic acid is used as a solvent during the obtaining of cobalt(III) acetate from cobalt(II) acetate by an electrochemical method. After the operation, the remaining waste contains acetic acid. In thiswork, acetic acid which has been found in this waste was recovered by extractive distillation. Adiponitrile and sulfolane were used as high boiling solvents and the effects of solvent feed rate/solution feed rate ratio and type were investigated. According to the experimental results, it was seem that the recovery of acetic acid from waste streams is possible by extractive distillation.

  14. Limestone calcination under calcium-looping conditions for CO2 capture and thermochemical energy storage in the presence of H2O: an in situ XRD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Medina, Santiago

    2017-03-15

    This work reports an in situ XRD analysis of whether the calcination/carbonation behavior of natural limestone (CaCO 3 ) is affected by the addition of H 2 O to the calciner at a very low concentration under relevant Calcium-Looping (CaL) conditions for CO 2 capture in coal fired power plants (CFPP) and Thermochemical Energy Storage (TCES) in Concentrated Solar Power plants (CSP). Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of steam in the calciner at a high concentration yields a significant increase in the reaction rate. However, a further undesired consequence is the serious deterioration of the CaO mechanical strength, which would lead to particle attrition and mass loss in any CaL process based on the use of circulating fluidized beds. The results presented in this manuscript on the time evolution of the wt% and crystallite size of the phases involved in the calcination/carbonation reactions indicate that the calcination rate is still notably increased by the presence of H 2 O at very low concentrations whereas the reactivity toward carbonation and crystal structure of the formed CaO are not essentially affected, which suggests that the CaO mechanical strength is not impaired. Thus, the benefit of using steam for calcination in the CaL process could be still retained while at the same time particle attrition would not be promoted.

  15. Hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Nobuo; Mitsui, Jin

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation in fusion fuel cycle and tritium recovery from heavy water reactor are very important, and therefore the early establishment of these separation techniques are desired. The cryogenic distillation method in particular is promising for the separation of hydrogen isotope and the recovery of high concentrated tritium. The studies of hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method have been carried out by using the experimental apparatus made for the first time in Japan. The separation of three components (H 2 -HD-D 2 ) under total reflux conditions was got by using the packing tower of 500 mm height. It was confirmed that the Height Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) was 20 - 30 mm for the vapor's line velocity of 20 - 80 mm/s. (author)

  16. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory's Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Vince

    2011-01-01

    relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

  17. High-Temperature Release of SO2 from Calcined Cement Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of alternative fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions may occur and cause reductive decomposition of sulfates from calcined cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2...... concentration, which may cause deposit formation in the kiln system. In this study, the release of sulfur from calcined cement raw materials under both oxidizing and reducing conditions is investigated. The investigations include thermodynamic equilibrium calculations in the temperature interval of 800–1500 °C...... and experiments in a tube furnace reactor in the temperature interval of 900–1100 °C. The investigated conditions resemble actual conditions in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns. It was found that the sulfates CaSO4, K2SO4, and Na2SO4 were all stable under oxidizing conditions but began to decompose...

  18. PARAFFIN SEPARATION VACUUM DISTILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid A. Abdulrahman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulated column performance curves were constructed for existing paraffin separation vacuum distillation column in LAB plant (Arab Detergent Company/Baiji-Iraq. The variables considered in this study are the thermodynamic model option, top vacuum pressure, top and bottom temperatures, feed temperature, feed composition & reflux ratio. Also simulated columns profiles for the temperature, vapor & liquid flow rates composition were constructed. Four different thermodynamic model options (SRK, TSRK, PR, and ESSO were used, affecting the results within 1-25% variation for the most cases.The simulated results show that about 2% to 8 % of paraffin (C10, C11, C12, & C13 present at the bottom stream which may cause a problem in the LAB plant. The major variations were noticed for the top temperature & the  paraffin weight fractions at bottom section with top vacuum pressure. The bottom temperature above 240 oC is not recommended because the total bottom flow rate decreases sharply, where as  the weight fraction of paraffins decrease slightly. The study gives evidence about a successful simulation with CHEMCAD

  19. Distillation of oil shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronder, G A

    1926-03-22

    To distill oil shales, cannel coals, and other carbonaceous materials for the extraction therefrom of hydrocarbons and volatile nitrogenous compounds, hard non-condensable gases from the condensers and scrubbers are withdrawn by blowers and admixed with burnt gases, obtained through conduits from the flues of heaters, and forced downwardly through horizontal chambers, connected by vertical conduits, of the heaters and delivered into the retort beneath the grate. Passing upwardly through the charge they vaporize the volatile substances in the shale, and a suction pump removes the vapors from the top of the retort. Immediately they are produced and at substantially the same temperature as that at which they emanate, thus preventing cracking of the oil vapors and condensation of the oil at the top of the retort. The amount of burnt flue gas admixed with the hard gases is regulated by two valves until a required uniform temperature is obtained. A generator supplies producer gas to a heater at the commencement of the retorting operation for circulation through the shale charge to initially produce oil vapors. The generator is connected by a pipe to the gas conduit leading to blowers.

  20. Low temperature distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, J N; Postel, C

    1929-04-09

    To recover gas, oil tars, and coked residues by low temperature distillation from bituminous coals, lignites, oil shales, and the like, the raw material is fed from a hopper into a rotary retort which is zonally heated, the temperature being greatest at the discharge end. The material is heated first to a relatively low temperature, thereby removing the moisture and lighter volatiles which are withdrawn through a pipe by the suction of a pump, while the higher boiling point volatiles and fixed gases are withdrawn by suction through an outlet from the higher temperature zone. The vapors withdrawn from the opposite ends of the retort pass through separate vapor lines and condensers, and the suction in each end of the retort, caused by the pumps, is controlled by valves, which also control the location of the neutral point in the retort formed by said suction. Air and inert gas may be introduced into the retort from pipe and stack respectively through a pipe, and steam may be admitted into the high temperature zone through a pipe.

  1. Distillation of carbonaceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainscow, J W.H.

    1936-10-03

    To recover hydrocarbon products by distillation of carbonaceous material in a plurality of horizontal zones maintained at different temperatures, a retort has a plurality of superimposed (3) retort chambers, the uppermost being in communication at one end with a hopper and at the other end through coupled junction not shown with one end of the next lower chamber, whose opposite end communicates with lowermost chamber, the other end of which has a sealed discharge passage, tank, and conveyor not shown. Each retort chamber has stirring and conveying means consisting of helical blades (2) attached to radial arms on shaft mounted in water cooled bearings and driven through suitably mounted sprocket wheels and chains not shown. Each retort chamber has a gas dome, with pyrometer tube, and off-take connected to a common main opening into a dust eliminator which in turn connects with a plurality of vertical condensation towers of known construction, maintained at different temperatures by means of steam from a superheater not shown situated in one retort chamber. The retort heating gases pass from the furnace via zig-zag, (three) baffles under and around each retort chamber to a flue not shown.

  2. Destructive distillation; retorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilby, G T

    1881-10-03

    For distilling shale and other oil-yielding minerals. Relates to apparatus described in Specification No. 2169 (1881) in which retorts arranged in sets, and mounted loosely in brickwork to allow expansion, are formed preferably of upper iron tubes, fixed by socket rings, to lower fireclay tubes formed with belts which, together with ledges in the sides of the oven, support fireclay slabs. In some cases the lower parts of the retorts may be formed of iron tubes. Each set of four upper tubes is supplied with a four-way hopper, suspended by means of a pair of counter-weighted levers, centered on bearing plates and connected with the hopper by links. A single pipe connected to the hopper serves for leading off the vapors from the four retorts. The retorts are heated by a furnace, the hot gases from which after acting on the retorts are led to ovens in which are placed steam generators and superheaters, from which steam is conveyed to the interior of the retorts to assist the decomposition.

  3. Furnaces for destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A

    1897-12-04

    Shale or other material is dropped from a hopper F into an annular retort or kiln A/sup 3/, the walls of which enclose annular flues C, C/sup 1/ in which gas is burnt to heat it. Radial flues also extend across the kiln. The kiln is supported above the ground level by pillars B. The material rests at the bottom on an annular plate H, having a flat middle portion with inclined sides. This is supported within an annular hopper I, provided with counterweighted discharging doors I/sup 1/, held by latches and sealed by placing water on them; or a large conical hopper may be used, provided with a conveyer screw, and containing water. Four long scrapers J are reciprocated radially on the flat part of the plate H by rods J/sup 1/, passed through stuffing-boxes in the hopper, and engaged with eccentric K which are rotated by worm gearing. Doors M in the hopper I, and holes in the plate H, permit stirring-tools to be introduced. The upper part of the kiln consists of iron rings a, a/sup 1/; the products of combustion from the flues pass through openings a/sup 5/ into a central chimney a/sup 3/. The products of distillation are delivered through tubes G.

  4. Destructive distillation of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollason, A

    1918-08-23

    To obtain light oils and ammonia from coals having volatile and oxygen contents, the crushed material is mixed with 5 percent of ground amorphous calcium carbonate and distilled slowly in a cast iron retort to remove the water and light oils, the ammonia being synthesized at a later stage. The crushed residue is gasified in a producer by a blast of air and superheated steam at about 950/sup 0/C. The steam and air are passed very slowly at low pressure through the fuel to cause the dissociation of the atmospheric nitrogen molecules into atoms. The gases are then passed to a heater, having a temperature of 500/sup 0/C, and thence to a continuously working externally-heated retort charged with fuel, such as the hard retort residues, maintained below 850/sup 0/C. The water vapor in the gases is dissociated by the incandescent fuel, the oxygen combining with the carbon, and the lime present in the fuel causes the hydrogen to combine with the free nitrogen atoms, thus forming ammonia. The gases after leaving the retort are cooled down to 85 to 95/sup 0/C and the ammonia may be recovered by conversion into ammonium sulphate. The resultant cooled gases may again be charged with superheated steam and utilized again in the heater and retort.

  5. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    Concentration of fruit juices by membrane distillation is an interesting process as it can be done at low temperature giving a gentle concentration process with little deterioration of the juices. Since the juices contains many different aroma compounds with a wide range of chemical properties...... such as volatility, activity coefficient and vapor pressure, it is important to know how these aroma compounds will eventually pass through the membrane. Experiments have been made on an aroma model solution and on black currant juice in a lab scale membrane distillation set up which can be operated in various types...... of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...

  6. Use of solar distillation for olive mill wastewater drying and recovery of polyphenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklavos, Sotirios; Gatidou, Georgia; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Haralambopoulos, Dias

    2015-10-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) is characterized by its high organic load and the presence of phenolic compounds. For first time, a solar distillator was used to investigate the simultaneous solar drying of OMW and the recovery of phenolic compounds with antioxidant properties in the distillate. Two experiments were conducted and the role of thermal insulation on the performance of the distiller was studied. The use of insulation resulted to higher temperatures in the distillator (up to 84.3 °C and 78.5 °C at the air and sludge, respectively), shorter period for OMW dewatering (14 days), while it increased the performance of distillator by 26.1%. Chemical characterization of the distillate showed that pH and COD concentration gradually decreased during the experiments, whereas an opposite trend was noticed for conductivity and total phenols concentration. Almost 4% of the total phenols found initially in OMW were transferred to the distillate when an insulated solar distillator was used. Gas chromatographic analysis of collected distillates confirmed the presence of tyrosol in all samples; whereas hydroxytyrosol was found only in fresh collected distillate samples. Further experiments should be conducted to optimize the process and quantify the concentrations of recovered phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anaesthetic effects of Adenia gummifera distillates on Apis mellifera (Honeybee).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngarivhume, T; Dzomba, P; Gwizangwe, I; Zendera, C H; Katsvanga, C A T; Jimu, L; Moyo, M; Chagonda, T

    2008-01-01

    The anaesthetic activities of steam distillates of Adenia gummifera stem on Apis mellifera were evaluated by a diffusion method. Live, direct and fractional (61-80 degrees C fraction) distillates had greater anaesthetic effect while vacuum distillates were mild. The anaesthetic activity significantly increased with concentration up to 6% (v/v), and then it levelled off, while excessive exposure was lethal. The number of bees in a given volume had no significant effect on anaesthetic activity but container volume (F(cal) = 66.4; F(3,8) = 4.07) and bee-distillate distance (F(cal) = 31.0; F(2,6) = 5.14) did, suggesting the rate of diffusion of active component could be the determining factor. The active component is likely to contain amines and the rest halogenated alkane.

  8. Method of distilling organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, E G.T.

    1921-11-11

    In the distillation of organic materials, by means of coursing heated gases through the distillation chamber, that can be heated by other means also, a method is given by which the hot gases coming from the distillation chamber are cooled in one or more heat-absorbent devices (for example, in spray coolers, condensers and/or water). The greater part of the products or constituents condensable at ordinary temperature are separated from the vapors and gases, and thereafter the gases should be passed through the distillation chamber after the necessary additional heating in special heaters, as one or more heat producers, suitably of the same construction as the heat absorbers, for heating and saturation with steam by means of warm condensate and/or water obtained fully or partly from the heat absorbers, possibly after separation of tar or oil from them. The patent has 11 other claims.

  9. Process of distilling heavy hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1929-12-03

    This invention has for its object the distillation of heavy liquid hydrocarbons for the purpose of obtaining lighter hydrocarbons stable and immediately salable for fuels in combustion motors. The process is distinguished by the fact that the heavy hydrocarbon is distilled by means of heating to a temperature in keeping with the nature of the material to be treated up to 350/sup 0/C under pressure or without pressure the distillation being carried out on catalysts containing successively nickel, copper, and iron (3 parts of nickel, 1 part of copper, and 1 part of iron), the vapors produced by this distillation being exposed in turn to the action of catalysts of the same nature and in the same proportion.

  10. Retorts for distilling carbonaceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, H E

    1921-09-12

    A retort for distilling carbonaceous material is described in which a mass of such material is retained in a pocket formed between an outer wall and an internal wall which is perforated to permit the free escape of distilled products, the retorts having heating means that directly heat the retort but are so related to the pocket that the material therein is heated indirectly and simultaneously from all sides entirely by heat conducted thereto by the walls.

  11. Distillation process using microchannel technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee [Dublin, OH; Simmons, Wayne W [Dublin, OH; Silva, Laura J [Dublin, OH; Qiu, Dongming [Carbondale, IL; Perry, Steven T [Galloway, OH; Yuschak, Thomas [Dublin, OH; Hickey, Thomas P [Dublin, OH; Arora, Ravi [Dublin, OH; Smith, Amanda [Galloway, OH; Litt, Robert Dwayne [Westerville, OH; Neagle, Paul [Westerville, OH

    2009-11-03

    The disclosed invention relates to a distillation process for separating two or more components having different volatilities from a liquid mixture containing the components. The process employs microchannel technology for effecting the distillation and is particularly suitable for conducting difficult separations, such as the separation of ethane from ethylene, wherein the individual components are characterized by having volatilities that are very close to one another.

  12. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  13. Distilling carbonaceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karrick, L C

    1926-11-02

    Coal, shale and the like are distilled in a current of superheated steam which is passed into a retort at about midway between its ends a further supply being if necessary introduced at the bottom to generate water-gas, and the coke being dry quenched in a hopper below the retort. Combustion products may also be introduced and the temperature may be varied from 950 to 1725/sup 0/F, oil, gas, resin and a residual coke having good adsorbent value, being obtained. The charge from hoppers and auxiliary hoppers is fed to retorts situated between gas and steam preheaters, the rate of downward movement being controlled by discharge rollers having arms, counterweighted rocking arms allowing the residue to be fed downwards into hoppers. Steam from a pipe is superheated in horizontal passages, and admitted through ports into the retort. Preheated fuel gas is burnt in combustion flues and passes down through vertical flues, across horizontal flues and up flues adjacent the retorts, from which by ports and flues it passes down a chamber having an air or gas preheater each having two independent systems, one discharging into the combustion chamber beneath it and the other into an adjacent chamber. Air or gas enters by pipes and after being heated in pipes is fed by ports to the chamber. The volatiles pass off through outlets leading to a main air cooled condenser and a water-cooled condenser delivering to a separating tank connecting with pipes for quenching the residues and with pipes to preheat the charge in the hoppers and maintain a gas barrier the rein. Superheated steam may also be admitted through ports to generate water-gas and increase the total volume of gases and combustion products may be introduced through ports. The upper part of the retort is made of cast iron, the high temperature parts of silica or carborundum brick, and the lower part of chrome iron or other metal.

  14. Distillation Designs for the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange,Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Gravity-based distillation methods may be applied to the purification of wastewater on the lunar base. These solutions to water processing are robust physical separation techniques, which may be more advantageous than many other techniques for their simplicity in design and operation. The two techniques can be used in conjunction with each other to obtain high purity water. The components and feed compositions for modeling waste water streams are presented in conjunction with the Aspen property system for traditional stage distillation. While the individual components for each of the waste streams will vary naturally within certain bounds, an analog model for waste water processing is suggested based on typical concentration ranges for these components. Target purity levels for recycled water are determined for each individual component based on NASA s required maximum contaminant levels for potable water Optimum parameters such as reflux ratio, feed stage location, and processing rates are determined with respect to the power consumption of the process. Multistage distillation is evaluated for components in wastewater to determine the minimum number of stages necessary for each of 65 components in humidity condensate and urine wastewater mixed streams.

  15. Zone distillation: a new purification method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    The features of zone distillation (with zone melting of refined material and with pulling of condensate) as a new purification method are shown. The method is based on similarity of equations of distillation and crystallization refining. The analogy between some distillation and condensation methods (particularly between zone distillation and zone recrystallization) is should up

  16. Adsorption of basic chromium sulfate used in the tannery industries by calcined hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Rivera R, R.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    The sorption behavior of the chemical species of Cr(III) from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite calcined products was investigated considering the equilibrium ph (5.0 to 8.9) and the chromium concentration in aqueous solution (from 10.6 to 430.0 mmol/L) to obtain the corresponding isotherms. Each solution was prepared from basic Cr(III) sulphate which is a primary tanning agent used in the tannery industries. In this work no previous oxidation treatment was done to form Cr(vi) in order to remove the chromium from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite. The amount of chromium in the remaining solutions after the sorption processes in a batch system by visible spectroscopy (Vis) was determined. The calcined hydrotalcite before and after the contact with the chromium(III) solutions by X-ray power diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, were characterized. The specific are by Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (Bet) method of each sample was also evaluated. It was found that under the experimental conditions of this work hydrolyzed species of Cr(III) are precipitated on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite instead other adsorption mechanism, and the sulfate ions were the responsible to regenerated the crystalline structure of hydrotalcite, therefore the results are discussed in terms of both Cr(III) and sulfate chemical species. (Author)

  17. Adsorption of basic chromium sulfate used in the tannery industries by calcined hydrotalcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Rivera R, R.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T., E-mail: beatriz.lopez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of the chemical species of Cr(III) from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite calcined products was investigated considering the equilibrium ph (5.0 to 8.9) and the chromium concentration in aqueous solution (from 10.6 to 430.0 mmol/L) to obtain the corresponding isotherms. Each solution was prepared from basic Cr(III) sulphate which is a primary tanning agent used in the tannery industries. In this work no previous oxidation treatment was done to form Cr(vi) in order to remove the chromium from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite. The amount of chromium in the remaining solutions after the sorption processes in a batch system by visible spectroscopy (Vis) was determined. The calcined hydrotalcite before and after the contact with the chromium(III) solutions by X-ray power diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, were characterized. The specific are by Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (Bet) method of each sample was also evaluated. It was found that under the experimental conditions of this work hydrolyzed species of Cr(III) are precipitated on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite instead other adsorption mechanism, and the sulfate ions were the responsible to regenerated the crystalline structure of hydrotalcite, therefore the results are discussed in terms of both Cr(III) and sulfate chemical species. (Author)

  18. Oxyfuel carbonation/calcination cycle for low cost CO2 capture in existing power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, Luis M.; Abanades, J. Carlos; Escosa, Jesus M.; Pano, Jara; Gimenez, Antonio; Sanchez-Biezma, Andres; Ballesteros, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Postcombustion CO 2 capture is the best suitable capture technology for existing coal power plants. This paper focuses on an emerging technology that involves the separation of CO 2 using the reversible carbonation reaction of CaO to capture CO 2 from the flue gas, and the calcination of CaCO 3 to regenerate the sorbent and produce concentrated CO 2 for storage. We describe the application to this concept to an existing (with today's technology) power plant. The added capture system incorporates a new supercritical steam cycle to take advantage of the large amount of heat coming out from the high temperature capture process (oxyfired combustion of coal is needed in the CaCO 3 calciner). In these conditions, the capture system is able to generate additional power (26.7% efficiency respect to LHV coal input to the calciner after accounting for all the penalties in the overall system), without disturbing the steam cycle of the reference plant (that retains its 44.9 efficiency). A preliminary cost study of the overall system, using well established analogues in the open literature for the main components, yields capture cost around 16 Euro /ton CO 2 avoided and incremental cost of electricity of just over 1 Euro /MW h e

  19. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval From Binsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Mohr, C.M.; Nelson, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak c oncentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  20. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval From Binsets; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Mohr, C.M.; Nelson, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak c oncentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  1. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  2. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staiger, M. Daniel; Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  3. Total oxidation of toluene over calcined trimetallic hydrotalcites type catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio, Luz A. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IBB - Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Grupo Catalizadores y Adsorbentes, Universidad de Antioquia 1-317, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia); Velasquez, Juliana; Echavarria, Adriana [Grupo Catalizadores y Adsorbentes, Universidad de Antioquia 1-317, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia); Faro, Arnaldo [Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, CT bloco A, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ramoa Ribeiro, F. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IBB - Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, M. Filipa, E-mail: filipa.ribeiro@ist.utl.pt [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IBB - Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-05-15

    Two trimetallic ZnCuAl and MnCuAl hydrotalcites have been successfully synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The manganese based material was identified as a new hydrotalcite phase. Both lamellar precursors were calcined at 450 and 600 deg. C and the resulting catalysts were tested on reaction of total oxidation of toluene. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction. It was found that ZnCuAl materials are composed of copper and zinc oxides supported on alumina; while MnCuAl ones comprise basically spinel phases, which were not completely identified. The catalytic behavior of the calcined samples showed that Mn hydrotalcite calcined at 450 deg. C exhibited the best catalytic performance that corresponds to 100% toluene conversion into CO{sub 2} at about 300 deg. C.

  4. Microstructural changes in porous hematite nanoparticles upon calcination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rune; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Molenbroek, Alfons M.

    2011-01-01

    This combined study using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and adsorption isotherm techniques demonstrates radical changes in the microstructure of porous hematite (-Fe2O3) nanoparticles upon calcination in air. TEM....... The change in microstructure also causes a reduction in the surface area as calculated by gaseous adsorption. The XRPD and SANS data show that the crystallite and SANS particle sizes are virtually unchanged by calcination at 623 K. Calcination at 973 K induces a significant alteration of the sample. The XRPD...... data reveal that the crystallite size increases significantly, and the SANS and adsorption isotherm studies suggest that the specific surface area decreases by a factor of 5–6. The TEM images show that the particles are sintered into larger agglomerates, but they also show that parts of the porous...

  5. Total oxidation of toluene over calcined trimetallic hydrotalcites type catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Luz A.; Velasquez, Juliana; Echavarria, Adriana; Faro, Arnaldo; Ramoa Ribeiro, F.; Ribeiro, M. Filipa

    2010-01-01

    Two trimetallic ZnCuAl and MnCuAl hydrotalcites have been successfully synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The manganese based material was identified as a new hydrotalcite phase. Both lamellar precursors were calcined at 450 and 600 deg. C and the resulting catalysts were tested on reaction of total oxidation of toluene. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption and H 2 temperature-programmed reduction. It was found that ZnCuAl materials are composed of copper and zinc oxides supported on alumina; while MnCuAl ones comprise basically spinel phases, which were not completely identified. The catalytic behavior of the calcined samples showed that Mn hydrotalcite calcined at 450 deg. C exhibited the best catalytic performance that corresponds to 100% toluene conversion into CO 2 at about 300 deg. C.

  6. Letter report: Evaluation of dryer/calciner technologies for testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, G.

    1996-02-01

    This letter report describes some past experiences on the drying and calcination of radioactive materials or corresponding simulants; and the information needed from testing. The report also includes an assessment of informational needs including possible impacts to a full-scale plant. This includes reliability, maintenance, and overall size versus throughput. Much of the material was previously compiled and reported by Mike Elliott of PNL open-quotes Melter Performance Assessmentclose quotes and Larry Eisenstatt of SEG on contract to WHC in a letter to Rod Powell. Also, an annotated bibliography was prepared by Reagan Seymour of WHC. Descriptions of the drying and calciner technologies, development status, advantages and disadvantages of using a WFE or calciner, and recommendations for future testing are discussed in this report

  7. Design and construction of a Fresnel linear distiller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saettone, E.

    2014-01-01

    It was designed a Fresnel linear distiller based on optical calculations obtained from taking into account Lima's latitude value, Earth inclination angle and heat absorber cavity's dimensions. The 5.6 m 2 reflective surface concentrator of the distiller was constructed with 32 plane rectangular mirrors; the heat absorber cavity was made with a rectangular blackened aluminum tube 1 m long and installed 2.5 m over the plane of mirrors. The Fresnel linear distiller was installed at the University of Lima and experimental tests were performed during no cloudy summer days. There were measured ambient temperature, heat absorber cavity temperature, radiant flux and fresh water volume. From this, it was obtained a production of 0.89 liters/hour and 0.79 L/m 2 , and it was calculated a total performance of 34.5% in desalting sea water. Finally, it is presented a comparison between Fresnel linear distiller (FLD) and parabolic trough distiller (PTD) with similar dimensions and characteristics. It is obtained that the last one produced almost 32% more fresh water than the former, but at the same time, the FLD is almost 20% cheaper than PTD. However, water cost production with both distillers using is almost the same. (author)

  8. Toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon distillates to soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Janet H; Stephenson, Gladys L; Birkholz, Detlef; Wang, Zhendi; Dixon, D George

    2010-12-01

    Canadian standards for petroleum hydrocarbons in soil are based on four distillate ranges (F1, C6-C10; F2, >C10-C16; F3, >C16-C34; and F4, >C34). Concerns have arisen that the ecological soil contact standards for F3 may be overly conservative. Oil distillates were prepared and characterized, and the toxicity of F3 and two subfractions, F3a (>C16-C23) and F3b (>C23-C34), to earthworms (Eisenia andrei), springtails (Orthonychiurus folsomi), and northern wheatgrass (Elymus lanceolatus), as well as the toxicity of F2 to earthworms, was determined. Clean soil was spiked with individual distillates and measured concentrations were determined for select tests. Results agree with previous studies with these distillates. Reported toxicities of crude and petroleum products to invertebrates were generally comparable to that of F3 and F3a. The decreasing order of toxicity was F3a > F3 > F3b with invertebrates, and F3a > F3b > F3 with plants. The toxicities of F3a and F3b were not sufficiently different to recommend regulating hydrocarbons based on these distillate ranges. The results also suggest that test durations may be insufficient for determining toxicity of higher distillate ranges, and that the selection of species and endpoints may significantly affect interpretation of toxicity test results. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  9. Efficiency of fermionic quantum distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbrych, Jacek W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feiguin, Adrian E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Dagotto, Elbio R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Heidrich-Meisner, F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Munchen, Munchen (Germany)

    2017-09-13

    Here, we present a time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group investigation of the quantum distillation process within the Fermi-Hubbard model on a quasi-one-dimensional ladder geometry. The term distillation refers to the dynamical, spatial separation of singlons and doublons in the sudden expansion of interacting particles in an optical lattice, i.e., the release of a cloud of atoms from a trapping potential. Remarkably, quantum distillation can lead to a contraction of the doublon cloud, resulting in an increased density of the doublons in the core region compared to the initial state. As a main result, we show that this phenomenon is not limited to chains that were previously studied. Interestingly, there are additional dynamical processes on the two-leg ladder such as density oscillations and self-trapping of defects that lead to a less efficient distillation process. An investigation of the time evolution starting from product states provides an explanation for this behavior. Initial product states are also considered since in optical lattice experiments, such states are often used as the initial setup. We propose configurations that lead to a fast and efficient quantum distillation.

  10. Techniques for detection of transition phases in calcined alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandolfelli, V.C.; Folgueras-Dominguez, S.

    1987-01-01

    Detection of transition phases in alumina, is very important in the receiving control and calcination of aluminium hydroxide. The non alfa or transition phases difficults the processability and causes localized shrinkage on sintering compromising the dimensional and mechanical aspects of the product. In this research using refraction index, absorption of dyes, specific density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, analyses, are done in calcined hydroxides submited to different thermal treatments. The limits and facilities of each technique are discussed and compared. (Author) [pt

  11. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    1999-06-01

    A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

  12. Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

    2005-06-01

    The current baseline assumption is that packaging ¡§as is¡¨ and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80„aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels

  13. Three-phase fluidized distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravagnani, T.M.K.; Pereira, J.A.F.R.

    2001-01-01

    Separation efficiency in distillation operations can be improved by modifying the characteristics of the dispersions formed on the trays. The present work reports on the hydrodynamic and mass transfer characteristics of liquid-solid-vapour dispersions formed on sieve trays without downcomers of a distillation column operating under total reflux conditions. Murphree efficiency and the operating limits of distillation using the ethanol-n-butanol system are analyzed for a large range of vapour velocities and liquid mixture compositions, utilising wettable PVC particles and non-wettable silicone, PE, and Teflon((R)) particles. It was verified that wettable particles show a drastic reduction in the upper operating limit of vapour velocity, but this does not occur for non-wettable particles. Tray efficiency can be increased when non-wettable particles are used, mainly for high vapour velocity operations. (author)

  14. Continuous fractional distillation of petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-11-05

    This invention has for its object a process of distillation, fractional, and continuous, of shale oil, tar, etc., characterized by the vapors leaving the evaporation chamber being forced, before condensation, to go over a continuous circuit. The vapors traverse first a preheater then return to the vaporization chamber in which they are passed along large surfaces and by application of the counter-current principle in contact with the liquid to be distilled. They stream through the chamber in a continuous manner (the quantity of vapor emitted in the circuit being determined in a manner to advance the distillation just to completion); the excess of vapor formed being removed from the circuit and sent to a condensing apparatus for fractionation.

  15. Performance indicators of bioethanol distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriaga, Nilson

    2009-01-01

    The increase of biofuels demand accelerates the construction of new production plants and technological improvements in the process so the development of versatile tools for evaluating alternatives becomes an undeniable challenge. It was established through heuristic rules, thermodynamic analysis and simulation computer the energy consumption and performance indicators that govern, from fermented mash (ethanol 8.5 % v/v), the distillation of various capacities for bioethanol production: 20, 60, 100 and 150 KLD (kiloliters / day) through Aspen PlusTM simulator. It was found that the distillation demand nearly 30% of heat that would be obtained by burning alcohol fuel produced thus it is necessary the use of raw materials that generate enough biomass to produce the steam required. In addition, correlations were found to allow for easy diameters of distillation columns in terms of production capacity.

  16. Membrane distillation of industrial cooling tower blowdown water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.E. Koeman-Stein

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of membrane distillation for desalination of cooling tower blowdown water (CTBD is investigated. Technical feasibility is tested on laboratory and pilot scale using real cooling tower blowdown water from Dow Benelux in Terneuzen (Netherlands. Two types of membranes, polytetrafluorethylene and polyethylene showed good performance regarding distillate quality and fouling behavior. Concentrating CTBD by a factor 4.5 while maintaining a flux of around 2 l/m2*h was possible with a water recovery of 78% available for reuse. Higher concentration factors lead to severe decrease in flux which was caused by scaling. Membrane distillation could use the thermal energy that would otherwise be discharged of in a cooling tower and function as a heat exchanger. This reduces the need for cooling capacity and could lead to a total reduction of 37% water intake for make-up water, as well as reduced energy and chemicals demands and greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Toxicity and toxicokinetics of binary combinations of petroleum hydrocarbon distillates with the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Janet; Stephenson, Gladys; Birkholz, Detlef; Dixon, D George

    2013-04-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) act via narcosis and are expected to have additive toxicity. However, previous work has demonstrated less-than-additive toxicity with PHC distillates and earthworms. A study was initiated to investigate this through toxicity and toxicokinetic studies with the earthworm Eisenia andrei. Three petroleum distillate fractions, F2 (>C10-C16), F3a (>C16-C23), and F3b (>C23-C34), were used in two binary combinations, F2F3a and F3aF3b. In the toxicity study, clean soil was spiked with equitoxic combinations of the two distillates ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 toxic units. In the toxicokinetic study, a binary combination consisting of one concentration of each distillate was used. On a soil concentration basis, the toxicity of the binary combinations of distillates was less than additive. Accumulation of the individual distillates, however, was generally reduced when a second distillate was present, resulting in lower body burden. This is thought to be due to the presence of a nonaqueous-phase liquid at the soil concentrations used. On a tissue concentration basis, toxicity was closer to additive. The results demonstrate that tissue concentrations are the preferred metric for toxicity for earthworms. They also demonstrate that the Canada-wide soil standards based on individual distillates are likely protective. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  18. Economic Analysis in Series-Distillation Desalination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Rahmah Lubis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to produce potable water economically is the primary purpose of seawater desalination research. Reverse osmosis (RO and multi-stage flash (MSF cost more than potable water produced from fresh water resources. Therefore, this research investigates a high-efficiency mechanical vapor-compression distillation system that employs an improved water flow arrangement. The incoming salt concentration was 0.15% salt for brackish water and 3.5% salt for seawater, whereas the outgoing salt concentration was 1.5% and 7%, respectively. Distillation was performed at 439 K and 722 kPa for both brackish water feed and seawater feed. Water costs of the various conditions were calculated for brackish water and seawater feeds using optimum conditions considered as 25 and 20 stages, respectively. For brackish water at a temperature difference of 0.96 K, the energy requirement is 2.0 kWh/m3. At this condition, the estimated water cost is $0.39/m3 achieved with 10,000,000 gal/day distillate, 30-year bond, 5% interest rate, and $0.05/kWh electricity. For seawater at a temperature difference of 0.44 K, the energy requirement is 3.97 kWh/m3 and the estimated water cost is $0.61/m3. Greater efficiency of the vapor compression system is achieved by connecting multiple evaporators in series, rather than the traditional parallel arrangement. The efficiency results from the gradual increase of salinity in each stage of the series arrangement in comparison to parallel. Calculations using various temperature differences between boiling brine and condensing steam show the series arrangement has the greatest improvement at lower temperature differences. Keywords: desalination, dropwise condensation, mechanical-vapor compression

  19. Chemical composition of distillers grains, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, KeShun

    2011-03-09

    In recent years, increasing demand for ethanol as a fuel additive and decreasing dependency on fossil fuels have resulted in a dramatic increase in the amount of grains used for ethanol production. Dry-grind is the major process, resulting in distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) as a major coproduct. Like fuel ethanol, DDGS has quickly become a global commodity. However, high compositional variation has been the main problem hindering its use as a feed ingredient. This review provides updated information on the chemical composition of distillers grains in terms of nutrient levels, changes during dry-grind processing, and causes for large variation. The occurrence in grain feedstock and the fate of mycotoxins during processing are also covered. During processing, starch is converted to glucose and then to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Most other components are relatively unchanged but concentrated in DDGS about 3-fold over the original feedstock. Mycotoxins, if present in the original feedstock, are also concentrated. Higher fold of increases in S, Na, and Ca are mostly due to exogenous addition during processing, whereas unusual changes in inorganic phosphorus (P) and phytate P indicate phytate hydrolysis by yeast phytase. Fermentation causes major changes, but other processing steps are also responsible. The causes for varying DDGS composition are multiple, including differences in feedstock species and composition, process methods and parameters, the amount of condensed solubles added to distiller wet grains, the effect of fermentation yeast, and analytical methodology. Most of them can be attributed to the complexity of the dry-grind process itself. It is hoped that information provided in this review will improve the understanding of the dry-grind process and aid in the development of strategies to control the compositional variation in DDGS.

  20. Volatilities of ruthenium, iodine, and technetium on calcining fission product nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimshaw, S.J.; Case, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Various high-level nitrate wastes were subjected to formic acid denitration. Formic acid reacts with the nitrate anion to yield noncondensable, inert gases according to the following equation: 4 HCOOH + 2 HNO 3 → N 2 O + 4 CO 2 + 5 H 2 O. These gases can be scrubbed free of 106 Ru, 131 I, and 99 Tc radioactivities prior to elimination from the plant by passage through HEPA filters. The formation of deleterious NO/sub x/ is avoided. Moreover, formic acid reduces ruthenium to a lower valence state with a sharp reduction in RuO 4 volatility during subsequent calcination of the pretreated waste. It is shown that a minimum of 3% of RuO 4 in an off-gas stream reacts with Davison silica gel (Grade 40) to give a fine RuO 2 aerosol having a particle size of 0.5 μ. This RuO 2 aerosol passes through water or weak acid scrub solutions but is trapped by a caustic scrub solution. Iodine volatilizes almost completely on calcining an acidic waste, and the iodine volatility increases with increasing calcination temperature. On calcining an alkaline sodium nitrate waste the iodine volatility is about an order of magnitude lower, with a relatively low iodine volatility of 0.39% at a calcination temperature of 250 0 C and a moderate volatility of 9.5% at 600 0 C. Volatilities of 99 Tc were generally 0 C. Data are presented to indicate that 99 Tc concentrates in the alkaline sodium nitrate supernatant waste, with approx. 10 mg 99 Tc being associated with each curie of 137 Cs present in the waste. It is shown that lutidine (2,4 dimethyl-pyridine) extracts Tc(VII) quantitatively from alkaline supernatant wastes. The distribution coefficient (K/sub D/) for Tc(VII) going into the organic phase in the above system is 102 for a simulated West Valley waste and 191 for a simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste

  1. Restart plan for the prototype vertical denitration calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-09-01

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The Restart Plan will govern the transition of the test program from the completion of the activity based startup review; through equipment checkout and surrogate material runs; to resumption of the testing program and transition to unrestricted testing.

  2. CALCIUM OXIDE CHARACTERISTICS PREPARED FROM AMBUNTEN’S CALCINED LIMESTONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimatul Munawaroh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are widely used in industry. CaO and CaCO3 can be synthesized or derived from limestone. The purpose of this study to determine the characteristics of CaO calcined limestone from Ambunten Sumenep. Lime in calcined at 850 ° C for 6 hours. Characterization of X-ray fluorescence (XRF was conducted to determine the chemical composition of limestone, X-ray diffraction test (XRD to find the lime crystalline phase and FTIR test to determine the absorption of wave number. XRF test results showed that the limestone chemical composition consisted of Ca of 95.37% as the dominant element, Mg of 4.1%, Fe 0.17% and Y by 0.39%. The XRD test results showed that the limestone crystal phase is ankerite (Ca [Fe, Mg] [CO3] 2 and after the calcined phase calcination is vaterite (Ca [OH] 2, calcite (CaO and calcite (CaCO3. While the FTIR test results show that the CaO spectra are seen at 3741.24, 1417.12 and 874.14 cm-1.

  3. Inductive classification of operating data from a fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    A process flowsheet expert system for a fluidized bed calciner which solidifies high-level radioactive liquid waste was developed from pilot-plant data using a commercial, inductive classification program. After initial classification of the data, the resulting rules were inspected and adjusted to match existing knowledge of process chemistry. The final expert system predicts performance of process flowsheets based upon the chemical composition of the calciner feed and has been successfully used to identify potential operational problems prior to calciner pilot-plant testing of new flowsheets and to provide starting parameters for pilot-plant tests. By using inductive classification techniques to develop the initial rules from the calciner pilot-plant data and using existing process knowledge to verify the accuracy of these rules, an effective expert system was developed with a minimum amount of effort. This method may be applied for developing expert systems for other processes where numerous operating data are available and only general process chemistry effects are known

  4. Ninth Processing Campaign in the Waste Calcining Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.F.; Donovan, R.I.; Swenson, M.C.

    1982-04-01

    This report discusses the Ninth (and final) Processing Campaign at the Waste Calcining Facility. Several processing interruptions were experienced during this campaign and the emphasis of this report is on process and equipment performance with operating problems and corrective actions discussed in detail

  5. Physical and chemical characterization of synthetic calcined sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slates, R.V.; Mosley, W.C. Jr.; Tiffany, B.; Stone, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    Calcined synthetic sludge was chemically characterized in support of engineering studies to design a processing plant to solidify highly radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant. An analytical technique is described which provides quantitative data by mass spectrometric analysis of gases evolved during thermogravimetric analysis without measurements of gas flow rates or mass spectrometer sensitivities. Scanning electron microprobe analysis, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and several other common analytical methods were also used. Calcined sludge consists primarily of amorphous particles of hydrous oxides with iron, manganese, nickel, and calcium distributed fairly uniformly throughout the powder. Iron, manganese, nickel, and calcium exist in forms that are highly insoluble in water, but aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, and sodium exhibit relative water solubilities that increase in the given order from 60% to 94%. Evolved gas analysis in a helium atmosphere showed that calcined sludge is completely dehydrated by heating to 400 0 C, carbon dioxide is evolved between 100 to 700 0 C with maximum evolution at 500 0 C, and oxygen is evolved between 400 and 1000 0 C. Evolved gas analyses are also reported for uncalcined sludge. A spinel-type oxide similar to NiFe 2 O 4 was detected by x-ray diffraction analysis at very low-level in calcined sludge

  6. Calcined eggshell (CES): An efficient natural catalyst for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydes with active methylene compounds using calcined eggshell (CES) as an efficient ... of the important reactions to achieve carbon–carbon ... solid catalyst for biodiesel production,24 as a catalyst ... which supports for adsorption of water on CaO and ... The organic phase .... After extraction of the product with ethylac-.

  7. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-12-05

    Dec 5, 2003 ... the catalyst activity. The results obtained by Rathousky et al.,9 however, revealed that the pretreatment conditions had a significant effect on the catalytic properties of Co/Al2O3 and. Co/SiO2 catalysts. Turnover frequency (TOF) for the F-T reaction decreased with increasing calcination temperature for both.

  8. Restart plan for the prototype vertical denitration calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The Restart Plan will govern the transition of the test program from the completion of the activity based startup review; through equipment checkout and surrogate material runs; to resumption of the testing program and transition to unrestricted testing

  9. Commissioning and operation of distillation column at Madras Atomic Power Station (Paper No. 1.10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neelakrishnan, G.; Subramanian, N.

    1992-01-01

    In Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), an upgrading plant based on vacuum distillation was constructed to upgrade the downgraded heavy water collected in vapor recovery dryers. There are two distillation columns and each having a capacity of 77.5 tonne per annum of reactor grade heavy water with average feed concentration of 30% IP. The performance of the distillation columns has been very good. The column I and column II have achieved an operating factor of 92% and 90% respectively. The commissioning activities, and subsequent improvements carried out in the distillation columns are described. (author)

  10. Vitrification of radioactive high-level waste by spray calcination and in-can melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M. S.; Bjorklund, W. J.

    1980-07-01

    After several nonradioactive test runs, radioactive waste from the processing of 1.5 t of spent, light water reactor fuel was successfully concentrated, dried and converted to a vitreous product. A total of 97 L of waste glass (in two stainless steel canisters) was produced. The spray calcination process coupled to the in-can melting process, as developed at Pacific Northwest Labortory, was used to vitrify the waste. An effluent system consisting of a variety of condensation of scrubbing steps more than adequately decontaminated the process off gas before it was released to the atmosphere.

  11. Criticality safety analysis of a calciner exit chute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haught, C.F.; Basoglu, B.; Brewer, R.W.; Hollenback, D.F.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Dodds, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    Calcination of uranyl nitrate into uranium oxide is part of normal operations of some enrichment plants. Typically, a calciner discharges uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 ) into an exit chute that directs the powder into a receiving can located in a glove box. One possible scenario for a criticality accident is the exit chute becoming blocked with powder near its discharge. The blockage restricts the flow of powder causing the exit chute to become filled with the powder. If blockage does occur, the height of the powder could reach a level that would not be safe from a criticality point of view. In this analysis, the subcritical height limit is examined for 98% enriched U 3 O 8 in the exit chute with full water reflection and optimal water moderation. The height limit for ensuring criticality safety during such an accumulation is 28.2 cm above the top of the discharge pipe at the bottom of the chute. Chute design variations are also evaluated with full water reflection and optimal water moderation. Subcritical configurations for the exit chute variation are developed, but the configurations are not safe when combined with the calciner. To ensure criticality safety, modifications must be made to the calciner tube or safety measures must be implemented if these designs are to be utilized with 98% enriched material. A geometrically safe configuration for the exit chute is developed for a blockage of 20% enriched powder with full water reflection and optimal water moderation, and this configuration is safe when combined with the existing calciner

  12. Distillation of oil-bearing minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-05-21

    In the process of distilling oil-bearing minerals such as oil shale which disintegrates during distillation, wherein the subdivided minerals are subjected to a distillation temperature in the form of a highly turbulent dense mass fluidized by an upwardly flowing gasiform medium in a distillation zone and the heat required by the distillation is supplied by burning solid distillation residue with a combustion-supporting gas in the form of a fluidized mass of solids in a separate combustion zone at a temperature substantially higher than the distillation temperature and returning solid combustion residue substantially at the higher temperature to the distillation zone. The steps of starting up the process which consists of maintaining in the distillation and combustion zones dense turbulent fluidized beds of non-disintegrating solids, circulating the non-disintegrating solids between said beds, heating the circulating solids by an auxiliary heat supply until the bed in the distillation zone has reached at least the distillation temperature, thereafter charging fresh oil-bearing minerals to the bed in the distillation zone, continuing the circulation, withdrawing solids which have passed through the combustion zone at a rate adequate to maintain a solids balance, supplying the combustion-supporting gas to the combustion zone to cause the combustion of the residue, and discontinuing the auxilary heating when sufficient heat for the distillation is being generated in the combustion zone.

  13. Konference Distillation and Absorption 2010

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bendová, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 10 (2009), s. 862 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : conference * announcement * distillation and absorption Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Distilling oils and bituminous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutz, H

    1925-08-25

    In the distillation of bituminous materials such as coal, brown coal, peat, or mineral and tar oils or tar, in the presence of hot neutral gases such as hydrogen, illuminating gas, or water-gas, sulfur dioxide is also fed into the above-mentioned materials or into the vapors evolved therefrom. By this treatment better products are obtained.

  15. Distillation of shale in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Ganahl, C F

    1922-07-04

    To distill buried shale or other carbon containing compounds in situ, a portion of the shale bed is rendered permeable to gases, and the temperature is raised to the point of distillation. An area in a shale bed is shattered by explosives, so that it is in a relatively finely divided form, and the tunnel is then blocked by a wall, and fuel and air are admitted through pipes until the temperature of the shale is raised to such a point that a portion of the released hydrocarbons will burn. When distillation of the shattered area takes place and the lighter products pass upwardly through uptakes to condensers and scrubbers, liquid oil passes to a tank and gas to a gasometer while heavy unvaporized products in the distillation zone collect in a drain, flow into a sump, and are drawn off through a pipe to a storage tank. In two modifications, methods of working are set out in cases where the shale lies beneath a substantially level surface.

  16. Distillation of oil-bearing minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-12-03

    A process of distilling oil-bearing minerals of the type of oil shale which disintegrate during distillation consists of subjecting the subdivided minerals to a distillation temperature in the form of a highly turbulent dense mass fluidized by an upwardly flowing gasiform medium in a distillation zone and supplying the heat required for the distillation by burning solid distillation residue with a combustion-supporting gas in the form of a fluidized mass of solids in a separate combustion zone at a combustion temperature and returning solid combustion residue substantially at the combustion temperature to the distillation zone. Combustion temperature is positively maintained at a figure not exceeding 1,200/sup 0/F and at a figure which is not substantially more than 50/sup 0/F higher than the distillation temperature.

  17. Estimating the effect of fermentation yeast on distillers grains protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) is the key co-product of bio-ethanol production from grains. Major factors affecting its quality and market values include protein quantity (concentration) and quality (amino acid composition). Yet, the effect of fermentation yeast on DDGS quality has no...

  18. Energy Efficient Bioethanol Purification by Heat Pump Assisted Extractive Distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Anton A.; Luo, Hao; Bildea, Costin Sorin

    2015-01-01

    The purification of bioethanol fuel requires an energy demanding separation process to concentrate the diluted streams obtained in the fermentation stage and to overcome the azeotropic behaviour of ethanol-water mixture. The classic separation sequence consists of three distillation columns that

  19. Novel heat-pump-assisted extractive distillation for bioethanol purification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Hao; Bildea, Costin Sorin; Kiss, Anton A.

    2015-01-01

    The purification of bioethanol fuel involves an energy-intensive separation process to concentrate the diluted streams obtained in the fermentation stage and to overcome the azeotropic behavior of the ethanol-water mixture. The conventional separation sequence employs three distillation columns that

  20. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Abildskov, Jens; Kiss, Anton A.

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during past decades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Various techniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packed bed, dividing-wall columns and

  1. In Vitro Studies Evaluating Leaching of Mercury from Mine Waste Calcine Using Simulated Human Body Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almad?n, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute prim...

  2. Potential Health Risk of Herbal Distillates and Decoctions Consumption in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F; Akhbarizadeh, R; Keshavarzi, B; Tavakoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Concentration of 26 elements in 16 different herbal distillates and 5 herbal decoctions, were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elemental content of five raw herbal materials used for making decoctions and seven distilled and boiled residues were also evaluated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results indicated that herbal products display a wide range of elemental concentrations. Compared with world health regulations, the concentrations of the elements in herbal distillates and decoctions did not exceed the recommended limits. The analysis of herbal extracts did not show a significant transfer of toxic elements during decoction preparation. Comparison of elemental content among fresh herbal material and herbal distillate and decoction of the same herb showed that, besides the elemental abundance of herbal organs, the ionic potential of elements also play an important role in elemental content of herbal products. Based on the results of the research, it seems that most health benefits attributed to herbal products (especially herbal distillates) are more related to their organic compounds rather than elemental composition. Calculated hazard quotient (HQ) and hazard index (HI) were used to evaluate the noncarcinogenic health risk from individual and combined metals via daily consumption of 100 ml of herbal distillates and 250 ml of herbal decoctions. Both HQs and HI through consumption of herbal distillates and herbal decoctions (except Valerian) were below 1. Apparently, daily consumption of herbal distillates and decoctions at the indicated doses poses no significant health risk to a normal adult.

  3. Economical investigation of solar water distillation in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakr, I A; Khalil, M A; Delyannis, A; Delyannis, E [eds.

    1976-01-01

    Many ways of solar water distillation have been suggested but most of them are either too expensive or only a practical solution to different processes under investigation. Solar heat distillation has a bright future because the greatest potential needs appear to be in those sections where the availability of solar energy is high and the availability of potable water is low as in our Egyptian deserts where the solar intensity has a yearly mean value of about 6000 kcal/(m/sup 2/day). The solar distillation method has a number of economic characteristics which are different from other sea water conversion methods, including: The processing equipment is very simple and results in low equipment costs. No special skills are required for both erection and operation. It can be used with saline water of wide range of salt concentration. The still design is essentially modular, and can be made to meet any desired capacity. Scale formation and corrosion are minor problems as compared with other methods. Power requirements are negligible. The cost of unit construction is not markedly influenced by the size of the still. The lack of quantitative and operative data of solar water distillation techniques with respect to their cost needs in investigation from the economical standpoint of view in Egypt. The subject of this work is to find the order of magnitude of the fresh water cost by solar distillation.

  4. A catalytic distillation process for light gas oil hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Villamil, F.D.; Marroquin, J.O.; Paz, C. de la; Rodriguez, E. [Prog. de Matematicas Aplicadas y Computacion, Prog. de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A light gas oil hydrodesulfurization process via catalytic distillation is developed and compared to a conventional process. By integrating the separation and reaction into a single unit, the catalytic distillation may produce a diesel with low concentration of sulfur compounds at a lower cost than the traditional reaction/separation process. The process proposed in this work is compared to an optimised conventional hydrodesulfurization unit which represents fairly well a plant that belongs to the National System of Refineries. During the optimisation of the conventional process, a compromise is established among the production of diesel and naphtha and the operating costs. The results show that the light gas oil hydrodesulfurization via catalytic distillation is as or more efficient than the conventional process. However, the removal of the sulfur compounds is carried out under less rigorous conditions. This design reduces the fix and operational costs. (author)

  5. Cascade Distillation Subsystem Development: Progress Toward a Distillation Comparison Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, M. R.; Lubman, A.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential for the success of long-duration manned missions to the Moon and Mars. Honeywell International and a team from NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The wastewater processor, referred to as the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS), utilizes an innovative and efficient multistage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. The rotary centrifugal design of the system also provides gas/liquid phase separation and liquid transport under microgravity conditions. A five-stage subsystem unit has been designed, built, delivered and integrated into the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for performance testing. A major test objective of the project is to demonstrate the advancement of the CDS technology from the breadboard level to a subsystem level unit. An initial round of CDS performance testing was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2008. Based on FY08 testing, the system is now in development to support an Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project distillation comparison test expected to begin in early 2009. As part of the project objectives planned for FY09, the system will be reconfigured to support the ELS comparison test. The CDS will then be challenged with a series of human-gene-rated waste streams representative of those anticipated for a lunar outpost. This paper provides a description of the CDS technology, a status of the current project activities, and data on the system s performance to date.

  6. Mathematical modeling of an in-line low-NOx calciner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliuta, Ion; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Jensen, Lars Skaarup

    2002-01-01

    The reduction of the NOx content in in-line-calciner-type kiln systems can be made by optimization of the primary filing in the rotary kiln and of the secondary firing in the calciner. Because the optimization of calciner offers greater opportunities the mathematical modeling of this reactor...

  7. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  8. Development of a SREX flowsheet for the separation of strontium from dissolved INEEL zirconium calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning 90 Sr from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. These laboratory results were used to develop a flowsheet for countercurrent testing of the SREX process with dissolved pilot plant calcine. Testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. Dissolved Run No.64 pilot plant calcine spiked with 85 Sr was used as feed solution for the testing. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0.15 M 4prime,4prime(5prime)-di-(tert-butylcyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L.), a 1.0 M NaNO 3 scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.01 M HNO 3 strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.25 M Na2CO 3 wash section to remove degradation products from the solvent, and a 0.1 M HNO 3 rinse section. The behavior of 85 Sr, Na, K, Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted 85 Sr from the dissolved pilot plant calcine with a removal efficiency of 99.6%. Distribution coefficients for 85 Sr ranged from 3.6 to 4.5 in the extraction section. With these distribution coefficients a removal efficiency of approximately >99.99% was expected. It was determined that the lower than expected removal efficiency can be attributed to a stage efficiency of only 60% in the extraction section. Extracted K was effectively scrubbed from the SREX solvent with the 1.0 M NaNO 3 resulting in only 6.4% of the K in the HLW strip product. Sodium was not extracted from the dissolved calcine by the SREX solvent; however, the use of a 1.0 M NaNO 3 scrub solution resulted in a Na concentration of 70 mg/L (12.3% of the feed concentration) in the HLW strip product. Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr were determined to be essentially inextractable

  9. Tissue free water tritium separation from foodstuffs by azeotropic distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, F.; Ciubotaru, A.; Popa, D.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the tritium separation from tissue free water in foodstuffs by azeotropic distillation is described. Tritium in tissue water is assayed by liquid scintillation counting using well-established quenched correction method. The mean value of the tritium concentration in tissue water from foodstuffs is about 6-12 Bq/l very similar to the tritium mean concentration measured in the surface waters of the area where the samples have been collected (about 12 Bq/l. Therefore, the tritium content in the water fraction of the food samples can be considered in equilibrium with the local environmental water sources. The azeotropic distillation it is an accessible separation method which does not need a sophisticated and expansive distillation apparatus. It is a fast method of separation tissue free water from foodstuffs being very important in the surveillance activity of the environmental within nuclear electric plant. It is suitable for processing a small quantity of samples and for a production type facility when a large number of samples must be processed because the solvent can be purified and reused. The azeotropic distillation has some limits being used to separate water from samples with high content of water (85-90%) and simple a simple chemical structures as: vegetables, fruits, cereal, soil, vegetation. According to the results obtained, the organic substituents of milk, wine, meat (casein, lactose, milk fat, alcohol, esters) may enhance the chemisorption of tritium on through exchange organic hydrogen as -OH, -SH, -NH, -COOH with tritium. Also, the tissue water separation by azeotropic distillation is not complete and can not guarantee the absence of the vaporization isotope effect of the HTO/H 2 O system., However, the azeotropic distillation is the preferred method of the water extraction from food samples, which makes it useful for the tritium transfer from soil to foodstuffs. (authors)

  10. Tissue free water tritium separation from foodstuffs by azeotropic distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, F; Ciubotaru, A; Popa, D [Inspectorate of Public Health of Bucharest (Romania)

    1999-12-31

    In this paper the tritium separation from tissue free water in foodstuffs by azeotropic distillation is described. Tritium in tissue water is assayed by liquid scintillation counting using well-established quenched correction method. The mean value of the tritium concentration in tissue water from foodstuffs is about 6-12 Bq/l very similar to the tritium mean concentration measured in the surface waters of the area where the samples have been collected (about 12 Bq/l. Therefore, the tritium content in the water fraction of the food samples can be considered in equilibrium with the local environmental water sources. The azeotropic distillation it is an accessible separation method which does not need a sophisticated and expansive distillation apparatus. It is a fast method of separation tissue free water from foodstuffs being very important in the surveillance activity of the environmental within nuclear electric plant. It is suitable for processing a small quantity of samples and for a production type facility when a large number of samples must be processed because the solvent can be purified and reused. The azeotropic distillation has some limits being used to separate water from samples with high content of water (85-90%) and simple a simple chemical structures as: vegetables, fruits, cereal, soil, vegetation. According to the results obtained, the organic substituents of milk, wine, meat (casein, lactose, milk fat, alcohol, esters) may enhance the chemisorption of tritium on through exchange organic hydrogen as -OH, -SH, -NH, -COOH with tritium. Also, the tissue water separation by azeotropic distillation is not complete and can not guarantee the absence of the vaporization isotope effect of the HTO/H{sub 2}O system., However, the azeotropic distillation is the preferred method of the water extraction from food samples, which makes it useful for the tritium transfer from soil to foodstuffs. (authors) 2 tabs.

  11. Rhamnolipid produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa USM-AR2 facilitates crude oil distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asshifa Md Noh, Nur; Al-Ashraf Abdullah, Amirul; Nasir Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad; Ramli Mohd Yahya, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    A biosurfactant-producing and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa USM-AR2, was used to assist conventional distillation. Batch cultivation in a bioreactor gave a biomass of 9.4 g L(-1) and rhamnolipid concentration of 2.4 g L(-1) achieved after 72 h. Biosurfactant activity (rhamnolipid) was detected by the orcinol assay, emulsification index and drop collapse test. Pretreatment of crude oil TK-1 and AG-2 with a culture of P. aeruginosa USM-AR2 that contains rhamnolipid was proven to facilitate the distillation process by reducing the duration without reducing the quality of petroleum distillate. It showed a potential in reducing the duration of the distillation process, with at least 2- to 3-fold decreases in distillation time. This is supported by GC-MS analysis of the distillate where there was no difference between compounds detected in distillate obtained from treated or untreated crude oil. Calorimetric tests showed the calorie value of the distillate remained the same with or without treatment. These two factors confirmed that the quality of the distillate was not compromised and the incubation process by the microbial culture did not over-degrade the oil. The rhamnolipid produced by this culture was the main factor that enhanced the distillation performance, which is related to the emulsification of hydrocarbon chains in the crude oil. This biotreatment may play an important role to improve the existing conventional refinery and distillation process. Reducing the distillation times by pretreating the crude oil with a natural biosynthetic product translates to energy and cost savings in producing petroleum products.

  12. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael

    2005-01-01

    During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way

  13. Corrosion monitoring of storage bins for radioactive calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, T.L.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive liquid waste produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant is calcined to a granular solid for long term storage in stainless steel bins. Corrosion evaluation of coupons withdrawn from these bins indicates excellent performance for the materials of construction of the bins. At exposure periods of up to six years the average penetration rates are 0.01 and 0.05 mils per year for Types 304 and 405 stainless steels, respectively. (auth)

  14. Improvements in or relating to calcining reducible compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus is described for calcining compounds of uranium compounds to temperatures of up to about 1000 0 C to produce UO 2 powders of uniform quality and having an oxygen content of less than 2.2 atoms of oxygen per atom of uranium. The apparatus comprises discharge and cooling means having an inlet end operatively joined with an air tight seal to a rotating Kiln to receive hot UO 2 powder therefrom without contact with air. (author)

  15. Key distillation in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Boris Aron

    1998-11-01

    Quantum cryptography is a technique which permits two parties to communicate over an open channel and establish a shared sequence of bits known only to themselves. This task, provably impossible in classical cryptography, is accomplished by encoding the data on quantum particles and harnessing their unique properties. It is believed that no eavesdropping attack consistent with the laws of quantum theory can compromise the secret data unknowingly to the legitimate users of the channel. Any attempt by a hostile actor to monitor the data carrying particles while in transit reveals itself through transmission errors it must inevitably introduce. Unfortunately, in practice a communication is not free of errors even when no eavesdropping is present. Key distillation is a technique that permits the parties to overcome this difficulty and establish a secret key despite channel defects, under the assumption that every particle is handled independently from other particles by the enemy. In the present work, key distillation is described and its various aspects are studied. A relationship is derived between the average error rate resulting from an eavesdropping attack and the amount of information obtained by the attacker. Formal definition is developed of the security of the final key. The net throughput of secret bits in a quantum cryptosystem employing key distillation is assessed. An overview of quantum cryptographic protocols and related information theoretical results is also given.

  16. Interim status of vertical calciner testing through calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A prototype vertical calciner was constructed and tested for use in converting plutonium solutions to dry plutonium dioxide in the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant. Six non-radioactive runs were completed in June and July, 1995. Fourteen runs with plutonium nitrate solutions were completed between September, 1995 and August, 1996. Equipment modifications were made following those runs. The test runs with plutonium have converted 62.3 L of feed solution containing 11.1 kg of plutonium into dry plutonium dioxide containing 8.5 kg of plutonium. The decrease in product plutonium content is primarily due to plutonium accumulation within the calciner powder bed from particle compaction. Nine of the eleven product batches have had Losses On Ignition that met the storage criterion of less than 0.5 weight percent at 950 C. The highest Loss On Ignition found was 0.718 weight percent. Initial problems with agitator shaft binding and breakage of bushings have been eliminated. A feed pump control problem has been found and the pump replaced. Improvement in scrubber efficiency is needed. Future runs are planned to confirm that (1) the remainder of product meets the Loss On Ignition criterion, (2) the replacement feedpump works as needed, and (3) the scrubber efficiency improves. The operating staff for the production calciner may also be observing the prototype's runs to gain familiarity with the process and equipment

  17. Synthesis of type A zeolite from calcinated kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, E.C.; Neves, R.F.; Souza, J.A.S.; Moraes, C.G.; Macedo, E.N.

    2011-01-01

    The mineral production has caused great concern in environmental and industrial scenario due to the effects caused to the environment. The industries of processing kaolin for paper are important economically for the state of Para, but produce huge quantities of tailings, which depend on large areas to be stocked. This material is rich in silico-aluminates can be recycled and used as raw material for other industries. The objective is to synthesize zeolite A at different temperatures of calcination and synthesis. The starting materials and synthesis of zeolite A have been identified and characterized through analysis of X-ray diffraction (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (MEV). The synthesis process of zeolite A, using as source of silica and the aluminum metakaolin, which was calcined at temperatures of 700 ° C and 800 ° C for 2 hours of landing in a burning furnace type muffle. Observed in relation to the calcination of kaolin as the main phase, the metakaolin. This is just a removal of water from its structure, so we opted for the lower temperature, less energy consumption. The synthesis process of zeolite A, produced good results for the formation of zeolites type A, which were characterized with high purities. (author)

  18. Tocopherol composition of deodorization distillates and their antioxidative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogala-Kalucka, Malgorzata; Korczak, Jozef; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Elmadfa, Ibrahim

    2004-02-01

    During the last stage of plant oil refining, deodorization distillates containing very important biological substances such as tocopherols, sterols, terpenoids or hydrocarbons are formed as a by-products. This study aimed at evaluating the content and antioxidant capacity of tocopherol concentrates from deodorization distillates obtained after the refining of rapeseed, soybean and sunflower oil. The majority of the matrix substances were eliminated from deodorization distillates by freezing with an acetone solution at -70 degrees C. The tocopherol concentrates obtained in this way contained approximately fivefold more tocopherols than the quantity in condensates after deodorization. Antioxidant activity was investigated by observing the peroxide value at 25 degrees C and using the Oxidograph test. The test medium was lard enriched with the tocopherol concentrates of the three plant oils versus single, synthetic alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols (-T), which served for comparison. In these model systems, all investigated tocopherol concentrates exhibited antioxidant capacity. Their antioxidant effect was significantly lower than that of single delta-T and gamma-T, but significantly higher than alpha-T. The results prove that natural tocopherol concentrates obtained from plant oils are valuable food antioxidants and they also increase the biological and nutritional value of food especially when administered to animal fats or food of animal origin. Tocopherol concentrates can fully replace synthetic antioxidants that have been used thus far.

  19. The influence of calcination on the physical and chemical properties of petroleum and mixed cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, K; Syrek, H

    1980-01-01

    Freshly prepared petroleum and coal-petroleum cokes, before utilization for the production of various materials, are subjected to calcining--thermal treatment in a neutral or reducing atmosphere without the admission of air at less than or equal to 1400/sup 0/. During calcining, stabilization of the physical and chemical properties of the cokes takes place. The properties of the obtained coke depend chiefly on the calcining time and temperature. During calcining, volatile substances are removed almost completely from the coke; the coke density is increased, and its structure is put in order; the electrical conductivity is improved; the mechanical strength is increased; and the reactivity of the coke is decreased. Laboratory studies were conducted on calcining mixed coal-petroleum cokes of two grades at 1200, 1250, and 1300/sup 0/ for 2-6 h. In the calcining products the content of volatile substances, the ash content, S content, and density were determined. It was ascertained that calcining of mixed coal-petroleum cokes goes analogously to calcining of pure petroleum cokes. Raising the temperature and increasing the time of calcining has a substantial effect on improvement of coke physical and chemical properties. For high-quality coke, calcining is to be carried out at greater than or equal to 1300/sup 0/ for 4-6 h, for ordinary coke at > 1200/sup 0/ and greater than or equal to 4 h. The results are regarded as starting data for an industrial study of the calcining process.

  20. Effects of Replacing Dry-rolled Corn with Increasing Levels of Corn Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles on Characteristics of Digestion, Microbial Protein Synthesis and Digestible Energy of Diet in Hair Lambs Fed High-concentrate Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Castro-Pérez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Four male lambs (Katahdin; average live weight 25.9±2.9 kg with “T” type cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4×4 Latin square experiment to evaluate the influence of supplemental dry distillers grain with solubles (DDGS levels (0, 10, 20 and 30%, dry matter basis in substitution for dry-rolled (DR corn on characteristics of digestive function and digestible energy (DE of diet. Treatments did not influence ruminal pH. Substitution of DR corn with DDGS increased ruminal neutral detergent fiber (NDF digestion (quadratic effect, p<0.01, but decreased ruminal organic matter (OM digestion (linear effect, p<0.01. Replacing corn with DDGS increased (linear, p≤0.02 duodenal flow of lipids, NDF and feed N. But there were no treatment effects on flow to the small intestine of microbial nitrogen (MN or microbial N efficiency. The estimated UIP value of DDGS was 44%. Postruminal digestion of OM, starch, lipids and nitrogen (N were not affected by treatments. Total tract digestion of N increased (linear, p = 0.04 as the DDGS level increased, but DDGS substitution tended to decrease total tract digestion of OM (p = 0.06 and digestion of gross energy (p = 0.08. However, it did not affect the dietary digestible energy (DE, MJ/kg, reflecting the greater gross energy content of DDGS versus DR corn in the replacements. The comparative DE value of DDGS may be considered similar to the DE value of the DR corn it replaced up to 30% in the finishing diets fed to lambs.

  1. Design of Microporosity in Membrane Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tom; Patankar, Neelesh

    2017-11-01

    Membrane Distillation (MD) is a desalination method where only vapor can pass through pores in a hydrophobic membrane. Unlike reverse osmosis, MD is insensitive to feed salinity (osmotic pressure) and demonstrates near 100% salt rejection in processing wastewater with a high concentration of nonvolatile impurities. To maximize vapor flux and maintain salt rejection, we demonstrate using molecular dynamics the critical pore radius below which the liquid feed will not intrude or nucleate inside the pores for cylindrical, re-entrant and conical pore geometries. We note that re-entrant structures not only can process low surface-tension wastewater due to its inherent oleophobicity, but can also be optimized to achieve maximum vapor transport compared to all other pore geometries as a function of the material hydrophobicity.

  2. Distillation and Air Stripping Designs for the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Air stripping and distillation are two different gravity-based methods, which may be applied to the purification of wastewater on the lunar base. These gravity-based solutions to water processing are robust physical separation techniques, which may be advantageous to many other techniques for their simplicity in design and operation. The two techniques can be used in conjunction with each other to obtain high purity water. The components and feed compositions for modeling waste water streams are presented in conjunction with the Aspen property system for traditional stage distillation models and air stripping models. While the individual components for each of the waste streams will vary naturally within certain bounds, an analog model for waste water processing is suggested based on typical concentration ranges for these components. Target purity levels for the for recycled water are determined for each individual component based on NASA s required maximum contaminant levels for potable water Distillation processes are modeled separately and in tandem with air stripping to demonstrate the potential effectiveness and utility of these methods in recycling wastewater on the Moon. Optimum parameters such as reflux ratio, feed stage location, and processing rates are determined with respect to the power consumption of the process. Multistage distillation is evaluated for components in wastewater to determine the minimum number of stages necessary for each of 65 components in humidity condensate and urine wastewater mixed streams. Components of the wastewater streams are ranked by Henry s Law Constant and the suitability of air stripping in the purification of wastewater in terms of component removal is evaluated. Scaling factors for distillation and air stripping columns are presented to account for the difference in the lunar gravitation environment. Commercially available distillation and air stripping units which are considered suitable for Exploration Life Support

  3. Pecularities of carrying out radioactive wastes vitrification process without preliminary calcination of wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinovich, A.A.; Kulichenko, V.V.; Bel'tyukov, V.A.; Nikiforov, A.S.; Nikipelov, B.V.; Stepanov, S.E.; Baskov, L.I.; Kulakov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Vitrification technology is considered for liquid radioactive wastes by means of electric furnace where heating of glass-paste is done by electric current passing through the melt. Continious process of gehydration, calcination and vitrification is going on in one apparatus. Testing if the method has been performed by use of a model solution, containing sodium and aluminium nitrates. To obtain phosphoric acid has been added into the solution. Lay-out of the device and its description as well as technical parameters of the electric furnace are given. The results are stated for determination of the optimum operation conditions for the device. To reduce entrainment of solid components, molasses has been added in the solution. Parameters are given for the process of the solution containing 80 g/l molasses processing. It has been shown that edding molasses to the solution permitted to reduse power consumption of the process due to the heat generation during oxidation-reduction reaction on the melt surface. The results are given for investigations of the nitrogen oxides catching in scrubbers. These results have shown that introduction of molasses reduces nitrigen oxides concentration. The results of the experimental works have shown the possibility of the continious process of dehydration, calcination and vitrification in single device with application of remote control and monitoring by means of automatics. (I.T.) [ru

  4. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  5. Low temperature distillation of coal, shale, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-08-12

    A process is disclosed for the low temperature distillation of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, lignite, shale or the like, which comprises feeding or supplying the comminuted fuel in the form of a layer of shallow depth to drying and distilling zones in succession moving the fuel forward through the zones, submitting it to progressively increasing nonuniform heating therein by combustion gases supplied to the distillation zone and traveling thence to the drying zone, the gases heating the distillation zone indirectly and the drying zone both indirectly and then directly such that the fuel retains its solid discrete form during substantially the whole of its travel through the drying and distillation zones, subjecting the fuel for a portion of its travel to a zigzag ploughing and propelling movement on a heated sole, and increasing the heating so as to cause fusion of the fuel immediately prior to its discharge from the distillation zone.

  6. Factors influencing the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution by calcined Mg-Al-CO{sub 3} layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv Liang [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Controllable Chemical Reactions, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Box 98, 15 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chao Yang District, Beijing 100029 (China); West Branch of Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 324006 (China); He Jing [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Controllable Chemical Reactions, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Box 98, 15 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chao Yang District, Beijing 100029 (China); Wei Min [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Controllable Chemical Reactions, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Box 98, 15 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chao Yang District, Beijing 100029 (China); Evans, D.G. [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Controllable Chemical Reactions, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Box 98, 15 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chao Yang District, Beijing 100029 (China); Duan Xue [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Controllable Chemical Reactions, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Box 98, 15 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chao Yang District, Beijing 100029 (China)]. E-mail: duanx@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2006-05-20

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) calcined at different temperatures (denoted as CLDH) have been demonstrated to recover their original layered structure in the presence of appropriate anions. In the light of this so-called 'memory effect', a study of removal of fluoride from aqueous solution by calcined Mg-Al-CO{sub 3}-LDH has been carried out. The LDH calcined at 500 deg. C had the highest capacity of removal of fluoride ion, because of retention of its intrinsic structure. The CLDH with an Mg/Al ratio of 2 has a remarkable ability to adsorb anions. The adsorption loading is higher for the calcined Mg-Al-LDH than for calcined Zn-Al and Ni-Al-LDH. The influence of varying the conditions for removal of fluoride, such as the pH of aqueous solution, the initial fluoride concentration, the dosage of adsorbent, and temperature on removal of fluoride have been investigated. The influence of co-existing anions in fluoride aqueous solution indicates that the percentage of removal of fluoride increased in order PO{sub 4} {sup 3-} < Cl{sup -} {approx} SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} < Br{sup -} << NO{sub 3} {sup -}. It was found that maximum removal of fluoride from aqueous solutions was obtained in 6 h at pH 6.0 with an initial concentration of 50 mg/L, and that the retention of fluoride ions by the CLDH material was 98% or higher. The residual fluoride concentration was found to be 0.4 mg/L with an initial concentration of 20 mg/L, which meets the national standard for drinking water quality. The Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm were used to fit the data of equilibrium experiments. The results of X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and TG-MS demonstrate that the adsorption phenomenon is accompanied by rehydration with concomitant uptake of fluoride ions to rebuild the initial layered structure.

  7. Evaluation of chemical composition of defect wine distillates

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaljević Žulj, Marin; Posavec, Barbara; Škvorc, Melanija; Tupajić, Pavica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition of the distillate obtained from wine with off-flavour. The chemical composition of wine distillates obtained by distillation of Chardonnay wine with oxidation off-flavour was investigated. Distillation of wine was carried out using a simple distillation pot still by double distillation and separation the different portion of the first fraction. Volatile compounds of wine and wine distillates (acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol ...

  8. Method and arrangement of distillation of shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, S V

    1920-03-29

    A method is given of distilling shale and other bituminous materials utilizing the heat from the combustion of the residue, possibly with additional heat from other fuels. It is characterized by the shale, which is arranged in layers, being first submitted to a process of distillation utilizing the heat mentioned, and at the same time recovering the products of distillation, and second the shale being burned without disturbing the layers to any appreciable extent. The patent has 16 more claims.

  9. Calcination of Rod-like Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals with an Anti-sintering Agent Surrounding the Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, M.; Furuzono, T.

    2007-01-01

    Sintering-free nanocrystals of calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) having a rod-like morphology were fabricated by calcination at 800 deg. C for 1 h with an anti-sintering agent surrounding original HAp particles and the agent was subsequently removed after calcination. The original HAp particles having a rod-like morphology with a size ranging from 30 to 80 nm (short axis) and 300 to 500 nm (long axis) were prepared by wet chemical process, and poly(acrylic acid, calcium salt) (PAA-Ca) was used as the anti-sintering agent. In the case of calcination without additives, the mean size of HAp crystals dispersed in an ethanol medium increased by about 4 times and the specific surface area of the crystals exhibited a 25% decrease compared to those of the original HAp particles because of calcination-induced sintering among the crystals. On the other hand, the HAp crystals calcined with the anti-sintering agent, PAA-Ca, could be dispersed in an ethanol medium at the same size as the original particles, and they preserved the specific surface area after calcination. These results indicate that PAA-Ca and/or its thermally decomposed product, CaO, surrounded the HAp particles and protected them against calcination-induced sintering during calcination. The HAp crystals calcined with PAA-Ca showed high crystallinity, and no other calcium phosphate phases could be detected after washing with water

  10. Advanced fluid bed calciner information on IR-100 award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druby, M.C.; Owen, T.J.; Klem, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The advanced fluidized bed calciner provides time, temperature and turbulence to change a liquid slurry such as ammonium diuranate into a uranium dioxide powder. The liquid is sprayed into a hot chamber (up to 700 0 C) which includes thousands of tiny metal beads, about the size of BB's. The constantly moving beads provide an efficient heat transfer media for the immediate transformation of the slurry droplets into dry particles of powder, which are carried out by hot nitrogen gas and recovered in a collector

  11. Remote process connectors for the new waste calcining facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.T.; Carter, J.A.; Hohback, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    The remote process connectors developed, used, and tested at the Remote Maintenance Development Facility are described. These connectors, including the three-bolt kinematic-graphite flange and watertight electrical connectors, are assembled on master jigs (holding-welding fixture) to form interchangeable pump and valve loop assemblies. These assemblies, with their guide-in platforms, make possible a method of performing remote maintenance at the New Waste Calcining Facility which is a departure from methods that until now have been the standard of the industry

  12. Hybrid wind-power-distillation plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninić Neven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports and elaborates on the idea of a solar distiller and an offshore wind power plant operating together. The subject under discussion is a single-stage solar distillation plant with vaporization, using adiabatic expansion in the gravitational field inside a wind power plant supporting column. This scheme divides investment costs for electric power and distillate production. In the region of the Adriatic Sea, all electric power produced could be “converted” to hydrogen using less than 10% of the distillate produced.

  13. Dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation emphasizing the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, first-principle model has been formulated, which is flexible enough to describe various diabatic distillation configurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found and control...

  14. Dynamic Effects of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic eects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation with primary focus on the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, rst-principle model has been formulated, which is exible to describe various diabatic distillation congurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found. Control...

  15. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan; Srivatsa Bettahalli, N.M.; Fedoroff, Nina V.; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Leiknes, TorOve

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  16. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2018-01-31

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  17. Submerged membrane distillation for seawater desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Amy, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    A submerged membrane distillation (SMD) process for fresh water production from Red Sea water using commercially available hollow fiber membranes has been successfully employed and compared with the conventional direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. The hollow fiber membranes have been characterized for its morphology using field effect scanning electron microscope. In SMD process, a bunch of hollow fiber membranes are glued together at both ends to get a simplified open membrane module assembly submerged into the coolant tank equipped with a mechanical stirrer. Hot feed stream is allowed to pass through the lumen side of the membrane using a feed pump. Continuous stirring at the coolant side will reduce the temperature and concentration polarization. During the conventional DCMD process, using feed-coolant streams with co-current and counter-current flows has been tested and the results are compared in this study. In SMD process, a water vapor flux of 10.2 kg m-2 h-1 is achieved when using a feed inlet temperature of 80°C and coolant temperature of 20°C. Under the same conditions, during conventional DCMD process, a water vapor flux of 11.6 and 10.1 kg m-2 h-1 were observed during counter-current and co-current flow streams, respectively. Results show that the water production in the SMD process is comparable with the conventional DCMD process, while the feed-coolant flow streams are in the co-current direction. During conventional DCMD operation, a 15% increase in the water production is observed when feed-coolant streams are in the counter-current direction compared to the co-current direction. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  18. Submerged membrane distillation for seawater desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2014-08-11

    A submerged membrane distillation (SMD) process for fresh water production from Red Sea water using commercially available hollow fiber membranes has been successfully employed and compared with the conventional direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. The hollow fiber membranes have been characterized for its morphology using field effect scanning electron microscope. In SMD process, a bunch of hollow fiber membranes are glued together at both ends to get a simplified open membrane module assembly submerged into the coolant tank equipped with a mechanical stirrer. Hot feed stream is allowed to pass through the lumen side of the membrane using a feed pump. Continuous stirring at the coolant side will reduce the temperature and concentration polarization. During the conventional DCMD process, using feed-coolant streams with co-current and counter-current flows has been tested and the results are compared in this study. In SMD process, a water vapor flux of 10.2 kg m-2 h-1 is achieved when using a feed inlet temperature of 80°C and coolant temperature of 20°C. Under the same conditions, during conventional DCMD process, a water vapor flux of 11.6 and 10.1 kg m-2 h-1 were observed during counter-current and co-current flow streams, respectively. Results show that the water production in the SMD process is comparable with the conventional DCMD process, while the feed-coolant flow streams are in the co-current direction. During conventional DCMD operation, a 15% increase in the water production is observed when feed-coolant streams are in the counter-current direction compared to the co-current direction. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  19. Retrieval System for Calcined Waste for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Randy L.; Johnston, Beau A.; Lower, Danielle E. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC. The Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the conceptual approach to retrieve radioactive calcine waste, hereafter called calcine, from stainless steel storage bins contained within concrete vaults. The retrieval system will allow evacuation of the granular solids (calcine) from the storage bins through the use of stationary vacuum nozzles. The nozzles will use air jets for calcine fluidization and will be able to rotate and direct the fluidization or displacement of the calcine within the bin. Each bin will have a single retrieval system installed prior to operation to prevent worker exposure to the high radiation fields. The addition of an articulated camera arm will allow for operations monitoring and will be equipped with contingency tools to aid in calcine removal. Possible challenges (calcine bridging and rat-holing) associated with calcine retrieval and transport, including potential solutions for bin pressurization, calcine fluidization and waste confinement, are also addressed. The Calcine Disposition Project has the responsibility to retrieve, treat, and package HLW calcine. The calcine retrieval system has been designed to incorporate the functions and technical characteristics as established by the retrieval system functional analysis. By adequately implementing the highest ranking technical characteristics into the design of the retrieval system, the system will be able to satisfy the functional requirements. The retrieval system conceptual design provides the means for removing bulk calcine from the bins of the CSSF vaults. Top-down vacuum retrieval coupled with an articulating camera arm will allow for a robust, contained process capable of evacuating bulk calcine from bins and transporting it to the processing facility. The system is designed to fluidize, vacuum, transport and direct the calcine from its current location to the CSSF roof-top transport lines. An articulating camera arm, deployed through an adjacent access riser, will work in conjunction with the

  20. Determination of Methanol Content in Herbal Distillates Produced in Urmia Using Spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Delirrad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herbal distillates have been used for many centuries as drinks, flavors, and herbal medicine in Iran, especially in the city of Urmia. Recently, some studies claimed the presence of methanol in different types of herbal distillates. Methanol is a highly toxic compound which can cause acute or chronic toxicity in humans. Acute poisoning with methanol can cause different complications and even death while chronic methanol exposure has a wide range of nonspecific and misleading findings. The main purpose of this study was to determine methanol content in the commonly-used industrial herbal distillates produced in Urmia. Methods: Five samples of six types of most commonly used herbal distillates (peppermint, musk willow, lemon balm, pennyroyal, dill, and rose water were purchased from five active herbal distillates manufacturers in Urmia. All samples were transferred to the laboratory and methanol content of each sample was measured two times according to the standard method of analysis using spectrophotometer. Results: The lowest and highest concentration of methanol were found in rose water (mean=72.4±32.1 ppm and musk willow (mean=278.3±106 ppm samples, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among methanol concentrations in the studied herbal distillates (F=60.9, P <0.001. Discussion: Different amounts of methanol were found in herbal distillates and it seems that there are statistically significant differences in methanol concentrations of various types of herbal distillates. Therefore, considering the harmful effects of methanol on human health, further studies are required for determining permitted levels of methanol in herbal distillates.

  1. Chloride Ingress in Chemically Activated Calcined Clay-Based Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mwiti Marangu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-laden environments pose serious durability concerns in cement based materials. This paper presents the findings of chloride ingress in chemically activated calcined Clay-Ordinary Portland Cement blended mortars. Results are also presented for compressive strength development and porosity tests. Sampled clays were incinerated at a temperature of 800°C for 4 hours. The resultant calcined clay was blended with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC at replacement level of 35% by mass of OPC to make test cement labeled PCC35. Mortar prisms measuring 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm were cast using PCC35 with 0.5 M Na2SO4 solution as a chemical activator instead of water. Compressive strength was determined at 28th day of curing. As a control, OPC, Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, and PCC35 were similarly investigated without use of activator. After the 28th day of curing, mortar specimens were subjected to accelerated chloride ingress, porosity, compressive strength tests, and chloride profiling. Subsequently, apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp were estimated from solutions to Fick’s second law of diffusion. Compressive strength increased after exposure to the chloride rich media in all cement categories. Chemically activated PCC35 exhibited higher compressive strength compared to nonactivated PCC35. However, chemically activated PCC35 had the least gain in compressive strength, lower porosity, and lower chloride ingress in terms of Dapp, compared to OPC, PPC, and nonactivated PCC35.

  2. Characterization and differentiation of monovarietal grape marc distillates on the basis of varietal aroma compound composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Igor; Milicević, Borislav; Banović, Mara; Tomas, Srećko; Radeka, Sanja; Persurić, Dordano

    2010-06-23

    To investigate the varietal aroma compound composition of monovarietal grape marc distillates made from six different varieties (Vitis vinifera L.) in the region of Istria (Croatia), 30 samples were subjected to GC/MS and GC/FID analysis. A total of 73 compounds were identified: 45 monoterpenes, 20 sesquiterpenes, 3 diterpenes, and 5 C(13)-norisoprenoids. The largest number and the highest concentration of monoterpenes were found in Muscat Blanc, followed by Rose Muscat of Porec (Muskat ruza porecki) distillates, which were both characterized as highly aromatic. Lower, but still significant monoterpenol content was determined in distillates made from Istrian Malvasia (Malvazija istarska) grape marc. Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Teran distillates exhibited poorer monoterpene profiles, while Teran distillates contained elevated sesquiterpene concentrations. It was concluded that investigated monovarietal grape marc distillates significantly differ in varietal aroma compound composition. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis provided efficient discrimination models, and extracted various monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and C(13)-norisoprenoids as important differentiators of distillates according to varietal origin.

  3. 27 CFR 19.322 - Distillates containing extraneous substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distillates containing... Distillates containing extraneous substances. (a) Use in production. Distillates containing substantial... produced. Distillates removed from the distilling system under the provisions of this paragraph shall be...

  4. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of distillates... distillates containing aldehydes. Distillates containing aldehydes may be received on wine premises for use in the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were...

  5. 46 CFR 148.04-17 - Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. 148.04-17...-17 Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. (a) The requirements of this part do not apply to bulk shipments of petroleum coke, calcined, on any vessel when the material is less than 130 °F. (b...

  6. Online {sup 222}Rn removal by cryogenic distillation in the XENON100 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-06-15

    We describe the purification of xenon from traces of the radioactive noble gas radon using a cryogenic distillation column. The distillation column was integrated into the gas purification loop of the XENON100 detector for online radon removal. This enabled us to significantly reduce the constant {sup 222}Rn background originating from radon emanation. After inserting an auxiliary {sup 222}Rn emanation source in the gas loop, we determined a radon reduction factor of R > 27 (95% C.L.) for the distillation column by monitoring the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration inside the XENON100 detector. (orig.)

  7. MULTIVARIATE GEOGRAPHICAL CHARACTERISATION OF SLOVAK FRUIT DISTILLATES THROUGH MINERAL ELEMENTS PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Koreňovská

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mg, Ca, Zn, Cu, K and Na were determined in some species of Slovakian fruit distillates by atomic absorption spectrometry with the aim to differentiate the spirit drinks according to geographical origin. Potassium, sodium and copper were found as markers with the highest concentrations and variability in the distillates, namely in the apricot and grape brandy. Using the multivariate statistics of principal component and canonical discriminant analysis enabled relative effective differentiation of samples according to their regional origin. Prediction ability of the model resulted in more than 80% of correctly classified samples of the fruit distillates into the relevant Slovakian regions. doi: 10.5219/164

  8. Recycling of acetone by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, D.L.; Campbell, B.A.; Phelan, J.E.; Harper, M.

    1992-09-01

    The Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) identifies spent acetone solvent as a listed hazardous waste. At Fernald, acetone has been spent that has been contaminated with radionuclides and therefore is identified as a mixed hazardous waste. At the time of this publication there is no available approved method of recycling or disposal of radioactively contaminated spent acetone solvent. The Consent Decree with the Ohio EPA and the Consent Agreement with the United States EPA was agreed upon for the long-term compliant storage of hazardous waste materials. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility for safely decontaminating spent acetone to background levels of radioactivity for reuse. It was postulated that through heat distillation, radionuclides could be isolated from the spent acetone

  9. Retort for distilling coal oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbon, J

    1865-12-20

    The construction of a retort for extracting or distilling coal oil or other products from cannel coal, shale, or schist, and more particularly of small coal or dust technically called slack, consists in applying self-acting feed and discharge apparatus to a revolving cylindrical wrought or cast iron retort, and constructing the inner surface of the cylindrical retort with a projecting ridge which encircles the interior of the retort in a spiral manner, the same as the interior of a female screw, and the ridge may be either cast upon or riveted on the internal surface, and is so arranged to cause the material to be operated upon to advance from one end of the retort to the other, as the retort revolves by following the course of the spiral screw or worm formed by the projecting ridge.

  10. Distillation of solid carbonaceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burney, C D

    1918-08-31

    A method of distilling carbonaceous material at low or moderate temperatures is described in which the main supply of gases for heating the material under treatment is generated in a combustion chamber located externally of the retort chamber from which combustion chamber the gases are withdrawn and passed under control through hollow elements located within the retort chamber in such manner as to insure the production of the desired temperature gradient along the length of the retort, the said elements being so constructed that they serve to bring the heating gases into indirect contact with the material undergoing treatment while also moving the material progressively through the retort in the opposite direction to that in which the heating gases flow.

  11. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P 2 O 5 were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m 2 -day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification

  12. Driving Force Based Design of Cyclic Distillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Fjordbak; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2017-01-01

    with mixed phase feeds. A range of binary test cases, benzene toluene, methanol water, and ethanol water, are evaluated. The advantage of the design approach in cyclic distillation is shown to be analogous to the advantages obtained in conventional continuous distillation, including a minimal utility...

  13. Apparatus for distillation of bituminous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carthaus, E; von Rittersberg, K; Abraham, A

    1917-05-03

    Apparatus for dry distillation of bituminous material, such as oil shale and brown coal with simultaneous fractional separation of the distillate, consists in the fact, that the domed water-cooled condenser, arranged above the conveyer carrying it, is divided by double vertical partitions in the chamber.

  14. Method of distillation of sulfurous bituminous shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallback, A J.S.; Bergh, S V

    1918-04-22

    A method of distillation of sulfur-containing bituminous shales is characterized by passing the hot sulfur-containing and oil-containing gases and vapors formed during the distillation through burned shale containing iron oxide, so that when these gases and vapors are thereafter cooled they will be, as far as possible, free from sulfur compounds. The patent contains six more claims.

  15. Membrane distillation against a pressure difference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, L.; van der Ham, LV; Kuipers, N.J.M.; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Kjelstrup, S

    2017-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an attractive technology for production of fresh water from seawater. The MemPower®MemPower® concept, studied in this work, uses available heat (86 °C) to produce pressurized water (2.2 bar and 46 °C) by membrane distillation, which again can be used to power a turbine for

  16. Process of distillation of oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, A L

    1968-08-16

    In an oil-shale distillation apparatus with a single retort, in which separate zones of preheating, distillation, combustion, and cooling are maintained, the operation is conducted at a presssure higher than the atmospheric pressure, preferably at a gage pressure between about 0.35 and 7.0 bars. This permits increasing the capacity of the installation.

  17. Recycling of Waste Acetone by Fractional Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weires, Nicholas A.; Johnston, Aubrey; Warner, Don L.; McCormick, Michael M.; Hammond, Karen; McDougal, Owen M.

    2011-01-01

    Distillation is a ubiquitous technique in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum; the technique dates back to ca. 3500 B.C.E. With the emergence of green chemistry in the 1990s, the importance of emphasizing responsible waste management practices for future scientists is paramount. Combining the practice of distillation with the message…

  18. 7 CFR 58.331 - Starter distillate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Starter distillate. 58.331 Section 58.331 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.331 Starter distillate. The refined flavor components when used to flavor butter and related...

  19. Membrane distillation against a pressure difference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, L.; Ham, L.V. van der; Kuipers, N.J.M.; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Kjelstrup, S.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an attractive technology for production of fresh water from seawater. The MemPower® concept, studied in this work, uses available heat (86 °C) to produce pressurized water (2.2 bar and 46 °C) by membrane distillation, which again can be used to power a turbine for

  20. Experimental study on the effect of calcination on the volcanic ash activity of diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liguang; Pang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The volcanic ash activity of diatomite was studied under the conditions of aerobic calcination and vacuum calcination by the combined water rate method, it was characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The results showed that the volcanic ash activity of diatomite under vacuum conditions was higher than that of aerobic calcination, 600°C vacuum calcination 2h, the combined water rate of diatomite-Ca(OH)2-H2O system was increased from 6.24% to 71.43%, the volcanic ash activity reached the maximum value, the specific surface

  1. Secondary Aroma Compounds in Fresh Grape Marc Distillates as a Result of Variety and Corresponding Production Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislav Miličević

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the composition of secondary aroma compounds of fresh grape marc distillates as a result of variety and production technology, 30 samples (6 varieties×5 samples were analysed. White grape marc samples from Malvazija istarska, Chardonnay and Muscat Blanc were obtained as by-products in standard white wine production, while red grape marc samples from Teran and Cabernet Sauvignon were obtained after standard red wine production procedures. Marc from red grape variety Muškat ruža porečki was obtained during the production of rosé wines. All fermented marc samples were distilled using a traditional copper alembic. The obtained distillates were subjected to GC/MS and GC/FID analyses. Malvazija istarska distillates exhibited exceptionally high methanol content. Distillates from white grape varieties were found to be characterized by higher C6 alcohol and 1-propanol concentrations, while red grape distillates contained higher amounts of the majority of alcohols, acids, and esters. In Muškat ruža distillates intermediate concentrations of many important aroma compounds were found. It was concluded that differences in the production technology parameters, depending on the variety, resulted in differences in secondary aroma profiles, most evident between distillates from white and red varieties. These findings were confirmed applying stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA, which resulted in 100 % correct classification of distillates according to the variety and corresponding production technology.

  2. Method of distillation of alum shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultman, G H

    1920-02-03

    A method is given of distilling alum shale by means of preheated gases obtained from the process of distillation in which the gases are circulating within a system consisting of the retort, the condensation apparatus, and generator, each separate. It is characterized by leading the gases produced during the distillation through a condensation apparatus for separation of the condensable products, such as oil, benzene, ammonia, and sulfur, and the noncondensable gases are conveyed through one or more heated generators that have been charged with residue from the process of distillation (any superfluous amount of gas formed during the process being released). The heated gases are thereupon passed to the retort for completion of the distillation process.

  3. Operation and Design of Diabatic Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas

    Diabatic operation of a distillation column implies that heat is exchanged in one or more stages in the column. The most common way of realising diabatic operation is by internal heat integration resulting in a heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). When operating the rectifying section...... at a higher pressure, a driving forcefor transferring heat from the rectifying section to the stripping section is achieved. As a result, the condenser and reboiler duties can be significantly reduced. For two-product distillation, the HIDiC is a favourable alternative to the conventional distillation column....... Energy savings up to 83% are reported for the HIDiC compared to the CDiC, while the reported economical savings are as high as 40%. However, a simpler heat-integrated distillation column configuration exists, which employs compression in order to obtain a direct heat integration between the top vapour...

  4. An Automatic Approach to the Stabilization Condition in a HIx Distillation Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Woon; Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young; Kim, Yong Wan; Chang, Jong Hwa; Youn, Cheung

    2010-01-01

    In the Sulfur-Iodine(SI) thermochemical process to produce nuclear hydrogen, an H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary mixture solution discharged from the Bunsen reaction is primarily concentrated by electro-electrodialysis. The concentrated solution is distillated in the HIx distillation column to generate a high purity HI vapor. The pure HI vapor is obtained at the top of the HIx distillation column and the diluted HIx solution is discharged at the bottom of the column. In order to simulate the steady-state HIx distillation column, a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model of the H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary system is required and the subprogram to calculate VLE concentrations has been already introduced by KAERI research group in 2006. The steady state simulation code for the HIx distillation process was also developed in 2007. However, the intrinsic phenomena of the VLE data such as the steep slope of a T-x-y diagram caused the instability of the simulation calculation. In this paper, a computer program to automatically find a stabilization condition in the steady state simulation of the HIx distillation column is introduced. A graphic user interface (GUI) function to monitor an approach to the stabilization condition was added in this program

  5. Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Furukawa, Keiko; Serizawa, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2009-06-02

    Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals and surface-modified substrates were investigated by measuring adsorption behavior and adhesion strength with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a contact-mode atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The goal was to develop better control of HAp-nanocrystal coatings on biomedical materials. HAp nanocrystals with rodlike or spherical morphology were prepared by a wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an antisintering agent to prevent the formation of sintered polycrystals. The substrate surface was modified by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, or graft polymerization with a functional monomer. QCM measurement showed that the rodlike HAp nanocrystals adsorbed preferentially onto anionic COOH-modified substrates compared to cationic NH2- or hydrophobic CH3-modified substrates. On the other hand, the spherical nanocrystals adsorbed onto NH2- and COOH-modified substrates, which indicates that the surface properties of the HAp nanocrystals determined their adsorption behavior. The adhesion strength, which was estimated from the force required to move the nanocrystal in contact-mode AFM, on a COOH-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was almost 9 times larger than that on a COOH-modified substrate prepared by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, indicating that the long-chain polymer grafted on the substrate mitigated the surface roughness mismatch between the nanocrystal and the substrate. The adhesion strength of the nanocrystal bonded covalently by the coupling reaction to a Si(OCH3)-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was approximately 1.5 times larger than that when adsorbed on the COOH-grafted substrate.

  6. Development on the cryogenic hydrogen isotopes distillation process technology for tritium removal (Final report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ki Woung; Kim, Yong Ik; Na, Jeong Won; Ku, Jae Hyu; Kim, Kwang Rak; Jeong, Yong Won; Lee, Han Soo; Cho, Young Hyun; Ahn, Do Hee; Baek, Seung Woo; Kang, Hee Seok; Kim, You Sun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    While tritium exposure to the site-workers in Wolsung NPP is up to about 40% of the total personnel exposure, Ministry of Science and Technology has asked tritium removal facility for requirement of post heavy-water reactor construction. For the purpose of essential removal of tritium from the Wolsung heavy-water reactor system, a preliminary study on the cryogenic Ar-N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} distillation process for development of liquid-phase catalytic exchange cryogenic hydrogen distillation process technology. The Ar-N{sub 2} distillation column showed good performance with approximately 97% of final Ar concentration, and a computer simulation code was modified using these data. A simulation code developed for cryogenic hydrogen isotopes (H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2}, HT, DT, T{sub 2}) distillation column showed good performance after comparison with the result of a JAERI code, and a H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} distillation column was made. Gas chromatography for hydrogen isotopes analysis was established using a vacuum sampling loop, and a schematic diagram of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} distillation process was suggested. A feasibility on modification of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} distillation process control system using Laser Raman Spectroscopy was studied, and the consideration points for tritium storage system for Wolsung tritium removal facility was suggested. 31 tabs., 79 figs., 68 refs. (Author).

  7. Development on the cryogenic hydrogen isotopes distillation process technology for tritium removal (Final report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Ki Woung; Kim, Yong Ik; Na, Jeong Won; Ku, Jae Hyu; Kim, Kwang Rak; Jeong, Yong Won; Lee, Han Soo; Cho, Young Hyun; Ahn, Do Hee; Baek, Seung Woo; Kang, Hee Seok; Kim, You Sun

    1995-12-01

    While tritium exposure to the site-workers in Wolsung NPP is up to about 40% of the total personnel exposure, Ministry of Science and Technology has asked tritium removal facility for requirement of post heavy-water reactor construction. For the purpose of essential removal of tritium from the Wolsung heavy-water reactor system, a preliminary study on the cryogenic Ar-N 2 and H 2 -D 2 distillation process for development of liquid-phase catalytic exchange cryogenic hydrogen distillation process technology. The Ar-N 2 distillation column showed good performance with approximately 97% of final Ar concentration, and a computer simulation code was modified using these data. A simulation code developed for cryogenic hydrogen isotopes (H 2 , HD, D 2 , HT, DT, T 2 ) distillation column showed good performance after comparison with the result of a JAERI code, and a H 2 -D 2 distillation column was made. Gas chromatography for hydrogen isotopes analysis was established using a vacuum sampling loop, and a schematic diagram of H 2 -D 2 distillation process was suggested. A feasibility on modification of H 2 -D 2 distillation process control system using Laser Raman Spectroscopy was studied, and the consideration points for tritium storage system for Wolsung tritium removal facility was suggested. 31 tabs., 79 figs., 68 refs. (Author)

  8. Mutagenicity and chemical characterization of two petroleum distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, J H; MacGregor, J A; King, R W

    1984-08-01

    To investigate if the Salmonella/microsome assay could reliably screen complex petroleum samples for their carcinogenic potential, two high boiling (700-1070 degrees F) petroleum distillates with known activity in a dermal carcinogenesis bioassay were fully characterized with respect to their hydrocarbon composition and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PNA) content and assayed for mutagenic activity. Mutagenicity assays were also carried out on the aromatic hydrocarbon aggregates separated from these oils by adsorption chromatography. The composition of the distillates differed substantially, and reflected the fact that they were derived from crude oils that were extremely divergent in hydrocarbon character. Both the distillate and aromatic samples consistently induced a very slight increase in revertant TA98 and TA100 colonies; however, an increase of 2-4-fold over background was observed when the S-9 concentration was increased 5-10 times that of the standard assay. The maximal response was less than that expected from the samples' known PNA content and observed potency in the dermal carcinogenesis bioassay. In the Salmonella/microsome assay, all samples inhibited the mutagenic activity of added benzo[a]pyrene. Discordance between the magnitude of the samples' mutagenic activity and their known PNA content may be related to direct or indirect inhibition of sample PNAs by other components of the complex petroleum fractions. Observed inhibitory effects support the use of elevated S-9 concentration in the in vitro assays assessing the carcinogenic potential of petroleum-derived materials.

  9. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  10. Method of distillation of bituminous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, E G.T.

    1919-11-12

    A method is described of dry distillation of bituminous materials by leading warm combustible gases, mixed or not mixed with steam, through the distillation chamber in direct contact with the materials, during which process the distillation chamber may be heated by other means. It is characterized by the mixture of distillation products (formed by the vapors produced by heating the raw materials) and the gas (circulating gas) used for heating in the process, being led through coolers or similar contrivances, in order to separate through condensation the greater part of the content of the products or materials condensable at ordinary temperatures, and also to recover as much as possible of the highly volatile oils in the gas. Thereafter the gas is split, one part is, without further cleaning, and led through the distillation chamber, after this gas has been reheated in suitable apparatus. The other part (surplus gas), which in volume corresponds approximately to the new-formed distillation gases, is treated according to known methods for the extraction of the remaining products of the distillation, such as volatile oils, ammonia, methyl alcohol, sulfuretted hydrogen, and others. The patent contains three other claims.

  11. Microbubble Distillation for Ethanol-Water Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atheer Al-yaqoobi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a novel approach for separating ethanol-water mixture by microbubble distillation technology was investigated. Traditional distillation processes require large amounts of energy to raise the liquid to its boiling point to effect removal of volatile components. The concept of microbubble distillation by comparison is to heat the gas phase rather than the liquid phase to achieve separation. The removal of ethanol from the thermally sensitive fermentation broths was taken as a case of study. Consequently the results were then compared with those which could be obtained under equilibrium conditions expected in an “ideal” distillation unit. Microbubble distillation has achieved vapour compositions higher than that which could be obtained under traditional equilibrium conditions. The separation was achieved at liquid temperature significantly less than the boiling point of the mixture. In addition, it was observed that the separation efficiency of the microbubble distillation could be increased by raising the injected air temperature, while the temperature of the liquid mixture increased only moderately. The separation efficiency of microbubble distillation was compared with that of pervaporation for the recovery of bioethanol from the thermally sensitive fermentation broths. The technology could be controlled to give high separation and energy efficiency. This could contribute to improving commercial viability of biofuel production and other coproducts of biorefinery processing.

  12. Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pensinger, Stuart; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. Based upon the results of the 2009 distillation comparison test (DCT) and recommendations of the expert panel, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) project advanced the technology by increasing reliability of the system through redesign of bearing assemblies and improved rotor dynamics. In addition, the project improved the CDS power efficiency by optimizing the thermoelectric heat pump (TeHP) and heat exchanger design. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell d International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades as compared to previous system performance. The system was challenged with Solution 1 from the NASA Exploration Life Support (ELS) distillation comparison testing performed in 2009. Solution 1 consisted of a mixed stream containing human-generated urine and humidity condensate. A secondary objective of this testing is to evaluate the performance of the CDS as compared to the state of the art Distillation Assembly (DA) used in the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This was done by challenging the system with ISS analog waste streams. This paper details the results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  13. Synthesis of Cd/(Al+Fe) layered double hydroxides and characterization of the calcination products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M.R.; Barriga, C.; Fernandez, J.M.; Rives, V.; Ulibarri, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Cd(II), Al(III), and Fe(III) in the brucite-like layers with different starting Fe/Al atomic ratios and with nitrate as counteranion have been prepared following the coprecipitation method at a constant pH value of 8. An additional Cd(II),Al(III)-LDH sample interlayered with hexacyanoferrate(III) ions has been prepared by ionic exchange at pH 9. The samples have been characterized by elemental chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and FT-IR spectroscopy. Their thermal stability has been assessed by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) and mass spectrometric analysis of the evolved gases. The PXRD patterns of the solids calcined at 800 deg. C show diffraction lines corresponding to Cd(Al)O and spinel-type materials, which precise nature (CdAl 2 O 4 , Cd 1-x Fe 2+x O 4 , or Cd x Fe 2.66 O 4 ) depends on location and concentration of iron in the parent material or precursor. - Graphical abstract: Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Cd(II), Al(III), and Fe(III) in the brucite-like layers with different starting Fe/Al atomic ratios and with nitrate as counteranion have been prepared following the coprecipitation method. An additional Cd(II),Al(III)-LDH sample interlayered with hexacyanoferrate(III) ions has been prepared by ionic exchange. Calcination at 800 deg. C shows diffraction lines corresponding to CdO and to spinel-type materials. SEM micrograph of sample CdAlFe-N-0

  14. Model of fragmentation of limestone particles during thermal shock and calcination in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saastamoinen, J.; Pikkarainen, T.; Tourunen, A.; Rasanen, M.; Jantti, T. [VTT Technical Research Center, Jyvaskyla (Finland)

    2008-11-15

    Fragmentation of limestone due to thermal shock and calcination in a fluidised bed was studied through experiments and modelling. The time for heating was estimated by model calculations and the time for calcination by measurements. Fragmentation due to thermal shock was carried out by experiments in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere in order to prevent the effect of calcination. It was found to be much less than fragmentation due to calcination. Average particle sizes before and after fragmentation are presented for several types of limestone. The effects of particle size and gas composition on the primary fragmentation were studied through experiments. Increasing the fluidisation velocity increased the tendency to fragment. The evolution of the particle size distribution (PSD) of limestone particles due to thermal shock and during calcination (or simultaneous calcination and sulphation) were calculated using a population balance model. Fragmentation due to thermal shock is treated as an instantaneous process. The fragmentation frequency during calcination is presented as exponentially decaying over time. In addition to the final PSD, this model also predicts the PSD during the calcination process. The fragmentation was practically found to end after 10 min. Furthermore. a population balance method to calculate the particle size distribution and amount of limestone in fluidised beds in dynamic and steady state, when feeding history is known, is presented.

  15. Model for the sulfidation of calcined limestone and its use in reactor models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the sulfidation of a single calcined limestone particle was developed and experimentally verified. This model, which includes no fitting parameters, assumes a calcined limestone particle to consist of spherical grains of various sizes that react with H2S according to

  16. A conceptual and calculational model for gas formation from impure calcined plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, John L.; Eller, P. Gary

    2000-01-01

    Safe transport and storage of pure and impure plutonium oxides requires an understanding of processes that may generate or consume gases in a confined storage vessel. We have formulated conceptual and calculational models for gas formation from calcined materials. The conceptual model for impure calcined plutonium oxides is based on the data collected to date

  17. Calcination effects on CeZrOx geometry and styrene production from ethylbenzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacevic, M.; Brunet Espinosa, Roger; Lefferts, Leonardus; Mojet, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A series of CeZrOx catalysts was prepared by calcination of hydrothermally obtained metal oxide precipitate at increasing temperatures. The samples were characterized by HRSEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy, showing a change in morphology and particle size as a function of calcination temperature.

  18. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability

  19. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-10-05

    A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability.

  20. Energy consumption maps for quaternary distillation sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Castro, F.I.; Ramírez-Vallejo, N.E.; Segovia-Hernandez, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermally coupled distillation columns represent a very interesting option for the intensification of distillation systems in order to reduce the energy consumption, and, as a consequence, the environmental impact of the separation process. Several thermally coupled distillation schemes can......, for a given mixture, depends on the nature of the mixture, usually quantified for ternary mixtures through the ease of separation index (ESI), and also on the feed composition. As can be noticed, the size of the design and optimization problem increases when these variables are considered in the generation...

  1. Vacuum distillation of plutonium pyrochemical salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, Gilles; Faure, S.; Fiers, B.; Saintignon, S.; Lemoine, O.; Cardona-Barrau, D.; Devillard, D.

    2012-01-01

    A pyrochemical process is developed to upgrade the safety of plutonium spent salts interim storage. The feed material, consisting of alkali or alkali-earth chlorides containing various Pu and Am species, is first oxidized to convert the actinides into oxides. Then the chlorides are removed by vacuum distillation which requires temperature from 750 degrees C to 1100 degrees C. After a comprehensive R and D program, full-scale equipment was built to test the distillation of active salts. Tests with NaCl/KCl oxidized spent salt give decontamination factor of chlorides higher than 20000. The distilled salt meets the radiologic requirements to be discarded as low level waste. (authors)

  2. [On the content of polycyclic aromatics in middle distillates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlan, A

    1982-05-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatics determined up to now in Diesel fuel and light fuel oil are between five percent by weight for all and 0.02 percent by weight for nearly a dozen individuals. These results are contrasted and commented. It is not adequate to the problem to consider only a few polycycles in the analysis and to neglect practical completely alkylated derivates. Already for this reason the results with the small concentrations are not regarded to be characteristics for middle distillates. Probably insufficient analytics are also responsible for the determination of the low contents.

  3. Improving distillation method and device of tritiated water analysis for ultra high decontamination efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Fa; Wang, Chu-Fang; Lin, Chien-Kung

    2015-01-01

    It is important that monitoring environmental tritiated water for understanding the contamination dispersion of the nuclear facilities. Tritium is a pure beta radionuclide which is usually measured by Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC). The average energy of tritum beta is only 5.658 keV that makes the LSC counting of tritium easily be interfered by the beta emitted by other radionuclides. Environmental tritiated water samples usually need to be decontaminated by distillation for reducing the interference. After Fukushima Nucleaer Accident, the highest gross beta concentration of groundwater samples obtained around Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station is over 1,000,000 Bq/l. There is a need for a distillation with ultra-high decontamination efficiency for environmental tritiated water analysis. This study is intended to improve the heating temperature control for better sub-boiling distillation control and modify the height of the container of the air cooling distillation device for better fractional distillation effect. The DF of Cs-137 of the distillation may reach 450,000 which is far better than the prior study. The average loss rate of the improved method and device is about 2.6% which is better than the bias value listed in the ASTM D4107-08. It is proven that the modified air cooling distillation device can provide an easy-handling, water-saving, low cost and effective way of purifying water samples for higher beta radionuclides contaminated water samples which need ultra-high decontamination treatment. - Highlights: • The improvements of method and device make the decontaminatin factor (DF) of Cs-137 of distillation reach over 450,000. • The decontamination factor ( DF) value may be increased about 20 times by increasing the height of the container from 7 cm to 20 cm. • The device provides an easy-handling, water-saving, low cost, stable and effective way for the distillation of triated water analysis.

  4. Influence of calcination temperature on the structure and morphology of HAp bioceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, C.M.L.; Santos, P.T.A.; Rodrigues, P.A.; Costa, A.C.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of calcination temperature on the structure and morphology of samples of hydroxyapatite (HAp) synthesized by the wet method. For hydroxyapatite was used as precursor solutions of calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid 1M solution of calcium hydroxide was stirred and heated to 80 ° C and then dropwise with a solution of phosphoric acid. After the liquid was evaporated without an oven at 110 ° C and sieved. The sample of PA as synthesized was submitted to calcination at 900 °C and 1100 °C / 2 hours. The samples as synthesized and after calcination were characterized by XRD, XRF, FTIR, SEM. The XRD showed the presence of phase hydroxyapatite for samples without calcining and both calcination temperatures studied. FTIR spectra showed bands group and PO 4 3- , CO 3 2- . Through the SEM micrograph, there is the formation of agglomerates in the form of porous flakes approximately spherical shape. (author)

  5. Aqueous chemical route synthesis and the effect of calcination temperature on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ramzan Parra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the controlled size of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized via simple aqueous chemical route without the involvement of any capping agent. The effect of different calcination temperatures on the size of the ZnO nanoparticles was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD results indicated that all the samples have crystalline wurtzite phase, and peak broadening analysis was used to evaluate the average crystallite size and lattice strain using Scherrer's equation and Williamson–Hall (W–H method. Morphology and elemental compositions were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy. The average crystallite size of ZnO nanoparticles estimated from Scherrer's formula and W–H analysis was found to increase with the increase in calcination temperature. These results were in good agreement with AFM results. Optical properties were investigated using UV–vis spectroscopy in diffused reflectance (DR mode, with a sharp increase in reflectivity at 375 nm and the material has a strong reflective characteristic after 420 nm at 500 °C calcination temperature. Furthermore, photoluminescence spectroscopic results revealed intensive ultraviolet (UV emission with reduced defect concentrations and a slight shifting in band gap energies with increased calcination temperature from 200 °C to 500 °C. This study suggests that the as-prepared ZnO nanoparticles with bandgap tunability might be utilized as window layer in optoelectronic devices.

  6. LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G.

    2012-03-06

    The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

  7. Study of the repartition of phthalate esters during distillation of wine for spirit production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montevecchi, Giuseppe; Masino, Francesca; Di Pascale, Nicolas; Vasile Simone, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Andrea

    2017-12-15

    Due to health concerns and legal matters, an investigation to limit phthalates esters (PEAs) in spirits is necessary. A lab still was used to perform pilot distillations according to the official method for brandy production in order to explore the repartition into the distilled fractions of each PAE. The process was divided in two steps: a première chauffe and a bonne chauffe. The former step included the cut into heads, heart and tails, while the latter into heads, brandy, secondes, and tails. The behaviour of each PAE during distillation was affected by its own chemical nature. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was entirely carried over into the distillate, while bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) only partially, and diisononyl phthalate (DINP) accumulated in the stillage. During the bonne chauffe, DBP and DEHP accumulated in the secondes more than in the brandy. A rectification step of the secondes was demonstrated to considerably reduce PAEs concentration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Interferometric study on the mass transfer in cryogenic distillation under magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, S. R.; Zhang, R. P.; Y Rong, Y.; Zhi, X. Q.; Qiu, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Cryogenic distillation has long been used for the mass production of industrial gases because of its features of high efficiency, high purity, and capability to produce noble gases. It is of great theoretical and practical significance to explore methods to improve the mass transfer efficiency in cryogenic distillation. The negative correlation between the susceptibility of paramagnetic oxygen and temperature provides a new possibility of comprehensive utilization of boiling point and susceptibility differences in cryogenic distillation. Starting from this concept, we proposed a novel distillation intensifying method by using gradient magnetic field, in which the magnetic forces enhance the transport of the oxygen molecules to the liquid phase in the distillation. In this study, a cryogenic testbed was designed and fabricated to study the diffusion between oxygen and nitrogen under magnetic field. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to visualize the concentration distribution during the diffusion process. The mass transfer characteristics with and without magnetic field, in the chamber filled with the magnetized medium, were systematically studied. The concentration redistribution of oxygen was observed, and the stable stratified diffusion between liquid oxygen and nitrogen was prolonged by the non-uniform magnetic field. The experimental results show that the magnetic field can efficiently influence the mass transfer in cryogenic distillation, which can provide a new mechanism for the optimization of air separation process.

  9. Validation of Agent Based Distillation Movement Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gill, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Agent based distillations (ABD) are low-resolution abstract models, which can be used to explore questions associated with land combat operations in a short period of time Movement of agents within the EINSTein and MANA ABDs...

  10. Distillation modeling for a uranium refining process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at Argonne National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of uranium following an electrorefining process. Distillation of a salt electrolyte, containing a eutectic mixture of lithium and potassium chlorides, from uranium is achieved by a simple batch operation and is termed {open_quotes}cathode processing{close_quotes}. The incremental distillation of electrolyte salt will be modeled by an equilibrium expression and on a molecular basis since the operation is conducted under moderate vacuum conditions. As processing continues, the two models will be compared and analyzed for correlation with actual operating results. Possible factors that may contribute to aberrations from the models include impurities at the vapor-liquid boundary, distillate reflux, anomalous pressure gradients, and mass transport phenomena at the evaporating surface. Ultimately, the purpose of either process model is to enable the parametric optimization of the process.

  11. Distillation modeling for a uranium refining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at Argonne National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of uranium following an electrorefining process. Distillation of a salt electrolyte, containing a eutectic mixture of lithium and potassium chlorides, from uranium is achieved by a simple batch operation and is termed open-quotes cathode processingclose quotes. The incremental distillation of electrolyte salt will be modeled by an equilibrium expression and on a molecular basis since the operation is conducted under moderate vacuum conditions. As processing continues, the two models will be compared and analyzed for correlation with actual operating results. Possible factors that may contribute to aberrations from the models include impurities at the vapor-liquid boundary, distillate reflux, anomalous pressure gradients, and mass transport phenomena at the evaporating surface. Ultimately, the purpose of either process model is to enable the parametric optimization of the process

  12. Rotary drum for distilling bituminous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-11-02

    A rotary drum with insert tubes for distilling bituminous materials, like mineral coal, brown coal, wood, peat, and oil-shale, is characterized in that the insert tube is heated also by superheated steam introduced into the drum.

  13. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions using Fe3O4-HBC composite: effect of calcination on adsorbents performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shams Ali Baig

    Full Text Available The presence of elevated concentration of arsenic in water sources is considered to be health hazard globally. Calcination process is known to change the surface efficacy of the adsorbent. In current study, five adsorbent composites: uncalcined and calcined Fe3O4-HBC prepared at different temperatures (400°C and 1000°C and environment (air and nitrogen were investigated for the adsorptive removal of As(V and As(III from aqueous solutions determining the influence of solution's pH, contact time, temperature, arsenic concentration and phosphate anions. Characterizations from FTIR, XRD, HT-XRD, BET and SEM analyses revealed that the Fe3O4-HBC composite at higher calcination temperature under nitrogen formed a new product (fayalite, Fe2SiO4 via phase transformation. In aqueous medium, ligand exchange between arsenic and the effective sorbent site ( = FeOOH was established from the release of hydroxyl group. Langmuir model suggested data of the five adsorbent composites follow the order: Fe3O4-HBC-1000°C(N2>Fe3O4-HBC (uncalcined>Fe3O4-HBC-400°C(N2>Fe3O4-HBC-400°C(air>Fe3O4-HBC-1000°C(air and the maximum As(V and As(III adsorption capacities were found to be about 3.35 mg g(-1 and 3.07 mg g(-1, respectively. The adsorption of As(V and As(III remained stable in a wider pH range (4-10 using Fe3O4-HBC-1000°C(N2. Additionally, adsorption data fitted well in pseudo-second-order (R2>0.99 rather than pseudo-first-order kinetics model. The adsorption of As(V and As(III onto adsorbent composites increase with increase in temperatures indicating that it is an endothermic process. Phosphate concentration (0.0l mM or higher strongly inhibited As(V and As(III removal through the mechanism of competitive adsorption. This study suggests that the selective calcination process could be useful to improve the adsorbent efficiency for enhanced arsenic removal from contaminated water.

  14. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions using Fe3O4-HBC composite: effect of calcination on adsorbents performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Shams Ali; Sheng, TianTian; Sun, Chen; Xue, XiaoQin; Tan, LiSha; Xu, XinHua

    2014-01-01

    The presence of elevated concentration of arsenic in water sources is considered to be health hazard globally. Calcination process is known to change the surface efficacy of the adsorbent. In current study, five adsorbent composites: uncalcined and calcined Fe3O4-HBC prepared at different temperatures (400°C and 1000°C) and environment (air and nitrogen) were investigated for the adsorptive removal of As(V) and As(III) from aqueous solutions determining the influence of solution's pH, contact time, temperature, arsenic concentration and phosphate anions. Characterizations from FTIR, XRD, HT-XRD, BET and SEM analyses revealed that the Fe3O4-HBC composite at higher calcination temperature under nitrogen formed a new product (fayalite, Fe2SiO4) via phase transformation. In aqueous medium, ligand exchange between arsenic and the effective sorbent site ( = FeOOH) was established from the release of hydroxyl group. Langmuir model suggested data of the five adsorbent composites follow the order: Fe3O4-HBC-1000°C(N2)>Fe3O4-HBC (uncalcined)>Fe3O4-HBC-400°C(N2)>Fe3O4-HBC-400°C(air)>Fe3O4-HBC-1000°C(air) and the maximum As(V) and As(III) adsorption capacities were found to be about 3.35 mg g(-1) and 3.07 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of As(V) and As(III) remained stable in a wider pH range (4-10) using Fe3O4-HBC-1000°C(N2). Additionally, adsorption data fitted well in pseudo-second-order (R2>0.99) rather than pseudo-first-order kinetics model. The adsorption of As(V) and As(III) onto adsorbent composites increase with increase in temperatures indicating that it is an endothermic process. Phosphate concentration (0.0l mM or higher) strongly inhibited As(V) and As(III) removal through the mechanism of competitive adsorption. This study suggests that the selective calcination process could be useful to improve the adsorbent efficiency for enhanced arsenic removal from contaminated water.

  15. Multipartite secret key distillation and bound entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusiak, Remigiusz; Horodecki, Pawel

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that quantum cryptography beyond pure entanglement distillation is possible and a paradigm for the associated protocols has been established. Here we systematically generalize the whole paradigm to the multipartite scenario. We provide constructions of new classes of multipartite bound entangled states, i.e., those with underlying twisted Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) structure and nonzero distillable cryptographic key. We quantitatively estimate the key from below with the help of the privacy squeezing technique.

  16. Furnaces for the distillation of coal, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, F A; Deacon, M; Brady, N P.W.

    1918-08-14

    A tunnel or other furnace for the distillation of coal of the kind provided with inverted pockets in its roof to collect diverse distillates in the manner described, characterized by one or more of the pockets being provided with a sloping roof whose gradient from the higher end downwards is in the direction of the forward travel of the fuel beneath it for the purposes described.

  17. Comparative evaluation of glasses reprocessing and reversible conditioning of calcinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Fission products and minor actinides separated during the spent fuel reprocessing treatment are industrially vitrified on-line and thus confined inside a glass matrix with admittedly durability properties. In the framework of the feasibility of a reversible conditioning, this document examines first the possible alternative ways of conditioning and storage of calcinates before vitrification, which may simplify the reversibility aspect. Such a conditioning must be compatible with the storage process, with a possible extraction of actinides and long-lived fission products, and with the vitrification process if no extraction is performed. Calcinates are pulverulent and comprise an important soluble fraction, a proportion of nitrates of about 30%, and release a high thermal power (17 kW/m 3 ) combined to a low thermal conductivity (0.1 to 0.15 W.m -1 k -1 ). Among the different foreseeable solutions (denitration, mixing with another material, with or without compacting, dissolution inside another material..), the dissolution inside a borate seems to be the most acceptable with respect to the safety, feasibility and vitrification aspects. The thermal aspect of the storage remains complex as a specific container is necessary. In a second part, this report analyzes the possibility to re-extract back the long-lived radionuclides from vitrified wastes. The different possible ways to destroy the glass structure and to transfer the fission products and minor actinides in an aqueous solution compatible with an hydrometallurgical separation process are explored. Two processes are foreseeable: a low temperature dissolution process which requires a preliminary crushing and the handling of huge amounts of acids, and a both high and low temperature process which comprises the following steps: melting, fractionation by water tempering, addition of Na 2 O or sodium tetraborate to make it sensible to hot leaching, separation of fission products and minor actinides, recycling of

  18. Active solar distillation - A detailed review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, K.; Pitchandi, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tamilnadu College of Engineering, Coimbatore 641659, Tamilnadu (India); Arjunan, T.V. [Department of Automobile Engineering, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004, Tamilnadu (India); Senthilkumar, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KSR College of Engineering, Tiruchengode 637215, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-08-15

    All over the world, access to potable water to the people are narrowing down day by day. Most of the human diseases are due to polluted or non-purified water resources. Even today, under developed countries and developing countries face a huge water scarcity because of unplanned mechanism and pollution created by manmade activities. Water purification without affecting the ecosystem is the need of the hour. In this context, many conventional and non-conventional techniques have been developed for purification of saline water. Among these, solar distillation proves to be both economical and eco-friendly technique particularly in rural areas. Many active distillation systems have been developed to overcome the problem of lower distillate output in passive solar stills. This article provides a detailed review of different studies on active solar distillation system over the years. Thermal modelling was done for various types of active single slope solar distillation system. This review would also throw light on the scope for further research and recommendations in active solar distillation system. (author)

  19. CFD Modelling and Experimental Testing of Thermal Calcination of Kaolinite Rich Clay Particles - An Effort towards Green Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay

    Cement industry is one of the major industrial emitters of greenhouse gases, generating 5-7% of the total anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Consequently, use of supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) to replace part of the CO2-intensive cement clinker is an attractive way to mitigate CO2 emissions...... from cement industry. SCMs based on industrial byproducts like fly ashes and slags are subject to availability problems. Yet clays are the most ubiquitous material on earth's crust. Thus, properly calcined clays are a very promising candidate for SCMs to produce green cements. Calcination...... property of the calcined clay material, among which is the density of calcines. By using the variation in density of calcines, an optimum residence time has been marked. At this time the calcines display a minimum density that corresponds to the most dehydroxylated calcines. The behavior of flash calcined...

  20. Dry Distillation of Radioiodine from TeO2 Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Koziorowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As medical cyclotrons are becoming more abundant, 123I and 124I are getting more attention as alternatives to 131I for diagnostics of thyroid disease. Both 123I and 124I provide better diagnostics, deliver less dose to patients and both reduce the risk of thyroid stunning, facilitating subsequent therapy. Dry distillation of radioiodine from tellurium dioxide targets has become the standard approach to producing these radioiodines. Setting up such a production of radioiodine is associated with a lengthy optimization of the process and for this purpose natural tellurium is often used for economical reasons. In this paper, the distillation parameters are scrutinized to ensure optimal distillation temperature, in order to minimize time spent and prevent loss of expensive target material. It is further demonstrated how the individual iodine isotopes, produced from proton bombardment of natTe, will diffuse out of the target in a time dependent ratio. We believe the effect is due to the isotopes having their maximum cross section at different energies. The individual isotopes produced will thus have their highest concentration at different depths in the target. This results in individual mean diffusion lengths and diffusion times for the different isotopes.

  1. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Greenberg

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf and woody plant tissue (Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli, Saccharum officinarum and Oriza sativa were heated from 30 to 300°C and volatile organic compound (VOC emissions were identified and quantified. Major VOC emissions were mostly oxygenated and included acetic acid, furylaldehyde, acetol, pyrazine, terpenes, 2,3-butadione, phenol and methanol, as well as smaller emissions of furan, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and benzaldehyde. Total VOC emissions from distillation and pyrolysis were on the order of 10 gC/kgC dry weight of vegetation, as much as 33% and 44% of CO2 emissions (gC(VOC/gC(CO2 measured during the same experiments, in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. The emissions are similar in identity and quantity to those from smoldering combustion of woody tissue and of different character than those evolved during flaming combustion. VOC emissions from the distillation of pools and endothermic pyrolysis under low turbulence conditions may produce flammable concentrations near leaves and may facilitate the propagation of wildfires. VOC emissions from charcoal production are also related to distillation and pyrolysis; the emissions of the highly reactive VOCs from production are as large as the carbon monoxide emissions.

  2. Flux Enhancement in Membrane Distillation Using Nanofiber Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation (MD is an emerging separation technology, whose largest application potential lies in the desalination of highly concentrated solutions, which are out of the scope of reverse osmosis. Despite many attractive features, this technology is still awaiting large industrial application. The main reason is the lack of commercially available membranes with fluxes comparable to reverse osmosis. MD is a thermal separation process driven by a partial vapour pressure difference. Flux, distillate purity, and thermal efficiency are always in conflict, all three being strictly connected with pore size, membrane hydrophobicity, and thickness. The world has not seen the ideal membrane yet, but nanofibers may offer a solution to these contradictory requirements. Membranes of electrospun PVDF were tested under various conditions on a direct contact (DCMD unit, in order to determine the optimum conditions for maximum flux. In addition, their performance was compared to commonly available PTFE, PE, and PES membranes. It was confirmed that thinner membranes have higher fluxes and a lower distillate purity and also higher energy losses via conduction across the membrane. As both mass and heat transfer are connected, it is best to develop new membranes with a target application in mind, for the specific membrane module and operational conditions.

  3. 7 CFR 160.8 - Steam distilled wood turpentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Steam distilled wood turpentine. 160.8 Section 160.8... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.8 Steam distilled wood turpentine. The designation “steam distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by steam distillation from...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.703 - Distillate diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distillate diesel fuel. 1065.703... Standards § 1065.703 Distillate diesel fuel. (a) Distillate diesel fuels for testing must be clean and... distillate diesel fuels: (1) Cetane improver. (2) Metal deactivator. (3) Antioxidant, dehazer. (4) Rust...

  5. Three methods to distill multipartite entanglement over bipartite noisy channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soojoon; Park, Jungjoon

    2008-01-01

    We first assume that there are only bipartite noisy qubit channels in a given multipartite system, and present three methods to distill the general Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. By investigating the methods, we show that multipartite entanglement distillation by bipartite entanglement distillation has higher yield than ones in the previous multipartite entanglement distillations

  6. Distillation time effect on lavender essential oil yield and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Cantrell, Charles L; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) is one of the most widely grown essential oil crops in the world. Commercial extraction of lavender oil is done using steam distillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the length of the distillation time (DT) on lavender essential oil yield and composition when extracted from dried flowers. Therefore, the following distillation times (DT) were tested in this experiment: 1.5 min, 3 min, 3.75 min, 7.5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, 90 min, 120 min, 150 min, 180 min, and 240 min. The essential oil yield (range 0.5-6.8%) reached a maximum at 60 min DT. The concentrations of cineole (range 6.4-35%) and fenchol (range 1.7-2.9%) were highest at the 1.5 min DT and decreased with increasing length of the DT. The concentration of camphor (range 6.6-9.2%) reached a maximum at 7.5-15 min DT, while the concentration of linalool acetate (range 15-38%) reached a maximum at 30 min DT. Results suggest that lavender essential oil yield may not increase after 60 min DT. The change in essential oil yield, and the concentrations of cineole, fenchol and linalool acetate as DT changes were modeled very well by the asymptotic nonlinear regression model. DT may be used to modify the chemical profile of lavender oil and to obtain oils with differential chemical profiles from the same lavender flowers. DT must be taken into consideration when citing or comparing reports on lavender essential oil yield and composition.

  7. Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

  8. Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1980's development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96

  9. Calcination/dissolution chemistry development Fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The task open-quotes IPC Liaison and Chemistry of Thermal Reconstitutionclose quotes is a $300,000 program that was conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Research and Development (EM-53) Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program supported under technical task plan (TTP) RL4-3-20-04. The principal investigator was Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The task encompassed the following two subtasks related to the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste: (1) Technical Liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science (IPC/RAS) and its research into the chemistry of transuranic elements (TRU) and technetium (Tc) in alkaline media. (2) Laboratory investigation of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution (C/D) (or thermal reconstitution) as an alternative to the present reference Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment flowsheet, Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW). This report fulfills the milestone for the C/D subtask to open-quotes Provide End-of-Year Report on C/D Laboratory Test Resultsclose quotes due 30 September 1995. A companion report, fulfilling the milestone to provide an end-of-year report on the IPC/RAS liaison, also has been prepared

  10. Pyrochemical separation of radioactive components from inert materials in ICPP high-level calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Debbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    Since 1963, calcination of aqueous wastes from reprocessing of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels has resulted in the accumulation of approximately 3800 m 3 of high-level waste (HLW) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The waste is in the form of a granular solid called calcine and is stored on site in stainless steel bins which are encased in concrete. Due to the leachability of 137 Cs and 90 Sr and possibly other radioactive components, the calcine is not suitable for final disposal. Hence, a process to immobilize calcine in glass is being developed. Since radioactive components represent less than 1 wt % of the calcine, separation of actinides and fission products from inert components is being considered to reduce the volume of HLW requiring final disposal. Current estimates indicate that compared to direct vitrification, a volume reduction factor of 10 could result in significant cost savings. Aqueous processes, which involve calcine dissolution in nitric acid followed by separation of actinide and fission products by solvent extraction and ion exchange methods, are being developed. Pyrochemical separation methods, which generate small volumes of aqueous wastes and do not require calcine dissolution, have been evaluated as alternatives to aqueous processes. This report describes three proposed pyrochemical flowsheets and presents the results of experimental studies conducted to evaluate their feasibility. The information presented is a consolidation of three reports, which should be consulted for experimental details

  11. Continuous plutonium(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination process. [From product streams from Redox, Purex, or Recuplex solvent extraction plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beede, R L

    1956-09-27

    A continuous plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination process has been developed. Continuous and batch decomposition of the oxalate in the filtrates has been demonstrated. The processes have been demonstrated in prototype equipment. Plutonium (IV) oxalate was precipitated continuously at room temperature by the concurrent addition of plutonium (IV) nitrate feed and oxalic acid into the pan of a modified rotary drum filter. The plutonium (IV) oxalate was calcined to plutonium dioxide, which could be readily hydrofluorinated. Continuous decomposition of the oxalate in synthetic plutonium (IV) oxalate filtrates containing plutonium (IV) oxalate solids was demonstrated using co-current flow in a U-shaped reactor. Feeds containing from 10 to 100 g/1 Pu, as plutonium (IV) nitrate, and 1.0 to 6.5 M HNO/sub 3/, respectively, can be processed. One molar oxalic acid is used as the precipitant. Temperatures of 20 to 35/sup 0/C for the precipitation and filtration are satisfactory. Plutonium (IV) oxalate can be calcined at 300 to 400/sup 0/C in a screw-type drier-calciner to plutonium dioxide and hydrofluorinated at 450 to 550/sup 0/C. Plutonium dioxide exceeding purity requirements has been produced in the prototype equipment. Advantages of continuous precipitation and filtration are: uniform plutonium (IV) oxalate, improved filtration characteristics, elimination of heating and cooling facilities, and higher capacities through a single unit. Advantages of the screw-type drier-calciner are the continuous production of an oxide satisfactory for feed for the proposed plant vibrating tube hydrofluorinator, and ease of coupling continuous precipitation and filtration to this proposed hydrofluorinator. Continuous decomposition of oxalate in filtrates offers advantages in decreasing filtrate storage requirements when coupled to a filtrate concentrator. (JGB)

  12. Effects of distillation system and yeast strain on the aroma profile of Albariño (Vitis vinifera L.) grape pomace spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Garay, Y; Blanco, P; López-Vázquez, C; Rodríguez-Bencomo, J J; Pérez-Correa, J R; López, F; Orriols, I

    2014-10-29

    Orujo is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in Galicia (northwest Spain) from distillation of grape pomace, a byproduct of the winemaking industry. In this study, the effect of the distillation system (copper charentais alembic versus packed column) and the yeast strain (native yeast L1 versus commercial yeast L2) on the chemical and sensory characteristics of orujo obtained from Albariño (Vitis vinifera L.) grape pomace has been analyzed. Principal component analysis, with two components explaining 74% of the variance, is able to clearly differentiate the distillates according to distillation system and yeast strain. Principal component 1, mainly defined by C6-C12 esters, isoamyl octanoate, and methanol, differentiates L1 from L2 distillates. In turn, principal component 2, mainly defined by linear alcohols, linalool, and 1-hexenol, differentiates alembic from packed column distillates. In addition, an aroma descriptive test reveals that the distillate obtained with a packed column from a pomace fermented with L1 presented the highest positive general impression, which is associated with the highest fruity and smallest solvent aroma scores. Moreover, chemical analysis shows that use of a packed column increases average ethanol recovery by 12%, increases the concentration of C6-C12 esters by 25%, and reduces the concentration of higher alcohols by 21%. In turn, L2 yeast obtained lower scores in the alembic distillates aroma profile. In addition, with L1, 9% higher ethanol yields were achieved, and L2 distillates contained 34%-40% more methanol than L1 distillates.

  13. A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities

  14. The effect of calcination conditions on the graphitizability of novel synthetic and coal-derived cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Barbara Ellen

    The effects of calcination heating rate and ultimate calcination temperature upon calcined coke and subsequent graphitic material microstructures were studied for materials prepared from three different precursors. The pitch precursors used were Mitsubishi AR pitch (a synthetic, 100% mesophase pitch), the NMP-extracted portion of a raw coal, and the NMP-extracted fraction of a coal liquefaction residue obtained from an HTI pilot plant. These materials were all green-coked under identical conditions. Optical microscopy confirmed that the Mitsubishi coke was very anisotropic and the HTI coke was nearly as anisotropic. The coke produced from the direct coal extract was very isotropic. Crystalline development during calcination heating was verified by high-temperature x-ray diffraction. Experiments were performed to ascertain the effects of varying calcination heating rate and ultimate temperature. It was determined that calcined coke crystallite size increased with increasing temperature for all three materials but was found to be independent of heating rate. The graphene interplanar spacing decreased with increasing temperature for the isotropic NMP-extract material but increased with increasing temperature for the anisotropic materials---Mitsubishi and HTI cokes. Graphene interplanar spacing was also found to be independent of heating rate. Calcined coke real densities were, likewise, found to be independent of heating rate. The anisotropic cokes (Mitsubishi and HTI) exhibited increasing real density with increasing calcination temperature. The NMP-extract coke increased in density up to 1050°C and then suffered a dramatic reduction in real density when heated to 1250°C. This is indicative of puffing. Since there was no corresponding disruption in the crystalline structure, the puffing phenomena was determined to be intercrystalline rather than intracrystalline. After the calcined cokes were graphitized (under identical conditions), the microstructures were re

  15. Remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for the NWCF calciner vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.D.; Carter, J.A.; May, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    The development and testing of remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for calcination of liquid radioactive wastes in the calciner vessel of the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) being built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. A complete fuel nozzle assembly was fabricated and tested at the Remote Maintenance Development Facility to evolve design refinements, identify required support equipment, and develop handling techniques. The design also provided for remote replacement of the nozzle support carriage and adjacent feed and fuel pipe loops using two pairs of master-slave manipulators

  16. Direct Contact Membrane Distillation of Dairy Process Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Weeks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation (MD was applied for the concentration of a range of dairy streams, such as whole milk, skim milk and whey. MD of a pure lactose solution was also investigated. Direct contact MD (DCMD mode experiments were carried out in continuous concentration mode, keeping the warm feed/retentate and cold permeate stream temperatures at 54 °C and 5 °C respectively. Performance in terms of flux and retention was assessed. The flux was found to decrease with an increase of dry-matter concentration in the feed. Retention of dissolved solids was found to be close to 100% and independent of the dry-matter concentration in the feed. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR of the fouled membranes confirms organics being present in the fouling layer.

  17. Adsorption of a cationic dye (Yellow Basic 28 ontothe calcined mussel shells: Kinetics, Isotherm and Thermodynamic Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane EL Ouahabi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to valorise the mussel shells and evaluate the adsorption capacity of calcined mussel shells for the cationic dyes.  The adsorbent was characterized by DRX, FTIR, BET and SEM, respectively. The adsorption of Yellow Basic28 on calcined mussel shells was investigated using the parameters such as concentrations (10-50mg/L, pH (3-10, ionic strength (0-2 mol / L and temperature (288 - 318 °C.  The adsorption rate data were analysed according to the first and second-order kinetic models.  The adsorption kinetics was found to be best represented by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.  The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Elovich and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherm equations on the dye-adsorbent system. The experimental data yielded excellent fits with Freundlich isotherm equation (R² = 0.966. It was indicative of the heterogeneity of the adsorption sites on the CMS particles.  Various thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy of adsorption ΔH°, free energy change ΔG°and entropy ΔS° were estimated.  The positive value of ΔH°(30.321 kJ/mol and negative values of ΔG° (from -5.392 to -2.873 kJ/mol show the process is endothermic and spontaneous.  The negative value of entropy ΔS° (-87.172 J/mol K suggest the decreased randomness at the solid-liquid interface during the adsorption of dyes onto calcined mussel shells.

  18. Quick assessment of binary distillation efficiency using a heat engine perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahušiak, M.; Kiss, A.A.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Schuur, B.

    2016-01-01

    With emphasis on close boiling, (near-)ideal VLE mixtures, this paper links the efficiency of distillation to the binary feed composition and thermal properties of the compounds. The proposed approach, treating the process as a heat engine, allows to directly quantify distillation performance (in terms of energy intensity & efficiency) based on the components boiling points and feed composition. In addition, this approach reviews and formulates simple, approximate and essentially non-iterative calculation procedures to quickly estimate the energy efficiency of distillation. These estimations may be applied to identify opportunities to save significant amounts of energy. The results show that the reboiler duty for low relative volatility is relatively independent of the heat of vaporization and feed composition, while being reciprocally proportional to the Carnot efficiency of the distillation column. The internal efficiency for distillation of mixtures with low relative volatility has a maximum of about 70% for a symmetrical feed (equimolar ratio) and decreases to zero for unsymmetrical feed compositions approaching infinite dilution. With increasing relative volatility, the maximum efficiency is preserved, but the locus shifts towards lower light component fractions. At very high relative volatility, the internal efficiency increases with decreasing concentration of light component, as typical for evaporators. - Highlights: • A heat engine perspective was applied to estimate binary distillation efficiency. • The method was derived from first principles. • Validation on industrial cases showed the strength of the method.

  19. High-temperature vacuum distillation separation of plutonium waste salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this task, high-temperature vacuum distillation separation is being developed for residue sodium chloride-potassium chloride salts resulting from past pyrochemical processing of plutonium. This process has the potential of providing clean separation of the salt and the actinides with minimal amounts of secondary waste generation. The process could produce chloride salt that could be discarded as low-level waste (LLW) or low actinide content transuranic (TRU) waste, and a concentrated actinide oxide powder that would meet long-term storage standards (DOE-DTD-3013-94) until a final disposition option for all surplus plutonium is chosen

  20. Simple multicomponent batch distillation procedure with a variable reflux policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. García

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a shortcut procedure for batch distillation simulation with a variable reflux policy. The procedure starts from a shortcut method developed by Sundaram and Evans in 1993 and uses an iterative cycle to calculate the reflux ratio at each moment. The functional relationship between the concentrations at the bottom and the dome is evaluated using the Fenske equation and is complemented with the equations proposed by Underwood and Gilliland. The results of this procedure are consistent with those obtained using a fast method widely validated in the relevant literature.

  1. Adsorption behavior of calcined layered double hydroxides towards removal of iodide contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Liang; He Jing; Wei Min; Evans, D.G.; Duan Xue

    2005-01-01

    , the effect of various factors such as (a) CLDH structure, (b) conditions for removal of iodide ion, such as dosage of adsorbent, initial concentration of iodide ion, and temperature and (c) co-existing anions in iodide contamination on the removal of iodide ion, have been investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained at a calcined temperature of 500 degree C with Mg/Al ratio of 4. The uptake capacity of CLDH increased with increasing adsorbent dose, but decreased with increasing initial iodide ion concentration. The applicability of the Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm show that the sorption capacity was approximately 376 mg/g, and Gibbs free energy(ΔG 0 ) for the process is -27. 8 KJ/mol. The negative ΔG 0 value shows the spontaneity of the adsorption process. The explanation of the adsorption phenomenon is supported by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and TG-MS results.

  2. Process for distilling shales, peats, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felizat, G

    1922-01-09

    The invention has for its object: a process for the distillation of shales, peats, and analogous products characterized by injecting across the substance a very rapid stream of superheated steam under pressure in order to effect a rapid removal of the products of distillation, to lower also the temperature at which it distills, to equalize the temperature throughout the mass, to hydrogenate the heavy hydrocarbons. An apparatus is put into operation characterized by the combination of a retort receiving the material to be distilled with a superheater for the steam, the combustion products which escape from the hearth of the superheater going to encircle the retort while the steam which comes off the superheater traverses this retort, the pressure of the steam being regulated by a convenient regulator; the products of the distillation result from the simultaneous action of the hot gases and steam on the contents of the retort being, on the other hand, separated at the outlet of this retort by means of cooling in a gas separator, a condenser, and part of the gas after being separated serving to heat the mentioned superheater.

  3. Calcining natural zeolites to improve their effect on cementitious mixture workability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seraj, Saamiya; Ferron, Raissa D.; Juenger, Maria C.G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits to long-term concrete durability, the use of natural zeolites as supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) is uncommon due to their high water demand. The motivation of the research presented here was to better understand how the physical and chemical characteristics of natural zeolites influenced the workability of cementitious mixtures and whether those properties could be modified through calcination to mitigate the high water demand of natural zeolites. In this research, three different natural zeolites were characterized in their original and calcined states using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurements. Rheology experiments were then conducted on cementitious pastes containing these natural zeolites, in their original and calcined states, to assess mixture viscosity and yield stress. Results showed that calcination destabilized the structure of the natural zeolites and reduced their surface area, which led to an improvement in mixture viscosity and yield stress.

  4. Chloride adsorption by calcined layered double hydroxides in hardened Portland cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon; Moon, Juhyuk; Bae, Sungchul; Duan, Xiaonan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Monteiro, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using calcined layered double hydroxides (CLDHs) to prevent chloride-induced deterioration in reinforced concrete. CLDHs not only adsorbed chloride ions in aqueous solution with a memory effect but also had

  5. Design criteria for the new waste calcining facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, F.H.; Bingham, G.E.; Buckham, J.A.; Dickey, B.R.; Slansky, C.M.; Wheeler, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    The New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is being built to replace the existing fluidized-bed, high-level waste calcining facility (WCF). Performance of the WCF is reviewed, equipment failures in WCF operation are examined, and pilot-plant studies on calciner improvements are given in relation to NWCF design. Design features of the NWCF are given with emphasis on process and equipment improvements. A major feature of the NWCF is the use of remote maintenance facilities for equipment with high maintenance requirements, thereby reducing personnel exposures during maintenance and reducing downtime resulting from plant decontamination. The NWCF will have a design net processing rate of 11.36 m 3 of high-level waste per day, and will incorporate in-bed combustion of kerosene for heating the fluidized bed calciner. The off-gas cleaning system will be similar to that for the WCF

  6. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO 2 rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO 2 -rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium-rich solids. The calciner and some of its ancillary equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability

  7. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO 2 rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO 2 -rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability

  8. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-02-03

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO{sub 2} rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO{sub 2}-rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium-rich solids. The calciner and some of its ancillary equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability.

  9. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-02-03

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO{sub 2} rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO{sub 2}-rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability.

  10. The influence of ferric iron in calcined nano-Mg/Al hydrotalcite on adsorption of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Lili [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Ma Wei, E-mail: chmawv@yahoo.com [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Han Mei; Cheng Zihong [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The reconstruction processes of CH-Mg/Al and CH-Mg/Al/Fe were fast and efficient, but the adsorption of Cr (VI) on CH-Mg/Al/Fe reached equilibrium faster. {yields} The removal mechanism involved not only intercalation but also adsorption on external surface of the layers and interlayer anion exchange. {yields} The existence of Fe3{sup +} in Mg/Al calcined hydrotalcite led to the interlayer anion exchange more difficult and it is affected equilibrium amount of Cr (VI) adsorption. - Abstract: The influence of ferric iron in calcined nano-Mg/Al hydrotalcite on removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution was studied from aspects of structure characteristics, adsorption properties and mechanism discussions. The calcined hydrotalcites (CH-Mg/Al and CH-Mg/Al/Fe) were obtained by thermal decomposition of their corresponding precursors and characterized by XRD, TEM, pH{sub PZC} and FTIR. The adsorption properties were studied as a function of pH, initial Cr (VI) concentration and contact time. The results showed that the nature of adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous for both CH-Mg/Al and CH-Mg/Al/Fe, but the thermodynamic parameter value changes revealed the addition of Fe{sup 3+} is disadvantage to adsorption process and the theoretical saturated adsorption capacity decreased by approximately 10.2 mg/g at tested temperatures. The removal mechanism involved not only intercalation but adsorption on external surface of the layers and interlayer anion exchange for both CH-Mg/Al and CH-Mg/Al/Fe. Furthermore, the results also indicated that intercalation accounts for a large proportion during removal process whatever for CH-Mg/Al, or for CH-Mg/Al/Fe. Additionally, the replacement of Al{sup 3+} by Fe{sup 3+} in CH-Mg/Al led to the interlayer anion exchange more difficult. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that the existence of ferric iron in calcined Mg/Al hydrotalcite is unfavorable to removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution.

  11. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael; Jantzen, Carol M.

    1999-01-01

    Natural and synthetic zeolites are extremely versatile materials. They can adsorb a variety of liquids and gases, and also take part in cation exchange reactions. Zeolites are easy to synthesize from a wide variety of natural and man made materials. One combination of starting materials that exhibits a great deal of promise is a mixture of metakaolinite and/or Class F fly ash and concentrated sodium hydroxide solution. Once these ingredients are mixed and cured at elevated temperatures, they react to form a hard, dense, ceramic-like material that contains significant amounts of crystalline tectosilicates (zeolites and feldspathoids). Zeolites have the ability to sequester ions in lattice positions or within their networks of channels and voids. As such they are nearly perfect waste forms, the zeolites can host alkali, alkaline earth and a variety of higher valance cations. In addition to zeolites, it has been found that the zeolites are accompanied by an alkali aluminosilicate hydrate matrix that is a host, not only to the zeolites, but to residual amounts of insoluble hydroxide phases as well. A previous publication has established the fact that a mixture of a calcined equivalent ICPP waste (sodium aluminate/hydroxide solution containing ∼3:1 Na:Al) and fly ash and/or metakaolinite could be cured at various temperatures to produce a monolith containing Zeolite A (80 C) or Na-P1 plus hydroxy sodalite (130 C) crystals dispersed in an alkali aluminosilicate hydrate matrix. Dissolution tests have shown these materials (so-called hydroceramics) to have superior retention for alkali, alkaline earth and heavy metal ions. The zeolitization process is a simple one. Metakaolinite and/or Class F fly ash is mixed with a caustic sodium-bearing calcine and enough water to make a thick paste. The paste is transferred to a metal canister and ''soaked'' for a few hours at 70-80 C prior to steam autoclaving the sample at ∼200 C for 6-8 hours. The waste form produced in this

  12. Solvent distillations studies for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1989-01-01

    The substantial amounts of solvent used in large reprocessing plants are such that considerable care must be paid to solvent management to limit the production of organic wastes. The installation of intensive treatment by chemical regeneration serves to increase the service life of the solvent. General solvent management, combined with a distillation unit under reduced pressure also helps to recycle the two components of the solvent at a low activity level. Distillation also serves to remove the heavy degradation products that are generally responsible for poor hydraulic behavior and for the holdup of radioactive products such as plutonium, zirconium and ruthenium. From the safety standpoint, the flashpoint of the distilled diluent tends to rise. It can therefore be recycled without risk

  13. Entanglement distillation protocols and number theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombin, H.; Martin-Delgado, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    We show that the analysis of entanglement distillation protocols for qudits of arbitrary dimension D benefits from applying basic concepts from number theory, since the set Z D n associated with Bell diagonal states is a module rather than a vector space. We find that a partition of Z D n into divisor classes characterizes the invariant properties of mixed Bell diagonal states under local permutations. We construct a very general class of recursion protocols by means of unitary operations implementing these local permutations. We study these distillation protocols depending on whether we use twirling operations in the intermediate steps or not, and we study them both analytically and numerically with Monte Carlo methods. In the absence of twirling operations, we construct extensions of the quantum privacy algorithms valid for secure communications with qudits of any dimension D. When D is a prime number, we show that distillation protocols are optimal both qualitatively and quantitatively

  14. Low temperature distillation of powdered materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1929-04-11

    In the low temperature distillation of powdered material such as coal, brown coal, or oil shale, dust carried by the gases and vapors is precipitated by supplying liquid hydrocarbons to the effluent gases, for example, to a dust remover through which the distillates pass. The material is supplied through a hopper and moved through a retort by a worm feed, and is discharged into a sump. Scavenging gases such as steam may be introduced through a pipe. Two conveyor worms moving in opposite directions are provided in an outlet conduit which may be surrounded by a cooling jacket. Heavy hydrocarbons condense on the walls of the conduit and on the conveyor worms and serve as dust catchers for the distillates, the lighted volatiles escaping through an outlet. The high boiling point oils flow back to and are cracked in the retort. Oils such as tar oils may be sprayed into the conduit or directly adjacent the entry of the material from feeding hopper.

  15. Superadditivity of distillable entanglement from quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Roychowdhury, Vwani

    2005-12-01

    We show that the phenomenon of superadditivity of distillable entanglement observed in multipartite quantum systems results from the consideration of states created during the execution of the standard end-to-end quantum teleportation protocol [and a few additional local operations and classical communication (LOCC) steps] on a linear chain of singlets. Some of these intermediate states are tensor products of bound entangled (BE) states, and hence, by construction possess distillable entanglement, which can be unlocked by simply completing the rest of the LOCC operations required by the underlying teleportation protocol. We use this systematic approach to construct both new and known examples of superactivation of bound entanglement, and examples of activation of BE states using other BE states. A surprising outcome is the construction of noiseless quantum relay channels with no distillable entanglement between any two parties, except for that between the two end nodes.

  16. Superadditivity of distillable entanglement from quantum teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Roychowdhury, Vwani

    2005-01-01

    We show that the phenomenon of superadditivity of distillable entanglement observed in multipartite quantum systems results from the consideration of states created during the execution of the standard end-to-end quantum teleportation protocol [and a few additional local operations and classical communication (LOCC) steps] on a linear chain of singlets. Some of these intermediate states are tensor products of bound entangled (BE) states, and hence, by construction possess distillable entanglement, which can be unlocked by simply completing the rest of the LOCC operations required by the underlying teleportation protocol. We use this systematic approach to construct both new and known examples of superactivation of bound entanglement, and examples of activation of BE states using other BE states. A surprising outcome is the construction of noiseless quantum relay channels with no distillable entanglement between any two parties, except for that between the two end nodes

  17. Decomposition of pre calcined aluminium silicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomidi, A.K.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of pre calcined aluminium silicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid. The physicochemical properties of initial aluminium silicate ores were studied by means of X-ray phase, differential thermal and silicate analysis. The chemical composition of aluminium containing ores was determined. The optimal conditions of interaction of initial and pre calcined siallites with hydrochloric acid were defined. The kinetics of acid decomposition of aluminium silicate ores was studied as well.

  18. Silicon-Polymer Encapsulation of High-Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Miller, C.M.; Giansiracusa, J.A.; Kimmel, R.; Prewett, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: (1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; (2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, (3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test

  19. Determination of 129I using distillation method and liquid scintillation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, B.; Dulanska, S.; Remenec, B.; Matel, L.; Gardonova, V.

    2014-01-01

    The conditions for effective distillation of iodine as a screening method for the determination of 129 I by liquid scintillation spectrometry were optimized. By distillation of iodine it is possible to achieve high-purity fraction without interferences needed for measuring 129 I for liquid scintillation spectrometer. Yields of separation were determined gravimetrically using PdI 2 ·H 2 O. The environment that was found to be effective for distillation of iodine is made up of 1 - 2 mol dm -3 HNO 3 together with 0.4 g of NaNO 2 as an oxidizing agent (I . →I 2 ). For testing of distillation, suitable apparatus for distillation of iodine was designed. The apparatus was connected to a vacuum box, which sucks iodine of the distilled solution. Then the iodine was captured in a solution of NaOH at a concentration of 1.5 mol dm -3 . As part of the optimization methodology, it was found that the concentration of NaOH solution for adsorption I 2 (g) does not have any influence on the yields, as opposed to its volume, where it is necessary to use a maximum amount of NaOH in the holding flask for maximum adsorption of iodine. It was determined, that time needed for coagulation PdI 2 ·H 2 O is 24 hours and suitable time for distillation was 20 minutes. Optimized method for the determination of 129 I was applied for various matrices from NPPs in Slovak Republic. Values of 129 I for all analyzed samples were less than the minimum detectable activity (0.043 Bq). The separation yields were in the range (73.14 to 82.04)% and 129 I was measured on a liquid scintillation spectrometer TRI CARB 2900TR with high detection efficiency of 95%. (authors)

  20. Augmentation of a solar still distillate yield via absorber plate coated with black nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Kabeel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of utilizing nanomaterial on the solar still productivity investigated experimentally. Cuprous oxides (CuO chosen as a nanoparticles material. The nanoparticles added to the black paint of the solar still walls to enhance the solar still performance. Experiments conducted with cuprous oxide nanoparticles weight concentrations ranged from 10% to 40%. It is found that adding nanoparticles to paint increase heat transfer rate and saline water temperature. Solar still productivity of the proposed system is higher than that for the conventional still. Results acquired that utilizing CuO nanoparticles boosted the distillate by 16% and 25% as compared to the conventional solar still (CSS at weight fraction concentration of 10% and 40%, respectively. Payback period of the distillation system for the modified still using CuO nanomaterials is about 96 days, at weight fraction 10%, which is considerable as compared by 89 days for CSS. Keywords: Nanomaterial, Solar still, Distillation, Nanoparticle

  1. Use of an Electronic Tongue to Detect Geosmin in Distilled Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Guilherme S.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.

    2011-11-01

    An electronic tongue (ET) system consisting of conducting polymer sensors was employed to detect geosmin (GSM) in distilled water. GSM is a tainting compound and known to cause undesirable tastes and odors in water and aquaculture farming. Diluted solutions of GSM were prepared in distilled water at different concentrations. The electrical response (capacitance) of the sensors was analyzed using principal analysis component (PCA). The data obtained were separated into different clusters indicating a good sensibility of the ET system to this compound in distilled water. The ET showed signal saturation for concentrations higher than 300 ng.L-1. So far, the detection limit of our system is 25 ng.L-1. Nevertheless, close grouping between repeated tests indicated that the ET system response is reproducible.

  2. Thiosulphate leaching of gold-, silver-, copper flotation concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samikhov, Sh.R.; Zinchenko, Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to thiosulphate leaching of gold-, silver-, copper flotation concentrates. For the purpose to improve the process of thiosulphate leaching the ore samples were calcined at temperature 600 ℃ during two hours. During the calcination process of gold-sulphide ores and concentrates the minerals pyrite and arsenopyrite oxidize which lead to opening of gold contains in them. It was defined that thiosulphate leaching can be recommended as an alternative to cyanic process.

  3. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, R. J.; Neveril, R. B.; Remus, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration (VD/VF) water recovery system are considered. As a functional model, the system converts urine and condensates waste water from six men to potable water on a steady-state basis. The system is designed for 180-day operating durations and for function on the ground, on zero-g aircraft, and in orbit. Preparatory tasks are summarized for conducting low gravity tests of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration system for recovering water from urine.

  4. Process and apparatus for distilling bituminous minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyrier, J A

    1922-03-27

    This process of distillation of bituminous minerals and particularly bituminous limestone is characterized by the fact that the minerals are introduced into the retort where they stand only the temperature necessary to distill the water and lighter oils that they contain and then are drawn out into the hearth and serve for heating the retort. The apparatus is characterized by the fact that the retort has a screw conveyor, placed in the flue of the hearth, supplied with a chamber for evacuation below this hearth.

  5. Process and apparatus for destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, D; Hedbaeck, T J

    1951-01-10

    A process of distilling wood, coal, shale, and like materials in an externally heated retort, consists of heating the retort by burning fuel in a combustion chamber completely or partly surrounding the retort and passing a heat-absorbing medium through ducts which are mounted in or adjacent the greater part of the length of the retort walls which are so arranged as to effect a greater degree of heat extraction at one part of the retort than at another part of the retort. The zones of different heat extraction being related to the heat developed in the combustion chamber maintains the most favourable distillation temperature in all parts of the retort.

  6. Membrane distillation against a pressure difference

    OpenAIRE

    Keulen, L.; van der Ham, L.V.; Kuipers, N.J.M.; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Kjelstrup, S.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an attractive technology for production of fresh water from seawater. The MemPower®MemPower® concept, studied in this work, uses available heat (86 °C) to produce pressurized water (2.2 bar and 46 °C) by membrane distillation, which again can be used to power a turbine for co-production of electricity. We develop a non-equilibrium thermodynamic model to accurately describe the transfer at the liquid-membrane interfaces, as well as through the hydrophobic membrane. The...

  7. Experimental entanglement distillation of mesoscopic quantum states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Ruifang; Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Heersink, Joel

    2008-01-01

    channel, the distribution of loss-intolerant entangled states is inevitably afflicted by decoherence, which causes a degradation of the transmitted entanglement. To combat the decoherence, entanglement distillation, a process of extracting a small set of highly entangled states from a large set of less...... entangled states, can be used(4-14). Here we report on the distillation of deterministically prepared light pulses entangled in continuous variables that have undergone non-Gaussian noise. The entangled light pulses(15-17) are sent through a lossy channel, where the transmission is varying in time similarly...

  8. Static multiplicities in heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Klavs; Andersen, Torben Ravn; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of a bifurcation analysis on heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences are given. Two sequences suitable for ethanol dehydration are compared: The 'direct' and the 'indirect' sequence. It is shown, that the two sequences, despite their similarities, exhibit very...... different static behavior. The method of Petlyuk and Avet'yan (1971), Bekiaris et al. (1993), which assumes infinite reflux and infinite number of stages, is extended to and applied on heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences. The predictions are substantiated through simulations. The static sequence...

  9. Origin of Activity and Stability Enhancement for Ag3PO4 Photocatalyst after Calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyu Dong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pristine Ag3PO4 microspheres were synthesized by a co-precipitation method, followed by being calcined at different temperatures to obtain a series of calcined Ag3PO4 photocatalysts. This work aims to investigate the origin of activity and stability enhancement for Ag3PO4 photocatalyst after calcination based on the systematical analyses of the structures, morphologies, chemical states of elements, oxygen defects, optical absorption properties, separation and transfer of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and active species. The results indicate that oxygen vacancies (VO˙˙ are created and metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are formed by the reaction of partial Ag+ in Ag3PO4 semiconductor with the thermally excited electrons from Ag3PO4 and then deposited on the surface of Ag3PO4 microspheres during the calcination process. Among the calcined Ag3PO4 samples, the Ag3PO4-200 sample exhibits the best photocatalytic activity and greatly enhanced photocatalytic stability for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB solution under visible light irradiation. Oxygen vacancies play a significantly positive role in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity, while metallic Ag has a very important effect on improving the photocatalytic stability. Overall, the present work provides some powerful evidences and a deep understanding on the origin of activity and stability enhancement for the Ag3PO4 photocatalyst after calcination.

  10. Effects of rapid calcination on properties of calcium-based sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Chang-Feng; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim

    2010-01-01

    The calcination process may influence subsequent fragmentation, sintering and swelling when CaO derived from limestone acts as a CO 2 or SO 2 -sorbent in combustion, gasification and reforming. Sorbent properties are affected by CO 2 partial pressure, total pressure, temperature, heating rate, impurities and sample size. In this study, the effect of calcination heating rate was investigated based on an electrically heated platinum foil. The effects of heating rate (up to 800 C/s), calcination temperature (700-950 C), particle size (90-180 μm) and sweep gas velocity were investigated. Higher initial heating rates led to lower extents of limestone calcination, but the extents of carbonation of the resulting CaO were similar to each other. Calcium utilization declined markedly during carbonation or sulphation of CaO after calcination by rapid heating. Experimental results show that carbonation and calcium utilization were most effective for carbonation temperatures between 503 and 607 C. Increasing the extent of calcination is not the best way to improve overall calcium utilization due to the vast increase in energy consumption. (author)

  11. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  12. Characterization of magnetic biochar amended with silicon dioxide prepared at high temperature calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Shams Ali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcination is considered to increase the hardness of composite material and prevent its breakage for the effective applications in environmental remediation. In this study, magnetic biochar amended with silicon dioxide was calcined at high temperature under nitrogen environment and characterized using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis revealed elimination of Fe3O4 peaks under nitrogen calcination and formation of Fe3Si and iron as major constituents of magnetic biochar-SiO2 composite, which demonstrated its superparamagnetic behavior (>80 A2·kg−1 comparable to magnetic biochar. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA revealed that both calcined samples generated higher residual mass (>96 % and demonstrated better thermal stability. The presence of various bands in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR was more obvious and the elimination of H–O–H bonding was observed at high temperature calcination. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM images revealed certain morphological variation among the samples and the presence of more prominent internal and external pores, which then judged the surface area and pore volume of samples. Findings from this study suggests that the selective calcination process could cause useful changes in the material composites and can be effectively employed in environmental remediation measures.

  13. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project's scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary

  14. Infrared detection of the mineralogical aspects that influence the processing of calcined kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenheide, Stefan; Guatame-Garcia, Adriana; Buxton, Mike; van der Werff, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Calcined kaolin is an industrial minerals product used in the production of paper, paint, rubber and other specialty applications. It is produced from kaolinite through a series of refinement steps and final calcination at temperatures of above 900°C, with the aim of generating a whiter and more abrasive material. The raw kaolin ore is a mixture of clay minerals, quartz and feldspars, where kaolinite is the main constituent. The optimal kaolin ores to feed the processing plant should ideally have high kaolinite abundance, be free in Fe-bearing mineralogy (to avoid influence in the colour of the product), and the kaolinite itself should be of high crystallinity (to ensure the correct abrasiveness after calcination). This work presents a case study from the kaolin deposits in the St. Austell Granite (South-West England), which are known for their high quality and world-class size. In this area, the kaolin is of primary-hydrothermal origin, with mineral associations that are related to the genetic history. The eventual depletion of the high-quality reserves is bringing now the attention to the lower grade zones, where the amount of impurities increases. As a consequence, it is critical to developing strategies that ensure the supply of high-quality ore to the processing plant. For this, it is necessary to acquire a thorough knowledge of the ore, including relative abundance of the minerals and their textural relationships. Hyperspectral images in the visible-near infrared (VNIR) and short-wave infrared (SWIR) ranges were collected from drill cores and run-off-mine (ROM) samples, obtained from one of the kaolin pits in the St. Austell area, where the kaolin quality is known to be lower than in the rest of the deposit. A series of mineral maps were generated to assess the distribution, texture and abundance of the Fe-bearing mineralogy and the other kaolin-associated minerals, as well as the variations in the crystallinity of kaolinite. The mineral maps enabled the

  15. Electro-oxidation nitrite based on copper calcined layered double hydroxide and gold nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Lin; Meng Xiaomeng; Xu Minrong; Shang Kun [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Ai Shiyun, E-mail: ashy@sdau.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Liu Yinping [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A nitrite sensor fabricated based on copper calcined layered double hydroxides and gold nanoparticles modified electrode. > This sensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation to nitrite. > This nitrite sensor exhibited very good analytical performance with low cost, convenient preparation and rapid detection. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel nitrite sensor was constructed based on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a copper calcined layered double hydroxide (Cu-CLDH) modified glassy carbon electrode. Electrochemical experiments showed that AuNPs/CLDH composite film exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation activity with nitrite due to the synergistic effect of the Cu-CLDH with AuNPs. The fabricated sensor exhibited excellent performance for nitrite detection within a wide concentration interval of 1-191 {mu}M and with a detection limit of 0.5 {mu}M. The superior electrocatalytic response to nitrite was mainly attributed to the large surface area, minimized diffusion resistance, and enhanced electron transfer of the Cu-CLDH and AuNPs composition film. This platform offers a novel route for nitrite sensing with wide analytical applications and will supply the practical applications for a variety of simple, robust, and easy-to-manufacture analytical approaches in the future.

  16. Electro-oxidation nitrite based on copper calcined layered double hydroxide and gold nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Lin; Meng Xiaomeng; Xu Minrong; Shang Kun; Ai Shiyun; Liu Yinping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A nitrite sensor fabricated based on copper calcined layered double hydroxides and gold nanoparticles modified electrode. → This sensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation to nitrite. → This nitrite sensor exhibited very good analytical performance with low cost, convenient preparation and rapid detection. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel nitrite sensor was constructed based on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a copper calcined layered double hydroxide (Cu-CLDH) modified glassy carbon electrode. Electrochemical experiments showed that AuNPs/CLDH composite film exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation activity with nitrite due to the synergistic effect of the Cu-CLDH with AuNPs. The fabricated sensor exhibited excellent performance for nitrite detection within a wide concentration interval of 1-191 μM and with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. The superior electrocatalytic response to nitrite was mainly attributed to the large surface area, minimized diffusion resistance, and enhanced electron transfer of the Cu-CLDH and AuNPs composition film. This platform offers a novel route for nitrite sensing with wide analytical applications and will supply the practical applications for a variety of simple, robust, and easy-to-manufacture analytical approaches in the future.

  17. Adsorption of methyl orange from aqueous solution onto calcined Lapindo volcanic mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalil, Aishah A.; Triwahyono, Sugeng; Adam, S. Hazirah; Rahim, N. Diana; Aziz, M. Arif A.; Hairom, N. Hanis H.; Razali, N. Aini M.; Abidin, Mahani A.Z.; Mohamadiah, M. Khairul A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, calcined Lapindo volcanic mud (LVM) was used as an adsorbent to remove an anionic dye, methyl orange (MO), from an aqueous solution by the batch adsorption technique. Various conditions were evaluated, including initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, contact time, solution pH, and temperature. The adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms of the LVM were studied using pseudo-first-order and -second-order kinetic equations, as well as the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The experimental data obtained with LVM fits best to the Langmuir isotherm model and exhibited a maximum adsorption capacity (q max ) of 333.3 mg g -1 ; the data followed the second-order equation. The intraparticle diffusion studies revealed that the adsorption rates were not controlled only by the diffusion step. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy, showed that the adsorption is endothermic, random and spontaneous at high temperature. The results indicate that LVM adsorbs MO efficiently and could be utilized as a low-cost alternative adsorbent for the removal of anionic dyes in wastewater treatment.

  18. An acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on graphene-gold nanocomposite and calcined layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chen; Guo, Yemin; Sun, Xia; Zheng, Yuhe; Wang, Xiangyou

    2014-05-10

    In this study, a novel acetylcholinesterase-based biosensor was fabricated. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was immobilized onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with the aid of Cu-Mg-Al calcined layered double hydroxide (CLDH). CLDH can provide a bigger effective surface area for AChE loading, which could improve the precision and stability of AChE biosensor. However, the poor electroconductibility of CLDHs could lead to the low sensitivity of AChE biosensor. In order to effectively compensate the disadvantages of CLDHs, graphene-gold nanocomposites were used for improving the electron transfer rate. Thus, the graphene-gold nanocomposite (GN-AuNPs) was firstly modified onto the GCE, and then the prepared CLDH-AChE composite was immobilized onto the modified GCE to construct a sensitive AChE biosensor for pesticides detection. Relevant parameters were studied in detail and optimized, including the pH of the acetylthiocholine chloride (ATCl) solution, the amount of AChE immobilized on the biosensor and the inhibition time governing the analytical performance of the biosensor. The biosensor detected chlorpyrifos at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 150μg/L. The detection limit for chlorpyrifos was 0.05μg/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dehydration of ethanol with salt extractive distillation-a comparative analysis between processes with salt recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligero, E.L.; Ravagnani, T.M.K. [Departamento de Engenharia de Sistemas Qumicos, Faculdade de Engenharia Qumica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Anhydrous ethanol can be obtained from a dilute aqueous solution of ethanol via extractive distillation with potassium acetate. Two process flowsheets with salt recovery were proposed. In the first, dilute ethanol is directly fed to a salt extractive distillation column and, after that, the salt is recovered in a multiple effect evaporator followed by a spray dryer. In the second, the concentrated ethanol from conventional distillation is fed to a salt extractive distillation column. In this case, salt is recovered in a single spray dryer. In both processes the recovered salt is recycled to be used in the extractive distillation column. Every component of each process was rigorously modeled and its behavior was simulated for a wide range of operating conditions. A global simulation was then carried out. The results show that the second process is more interesting in terms of energy consumption than the first. Furthermore, it would be easier to implement changes on existing benzene extractive anhydrous ethanol plants to convert them to more ecologically attractive concentrated ethanol feed processes. (author)

  20. Height determination at the transfer unit in isotopic distillation of hydrogen on type B7 ordered column packing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, F.; Croitoru, C.; Peculea, M.

    2001-01-01

    Owing to the low pressure drop implied by ordered column packings these are often utilized for vacuum distillations and separation of mixtures in which the important component occurs at a very low concentration, as for instance is the case of water, deuterium or oxygen isotopic distillation. The paper presents a model for determination of the height of transfer unit (HTU) in the hydrogen isotopic distillation installation, equipped with ordered column packing of B7 type. The computed values for HUT based on the analogy between heat, moment and mass transfer, were compared with the experimental data

  1. Calcination, Reduction and Sintering of ADU Spheres for HTGR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Yeon Ku; Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Ju Hee; Cho, Hyo Jin; Cho, Moon Seoung

    2011-01-01

    formation of spheres is then formed by the dispersed in air and ammonia gases atmosphere. The gelation of polymer was induced at the surface of the droplets in this step. The surfaces of these liquid droplets are slightly solidified by reaction of ammonia gas and uranyl ion into the droplets. Spherical droplets are converted to aged-ADU gels in NH 4 OH solution. Then, many steps, such as the ageing and drying of ADU gel, the calcining to UO 3 , the sintering to UO 2 , were progressed continuously

  2. Treatment of uranium-bearing wastewater by vacuum membrane distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Xiaolin; Li Qicheng; Chen Bingbing

    2006-01-01

    The removal of uranium from wastewater was carried out by vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) using microporous polypropylene membrane. The effects of feed temperature, mass concentration of U, flow rate and vacuum-side pressure on permeation flux and rejection were studied. The optimum experimental conditions are as follows: feed flow rate is 0.5 m/s, feed temperature is 55 degree C, vacuum-side pressure is 2.66 kPa. When the mass concentrations of U in the feed solution range from 1 mg/L to 9 mg/L, the membrane flux is 3.5 kg/(m 2 ·h) and the rejection rate is 99.1% under the optimum conditions. The water separated from uranium solution by vacuum membrane distillation could meet the state-controlled discharge standard 0.05 mg/L. The VMD as a novel technology will play an important role in the treatment of uranium-bearing wastewater. (authors)

  3. Batch extractive distillation for high purity methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weijiang; Ma Sisi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the application in chemical industry and microelectronic industry, market status and the present situation of production of high purity methanol at home and abroad were introduced firstly. Purification of industrial methanol for high purity methanol is feasible in china. Batch extractive distillation is the best separation technique for purification of industrial methanol. Dimethyl sulfoxide was better as an extractant. (authors)

  4. Non-equilibrium modelling of distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, J.A

    This is a lecture on the way that we engineers model distillation. How we have done such modelling, how we would like to do it, and how far we have come at this moment. The ideas that I will be bringing forward are not my own. I owe them mostly to R. Krishna, R. Taylor, H. Kooijman and A. Gorak.

  5. Vertical retorts for distilling, carbonizing, roasting, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, H R.L.; Bates, W R

    1917-11-17

    In a continuously operated vertical retort for destructive distillation or roasting the combination of an annular internally and externally heated construction with an annular plunger adapted to compress and assist the travel of the charge and to aid in discharging material substantially is described.

  6. Obtaining shale distillate free from sulphur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyl, G E

    1917-09-14

    A process whereby, from sulfur-containing shale, products free from sulfur may be obtained, consisting of mixing with the finely ground shale a portion of iron salts containing sufficient metal to unite with all the sulfur in the shale and form sulfide therewith, grinding the mixture to a fine state of subdivision and subsequently subjecting it to destructive distillation.

  7. Holoprosencephaly: A mythologic and teratologic distillate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M Michael

    2010-02-15

    This review of holoprosencephaly provides a mythologic and teratologic distillate of the subject under the following headings: Babylonian tablets; Greek mythology; pictures from the 16th through the 20th Centuries; 19th Century teratology; history of more modern concepts and their terminologies; and ocean-going ships named "Cyclops." 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Designing reactive distillation processes with improved efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida-Rivera, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation a life-span inspired perspective is taken on the conceptual design of grassroots reactive distillation processes. Attention was paid to the economic performance of the process and to potential losses of valuable resources over the process life span. The research was cast in a

  9. Robust Geometric Control of a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kymmel, Mogens; Andersen, Henrik Weisberg

    1987-01-01

    A frequency domain method, which makes it possible to adjust multivariable controllers with respect to both nominal performance and robustness, is presented. The basic idea in the approach is that the designer assigns objectives such as steady-state tracking, maximum resonance peaks, bandwidth, m...... is used to examine and improve geometric control of a binary distillation column....

  10. Lubricity characteristics of marine distillate fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutchley, Ian [Innospec Fuel Specialties, Ellesmere Port (United Kingdom); Green, Michael [Intertek Lintec ShipCare Services, Darlington (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    This article from Innospec Fuel Specialties, Ellesmere Port, UK, and Intertek Lintec ShipCare Services, Darlington, UK, examines the lubricity characteristics of marine distillate fuels available today in relation to the requirements and limits imposed in ISO8217:2010. It will estimate expected failure rates and also asses the perceived relationship between lubricity, sulphur content and viscosity. (orig.)

  11. Non-equilibrium modelling of distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, JA; Darton, R

    1997-01-01

    There are nasty conceptual problems in the classical way of describing distillation columns via equilibrium stages, and efficiencies or HETP's. We can nowadays avoid these problems by simulating the behaviour of a complete column in one go using a non-equilibrium model. Such a model has phase

  12. Design and performance of a full-scale spray calciner for nonradioactive high-level-waste-vitrification studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, F.A.

    1981-06-01

    In the spray calcination process, liquid waste is spray-dried in a heated-wall spray dryer (termed a spray calciner), and then it may be combined in solid form with a glass-forming frit. This mixture is then melted in a continuous ceramic melter or in an in-can melter. Several sizes of spray calciners have been tested at PNL- laboratory scale, pilot scale and full scale. Summarized here is the experience gained during the operation of PNL's full-scale spray calciner, which has solidified approx. 38,000 L of simulated acid wastes and approx. 352,000 L of simulated neutralized wastes in 1830 h of processing time. Operating principles, operating experience, design aspects, and system descriptions of a full-scale spray calciner are discussed. Individual test run summaries are given in Appendix A. Appendices B and C are studies made by Bechtel Inc., under contract by PNL. These studies concern, respectively, feed systems for the spray calciner process and a spray calciner vibration analysis. Appendix D is a detailed structural analysis made at PNL of the spray calciner. These appendices are included in the report to provide a complete description of the spray calciner and to include all major studies made concerning PNL's full-scale spray calciner

  13. Distilled water nasal provocation in hyperreactive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, T; Anzic, S A; Kalogjera, L

    1999-01-01

    Nonisotonic aerosol may act as a provocation agent in the upper and lower airways of hyperreactive individuals. The purpose of the study was to compare the results of nasal challenge with distilled water in patients with allergic rhinitis to those with noninfective nonallergic rhinitis (NINAR), with respect to the potential clinical use of the obtained data. A group of 68 ambulatory patients with allergic rhinitis or NINAR (39 perennial allergic, 6 seasonal, 23 NINAR) were challenged with 10 mL of distilled water aerosol after the baseline active anterior rhinomanometry. Patients with nasal polyposis at endoscopy, significant unilateral septal deviation, positive bacteriologic swab, recent nasal surgery, and uncertain anamnestic data about the medication taken 6 weeks before the provocation were excluded from the study. After 10 minutes of nasal provocation, rhinomanometry was repeated to assess the response. In 15 patients of the perennial allergic group, the same measurements were performed after a 2-week oral antihistamine and topical steroid therapy. Nasal resistance was significantly increased on the more patent side of the nose after nasal provocation with distilled water aerosol in allergic patients in comparison to the nasal resistance before provocation. In the patients with NINAR, the provocation resulted in a significant rise on the more patent side, but the total nasal airway resistance (NAR) levels were also significantly increased. The systemic antihistamine and topical steroid 2-week therapy in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis significantly reduced the response to nasal distilled water provocation. Nasal provocation with distilled water aerosol is a cheap, simple, and acceptable method that provides useful clinical data on the level of nonspecific nasal hyperreactivity and the therapy success.

  14. Recovery of distillation, gasification, and if necessary redistilled products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stier, H

    1885-05-17

    Collection chambers are operated in pairs. In one of a pair of chambers there is alternately gasification (heating gas generation or complete combustion), in the other distillation, and continually the products from combustion carry on the distillation.

  15. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Eleiwi, Fadi; Karam, Ayman M.

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane

  16. The Design and Manufacturing of Essential oil Distillation Plant for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Design and Manufacturing of Essential oil Distillation Plant for rural poverty ... The adaptation of oil distillation technology for essential oil production is ... based on local resources and the first prototype has been manufactured and tested.

  17. Method of increased bioethanol concentration with reduced heat consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremers, G.; Blija, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ethanol dehydration applying method of non-reflux saline distillation was conduced on a laboratory scale and in bigger pilot equipment. Results make possible recommend new method for the increased of ethanol concentration. Heat consumption reduced by 50% and cooling water consumption by 90 % when the non-reflux distillation was applied. Reflux flow in the column is replacing with contact mass, which consist from saline layer and seclude medium. Basis diagram of ethanol non-reflux saline distillation was established. Distillation equipment and number of plates in the column can calculate using basis diagram. Absolute ethanol can obtain with non-reflux saline distillation. Absolute ethanol use in produce of biofuel (author)

  18. Effects of Coke Calcination Level on Pore Structure in Carbon Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ning; Xue, Jilai; Lang, Guanghui; Bao, Chongai; Gao, Shoulei

    2016-02-01

    Effects of coke calcination levels on pore structure of carbon anodes have been investigated. Bench anodes were prepared by 3 types of cokes with 4 calcination temperatures (800°C, 900°C, 1000°C and 1100°C). The cokes and anodes were characterized using hydrostatic method, air permeability determination, mercury porosimetry, image analysis and confocal microscopy (CSLM). The cokes with different calcination levels are almost the same in LC values (19-20 Å) and real density (1.967-1.985 g/cm3), while the anode containing coke calcined at 900°C has the lowest open porosity and air permeability. Pore size distribution (represented by Anode H sample) can be roughly divided into two ranges: small and medium pores in diameter of 10-400 μm and large pores of 400-580 μm. For the anode containing coke calcined at 800°C, a number of long, narrow pores in the pore size range of 400-580 μm are presented among cokes particles. Formation of these elongated pores may be attributed to coke shrinkages during the anode baking process, which may develop cracking in the anode under cell operations. More small or medium rounded pores with pore size range of 10-400 μm emerge in the anodes with coke calcination temperatures of 900°C, 1000°C and 1100°C, which may be generated due to release of volatiles from the carbon anode during baking. For the anode containing coke calcined at 1100°C, it is found that many rounded pores often closely surround large coke particles, which have potential to form elongated, narrow pores.

  19. Distillation irrigation: a low-energy process for coupling water purification and drip irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for combining solar distillation and drip irrigation to simultaneously desalinize water and apply this water to row crops. In this paper, the basic method is illustrated by a simple device constructed primarily of sheets of plastic, which uses solar energy to distill impaired water and apply the distillate to a widely spaced row crop. To predict the performance of the proposed device, an empirical equation for distillate production, dp, is developed from reported solar still production rates, and a modified Jensen-Haise equation is used to calculate the potential evapotranspiration, et, for a row crop. Monthly values for et and dp are calculated by using a generalized row crop at five locations in the Western United States. Calculated et values range from 1 to 22 cm month-1 and calculated dp values range from 2 to 11 cm month-1, depending on the location, the month, and the crop average. When the sum of dp plus precipitation, dp + P, is compared to et for the case of 50% distillation irrigation system coverage, the results indicate that the crop's et is matched by dp + P, at the cooler locations only. However, when the system coverage is increased to 66%, the crop's et is matched by dp + P even at the hottest location. Potential advantages of distillation irrigation include the ability: (a) to convert impaired water resources to water containing no salts or sediments; and (b) to efficiently and automatically irrigate crops at a rate that is controlled primarily by radiation intensities. The anticipated disadvantages of distillation irrigation include: (a) the high costs of a system, due to the large amounts of sheeting required, the short lifetime of the sheeting, and the physically cumbersome nature of a system; (b) the need for a widely spaced crop to reduce shading of the system by the crop; and (c) the production of a concentrated brine or precipitate, requiring proper off-site disposal. ?? 1989.

  20. TWOPOT: a computer model of the two-pot extractive distillation concept for nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubin, R.T.; Holland, W.D.; Counce, R.M.; Beckwith, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    A mathematical model, TWOPOT, of the ''two-pot'' extractive distillation concept for nitric acid concentration has been developed. Prediction from a computer simulation using this model shows excellent agreement with the experimental data. This model is recommended for use in the design of large-scale, similar-purpose equipment. 9 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Application of antioxidants during short-path distillation of structured lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm-Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2007-01-01

    A specific structured lipid was produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid. The antioxidative effect of adding alpha-tocopherol, ascorbyl palmitate or citric acid (each in three different concentrations) was investigated before and after the purification process (short-path distillation...

  2. Nutritional quality of eggs from hens fed distillers' dried grains with solubles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distiller grains with soluble (DDGS) have roughly three times the amount of oil as regular corn used in feeds, and several studies have shown that DDGS also have higher concentrations of lipophilic bioactives such as tocopherols, tocotrienols, and xanthophylls, because the levels found in whole corn...

  3. A catalyst for hydrogenating medium-distilled petroleum fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mordanov, M A; Gasanova, Zh I; Isaev, A Ia; Khavkin, V A; Kurganov, V M; Musaeva, S K

    1982-01-01

    The catalyst for hydrogenating medium-distilled petroleum fractions, which contain Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Ni-concentrate components in the gamma-A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ transfer agent, also contains, as a Ni-concentrate component, NiO and Re in the following component ratios (by percentage): Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 25-44, NiO 4-25, Re 1-2 and the transfer agent the remainder, in order to improve catalytic resistance to catalyst toxins--nitrous and sulfurous compounds. The resistance of the proposed catalyst to toxins makes it possible to hydrogenate in less stringent conditions (280 degrees, 30 atmospheres) without first hydropurifying the raw material. Here, the catalyst's selectivity reaches 100 percent (aromatic hydrocarbons are absent); the yield of the target fraction is 99 percent.

  4. A Modeling Framework for Conventional and Heat Integrated Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a generic, modular model framework for describing fluid separation by distillation is presented. At present, the framework is able to describe a conventional distillation column and a heat-integrated distillation column, but due to a modular structure the database can be further...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9635 - Terpene residue distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Terpene residue distillates. 721.9635... Substances § 721.9635 Terpene residue distillates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as terpene residue distillates (PMN P-96-897...

  6. 27 CFR 26.40 - Marking containers of distilled spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... spirits. The distiller, rectifier, or bottler shall serially number each case, barrel, cask, or similar... the container, the distiller, rectifier, or bottler shall plainly print, stamp, or stencil with... barrel, cask or similar container or on one side of each case, as follows: (a) The name of the distiller...

  7. 7 CFR 160.9 - Destructively distilled wood turpentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destructively distilled wood turpentine. 160.9 Section... REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.9 Destructively distilled wood turpentine. The designation “destructively distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine...

  8. Functionalization of a Hydrophilic Commercial Membrane Using Inorganic-Organic Polymers Coatings for Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Eykens

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation is a thermal separation technique using a microporous hydrophobic membrane. One of the concerns with respect to the industrialization of the technique is the development of novel membranes. In this paper, a commercially available hydrophilic polyethersulfone membrane with a suitable structure for membrane distillation was modified using available hydrophobic coatings using ORMOCER® technology to obtain a hydrophobic membrane that can be applied in membrane distillation. The surface modification was performed using a selection of different components, concentrations, and application methods. The resulting membranes can have two hydrophobic surfaces or a hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface depending on the application method. An extensive characterization procedure confirmed the suitability of the coating technique and the obtained membranes for membrane distillation. The surface contact angle of water could be increased from 27° up to 110°, and fluxes comparable to membranes commonly used for membrane distillation were achieved under similar process conditions. A 100 h test demonstrated the stability of the coating and the importance of using sufficiently stable base membranes.

  9. Energy efficiency of acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) recovery by heat-integrated distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisales Diaz, Victor Hugo; Olivar Tost, Gerard

    2018-03-01

    Acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) is an alternative biofuel. However, the energy requirement of ABE recovery by distillation is considered elevated (> 15.2 MJ fuel/Kg-ABE), due to the low concentration of ABE from fermentation broths (between 15 and 30 g/l). In this work, to reduce the energy requirements of ABE recovery, four processes of heat-integrated distillation were proposed. The energy requirements and economic evaluations were performed using the fermentation broths of several biocatalysts. Energy requirements of the processes with four distillation columns and three distillation columns were similar (between 7.7 and 11.7 MJ fuel/kg-ABE). Double-effect system (DED) with four columns was the most economical process (0.12-0.16 $/kg-ABE). ABE recovery from dilute solutions by DED achieved energy requirements between 6.1 and 8.7 MJ fuel/kg-ABE. Vapor compression distillation (VCD) reached the lowest energy consumptions (between 4.7 and 7.3 MJ fuel/kg-ABE). Energy requirements for ABE recovery DED and VCD were lower than that for integrated reactors. The energy requirements of ABE production were between 1.3- and 2.0-fold higher than that for alternative biofuels (ethanol or isobutanol). However, the energy efficiency of ABE production was equivalent than that for ethanol and isobutanol (between 0.71 and 0.76) because of hydrogen production in ABE fermentation.

  10. Physico-chemical and sensorial evaluation of sugarcane spirits produced using distillation residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Galvão Tavares Menezes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the use of vinasse from cachaça as an ingredient of the fermentation medium for the spirit production. The fermentations were conducted out in three successive batches using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolate. In the first batch, the sugarcane broth was only diluted with distilled water. In the second and third batches, the fermentations were carried out using the cane broth diluted with vinasse from the distillation of the sugarcane wines of the first and second batches, respectively at a concentration of 10% (v/v. The spirits were submitted to the physicochemical and sensorial analyses. The results showed that vinasse addition did not affect the fermentation, distillation and chemical-sensorial quality of the beverage. Therefore, the vinasse addition could be an alternative use for that residue.

  11. Toxicological findings in two planned complex suicide cases: ingestion of petroleum distillates and subsequent hanging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María Antonia; Ballesteros, Salomé

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes two fatal cases of planned complex suicide by two male individuals, 86 and 51 years old, involving ingestion of petroleum distillates and hanging. Remarkable internal findings during autopsy of both cases included the intense odor of petroleum distillates that alerted authorities to the suspicion of ingestion. The initial toxicological screening and quantitation of these compounds were performed by gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection, and confirmation was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in total ion chromatogram mode after liquid-liquid extraction of biological samples following a previously published analytical method. In Case 1, diesel fuel No. 2 concentrations were distillates when there is a suspicion of ingestion of these products due to the odor observed at the scene of death and/or during autopsy. The results of these toxicological investigations can help to determine the manner of death and the medicolegal interpretation.

  12. Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application

  13. Preparation of plutonium waste forms with ICPP calcined high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Holleran, T.P. [Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Glass and glass-ceramic forms developed for the immobilization of calcined high-level wastes generated by Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) fuel reprocessing activities have been investigated for ability to immobilize plutonium and to simultaneously incorporate calcined waste as an anti-proliferation barrier. Within the forms investigated, crystallization of host phases result in an increased loading of plutonium as well as its incorporation into potentially more durable phases than the glass. The host phases were initially formed and characterized with cerium (Ce{sup +4}) as a surrogate for plutonium (Pu{sup +4}) and samarium as a neutron absorber for criticality control. Verification of the surrogate testing results were then performed replacing cerium with plutonium. All testing was performed with surrogate calcined high-level waste. The results of these tests indicated that a potentially useful host phase, based on zirconia, can be formed either by devitrification or solid state reaction in the glass studied. This phase incorporates plutonium as well as samarium and the calcined waste becomes part of the matrix. Its ease of formation makes it potentially useful in excess plutonium dispositioning. Other durable host phases for plutonium and samarium, including zirconolite and zircon have been formed from zirconia or alumina calcine through cold press-sintering techniques and hot isostatic pressing. Host phase formation experiments conducted through vitrification or by cold press-sintering techniques are described and the results discussed. Recommendations are given for future work that extends the results of this study.

  14. Applied laboratory research of high-level waste denitration and calcination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.

    1977-01-01

    Denitration and calcination processes are assessed for model solutions of high-level radioactive wastes. The kinetics was studied of the reaction of HNO 3 with HCOOH with respect to the final composition of the gaseous product. A survey is presented of used denitration agents and of reaction processes. Calcination was studied both as associated with denitration in a single technological step and separately. Also studied was the pyrolysis and chemical decomposition of sodium nitrate which forms an indecomposable melt in the temperature region of 320 to 850 degC under normal conditions. Based on the experiments a laboratory unit was designed and produced for the denitration and calcination of model solutions of high-level radioactive wastes operating in a temperature range of 100 to 550 degC with a capacity of 1000 ml/h. A boiler type stirred evaporator with electric heating (3 kW) was chosen for the denitration unit while a vertical calcinator modified from a film evaporator with a thermal input of 4 kW was chosen for the calcination unit. (B.S.)

  15. Chemistry of proposed calcination/dissolution processing of Hanford Site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Plans exist to separate radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in south central Washington State into low-level and high-level fractions, and to immobilize the separate fractions in high-integrity vitrified forms for long-term disposal. Calcination with water dissolution has been proposed as a possible treatment for achieving low/high-level separation. Chemistry development activities conducted since 1992 with simulated and genuine tank waste show that calcination/dissolution destroys organic carbon and converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide and benign offgases. The process also dissolves significant quantities of bulk chemicals (aluminum, chromium, and phosphate), allowing their redistribution from the high-level to the low-level fraction. Present studies of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution processing of genuine wastes, conducted in the period October 1993 to September 1994, show the importance of sodium fluoride phosphate double salt in controlling phosphate dissolution. Peptization of waste solids is of concern if extensive washing occurs. Strongly oxidizing conditions imposed by calcination reactions were found to convert transition metals to soluble anions in the order chromate > manganate > > ferrate. In analogy with manganese behavior, plutonium dissolution, presumably by oxidation to more soluble anionic species, also occurs by calcination/dissolution. Methods to remove plutonium from the product low-level solution stream must be developed

  16. Final safety-analysis report for the Fifth Calcined Solids Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive aqueous wastes generated by the solvent extraction of uranium from expended fuels at ICPP will be calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). The calcined solids are pneumatically transferred to stainless steel bins enclosed in concrete vaults for interim storage of up to 500 years. The Fifth Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF) provides 1000 m 3 of storage and consists of seven annular stainless steel bins inside a reinforced concrete vault set on bedrock. Storage of calcined solids is essentially a passive operation with very little opportunity for release of radionuclides and with no potential for criticality. There will be no potential for fire or explosion. Shielding has been designed to assure that the radiation levels at the vault exterior surfaces will be limited to less than 0.5 mRem/h. A sump in the vault floor will collect any in-leakage that may occur. Any water that collects in the sump will be sampled then removed with the sump jet. There will be an extremely small chance of release of radioactive particulates into the atmosphere as a result of a bin leak. The Design Basis Accident (DBA) postulates the spill of solids from an eroded fill line into the vault coupled with a failure of the vault cooling air radiation monitor. For the DBA, the maximum calculated radiation dose to an exposed individual near the site boundary is less than 1.2 μRem to the bone and lung

  17. Removal of Dissolved Silica using Calcinated Hydrotalcite in Real-life Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krumhansl, James L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Water shortages are a growing global problem. Reclamation of industrial and municipal wastewater will be necessary in order to mitigate water scarcity. However, many operational challenges, such as silica scaling, prevent large scale water reuse. Previously, our team at Sandia has demonstrated the use of selective ion exchange materials, such as calcinated hydrotalcite (HTC, (Mg 6 Al 2 (OH) 16 (CO 3 )*4H 2 O)), for the low cost removal of silica from synthetic cooling tower water. However, it is not currently know if calcinated HTC has similar capabilities in realistic applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of calcinated HTC to remove silica from real cooling tower water. This was investigated under both batch and continuous conditions, and in the presence of competing ions. It was determined that calcinated HTC behaved similarly in real and synthetic cooling tower water; the HTC is highly selective for the silica even in the presence of competing cations. Therefore, the data concludes that calcinated HTC is a viable anti-scaling pretreatment for the reuse of industrial wastewaters.

  18. Preparation of plutonium waste forms with ICPP calcined high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A.; O'Holleran, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    Glass and glass-ceramic forms developed for the immobilization of calcined high-level wastes generated by Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) fuel reprocessing activities have been investigated for ability to immobilize plutonium and to simultaneously incorporate calcined waste as an anti-proliferation barrier. Within the forms investigated, crystallization of host phases result in an increased loading of plutonium as well as its incorporation into potentially more durable phases than the glass. The host phases were initially formed and characterized with cerium (Ce +4 ) as a surrogate for plutonium (Pu +4 ) and samarium as a neutron absorber for criticality control. Verification of the surrogate testing results were then performed replacing cerium with plutonium. All testing was performed with surrogate calcined high-level waste. The results of these tests indicated that a potentially useful host phase, based on zirconia, can be formed either by devitrification or solid state reaction in the glass studied. This phase incorporates plutonium as well as samarium and the calcined waste becomes part of the matrix. Its ease of formation makes it potentially useful in excess plutonium dispositioning. Other durable host phases for plutonium and samarium, including zirconolite and zircon have been formed from zirconia or alumina calcine through cold press-sintering techniques and hot isostatic pressing. Host phase formation experiments conducted through vitrification or by cold press-sintering techniques are described and the results discussed. Recommendations are given for future work that extends the results of this study

  19. RECONSTRUCTION OF CALCINED Zn -Al LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES DURING TETRACYCLINE ADSORPSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Starukh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Al mixed oxides containing ZnO different degree crystallinity were obtained by calcinations of Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs. The reconstruction of calcined Zn-Al LDHs has been performed under stirring in aqueous suspensions. The assynthesized LDHs, its decomposition products, as well as the reconstructed solids upon hydration were characterized by XRD, N2adsorption, differential and thermal gravimetric analysis. It was found that the ability of Zn-Al LDHs to recover a layered structure under the hydration of mixed oxides depends on the degree of ZnO crystallinity. The partial reconstruction of Zn-Al layered structure occurs in tetracycline solutions irrespective to the degree of ZnO crystallinity in calcined LDHs. Calcined Zn-Al LDHs demonstrate the higher adsorption capacity to tetracycline in comparison with as-prepared Zn-Al LDHs. The adsorption of TC on calcined and uncalcined ZnAl LDHs occurs on the centers of one particular type. It is suggested that surface complexation of the A-ring ligand of TC with Al-OH centers takes place.

  20. Redox calcination study of Synroc D powder containing simulated SRL waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1982-01-01

    According to Ringwood [A.E. Ringwood, W. Sinclair, and G.M. McLaughlin, Nuclear Waste Immobilization, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, Rept. UCRL-15147 (1979)], the iron oxidation state is important in controlling, the spinel mineralogy and composition if the amount of titania (TiO 2 ) consumed in spinel formation is to be minimized in favor of the formation of the Synroc phases, zirconolite, perovskite, and nepheline. In our redox calcination studies we observed that the iron oxidation state of FeO/Fe 2 O 3 can be controlled by the redoxcalcining atmosphere. In a CO atmosphere, the oxidation state was reduced to less than 7 wt % Fe 2 O 3 . With appropriate CO 2 /CO gas mixtures the resultant iron oxidation states were in the range of 45 to 59 wt % Fe 2 O 3 . Direct rotary redox calcination of spray dried powder at 600 0 C, without prior air calcination, showed increased redox efficiency when compared to powder that had been previously air calcined at 650 0 C. We believe this is caused by a reduction in particle size. Rotary calcination at 800 0 C in argon has no measurable reduction affect on the iron oxidation state of Synroc D powder

  1. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  2. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  3. Direct contact membrane distillation: Capability to desalt raw water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Boubakri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the potentialities of membrane distillation to desalt raw waters were investigated. The experiments were performed on a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD unit using a flat sheet polypropylene (PP membrane with a low pore size of 0.064 μm. The effect of relevant operating parameters such as transmembrane temperature difference, hydrodynamic conditions and ionic strength on permeate flux and conductivity was studied. The results indicated that a permeate flux increases with increasing transmembrane temperature difference and Reynolds number, and slightly decreases with increasing ionic strength. The permeate flux reached 4.24 L/m2 h at a temperature difference of 60 °C and Reynolds number of 3740 and ionic strength of 8.56 × 10−2 M. DCMD process using PP with low pore size membrane present a very low salt passage through the membrane which was not affected by feed concentration. DCMD process has been applied during a long period to desalt raw water without any pretreatment. For brackish water, the variation of permeate flux and conductivity were slightly changed as function of operating time. For seawater, the permeate flux decreased slightly and the permeate conductivity increased sharply in which a simple pretreatment step is recommended to ameliorate the performance of DCMD process.

  4. Mathematical modeling of alcohol distillation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ones Osney Pérez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available New evaluation modules are proposed to extend the scope of a modular simulator oriented to the sugar cane industry, called STA 4.0, in a way that it can be used to carry out x calculation and analysis in ethanol distilleries. Calculation modules were developed for the simulation of the columns that are combined in the distillation area. Mathematical models were supported on materials and energy balances, equilibrium relations and thermodynamic properties of the ethanol-water system. Ponchon-Savarit method was used for the evaluation of the theoretical stages in the columns. A comparison between the results using Ponchon- Savarit method and those obtained applying McCabe-Thiele method was done for a distillation column. These calculation modules for ethanol distilleries were applied to a real case for validation.

  5. Companded total condensation loxboil air distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a dual pressure cryogenic distillation process for producing gaseous oxygen from a supply of compressed and cleaned air, comprising: a. cooling a major fraction of the compressed and cleaned air; b. rectifying the major fraction in a high pressure rectifier to liquid nitrogen overhead product and kettle liquid bottom product; c. distilling the kettle liquid in a low pressure column to liquid oxygen bottom product and gaseous nitrogen overhead product; d. working expanding a compensating vapor comprised of at least 77% N/sub 2/ thereby producing refrigeration; and e. further compressing the remaining minor fraction comprising no more than about 30% of the compressed, cleaned warm air in a compressor powered by the expansion

  6. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1984-03-27

    A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

  7. Innovative Vacuum Distillation for Magnesium Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tianbai; Li, Naiyi; Mei, Xiaoming; Yu, Alfred; Shang, Shixiang

    Magnesium recycling now becomes a very important subject as magnesium consumption increases fast around the world. All commonly used magnesium die-casting alloys can be recycled and recovered to the primary metal quality. The recycled materials may be comprised of biscuits, sprues, runners, flash, overflows, dross, sludge, scrap parts, and old parts that are returned from service, An innovative magnesium recycle method, vacuum distillation, is developed and proved out to be able to recycle magnesium scraps, especially machining chips, oily magnesium, smelting sludge, dross or the mixture. With this process at a specific temperature and environment condition, magnesium in scraps can be gasified and then solidified to become crystal magnesium crown. This `recycled' magnesium crown is collected and used as the raw material of magnesium alloys. The experimental results show the vacuum distillation is a feasible and plausible method to recycle magnesium. Further, the cost analysis will be addressed in this paper.

  8. Solar desalination by freezing and distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvajic, G.

    It is noted that among seawater desalination processes the absorption-freeze vapor compression processes based on the thermal heat pump, although untested commercially and still in the development stage, appears technically and economically an attractive application of low-grade (exergy) solar heat. The distillation processes proposed here may be conveniently powered by low-grade solar heat (from flat plate solar collectors). It is expected that the scaling problem will be insignificant in comparison with that encountered in the conventional multistage flash process. The novel feature here is the use of enlarged capacity for heat exchange between distillate and brine via latent heat of solid-liquid phase change of a suitable hydrophobic intermediate heat transfer material.

  9. Surface active agents from Egyptian petroleum distillates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, T.M.

    Kerosene and solar distillates from local crude petroleum 'Morgan' were fractionated. These fractions were refined with oleum and then distilled. The normal paraffins were separated from the refined fractions by the urea adduction technique. These paraffin cuts were subjected to 50% chlorination and the obtained monochlorinated paraffins were used in the synthesis of alkylbenzenes and alkyldiphenyls which were converted to anionic surfactants by sulphonation with 95% sulphuric acid. The sulphonyl chlorides of alkylbenzenes and of alkyldiphenyls were prepared and then converted to the corresponding sulphonamides. The prepared sulphonamides were then processed to nonionic surfactants through condensation with ethylene oxide. The ethoxylates were sulphated with chlorosulphonic acid and phosphated with phosphorus pentoxide to anionic surfactants. The surface active properties and the biodegradability of all the prepared surfactants were determined.

  10. Some remarks on the carrier distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avni, R.; Chaput, M.

    1961-01-01

    The method described by SCRIBNER and MULLIN makes possible the spectrographic analysis of the refractory oxides of uranium and plutonium. It uses a distillation of the elements which is more or less selective. The influence of the carrier is the subject of as many hypotheses as there are parameters involved in the process. The measurements of the arc temperature carried out on the leading edges of the vibration bands and of certain copper lines have made it possible to show the influence of the nature of the carrier and to establish a relationship between the values of the excitation potentials of the atoms and the temperatures produced. Further, this result makes it possible to explain certain contradictions between the principle of a fractional distillation in the arc which is incompatible with the refractory properties of certain elements and their spectrographic sensitivity. (author) [fr

  11. 136 Xe enrichment through cryogenic distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Henning O.; Bottenus, Daniel R.; Clayton, Christopher K.; Stephenson, David E.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2017-09-01

    The next generation of 136Xe neutrinoless double beta decay experiments will require on the order of 5 tons of enriched 136Xe. By estimating the relative volatilities of the xenon isotopes and using standard chemical engineering techniques we explore the feasibility of using cryogenic distillation to produce 5 tons of 80% enriched 136Xe in 5-6 years. With current state-of-the-art distillation column packing materials we can estimate the total height of a traditional cryogenic distillation column. We also, report on how Micro Channel Distillation may reduce the overall size of a distillation system for 136Xe production.

  12. Process modeling and control applied to real-time monitoring of distillation processes by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo R; Pedroza, Ricardo H P; Sousa, A O; Lima, Kássio M G; de Juan, Anna

    2017-09-08

    A distillation device that acquires continuous and synchronized measurements of temperature, percentage of distilled fraction and NIR spectra has been designed for real-time monitoring of distillation processes. As a process model, synthetic commercial gasoline batches produced in Brazil, which contain mixtures of pure gasoline blended with ethanol have been analyzed. The information provided by this device, i.e., distillation curves and NIR spectra, has served as initial information for the proposal of new strategies of process modeling and multivariate statistical process control (MSPC). Process modeling based on PCA batch analysis provided global distillation trajectories, whereas multiset MCR-ALS analysis is proposed to obtain a component-wise characterization of the distillation evolution and distilled fractions. Distillation curves, NIR spectra or compressed NIR information under the form of PCA scores and MCR-ALS concentration profiles were tested as the seed information to build MSPC models. New on-line PCA-based MSPC approaches, some inspired on local rank exploratory methods for process analysis, are proposed and work as follows: a) MSPC based on individual process observation models, where multiple local PCA models are built considering the sole information in each observation point; b) Fixed Size Moving Window - MSPC, in which local PCA models are built considering a moving window of the current and few past observation points; and c) Evolving MSPC, where local PCA models are built with an increasing window of observations covering all points since the beginning of the process until the current observation. Performance of different approaches has been assessed in terms of sensitivity to fault detection and number of false alarms. The outcome of this work will be of general use to define strategies for on-line process monitoring and control and, in a more specific way, to improve quality control of petroleum derived fuels and other substances submitted

  13. Production of bio-fuel ethanol from distilled grain waste eluted from Chinese spirit making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Sun, Zhaoyong; Zhang, Wenxue; Tang, Yueqin; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    Distilled grain waste eluted from Chinese spirit making is rich in carbohydrates, and could potentially serve as feedstock for the production of bio-fuel ethanol. Our study evaluated two types of saccharification methods that convert distilled grain waste to monosaccharides: enzymatic saccharification and concentrated H2SO4 saccharification. Results showed that enzymatic saccharification performed unsatisfactorily because of inefficient removal of lignin during pretreatment. Concentrated H2SO4 saccharification led to a total sugar recovery efficiency of 79.0 %, and to considerably higher sugar concentrations than enzymatic saccharification. The process of ethanol production from distilled grain waste based on concentrated H2SO4 saccharification was then studied. The process mainly consisted of concentrated H2SO4 saccharification, solid-liquid separation, decoloration, sugar-acid separation, oligosaccharide hydrolysis, and continuous ethanol fermentation. An improved simulated moving bed system was employed to separate sugars from acid after concentrated H2SO4 saccharification, by which 95.8 % of glucose and 85.8 % of xylose went into the sugar-rich fraction, while 83.3 % of H2SO4 went into the acid-rich fraction. A flocculating yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae KF-7, was used for continuous ethanol fermentation, which produced an ethanol yield of 91.9-98.9 %, based on glucose concentration.

  14. Calcination of Fluorinel-sodium waste blends using sugar as a feed additive (formerly WINCO-11879)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newby, B.J.; Thomson, T.D.; O'Brien, B.H.

    1992-06-01

    Methods were studied for using sugar as a feed additive for converting the sodium-bearing wastes stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant into granular, free flowing solids by fluidized-bed calcination at 500 degrees C. All methods studied blended sodium-bearing wastes with Fluorinel wastes but differed in the types of sugar (sucrose or dextrose) that were added to the blend. The most promising sugar additive was determined to be sucrose, since it is converted more completely to inorganic carbon than is dextrose. The effect of the feed aluminum-to-alkali metal mole ratio on calcination of these blends with sugar was also investigated. Increasing the aluminum-to-alkali metal ratio from 0.6 to 1.0 decreased the calcine product-to-fines ratio from 3.0 to 1.0 and the attrition index from 80 to 15%. Further increasing the ratio to 1.25 had no effect

  15. Ce - promoted catalyst from hydrotalcites for CO2 reforming of methane: calcination temperature effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Daza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ce-promoted Ni-catalysts from hydrotalcites were obtained. The effect of calcination temperature on the chemical and physical properties of the catalysts was studied. Several techniques were used to determine the chemical and physical characteristics of oxides. The apparent activation energies of reduction were determined. Catalytic experiments at 48 L g-1h-1 without pre-reduction in CO2 reforming of methane were performed. The spinel-like phase in these oxides was only formed at 1000 ºC. The reduction of Ni2+ in the oxides was clearly affected by the calcination temperature which was correlated with catalytic performance. The catalyst calcined at 700 ºC showed the greatest activity.

  16. Pyrochemical treatment of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-level waste calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, T.A.; DelDebbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Sharpsten, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1951 to recover uranium, krypton-85, and isolated fission products for interim treatment and immobilization. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then, since 1963, calcined to form a dry granular solid. The resulting high-level waste (HLW) calcine is stored in seismically hardened stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. A research and development program has been established to determine the feasibility of treating ICPP HLW calcine using pyrochemical technology.This technology is described

  17. Stoichiometry of the U3O8 phase formed during calcination of some uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Farah, M.Y.; Rofail, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    Although recent work has shown U 3 O 8 phase to be the decomposition product obtained after calcining uranyl nitrate, sulphate or ammonium uranate, neither the necessary conditions for obtaining stoichiometric U 3 O 8 nor the details of the reaction have been established. Presence of sulphate or nitrate ions during preparation greatly affects the O/U of the obtained oxides and the physico-chemical properties of uranium tetrafluoride prepared afterwards from it (1-3). The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcination regimes on the stoichiometry of the U 3 O 8 phase produced by the thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate, sulphate, and ammonium uranate, which was prepared by precipitation from nuclear-pure uranyl sulphate. Stoichiometry of the U 3 O 8 phase formed during calcination of ammonium uranate precipitated from nuclear pure uranyl nitrate solution was reported before (1)

  18. Characterisation of sugar cane straw waste as pozzolanic material for construction: Calcining temperature and kinetic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias, Moises; Villar-Cocina, E.; Valencia-Morales, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of calcining temperature (800 and 1000 deg. C) on the pozzolanic activation of sugar cane straw (SCS). The reaction kinetics of SCS ash-lime mixtures were inferred from physicochemical characteristics (X-ray diffraction patterns and thermogravimetry analysis. The fitting of a kinetic-diffusive model to the experimental data (fixed lime versus time) allowed the computing of the kinetic parameters (reaction rate constant) of the pozzolanic reaction. Results obtained confirm that the sugar cane straw ash (SCSA) calcined at 800 and 1000 deg. C have properties indicative of very high pozzolanic activity. No influence of calcining temperature on the pozzolanic activity was observed. Also, no crystalline compounds during the pozzolanic reaction were identified up to 90 days of reaction. Environmental durability and strength of the consequential mortars remain to be assessed

  19. Synthesis of well-dispersed ZnO nanomaterials by directly calcining zinc stearate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Guangsheng; Shi Chen; Tao Dongliang; Qian Weizhong; Han Dongmei

    2009-01-01

    Well-dispersed ZnO nanomaterials were synthesized by direct calcination of zinc stearate. Results from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated both the decomposition degree of organic ligand and the purity of calcined products were increased with the calcination temperature. The influence of decomposition temperature on the morphology of ZnO nanomaterials was investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results revealed the morphology of ZnO transformed from nanosheets to hexagonal nanopyramids and then to nanoparticles at 573, 673 and 773 K respectively. Finally, a morphology evolution model of ZnO nanomaterials under different temperatures was proposed

  20. Calcinated tea and cellulose composite films and its dielectric and lead adsorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Jung Woong; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, calcinated tea and cellulose composite (CTCC) films were fabricated via solution casting method. Chemical structure, morphology, crystallinity and thermal stability of the fabricated films were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The effect of calcinated tea loading on the properties of the prepared CTCC films was studied. The results suggest that the prepared CTCC films show higher mechanical properties, thermal stability and dielectric constant than the neat cellulose film. In addition, the CTCC films adsorb Pb 2+ ions and its adsorption performance depends on the calcinated tea content and pH level. The CTCC films are useful for sensors, flexible capacitor as well as lead adsorption applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.