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Sample records for dissolved solids

  1. Inter-relationship between major ions, total dissolved solids and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sulphate and magnesium concentrations were highest in station 7 while other parameters (potassium, chloride, calcium, alkalinity, conductivity and total dissolved solids (T. D. S.)) were highest in station 6. The ponds belong to class 1 of the African waters since they all have electrical conductance of less than 600 s cm-1.

  2. Measurement of total dissolved solids using electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Vinod K.; Jat, J.R.; Reddy, G.B.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Phani Babu, C.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.

    2017-01-01

    Total dissolved solids (TDS) is an important parameter for the disposal of effluents generated during processing of different raw materials like Magnesium Di-uranate (MDU), Heat Treated Uranium Peroxide (HTUP), Sodium Di-uranate (SDU) in Uranium Extraction plant and Washed and Dried Frit (WDF) in Zirconium Extraction Plant. The present paper describes the use of electrical conductivity for determination of TDS. As electrical conductivity is matrix dependent property, matrix matched standards were prepared for determination of TDS in ammonium nitrate solution (AN) and mixture of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulphate (AN/AS) and results were found to be in good agreement when compared with evaporation method. (author)

  3. Modeled Sources, Transport, and Accumulation of Dissolved Solids in Water Resources of the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anning, David W

    2011-10-01

    Information on important source areas for dissolved solids in streams of the southwestern United States, the relative share of deliveries of dissolved solids to streams from natural and human sources, and the potential for salt accumulation in soil or groundwater was developed using a SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes model. Predicted area-normalized reach-catchment delivery rates of dissolved solids to streams ranged from Salton Sea accounting unit.

  4. The role of baseflow in dissolved solids delivery to streams in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, C.; Miller, M. P.; Schwarz, G. E.; Susong, D.

    2017-12-01

    Salinity has a major effect on water users in the Colorado River Basin, estimated to cause almost $300 million per year in economic damages. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program implements and manages projects to reduce salinity (dissolved solids) loads, investing millions of dollars per year in irrigation upgrades, canal projects, and other mitigation strategies. To inform and improve mitigation efforts, there is a need to better understand sources of salinity to streams and how salinity has changed over time. This study explores salinity in baseflow, or groundwater discharge to streams, to assess whether groundwater is a significant contributor of dissolved solids to streams in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). Chemical hydrograph separation was used to estimate long-term mean annual baseflow discharge and baseflow dissolved solids loads at stream gages (n=69) across the UCRB. On average, it is estimated that 89% of dissolved solids loads originate from the baseflow fraction of streamflow. Additionally, a statistical trend analysis using weighted regressions on time, discharge, and season was used to evaluate changes in baseflow dissolved solids loads in streams with data from 1987 to 2011 (n=29). About two-thirds (62%) of these streams showed statistically significant decreasing trends in baseflow dissolved solids loads. At the two most downstream sites, Green River at Green River, UT and Colorado River at Cisco, UT, baseflow dissolved solids loads decreased by a combined 780,000 metric tons, which is approximately 65% of the estimated basin-scale decrease in total dissolved solids loads in the UCRB attributed to salinity control efforts. Results indicate that groundwater discharged to streams, and therefore subsurface transport processes, play a large role in delivering dissolved solids to streams in the UCRB. Decreasing trends in baseflow dissolved solids loads suggest that salinity mitigation projects, changes in land use, and/or climate are

  5. Characterization of dissolved solids in water resources of agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, 2004-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Steven J.; Spangler, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Naftz, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, have been identified as contributing dissolved solids to Flaming Gorge Reservoir. Concentrations of dissolved solids in water resources of agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, ranged from 35 to 7,410 milligrams per liter. The dissolved-solids load in seeps and drains in the study area that discharge to Flaming Gorge Reservoir ranged from less than 0.1 to 113 tons per day. The most substantial source of dissolved solids discharging from the study area to the reservoir was Birch Spring Draw. The mean daily dissolved-solids load near the mouth of Birch Spring Draw was 65 tons per day.The estimated annual dissolved-solids load imported to the study area by Sheep Creek and Peoples Canals is 1,330 and 13,200 tons, respectively. Daily dissolved-solid loads discharging to the reservoir from the study area, less the amount of dissolved solids imported by canals, for the period July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005, ranged from 72 to 241 tons per day with a mean of 110 tons per day. The estimated annual dissolved-solids load discharging to the reservoir from the study area, less the amount of dissolved solids imported by canals, for the same period was 40,200 tons. Of this 40,200 tons of dissolved solids, about 9,000 tons may be from a regional source that is not associated with agricultural activities. The salt-loading factor is 3,670 milligrams per liter or about 5.0 tons of dissolved solids per acre-foot of deep percolation in Lucerne Valley and 1,620 milligrams per liter or 2.2 tons per acre-foot in South Valley.The variation of δ87Sr with strontium concentration indicates some general patterns that help to define a conceptual model of the processes affecting the concentration of strontium and the δ87Sr isotopic ratio in area waters. As excess irrigation water percolates through soils derived from Mancos Shale, the δ87Sr isotopic ratio (0.21 to 0.69 permil) approaches one that is typical of deep percolation from irrigation on Mancos

  6. Dissolved-solids sources, loads, yields, and concentrations in streams of the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anning, David W.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that excessive dissolved-solids concentrations in water can have adverse effects on the environment and on agricultural, domestic, municipal, and industrial water users. Such effects motivated the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Quality Assessment Program to develop a SPAtially-Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes (SPARROW) model that has improved the understanding of sources, loads, yields, and concentrations of dissolved solids in streams of the conterminous United States.

  7. Modeling Dissolved Solids in the Rincon Valley, New Mexico Using RiverWare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudu, S.; Ahn, S. R.; Sheng, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Simulating transport and storage of dissolved solids in surface water and underlying alluvial aquifer is essential to evaluate the impacts of surface water operations, groundwater pumping, and climate variability on the spatial and temporal variability of salinity in the Rio Grande Basin. In this study, we developed a monthly RiverWare water quantity and quality model to simulate the both concentration and loads of dissolved solids for the Rincon Valley, New Mexico from Caballo Reservoir to Leasburg Dam segment of the Rio Grande. The measured flows, concentration and loads of dissolved solids in the main stream and drains were used to develop RiveWare model using 1980-1988 data for calibration, and 1989-1995 data for validation. The transport of salt is tracked using discretized salt and post-process approaches. Flow and salt exchange between the surface water and adjacent groundwater objects is computed using "soil moisture salt with supplemental flow" method in the RiverWare. In the groundwater objects, the "layered salt" method is used to simulate concentration of the dissolved solids in the shallow groundwater storage. In addition, the estimated local inflows under different weather conditions by using a calibrated Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) were fed into the RiverWare to refine the simulation of the flow and dissolved solids. The results show the salt concentration and loads increased at Leasburg Dam, which indicates the river collects salts from the agricultural return flow and the underlying aquifer. The RiverWare model with the local inflow fed by SWAT delivered the better quantification of temporal and spatial salt exchange patterns between the river and the underlying aquifer. The results from the proposed modeling approach can be used to refine the current mass-balance budgets for dissolved-solids transport in the Rio Grande, and provide guidelines for planning and decision-making to control salinity in arid river environment.

  8. Simulated effects of surface coal mining and agriculture on dissolved solids in the Redwater River, east-central Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R.F.; Lambing, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolved solids concentrations in five reaches of the Redwater River in east-central Montana were simulated to evaluate the effects of surface coal mining and agriculture. A mass-balance model of streamflow and dissolved solids load developed for the Tongue River in southeastern Montana was modified and applied to the Redwater River. Mined acreages, dissolved solids concentrations in mined spoils, and irrigated acreage can be varied in the model to study relative changes in the dissolved solids concentration in consecutive reaches of the river. Because of extreme variability and a limited amount of data, the model was not consecutively validated. Simulated mean and median monthly mean streamflows and consistently larger than those calculated from streamflow records. Simulated mean and median monthly mean dissolved solids loads also are consistently larger than regression-derived values. These discrepancies probably result from extremely variable streamflow, overestimates of streamflow from ungaged tributaries, and weak correlations between streamflow and dissolved solids concentrations. The largest increases in simulated dissolved solids concentrations from mining and agriculture occur from September through January because of smaller streamflows and dissolved solids loads. Different combinations of agriculture and mining under mean flow conditions resulted in cumulative percentage increases of dissolved solids concentrations of less than 5% for mining and less than 2% for agriculture. (USGS)

  9. COMMUNITY SCALE STREAM TAXA SENSITIVITIES TO DIFFERENT COMPOSITIONS OF EXCESS TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model stream chronic dosing studies (42 d) were conducted with three total dissolved solids (TDS) recipes. The recipes differed in composition of major ions. Community scale emergence was compared with single-species responses conducted simultaneously using the whole effluent tox...

  10. Specific Conductance and Dissolved-Solids Characteristics for the Green River and Muddy Creek, Wyoming, Water Years 1999-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melanie L.; Davidson, Seth L.

    2009-01-01

    Southwestern Wyoming is an area of diverse scenery, wildlife, and natural resources that is actively undergoing energy development. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to assess and enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale, while facilitating responsible energy development through local collaboration and partnerships. Water-quality monitoring has been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on the Green River near Green River, Wyoming, and Muddy Creek near Baggs, Wyoming. This monitoring, which is being conducted in cooperation with State and other Federal agencies and as part of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, is in response to concerns about potentially increased dissolved solids in the Colorado River Basin as a result of energy development. Because of the need to provide real-time dissolved-solids concentrations for the Green River and Muddy Creek on the World Wide Web, the U.S. Geological Survey developed regression equations to estimate dissolved-solids concentrations on the basis of continuous specific conductance using relations between measured specific conductance and dissolved-solids concentrations. Specific conductance and dissolved-solids concentrations were less varied and generally lower for the Green River than for Muddy Creek. The median dissolved-solids concentration for the site on the Green River was 318 milligrams per liter, and the median concentration for the site on Muddy Creek was 943 milligrams per liter. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 187 to 594 milligrams per liter in samples collected from the Green River during water years 1999-2008. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 293 to 2,485 milligrams per liter in samples collected from Muddy Creek during water years 2006-08. The differences in dissolved-solids concentrations in samples collected from the Green River compared to samples collected from Muddy

  11. Estrogenic and AhR activities in dissolved phase and suspended solids from wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Sonia; Gomez, Elena; Picot, Bernadette; Cavaillès, Vincent; Casellas, Claude; Balaguer, Patrick; Fenet, Hélène

    2010-05-15

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ERalpha) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) activities between the dissolved phase and suspended solids were investigated during wastewater treatment. Three wastewater treatment plants with different treatment technologies (waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), trickling filters (TFs) and activated sludge supplemented with a biofilter system (ASB)) were sampled. Estrogenic and AhR activities were detected in both phases in influents and effluents. Estrogenic and AhR activities in wastewater influents ranged from 41.8 to 79 ng/L E(2) Eq. and from 37.9 to 115.5 ng/L TCDD Eq. in the dissolved phase and from 5.5 to 88.6 ng/g E(2) Eq. and from 15 to 700 ng/g TCDD Eq. in the suspended solids. For both activities, WSP showed greater or similar removal efficiency than ASB and both were much more efficient than TF which had the lowest removal efficiency. Moreover, our data indicate that the efficiency of removal of ER and AhR activities from the suspended solid phase was mainly due to removal of suspended solids. Indeed, ER and AhR activities were detected in the effluent suspended solid phase indicating that suspended solids, which are usually not considered in these types of studies, contribute to environmental contamination by endocrine disrupting compounds and should therefore be routinely assessed for a better estimation of the ER and AhR activities released in the environment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid and suspended/dissolved waste (N, P, O) from rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2011-01-01

    differences between the dietary treatment groups in the waste produced. On average, 48% of the ingestedNwas recovered in thewater (TANconstituting 64–79%of this)and7% inthesolids. In comparison, 1% of the ingested P was recovered in the water and 43% in the solids. A breakpoint value of 5.6 g standardized......Quantifying aquaculture waste into different waste fractions will make it possible to design different treatment setups for obtaining specific cleaning objectives. The aim of this study was therefore to measure “all” solid and suspended/dissolved (i.e. unsedimented) waste from juvenile rainbow...... trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) fed three commonly applied commercial diets, “all” waste referring to: total nitrogen (N), total ammonia nitrogen (TAN=NH3-N+NH4-N), total phosphorus (P), and organicmatter characterized by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the biological oxygen demand after 5 days (BOD5...

  13. Temporal and spatial variations in total suspended and dissolved solids in the upper part of Manoa stream, Hawaii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.; Fares, Ali; Tran, Dai Ngia

    2011-01-01

    Hawaiian watersheds are small, steep, and receive high intensity rainfall events of non-uniform distribution. These geographic and weather patterns result in flashy streams of strongly variable water quality even within various stream segments. Total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids

  14. Solubility Enhancement and Formulation of Mouth Dissolving Tablet of Clonazepam with Solid Dispersion Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati C. Jagdale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clonazepam (CLZ is an anticonvulsant benzodiazepine widely used in the treatment of epilepsy. CLZ is a BCS Class II drug and its bioavailability is thus dissolution limited. The objective of the present study was to prepare solid dispersions (SDs of CLZ by various techniques, using the amphiphilic carrier Gelucire 50/13 in various proportions, to increase its water solubility. Drug-polymer interactions were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR and UltraViolet (UV spectroscopy. The SDs were characterized physically by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD. A phase solubility study was performed and the stability constant (Ks was found to be 275.27, while the negative Gibbs free energy (ΔGo tr indicated spontaneous solubilization of the drug. The dissolution study showed that the SDs considerably enhanced the dissolution rate of the drug. The FTIR and UV spectra revealed no chemical incompatibility between the drug and Gelucire 50/13. XRD patterns and the DSC profiles indicated the CLZ was in the amorphous form, which explains the improved dissolution rate of the drug from its SDs. Finally, mouth dissolving tablets (MDTs were prepared from the optimized batches (kneading method of solid dispersion, using crospovidone and Doshion P544 resin as superdisintegrants. The tablets were characterized by in-vitro disintegration and dissolution tests. The study of the MDTs showed disintegration times in the range 32.0±0.85 to 20.0±1.30 sec and dissolution was faster than for the commercial preparation. In conclusion, this investigation demonstrated the potential of solid dispersions of a drug with Gelucire 50/13 for promoting the dissolution of the drug and contributed to the understanding of the effect of a superdisintegrant on mouth dissolving tablets containing a solid dispersion of a hydrophobic drug.

  15. Water resources and effects of potential surface coal mining on dissolved solids in Hanging Woman Creek basin, southeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater resources of the Hanging Woman Creek basin, Montana include Holocene and Pleistocene alluvial aquifers and sandstone , coal, and clinker aquifers in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Surface water resources are composed of Hanging Woman Creek, its tributaries, and small stock ponds. Dissolved-solids concentrations in groundwater ranged from 200 to 11,00 mg/L. Generally, concentrations were largest in alluvial aquifers and smallest in clinker aquifers. Near its mouth, Hanging Woman Creek had a median concentration of about 1,800 mg/L. Mining of the 20-foot to 35-foot-thick Anderson coal bed and 3-foot to 16-foot thick Dietz coal bed could increase dissolved-solids concentrations in shallow aquifers and in Hanging Woman Creek because of leaching of soluble minerals from mine spoils. Analysis of saturated-paste extracts from 158 overburden samples indicated that water moving through mine spoils would have a median increase in dissolved-solids concentration of about 3,700 mg/L, resulting in an additional dissolved-solids load to Hanging Woman Creek of about 3.0 tons/day. Hanging Woman Creek near Birney could have an annual post-mining dissolved-solids load of 3,415 tons at median discharge, a 47% increase from pre-mining conditions load. Post-mining concentrations of dissolved solids, at median discharge, could range from 2,380 mg/L in March to 3,940 mg/L in August, compared to mean pre-mining concentrations that ranged from 1,700 mg/L in July, November, and December to 2,060 mg/L in May. Post-mining concentrations and loads in Hanging Woman Creek would be smaller if a smaller area were mined. (USGS)

  16. Forecasting models for flow and total dissolved solids in Karoun river-Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani, Mohammad Hassan; Salmani Jajaei, Efat

    2016-04-01

    Water quality is one of the most important factors contributing to a healthy life. From the water quality management point of view, TDS (total dissolved solids) is the most important factor and many water developing plans have been implemented in recognition of this factor. However, these plans have not been perfect and very successful in overcoming the poor water quality problem, so there are a good volume of related studies in the literature. We study TDS and the water flow of the Karoun river in southwest Iran. We collected the necessary time series data from the Harmaleh station located in the river. We present two Univariate Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Movement Average (ARIMA) models to forecast TDS and water flow in this river. Then, we build up a Transfer Function (TF) model to formulate the TDS as a function of water flow volume. A performance comparison between the Seasonal ARIMA and the TF models are presented.

  17. Design and Implementation of Remotely Monitoring System for Total Dissolved Solid in Baghdad Drinking Water Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Abdul-Ridha Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available he pollution of drinking water is a dangerous problem for the whole world, it can threaten the health of people and as people in developed society attaches more importance to environmental protection, it is of great research significance to intelligently and remotely monitoring the environment. Therefore in this paper, a remote water monitoring system for Baghdad drinking water system is suggested. The proposed system consists of data sensing and monitoring nodes at different locations in Baghdad to sensing and analyzes the data. These nodes are periodically measured Total Dissolved Solids (TDS. In case of measured value above TDS threshold which is 500 ppm, then an automated warning message will be sent to authorize persons in the maintenance center via Global Position System to take the correct action. This suggested structure has several advantages over traditional monitoring systems in terms of price, portability, reliability, applicability and takes a sample from a water tap in easy and real-time approach.

  18. Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Treatment Technologies for the Removal of Total Dissolved Solids from Coal Mine Water: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coal mine water (CMW) is typically treated to remove suspended solids, acidity, and soluble metals, but high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) have been reported to impact the environment at several CMW discharge points. Consequently, various states have establishe...

  19. Sensing dissolved sediment porewater concentrations of persistent and bioaccumulative poolutants using disposable solid-phase microextraction fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, P.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Wijnker, F.; Legierse, K.C.H.M.; Kraaij, R.H.; Tolls, J.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2000-01-01

    Polymer coated glass fibers were applied as disposable samplers to measure dissolved concentrations of persistent and bioaccumulative pollutants (PBPs) in sediment porewater. The method is called matrix solid-phase microextraction (matrix-SPME), because it utilizes the entire sediment matrix as a

  20. Determination of colloidal and dissolved silver in water samples using colorimetric solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, April A; Lipert, Robert J; Porter, Marc D

    2010-03-15

    The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to resurgence in the use of silver as a biocidal agent in applications ranging from washing machine additives to the drinking water treatment system on the International Space Station (ISS). However, growing concerns about the possible toxicity of colloidal silver to bacteria, aquatic organisms and humans have led to recently issued regulations by the US EPA and FDA regarding the usage of silver. As part of an ongoing project, we have developed a rapid, simple method for determining total silver, both ionic (silver(I)) and colloidal, in 0.1-1mg/L aqueous samples, which spans the ISS potable water target of 0.3-0.5mg/L (total silver) and meets the US EPA limit of 0.1mg/L in drinking water. The method is based on colorimetric solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) and involves the extraction of silver(I) from water samples by passage through a solid-phase membrane impregnated with the colorimetric reagent DMABR (5-[4-(dimethylamino)benzylidene]rhodanine). Silver(I) exhaustively reacts with impregnated DMABR to form a colored compound, which is quantified using a handheld diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Total silver is determined by first passing the sample through a cartridge containing Oxone, which exhaustively oxidizes colloidal silver to dissolved silver(I). The method, which takes less than 2 min to complete and requires only approximately 1 mL of sample, has been validated through a series of tests, including a comparison with the ICP-MS analysis of a water sample from ISS that contained both silver(I) and colloidal silver. Potential earth-bound applications are also briefly discussed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlation between conductivity and total dissolved solid in various type of water: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusydi, Anna F.

    2018-02-01

    Conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS) are water quality parameters, which are used to describe salinity level. These two parameters are correlated and usually expressed by a simple equation: TDS = k EC (in 25 °C). The process of obtaining TDS from water sample is more complex than that of EC. Meanwhile, TDS analysis is very important because it can illustrate groundwater quality, particularly in understanding the effect of seawater intrusion better than EC analysis. These conditions make research in revealing TDS/EC ratios interesting to do. By finding the ratio value, TDS concentration can be measured easily from EC value. However, the ratio cannot be defined easily. Previous research results have found that the correlation between TDS and EC are not always linear. The ratio is not only strongly influenced by salinity contents, but also by materials contents. Furthermore, the analysis of TDS concentration from EC value can be used to give an overview of water quality. For more precision, TDS concentrations need to be analyzed using the gravimetric method in the laboratory.

  2. Estimation of Rivers Dissolved Solids TDS by Soft Computing (Case Study: Upstream of Boukan Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zaman Zad Ghavidel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A total dissolved solid (TDS is an important indicator for water quality assessment. Since the composition of mineral salts and discharge affects the TDS of water, it is important to understand the relationship of mineral salts composition with TDS. Materials and Methods: In this study, methods of artificial neural networks with Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm, adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system based on Subtractive Clustering and Gene expression programming were used to model water quality properties of Zarrineh River Basin at upstream of Boukan dam, to be developed in total dissolved solids prediction. ANN and ANFIS programs code were written using MATLAB programming language. Here, the ANN with one hidden layer was used and the hidden nodes’ number was determined using trial and error. Different activation functions (logarithm sigmoid, tangent sigmoid and linear were tried for the hidden and output nodes and the GeneXpro Tools 4.0 were used to obtain the equation of the best models. Therefore, water quality data from two hydrometer stations, namely Anyan and Safakhaneh hydrometer stations were used during the statistical period of 18 years (1389-1372. In this research, for selecting input variables to the data driven models the stepwise regression method was used. In the application, 75% of data set were used for training and the remaining, 25% of data set were used for testing, randomly. In this paper, three statistical evaluation criteria, correlation coefficient (R, the root mean square error (RMSE and mean absolute error (MAE, were used to assess model’s performances. Results and Discussion: By applying stepwise method, the first significant (at 95% level variable entered to the model was the HCO3. The second variable that entered to the model was Ca. The third and fourth ones were Na and Q respectively. Mg was finally entered to the model. The optimal ANN architecture used in this study consists of an input

  3. Simultaneous quantification of dissolved organic carbon fractions and copper complexation using solid-phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElmurry, Shawn P.; Long, David T.; Voice, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Trace metal cycling in natural waters is highly influenced by the amount and type of dissolved organic C (DOC). Although determining individual species of DOC is unrealistic, there has been success in classifying DOC by determining operationally defined fractions. However, current fractionation schemes do not allow for the simultaneous quantification of associated trace metals. Using operational classifications, a scheme was developed to fractionate DOC based on a set of seven solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. The cartridges isolated fractions based on a range of specific mechanisms thought to be responsible for DOC aggregation in solution, as well as molecular weight. The method was evaluated to determine if it can identify differences in DOC characteristics, including differences in Cu-DOC complexation. Results are that: (1) cartridge blanks were low for both DOC and Cu, (2) differences are observed in the distribution of DOC amongst the fractions from various sources that are consistent with what is known about the DOC materials and the mechanisms operative for each cartridge, (3) when present as a free cation, Cu was not retained by non-cationic cartridges allowing the method to be used to assess Cu binding, (4) the capability of the method to provide quantitative assessment of Cu-DOC complexation was demonstrated for a variety of DOC standards, (5) Cu was found to preferentially bind with high molecular weight fractions of DOC, and (6) estimated partitioning coefficients and conditional binding constants for Cu were similar to those reported elsewhere. The method developed describes DOC characteristics based on specific bonding mechanisms (hydrogen, donor-acceptor, London dispersion, and ionic bonding) while simultaneously quantifying Cu-DOC complexation. The method provides researchers a means of describing not only the extent of DOC complexation but also how that complex will be behave in natural waters.

  4. Decadal-scale changes in dissolved-solids concentrations in groundwater used for public supply, Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Spangler, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Basin-fill aquifers are a major source of good-quality water for public supply in many areas of the southwestern United States and have undergone increasing development as populations have grown over time. During 2005, the basin-fill aquifer in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, provided approximately 75,000 acre-feet, or about 29 percent of the total amount of water used by a population of 967,000. Groundwater in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits that make up the aquifer occurs under unconfined and confined conditions. Water in the shallow unconfined part of the groundwater system is susceptible to near-surface contamination and generally is not used as a source of drinking water. Groundwater for public supply is withdrawn from the deeper unconfined and confined parts of the system, termed the principal aquifer, because yields generally are greater and water quality is better (including lower dissolved-solids concentrations) than in the shallower parts of the system. Much of the water in the principal aquifer is derived from recharge in the adjacent Wasatch Range (mountain-block recharge). In many areas, the principal aquifer is separated from the overlying shallow aquifer by confining layers of less permeable, fine-grained sediment that inhibit the downward movement of water and any potential contaminants from the surface. Nonetheless, under certain hydrologic conditions, human-related activities can increase dissolved-solids concentrations in the principal aquifer and result in groundwater becoming unsuitable for consumption without treatment or mixing with water having lower dissolved-solids concentrations. Dissolved-solids concentrations in areas of the principal aquifer used for public supply typically are less than 500 milligrams per liter (mg/L), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) secondary (nonenforceable) drinking-water standard. However, substantial increases in dissolved-solids concentrations in the principal aquifer have been documented in some

  5. Ambient conditions and fate and transport simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 2006--10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Beaver Lake is a large, deep-storage reservoir located in the upper White River Basin in northwestern Arkansas, and was completed in 1963 for the purposes of flood control, hydroelectric power, and water supply. Beaver Lake is affected by point and nonpoint sources of minerals, nutrients, and sediments. The City of Fayetteville discharges about half of its sewage effluent into the White River immediately upstream from the backwater of the reservoir. The City of West Fork discharges its sewage effluent into the West Fork of the White River, and the City of Huntsville discharges its sewage effluent into a tributary of War Eagle Creek. A study was conducted to describe the ambient conditions and fate and transport of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in Beaver Lake. Dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate are components of wastewater discharged into Beaver Lake and a major concern of the drinking water utilities that use Beaver Lake as their source. A two-dimensional model of hydrodynamics and water quality was calibrated to include simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate for the period January 2006 through December 2010. Estimated daily dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate loads were increased in the White River and War Eagle Creek tributaries, individually and the two tributaries together, by 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 times the baseline conditions to examine fate and transport of these constituents through time at seven locations (segments) in the reservoir, from upstream to downstream in Beaver Lake. Fifteen dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate fate and transport scenarios were compared to the baseline simulation at each of the seven downstream locations in the reservoir, both 2 meters (m) below the surface and 2 m above the bottom. Concentrations were greater in the reservoir at model segments closer to where the tributaries entered the reservoir. Concentrations resulting from the increase in loading became more diluted

  6. Heat impact caused molecular level changes in solid and dissolved soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Diana; Steffen, Bernhard; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The ubiquitous abundance of pyrolysed, highly aromatic organic matter, called "Black Carbon" (BC), in all environmental compartments became increasingly important in different fields of research beyond intensive investigated atmospheric aerosol due to climatic relevance. Its predominant high resistance to abiotic and biotic degradation resulted in turnover times from less than a century to several millennia. This recalcitrance led to the enrichment of BC in soils, accounting for 1-6% (European forest soils) to 60% (Chernozems) of total soil organic matter (SOM). Hence, soil BC acts an important sink in the global carbon cycle. In contrast, consequences for the nitrogen cycle up to date are rather inconsistently discussed. Soil related dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a major controlling factor in soil formation, an important pathway of organic matter transport and one of the largest active carbon reservoirs on earth, if considering oceans and other bodies of water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificially simulated wildfire by thermal treatment on the molecular composition of water extractable soil organic matter (DOM). Soils from two outdoor lysimeters with different management history were investigated. Soil samples, non-heated and heated up to 350°C were analyzed for elemental composition (carbon, nitrogen and sulfur) and for bulk molecular composition by Pyrolysis-Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the C- and N K-edges. DOM-samples obtained by hot water extraction, desalting and concentration by solid phase extraction were subsequently analyzed by flow injection analysis in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for the analysis of complex samples due to its outstanding mass

  7. Response surface modeling for optimization heterocatalytic Fenton oxidation of persistence organic pollution in high total dissolved solid containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekaran, G; Karthikeyan, S; Boopathy, R; Maharaja, P; Gupta, V K; Anandan, C

    2014-01-01

    The rice-husk-based mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) used in this study was precarbonized and activated using phosphoric acid. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm, X-ray powder diffraction, electron spin resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, (29)Si-NMR spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were used to characterize the MAC. The tannery wastewater carrying high total dissolved solids (TDS) discharged from leather industry lacks biodegradability despite the presence of dissolved protein. This paper demonstrates the application of free electron-rich MAC as heterogeneous catalyst along with Fenton reagent for the oxidation of persistence organic compounds in high TDS wastewater. The heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of the pretreated wastewater at optimum pH (3.5), H2O2 (4 mmol/L), FeSO4[Symbol: see text]7H2O (0.2 mmol/L), and time (4 h) removed chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon and dissolved protein by 86, 91, 83, and 90%, respectively.

  8. A data reconnaissance on the effect of suspended-sediment concentrations on dissolved-solids concentrations in rivers and tributaries in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred D.; Anning, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The Colorado River is one of the most important sources of water in the western United States, supplying water to over 35 million people in the U.S. and 3 million people in Mexico. High dissolved-solids loading to the River and tributaries are derived primarily from geologic material deposited in inland seas in the mid-to-late Cretaceous Period, but this loading may be increased by human activities. High dissolved solids in the River causes substantial damages to users, primarily in reduced agricultural crop yields and corrosion. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program was created to manage dissolved-solids loading to the River and has focused primarily on reducing irrigation-related loading from agricultural areas. This work presents a reconnaissance of existing data from sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) in order to highlight areas where suspended-sediment control measures may be useful in reducing dissolved-solids concentrations. Multiple linear regression was used on data from 164 sites in the UCRB to develop dissolved-solids models that include combinations of explanatory variables of suspended sediment, flow, and time. Results from the partial t-test, overall likelihood ratio, and partial likelihood ratio on the models were used to group the sites into categories of strong, moderate, weak, and no-evidence of a relation between suspended-sediment and dissolved-solids concentrations. Results show 68 sites have strong or moderate evidence of a relation, with drainage areas for many of these sites composed of a large percentage of clastic sedimentary rocks. These results could assist water managers in the region in directing field-scale evaluation of suspended-sediment control measures to reduce UCRB dissolved-solids loading.

  9. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge and understanding of dissolved solids in the Rio Grande–San Acacia, New Mexico, to Fort Quitman, Texas, and plan for future studies and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Douglas; Anderholm, Scott K.; Hogan, James F.; Phillips, Fred M.; Hibbs, Barry J.; Witcher, James C.; Matherne, Anne Marie; Falk, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Availability of water in the Rio Grande Basin has long been a primary concern for water-resource managers. The transport and delivery of water in the basin have been engineered by using reservoirs, irrigation canals and drains, and transmountain-water diversions to meet the agricultural, residential, and industrial demand. In contrast, despite the widespread recognition of critical water-quality problems, there have been minimal management efforts to improve water quality in the Rio Grande. Of greatest concern is salinization (concentration of dissolved solids approaching 1,000 mg/L), a water-quality problem that has been recognized and researched for more than 100 years because of the potential to limit both agricultural and municipal use. To address the issue of salinization, water-resource managers need to have a clear conceptual understanding of the sources of salinity and the factors that control storage and transport, identify critical knowledge gaps in this conceptual understanding, and develop a research plan to address these gaps and develop a salinity management program. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission (NMISC), and New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) initiated a project to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the transport of dissolved solids in the Rio Grande between San Acacia, New Mexico, and Fort Quitman, Texas. The primary objective is to provide hydrologic information pertaining to the spatial and temporal variability present in the concentrations and loads of dissolved solids in the Rio Grande, the source-specific budget for the mass of dissolved solids transported along the Rio Grande, and the locations at which dissolved solids enter the Rio Grande. Dissolved-solids concentration data provide a good indicator of the general quality of surface water and provide information on the factors governing salinization within

  11. Estimated dissolved-solids loads and trends at selected streams in and near the Uinta Basin, Utah, Water Years 1989–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2017-03-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Forum, studied trends in dissolved-solids loads at selected sites in and near the Uinta Basin, Utah. The Uinta Basin study area includes the Duchesne River Basin and the Middle Green River Basin in Utah from below Flaming Gorge Reservoir to the town of Green River.Annual dissolved-solids loads for water years (WY) 1989 through 2013 were estimated for 16 gaging stations in the study area using streamflow and water-quality data from the USGS National Water Information System database. Eight gaging stations that monitored catchments with limited or no agricultural land use (natural subbasins) were used to assess loads from natural sources. Four gaging stations that monitored catchments with agricultural land in the Duchesne River Basin were used to assess loads from agricultural sources. Four other gaging stations were included in the dissolved-solids load and trend analysis to help assess the effects of agricultural areas that drain to the Green River in the Uinta Basin, but outside of the Duchesne River Basin.Estimated mean annual dissolved-solids loads for WY 1989–2013 ranged from 1,520 tons at Lake Fork River above Moon Lake, near Mountain Home, Utah (UT), to 1,760,000 tons at Green River near Green River, UT. The flow-normalized loads at gaging stations upstream of agricultural activities showed no trend or a relatively small change. The largest net change in modeled flow-normalized load was -352,000 tons (a 17.8-percent decrease) at Green River near Green River, UT.Annual streamflow and modeled dissolved-solids loads at the gaging stations were balanced between upstream and downstream sites to determine how much water and dissolved solids were transported to the Duchesne River and a section of the Green River, and how much was picked up in each drainage area. Mass-balance calculations of WY 1989–2013 mean annual dissolved-solids loads at the studied sites show

  12. Characterization of isolated fractions of dissolved organic matter derived from municipal solid waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minda; He, Xiaosong; Liu, Jiaomei; Wang, Yuefeng; Xi, Beidou; Li, Dan; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Chao

    2018-04-14

    Understanding the heterogeneous evolution characteristics of dissolved organic matter fractions derived from compost is crucial to exploring the composting biodegradation process and the possible applications of compost products. Herein, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy integrated with reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography were utilized to obtain the molecular weight (MW) and polarity evolution characteristics of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and the hydrophilic (HyI) fractions during composting. The high-MW humic substances and building blocks in the HA fraction degraded faster during composting than polymers, proteins, and organic colloids. Similarly, the low MW acid FA factions transformed faster than the low weight neutral fractions, followed by building blocks, and finally polymers, proteins, and organic colloids. The evolutions of HyI fractions during composting occurred first for building blocks, followed by low MW acids, and finally low weight neutrals. With the progress of composting, the hydrophobic properties of the HA and FA fractions were enhanced. The degradation/humification process of the hydrophilic and transphilic components was faster than that of the hydrophobic component. Compared with the FA and HyI fractions, the HA fraction exhibited a higher MW and increased hydrophobicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interfering removal in samples with high amounts of dissolved solids for the determination of arsenic and selenium by TXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menegario, Amauri A.; Gomes, Ana Carla F.; Pellegrinotti, Daniel C.; Gine, Maria F.; Krug, Francisco J.; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.

    2002-01-01

    A matrix separation flow system coupled with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is proposed to remove Ca ++ , Mg ++ , Na + and K + major cations from samples containing high amounts of totally dissolved solids, using solid-liquid phases in flow system. This system is assembled with a 1.25 mL column of AG50W-X8 resin (in protonated form) and manual commutator, allowed the separation, addition of internal standard and subsequently a 40 μL aliquot of the eluate was deposited in the reflector support, dried in a furnace for 12 hours at 60 ± 5 deg C and analysed by TXRF. All the procedure is carried out in about 90 s and 0.5 mL of sample are required. The proposed approach was applied for determination of As and Se in plant material and sea water samples. When comparing with direct analysis (without separation), a reduction of 2 to 6 times on the limits of detection for these elements was attained. The accuracy of this methodology was satisfactory for As and Se in sea water and Se in rice certified samples. This procedure could be also used for Pb interference removal in the determination of As by X-ray fluorescence. (author)

  14. Methodology to quantify the role of the factors controlling the variation of rivers' total dissolved solids in Jiu Catchment (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adina Morosanu, Gabriela; Zaharia, Liliana; Ioana-Toroimac, Gabriela; Belleudy, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The total dissolved solids (TDS) is a river water quality parameter reflecting its concentration in solute ions. It is sensitive to many physical and anthropogenic features of the watershed. In this context, the objective of this work is to analyze the spatial variation of the TDS and to identify the role of the main controlling factors (e.g. geology, soils, land use) in Jiu River and some of its main tributaries, by using a methodology based on GIS and multivariate analysis. The Jiu watershed (10,000 kmp) is located in south-western Romania and it has a high diversity of physical and anthropogenic features influencing the water flow and its quality. The study is based on TDS measurements performed in August, 2016, during low flow conditions in the Jiu River and its tributaries. To measure in situ the TDS (ppm), an EC/TDS/Temperature Hand-held Tester was used in the 12 measuring points on Jiu River and in another 7 points on some of its tributaries. Across the hydrographic basin, the recorded TDS values ranged from 31 ppm to 607 ppm, while in the case of Jiu River, the TDS varied between 38 ppm at Lonea station (upper Jiu River) and 314 ppm at Išalniča (in the lower course). For each catchment corresponding to the sampling points, the influence of some contiguous features was defined on the basis of the lithology (marls, limestones, erodible bedrocks) and soils (clay textures), as well as the land cover/use influencing the solubility and solid content. This assessment was carried out in GIS through a set of spatial statistics analysis by calculating the percentages of the catchment coverage area for each determinant. In order to identify the contributions of different catchment features on the TDS variability, principal components analysis (PCA) was then applied. The results revealed the major role of the marls and clayey soils in the increase of TDS (on the Amaradia and Gilort rivers and some sections in the middle course of the Jiu River). In contrast

  15. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  16. Freely dissolved concentrations of anionic surfactants in seawater solutions: optimization of the non-depletive solid-phase microextraction method and application to linear alkylbenzene sulfonates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico Rico, A.; Droge, S.T.J.; Widmer, D.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A solid-phase microextraction method (SPME) has been optimized for the analysis of freely dissolved anionic surfactants, namely linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), in seawater. An effect of the thermal conditioning treatment on the polyacrylate fiber coating was demonstrated for both uptake

  17. Assessment of dissolved-solids loading to the Colorado River in the Paradox Basin between the Dolores River and Gypsum Canyon, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Christopher L.; Gerner, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Salinity loads throughout the Colorado River Basin have been a concern over recent decades due to adverse impacts on population, natural resources, and regional economics. With substantial financial resources and various reclamation projects, the salt loading to Lake Powell and associated total dissolved-solids concentrations in the Lower Colorado River Basin have been substantially reduced. The Colorado River between its confluence with the Dolores River and Lake Powell traverses a physiographic area where saline sedimentary formations and evaporite deposits are prevalent. However, the dissolved-solids loading in this area is poorly understood due to the paucity of water-quality data. From 2003 to 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation conducted four synoptic sampling events to quantify the salinity loading throughout the study reach and evaluate the occurrence and impacts of both natural and anthropogenic sources. The results from this study indicate that under late-summer base-flow conditions, dissolved-solids loading in the reach is negligible with the exception of the Green River, and that variations in calculated loads between synoptic sampling events are within measurement and analytical uncertainties. The Green River contributed approximately 22 percent of the Colorado River dissolved-solids load, based on samples collected at the lower end of the study reach. These conclusions are supported by water-quality analyses for chloride and bromide, and the results of analyses for the stable isotopes of oxygen and deuterium. Overall, no significant sources of dissolved-solids loading from tributaries or directly by groundwater discharge, with the exception of the Green River, were identified in the study area.

  18. Preparation and characterization of fast dissolving flurbiprofen and esomeprazole solid dispersion using spray drying technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Roshan; Tran, Tuan Hiep; Kim, Sung Yub; Woo, Kyu Bong; Choi, Yong Joo; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-04-11

    We aimed to develop an immediate-release flurbiprofen (FLU) and esomeprazole (ESO) combination formulation with enhanced gastric aqueous solubility and dissolution rate. Aqueous solubility can be enhanced by formulating solid dispersions (SDs) with a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-K30 hydrophilic carrier, using spray-drying technique. Aqueous and gastric pH dissolution can be achieved by macro-environmental pH modulation using sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) as the alkaline buffer. FLU/ESO-loaded SDs (FLU/ESO-SDs) significantly improved aqueous solubility of both drugs, compared to each drug powder. Dissolution studies in gastric pH and water were compared with the microenvironmental pH modulated formulations. The optimized FLU/ESO-SD powder formulation consisted of FLU/ESO/PVP-K30/sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) in a weight ratio 1:0.22:1.5:0.3, filled in the inner capsule. The outer capsule consisted of NaHCO3 and Mg(OH)2, which created the macro-environmental pH modulation. Increased aqueous and gastric pH dissolution of FLU and ESO from the SD was attributed to the alkaline buffer effects and most importantly, to drug transformation from crystalline to amorphous SD powder, clearly revealed by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction studies. Thus, the combined FLU and ESO SD powder can be effectively delivered as an immediate-release formulation using the macro-environmental pH modulation concept. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Nickel toxicity to benthic organisms: The role of dissolved organic carbon, suspended solids, and route of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Kevin W; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Burton, G Allen

    2016-01-01

    Nickel bioavailability is reduced in the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), suspended solids (TSS), and other complexing ligands; however, no studies have examined the relative importance of Ni exposure through different compartments (water, sediment, food). Hyalella azteca and Lymnaea stagnalis were exposed to Ni-amended water, sediment, and food, either separately or in combination. Both organisms experienced survival and growth effects in several Ni compartment tests. The DOC amendments attenuated L. stagnalis Ni effects (survival, growth, and (62)Ni bioaccumulation), and presence of TSS exposures demonstrated both protective and synergistic effects on H. azteca and L. stagnalis. (62)Ni trophic transfer from food to H. azteca and L. stagnalis was negligible; however, bioaccumulating (62)Ni was attributed to (62)Ni-water ((62)Ni flux from food), (62)Ni-TSS, and (62)Ni-food. Overall, H. azteca and L. stagnalis Ni compartment toxicity increased in the following order: Ni-water > Ni-sediment > Ni-all (water, sediment, food) > Ni-food. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Classification and Processing Optimization of Barley Milk Production Using NIR Spectroscopy, Particle Size, and Total Dissolved Solids Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasenka Gajdoš Kljusurić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley is a grain whose consumption has a significant nutritional benefit for human health as a very good source of dietary fibre, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic and phytic acids. Nowadays, it is more and more often used in the production of plant milk, which is used to replace cow milk in the diet by an increasing number of consumers. The aim of the study was to classify barley milk and determine the optimal processing conditions in barley milk production based on NIR spectra, particle size, and total dissolved solids analysis. Standard recipe for barley milk was used without added additives. Barley grain was ground and mixed in a blender for 15, 30, 45, and 60 seconds. The samples were filtered and particle size of the grains was determined by laser diffraction particle sizing. The plant milk was also analysed using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, in the range from 904 to 1699 nm. Furthermore, conductivity of each sample was determined and microphotographs were taken in order to identify the structure of fat globules and particles in the barley milk. NIR spectra, particle size distribution, and conductivity results all point to 45 seconds as the optimal blending time, since further blending results in the saturation of the samples.

  1. Annual and seasonal variation of turbidity, total dissolved solids, nitrate and nitrite in the Parsabad water treatment plant, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Zare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study investigated the annual and seasonal variation of turbidity; total dissolved solid (TDS, nitrate and nitrite in Parsabad water treatment plant (WTP, Iran. Materials and Methods: The water samples were obtained from the inlet and outlet of Parsabad WTP from February 2002 to June 2009. The samples′ turbidity, TDS, nitrate, nitrite, pH, and temperature were measured according to standard methods once a month and the average of these parameters were calculated for each season of year. Results: The maximum concentration of inlet turbidity, TDS, nitrate and nitrite were 691, 700.5, 25, and 0.17 mg/l, respectively. These parameters for outlet samples in the study period were 3.0, 696.7, 18, and 0.06 mg/l, respectively. While these concentrations in outlet zone were lower than World Health Organization (WHO or United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA water quality guidelines, WTP could not reduce the TDS, nitrate, nitrite and pH value and these parameters were not different in the inlet and outlet samples. However, the WTP reduced the turbidity significantly with an efficiency of up to 85%. Conclusion: This study showed that a common WTP with rapid sand filtration can treat a maximum river turbidity of 700 NTU in several years. As no differences were observed between inlet and outlet TDS, nitrate, nitrite and pH in the studied WTP. It can be concluded that compensatory schemes should be predicted for modification of these parameters when they exceed the standards in the emergency situations.

  2. Effluents from a waste rock deposit of a former uranium mine in Saxony/Germany - Mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Soon after uranium mining had ceased in eastern Germany in 1990, work for remediation of several mining sites began. The Wismut GmbH, owner of the Mine of Dresden-Gittersee's waste rock dump, introduced the concept of reducing the impact to the environment via water and air paths by implementing a multi-layer soil cover. The deposit consists mainly of waste rock (clastic sediments of Doehlener Becken, deep metamorphic rocks) but also of low-grade ore (U-rich coal) and tailing materials. At the time when remediation started, the effluents completely infiltrated the underground. Because of previous surface exfiltration activities, they were already known to be very rich in dissolved solids, especially in sulphate and uranium. As demanded by the state authorities, the owner funded a vast hydrogeological study of the site. In testing the efficiency of surface sealing, the study indicated a mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids for the current situation, and predicted emissions into the water path which would occur after realisation of the proposed soil cover. The field investigation program consisted of: measurements of flow, of concentrations of dissolved solids (esp. U and Ra-226) and of contents of environmental isotopes in precipitation, surface runoff, seepage water and groundwater in the current condition of the dump; the study of waste rock material (geochemistry, mineralogy); waste rock material elution tests; underground investigation by drilling boreholes up to 270 m in depth. The resulting data allowed for: a hydrogeological conceptual model of the site; a consistent mass flow balance for the current condition of the dump; a prediction of concentrations in groundwater resulting after the realisation of a soil cover. The predictions show that the concentrations of dissolved solids in the contaminated groundwater would be significantly decreased. Furthermore it would be possible to reach the standards for drinking water with respect to uranium

  3. Effects of potential surface coal mining on dissolved solids in Otter Creek and in the Otter Creek alluvial aquifer, southeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Otter Creek drains an area of 709 square miles in the coal-rich Powder River structural basin of southeastern Montana. The Knobloch coal beds in the Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation is a shallow aquifer and a target for future surface mining in the downstream part of the Otter Creek basin. A mass-balance model was used to estimate the effects of potential mining on the dissolved solids concentration in Otter Creek and in the alluvial aquifer in the Otter Creek valley. With extensive mining of the Knobloch coal beds, the annual load of dissolved solids to Otter Creek at Ashland at median streamflow could increase by 2,873 tons, or a 32-percent increase compared to the annual pre-mining load. Increased monthly loads of Otter Creek, at the median streamflow, could range from 15 percent in February to 208 percent in August. The post-mining dissolved solids load to the subirrigated part of the alluvial valley could increase by 71 percent. The median dissolved solids concentration in the subirrigated part of the valley could be 4,430 milligrams per liter, compared to the pre-mining median concentration of 2,590 milligrams per liter. Post-mining loads from the potentially mined landscape were calculated using saturated-paste-extract data from 506 overburdened samples collected from 26 wells and test holes. Post-mining loads to the Otter Creek valley likely would continue at increased rates for hundreds of years after mining. If the actual area of Knobloch coal disturbed by mining were less than that used in the model, post-mining loads to the Otter Creek valley would be proportionally smaller. (USGS)

  4. Concentration and flux of total and dissolved phosphorus, total nitrogen, chloride, and total suspended solids for monitored tributaries of Lake Champlain, 1990-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalie, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Annual and daily concentrations and fluxes of total and dissolved phosphorus, total nitrogen, chloride, and total suspended solids were estimated for 18 monitored tributaries to Lake Champlain by using the Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Seasons regression model. Estimates were made for 21 or 23 years, depending on data availability, for the purpose of providing timely and accessible summary reports as stipulated in the 2010 update to the Lake Champlain “Opportunities for Action” management plan. Estimates of concentration and flux were provided for each tributary based on (1) observed daily discharges and (2) a flow-normalizing procedure, which removed the random fluctuations of climate-related variability. The flux bias statistic, an indicator of the ability of the Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season regression models to provide accurate representations of flux, showed acceptable bias (less than ±10 percent) for 68 out of 72 models for total and dissolved phosphorus, total nitrogen, and chloride. Six out of 18 models for total suspended solids had moderate bias (between 10 and 30 percent), an expected result given the frequently nonlinear relation between total suspended solids and discharge. One model for total suspended solids with a very high bias was influenced by a single extreme value; however, removal of that value, although reducing the bias substantially, had little effect on annual fluxes.

  5. Towards explaining excess CO2 production in wetlands - the roles of solid and dissolved organic matter as electron acceptors and of substrate quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Gao, Chuanyu; Agethen, Svenja; Sander, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To understand carbon storage in water logged, anaerobic peatlands, factors controlling mineralization have been studied for decades. Temperature, substrate quality, water table position and the availability of electron acceptors for oxidation of organic carbon have been identified as major factors. However, many studies reported an excess carbon dioxide (CO2) production over methane (CH4) that cannot be explained by available electron acceptors, and peat soils did not reach strictly methanogenic conditions (i.e., a stoichiometric formation ratio of 1:1 of CO2 to CH4). It has been hypothesized that peat organic matter (OM) provides a previously unrecognized electron acceptor for microbial respiration, elevating CO2 to CH4 ratios. Microbial reduction of dissolved OM has been shown in the mid 90's, but only recently mediated electrochemical techniques opened the possibility to access stocks and changes in electron accepting capacities (EAC) of OM in dissolved and solid form. While it was shown that the EAC of OM follows redox cycles of microbial reduction and O2 reoxidation, changes in the EAC of OM were so far not related quantitatively to CO2 production. We therefore tested if CO2 production in anoxic peat incubations is balanced by the consumption of electron acceptors if EAC of OM is included. We set up anoxic incubations with peat and monitored production of CO2 and CH4, and changes in EAC of OM in the dissolved and solid phase over time. Interestingly, in all incubations, the EAC of dissolved OM was poorly related to CO2 and CH4 production. Instead, dissolved OM was rapidly reduced at the onset of the incubations and thereafter remained in reduced form. In contrast, the decrease in the EAC of particulate (i.e. non-dissolved) OM was closely linked to the observed production of non-methanogenic CO2. Thereby, the total EAC of the solid OM pool by far exceeded the EAC of the dissolved OM pool. Over the course of eight week incubations, measured decreases in the EAC

  6. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility.

  7. Groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium in Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Rick; Ortiz, Roderick F.; Brown, Christopher R.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    2016-11-28

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arkansas River Basin Regional Resource Planning Group, initiated a study of groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and loading of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium to Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, to improve understanding of sources and processes affecting loading of these constituents to streams in the Arkansas River Basin. Fourteen monitoring wells were installed in a series of three transects across Fountain Creek near Pueblo, and temporary streamgages were established at each transect to facilitate data collection for the study. Groundwater and surface-water interaction was characterized by using hydrogeologic mapping, groundwater and stream-surface levels, groundwater and stream temperatures, vertical hydraulic-head gradients and ratios of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the hyporheic zone, and streamflow mass-balance measurements. Water quality was characterized by collecting periodic samples from groundwater, surface water, and the hyporheic zone for analysis of dissolved solids, selenium, uranium, and other selected constituents and by evaluating the oxidation-reduction condition for each groundwater sample under different hydrologic conditions throughout the study period. Groundwater loads to Fountain Creek and in-stream loads were computed for the study area, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium were evaluated on the basis of geology, geochemical conditions, land and water use, and evapoconcentration.During the study period, the groundwater-flow system generally contributed flow to Fountain Creek and its hyporheic zone (as a single system) except for the reach between the north and middle transects. However, the direction of flow between the stream, the hyporheic zone, and the near-stream aquifer was variable in response to streamflow and stage. During periods of low streamflow, Fountain Creek generally gained flow from

  8. Using disposable solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to determine the freely dissolved concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Fang; Cui Xinyi; Wang Wei; Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Gan, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are brominated flame retardants (BFRs). The ubiquity and persistence of PBDEs in sediment have raised concerns over their environmental fate and ecological risks. Due to strong affinity for sediment organic matter, environmental fate and bioavailability of PBDEs closely depend on their phase distribution. In this study, disposable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber was used to derive the freely dissolved concentration (C free ) of PBDEs in sediment porewater as a measurement of bioavailability. The PDMS-to-water partition coefficient (log K PDMS ) was 5.46–5.83 for BDE 47, 99, and 153. In sediments, PBDEs were predominantly sorbed to the sediment phase, with C free accounting for free of PBDEs decreased as their bromination or sediment organic carbon content increased. The strong association with dissolved organic matter (DOM) implies a potential for facilitated offsite transport and dispersion in the environment that depends closely on the stability of sediment aggregates. - Highlights: ► A disposable SPME method was developed for measuring C free of PBDEs in sediment. ► C free decreased with increasing congener bromination or sediment OC content. ► C free of PBDEs accounted for DOC values suggest a high probability for DOM-facilitated offsite transport. - A SPME method based on disposable PDMS fibers was developed for measuring the freely dissolved concentration of PBDEs (C free ) in sediment porewater.

  9. The use of dissolvable layered double hydroxide components in an in situ solid-phase extraction for chromatographic determination of tetracyclines in water and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiroonsoontorn, Nattaphorn; Sansuk, Sira; Santaladchaiyakit, Yanawath; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2017-10-13

    This research presents a simple and green in situ solid phase extraction (is-SPE) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the simultaneous analysis of tetracyclines (TCs) including tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline. In is-SPE, TCs were efficiently extracted through the precipitation formation of dissolvable layered double hydroxides (LDHs) by mixing the LDH components such as magnesium and aluminum ions (both in metal chloride salts) thoroughly in an alkaline sample solution. After the centrifugation, the precipitate was completely dissolved with trifluoroacetic acid to release the enriched TCs, and then analyzed by HPLC. Under optimized conditions, this method gave good enrichment factors (EFs) of 41-93 with low limits of detection (LODs) of 0.7-6μg/L and limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 3-15μg/L. Also, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of TCs in water and milk samples with the recoveries ranging from 81.7-108.1% for water and 55.7-88.7% for milk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Taxonomy of Means and Ends in Aquaculture Production—Part 2: The Technical Solutions of Controlling Solids, Dissolved Gasses and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorgvin Vilbergsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In engineering design, knowing the relationship between the means (technique and the end (desired function or outcome is essential. The means in Aquaculture are technical solutions like airlifts that are used to achive desired functionality (an end like controlling dissolved gasses. In previous work, the authors identified possible functions by viewing aquaculture production systems as transformation processes in which inputs are transformed by treatment techniques (means and produce outputs (ends. The current work creates an overview of technical solutions of treatment functions for both design and research purposes. A comprehensive literature review of all areas of technical solutions is identified and categorized into a visual taxonomy of the treatment functions for controlling solids, controlling dissolved gasses and controlling pH alkalinity and hardness. This article is the second in a sequence of four and partly presents the treatments functions in the taxonomy. The other articles in this series present complementary aspects of this research: Part 1, A transformational view on aquaculture and functions divided into input, treatment and output functions; Part 2, The current taxonomy paper; Part 3, The second part of the taxonomy; and Part 4, Mapping of the means (techniques for multiple treatment functions.

  11. Effect of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide(Nd) and metallic precipitate(Ru) on the thermophysical properties of MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joo

    2006-02-01

    This study experimentally investigated the effect of solid fission products on the thermophysical properties of the mixed oxide fuel and evaluated them on the basis of the analytical theory. Neodymium and ruthenium were selected for the experiments to represent the physical states of the solid fission product as a 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. The state of the additives, crystal structures, lattice parameters, and theoretical densities were investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermal diffusivities and thermal expansion rates were measured with laser flash method and dilatometry, respectively. The thermal expansion data were then fitted to obtain an correlation equation of the density variation as a function of the temperature. The specific heat capacity values were determined using the Neumann-Kopp's rule. The thermal expansion of the 'Nd.added' sample linearly increased with the concentration of the neodymium, which is primarily due to the fact that the melting point of Nd 2 O 3 is lower than that of UO 2 . On the other hand, the thermal expansion of the 'Ru.added' sample hardly changed with increasing ruthenium content. Thermal conductivities of the simulated MOX fuel were determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivities, density variation, and specific heat values measured in this study. The effect of additives on the thermal conductivity of the samples was quantified in the form of the thermal resistance equation, the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation, which was determined from measured data. For 'dissolved oxide' sample in the UO 2 matrix, the effect is mainly attributed to the increase of lattice point defects caused by U 4+ , Ce 4+ , Nd 3+ and O 2- ions, which play the role of phonon scattering centers, that is, mean free path of phonon scattering decreases with the point defects, thus increase the thermal resistance. Also, the mass difference between the host (U) and the substituted atom (Ce and/or Nd) can

  12. Solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    The purposes of this study were: (1) to provide information on the solid phases which are in apparent equilibrium with ground waters of basalt aquifers, and (2) to further develop the capability of geochemical modeling to support solute transport studies and performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. The basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington were chosen as the study area because: (1) regional ground-water analyses are readily available, (2) these basalts are a potential medium for a nuclear-waste repository, and (3) mineralogical analyses from local site studies are available

  13. Dissolvable layered double hydroxide as an efficient nanosorbent for centrifugeless air-agitated dispersive solid-phase extraction of potentially toxic metal ions from bio-fluid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, Maryam, E-mail: mrajabi@semnan.ac.ir; Arghavani-Beydokhti, Somayeh; Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza

    2017-03-08

    In the present work, a novel nanosorbent namely layered double hydroxides with 4-amino-5-hydroxyl-2,7-naphthalendisulfonic acid monosodium salt interlayer anion (Mg-Al-AHNDA-LDH) was synthesized and applied as a dissolvable nanosorbent in a centrifugeless ultrasound-enhanced air-agitated dispersive solid-phase extraction (USE-AA-D-SPE) method. This method was used for the separation and preconcentration of some metal ions including Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 6+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} prior to their determination using the micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (MS-FAAS) technique. The most interesting aspect of this nanosorbent is its immediate dissolvability at pH values lower than 4. This capability drastically eliminates the elution step, leading to a great improvement in the extraction efficiency and a decrease in the extraction time. Also in this method, the use of a syringe nanofilter eliminates the need for the centrifugation step, which is time-consuming and essentially causes the analysis to be off-line. Several effective parameters governing the extraction efficiency including the sample solution pH, amount of nanosorbent, eluent condition, number of air-agitation cycles, and sonication time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the good linear dynamic ranges of 2–70, 6–360, 7–725, 7–370, and 8–450 ng mL{sup −1} for the Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 6+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}and Ni{sup 2+} ions, respectively, with the correlation of determinations (R{sup 2}s) higher than 0.997 were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) were found to be 0.6, 1.7, 2.0, 2.1, and 2.4 for the Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 6+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} ions, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (percent relative standard deviations (%RSDs) (n = 5)) were below 7.8%. The proposed method was also successfully applied for the extraction and determination of the target ions in different biological fluid

  14. Dissolvable layered double hydroxide as an efficient nanosorbent for centrifugeless air-agitated dispersive solid-phase extraction of potentially toxic metal ions from bio-fluid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabi, Maryam; Arghavani-Beydokhti, Somayeh; Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, a novel nanosorbent namely layered double hydroxides with 4-amino-5-hydroxyl-2,7-naphthalendisulfonic acid monosodium salt interlayer anion (Mg-Al-AHNDA-LDH) was synthesized and applied as a dissolvable nanosorbent in a centrifugeless ultrasound-enhanced air-agitated dispersive solid-phase extraction (USE-AA-D-SPE) method. This method was used for the separation and preconcentration of some metal ions including Cd 2+ , Cr 6+ , Pb 2+ , Co 2+ , and Ni 2+ prior to their determination using the micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (MS-FAAS) technique. The most interesting aspect of this nanosorbent is its immediate dissolvability at pH values lower than 4. This capability drastically eliminates the elution step, leading to a great improvement in the extraction efficiency and a decrease in the extraction time. Also in this method, the use of a syringe nanofilter eliminates the need for the centrifugation step, which is time-consuming and essentially causes the analysis to be off-line. Several effective parameters governing the extraction efficiency including the sample solution pH, amount of nanosorbent, eluent condition, number of air-agitation cycles, and sonication time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the good linear dynamic ranges of 2–70, 6–360, 7–725, 7–370, and 8–450 ng mL −1 for the Cd 2+ , Cr 6+ , Pb 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ ions, respectively, with the correlation of determinations (R 2 s) higher than 0.997 were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) were found to be 0.6, 1.7, 2.0, 2.1, and 2.4 for the Cd 2+ , Cr 6+ , Pb 2+ , Co 2+ , and Ni 2+ ions, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (percent relative standard deviations (%RSDs) (n = 5)) were below 7.8%. The proposed method was also successfully applied for the extraction and determination of the target ions in different biological fluid and tap water samples. - Highlights: • A novel centrifugeless dispersive

  15. In vivo evaluation and in-depth pharmaceutical characterization of a rapidly dissolving solid ocular matrix for the topical delivery of timolol maleate in the rabbit eye model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Raeesa M; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Kumar, Pradeep; Carmichael, Trevor R; Pillay, Viness

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in-depth pharmaceutical properties and in vivo behavior of a novel lyophilized rapidly dissolving solid ocular matrix (RD-SOM) as a 'solid eye drop' formulation comprising timolol maleate as the model drug. Thermal and molecular transition analysis displayed similar findings with no incompatibility between formulation components. Porositometric studies confirmed the presence of interconnecting pores across the matrix surface. The HETCAM test indicated an irritation score of 0 with the inference of good tolerability for the RD-SOM in the New Zealand White albino rabbit eye model. Ex vivo permeation across excised rabbit cornea showed an improved steady state drug flux (0.00052 mg cm(-2)min(-1)) and permeability co-efficient (1.7 × 10(-4)cmmin(-1)) for the RD-SOM compared to pure drug and a marketed eye drop preparation. UPLC analysis quantitatively separated timolol maleate and the internal standard (diclofenac sodium) and gamma irradiation was used as a terminal sterilization procedure. In vivo results revealed a peak concentration of timolol was reached at 104.9 min. In the case of a typical eye drop formulation a lower Cmax was obtained (1.97 ug/mL). Level A point-to-point IVIVC plots via the Wagner-Nelson method revealed a satisfactory R(2) value of 0.84. In addition, the biodegradability and ocular compatibility of the RD-SOM was confirmed by histopathological toxicity studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Accuracy of different sensors for the estimation of pollutant concentrations (total suspended solids, total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand) in wastewater and stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepot, Mathieu; Aubin, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Many field investigations have used continuous sensors (turbidimeters and/or ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrophotometers) to estimate with a short time step pollutant concentrations in sewer systems. Few, if any, publications compare the performance of various sensors for the same set of samples. Different surrogate sensors (turbidity sensors, UV-visible spectrophotometer, pH meter, conductivity meter and microwave sensor) were tested to link concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS), total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD), and sensors' outputs. In the combined sewer at the inlet of a wastewater treatment plant, 94 samples were collected during dry weather, 44 samples were collected during wet weather, and 165 samples were collected under both dry and wet weather conditions. From these samples, triplicate standard laboratory analyses were performed and corresponding sensors outputs were recorded. Two outlier detection methods were developed, based, respectively, on the Mahalanobis and Euclidean distances. Several hundred regression models were tested, and the best ones (according to the root mean square error criterion) are presented in order of decreasing performance. No sensor appears as the best one for all three investigated pollutants.

  17. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and nature of solid extraction sorbent on recoverable DOM composition: Implication into potential lability of different compound groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Jae-Eun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Noting the source-dependent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this study explored the recoverable compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE) of two common sorbents (C18 and PPL) eluted with methanol solvent for contrasting DOM sources via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fresh algae and leaf litter extracts DOM, one riverine DOM, and one upstream lacustrine DOM were selected for the comparison. C18 sorbent was generally found to extract more diverse molecular formula, relatively higher molecular weight, and more heteroatomic DOM compounds within the studied mass range than PPL sorbent except for the leaf litter extract. Even with the same sorbent, the main molecular features of the two end member DOM were distributed on different sides of the axes of a multivariate ordination, indicating the source-dependent characteristics of the recoverable compounds by the sorbents. In addition, further examination of the molecular formula uniquely present in the two end members and the upstream lake DOM suggested that proteinaceous, tannin-like, and heteroatomic DOM constituents might be potential compound groups which are labile and easily degraded during their mobilization into downstream watershed. This study provides new insights into the sorbent selectivity of DOM from diverse sources and potential lability of various compound groups.

  18. Comparison of dialysis and solid-phase extraction for isolation and concentration of dissolved organic matter prior to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Cooper, William T. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Hodgkins, Suzanne; Chanton, Jeffrey P. [Florida State University, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Podgorski, David C. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Florida State University, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2012-08-15

    We compare two methods, solid-phase extraction (SPE) and dialysis, commonly used for extraction and concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) prior to molecular characterization by electrospray ionization (ESI) and ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Spectra of DOM samples from Minnesota and Sweden peatlands that were extracted with styrene divinyl benzene polymer SPE sorbents included ions with formulas that had higher oxygen to carbon (O/C) ratios than spectra of DOM from the same samples after de-salting by dialysis. The SPE method was not very effective in extracting several major classes of DOM compounds that had high ESI efficiencies, including carboxylic acids and organo-sulfur compounds, and that out-competed other less-functionalized compounds (e.g., carbohydrates) for charge in the ESI source. The large abundance of carboxylic acids in the dialysisextracted DOM, likely the result of in situ microbial production, makes it difficult to see other (mainly hydrophilic) compounds with high O/C ratios. Our results indicate that, while dialysis is generally preferable for the isolation of DOM, for samples with high microbial inputs, the use of both isolation methods is recommended for a more accurate molecular representation. (orig.)

  19. Impact of catastrophic events on small mountainous rivers: Temporal and spatial variations in suspended- and dissolved-solid fluxes along the Choshui River, central western Taiwan, during typhoon Mindulle, July 2-6, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliman, J. D.; Lee, T. Y.; Huang, J. C.; Kao, S. J.

    2017-05-01

    Small mountainous rivers deliver disproportionately large quantities of suspended and dissolved solids to the global ocean, often in response to catastrophic events such as earthquakes or floods. Here we report on the impact of a major flood on the Choshui River, central-western Taiwan, generated by typhoon Mindulle, July 2-6, 2004, five years after the nearby Mw 7.6 Chichi earthquake. Water samples taken at 3-h intervals at three stations along main stem, as well as from two downriver tributaries, allow us to delineate the temporal and spatial variability in concentrations and fluxes of suspended and dissolved constituents within the middle and lower portions of the river in response to this flood. High suspended-sediment concentrations, some as high as 200 g/l, reflected the rapid erosion of landslide scars and debris deposits generated by super-typhoon Herb in 1996 and the 1999 Chichi earthquake. Dissolved-solid and suspended-sediment discharges totaled 0.22 and 70 million tons (mt), 50 mt of which were discharged in just two days. Particulate organic carbon (POC) discharge, most of which was pre-modern in age, was 195,000 t. More than half of the discharged water, POC and dissolved solids came from upriver, whereas about 70% of the suspended sediment and 60% of the dissolved nitrate came from two downriver tributaries, the Chenyoulan and Qingshui rivers. Spatial and temporal differences in the character and discharge of suspended and dissolved solids within and between rivers in the Choshui drainage basin reflect different geologies, landslide histories, the effects of human impact, and the abrupt draining of the Tsaoling landslide lake in the Qingshui basin, as well as the possible shifting of importance of groundwater vs. overland flow. Neither wind-blown pollutants nor sea salts appear to have contributed significantly to dissolved solid character or discharge. Sediment contribution from the landslides in the Chenyoulan basin generated by super-typhoon Herb

  20. Dissolvable layered double hydroxide as an efficient nanosorbent for centrifugeless air-agitated dispersive solid-phase extraction of potentially toxic metal ions from bio-fluid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Maryam; Arghavani-Beydokhti, Somayeh; Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza

    2017-03-08

    In the present work, a novel nanosorbent namely layered double hydroxides with 4-amino-5-hydroxyl-2,7-naphthalendisulfonic acid monosodium salt interlayer anion (Mg-Al-AHNDA-LDH) was synthesized and applied as a dissolvable nanosorbent in a centrifugeless ultrasound-enhanced air-agitated dispersive solid-phase extraction (USE-AA-D-SPE) method. This method was used for the separation and preconcentration of some metal ions including Cd 2+ , Cr 6+ , Pb 2+ , Co 2+ , and Ni 2+ prior to their determination using the micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (MS-FAAS) technique. The most interesting aspect of this nanosorbent is its immediate dissolvability at pH values lower than 4. This capability drastically eliminates the elution step, leading to a great improvement in the extraction efficiency and a decrease in the extraction time. Also in this method, the use of a syringe nanofilter eliminates the need for the centrifugation step, which is time-consuming and essentially causes the analysis to be off-line. Several effective parameters governing the extraction efficiency including the sample solution pH, amount of nanosorbent, eluent condition, number of air-agitation cycles, and sonication time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the good linear dynamic ranges of 2-70, 6-360, 7-725, 7-370, and 8-450 ng mL -1 for the Cd 2+ , Cr 6+ , Pb 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ ions, respectively, with the correlation of determinations (R 2 s) higher than 0.997 were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) were found to be 0.6, 1.7, 2.0, 2.1, and 2.4 for the Cd 2+ , Cr 6+ , Pb 2+ , Co 2+ , and Ni 2+ ions, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (percent relative standard deviations (%RSDs) (n = 5)) were below 7.8%. The proposed method was also successfully applied for the extraction and determination of the target ions in different biological fluid and tap water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissolved gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of gaseous nitrogen, argon, oxygen and helium dissolved in groundwater are often different from their concentrations in rain and surface waters. These differences reflect changes in the gas content occurring after rain or surface water, having infiltrated into the ground, become isolated from equilibrium contact with the atmosphere. A study of these changes can give insight into the origin and subsequent subsurface history of groundwater. Nitrogen and argon concentrations for many groundwaters in southern Africa indicate that excess air is added to water during infiltration. The amount of excess air is believed to reflect the physical structure of the unsaturated zone and the climate of the recharge area. Since nitrogen and argon are essentially conservative in many aquifer environments in South Africa, their concentrations can be used in distinguishing grondwaters of different recharge origins. In some areas the high helium content of the groundwater suggests that much of the helium is derived through migration from a source outside (e.g. below) the aquifer itself. Radiogenic helium concentrations nevertheless show, in two artesian aquifers, a close linear relationship to the radiocarbon age of the groundwater. This indicates a uniformity in the factors responsible for the accumulation of helium, and suggests that in these circumstances helium data can be used to give information on the age of very old groundwater. In some groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations are found to decrease with increasing groundwater age. Whilst the rate of decrease may be very different for different aquifers, the field measurement of oxygen may be useful in preliminary surveys directed toward the location of recharge areas

  2. SUB-PPB QUANTITATION AND CONFIRMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATERS CONTAINING HIGH TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a drinking water contaminant originating from the dissolution of the salts of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium in water. It is used primarily as an oxidant in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag infla...

  3. Fast dissolving cyclodextrin complex of piroxicam in solid dispersion part I: influence of β-CD and HPβ-CD on the dissolution rate of piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, F; Skiba, M; Chaffai, N; Hallouard, F; Fatmi, S; Lahiani-Skiba, M

    2015-01-30

    Sublingual drug delivery is an interesting route for drug having significant hepatic first-pass metabolism or requiring rapid pharmacological effect as for patients suffering from swallowing difficulties, nausea or vomiting. Sublingual absorption could however be limited by the kinetic of drug dissolution. This study evaluated influences of cyclodextrins (β-CD or HP-β-CD) and their different inclusion process (spray-drying or freeze-drying) on the drug dissolution kinetic of solid dispersions in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, Mw 6000Da) of piroxicam, used as poor hydrosoluble drug model. A secondary objective was to determine influences of drug dispersion process in PEG (evaporation or melting methods) on the drug dissolution kinetic of piroxicam. Piroxicam solid dispersions containing or not cyclodextrins were characterized by different scanning calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravometry analyser (TGA) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In vitro drug dissolution study of these solid dispersions was then performed. The results demonstrated the high potential and interest of solid dispersions of drug previously included in cyclodextrins for sublingual delivery of hydrophobic drugs. This study also showed the advantages of evaporation method on the melting ones during drug dispersion in PEG. Indeed, drug complexation with cyclodextrins as dispersion by melting prevented the presence in solid dispersions of drug in crystalline form which can represent up to 63%. Moreover, dispersion in PEG by evaporation method gave more porous drug delivery system than with melting methods. This allowed complete (limited at most at 80-90% with melting methods) and quick drug dissolution without rebound effect like with melting ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Interfering removal in samples with high amounts of dissolved solids for the determination of arsenic and selenium by TXRF; Remocao de interferentes em amostras com altos teores de solidos dissolvidos para a determinacao de arsenio e selenio por TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menegario, Amauri A.; Gomes, Ana Carla F.; Pellegrinotti, Daniel C.; Gine, Maria F.; Krug, Francisco J.; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    A matrix separation flow system coupled with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is proposed to remove Ca{sup ++}, Mg{sup ++}, Na{sup +} and K{sup +} major cations from samples containing high amounts of totally dissolved solids, using solid-liquid phases in flow system. This system is assembled with a 1.25 mL column of AG50W-X8 resin (in protonated form) and manual commutator, allowed the separation, addition of internal standard and subsequently a 40 {mu}L aliquot of the eluate was deposited in the reflector support, dried in a furnace for 12 hours at 60 {+-} 5 deg C and analysed by TXRF. All the procedure is carried out in about 90 s and 0.5 mL of sample are required. The proposed approach was applied for determination of As and Se in plant material and sea water samples. When comparing with direct analysis (without separation), a reduction of 2 to 6 times on the limits of detection for these elements was attained. The accuracy of this methodology was satisfactory for As and Se in sea water and Se in rice certified samples. This procedure could be also used for Pb interference removal in the determination of As by X-ray fluorescence. (author)

  5. A solid phospholipid-bile salts-mixed micelles based on the fast dissolving oral films to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qing-yuan; Li, Xian-yi; Shen, Bao-de; Dai, Ling; Xu, He; Shen, Cheng-ying; Yuan, Hai-long; Han, Jin

    2014-06-01

    The phospholipid-bile salts-mixed micelles (PL-BS-MMs) are potent carriers used for oral absorption of drugs that are poorly soluble in water; however, there are many limitations associated with liquid formulations. In the current study, the feasibility of preparing the fast dissolving oral films (FDOFs) containing PL-BS-MMs was examined. FDOFs incorporated with Cucurbitacin B (Cu B)-loaded PL-sodium deoxycholate (SDC)-MMs have been developed and characterized. To prepare the MMs and to serve as the micellar carrier, a weight ratio of 1:0.8 and total concentration of 54 mg/mL was selected for the PL/SDC based on the size, size distribution, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, and morphology. The concentration of Cu B was determined to be 5 mg/mL. Results showed that a narrow size distributed nanomicelles with a mean particle size of 86.21 ± 6.11 nm and a zeta potential of -31.21 ± 1.17 mV was obtained in our optimized Cu B-PL/SDC-MMs formulation. FDOFs were produced by solvent casting method and the formulation with 50 mg/mL of pullulan and 40 mg/mL of PEG 400 were deemed based on the physico-mechanical properties. The FDOFs containing Cu B-PL/SDC-MMs were easily reconstituted in a transparent and clear solution giving back a colloidal system with spherical micelles in the submicron range. In the in vitro dissolution test, the FDOFs containing Cu B-PL/SDC-MMs showed an increased dissolution velocity markedly. The pharmacokinetics study showed that the FDOFs containing PL-SDC-MMs not only kept the absorption properties as same as the PL-SDC-MMs, but also significantly increased the oral bioavailability of Cu B compared to the Cu B suspension ( p < 0.05). This study showed that the FDOFs containing Cu B-PL/SDC-MMs could represent a novel platform for the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs via oral administration. Furthermore, the integration with the FDOFs could also provide a simple and cost-effective manner for the solidification of PL-SDC-MMs.

  6. Trends in concentrations of nitrate and total dissolved solids in public supply wells of the Bunker Hill, Lytle, Rialto, and Colton groundwater subbasins, San Bernardino County, California: Influence of legacy land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Landon, Matthew K.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations and temporal changes in concentrations of nitrate and total dissolved solids (TDS) in groundwater of the Bunker Hill, Lytle, Rialto, and Colton groundwater subbasins of the Upper Santa Ana Valley Groundwater Basin were evaluated to identify trends and factors that may be affecting trends. One hundred, thirty-one public-supply wells were selected for analysis based on the availability of data spanning at least 11 years between the late 1980s and the 2000s. Forty-one of the 131 wells (31%) had a significant (p relations of nitrate trends to depth, lateral position, and VOCs imply that increasing nitrate concentrations are associated with nitrate loading from historical agricultural land use and that more recent urban land use is generally associated with lower nitrate concentrations and greater VOC occurrence. Increasing TDS trends were associated with relatively greater current nitrate concentrations and relatively greater amounts of urban land. Decreasing TDS trends were associated with relatively greater amounts of natural land use. Trends in TDS concentrations were not related to depth, lateral position, or VOC occurrence, reflecting more complex factors affecting TDS than nitrate in the study area.

  7. Analyzing Solutions High in Total Dissolved Solids for Rare Earth Elements (REEs) Using Cation Exchange and Online Pre-Concentration with the seaFAST2 Unit; NETL-TRS-7-2017; NETL Technical Report Series; U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory: Albany, OR, 2017; p 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science; Torres, M. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science; Verba, C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Hakala, A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The accurate quantification of the rare earth element (REE) dissolved concentrations in natural waters are often inhibited by their low abundances in relation to other dissolved constituents such as alkali, alkaline earth elements, and dissolved solids. The high abundance of these constituents can suppress the overall analytical signal as well as create isobaric interferences on the REEs during analysis. Waters associated with natural gas operations on black shale plays are characterized by high salinities and high total dissolved solids (TDS) contents >150,000 mg/L. Methods used to isolate and quantify dissolved REEs in seawater were adapted in order to develop the capability of analyzing REEs in waters that are high in TDS. First, a synthetic fluid based on geochemical modelling of natural brine formation fluids was created within the Marcellus black shale with a TDS loading of 153,000 mg/L. To this solution, 1,000 ng/mL of REE standards was added based on preliminary analyses of experimental fluids reacted at high pressure and temperature with Marcellus black shale. These synthetic fluids were then run at three different dilution levels of 10, 100, and 1,000–fold dilutions through cation exchange columns using AG50-X8 exchange resin from Eichrom Industries. The eluent from the cation columns were then sent through a seaFAST2 unit directly connected to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to analyze the REEs. Percent recoveries of the REEs ranged from 80–110% and fell within error for the external reference standard used and no signal suppression or isobaric interferences on the REEs were observed. These results demonstrate that a combined use of cation exchange columns and seaFAST2 instrumentation are effective in accurately quantifying the dissolved REEs in fluids that are >150,000 mg/L in TDS and have Ba:Eu ratios in excess of 380,000.

  8. Dissolved Solids as HD Bioeffluent Toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    biodegradation process that treats hydrolyzed sulfur mustard. Hydrolyzed mustard was biodegraded in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) that reduced the...passed through trickling filters that represented a sewage treatment facility. The effluent produced from the trickling filters was nontoxic to...via a venturi tee micronizer, limestone pH adjustment, Zeta Sol Iron removal bed , carbon bed filtration, and particulate filtration. The water was

  9. Salinity: Electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of soil salinity is a quantification of the total salts present in the liquid portion of the soil. Soil salinity is important in agriculture because salinity reduces crop yields by reducing the osmotic potential making it more difficult for the plant to extract water, by causing spe...

  10. Trends in concentrations of nitrate and total dissolved solids in public supply wells of the Bunker Hill, Lytle, Rialto, and Colton groundwater subbasins, San Bernardino County, California: influence of legacy land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Landon, Matthew K

    2013-05-01

    Concentrations and temporal changes in concentrations of nitrate and total dissolved solids (TDS) in groundwater of the Bunker Hill, Lytle, Rialto, and Colton groundwater subbasins of the Upper Santa Ana Valley Groundwater Basin were evaluated to identify trends and factors that may be affecting trends. One hundred, thirty-one public-supply wells were selected for analysis based on the availability of data spanning at least 11 years between the late 1980s and the 2000s. Forty-one of the 131 wells (31%) had a significant (p<0.10) increase in nitrate and 14 wells (11%) had a significant decrease in nitrate. For TDS, 46 wells (35%) had a significant increase and 8 wells (6%) had a significant decrease. Slopes for the observed significant trends ranged from -0.44 to 0.91 mg/L/yr for nitrate (as N) and -8 to 13 mg/L/yr for TDS. Increasing nitrate trends were associated with greater well depth, higher percentage of agricultural land use, and being closer to the distal end of the flow system. Decreasing nitrate trends were associated with the occurrence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs); VOC occurrence decreases with increasing depth. The relations of nitrate trends to depth, lateral position, and VOCs imply that increasing nitrate concentrations are associated with nitrate loading from historical agricultural land use and that more recent urban land use is generally associated with lower nitrate concentrations and greater VOC occurrence. Increasing TDS trends were associated with relatively greater current nitrate concentrations and relatively greater amounts of urban land. Decreasing TDS trends were associated with relatively greater amounts of natural land use. Trends in TDS concentrations were not related to depth, lateral position, or VOC occurrence, reflecting more complex factors affecting TDS than nitrate in the study area. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitr...

  12. Geographical differences in the relationship between total dissolved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on the Department of Water Affairs water quality database. ... Keywords: conversion factors, electrical conductivity, field instruments, rivers, total dissolved solids, water quality ... of a number of TDS:EC ratios in samples where both measure-.

  13. Clarification of dissolved irradiated light-water-reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, G.C.

    1983-02-01

    Bench-scale studies with actual dissolved irradiated light water reactor (LWR) fuels showed that continuous centrifugation is a practical clarification method for reprocessing. Dissolved irradiated LWR fuel was satisfactorily clarified in a bench-scale, continuous-flow bowl centrifuge. The solids separated were successfully reslurried in water. When the reslurried solids were mixed with clarified centrate, the resulting suspension behaved similar to the original dissolver solution during centrifugation. Settling rates for solids in actual irradiated fuel solutions were measured in a bottle centrifuge. The results indicate that dissolver solutions may be clarified under conditions achievable by available plant-scale centrifuge technology. The effective particle diameter of residual solids was calculated to be 0.064 microns for Oconee-1 fuel and 0.138 microns for Dresden-1 fuel. Filtration was shown unsuitable for clarification of LWR fuel solutions. Conventional filtration with filter aid would unacceptably complicate remote canyon operation and maintenance, might introduce dissolved silica from filter aids, and might irreversibly plug the filter with dissolver solids. Inertial filtration exhibited irreversible pluggage with nonradioactive stand-in suspensions under all conditions tested

  14. Change in lattice parameter of tantalum due to dissolved hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra P. Tiwari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume expansion of tantalum due to the dissolved hydrogen has been determined using Bragg equation. The hydrogen was dissolved in the pure tantalum metal at constant temperature (360 °C and constant pressure (132 mbar by varying the duration of hydrogen charging. The amount of dissolved hydrogen was within the solid solubility limit. The samples with different hydrogen concentration were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Slight peak shifts as well as peak broadening were observed. The relative changes of lattice parameters plotted against the hydrogen concentration revealed that the lattice parameters varied linearly with the hydrogen concentration.

  15. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM in FF solution, fire manipulation caused an increase in aromaticity from 23 to 27% compared to the control, due to an increase of the aryl-C and a decrease of the O-alkyl-C and alkyl-C signal. Fire effects were leveled out in the mineral soil. For TOM, fire effects became notable only in the A horizon, exhibiting a decrease in aromaticity from 22 to 18% compared to the control, due to increased O-alkyl-C and diminished aryl-C proportions. Compared to the control, fire only caused minor DOC release rates (events did not significantly enhance the proportion of POC and PN in the total C and N amounts exhibiting values between 10 and 20%. To fully understand the quality and amount of translocated organic C and N compounds within soils under both ambient as well as fire environments, dissolved and particulate size fractions need to be considered.

  16. Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%–30.91%, 83.29%–90.51%, and 61.54–68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff. PMID:23935444

  17. Characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%-30.91%, 83.29%-90.51%, and 61.54-68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff.

  18. System and process for dissolution of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liezers, Martin; Farmer, III, Orville T.

    2017-10-10

    A system and process are disclosed for dissolution of solids and "difficult-to-dissolve" solids. A solid sample may be ablated in an ablation device to generate nanoscale particles. Nanoparticles may then swept into a coupled plasma device operating at atmospheric pressure where the solid nanoparticles are atomized. The plasma exhaust may be delivered directly into an aqueous fluid to form a solution containing the atomized and dissolved solids. The composition of the resulting solution reflects the composition of the original solid sample.

  19. Geographical differences in the relationship between total dissolved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The practical application of these findings is that users of EC meters should not simply apply a blanket conversion factor, but need to select an applicable factor for the river system in which they are measuring. Keywords: conversion factors, electrical conductivity, field instruments, rivers, total dissolved solids, water quality ...

  20. Development of antifouling of electrochemical solid-state dissolved oxygen sensors based on nanostructured Cu0.4Ru3.4O7 + RuO2 sensing electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuiykov, Serge; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring nanostructured sensing electrode materials to high antifouling resistance has been one of the main priorities of the development of water quality sensors in the 21st century. Nanostructured Cu 0.4 Ru 3.4 O 7 + RuO 2 -SEs have been developed to address the bio-fouling problem. The change in Cu 0.4 Ru 3.4 O 7 + RuO 2 structural development being promoted by advances in nano- and micro-scale pattering. Nanostructured Cu 0.4 Ru 3.4 O 7 + RuO 2 -SEs with different mol% of Cu 2 O were screen-printed on alumina sensor substrates and were consequently subjected to a 3-month field trial at the Water Treatment Plant. Their structural and electrochemical properties before and after the experiment were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical cyclic voltammerty (CV) techniques. The relationship between dissolved oxygen (DO) and the sensor's potential difference was found to be relatively linear, with the maximum sensitivity of −46 mV per decade being achieved at 20 mol% Cu 2 O at 7.27 pH. Moreover, a 3-month field trial in the sewerage environment has shown that Cu 0.4 Ru 3.4 O 7 + RuO 2 -SE with 20 mol% of Cu 2 O possesses much higher defences against bio-fouling than the same SE with only 10 mol% of Cu 2 O. The super-hydrophobic property of the developed Cu 0.4 Ru 3.4 O 7 + RuO 2 complex oxide has been considered as one of the essential pre-requisites for high antifouling resistance. Multiple antifouling defence strategies from biomimetic to bio-inspired must be incorporated in further development of nanostructured oxide SE to solve problems of bio-fouling on the sensor's SE.

  1. Method of dissolving metal ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuno, Masao; Soda, Yasuhiko; Kuroda, Sadaomi; Koga, Tadaaki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To dissolve and clean metal ruthenium deposited to the inner surface of a dissolving vessel for spent fuel rods. Method: Metal ruthenium is dissolved in a solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to which potassium permanganate is added. As the alkali metal hydroxide used herein there can be mentioned potassium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide can be mentioned, which is used as an aqueous solution from 5 to 20 % concentration in view of the solubility of metal ruthenium and economical merit. Further, potassium permanganate is used by adding to the solution of alkali metal hydroxide at a concentration of 1 to 5 %. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  3. METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotin, L.A.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use of about 1 or 2 percent of perchioric acid based on the weight of the nitric acid used, reduces the time of dissolution of uranium by a factor of about 100.

  4. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO x emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO x fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO x emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO 2 which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered

  5. Monitoring dissolved radioactive cesium in Abukuma River in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Kurosawa, Akihiko; Komai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive materials were released into the atmosphere and deposited over wide areas of farmland, forests, and cities; elevated levels of "1"3"1I, "1"3"4Cs, and "1"3"7Cs have been detected in these areas due to the accident at the Tokyo Power Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the April 2011 earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan. Radioactive Cs deposited on farmland and forests gradually leaches into water bodies such as mountain streams and rivers adsorbed onto particles or in a dissolved state. It is important to calrify the level of dissolved and total radioactive Cs in environmental water for forecasting the of discharge of radioactive Cs from forest and watersheds, assessing on the effect of dissolved and total radioactive Cs on not only irrigation water but also rice and other crops, and evaluating the transport of radioactive Cs from rivers to costal areas. Therefore, it is important to monitor their levels in Fukushima Prefecture over time. In this research, we monitored the levels of dissolved and total radioactive Cs in Abukuma River using a conventional evaporative concentration method. By monitoring the river waters since September 2012, it was estimated that the levels of dissolved radioactive Cs were less than 0.128 Bq/L and those of total radioactive Cs were less than 0.274 Bq/L in the main stream and branches of Abukuma River in the low suspended solid condition. (author)

  6. ICPP custom dissolver explosion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Hawk, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the recovery from the February 9, 1991, small scale explosion in a custom processing dissolver at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) a Department of Energy facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The custom processing facility is a limited production area designed to recover unirradiated uranium fuel. A small amount of the nuclear material received and stored at the ICPP is unique and incompatible with the major head end dissolution processes. Custom processing is a small scale dissolution facility for processing these materials in an economical fashion in the CPP-627 hot chemistry laboratory. Two glass dissolvers were contained in a large walk in hood area. Utilities for dissolution and connections to the major ICPP uranium separation facility were provided. The fuel processing operations during this campaign involved dissolving uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranium/fissium alloy in nitric acid

  7. ICPP custom dissolver explosion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Hawk, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the recovery from the February 9, 1991 small scale explosion in a custom processing dissolver at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Custom processing is a small scale dissolution facility which processes nuclear material in an economical fashion. The material dissolved in this facility was uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranium/fissium alloy in nitric acid. The paper explained the release of fission material, and the decontamination and recovery of the fuel material. The safety and protection procedures were also discussed. Also described was the chemical analysis which was used to speculate the most probable cause of the explosion. (MB)

  8. Method for dissolving ceramic beryllia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, A.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for dissolving a nuclear fuel composition consisting of a sintered mass containing beryllia, a nuclear fuel selected from uranium and plutonium and a stabilizing agent, sintered at a temperature of at least 1500 0 C to a density of about 2.7 gs/cc. The process comprises contacting said sintered mass with a stoichiometric excess of lithium oxide dissolved or dispersed in a carrier selected from lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate at a temperature in the range 750--850 0 C to convert the beryllia to lithium beryllate and thereafter recovering the nuclear fuel content of said mass. (U.S.)

  9. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  10. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  11. an approach to estimate total dissolved solids in groundwater using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistivities of the aquifer delineated were subsequently used to estimate TDS in groundwater which was correlated with those ... the concentrations of these chemical constituents in the ..... TDS determined by water analysis varied between 17.

  12. Effects of electrolyte total dissolved solids (TDS) on performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... microbial desalination cells; rRNA, ribosomal ribonucleic acid;. NCBI, national center for biotechnology information. microbial fuel cells (MFC) technology provides a new way to saline wastewater treatment. MFCs are bio-electro- chemical reactors which are different from traditional anaerobic biological ...

  13. Identification of dissolved-constituent sources in mine-site ground water using batch mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gregory M.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments were used to help identify lithologic and mineralogic sources of increased concentrations of dissolved solids in water affected by surface coal mining in northwestern Colorado. Ten overburden core samples were analyzed for mineral composition and mixed with distilled water for 90 days until mineral-water equilibrium was reached. Between one day and 90 days after initial contact, specific conductance in the sample mixtures had a median increase of 306 percent. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 200 to 8,700 mg/L in water samples extracted from the mixtures after 90 days. Mass-balance simulations were conducted using the geochemical models BALANCE and WATEQF to quantify mineral-water interactions occurring in five selected sample mixtures and in water collected from a spring at a reclaimed mine site. The spring water is affected by mineral-water interactions occurring in all of the lithologic units comprising the overburden. Results of the simulations indicate that oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of dolomite, gypsum, and epsomite, and cation-exchange reactions are the primary mineral-water interactions occurring in the overburden. Three lithologic units in the overburden (a coal, a sandstone, and a shale) probably contribute most of the dissolved solids to the spring water. Water sample extracts from mixtures using core from these three units accounted for 85 percent of the total dissolved solids in the 10 sample extracts. Other lithologic units in the over-burden probably contribute smaller quantities of dissolved solids to the spring water.

  14. Identification of dissolved-constituent sources in mine-site ground water using batch mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.M.; Williams, R.S. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments were used to help identify lithologic mineralogic sources of increased concentrations of dissolved solids in water affected by surface coal mining in northwestern Colorado. Ten overburden core samples were analyzed for mineral composition and mixed with distilled water for 90 days until mineral-water equilibrium was reached. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 200 to 8,700 mg/L in water samples extracted from the mixtures after 90 days. Mass-balance simulations were conducted using the geochemical models BALANCE and WATEQF to quantify mineral-water interactions occurring in five selected sample mixtures and in water collected from a spring at a reclaimed mine site. The spring water is affected by mineral-water interactions occurring in all of lithologic units comprising the overburden. Results of the simulations indicate that oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of dolomite, gypsum, and epsomite, and cation-exchange reactions are the primary mineral-water interactions occurring in the overburden. Three lithologic units in the overburden probably contribute most of the dissolved solids to the spring water. Water sample extracts from mixtures using core from these three units accounted for 85 percent of the total dissolved solids in the 10 sample extracts. Other lithologic units in the overburden probably contribute smaller quantities of dissolved solids to the spring water

  15. Removal of Dissolved Salts and Particulate Contaminants from Seawater: Village Marine Tec., Expeditionary Unit Water Purifier, Generation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EUWP was developed to treat challenging water sources with variable turbidity, chemical contamination, and very high total dissolved solids (TDS), including seawater, during emergency situations when other water treatment facilities are incapacitated. The EUWP components incl...

  16. Thermotransport in interstitial solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel'son, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of literature data the problem of thermotransport of impurities (H, N, O, C) in interstitial solid solutions is considered. It is shown that from experimental data on the thermotransport an important parameter of dissolved atoms can be found which characterizes atom state in these solutions-enthalpy of transport

  17. Significance of dissolved methane in effluents of anaerobically ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for energy efficient Domestic Wastewater (DWW) treatment is increasing annually with population growth and expanding global energy demand. Anaerobic treatment of low strength DWW produces methane which can be used to as an energy product. Temperature sensitivity, low removal efficiencies (Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Suspended Solids (SS), and Nutrients), alkalinity demand, and potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have limited its application to warmer climates. Although well designed anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors (AnMBRs) are able to effectively treat DWW at psychrophilic temperatures (10–30 °C), lower temperatures increase methane solubility leading to increased energy losses in the form of dissolved methane in the effluent. Estimates of dissolved methane losses are typically based on concentrations calculated using Henry's Law but advection limitations can lead to supersaturation of methane between 1.34 and 6.9 times equilibrium concentrations and 11–100% of generated methane being lost in the effluent. In well mixed systems such as AnMBRs which use biogas sparging to control membrane fouling, actual concentrations approach equilibrium values. Non-porous membranes have been used to recover up to 92.6% of dissolved methane and well suited for degassing effluents of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors which have considerable solids and organic contents and can cause pore wetting and clogging in microporous membrane modules. Micro

  18. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  19. Contacting particulate solids with liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for contacting particulate solids with a fluid. The particular applications described are 1) an acid dissolver for dissolving plutonium from plutonium contaminated ash produced by the incineration of waste such as rubber gloves, tissue paper etc. and 2) apparatus for dissolving gel spheres of nuclear fuel material. The liquid, e.g. acid for use in a leaching process flows through a vertical conduit and past a series of baffles spaced along the axis of the conduit. Each baffle defines a mixing chamber and provides a small gap around its perimeter between the baffle and the wall of the conduit. The baffles are provided with sloping top surfaces for preventing solid particles from settling on the baffles and sloping undersurfaces to improve mixing of the liquid and the solid particles. The liquid flows upwards in the conduit but solid particles may be fed from the top or from the bottom of the conduit to mix with the liquid. Gas may be introduced to promote improved flow conditions. (U.K.)

  20. Method for removing dissolved oxygen from aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.G. de.

    1985-01-01

    Water for use in steam generation systems, which is contained in a storage tank, is deoxygenated for use in the system by adding hydrogen to a stream of the water and intimately mixing the same, pressurizing the stream to a pressure of 60 to 150 psig, and contacting the pressurized stream with a catalyst bed of palladium or platinum dispersed on a solid carrier. The hydrogen reacts with the dissolved oxygen in the presence of the catalyst at ambient temperatures, to produce a deoxygenated stream of water containing less than 10 ppb of oxygen. The deoxygenated water can be returned to the storage tank or supplied directly to the steam generation system. (author)

  1. Extraction and quantitation of furanic compounds dissolved in oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreh, O.; Torkos, K.; Mahara, M.B.; Borossay, J.

    1998-01-01

    Furans are amongst the decomposition products which are generated by the degradation of cellulose in paper. Paper insulation is used in capacitors, cables and transformers. These furans dissolve in the impregnating mineral oil, and a method, involving liquid/liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography, has been developed to determine the concentration of 2-furfural the most stable compound in oil. The degradation of paper is being examined in order to find correlation between the change in dielectric and mechanical properties and the increase in concentration of 2-furfural in the oil. (author)

  2. Chemical dissolving of sludge from a high level waste tank at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.F.; Hill, A.J. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    The concept for decontamination and retirement of radioactive liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) involves hydraulic slurrying to remove most of the settled sludges followed by chemical dissolving of residual sludges. Dissolving tests were carried out with small samples of sludge from SRP Tank 16H. Over 95 percent of the sludge was dissolved by 8 wt percent oxalic acid at 85 0 C with agitation in a two-step dissolving process (50 hours per step) and an initial reagent-to-sludge volume of 20. Oxalic acid does not attack the waste tank material of construction, appears to be compatible with the existing waste farm processes and equipment after neutralization, and with future processes planned for fixation of the waste into a high-integrity solid for packaging and shipping

  3. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 22 0 C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 90 0 C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 22 0 C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables

  4. Dissolved CO2 Increases Breakthrough Porosity in Natural Porous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Bruns, S; Stipp, S L S; Sørensen, H O

    2017-07-18

    When reactive fluids flow through a dissolving porous medium, conductive channels form, leading to fluid breakthrough. This phenomenon is caused by the reactive infiltration instability and is important in geologic carbon storage where the dissolution of CO 2 in flowing water increases fluid acidity. Using numerical simulations with high resolution digital models of North Sea chalk, we show that the breakthrough porosity is an important indicator of dissolution pattern. Dissolution patterns reflect the balance between the demand and supply of cumulative surface. The demand is determined by the reactive fluid composition while the supply relies on the flow field and the rock's microstructure. We tested three model scenarios and found that aqueous CO 2 dissolves porous media homogeneously, leading to large breakthrough porosity. In contrast, solutions without CO 2 develop elongated convective channels known as wormholes, with low breakthrough porosity. These different patterns are explained by the different apparent solubility of calcite in free drift systems. Our results indicate that CO 2 increases the reactive subvolume of porous media and reduces the amount of solid residual before reactive fluid can be fully channelized. Consequently, dissolved CO 2 may enhance contaminant mobilization near injection wellbores, undermine the mechanical sustainability of formation rocks and increase the likelihood of buoyance driven leakage through carbonate rich caprocks.

  5. Dissolved Carbon Fluxes During the 2017 Mississippi River Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, J. H.; Xu, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Mississippi River drains approximately 3.2 million square kilometres of land and discharges about 680 cubic kilometres of water into the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, acting as a significant medium for carbon transport from land to the ocean. A few studies have documented annual carbon fluxes in the river, however it is unclear whether floods can create riverine carbon pulses. Such information is critical in understanding the effects that extreme precipitation events may have on carbon transport under the changing climate. We hypothesize that carbon concentration and mass loading will increase in response to an increase in river discharge, creating a carbon pulse, and that the source of carbon varies from river rising to falling due to terrestrial runoff processes. This study investigated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) loadings during the 2017 Mississippi River early-summer flood. Water samples were taken from the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge on the rising limb, crest, and falling limb of the flood. All samples were analysed for concentrations of DOC, DIC, and their respective isotopic signature (δ13C). Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) was also recorded in the field at each sampling trip. Additionally, the water samples were analysed for nutrients, dissolved metals, and suspended solids, and in-situ measurements were made on water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance. The preliminary findings suggest that carbon species responded differently to the flood event and that δ13C values were dependent on river flood stage. This single flood event transported a large quantity of carbon, indicating that frequent large pulses of riverine carbon should be expected in the future as climate change progresses.

  6. Cycling downwards - dissolved organic matter in soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, K.; Kalbitz, K.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter has been recognized as mobile, thus crucial to translocation of metals, pollutants but also of nutrients in soil. We present a conceptual model of the vertical movement of dissolved organic matter with soil water, which deviates from the view of a chromatographic stripping

  7. Dissolving method for nuclear fuel oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Makoto; Asano, Yuichiro; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Takashima, Yoichi; Ikeda, Yasuhisa.

    1996-01-01

    In a method of dissolving oxides of nuclear fuels in an aqueous acid solution, the oxides of the nuclear fuels are dissolved in a state where an oxidizing agent other than the acid is present together in the aqueous acid solution. If chlorate ions (ClO 3 - ) are present together in the aqueous acid solution, the chlorate ions act as a strong oxidizing agent and dissolve nuclear fuels such as UO 2 by oxidation. In addition, a Ce compound which generates Ce(IV) by oxidation is added to the aqueous acid solution, and an ozone (O 3 ) gas is blown thereto to dissolve the oxides of nuclear fuels. Further, the oxides of nuclear fuels are oxidized in a state where ClO 2 is present together in the aqueous acid solution to dissolve the oxides of nuclear fuels. Since oxides of the nuclear fuels are dissolved in a state where the oxidizing agent is present together as described above, the oxides of nuclear fuels can be dissolved even at a room temperature, thereby enabling to use a material such as polytetrafluoroethylene and to dissolve the oxides of nuclear fuels at a reduced cost for dissolution. (T.M.)

  8. Dissolved air flotation and me.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edzwald, James K

    2010-04-01

    This paper is mainly a critical review of the literature and an assessment of what we know about dissolved air flotation (DAF). A few remarks are made at the outset about the author's personal journey in DAF research, his start and its progression. DAF has been used for several decades in drinking water treatment as an alternative clarification method to sedimentation. DAF is particularly effective in treating reservoir water supplies; those supplies containing algae, natural color or natural organic matter; and those with low mineral turbidity. It is more efficient than sedimentation in removing turbidity and particles for these type supplies. Furthermore, it is more efficient in removing Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. In the last 20 years, fundamental models were developed that provide a basis for understanding the process, optimizing it, and integrating it into water treatment plants. The theories were tested through laboratory and pilot-plant studies. Consequently, there have been trends in which DAF pretreatment has been optimized resulting in better coagulation and a decrease in the size of flocculation tanks. In addition, the hydraulic loading rates have increased reducing the size of DAF processes. While DAF has been used mainly in conventional type water plants, there is now interest in the technology as a pretreatment step in ultrafiltration membrane plants and in desalination reverse osmosis plants. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An introduction to fast dissolving oral thin film drug delivery systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Harsha; Gupte, Aasavari

    2013-12-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies are switching their products from tablets to fast dissolving oral thin films (OTFs). Films have all the advantages of tablets (precise dosage, easy administration) and those of liquid dosage forms (easy swallowing, rapid bioavailability). Statistics have shown that four out of five patients prefer orally disintegrating dosage forms over conventional solid oral dosages forms. Pediatric, geriatric, bedridden, emetic patients and those with Central Nervous System disorders, have difficulty in swallowing or chewing solid dosage forms. Many of these patients are non-compliant in administering solid dosage forms due to fear of choking. OTFs when placed on the tip or the floor of the tongue are instantly wet by saliva. As a result, OTFs rapidly hydrate and then disintegrate and/or dissolve to release the medication for local and/or systemic absorption. This technology provides a good platform for patent non- infringing product development and for increasing the patent life-cycle of the existing products. The application of fast dissolving oral thin films is not only limited to buccal fast dissolving system, but also expands to other applications like gastroretentive, sublingual delivery systems. This review highlights the composition including the details of various types of polymers both natural and synthetic, the different types of manufacturing techniques, packaging materials and evaluation tests for the OTFs.

  10. Millstone 3 condensate dissolved gas monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.F.; Grondahl, E.E.; Snyder, D.T.

    1988-01-01

    Condensate dissolved oxygen problems at Millstone Point Unit 3 (MP3) were investigated using the Dissolved Gas Monitoring System developed by Radiological and Chemical Technology, Inc. under EPRI sponsorship. Argon was injected into the turbine exhaust basket tips to perform a dissolved gas transport analysis and determine steam jet air ejector gas removal efficiency. The operating configuration of the steam jet air ejector system was varied to determine the effect on gas removal efficiency. Following circulating water chlorination, the gas removal efficiency was determined to evaluate the effect of condenser tube fouling on steam jet air ejector performance

  11. Dissolving microneedle patches for dermal vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Leone, M.; Monkare, J.T.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Kersten, G.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    The dermal route is an attractive route for vaccine delivery due to the easy skin accessibility and a dense network of immune cells in the skin. The development of microneedles is crucial to take advantage of the skin immunization and simultaneously to overcome problems related to vaccination by conventional needles (e.g. pain, needle-stick injuries or needle re-use). This review focuses on dissolving microneedles that after penetration into the skin dissolve releasing the encapsulated antige...

  12. Nanocrystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiter, H.

    1991-01-01

    Nanocrystalline solids are polycrystals, the crystal size of which is a few (typically 1 to 10) nanometres so that 50% or more of the solid consists of incoherent interfaces between crystals of different orientations. Solids consisting primarily of internal interfaces represent a separate class of atomic structures because the atomic arrangement formed in the core of an interface is known to be an arrangement of minimum energy in the potential field of the two adjacent crystal lattices with different crystallographic orientations on either side of the boundary core. These boundary conditions result in atomic structures in the interfacial cores which cannot be formed elsewhere (e.g. in glasses or perfect crystals). Nanocrystalline solids are of interest for the following four reasons: (1) Nanocrystalline solids exhibit an atomic structure which differs from that of the two known solid states: the crystalline (with long-range order) and the glassy (with short-range order). (2) The properties of nanocrystalline solids differ (in some cases by several orders of magnitude) from those of glasses and/or crystals with the same chemical composition, which suggests that they may be utilized technologically in the future. (3) Nanocrystalline solids seem to permit the alloying of conventionally immiscible components. (4) If small (1 to 10 nm diameter) solid droplets with a glassy structure are consolidated (instead of small crystals), a new type of glass, called nanoglass, is obtained. Such glasses seem to differ structurally from conventional glasses. (orig.)

  13. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  14. Estimation of Particle Material And Dissolved Flows During Floods In The Inaouene Watershed. (Northeast Of Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibari, Hayat; Haida, Souad; Foutlane, Mohamed

    2018-05-01

    This work aims to estimate the contributions of the Inaouene River during the floods. It is in this context that the dissolved and particulate matter flows were measured during the flood periods followed by the 1996/97 study year at the two hydrological stations Bab Marzouka (upstream) and El Kouchat (downstream). The specific flows of dissolved materials calculated upstream and downstream of the Inaouene watershed correspond respectively to 257 t/ km2/year and 117 t/ km2/year. Chlorides represent 30% and 41% respectively of the total dissolved transport upstream and downstream. The potential mechanical degradation affecting the Inaouene watershed can deliver a solid load estimated at 6.106 t/year corresponding to a specific flow of 2142 t/km2/year.

  15. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species

  16. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroch, C.J. [Wastren, Inc., Westminster, CO (United States); Grant, P.J. [Wastren, Inc., Hummelstown, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. There is considerable interest in developing processes that remove or destroy the nitrate wastes. Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX) is a possible process that should be more cost effective in treating aqueous waste steams. This report describes the EDIX process.

  17. Solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The article drawn up within the framework of 'the assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' provides an overview of solid waste management, and assesses future wastes volume and waste disposal issues.In particular it addresses the following concerns: - Long term projections of solid waste arisings (i.e. domestic, industrial, such commercial wastes, vehicle types, construction waste, waste oils, hazardous toxic wastes and finally hospital and clinical wastes) are described. - Appropriate disposal routes, and strategies for reducing volumes for final disposal - Balance between municipal and industrial solid waste generation and disposal/treatment and - environmental impacts (aesthetics, human health, natural environment )of existing dumps, and the potential impact of government plans for construction of solid waste facilities). Possible policies for institutional reform within the waste management sector are proposed. Tables provides estimations of generation rates and distribution of wastes in different regions of Lebanon. Laws related to solid waste management are summarized

  18. Plan for radionuclide tracer studies of the residence time distribution in the Wilsonville dissolver and preheater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.; Brashear, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Stimulus-response measurements using radiotracers to measure residence time distribution (RTD) and hydrodynamic parameters for the preheaters and dissolvers at the Ft. Lewis Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) and the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal conversion pilot plants are reviewed. A plan is also presented for a series of radioactive tracer studies proposed for the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, to measure the RTD for the preheater and dissolvers in the SRC-I mode. The tracer for the gas phase will be 133 Xe, and 198 Au (on carbonized resin or as an aqueous colloidal suspension) will be used as the slurry tracer. Four experimental phases are recommended for the RTD tracer studies: (1) preheater; (2) dissolver with 100% takeoff; (3) dissolver with 100% takeoff and solids withdrawal; and (4) dissolver with 50% takeoff. Eighteen gas-tracer and 22 liquid-tracer injections are projected to accomplish the four experimental phases. Two to four tracer injections are projected for preliminary tests to ensure the capability of safe injection of the radiotracers and the collection of statistically significant data. A complete projected cost and time schedule is provided, including procurement of necessary components, preparation of the radiotracers, assembly and testing of tracer injection apparatus and detection systems, onsite work and tracer injections, laboratory experimentation, data analysis, and report writing

  19. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stubbins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved black carbon (DBC, defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their

  20. KOMBINASI ULTRAFILTRASI DAN DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION UNTUK PEMEKATAN MIKROALGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Widiasa

    2014-05-01

    study is aimed to investigate the potential of combination of ultrafiltration (UF and dissolved air flotation  (DAF for concentration of microalgae in laboratory scale. The experimental results showed that fluxes of the UF membrane decreased sharply due to deposition of microalgae biomass during first 20 minutes of filtration. Periodically backwash using the UF permeate (backwash  interval = 20 minutes;  backwash duration = 10 seconds;  backwash pressure = 1 bar gave an effective fouling control to maintain reasonable stable fluxes. In addition,  the UF membrane gave separation of microalgae biomass ~ 100%. Permeate quality is strongly stable in which turbidity < 0.5 NTU, organic content < 10 mg/L, and color < 10 PCU.  Moreover, concentration of the UF retentate by DAF under saturation pressure of 6 bars was able to produced microalgae feedstock having 20 g/L dry microalgae. PAC is required for DAF feed with dosage of 1.3–1.6 mg PAC/mg suspended solids.

  1. Dissolving Microneedle Patches for Dermal Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Mönkäre, J; Bouwstra, J A; Kersten, G

    2017-11-01

    The dermal route is an attractive route for vaccine delivery due to the easy skin accessibility and a dense network of immune cells in the skin. The development of microneedles is crucial to take advantage of the skin immunization and simultaneously to overcome problems related to vaccination by conventional needles (e.g. pain, needle-stick injuries or needle re-use). This review focuses on dissolving microneedles that after penetration into the skin dissolve releasing the encapsulated antigen. The microneedle patch fabrication techniques and their challenges are discussed as well as the microneedle characterization methods and antigen stability aspects. The immunogenicity of antigens formulated in dissolving microneedles are addressed. Finally, the early clinical development is discussed.

  2. DESIGN OF A DISSOLVED AIR FLOAT (DAF) IN THE TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER A TEXTILE

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Colotta, G.

    2014-01-01

    We presented the design of a dissolved air flotation system (DAF) to separate coagulated solids (dye) in the wastewater of a textile plant. The obtained yields of removal of suspended solids (SS) they are 82%. The size of the float to treat 35 m3/h of residual water of a textile is 5,7 m. Se presenta el diseño de un flotador por aire disuelto (DAF) para separar sólidos coagulados y floculados (tinte) provenientes de los efluentes de una planta textil. Los rendimientos obtenidos de remoción...

  3. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  4. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  5. Krypton retention on solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    Over a dozen prospective adsorbents for krypton were studied and evaluated with respect to adsorption capacity and cost for dissolver off-gas streams from nuclear reprocessing plants. Results show that, at subambient temperature (-40 0 to -80 0 C), the commercially available hydrogen mordenite has sufficient adsorptive capacity to be the most cost-effective material studied. Silver mordenite has a higher capacity for krypton retention, but is 50 times more expensive than hydrogen mordenite. The results indicate that a solid adsorbent system is feasible and competitive with other developing systems whih utilize fluorocarbon absorption and cryogenic distillation

  6. Dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons in the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Topgi, R.S.; Noronha, R.J.; Fondekar, S.P.

    Mean dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons, measured using UV-spectrophotometry, at 0 and 10m were 51 plus or minus 1 and 55 plus or minus 1.2 mu g/litre respectively; range of variation being between 28 and 83 mu g/litre. Very little difference...

  7. Dissolved carbohydrate in the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhople, V.M.; Bhosle, N.B.

    with chlorophyll a (P 0.001) and phaeopigments (P 0.001) suggesting its release from the former and zooplankton grazing in the latter. Inverse correlations with dissolved oxygen, phosphate and nitrate indicated the possibility of the release of carbohydrate from...

  8. Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilan, Rachael Miller

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

  9. Total dissolved carbohydrate in Mahi river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Rokade, M.A.; Zingde, M.D.

    Total dissolved carbohydrate varied from 4.37-15 mg l-1 and 3.71-15.95 mg l-1 in the surface and bottom samples respectively. Highest concentration of carbohydrate was observed at station 1 which decreased downward upto Station 6 which showed...

  10. Release of dissolved 85Kr by standing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Norikatsu; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Tsukui, Kohei

    1986-01-01

    The experiments on the release of dissolved 85 Kr by standing at room temperature were carried out to examine the influence of liquid level in a sampler and properties of solvent on the release efficiency. Six kinds of organic solvents as well as water were taken as solvents. The half-life period in case of the decrease in concentration of the dissolved 85 Kr which was used as an index of release efficiency, was proportional to the liquid level in the sampler and was inversely proportional to the diffusion coefficient of Kr gas in solvent. For organic solvents belonging to homologous series, the half-life period became longer with increasing the carbon number of solvent molecule. From the relationship between the half-life period and the carbon number, the release efficiency in the dissolved 85 Kr can be predicted for any commonly used solvent as a practical application. This method was found to be an effective means of removing the dissolved 85 Kr of low level though it takes rather long time. (author)

  11. Subcooled boiling effect on dissolved gases behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmitko, M.; Sinkule, J.; Linek, V.

    1999-01-01

    A model describing dissolved gasses (hydrogen, nitrogen) and ammonia behaviour in subcooled boiling conditions of WWERs was developed. Main objective of the study was to analyse conditions and mechanisms leading to formation of a zone with different concentration of dissolved gases, eg. a zone depleted in dissolved hydrogen in relation to the bulk of coolant. Both, an equilibrium and dynamic approaches were used to describe a depletion of the liquid surrounding a steam bubble in the gas components. The obtained results show that locally different water chemistry conditions can be met in the subcooled boiling conditions, especially, in the developed subcooled boiling regime. For example, a 70% hydrogen depletion in relation to the bulk of coolant takes about 1 ms and concerns a liquid layer of 1 μn surrounding the steam bubble. The locally different concentration of dissolved gases can influence physic-chemical and radiolytic processes in the reactor system, eg. Zr cladding corrosion, radioactivity transport and determination of the critical hydrogen concentration. (author)

  12. Radiocarbon in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clercq, M. le; Plicht, J. van der; Meijer, H.A.J.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) plays an important role in the ecology and carbon cycle in the ocean. Analytical problems with concentration and isotope ratio measurements have hindered its study. We have constructed a new analytical method based on supercritical oxidation for the determination of

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF USING DILUTE OXALIC ACID TO DISSOLVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE IRON BASED SLUDGE SIMULANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E

    2008-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken South Carolina, there is a crucial need to remove residual quantities of highly radioactive iron-based sludge from large select underground storage tanks (e.g., 19,000 liters of sludge per tank), in order to support tank closure. The use of oxalic acid is planned to dissolve the residual sludge, hence, helping in the removal. Based on rigorous testing, primarily using 4 and 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions, it was concluded that the more concentrated the acid, the greater the amount of residual sludge that would be dissolved; hence, a baseline technology on using 8 wt% oxalic acid was developed. In stark contrast to the baseline technology, reports from other industries suggest that the dissolution will most effectively occur at 1 wt% oxalic acid (i.e., maintaining the pH near 2). The driver for using less oxalic acid is that less (i.e., moles) would decrease the severity of the downstream impacts (i.e., required oxalate solids removal efforts). To determine the initial feasibility of using 1 wt% acid to dissolve > 90% of the sludge solids, about 19,000 liters of representative sludge was modeled using about 530,000 liters of 0 to 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions. With the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium based software results showing that 1 wt% oxalic acid could theoretically work, simulant dissolution testing was initiated. For the dissolution testing, existing simulant was obtained, and an approximate 20 liter test rig was built. Multiple batch dissolutions of both wet and air-dried simulant were performed. Overall, the testing showed that dilute oxalic acid dissolved a greater fraction of the stimulant and resulted in a significantly larger acid effectiveness (i.e., grams of sludge dissolved/mole of acid) than the baseline technology. With the potential effectiveness confirmed via simulant testing, additional testing, including radioactive sludge testing, is planned

  14. Krypton retention on solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental laboratory program was conducted to develop economical solid adsorbents for the retention of krypton from a dissolver off-gas stream. The study indicates that a solid adsorbent system is feasible and competitive with other developing systems which utilize fluorocarbon absorption nd cryogenic distillation. This technology may have potential applications not only in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, but also in nuclear reactors and in environmental monitoring. Of the 13 prospective adsorbents evaluated with respect to adsorption capacity and cost, the commercially available hydrogen mordenite was the most cost-effective material at subambient temperatures (-40 0 to -80 0 C). Silver mordenite has a higher capacity for krypton retention, but is 50 times more expensive than hydrogen mordenite

  15. Solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  16. Characterizing Dissolved Gases in Cryogenic Liquid Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian A.

    Pressure-Density-Temperature-Composition (PrhoT-x) measurements of cryogenic fuel mixtures are a historical challenge due to the difficulties of maintaining cryogenic temperatures and precision isolation of a mixture sample. For decades NASA has used helium to pressurize liquid hydrogen propellant tanks to maintain tank pressure and reduce boil off. This process causes helium gas to dissolve into liquid hydrogen creating a cryogenic mixture with thermodynamic properties that vary from pure liquid hydrogen. This can lead to inefficiencies in fuel storage and instabilities in fluid flow. As NASA plans for longer missions to Mars and beyond, small inefficiencies such as dissolved helium in liquid propellant become significant. Traditional NASA models are unable to account for dissolved helium due to a lack of fundamental property measurements necessary for the development of a mixture Equation Of State (EOS). The first PrhoT-x measurements of helium-hydrogen mixtures using a retrofitted single-sinker densimeter, magnetic suspension microbalance, and calibrated gas chromatograph are presented in this research. These measurements were used to develop the first multi-phase EOS for helium-hydrogen mixtures which was implemented into NASA's Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) to determine the significance of mixture non-idealities. It was revealed that having dissolved helium in the propellant does not have a significant effect on the tank pressurization rate but does affect the rate at which the propellant temperature rises. PrhoT-x measurements are conducted on methane-ethane mixtures with dissolved nitrogen gas to simulate the conditions of the hydrocarbon seas of Saturn's moon Titan. Titan is the only known celestial body in the solar system besides Earth with stable liquid seas accessible on the surface. The PrhoT-x measurements are used to develop solubility models to aid in the design of the Titan Submarine. NASA is currently designing the submarine

  17. Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J.; Whitesides, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to ± 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n degrees 19 proposed by BNFL, and to ± 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n degrees 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P IC method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for 238 U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Dissolved oxygen detection by galvanic displacement-induced

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dissolved oxygen detection by galvanic displacement-induced graphene/silver nanocomposite ... dissolved oxygen (DO) detection based on a galvanic displacement synthesized reduced graphene oxide–silver nanoparticles ... Current Issue

  19. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  20. Dissolvable microneedle fabrication using piezoelectric dispensing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Evin A; O'Mahony, Conor; Cronin, Michael; O'Mahony, Thomas; Moore, Anne C; Crean, Abina M

    2016-03-16

    Dissolvable microneedle (DMN) patches are novel dosage forms for the percutaneous delivery of vaccines. DMN are routinely fabricated by dispensing liquid formulations into microneedle-shaped moulds. The liquid formulation within the mould is then dried to create dissolvable vaccine-loaded microneedles. The precision of the dispensing process is critical to the control of formulation volume loaded into each dissolvable microneedle structure. The dispensing process employed must maintain vaccine integrity. Wetting of mould surfaces by the dispensed formulation is also an important consideration for the fabrication of sharp-tipped DMN. Sharp-tipped DMN are essential for ease of percutaneous administration. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of a piezoelectric dispensing system to dispense picolitre formulation volumes into PDMS moulds enabling the fabrication of bilayer DMN. The influence of formulation components (trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) content) and piezoelectric actuation parameters (voltage, frequency and back pressure) on drop formation is described. The biological integrity of a seasonal influenza vaccine following dispensing was investigated and maintained voltage settings of 30 V but undermined at higher settings, 50 and 80 V. The results demonstrate the capability of piezoelectric dispensing technology to precisely fabricate bilayer DMN. They also highlight the importance of identifying formulation and actuation parameters to ensure controlled droplet formulation and vaccine stabilisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissolved inorganic nutrients and chlorophyll on the narrow continental shelf of Eastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Fernandes Eça

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The eastern Brazilian continental shelf is narrow and subject to the influence of a western boundary current system, presenting lower biological productivity than other regions. In this study, the distribution of water masses, dissolved inorganic nutrients, chlorophyll-a and total suspended solids (TSS on the inner shelf (< 35 m depth, between Itacaré and Canavieiras, eastern Brazil, is presented. Sampling surveys were carried out in March and August 2006 and March 2007. Tropical water (TW prevailed during March 2006 and August 2007 with the lower salinity waters (< 36 found in most samples taken in March 2007, reflecting the influence of continental outflow and rain in coastal waters. Low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and Chl-a found were typical of TW and results suggested that the inner shelf waters were depleted in dissolved inorganic nitrogen in August 2006 and March 2007, and in phosphate in March 2006, potentially affecting phytoplankton growth. Stratification of the water column was observed due to differences in dissolved nutrient concentrations, chlorophyll-a and TSS when comparing surface and bottom samples, possibly the result of a colder water intrusion and mixing on the bottom shelf and a deep chlorophyll maximum and/or sediment resuspension effect. Despite this stratification, oceanographic processes such as lateral mixing driven by the Brazil Current as well as a northward alongshore drift driven by winds and tides transporting Coastal Water can lead to an enhanced mixing of these waters promoting some heterogeneity in this oligotrophic environment.

  2. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  3. Mathematical modeling of dissolved oxygen in fish ponds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematical modeling of dissolved oxygen in fish ponds. WJS Mwegoha, ME Kaseva, SMM Sabai. Abstract. A mathematical model was developed to predict the effects of wind speed, light, pH, Temperature, dissolved carbon dioxide and chemical oxygen demand (COD) on Dissolved Oxygen (DO) in fish ponds. The effects ...

  4. HB-Line Dissolver Dilution Flows and Dissolution Capability with Dissolver Charge Chute Cover Off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    A flow test was performed in Scrap Recovery of HB-Line to document the flow available for hydrogen dilution in the dissolvers when the charge chute covers are removed. Air flow through the dissolver charge chutes, with the covers off, was measured. A conservative estimate of experimental uncertainty was subtracted from the results. After subtraction, the test showed that there is 20 cubic feet per minute (cfm) air flow through the dissolvers during dissolution with a glovebox exhaust fan operating, even with the scrubber not operating. This test also showed there is 6.6 cfm air flow through the dissolvers, after subtraction of experimental uncertainty if the scrubber and the glovebox exhaust fans are not operating. Three H-Canyon exhaust fans provide sufficient motive force to give this 6.6 cfm flow. Material charged to the dissolver will be limited to chemical hydrogen generation rates that will be greater than or equal to 25 percent of the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) during normal operations. The H-Canyon fans will maintain hydrogen below LFL if electrical power is lost. No modifications are needed in HB-Line Scrap Recovery to ensure hydrogen is maintained less that LFL if the scrubber and glovebox exhaust fans are not operating

  5. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group-Determination of Dissolved Isoxaflutole and Its Sequential Degradation Products, Diketonitrile and Benzoic Acid, in Water Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael T.; Lee, Edward A.; Scribner, Elisabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of isoxaflutole and its sequential degradation products, diketonitrile and a benzoic acid analogue, in filtered water with varying matrices was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas. Four different water-sample matrices fortified at 0.02 and 0.10 ug/L (micrograms per liter) are extracted by vacuum manifold solid-phase extraction and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization in negative-ion mode with multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM). Analytical conditions for mass spectrometry detection are optimized, and quantitation is carried out using the following MRM molecular-hydrogen (precursor) ion and product (p) ion transition pairs: 357.9 (precursor), 78.9 (p), and 277.6 (p) for isoxaflutole and diketonitrile, and 267.0 (precursor), 159.0 (p), and 223.1 (p) for benzoic acid. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-d3 is used as the internal standard, and alachlor ethanesulfonic acid-d5 is used as the surrogate standard. Compound detection limits and reporting levels are calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures. The mean solid-phase extraction recovery values ranged from 104 to 108 percent with relative standard deviation percentages ranging from 4.0 to 10.6 percent. The combined mean percentage concentration normalized to the theoretical spiked concentration of four water matrices analyzed eight times at 0.02 and 0.10 ug/L (seven times for the reagent-water matrix at 0.02 ug/L) ranged from approximately 75 to 101 percent with relative standard deviation percentages ranging from approximately 3 to 26 percent for isoxaflutole, diketonitrile, and benzoic acid. The method detection limit (MDL) for isoxaflutole and diketonitrile is 0.003 ug/L and 0.004 ug/L for benzoic acid. Method reporting levels (MRLs) are 0.011, 0.010, and 0.012 ug/L for isoxaflutole, diketonitrile, and benzoic acid, respectively. On the basis

  6. Dissolved air flotation of polishing wastewater from semiconductor manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Lien, C Y

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of the dissolved air flotation (DAF) process in treating chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) wastewater was evaluated in this study. Wastewater from a local semiconductor manufacturer was sampled and characterised. Nano-sized silica (77.6 nm) with turbidity of 130 +/- 3 NTU was found in the slightly alkaline wastewater with traces of other pollutants. Experimental results indicated removal efficiency of particles, measured as suspended particle or turbidity, increased with increasing concentration of cationic collector cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). When CTAB concentration was 30 mg/L, pH of 6.5 +/- 0.1 and recycle ratio of 30%, very effective removal of particles (> 98%) was observed in saturation pressure range of 4 to 6 kg/cm2, and the reaction proceeded faster under higher pressure. Similarly, the reaction was faster under the higher recycle ratio, while final removal efficiency improved slightly as the recycle ratio increased from 20 to 40%. An insignificant effect of pH on treatment efficiency was found as pH varied from 4.5 to 8.5. The presence of activator, Al3+ and Fe3+, enhanced the system performance. It is proposed that CTAB adsorbs on silica particles in polishing wastewater through electrostatic interaction and makes particles more hydrophobic. The increase in hydrophobicity results in more effective bubble-particle collisions. In addition, flocculation of silica particles through bridging effect of collector was found; it is believed that flocculation of particles also contributed to flotation. Better attachment between gas bubble and solid, higher buoyancy and higher air to solid ratio all lead to effective flotation.

  7. Nitrogen fixation in the activated sludge treatment of thermomechanical pulping wastewater: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, A H; Anderson, S M; Evans, B G

    2003-01-01

    N-ViroTech, a novel technology which selects for nitrogen-fixing bacteria as the bacteria primarily responsible for carbon removal, has been developed to treat nutrient limited wastewaters to a high quality without the addition of nitrogen, and only minimal addition of phosphorus. Selection of the operating dissolved oxygen level to maximise nitrogen fixation forms a key component of the technology. Pilot scale activated sludge treatment of a thermomechanical pulping wastewater was carried out in nitrogen-fixing mode over a 15 month period. The effect of dissolved oxygen was studied at three levels: 14% (Phase 1), 5% (Phase 2) and 30% (Phase 3). The plant was operated at an organic loading of 0.7-1.1 kg BOD5/m3/d, a solids retention time of approximately 10 d, a hydraulic retention time of 1.4 d and a F:M ratio of 0.17-0.23 mg BOD5/mg VSS/d. Treatment performance was very stable over the three dissolved oxygen operating levels. The plant achieved 94-96% BOD removal, 82-87% total COD removal, 79-87% soluble COD removal, and >99% total extractives removal. The lowest organic carbon removals were observed during operation at 30% DO but were more likely to be due to phosphorus limitation than operation at high dissolved oxygen, as there was a significant decrease in phosphorus entering the plant during Phase 3. Discharge of dissolved nitrogen, ammonium and oxidised nitrogen were consistently low (1.1-1.6 mg/L DKN, 0.1-0.2 mg/L NH4+-N and 0.0 mg/L oxidised nitrogen). Discharge of dissolved phosphorus was 2.8 mg/L, 0.1 mg/L and 0.6 mg/L DRP in Phases 1, 2 and 3 respectively. It was postulated that a population of polyphosphate accumulating bacteria developed during Phase 1. Operation at low dissolved oxygen during Phase 2 appeared to promote biological phosphorus uptake which may have been affected by raising the dissolved oxygen to 30% in Phase 3. Total nitrogen and phosphorus discharge was dependent on efficient secondary clarification, and improved over the course of

  8. Dissolve energy obesity by energy diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Heum [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    2000-07-01

    Every organism takes needed materials or energy from outside and excretes unessential things to outside. This is called a metabolism or energy metabolism. Calculating the amount of energy consumed by human in the world by converting to the amount of metabolism of an animal to survive, the weight of a human being is corresponding to an animal with a weigh of 40 ton. Human beings can find a solution to dissolve energy obesity or can maintain a massive status by finding a new energy source in the universe.

  9. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Matsunaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  10. The measurement of dissolved and gaseous carbon dioxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosel, J.; Oelßner, W.; Decker, M.; Gerlach, G.; Guth, U.

    2011-07-01

    In this review the basic principles of carbon dioxide sensors and their manifold applications in environmental control, biotechnology, biology, medicine and food industry are reported. Electrochemical CO2 sensors based on the Severinghaus principle and solid electrolyte sensors operating at high temperatures have been manufactured and widely applied already for a long time. Besides these, nowadays infrared, non-dispersive infrared and acoustic CO2 sensors, which use physical measuring methods, are being increasingly used in some fields of application. The advantages and drawbacks of the different sensor technologies are outlined. Electrochemical sensors for the CO2 measurement in aqueous media are pointed out in more detail because of their simple setup and the resulting low costs. A detailed knowledge of the basic detection principles and the windows for their applications is necessary to find an appropriate decision on the technology to be applied for measuring dissolved CO2. In particular the pH value and the composition of the analyte matrix exert important influence on the results of the measurements.

  11. The measurement of dissolved and gaseous carbon dioxide concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zosel, J; Oelßner, W; Decker, M; Gerlach, G; Guth, U

    2011-01-01

    In this review the basic principles of carbon dioxide sensors and their manifold applications in environmental control, biotechnology, biology, medicine and food industry are reported. Electrochemical CO 2 sensors based on the Severinghaus principle and solid electrolyte sensors operating at high temperatures have been manufactured and widely applied already for a long time. Besides these, nowadays infrared, non-dispersive infrared and acoustic CO 2 sensors, which use physical measuring methods, are being increasingly used in some fields of application. The advantages and drawbacks of the different sensor technologies are outlined. Electrochemical sensors for the CO 2 measurement in aqueous media are pointed out in more detail because of their simple setup and the resulting low costs. A detailed knowledge of the basic detection principles and the windows for their applications is necessary to find an appropriate decision on the technology to be applied for measuring dissolved CO 2 . In particular the pH value and the composition of the analyte matrix exert important influence on the results of the measurements. (topical review)

  12. Dynamics of dissolved polymer chains in isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shi; Collins, Lance R

    2007-01-01

    Polymers are remarkable molecules that have relaxation times that can span 15 orders of magnitude. The very longest of the relaxation times for high molecular weight polymers are sufficiently long to overlap with fluid mechanical times scales; under those circumstances, polymers can influence the flow. A well-known example that is still not fully understood is polymer drag reduction. It has been known since Toms (1949 Proc. 1st Int. Congress on Rheology 2 135-41) that parts per million (mass basis) concentrations of polymers can reduce the drag on a solid surface by as much as 80%. Understanding the mechanism of drag reduction requires an understanding of the dynamics of the dissolved polymer chain in response to local fluctuations in the turbulent flow field. We investigate this by using Brownian dynamics simulations of bead-spring models of polymers immersed in a turbulent solvent that is separately computed using direct numerical simulations. We observe that polymer chains with parameters that are effective for drag reduction generally remain stretched for long periods of time and only occasionally relax. The relatively restricted configuration space they sample makes it reasonable to represent their behavior with simpler dumbbell models. We also study the spatial structure of the polymer stresses using a Lagrangian strategy. The results explain the need for relatively high spatial resolution for numerical simulations of polymer flows

  13. Distribution of dissolved carbohydrates and uronic acids in a tropical estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Bhosle, N.B.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    , concentrations of total dissolved carbohydrate (TCHO), dissolved polysaccharide (PCHO), dissolved monosaccharide (MCHO), and dissolved uronic acid (URA) were measured in the Mandovi estuary, west coast of India during the monsoon and premonsoon seasons...

  14. Heat and mass transfer involving droplets containing soluble solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, J.L.; Briggs, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    The mass loss and temperature history of aqueous drops containing dissolved solids were measured under varying conditions of air velocity and temperature. The data taken from these drops were compared with the computer solution to a diffusional model. Very good agreement was obtained

  15. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  16. Energy Harvesting, Electrode Processes and the Partitioning and Speciation of Solid Phase Iron and Sulfur in Marine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reimers, Clare

    2003-01-01

    .... Sediment, pore water and electrode surface analyses indicated that electricity product ion is coupled to the oxidation of dissolved and solid-phase forms of reduced sulfur supplied from the sediments...

  17. Temperature dependence of photodegradation of dissolved organic matter to dissolved inorganic carbon and particulate organic carbon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, P. J.; Molot, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2015), e0128884 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/0781; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09721S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dissolved organic carbon * particulate organic carbon * photodegradation * temperature Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  18. The release of dissolved nutrients and metals from coastal sediments due to resuspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnejais, Linda H.; Martin, William R.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    quantity of solid phase metals to the more bioavailable and mobile dissolved phase. The relative importance of sediment resuspension as a source of dissolved metals to Boston Harbor is expected to increase as continuing pollutant control decreases the inputs from other sources. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Influence of dissolved organic carbon on the efficiency of P sequestration by a lanthanum modified clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Line; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Lundberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory scale experiment was set up to test the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as ageing of the La–P complex formed during phosphorus (P) sequestration by a La modified clay (Phoslock®). Short term (7 days) P adsorption studies revealed a significant negative effect of added...... DOC on the P sequestration of Phoslock®, whereas a long-term P adsorption experiment revealed that the negative effect of added DOC was reduced with time. The reduced P binding efficiency is kinetic, as evident from solid-state 31P magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, who showed that the P...

  20. Colored dissolved organic matter in Tampa Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Hu, C.; Conmy, R.N.; Muller-Karger, F.; Swarzenski, P.

    2007-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorophyll and total suspended solids in Tampa Bay and its adjacent rivers were examined in June and October of 2004. Except in Old Tampa Bay (OTB), the spatial distribution of CDOM showed a conservative relationship with salinity in June, 2004 (aCDOM(400) = − 0.19 × salinity + 6.78, R2 = 0.98, n = 17, salinity range = 1.1–32.5) with little variations in absorption spectral slope and fluorescence efficiency. This indicates that CDOM distribution was dominated by mixing. In October, 2004, CDOM distribution was nonconservative with an average absorption coefficient (aCDOM(400), ∼ 7.76 m-1) about seven times higher than that in June (∼ 1.11 m-1). The nonconservative behavior was caused largely by CDOM removal at intermediate salinities (e.g., aCDOM(400) removal > 15% at salinity ∼ 13.0), which likely resulted from photobleaching due to stronger stratification. The spatial and seasonal distributions of CDOM in Tampa Bay showed that the two largest rivers, the Alafia River (AR) and Hillsborough River (HR) were dominant CDOM sources to most of the bay. In OTB, however, CDOM showed distinctive differences: lower absorption coefficient, higher absorption spectral slopes, and lower ratios of CDOM absorption to DOC and higher fluorescence efficiency. These differences may have stemmed from (1) changes in CDOM composition by more intensive photobleaching due to the longer residence time of water mass in OTB; (2) other sources of CDOM than the HR/AR inputs, such as local creeks, streams, groundwater, and/or bottom re-suspension. Average CDOM absorption in Tampa Bay at 443 nm, aCDOM(443), was about five times higher in June and about ten times higher in October than phytoplankton pigment absorption, aph(443), indicating that blue light attenuation in the water column was dominated by CDOM rather than by phytoplankton absorption throughout the

  1. Effect of dissolved oxygen on SCC of LP turbine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, W. C.

    2002-01-01

    Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) were carried out to investigate the effect of dissolved oxygen on Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) susceptibility of 3.5NiCrMoV steels used in discs of Low-Pressure (LP) steam turbines in electric power generating plants. The influence of dissolved oxygen on cracking in water was studied; for this purpose, specimens were strained to fracture at 150 .deg. C in water environments with various amounts of dissolved oxygen. The maximum elongation of the turbine steel decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. Dissolved oxygen significantly affected the SCC susceptibility of turbine steel in water. The increase of the SCC susceptibility of the turbine steel in a higher dissolved oxygen environment is due to the non protectiveness of the oxide layer of the turbine steel surface and the increase of corrosion current

  2. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Radiation-chemical disinfection of dissolved impurities and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities formed in the production processes of different materials, while modern plants being in use, is considered. For the first time the processes of deep industrial waste detoxication and due to this peculiarities of practically thorough neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities are considered. Attention is paid to devices and economic factors of neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities. The role of radiation-chemical detoxication for environment protection is considered

  4. Method to Estimate the Dissolved Air Content in Hydraulic Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify the air content in hydraulic fluid, an instrument was needed to measure the dissolved air content before the fluid was loaded into the system. The instrument also needed to measure the dissolved air content in situ and in real time during the de-aeration process. The current methods used to measure the dissolved air content require the fluid to be drawn from the hydraulic system, and additional offline laboratory processing time is involved. During laboratory processing, there is a potential for contamination to occur, especially when subsaturated fluid is to be analyzed. A new method measures the amount of dissolved air in hydraulic fluid through the use of a dissolved oxygen meter. The device measures the dissolved air content through an in situ, real-time process that requires no additional offline laboratory processing time. The method utilizes an instrument that measures the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. By using a standardized calculation procedure that relates the oxygen partial pressure to the volume of dissolved air in solution, the dissolved air content is estimated. The technique employs luminescent quenching technology to determine the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. An estimated Henry s law coefficient for oxygen and nitrogen in hydraulic fluid is calculated using a standard method to estimate the solubility of gases in lubricants. The amount of dissolved oxygen in the hydraulic fluid is estimated using the Henry s solubility coefficient and the measured partial pressure of oxygen in solution. The amount of dissolved nitrogen that is in solution is estimated by assuming that the ratio of dissolved nitrogen to dissolved oxygen is equal to the ratio of the gas solubility of nitrogen to oxygen at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The technique was performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The technique could be theoretically carried out at higher pressures and elevated

  5. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  6. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO 2 as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with 231 Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise

  7. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  8. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  9. The size distribution of dissolved uranium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, D.K.; Wong, G.T.F.

    1987-01-01

    The size distribution of dissolved uranium in natural waters is poorly known. Some fraction of dissolved uranium is known to associate with organic matter which had a wide range of molecular weights. The presence of inorganic colloidal uranium has not been reported. Ultrafiltration has been used to quantify the size distribution of a number of elements, such as dissolved organic carbon, selenium, and some trace metals, in both the organic and/or the inorganic forms. The authors have applied this technique to dissolved uranium and the data are reported here

  10. Nanocellular foam with solid flame retardant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Kelly-Rowley, Anne M.; Bunker, Shana P.; Costeux, Stephane

    2017-11-21

    Prepare nanofoam by (a) providing an aqueous solution of a flame retardant dissolved in an aqueous solvent, wherein the flame retardant is a solid at 23.degree. C. and 101 kiloPascals pressure when in neat form; (b) providing a fluid polymer composition selected from a solution of polymer dissolved in a water-miscible solvent or a latex of polymer particles in a continuous aqueous phase; (c) mixing the aqueous solution of flame retardant with the fluid polymer composition to form a mixture; (d) removing water and, if present, solvent from the mixture to produce a polymeric composition having less than 74 weight-percent flame retardant based on total polymeric composition weight; (e) compound the polymeric composition with a matrix polymer to form a matrix polymer composition; and (f) foam the matrix polymer composition into nanofoam having a porosity of at least 60 percent.

  11. Interference of dissolved salts in Cerenkov and liquid scintillation estimation of 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulhani, Vandana; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Reddy, Priyanka; Bhade, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Quenching is the most important effect occurring in Cerenkov and LSC because it affects the efficiency of conversion of β particles into light. Bore well water samples are very often concentrated by evaporation to reduce the detection limit which can also increase the dissolved solid content (TDS) in the sample. Some ground waters are inherently having higher TDS. Self-absorption of beta-particle radiation by the sample especially the lower-energy beta particles depends on sample thickness and density. Environmental samples, after applying the radiochemical procedure, are also estimated by Cerenkov/LSC and might be affected by colour quenching. To get best measurements using Liquid Scintillation and Cerenkov radiations, it is necessary to avoid high salt concentrations and colors which may weaken energy transfers within scintillator cocktails and sample medium. Therefore the degree of self-absorption and quench should be evaluated and taken into account in the calibration. Efficiency is represented as a function spectral quench parameter of external standard SQP(E). The quenching effect of dissolved solids on the efficiency of estimation of 90 Sr by Cerenkov and Liquid Scintillation are studied

  12. Role of natural dissolved organic compounds in determining the concentrations of americium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Orlandini, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of 241 Am, both in solution and bound to suspended particulate matter, have been measured in several North American lakes. Dissolved concentrations vary from 0.4 μBq/L to 85 μBq/L. The 241 Am in these lakes originated solely from global fallout and hence entered all lakes in the same physiocochemical form. The observed differences in solubility behavior must, therefore, be attributable to chemical and/or hydrological differences among the lakes. Concentrations of dissolved 241 Am are highly correlated with the corresponding concentrations of /sup 239, 240/Pu(III,IV), suggesting that a common factor is responsible for maintaining both in solution. The K/sub D/ values for 241 Am and /sup 239, 240/Pu(III,IV) are highly correlated with the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the waters, suggesting that the common factor is the formation of soluble complexes with natural DOC for both elements. This hypothesis was tested in a series of laboratory experiments in which the DOC from several of the lakes was isolated by ultrafiltration. Plots of K/sub D/, as a function of DOC concentration, show K/sub D/ to be very high (approx.10 6 ) at low DOC concentrations. Above critical concentrations (a few mg/L DOC) the K/sub D/ values begin a progressive decrease with increasing DOC. We conclude that in most surface waters, the dissolved 241 Am concentration is regulated by an adsorption/desorption equilibrium with the sediments (and suspended solids) and the value of K/sub D/ that characterizes this equilibrium is largely determined by the concentration of natural DOC in the water. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Solids loading evaluation for HB-line scrap recovery filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowder, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    The HB-Line Scrap Recovery facility uses wire screen filters to remove solids from plutonium-containing solutions transferred from the slab tank dissolvers. At times, the accumulation of solids is large enough to cause blinding (i.e., pluggage) of the filters. If the solids contain undissolved plutonium, significant accumulation of fissile material could impact operations. To address this potential issue, experiments were performed to define the minimum solids required to completely blind a filter. The solids loading experiments were performed by arranging 25- and 10-microm HB-Line filters in series to simulate the equipment in the scrap recovery process. Separate tests were performed using coarse and fine glass frit and cerium oxide powder suspended in 35 wt% sodium nitrate solution using a small turbine mixer. The solution and solids were transferred from a reservoir through the filter housings by vacuum. In each case, the 25-microm filter blinded first and was full of wet cake. After drying and accounting for the sodium nitrate in the filter cake, the following results were obtained. The results of the solids loading tests demonstrated that at least 800 g of solids accumulated in the filter housing before flow stopped. The actual amount of collected material was dependent upon the physical properties of the solids such as density and particle size. The mass of solids collected by the blinded 25-microm filter increased when successively finer solids were used in the experiments. Based on these results, one should anticipate that filters in the HB-Line Scrap Recovery Facility have the potential to collect similar quantities of material before transfer of solution from the dissolvers is severely impacted

  14. Recovery of krypton-85 from dissolver off-gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, J.P.; Lamb, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Rare Gas Plant at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Recovers fission product krypton and xenon from dissolver off gas streams. Recently the system was upgraded to allow processing of hydrogen rich dissolver off-gas streams. A trickle bed hydrogen recombiner was installed and tested. The Rare Gas Plant can now safely process gas streams containing up to 80% hydrogen

  15. The dependence on temperature and salinity of dissolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Dorothee C.E.; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Jong, Edwin de

    1999-01-01

    Recurring latitudinal patterns of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content and the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2) were observed in East Atlantic surface waters with strong gradients at hydrographic fronts. The dissolved inorganic carbon chemistry clearly displayed the effects of oceanic circulation and

  16. Radiation-chemical sanitation of dissolved pollutants and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical sanitation of dissolved toxic pollutants resulted from the production processes of different substances and modern equipment operation is considered. The processes of fundamental industrial sewage processing and, as a result, features of practically total disposal of dissolved toxic agents are considered for the first time

  17. Formulation of Fast-Dissolving Tablets of Promethazine Theoclate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To optimize and formulate promethazine theoclate fast-dissolving tablets that offer a suitable approach to the treatment of nausea and vomiting. Method: The solubility of promethazine theoclate was increased by formulating it as a fast-dissolving tablet containing β-cyclodextrin, crospovidone, and camphor, using ...

  18. Fast Dissolving Tablets of Aloe Vera Gel | Madan | Tropical Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The objective of this work was to prepare and evaluate fast dissolving tablets of the nutraceutical, freeze dried Aloe vera gel. Methods: Fast dissolving tablets of the nutraceutical, freeze-dried Aloe vera gel, were prepared by dry granulation method. The tablets were evaluated for crushing strength, disintegration ...

  19. Microbial degradation of dissolved proteins in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollibaugh, J.T.; Azam, F.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental protocol using radiolabeled proteins was developed to investigate the rates and mechanisms whereby dissolved proteins are degraded in natural marine plankton communities. The results of field observations and laboratory experiments indicate that proteins are degraded by a particle-bound, thermolabile system, presumably bacteria-associated enzymes, with an apparent half-saturation constant of ca. 25 μg bovine serum albumin (BSA) per liter. Gel permeation chromatography indicated that peptides of chain length intermediate between BSA and the final products of degradation (MW<700) do not accumulate in the medium. Competition experiments indicate that the system is relatively nonspecific. Turnover rates for the protein pool in samples collected in the Southern California Bight were of the same order of magnitude as the turnover rate of the L-leucine pool and were correlated with primary productivity, chlorophyll a concentrations, bacterial abundance and biomass, and L-leucine turnover rate. These data suggest that amino acids derived from proteins are utilized preferentially and do not completely mix with the amino acids in the bulk phase

  20. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-01-01

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese 'just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself 'with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties

  1. Optimizing dissolved air flotation design system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Féris

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved Air (Pressure Flotation-DAF, is a well-established separation process that employs micro-bubbles as a carrier phase. This work shows results concerning bubble generation at low working pressures in modified DAF-units to improve the collection of fragile coagula by bubbles. DAF of Fe (OH3 (as model was studied as a function of saturation pressure in the absence and presence of surfactants in the saturator. DAF was possible at 2 atm by lowering the air/water surface tension. This fact, which leads to substantial energy savings, was explained in terms of decreasing the "minimum" energy required for bubble nucleation and cavity in the nozzle. More, bubbles-fragile coagula attachment was improved by dividing the recycling water into two: 1 the inclined inlet to the cell (traditional and 2 inside the separation tank through a water flow inlet situated below the floating bed using a "mushroom" type diffuser. Because of the reduction observed in the degree of turbulence in the conventional collection zone, DAF performance improved yielding high precipitate recoveries.

  2. Statics of deformable solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bisplinghoff, Raymond L; Pian, Theodore HH

    2014-01-01

    Profusely illustrated exposition of fundamentals of solid mechanics and principles of mechanics, statics, and simple statically indeterminate systems. Covers strain and stress in three-dimensional solids, elementary elasticity, energy principles in solid continuum, and more. 1965 edition.

  3. Influence of colloidal dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the sorption of plutonium on natural sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Karttunen, J.O.; Mehlhoff, P.

    1982-01-01

    It now appears possible to formulate a practical model to describe the absorption of Pu(IV) by suspended solids. In such a model the constants describing the association of plutonium with both soluble organics and solid adsorbers must be known, as well as any variation in these constants due to solution properties such as pH and ionic strength. If the complexing ability of dissolved organic carbon is sufficiently constant, such a model could describe plutonium behavior in a wide variety of surface and ground waters. Observations to date indicate that the variation in K/sub D/ (K/sub D/ = concentration of Pu(IV) in suspended solids divided by the concentration of Pu(IV) in the water) among water bodies is due primarily to differences in water chemistry and that differences in the character of the absorbing solid are less important. The mathematical relationship and parameter values presented in this report adequately describe the adsorption of Pu(IV) on one-specific sediment

  4. The effects of particles and dissolved materials on in situ algal pigment fluorescence sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, J.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Field deployable sensors that measure algal pigment fluorescence (APF), such as chlorophyll-a (excitation/emission ca. 470/685 nm), and phycocyanin (ca. 590/685 nm), have been used to estimate algal biomass and study food-web dynamics in coastal and oceanic waters for many years. There is also widespread use of these sensors in real time river-observing networks. However, freshwater systems often possess elevated levels of suspended solids and dissolved organic material that can interfere with optical measurements. Data collected under conditions that result in interferences may not be comparable across time and between sites unless the data are appropriately corrected. Using standard reference materials and a surrogate for algal fluorescence (Rhodamine WT), lab experiments were conducted on several commercially available sensors to quantify sensitivity to interferences over a range of naturally occurring surface water conditions (DOC : 0-30 mg/L and turbidity: 0- 1000 FNU ). Chlorophyll-a sensors exhibited a slight but significant positive bias (2 mg/L, with signal quenching reaching a maximum of 15% at 30 mg/L DOC. All phycocyanin sensors displayed a positive non-linear bias with DOC concentration, reaching a maximum of 40% difference at 30 mg/L DOC. Both chlorophyll-a and phycocyanin sensors showed a positive linear relationship with suspended solids concentration (as indicated by turbidity).The effect of suspended solids on APF output can be explained by the detection of scattered excitation light (leaking through emission filters). Similar qualitative effects were observed for the sensors tested, though the magnitude of the effect varied among sensor type. This indicates that differences in sensor designs such as geometry, wavelength and signal post processing techniques is related to its sensitivity to interferences. Although sensors exhibited significant cross sensitivity to interferences, our results indicate that simple corrections can largely remove

  5. Theoretical solid state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Research activities at ORNL in theoretical solid state physics are described. Topics covered include: surface studies; particle-solid interactions; electronic and magnetic properties; and lattice dynamics

  6. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-09-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  7. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G.M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  8. Ecological consequences of elevated total dissolved solids associated with fossil fuel extraction in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossil fuel burning is considered a major contributor to global climate change. The outlook for production and consumption of fossil fuels int he US indicates continued growth to support growing energy demands. For example, coal-generated electricity is projected ot increase from...

  9. Dissolved Air Flotation of arsenic adsorbent particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Enrique Santander Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of arsenic from synthetic effluent was studied using the adsorbent particle flotation technique (APF and dissolved air flotation (DAF. A sample of an iron mineral was used as adsorbent particles of arsenic, ferric chloride as coagulant, cationic poly-acrylamide (NALCO 9808 as flocculants, and sodium oleate as collector. Adsorption studies to determine the pH influence, contact time, and adsorbent particles concentration on the adsorption of arsenic were carried out along with flotation studies to determine the removal efficiency of adsorbents particles. The results achieved indicate that the adsorption kinetic of arsenic is very rapid and that in range of pH’s from 2 to 7 the adsorption percentages remain constant. The equilibrium conditions were achieved in 60 minutes and about 95% of arsenic was adsorbed when used an adsorbent concentration of 2 g/L and pH 6.3. The maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent particles was 4.96 mg/g. The mean free energy of adsorption (E was found to be 2.63 kJ/mol, which suggests physisorption. The results of the flotation studies demonstrated that when synthetic effluents with 8.9 mg/L of arsenic were treated under the following experimental conditions; 2 g/L of adsorbent particles, 120 mg/L of Fe(III, 2 mg/L of Nalco 9808, 20 mg/L of sodium oleate, and 40% of recycle ratio in the DAF, it was possible to reach 98% of arsenic removal and 6.3 NTU of residual turbidity in clarified synthetic effluent.

  10. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  11. ???????????? SolidWorks/SolidWorks Flow Simulation/SolidWorks Simulation ??? ?????????? ???????? ?? ????????????? ???

    OpenAIRE

    ????????????, ?. ?.; ????????, ?. ?.; ?????, ?. ?.

    2012-01-01

    ? ?????? ???????? ??????? ??????? ???????? ?? ???????????? ??????????? ????????? SolidWorks/SolidWorks Flow Simulation (COSMOSFloWorks)/SolidWorks Simulation ??? ?????????? ???????? ?? ????????????? ???. ??? ???????? ????????? ???????? ?????????? ?? ?????? ???????? ??????? ? ????????????? ?????? ? ????????????? ????????????? ?????????? ???????????? SolidWorks Flow Simulation (COSMOSFloWorks). ??? ???????????? ??????????? ????????????? ?????? ?? ????????? ??????????? ??????? ?? ??????????? ...

  12. Evaluation of water quality by chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, Z.; Tasneem, M.A.; Javed, T.; Butt, S.; Fazil, M.; Ali, M.; Sajjad, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of Chlorophyll and dissolved Oxygen on water quality. Kalar Kahar and Rawal lakes were selected for this research. A Spectrophotometer was used for determination of Chlorophyll a, Chlorophyll b, Chlorophyll c and Pheophytin pigment. Dissolved Oxygen was measured in situ, using dissolved oxygen meter. The gamma O/sup 18/ of dissolved Oxygen, like concentration, is affected primarily by three processes: air water gas exchange, respiration and photosynthesis; gamma O/sup 18/ is analyzed on isotopic ratio mass spectrometer, after extraction of dissolved Oxygen from water samples, followed by purification and conversion into CO/sub 2/. Rawal lake receives most of the water from precipitation during monsoon period and supplemented by light rains in December and January. This water is used throughout the year for drinking purposes in Rawalpindi city. The water samples were collected from 5, 7.5, and 10 meters of depth for seasonal studies of physiochemical and isotopic parameters of water and dissolved Oxygen. Optimum experimental conditions for delta O/sup 18/ analysis of dissolved Oxygen from aqueous samples were determined. Stratification of dissolved Oxygen was observed in Rawal Lake before rainy season in summer. The water quality deteriorates with depth, because the respiration exceeds the photosynthesis and gas exchange. The concentration and delta O/sup 18/ of dissolved Oxygen show no variation with depth in 1998 winter sampling. Kalar Kahar lake gets water from springs, which are recharged by local rains on the nearby mountains. It is a big lake, with shallow and uniform depth of nearly 1.5 meters. A lot of vegetation can be seen on the periphery of the lake. Algae have grown on the floor of the lake Water samples were collected from the corner with large amount of vegetation and from the center of the lake for dissolved Oxygen and Chlorophyll measurements. Chlorophyll result shows that Kalar Kahar Lake falls in Eutrophic category

  13. Cold Dissolved Saltcake Waste Simulant Development, Preparation, and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Sell, Rachel L.

    2003-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. is identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission. Bulk vitrification, containerized grout, and steam reforming are three technologies under consideration for treatment of the radioactive saltcake wastes in 68 single-shell tanks. To support development and testing of these technologies, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with developing a cold dissolved saltcake simulant formulation to be representative of an actual saltcake waste stream, preparing 25- and 100-L batches of the simulant, and analyzing the composition of the batches to ensure conformance to formulation targets. Lacking a defined composition for dissolved actual saltcake waste, PNNL used available tank waste composition information and an equilibrium chemistry model (Environmental Simulation Program [ESP(trademark)]) to predict the concentrations of analytes in solution. Observations of insoluble solids in initial laboratory preparations for the model-predicted formulation prompted reductions in the concentration of phosphate and silicon in the final simulant formulation. The analytical results for the 25- and 100-L simulant batches, prepared by an outside vendor to PNNL specifications, agree within the expected measurement accuracy (∼10%) of the target concentrations and are highly consistent for replicate measurements, with a few minor exceptions. In parallel with the production of the 2nd simulant batch (100-L), a 1-L laboratory control sample of the same formulation was carefully prepared at PNNL to serve as an analytical standard. The instrumental analyses indicate that the vendor prepared batches of solution adequately reflect the as-formulated simulant composition. In parallel with the simulant development effort, a nominal 5-M (molar) sodium actual waste solution was prepared at the Hanford Site from a limited number of tank waste samples. Because this actual waste solution w

  14. Solid lubricants and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Braithwaite, E R

    1964-01-01

    Solid Lubricants and Surfaces deals with the theory and use of solid lubricants, particularly in colloidal form. Portions of this book are devoted to graphite and molybdenum disulfides, which are widely used solid lubricants in colloidal form. An extensive literature on the laboratory examination of hundreds of solids as potential lubricants is also provided in this text. Other topics discussed include the metals and solid lubricants; techniques for examining surfaces; other solid lubricants; metal shaping; and industrial uses of solid-lubricant dispersions. This publication is beneficial to e

  15. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola; Encina, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter...

  16. Remote repair of the dissolvers in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yosikuni

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai fuel reprocessing plant, there occurred failures (pinholes) in two dissolver tanks successively in 1982 and 1983. These dissolvers are set under high radiation field, not permitting access of the personnel. So, repair works were carried out after development of the remotely operated repair system. For repair of the failed dissolver tanks, after tests and studies, the means was employed of grinding off the wall surface to small depth and then forming over it a corrosion resistant sealing layer by padding welding. The repair system which enabled the repair and the inspection in the cell by remote operation consisted of six devices including polishing, welding, dye penetration test, etc. Repair works on the dissolvers took two months and a half from September 1983. (Mori, K.)

  17. Formulation of Fast-Dissolving Tablets of Promethazine Theoclate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    tablet containing β-cyclodextrin, crospovidone, and camphor, using direct compression method. A 33 full factorial design ... fast dissolving tablets (FDT) is the use of ... All the raw materials were passed ..... delivery systems: critical review in.

  18. DGT measurement of dissolved aluminum species in waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Bennett, William W.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum is acutely toxic, and elevated concentrations of dissolved Al can have detrimental effects on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Robust analytical methods that can determine environmentally relevant Al fractions accurately and efficiently are required by the environmental monitoring...

  19. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is essential for respiration in aquatic fauna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    more, thermal and salinity stratification inhibits ex- change of ... 2000) and larval densities (Harris and. Cyrus 1999) ...... dissolved oxygen and effects of short-term oxygen stress ... in the shrimp Crangon crangon exposed to hypoxia, anoxia.

  20. Dissolved helium and TDS in groundwater from Bhavnagar in Gujarat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    2003-01-02

    Jan 2, 2003 ... by enhanced pumping of old groundwater with relatively higher concentration of dissolved helium and salt .... solubility changes due to these (Weiss 1971) can- ... aquifers and relatively low helium concentra- .... permeability.

  1. Solid waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Golomeova, Saska; Zhezhova, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Waste is unwanted or useless materials from households, industry, agriculture, hospitals. Waste materials in solid state are classified as solid waste. Increasing of the amount of solid waste and the pressure what it has on the environment, impose the need to introduce sustainable solid waste management. Advanced sustainable solid waste management involves several activities at a higher level of final disposal of the waste management hierarchy. Minimal use of material and energy resources ...

  2. Sample Results from MCU Solids Outage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22

    additional details are provided below as recommendations. From this point on, IC-Anions analyses of the DSSHT should be part of the monthly routine analysis in order to spot negative trends in the oxalate leaving the MCU system. Care must be taken to monitor the oxalate content to watch for sudden precipitation of oxalate salts in the system; Conduct a study to optimize the cleaning strategy at ARP-MCU through decreasing the concentration or entirely eliminating the oxalic acid; The contents of the SSFT should remain unagitated. Routine visual observation should be maintained to ensure there is not a large buildup of solids. As water with agitation provided sufficient removal of the solids in the feed tank, it should be considered as a good means for dissolving oxalate solids if they are found in the future; Conduct a study to improve prediction of oxalate solubility in salt batch feed materials. As titanium and mercury have been found in various solids in this report, evaluate if either element plays a role in oxalate solubility during processing; Salt batch characterization focuses primarily on characterization and testing of unaltered Tank 21H material; however, non-typical feeds are developed through cleaning, washing, and/or sump transfers. As these solutions are processed through MCU, they may precipitate solids or reduce performance. Salt batch characterization and testing should be expanded to encompass a broader range of feeds that may be processed through ARPMCU.

  3. Removal of both dissolved and particulate iron from groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    H. van Dijk; H. Leijssen; L. Rietveld; A. Abrahamse; K. Teunissen

    2008-01-01

    Iron is the primary source for discolouration problems in the drinking water distribution system. The removal of iron from groundwater is a common treatment step in the production of drinking water. Even when clear water meets the drinking water standards, the water quality in the distribution system can deteriorate due to settling of iron (hydroxide) particles or post-treatment flocculation of dissolved iron. Therefore it is important to remove dissolved and particulate iron to a large exten...

  4. Monte Carlo criticality analysis for dissolvers with neutron poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Deshun; Dong, Xiufang; Pu, Fuxiang.

    1987-01-01

    Criticality analysis for dissolvers with neutron poison is given on the basis of Monte Carlo method. In Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron group parameters for fuel pieces, neutron transport length is determined in terms of maximum cross section approach. A set of related effective multiplication factors (K eff ) are calculated by Monte Carlo method for the three cases. Related numerical results are quite useful for the design and operation of this kind of dissolver in the criticality safety analysis. (author)

  5. Utilizing Colored Dissolved Organic Matter to Derive Dissolved Black Carbon Export by Arctic Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, Aron; Spencer, Robert; Mann, Paul; Holmes, R.; McClelland, James; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires have produced black carbon (BC) since land plants emerged. Condensed aromatic compounds, a form of BC, have accumulated to become a major component of the soil carbon pool. Condensed aromatics leach from soils into rivers, where they are termed dissolved black carbon (DBC). The transport of DBC by rivers to the sea is a major term in the global carbon and BC cycles. To estimate Arctic river DBC export, 25 samples collected from the six largest Arctic rivers (Kolyma, Lena, Mackenzie, Ob’, Yenisey and Yukon) were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and DBC. A simple, linear regression between DOC and DBC indicated that DBC accounted for 8.9 ± 0.3% DOC exported by Arctic rivers. To improve upon this estimate, an optical proxy for DBC was developed based upon the linear correlation between DBC concentrations and CDOM light absorption coefficients at 254 nm (a254). Relatively easy to measure a254 values were determined for 410 Arctic river samples between 2004 and 2010. Each of these a254 values was converted to a DBC concentration based upon the linear correlation, providing an extended record of DBC concentration. The extended DBC record was coupled with daily discharge data from the six rivers to estimate riverine DBC loads using the LOADEST modeling program. The six rivers studied cover 53% of the pan-Arctic watershed and exported 1.5 ± 0.1 million tons of DBC per year. Scaling up to the full area of the pan-Arctic watershed, we estimate that Arctic rivers carry 2.8 ± 0.3 million tons of DBC from land to the Arctic Ocean each year. This equates to ~8% of Arctic river DOC export, slightly less than indicated by the simpler DBC vs DOC correlation-based estimate. Riverine discharge is predicted to increase in a warmer Arctic. DBC export was positively correlated with river runoff, suggesting that the export of soil BC to the Arctic Ocean is likely to increase as the Arctic warms.

  6. Utilizing Colored Dissolved Organic Matter to Derive Dissolved Black Carbon Export by Arctic Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron eStubbins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires have produced black carbon (BC since land plants emerged. Condensed aromatic compounds, a form of BC, have accumulated to become a major component of the soil carbon pool. Condensed aromatics leach from soils into rivers, where they are termed dissolved black carbon (DBC. The transport of DBC by rivers to the sea is a major term in the global carbon and BC cycles. To estimate Arctic river DBC export, 25 samples collected from the six largest Arctic rivers (Kolyma, Lena, Mackenzie, Ob’, Yenisey and Yukon were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, and DBC. A simple, linear regression between DOC and DBC indicated that DBC accounted for 8.9 ± 0.3% DOC exported by Arctic rivers. To improve upon this estimate, an optical proxy for DBC was developed based upon the linear correlation between DBC concentrations and CDOM light absorption coefficients at 254 nm (a254. Relatively easy to measure a254 values were determined for 410 Arctic river samples between 2004 and 2010. Each of these a254 values was converted to a DBC concentration based upon the linear correlation, providing an extended record of DBC concentration. The extended DBC record was coupled with daily discharge data from the six rivers to estimate riverine DBC loads using the LOADEST modeling program. The six rivers studied cover 53% of the pan-Arctic watershed and exported 1.5 ± 0.1 million tons of DBC per year. Scaling up to the full area of the pan-Arctic watershed, we estimate that Arctic rivers carry 2.8 ± 0.3 million tons of DBC from land to the Arctic Ocean each year. This equates to ~8% of Arctic river DOC export, slightly less than indicated by the simpler DBC vs DOC correlation-based estimate. Riverine discharge is predicted to increase in a warmer Arctic. DBC export was positively correlated with river runoff, suggesting that the export of soil BC to the Arctic Ocean is likely to increase as the Arctic warms.

  7. Solid solutions of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and niobium-molybdenum alloys with varying atomic fraction of molybdenum from 0.15 to 0.75 was measured on the temperature range of 673 0 K to 1273 0 k for one atmosphere hydrogen pressure. The experimental technique involved the saturation of the solvent metal or alloy with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. The results obtained of hydrogen solubility are consistent with the quasi-regular model for the dilute interstitial solid solutions. The partial molar enthalpy and partial molar entropy in excess of the dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from data of solubility versus reciprocal doping temperature. The variation of the relative partial molar enthalpy of hydrogen dissolved in niobium-molybdenum alloys, with the increase of molybdenum content of the alloy was analized. (Author) [pt

  8. Accumulation of dissolved gases at hydrophobic surfaces in water and sodium chloride solutions: Implications for coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampton, M.A.; Nguyen, A.V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Division of Chemical Engineering

    2009-08-15

    Dissolved gases can preferentially accumulate at the hydrophobic solid-water interface as revealed by neutron reflectivity measurements. In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to examine accumulation of dissolved gases at a hydrophobic surface in water and sodium chloride solutions. The solvent-exchange method was used to artificially form gaseous domains accumulated at the interface suitable for AFM imaging. Smooth graphite surfaces were used as model surfaces to minimize the secondary effect of surface roughness on the imaging. The concentration of NaCl up to 1 M was found to have a negligible influence on the geometry and population of pre-existing nanobubbles, nanopancakes and nanobubble-nanopancake composites. The implications of the findings on coal flotation in saline water are discussed in terms of attraction between hydrophobic surfaces in water, bubble-particle attachment and hydrophobic coagulation between particles.

  9. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Partitioning of PCBs in Dissolver Solution After Neutralization/Precipitation (Caustic Adjustment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Hoppe, E.W.; Mong, G.M.; Silvers, K.L.; Slate, S.O.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the work described in this report was to gain a better understanding of how PCB congeners present in a simulated K Basin sludge dissolver solution will partition upon neutralization and precipitation (i.e., caustic adjustment). In a previous study (Mong et al. 1998),the entire series of sludge conditioning steps (acid dissolution, filtration, and caustic adjustment) were examined during integrated testing. In the work described here, the caustic adjustment step was isolated to examine the fate of PCBs in more detail within this processing step. For this testing, solutions of dissolver simulant (containing no solids) with a known initial concentration of PCB congeners were neutralized with caustic to generate a clarified supernatant and a settled sludge phase. PCBs were quantified in each phase (including the PCBs associated with the test vessel rinsates), and material balance information was collected

  10. Dissolved Vanillin as Tracer for Estuarine Lignin Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelkraut, F.

    1996-12-01

    Lignin is produced only by vascular plants and therefore can be used as a tracer for terrestrial organic carbon input to the estuarine and marine environments. Lignin measurements have been done by analyses of the oxidation products such as vanillin or 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. In the Elbe Estuary, free dissolved vanillin was analysed in order to test whether such measurements yield information on terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary and on the vanillin derived from lignin oxidation. In the period 1990-1992, concentrations of dissolved vanillin in the Elbe ranged from 0 to 60 μ g l -1(mean: 8 μg l -1). Higher values were found in areas of increased microbial activity such as the turbidity zone and the river mouth where the water chemistry is influenced by large tidal flats. No correlation was found between dissolved vanillin and suspended matter concentrations, although lignin is normally associated with suspended particulate matter, nor was a covariance seen between dissolved vanillin and the terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary. Apparently, biological conversion of lignin was faster than the transport processes, and local sources were more dominant for the vanillin concentration than riverine sources. The dissolved vanillin turnover was fast and, consequently, a significant amount of lignin may be converted within an estuary. In sediments from the Estuary, the concentrations of dissolved vanillin were similar to those found in the water phase and showed no clear vertical profile. The sediment is unlikely to be the source for vanillin.

  11. On the losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Villaume, Sandra; Jeandet, Philippe; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume

    2010-08-11

    Pouring champagne into a glass is far from being consequenceless with regard to its dissolved CO(2) concentration. Measurements of losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving were done from a bottled Champagne wine initially holding 11.4 +/- 0.1 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2). Measurements were done at three champagne temperatures (i.e., 4, 12, and 18 degrees C) and for two different ways of serving (i.e., a champagne-like and a beer-like way of serving). The beer-like way of serving champagne was found to impact its concentration of dissolved CO(2) significantly less. Moreover, the higher the champagne temperature is, the higher its loss of dissolved CO(2) during the pouring process, which finally constitutes the first analytical proof that low temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps it to retain its effervescence during the pouring process. The diffusion coefficient of CO(2) molecules in champagne and champagne viscosity (both strongly temperature-dependent) are suspected to be the two main parameters responsible for such differences. Besides, a recently developed dynamic-tracking technique using IR thermography was also used in order to visualize the cloud of gaseous CO(2) which flows down from champagne during the pouring process, thus visually confirming the strong influence of champagne temperature on its loss of dissolved CO(2).

  12. Sources and transformations of dissolved lignin phenols and chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Otsuchi Bay, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung eLu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved lignin phenols and optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM were measured to investigate the sources and transformations of terrigenous DOM (tDOM in Otsuchi Bay, Japan. Three rivers discharge into the bay, and relatively high values of syringyl:vanillyl phenols (0.73 ± 0.07 and cinnamyl:vanillyl phenols (0.33 ± 0.10 indicated large contributions of non-woody angiosperm tissues to lignin and tDOM. The physical mixing of river and seawater played an important role in controlling the concentrations and distributions of lignin phenols and chromophoric DOM (CDOM optical properties in the bay. Lignin phenol concentrations and the CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm, a(350, were strongly correlated in river and bay waters. Measurements of lignin phenols and CDOM in bay waters indicated a variety of photochemical and biological transformations of tDOM, including oxidation reactions, photobleaching and a decrease in molecular weight. Photodegradation and biodegradation of lignin and CDOM were investigated in decomposition experiments with river water and native microbial assemblages exposed to natural sunlight or kept in the dark. There was a rapid and substantial removal of lignin phenols and CDOM during the first few days in the light treatment, indicating transformations of tDOM and CDOM can occur soon after discharge of buoyant river water into the bay. The removal of lignin phenols was slightly greater in the dark (34% than in the light (30% during the remaining 59 days of the incubation. Comparison of the light and dark treatments indicated biodegradation was responsible for 67% of total lignin phenol removal during the 62-day incubation exposed to natural sunlight, indicating biodegradation is a dominant removal process in Otsuchi Bay.

  13. Absorption features of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and tracing implication for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in Changjiang Estuary, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X. Y.; Chen, X.; Deng, H.; Du, Y.; Jin, H. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) represents the light absorbing fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Studies have shown that the optical properties of CDOM can be used to infer the distribution and diffusion characteristics of DOC in the estuary and coastal zone. The inversion of DOC concentrations from remote sensing has been implemented in certain regions. In this study we investigate the potential of tracing DOC from CDOM by the measure...

  14. Relationships between colored dissolved organic matter and dissolved organic carbon in different coastal gradients of the Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, E. Therese; Kratzer, Susanne; Andersson, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Due to high terrestrial runoff, the Baltic Sea is rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the light-absorbing fraction of which is referred to as colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Inputs of DOC and CDOM are predicted to increase with climate change, affecting coastal ecosystems. We found that the relationships between DOC, CDOM, salinity, and Secchi depth all differed between the two coastal areas studied; the W Gulf of Bothnia with high terrestrial input and the NW Baltic Proper with ...

  15. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  16. Solid state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Physics, International Edition covers the fundamentals and the advanced concepts of solid state physics. The book is comprised of 18 chapters that tackle a specific aspect of solid state physics. Chapters 1 to 3 discuss the symmetry aspects of crystalline solids, while Chapter 4 covers the application of X-rays in solid state science. Chapter 5 deals with the anisotropic character of crystals. Chapters 6 to 8 talk about the five common types of bonding in solids, while Chapters 9 and 10 cover the free electron theory and band theory. Chapters 11 and 12 discuss the effects of moveme

  17. Theoretical solid state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical Solid State Physics, Volume 1 focuses on the study of solid state physics. The volume first takes a look at the basic concepts and structures of solid state physics, including potential energies of solids, concept and classification of solids, and crystal structure. The book then explains single-electron approximation wherein the methods for calculating energy bands; electron in the field of crystal atoms; laws of motion of the electrons in solids; and electron statistics are discussed. The text describes general forms of solutions and relationships, including collective electron i

  18. Novel salicylazo polymers for colon drug delivery: dissolving polymers by means of bacterial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saphier, Sigal; Karton, Yishai

    2010-02-01

    Novel azo polymers were prepared for colonic drug delivery with a release mechanism based on structural features of azo derivatives designed for rapid bacterial degradation leading to soluble polymers. Two Salicylazo derivatives were prepared and conjugated as side chains at different ratios to methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate copolymers (Eudragits). The azo compounds were designed to have a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic part on opposite sides of the azo bond. Upon reduction of the azo bonds, the hydrophobic part is released, resulting in a more water soluble polymer. The solubility of the polymeric films was studied relative to Eudragit S known to dissolve toward the end of the small intestine. One of the two azo derivatives prepared gave rise to polymers, which showed reduced solubility relative to Eudragit S. These polymers were subjected to reduction tests in anaerobic rat cecal suspensions by following the release of the hydrophobic product. Reduction rate was found to be rapid, comparable to that of Sulfasalazine. Studies on the azopolymeric films in anaerobic rat cecal suspensions, showed that these polymers dissolve faster than in sterilized suspensions. Solid dosage forms may be coated with these polymers to provide an efficient delivery system to the colon with a rapid release mechanism. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Effect of Dissolved Air Flotation Process on Thickening of Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atamaleki A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Sludge is an inescapable component of all wastewaters that originated from their treatment. dissolved air flotation (DAF process as an alternative clarifier is used in treatment of drinking water, pretreatment of wastewater, and as a phase separator in sludge activation processes. This study aimed to calibrated the usage of DAF process in a laboratory scale and under various conditions, to achieve the optimum efficiency in recycling the activated sludge. Instrument & Methods: In this experimental study, of Kashan's Shahid Beheshti hospital and immediately transported to the laboratory. The optimal dose of polyaluminum chloride coagulant and pH was determined and then applied in DAF process. Finally turbidity, electrical conductivity (EC and total solids (TS parameters were measured and compared with control sample. Findings: The optimal pH and optimal dose of coagulant were 6.5 and 25mg/l, respectively. Also Optimal process efficiency to reduce EC, TS and turbidity parameters were 23.4, 44.5 and 88%, respectively. Conclusion: Dissolved air flotation process removes the turbidity, EC and TS effectively; however, it has minimal impact on EC and TS.

  20. Evaluation of leachate dissolved organic nitrogen discharge effect on wastewater effluent quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolyard, Stephanie C; Reinhart, Debra R

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen is limited more and more frequently in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents because of the concern of causing eutrophication in discharge waters. Twelve leachates from eight landfills in Florida and California were characterized for total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). The average concentration of TN and DON in leachate was approximately 1146mg/L and 40mg/L, respectively. Solid-phase extraction was used to fractionate the DON based on hydrophobic (recalcitrant fraction) and hydrophilic (bioavailable fraction) chemical properties. The average leachate concentrations of bioavailable (bDON) and recalcitrant (rDON) DON were 16.5mg/L and 18.4mg/L, respectively. The rDON fraction was positively correlated, but with a low R 2 , with total leachate apparent color dissolved UV 254 , chemical oxygen demand (COD), and humic acid (R 2 equals 0.38, 0.49, and 0.40, respectively). The hydrophobic fraction of DON (rDON) was highly colored. This fraction was also associated with over 60% of the total leachate COD. Multiple leachate and wastewater co-treatment simulations were carried out to assess the effects of leachate on total nitrogen wastewater effluent quality using removals for four WWTPs under different scenarios. The calculated pass through of DON suggests that leachate could contribute to significant amounts of nitrogen discharged to aquatic systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Peak distortion in the column liquid chromatographic determination of omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, T; Collijn, E; Tivert, A M; Rosén, L

    1991-11-22

    Injection of a sample containing omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer (pH 9.2) into a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6) as the mobile phase and a C18 surface-modified silica as the solid phase resulted under special conditions in split peaks of omeprazole. The degree of peak split and the retention time of omeprazole varied with the concentration of borax in the sample solution and the ionic strength of the mobile phase buffer as well as with the column used. Borax is eluted from the column in a broad zone starting from the void volume of the column. The retention is probably due to the presence of polyborate ions. The size of the zone varies with the concentration of borax in the sample injected. In the borax zone the pH is increased compared with the pH of the mobile phase, and when omeprazole (a weak acid) is co-eluting in the borax zone its retention is affected. In the front part and in the back part of the borax zone, pH gradients are formed, and these gradients can induce the peak splitting. When the dissolving medium is changed to a phosphate buffer or an ammonium buffer at pH 9 no peak distortion of omeprazole is observed.

  2. Dissolved air flotation for treating wastewater of the nuclear industry. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Oliveros, H.B.; Jimenez-Moleon, M.C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, D.

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary testing of dissolved air flotation (DAF) for wastewater treatment is presented. A combined coagulation-flocculation/DAF column system is used to remove oil and 60 Co from nuclear industry wastewater. In this work, operational conditions and coagulant/flocculant concentrations are optimized by varying pH. Determinations of air-solids ratio (G/S), retention time (θ), pressure (P), volume of depressurized air-water mixture (V), turbidity and 60 Co concentrations are reported. The effect of the treatment on the efficiency of separation of oily residues is also discussed. The results establish that the coagulant/flocculant system, formed by a modified polyamine (25 mgL -1 ) and a slightly cationic polyacrylamide (1.5 mgL -1 ), under specific operational conditions (pH = 7, mixing intensity Im 1 = 300 s -1 and Im 2 = 30 s -1 ), allowed the destabilization of colloidal matter, resulting in resistant flocs. It was concluded that by using G/S = 0.3, θ = 15 min, P = 620 kPa and V = 0.0012 m 3 , the greatest percentage removals of oil, turbidity, total cobalt and 60 Co were obtained. These preliminary results then show that dissolved air flotation represents a good alternative for treatment of nuclear industry wastewater contaminated with radionuclides. (author)

  3. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26

    test samples at temperatures ranging from 26-30 °C. The metathesized sodium aluminate was then dissolved by addition of volumes of water approximately equal to 1.3 times the volumes of caustic added to the test slurries. Aluminate dissolution was allowed to proceed for 2 days at ambient temperatures of ≈29 °C. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.0 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 crushed heel solids composite test sample. The 20 wt% of solids remaining after the dissolution tests were 85-88 wt% gibbsite. If the density of the residual solids was approximately equal to that of gibbsite, they represented ≈17 vol% of the initial crushed solids composite test sample. In the water dissolution tests, addition of a volume of water ≈6.9 times the initial volume of the crushed solids composite was sufficient to dissolve and recover essentially all of the natrophosphate present. The ratio of the weight of water required to dissolve the natrophosphate solids to the estimated weight of natrophosphate present was 8.51. The Environmental Simulation Program (OLI Systems, Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey) predicts that an 8.36 w/w ratio would be required to dissolve the estimated weight of natrophosphate present in the absence of other components of the heel solids. Only minor amounts of Al-bearing solids were removed from the composite solids in the water dissolution tests. The caustic metathesis/aluminate dissolution test sequence, executed at temperatures ranging from 27-30 °C, dissolved and recovered ≈69 wt% of the gibbsite estimated to have been present in the initial crushed heel solids composite. This level of gibbsite recovery is consistent with that measured in previous scoping tests on the dissolution of gibbsite in strong caustic solutions. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.3 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 aggregate solids test sample. The residual solids were

  4. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X Q; Maie, N; Hanna, J V; Childers, D L; Jaffé, R

    2003-06-01

    In this study, the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), collected from wetlands of the Southern Everglades, was examined using a variety of analytical techniques in order to characterize its sources and transformation in the environment. The methods applied for the characterization of DOM included fluorescence spectroscopy, solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy, and pyrolysis-GC/MS. The relative abundance of protein-like components and carbohydrates increased from the canal site to more remote freshwater marsh sites suggesting that significant amounts of non-humic DOM are autochthonously produced within the freshwater marshes, and are not exclusively introduced through canal inputs. Such in situ DOM production is important when considering how DOM from canals is processed and transported to downstream estuaries of Florida Bay.

  5. Influence of foaming agents on solid thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal transport mechanism of foam glass is still lacking. The contribution of solid- and gas conduction to the total thermal conductivity remains to be reported. In many foam glasses, the solid phase consist of a mix of an amorphous and a crystalline part where foaming...... containing glass and crystalline foaming agents and amorphous samples where the foaming agents are completely dissolved in the glass structure, respectively. Results show that the samples prepared by sintering have a higher thermal conductivity than the samples prepared by melt-quenching. The thermal...... conductivities of the sintered and the melt-quenched samples represent an upper and lower limit of the solid phase thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared with these foaming agents. The content of foaming agents dissolved in the glass structure has a major impact on the solid thermal conductivity of foam...

  6. Comparison of dissolved and particulate arsenic distributions in shallow aquifers of Chakdaha, India, and Araihazar, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kazi M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the spatial variability of dissolved As concentrations in shallow aquifers of the Bengal Basin remains poorly understood. To address this, we compare here transects of simultaneously-collected groundwater and aquifer solids perpendicular to the banks of the Hooghly River in Chakdaha, India, and the Old Brahmaputra River in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Results Variations in surface geomorphology mapped by electromagnetic conductivity indicate that permeable sandy soils are associated with underlying aquifers that are moderately reducing to a depth of 10–30 m, as indicated by acid-leachable Fe(II/Fe ratios 5 mg L-1. More reducing aquifers are typically capped with finer-grained soils. The patterns suggest that vertical recharge through permeable soils is associated with a flux of oxidants on the banks of the Hooghly River and, further inland, in both Chakdaha and Araihazar. Moderately reducing conditions maintained by local recharge are generally associated with low As concentrations in Araihazar, but not systematically so in Chakdaha. Unlike Araihazar, there is also little correspondence in Chakdaha between dissolved As concentrations in groundwater and the P-extractable As content of aquifer particles, averaging 191 ± 122 ug As/L, 1.1 ± 1.5 mg As kg-1 (n = 43 and 108 ± 31 ug As/L, 3.1 ± 6.5 mg As kg-1 (n = 60, respectively. We tentatively attribute these differences to a combination of younger floodplain sediments, and therefore possibly more than one mechanism of As release, as well as less reducing conditions in Chakdaha compared to Araihazar. Conclusion Systematic dating of groundwater and sediment, combined with detailed mapping of the composition of aquifer solids and groundwater, will be needed to identify the various mechanisms underlying the complex distribution of As in aquifers of the Bengal Basin.

  7. Statistically optimized fast dissolving microneedle transdermal patch of meloxicam: A patient friendly approach to manage arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodwala, Sejal; Kumar, Praveen; Thakkar, Hetal P

    2017-06-15

    The long term administration of Meloxicam for the management of arthritis, a chronic disorder, results in gastrointestinal disturbances leading to poor patient compliance. Considering the favorable molecular weight, therapeutic dose, biological half-life and log P value of meloxicam for transdermal delivery, its fast dissolving microneedle patch, with an ability to breach the stratum corneum and efficiently deliver the cargo to deeper skin layers, were developed. Microneedle patch of low molecular weight polyvinyl alcohol and polyvinylpyrrolidone was prepared using Polydimethylsiloxane micromolds. The ratio of polyvinyl alcohol to polyvinyl pyrrolidone and solid content of matrix solution was optimized to achieve maximum needle strength. The optimized batch was extensively evaluated for in vitro dissolution, drug release, stability, ex vivo skin permeation/deposition, histopathology and in vivo pharmacodynamic study. The patch containing 9:1 polyvinyl alcohol to polyvinylpyrrolidone ratio with 50% solid content had shown maximum axial needle fracture force (0.9N) suitable for penetrating the skin. The optimized batch was found to be fast dissolving and released almost 100% drug in 60min following dissolution controlled kinetics. The formulation showed a significant drug deposition within skin (63.37%) and an improved transdermal flux (1.60μg/cm 2 /h) with a 2.58 fold enhancement in permeation as compared to plain drug solution. The formulation showed a comparable anti-inflammatory activity in rats when compared to its existing approved marketed oral tablet. Histopathology and stability evaluations demonstrated acceptable safety and shelf-life of the developed formulation. The successful verification of safety, efficacy and stability of microneedle patch advocated the suitability of the formulation for transdermal use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLETS CONTAINING SOLID DISPERSIONS OF BACLOFEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Janardhana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustained release tablets containing solid dispersions granules of a poorly water soluble drug were prepared to investigate the controlled release of the drug. Baclofen was chosen because of its poor water solubility and short elimination half-life. Poloxamer 188 and PEG 6000 were used as solid dispersion carrier. Free flowing solid dispersion granules were prepared by adsorbing the melt of the drug and carriers onto the surface of an adsorbent, Carbopol 934P followed by direct compression with HPMC K4M and HPMC K100 to obtain an solid dispersion loaded sustained release tablets. FTIR studies confirmed that the compatibility of drug and carriers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed partially amorphous structures of the drug in solid dispersion granules. The solid dispersion granules dissolved completely within 30 min, which was much faster than that of pure drug baclofen. The sustained release of baclofen from the solid dispersion containing tablet was achieved for 2 h in gastric fluid (pH 1.2 and for up to 10 h in intestinal fluid (pH 6.8. A combination of solid dispersion techniques using adsorption and sustained release concepts is a promising approach to control the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLETS CONTAINING SOLID DISPERSIONS OF BACLOFEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Janardhana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustained release tablets containing solid dispersions granules of a poorly water soluble drug were prepared to investigate the controlled release of the drug. Baclofen was chosen because of its poor water solubility and short elimination half-life. Poloxamer 188 and PEG 6000 were used as solid dispersion carrier. Free flowing solid dispersion granules were prepared by adsorbing the melt of the drug and carriers onto the surface of an adsorbent, Carbopol 934P followed by direct compression with HPMC K4M and HPMC K100 to obtain an solid dispersion loaded sustained release tablets. FTIR studies confirmed that the compatibility of drug and carriers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed partially amorphous structures of the drug in solid dispersion granules. The solid dispersion granules dissolved completely within 30 min, which was much faster than that of pure drug baclofen. The sustained release of baclofen from the solid dispersion containing tablet was achieved for 2 h in gastric fluid (pH 1.2 and for up to 10 h in intestinal fluid (pH 6.8. A combination of solid dispersion techniques using adsorption and sustained release concepts is a promising approach to control the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  10. Solid phase radioimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wide, L.

    1977-01-01

    Solid phase coupled antibodies were introduced to facilitate the separation of bound and free labelled ligand in the competitive inhibition radioimmunoassay. Originally, the solid matrix used was in the form of small particles and since then a number of different matrices have been used such as very fine powder particles, gels, paper and plastic discs, magnetic particles and the inside surface of plastic tubes. The coupling of antibodies may be that of a covalent chemical binding, a strong physical adsorbtion, or an immunological binding to a solid phase coupled antigen. New principles of radioimmunoassay such as the solid phase sandwich techniques and the immunoradiometric assay were developped from the use of solid phase coupled antigens and antibodies. The solid phase sandwich techniques are reagent excess methods with a very wide applicability. Several of the different variants of solid phase techniques are suitable for automation. Advantages and disadvantages of solid phase radioimmunoassays when compared with those using soluble reagents are discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. Leaching of dissolved phosphorus from tile-drained agricultural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, H E; Windolf, J; Kronvang, B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated leaching of dissolved phosphorus (P) from 45 tile-drains representing animal husbandry farms in all regions of Denmark. Leaching of P via tile-drains exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity with a low concentration in the majority of tile-drains and few tile-drains (15% in our investigation) having high to very high concentration of dissolved P. The share of dissolved organic P (DOP) was high (up to 96%). Leaching of DOP has hitherto been a somewhat overlooked P loss pathway in Danish soils and the mechanisms of mobilization and transport of DOP needs more investigation. We found a high correlation between Olsen-P and water extractable P. Water extractable P is regarded as an indicator of risk of loss of dissolved P. Our findings indicate that Olsen-P, which is measured routinely in Danish agricultural soils, may be a useful proxy for the P leaching potential of soils. However, we found no straight-forward correlation between leaching potential of the top soil layer (expressed as either degree of P saturation, Olsen-P or water extractable P) and the measured concentration of dissolved P in the tile-drain. This underlines that not only the source of P but also the P loss pathway must be taken into account when evaluating the risk of P loss.

  12. Dissolving Microneedle Patch for Transdermal Delivery of Human Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O; Felner, Eric I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical impact of biotechnology has been constrained by the limitations of traditional hypodermic injection of biopharmaceuticals. Microneedle patches have been proposed as a minimally invasive alternative. In this study, we assess the translation of a dissolving microneedle patch designed for simple, painless self-administration of biopharmacetucials that generates no sharp biohazardous waste. To study pharmacokinetics and safety of this approach, human growth hormone (hGH) was encapsulated in 600 μm long dissolving microneedles composed of carboxymethylcellulose and trehalose using an aqueous, moderate-temperature process that maintained complete hGH activity after encapsulation and retained most activity after storage for up to 15 months at room temperature and humidity. After manual insertion into the skin of hairless rats, hGH pharmacokinetics were similar to conventional subcutaneous injection. After patch removal, the microneedles had almost completely dissolved, leaving behind only blunt stubs. The dissolving microneedle patch was well tolerated, causing only slight, transient erythema. This study suggests that a dissolving microneedle patch can deliver hGH and other biopharmaceuticals in a manner suitable for self-administration without sharp biohazardous waste. PMID:21360810

  13. Laser cooling of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  14. Solid State Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces

  15. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  16. Solid state radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    Important recent developments provide accurate, sensitive, and reliable radiation measurements by using solid state radiation dosimetry methods. A review of the basic phenomena, devices, practical limitations, and categories of solid state methods is presented. The primary focus is upon the general physics underlying radiation measurements with solid state devices

  17. Complex hydrides as room-temperature solid electrolytes for rechargeable batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongh, P. E. de; Blanchard, D.; Matsuo, M.

    2016-01-01

    A central goal in current battery research is to increase the safety and energy density of Li-ion batteries. Electrolytes nowadays typically consist of lithium salts dissolved in organic solvents. Solid electrolytes could facilitate safer batteries with higher capacities, as they are compatible...... electrolytes, discussing in detail LiBH4, strategies towards for fast room-temperature ionic conductors, alternative compounds, and first explorations of implementation of these electrolytes in all-solid-state batteries....

  18. Dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic nitrogen data collected using bottle in a world wide distribution from 02 September 1998 to 02 November 2003 (NODC Accession 0002403)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) data were collected using bottle casts in a world wide distribution. Data were collected from 02...

  19. Dissolved black carbon along the land to ocean continuum of Paraiba do Sul River, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva Junior, Jomar; Dittmar, Thorsten; Niggemann, Jutta; Gomes de Almeida, Marcelo; de Rezende, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Rivers annually carry 25-28 Tg of pyrogenic dissolved organic matter (or dissolved black carbon, DBC) into the ocean, which is equivalent to about 10% of the entire land-ocean flux of dissolved organic carbon (Jaffé et al., Science 340, 345-347). Objective of this study was to identify the main processes behind the release and turnover of DBC on a riverine catchment scale. As model system we chose the land to ocean continuum of Paraíba do Sul River (Brazil), the only river system for which long-term DBC flux data exist (Dittmar, Rezende et al., Nature Geoscience 5, 618-622). The catchment was originally covered by Atlantic rain forest (mainly C3 plants) which was almost completely destroyed over the past centuries by slash-and-burn. As a result, large amounts of wood-derived charcoal reside in the soils. Today, fire-managed pasture and sugar cane (both dominated by C4 plants) cover most of the catchment. Water samples were collected at 24 sites along the main channel of the river, at 14 sites of the main tributaries and at 21 sites along the salinity gradient in the estuary and up to 35 km offshore. Sampling was performed in the wet seasons of 2013 and 2014, and the dry season of 2013. DBC was determined on a molecular level as benzenepolycarboxylic acids after nitric acid oxidation (Dittmar, Limnology and Oceanography: Methods 6, 230-235). Stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) were determined in solid phase extractable dissolved organic carbon (SPE-DOC) to distinguish C4 and C3 sources. Our results clearly show a relationship between hydrology and DBC concentrations in the river, with highest DBC concentrations in the wet season and lowest in the dry season. This relationship indicates that DBC is mainly mobilized from the upper soil horizons during heavy rainfalls. A significant correlation between DBC concentrations and δ13C-SPE-DOC indicated that most of DBC in the river system originates from C3 plants, i.e. from the historic burning event of the Atlantic rain

  20. Dissolved oxygen removal in a column packed with catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Chung, Hong Suk; Cho, Young Hyun; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Eun Kee

    1996-01-01

    The dissolved oxygen removed by H 2 -O 2 reaction in column packed with various catalysts was examined. The catalysts employed were the prepared polymeric catalyst, platinum on activated carbon, and Lewatit OC-1045 which is available commercially. The column experiments with the prepared polymeric catalyst showed the dissolved oxygen reduced to 35 ppb which is below the limit in feel water of power plants. This implies the likely application of the prepared catalyst for practical use. The activated carbon required the pre-treatment for the removed of dissolved oxygen, since the surface of activated carbon contains much oxygen adsorbed initially. The Lewatit catalyst exposed the best performance, however, the aged one showed the gradual loss of catalytic activity due to degradation of resin catalyst. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. (author)

  1. Relation between the amount of dissolved water and metals dissolved from stainless steel or aluminum plate in safflower oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasago, Masahisa; Takaoka, Kyo

    1986-12-01

    The amount of water dissolved in safflower oil at the frying temperature (180 deg C) was 518 -- 1012 ppM, allowing water to drop continuously (0.035 g/2 min) into the oil for 1 -- 3 h. When the oil was heated with metal plates under the same conditions, the amount of dissolved water in the oil increased more than in the absence of the metal plates. In case of stainless steel, the amount was 1.26 to 1.33 times, and with aluminum plates, 1.06 to 1.13 times the amount without plates. When these metal plates were heated with the oil under the above conditions, the water dissolved the metal of the plates into the oil. In case of stainless steel, iron dissolved from 0.17 to 0.77 ppM, nickel, 0.04 ppM and chromium, from 0.02 to 0.03 ppM. Similarly, the amount of aluminum dissolved from the aluminum plate was from 0.10 to 0.45 ppM.

  2. The relation between the amount of dissolved water and metals dissolved from stainless steel or aluminum plate in safflower oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasago, Masahisa; Takaoka, Kyo

    1986-01-01

    The amount of water dissolved in safflower oil at the frying temperature (180 deg C) was 518 ∼ 1012 ppm, allowing water to drop continuously (0.035 g/2 min) into the oil for 1 ∼ 3 h. When the oil was heated with metal plates under the same conditions, the amount of dissolved water in the oil increased more than in the absence of the metal plates. In case of stainless steel, the amount was 1.26 to 1.33 times, and with aluminum plates, 1.06 to 1.13 times the amount without plates. When these metal plates were heated with the oil under the above conditions, the water dissolved the metal of the plates into the oil. In case of stainless steel, iron dissolved from 0.17 to 0.77 ppm, nickel, 0.04 ppm and chromium, from 0.02 to 0.03 ppm. Similarly, the amount of aluminum dissolved from the aluminum plate was from 0.10 to 0.45 ppm. (author)

  3. Effects of dissolved organic matter from a eutrophic lake on the freely dissolved concentrations of emerging organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Qing-Hui; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Li, Fei-Peng; Chen, Ling

    2014-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioavailability of bisphenol A (BPA) and chloramphenicol by measuring the freely dissolved concentrations of the contaminants in solutions containing DOM that had been isolated from a mesocosm in a eutrophic lake. The abundance and aromaticity of the chromophoric DOM increased over the 25-d mesocosm experiment. The BPA freely dissolved concentration was 72.3% lower and the chloramphenicol freely dissolved concentration was 56.2% lower using DOM collected on day 25 than using DOM collected on day 1 of the mesocosm experiment. The freely dissolved concentrations negatively correlated with the ultraviolent absorption coefficient at 254 nm and positively correlated with the spectral slope of chromophoric DOM, suggesting that the bioavailability of these emerging organic contaminants depends on the characteristics of the DOM present. The DOM-water partition coefficients (log KOC ) for the emerging organic contaminants positively correlated with the aromaticity of the DOM, measured as humic acid-like fluorescent components C1 (excitation/emission=250[313]/412 nm) and C2 (excitation/emission=268[379]/456 nm). The authors conclude that the bioavailability of emerging organic contaminants in eutrophic lakes can be affected by changes in the DOM. © 2014 SETAC.

  4. Use of a dissolved-gas measurement system for reducing the dissolved oxygen at St. Lucie Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, D.T.; Coit, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    When the dissolved oxygen in the condensate at St. Lucie Unit 2 could not be reduced below the administrative limit of 10 ppB, EPRI cooperated with Florida Power and Light to find the cause and develop remedies. Two problems were identified with the assistance of a dissolved gas measurement system (DGMS) that can detect leaks into condensate when used with argon blanketing. Drain piping from the air ejection system had flooded which decreased its performance, and leaks were found at a strainer flange and a couple expansion joints. Initially the dissolved oxygen content was reduced to about 9 ppB; owever, the dissolved oxygen from Condenser A was consistently higher than that from condenser B. Injection of about 0.4 cubic per minute (CFM) of argon above the hotwell considerably improved the ventilation of Condenser A, reducing the dissolved oxygen about 30% to about 6 ppB. The use of nitrogen was equally effective. While inert gas injection is helpful, it may be better to have separate air ejectors for each condenser. Several recommendations for improving oxygen removal are given

  5. Dissolved gas concentrations of the geothermal fluids in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ai-Ti; Yang, Tsanyao Frank

    2010-05-01

    Taiwan, a geologically active island, is located on the boundary of the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian Plate. High heat flow and geothermal gradient generated by the complex collision and orogeny, warm up the meteoric water and/or the ground water. The heated water becomes geothermal fluids. In previous studies, researchers tried to categorize hot springs based on the appearance, chemical compositions and lithological areas. Because of the chemical inertness, the concentrations and isotopic composition of dissolved noble gases are good indicators of the mantle degassing, geothermal conditions, and so on. In this study, 55 hot springs were collected from different tectonic units. It is the first time to systematically study the hot springs in Taiwan in terms of dissolved gases. Hot spring water is sampled and stored in pre-evacuated glass bottles for analyzing gas compositions. The abundances of noble gases were determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer based on the isotope dilution technique. Samples with glass vials are introduced to RAD 7 and GC for dissolved Rn and major dissolved gases analyses. Furthermore, helium isotopic ratios and helium-neon ratios are measured on a conventional noble gas mass spectrometer. For hydrochemistry analysis, water samples are analyzed by IC, ICP-MS and titration. We can classify the hot springs samples into three major groups from main anion concentration data; and then, subdivide them into nine minor groups by cation concentration data. Moreover, according to major dissolved gases compositions, three major gas components: CH4, N2 and CO2, are identified. Dissolved noble gases provided more detailed clues about hot springs sources in Taiwan, such as the degree of mixing between meteoric water and deep-source water, which will be further discussed in this study.

  6. Photochemical Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter in Boreal Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y.; Vuorio, K.; Tiirola, M.; Perämäki, S.; Vahatalo, A.

    2016-12-01

    Boreal lakes are rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM) that terrestrially derived from forest soil and wetland, yet little is known about potential for photochemical transformation of aquatic DOM in boreal lakes. Transformation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) can decrease water color and enhance microbial mineralization, affecting primary production and respiration, which both affect the CO2 balance of the lakes. We used laboratory solar radiation exposure experiments with lake water samples collected from 54 lakes located in Finland and Sweden, representing different catchment composition and watershed location to assess photochemical reactivity of DOM. The pH of water samples ranged from 5.4 to 8.3, and the concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe) were between samples received simulated solar radiation corresponding to a daily dose of sunlight, and photomineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) was measured for determination of spectral apparent quantum yields (AQY). During irradiation, photobleaching decreased the absorption coefficients of CDOM at 330 nm between 4.9 and 79 m-1 by 0.5 to 11 m-1. Irradiation generated DIC from 2.8 to 79 μmol C L-1. The AQY at 330 nm ranged between 31 and 273 ×10-6 mol C mol photons-1 h-1, which was correlated positively with concentration of dissolved Fe, and negatively with pH. Further statistical analyze indicated that the interaction between pH and Fe may explain much of the photochemical reactivity of DOM in the examined lakes, and land cover concerns main catchment areas also can have impact on the photoreaction process. This study may suggest how environmental conditions regulate DOM photomineralization in boreal lakes.

  7. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  8. The dissolver paradox as a coupled fast-thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, H.F.; Webb, P.S.

    1993-05-01

    The dissolver paradox is treated as coupled fast-thermal reactors. Each reactor is sub-critical but the coupling is sufficient to form a critical system. The practical importance of the system occurs when the fast system by itself is mass limited and the thermal system by itself is volume limited. Numerous 1D calculations have been made to calculate the neutron multiplication parameters of the separate fast and thermal systems that occur in the dissolver paradox. A model has been developed to describe the coupling between the systems. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP code have tested the model

  9. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Shehata

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO. The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media.

  10. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Nader; Azab, Mohammed; Kandas, Ishac; Meehan, Kathleen

    2015-08-14

    This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO). The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media.

  11. Highly Polluted Wastewaters Treatment by Improved Dissolved Air Flotation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, I. C.; Covaliu, C. I.; Matache, M. G.; Doroftei, B. I.

    2017-06-01

    Numerous investigations are oriented towards the development of new wastewater treatment technologies, having high efficiencies for removing even low concentrations of pollutants found in water. These efforts were determined by the destroyer impact of the pollutants to the environment and human’s health. For this reason this paper presents our study concerning an improved dissolved air flotation technology for wastewater treatment. There is described a dissolved air flotation (DAF) installation composed by two equipments: pressurized capsule and lamellar settling. Also, there are presented some advantages of using nanoparticles as flotation collectors.

  12. History of Solid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Solid rockets are of interest to the space program because they are commonly used as boosters that provide the additional thrust needed for the space launch vehicle to escape the gravitational pull of the Earth. Larger, more advanced solid rockets allow for space launch vehicles with larger payload capacities, enabling mankind to reach new depths of space. This presentation will discuss, in detail, the history of solid rockets. The history begins with the invention and origin of the solid rocket, and then goes into the early uses and design of the solid rocket. The evolution of solid rockets is depicted by a description of how solid rockets changed and improved and how they were used throughout the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Modern uses of the solid rocket include the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle and the solid rockets used on current space launch vehicles. The functions and design of the SRB and the advancements in solid rocket technology since the use of the SRB are discussed as well. Common failure modes and design difficulties are discussed as well.

  13. Solid Base Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The importance of solid base catalysts has come to be recognized for their environmentally benign qualities, and much significant progress has been made over the past two decades in catalytic materials and solid base-catalyzed reactions. The book is focused on the solid base. Because of the advantages over liquid bases, the use of solid base catalysts in organic synthesis is expanding. Solid bases are easier to dispose than liquid bases, separation and recovery of products, catalysts and solvents are less difficult, and they are non-corrosive. Furthermore, base-catalyzed reactions can be performed without using solvents and even in the gas phase, opening up more possibilities for discovering novel reaction systems. Using numerous examples, the present volume describes the remarkable role solid base catalysis can play, given the ever increasing worldwide importance of "green" chemistry. The reader will obtain an overall view of solid base catalysis and gain insight into the versatility of the reactions to whic...

  14. Solid dispersions in oncology: a solution to solubility-limited oral drug absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawicki, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    This thesis discusses the formulation method solid dispersion and how it works to resolve solubility-limited absorption of orally dosed anticancer drugs. Dissolution in water is essential for drug absorption because only dissolved drug molecules are absorbed. The problem is that half of the arsenal

  15. Partitioning of organic matter and heavy metals in a sandy soil: Effects of extracting solution, solid to liquid ratio and pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fest, P.M.J.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Comans, R.N.J.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2008-01-01

    In sandy soils the behavior of heavy metals is largely controlled by soil organic matter (solid and dissolved organic matter; SOC and DOC). Therefore, knowledge of the partitioning of organic matter between the solid phase and soil solution is essential for adequate predictions of the total

  16. Evaluation of Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF for Pretreatment of the Karoon River Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeim Banisaeid

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a pilot dissolved air flotation (DAF unit is evaluated. It is the objective of the present study to determine the removal efficiency of DAF in removing turbidity and organic matter from theKaroonRiverfeeding a water treatment plant. Water quality investigations over the study period revealed that, thanks to the self-purification process in the river, the Karoon water quality is acceptable with respect to total organic carbon (TOC (never exceeding 2.89 mg/l but its turbidity has great fluctuations (from as low as 42 to 1,000 NTU due to the nature of the river. Its true color is in desirable conditions. Suspended solids removal efficiency of the pilot DAF unit varied from 38% to 95%, with an average level of 72%. The results from this study indicate that DAF removal efficiency is inversely related to the volume of inflow of solids into the system so that increasing TSS decreases removal efficiency. The high turbidity level in the absence of a primary sedimentation unit causes the flotation system to lose its desired efficiency. FAD cannot be, therefore, recommended for water treatment plants fed by the Karoon water unless a pretreatment unit is used. Furthermore, as FAD's TOC removal efficiency varies by up to 82%, and since part of the organic content includes volatile organic matter causing odors and undesirable taste, FAD is recommended as a complementary process in the treatment of high quality water.

  17. Compositions and constituents of freshwater dissolved organic matter isolated by reverse osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yulong; Huang, Wen; Ran, Yong; Mao, Jingdong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Concentration factor controls sorption of DOM and thus yields of reverse osmosis. • Solid-state 13 C NMR was used to characterize RO-isolated DOM from freshwater. • C distribution of freshwater RO-DOM differs from that of reported marine DOM. • The compositions of DOM were transformed during transport from rivers to oceans. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from riverine and lacustrine water was isolated using a reverse osmosis (RO) system. Solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13 C NMR) was used to quantitatively evaluate the compositions and constituents of DOM, which are compared with previous investigations on marine DOM. Results indicated that concentration factor (CF) was a key metric controlling yield and sorption of DOM on the RO system. The sorption was likely non-selective, based on the 13 C NMR and δ 13 C analyses. Carbohydrates and lipids accounted for 25.0–41.5% and 30.2–46.3% of the identifiable DOM, followed by proteins (18.2–19.8%) and lignin (7.17–12.8%). The freshwater DOM contained much higher alkyl and aromatic C but lower alkoxyl and carboxyl C than marine DOM. The structural difference was not completely accounted for by using structure of high molecular weight (HMW) DOM, suggesting a size change involved in transformations of DOM during the transport from rivers to oceans

  18. Dissolved Carbon Dioxide in Tropical East Atlantic Surface Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.C.E.; Baar, H.J.W. de; Jong, E. de

    1999-01-01

    Variability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) is discussed for tropical East Atlantic surface waters in October–November 1993 and May–June 1994. High precipitation associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, river input and equatorial upwelling

  19. Fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the continental shelf waters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) of southwestern Bay of Bengal surface water during southwest monsoon consisted five fluorophores, three humic-like and two protein-like. The humification index (HIX) and humic fluorophores, viz., visible (C), marine (M) and UV (A) humic-likes indicated, better than ...

  20. Dissolved iron in the Southern Ocean (Atlantic sector)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M. B.; Laan, P.; Middag, R.; De Baar, H. J. W.; van Ooijen, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comprehensive dataset of dissolved iron (Fe) comprising 482 values at 22 complete vertical profiles along a 1 degrees latitudinal section at the Zero meridian. In addition a shorter high resolution (similar to 00 degrees 09') surface section of the southernmost part of the transect (66

  1. Diffusion coefficients gases, dissolved in fluid of NPPs circulation contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piontkovskij, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    In article is brought analysis of diverse gases diffusion coefficients computation methods, dissolved in liquid. On the basis of this analysis and treatment of being equalizations for concrete gases and certain parameters offers universal diffusion coefficients determination dependence for diverse gases in wide range of parameters, circulation contours typical for work NPP

  2. Dissolved Nutrients from Submarine Groundwater in Flic en Flac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    through a thin blanket of unconsolidated sediment through a fracture system and is concentrated along the ... The lagoon is subjected to diffuse SGD flows which may contribute to its high dissolved nutrient values. ... coastal zone management and similar tropical volcanic lagoonal systems. INTRODUCTION. Lagoons and ...

  3. Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evans, Ch. D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Ostle, N.; Zielinski, P.; Cooper, M.; Peacock, M.; Clark, J.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.; Freeman, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2012), s. 3317-3331 ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : acidity * dissolved organic carbon * organic soil * peat * podzol * soil carbon * sulphur Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.910, year: 2012

  4. Dissolved nitrogen in drinking water resources of farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dissolved nitrogen in drinking water resources of farming communities in Ghana. ... African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology ... Concentrations of these potentially toxic substances were below WHO acceptable limits for surface and groundwaters, indicating these water resources appear safe for drinking ...

  5. Hydrogen ion (Ph), ammonia, dissolved oxygen and nitrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen ion (pH), dissolved oxygen, ammonia and nitrite concentrations were studied monthly in two systems (re-circulatory and semi-intensive of 3 m2 sizes) each for six months. The systems were each stocked with 200 g of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Results showed that all parameters were within acceptable limits ...

  6. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor dissolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sappi Saiccor (situated in Durban, South Africa) dissolving pulp mill effluent, produced from an acid bisulphite pulping process, uses acacia and eucalyptus hardwoods to produce a unique and different blend of lignin that has not been previously studied. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor's effluent has ...

  7. Mathematical model for dissolved oxygen prediction in Cirata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the implementation and performance of mathematical model to predict theconcentration of dissolved oxygen in Cirata Reservoir, West Java by using Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The simulation program was created using Visual Studio 2012 C# software with ANN model implemented in it. Prediction ...

  8. Mathematical modeling of dissolved oxygen in fish ponds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TUOYO

    A mathematical model was developed to predict the effects of wind speed, light, pH, Temperature, dissolved carbon dioxide .... chlorophyll, the energy obtained splits water, and oxygen ... is a function of temperature T, light L, substrate, and pH as shown in ..... plants and its relation to the concentration of carbon dioxide and.

  9. Degradation of riverine dissolved organic matter by seawater bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochelle-Newall, E.J.; Pizay, M-D.; Middelburg, J.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Gattuso, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The functional response of a seawater bacterial community transplanted into freshwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated together with the response of natural populations of bacteria to size-fractioned natural source water. Seawater bacteria were incubated over a period of 8 d in

  10. Impulsive Laser Induced Alignment of Molecules Dissolved in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; H. Nielsen, Jens; Slenczka, Alkwin

    2013-01-01

    We show that a 450 fs nonresonant, moderately intense, linearly polarized laser pulse can induce field-free molecular axis alignment of methyliodide (CH3I) molecules dissolved in a helium nanodroplet. Time-resolved measurements reveal rotational dynamics much slower than that of isolated molecules...

  11. Production of dissolved organic carbon in aquatic sediment suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Prevo, L.

    2003-01-01

    In many water quality models production of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is modelled as mineralisation from particulate organic matter (POM). In this paper it is argued that the DOC production from dessicated sediments by water turbulence may be of similar importance
    In many water quality

  12. Dilution limits dissolved organic carbon utilization in the deep ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrieta, J.M.; Mayol, E.; Hansman, R.L.; Herndl, G.J.; Dittmar, T.; Duarte, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the second largest reservoir of organic carbon in the biosphere. About 72% of the global DOC inventory is stored in deep oceanic layers for years to centuries, supporting the current view that it consists of materials resistant to microbial degradation. An

  13. Solid state video cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Cristol, Y

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Video Cameras reviews the state of the art in the field of solid-state television cameras as compiled from patent literature. Organized into 10 chapters, the book begins with the basic array types of solid-state imagers and appropriate read-out circuits and methods. Documents relating to improvement of picture quality, such as spurious signal suppression, uniformity correction, or resolution enhancement, are also cited. The last part considerssolid-state color cameras.

  14. Development of a method for rapid and simultaneous monitoring of particulate and dissolved radiocesium in water with nonwoven fabric cartridge filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideki Tsuji; Tetsuo Yasutaka; Yoshihiko Kondo; Yasukazu Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    A method for the rapid and simultaneous monitoring of particulate and dissolved 137 Cs concentration in water was developed. This method uses pleated polypropylene nonwoven fabric filter to collect particulate radiocesium, and nonwoven fabric impregnated with Prussian blue (PB) to absorb dissolved radiocesium. The fabric was placed into cylindrical plastic cartridges (SS-cartridge and PB-cartridge). Traditional monitoring methods, such as evaporative concentration, often require time for pre-processing. However, this method described requires much less pre-processing time before the detection. Experiments conducted with simulated river water demonstrated that almost all of the suspended solids weight was collected in the SS-cartridge, and that more than 92 % of dissolved 137 Cs was absorbed onto the two PB-cartridges by 2.5 L/min flow rate when the range of the pH was 6-8. This device was applied to monitor Abukuma River water at two locations and the results were compared with those obtained using the filtrating and evaporative concentration method. The suspended solids concentration in river water, calculated by weight gain of the SS-cartridge and by sediment weight after filtration with a 0.45-μm membrane filter, agreed well. The radioactivity of the particulate and dissolved 137 Cs also agreed well in one of the two replications of this method. In addition, the required time for pre-processing was reduced by 60 times that by filtrating and evaporative concentration method. This method can separately collect and concentrate particulate and dissolved radiocesium rapidly and simultaneously in the field. (author)

  15. Turbulent solutal convection and surface patterning in solid dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.S.; Liu, Y.; Ecke, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe experiments in which crystals of NaCl, KBr, and KCl are dissolved from below by aqueous solutions containing concentrations of the respective salts from zero concentration to near saturation. The solution near the solid-liquid interface is gravitationally unstable, producing turbulent hydrodynamic motion similar to thermal convection from a single surface cooled from above. The coupling of the fluid flow with the solid dissolution produces irregular patterns at the solid-liquid interface with a distribution of horizontal length scales. The dissolution mass flux and the pattern length scales are compared with a turbulent boundary layer model. Remarkable agreement is found, showing that the fluid motion controls both the dissolution rate and the interface patterning. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Nanoscale hydrodynamics near solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Diego; de la Torre, J. A.; Duque-Zumajo, D.; Español, Pep; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Chejne, Farid

    2018-02-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) is a successful and well-established theory for the study of the structure of simple and complex fluids at equilibrium. The theory has been generalized to dynamical situations when the underlying dynamics is diffusive as in, for example, colloidal systems. However, there is no such a clear foundation for Dynamic DFT (DDFT) for the case of simple fluids in contact with solid walls. In this work, we derive DDFT for simple fluids by including not only the mass density field but also the momentum density field of the fluid. The standard projection operator method based on the Kawasaki-Gunton operator is used for deriving the equations for the average value of these fields. The solid is described as featureless under the assumption that all the internal degrees of freedom of the solid relax much faster than those of the fluid (solid elasticity is irrelevant). The fluid moves according to a set of non-local hydrodynamic equations that include explicitly the forces due to the solid. These forces are of two types, reversible forces emerging from the free energy density functional, and accounting for impenetrability of the solid, and irreversible forces that involve the velocity of both the fluid and the solid. These forces are localized in the vicinity of the solid surface. The resulting hydrodynamic equations should allow one to study dynamical regimes of simple fluids in contact with solid objects in isothermal situations.

  17. Utilisation of solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balu, K

    1978-07-01

    The prime solution to the present energy crisis is the recovery of latent energy from waste materials, for solid waste contains recoverable energy and it merely needs to be released. The paper is concerned with classification of solid waste, energy content of waste, methods of solid waste disposal, and chemical processing of solid waste. Waste disposal must be performed in situ with energy recovery. Scarcity of available land, pollution problem, and unrecovered latent energy restrict the use of the land-filling method. Pyrolysis is an effective method for the energy recovery and disposal problems. Chemical processing is suitable for the separated cellulosic fraction of the waste material.

  18. Multivalent ion conducting solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanaka, N. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Solid electrolytes possess important characteristics for industrial applications. Only a single ionic species can macroscopically migrate in these solids. This paper described a the new NASICON (M-Zr-Nb-P-O) type system, exhibiting an exceptionally high level of trivalent M3+ ion conductivity on polycrystalline solids. The partial substitution of the smaller higher valent Nb5+ ion for Zr4+ stabilized the NASICON phase and realized the M3+ ion conduction in the NASICON structure. It was concluded that the conductivities of the series are comparable to those of the practically applied solid electrolytes of oxide anion conductors of YSZ and CSZ. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Management of solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. T.; Stinton, L. H.

    1980-04-01

    Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC, several waste management options were of solid waste. The current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste are highlighted. Capital operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options.

  20. Management of solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.T.; Stinton, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste requires the application of numerous qualitative and quantitative criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC several waste management options were identified as being applicable to the management of the various types of solid waste. This paper highlights the current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste. Capital and operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options

  1. Management of solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.T.; Stinton, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste requires the application of numerous qualitative and quantitative criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC, several waste management options were identified as being applicable to the management of the various types of solid waste. This paper highlights the current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste. Capital and operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options

  2. Understanding solid state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Holgate, Sharon Ann

    2009-01-01

    Where Sharon Ann Holgate has succeeded in this book is in packing it with examples of the application of solid state physics to technology. … All the basic elements of solid state physics are covered … . The range of materials is good, including as it does polymers and glasses as well as crystalline solids. In general, the style makes for easy reading. … Overall this book succeeds in showing the relevance of solid state physics to the modern world … .-Contemporary Physics, Vol. 52, No. 2, 2011I was indeed amused and inspired by the wonderful images throughout the book, carefully selected by th

  3. Management of solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.J. [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-12-31

    This chapter introduces the range of solid waste materials produced in the mining and mineral processing industries, with particular reference to Australia. The waste materials are characterised and their important geotechnical engineering properties are discussed. Disposal management techniques for metalliferous, coal, heavy mineral sand, fly ash and bauxite solid wastes are described. Geo-technical techniques for the management of potential contaminants are presented. Minimisation and utilisation of solid wastes, and the economics of solid waste management, are discussed from the perspectives of policy, planning, costing and rehabilitation. 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Production and Composition of Dissolved Black Carbon from Various Biochars and Environmentally-aged Charcoals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, K. W.; Zimmerman, A. R.; Hatcher, P.; Mitra, S.; Wozniak, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter, or black carbon (BC), is the solid carbonaceous product of biomass pyrolysis. While solid BC represents a long-lived portion of the C cycle, it releases pyrogenic dissolved organic matter (py-DOM) which may be more susceptible to mineralization and transformation. This py-DOM may impact environmental and public health and likely controls exchange between terrestrial and aquatic BC pools. Benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs), produced by acid digestion of samples, are used as molecular markers for pyrogenic organic matter. Yet, we currently have a poor understanding of the controls on the production of py-DOM and its yield of BPCA compounds. In response, aqueous leaching time series experiments were carried out using a series of laboratory-made biochars and environmentally-aged charcoals. While non-charred oak biomass released 31.8 mg C/g (45% C loss), oak biochars prepared at low temperatures (250 and 400ºC), produced 9.9 and 2.6 mg C/g (11 and 2.3% C loss), respectively. Oak chars prepared at a higher temperatures (650ºC) leached only 1.85 mg C/g (1.5% C loss). In contrast, an environmentally-aged charcoal (30 y old cypress charcoal) leached 10.9% of its C. On average, 59% (ranging 38-80%) of oak pyrogenic DOC was converted into BPCAs, suggesting that oak py-DOM has a variably condensed aromatic proportion. However, much less BPCAs were generated by BC parent solids. In addition, trace amounts of BPCA were generated from non-pyrolyzed grass, oak wood, and compost leachates; these lend concern to the use of BPCAs as exclusive pyrogenic molecular markers. As expected, BPCA molecular distribution showed that condensation increased with pyrolysis temperature of solid biochars and their corresponding leachates. The comparison of these findings to 13C and 1H NMR spectra of charcoal parent solids and their leachates will further elucidate the chemistry and production mechanisms of py-DOM.

  5. Solid-solid interactions in Co3O4-MoO3/MgO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, Nagi R.E.; Ghozza, Ahmed M.; El-Shobaky, Gamil A.

    2003-01-01

    Cobalt/magnesium mixed oxide solids and cobalt-molybdenum/magnesium mixed oxide solids were prepared by thermal decomposition of basic magnesium carbonate pretreated with different proportions of cobalt nitrate and then with calculated amounts of ammonium molybdate. The proportions of cobalt expressed as Co 3 O 4 were 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 mol while the concentrations of molybdenum expressed as mol% MoO 3 were 2.5 and 5.0. The prepared mixed solid specimens were calcined in air at 400-1000 deg. C. The solid-solid interactions in Co 3 O 4 -MoO 3 were investigated using DTA, TG and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results obtained revealed that MgO dissolved cobalt oxide in its lattice forming CoO-MgO solid solution. The amount of cobalt dissolved increases by increasing the temperature in the range 800-1000 deg. C. This finding was confirmed by X-ray diffractograms in which all the diffraction lines of cobalt oxide disappeared at 1000 deg. C. MoO 3 present interacted readily with MgO and cobalt oxide by heat treatment at temperature starting from 400 deg. C producing MgMoO 4 and CoMoO 4 which remained stable by heating at 1000 deg. C. The impregnation of basic magnesium carbonate with cobalt nitrate much enhanced its thermal decomposition yielding MgO, which decomposed completely at 395.5 deg. C instead of 525 deg. C. The formation of magnesium cobaltite (MgCo 2 O 4 ) has been ruled out via XRD investigation at relatively high diffraction angles

  6. Amazon River dissolved load: temporal dynamics and annual budget from the Andes to the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérôme; Filizola, Naziano; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina; Sánchez, Liz Stefanny Hidalgo; Lagane, Christelle; Casimiro, Waldo Sven Lavado; Noriega, Luis; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to estimate the export fluxes of major dissolved species at the scale of the Amazon basin, to identify the main parameters controlling their spatial distribution and to identify the role of discharge variability in the variability of the total dissolved solid (TDS) flux through the hydrological cycle. Data are compiled from the monthly hydrochemistry and daily discharge database of the "Programa Climatologico y Hidrologico de la Cuenca Amazonica de Bolivia" (PHICAB) and the HYBAM observatories from 34 stations distributed over the Amazon basin (for the 1983-1992 and 2000-2012 periods, respectively). This paper consists of a first global observation of the fluxes and temporal dynamics of each geomorphological domain of the Amazon basin. Based on mean interannual monthly flux calculations, we estimated that the Amazon basin delivered approximately 272 × 10(6) t year(-1) (263-278) of TDS during the 2003-2012 period, which represents approximately 7 % of the continental inputs to the oceans. This flux is mainly made up by HCO3, Ca and SiO2, reflecting the preferential contributions of carbonate and silicate chemical weathering to the Amazon River Basin. The main tributaries contributing to the TDS flux are the Marañon and Ucayali Rivers (approximately 50 % of the TDS production over 14 % of the Amazon basin area) due to the weathering of carbonates and evaporites drained by their Andean tributaries. An Andes-sedimentary area-shield TDS flux (and specific flux) gradient is observed throughout the basin and is first explained by the TDS concentration contrast between these domains, rather than variability in runoff. This observation highlights that, under tropical context, the weathering flux repartition is primarily controlled by the geomorphological/geological setting and confirms that sedimentary areas are currently active in terms of the production of dissolved load. The log relationships of concentration vs discharge have

  7. Universal decoherence in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M

    2004-03-26

    Symmetry implications for the decoherence of quantum oscillations of a two-state system in a solid are studied. When the oscillation frequency is small compared to the Debye frequency, the universal lower bound on the decoherence due to the atomic environment is derived in terms of the macroscopic parameters of the solid, with no unknown interaction constants.

  8. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  9. Orally-dissolving film for sublingual and buccal delivery of ropinirole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ka Lun; Fang, Yuan; Han, Hao; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ho Yin; Chow, Shing Fung; Lam, Tai Ning; Lee, Wai Yip Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Ropinirole is a very important treatment option for Parkinson's disease (PD), a major threat to the aging population. However, this drug undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism, resulting in a low oral bioavailability. Moreover, the necessity of frequent administration due to the short half-life of ropinirole may jeopardize patient compliance. Indeed, taking this drug in solid oral dosage forms (e.g. Tablet) can be a challenge because of the tremor, rigidity, limited mobility, and impaired drug absorption experienced by PD patients. In light of these, there is a pressing need to devise formulations for the delivery of ropinirole that allow simple and easy administration and fast drug action, as well as avoidance of first-pass metabolism and overcoming the challenge of impaired absorption due to gastrointestinal dysfunctions, etc. Herein, we seek to overcome all these challenges via sublingual or buccal delivery of orally-dissolving films. Accordingly, we aimed to fabricate and characterize orally-dissolving films of ropinirole and assess their in vivo pharmacokinetics after sublingual and buccal administration. The ropinirole oral film was non-toxic and exhibited fast disintegration and dissolution and was physically stable for at least 28 days. Upon buccal/sublingual administration of the oral films, ropinirole reached the systemic circulation within 15 min and bioavailability was significantly improved, which may be attributable to avoidance of first-pass metabolism via absorption through the oral cavity. In conclusion, our ropinirole oral film improved bioavailability after sublingual or buccal administration. This formulation potentially overcomes biopharmaceutical challenges and provide a convenient means of administration of ropinirole or other anti-PD drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of probe choice and solution conditions on the apparent photoreactivity of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizel, Andrew C; Remucal, Christina K

    2017-08-16

    Excited triplet states of dissolved organic matter ( 3 DOM) are quantified directly with the species-specific probes trans,trans-hexadienoic acid (HDA) and 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP), and indirectly with the singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) probe furfuryl alcohol (FFA). Although previous work suggests that these probe compounds may be sensitive to solution conditions, including dissolved organic carbon concentration ([DOC]) and pH, and may quantify different 3 DOM subpopulations, the probes have not been systematically compared. Therefore, we quantify the apparent photoreactivity of diverse environmental waters using HDA, TMP, and FFA. By conducting experiments under ambient [DOC] and pH, with standardized [DOC] and pH, and with solid phase extraction isolates, we demonstrate that much of the apparent dissimilarity in photochemical measurements is attributable to solution conditions, rather than intrinsic differences in 3 DOM production. In general, apparent quantum yields (Φ 1 O 2 ≥ Φ 3 DOM,TMP ≫ Φ 3 DOM,HDA ) and pseudo-steady state concentrations ([ 1 O 2 ] ss > [ 3 DOM] ss,TMP > [ 3 DOM] ss,HDA ) show consistent relationships in all waters under standardized conditions. However, intrinsic differences in 3 DOM photoreactivity are apparent between DOM from diverse sources, as seen in the higher Φ 1 O 2 and lower Φ 3 DOM,TMP of wastewater effluents compared with oligotrophic lakes. Additionally, while conflicting trends in photoreactivity are observed under ambient conditions, all probes observe quantum yields increasing from surface wetlands to terrestrially influenced waters to oligotrophic lakes under standardized conditions. This work elucidates how probe selection and solution conditions influence the apparent photoreactivity of environmental waters and confirms that 3 DOM or 1 O 2 probes cannot be used interchangeably in waters that vary in [DOC], pH, or DOM source.

  11. Nutrient and dissolved organic carbon removal from natural waters using industrial by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Laura A; Douglas, Grant B; Coleman, Shandel; Yuan, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation of excess nutrients in wastewater and stormwater is required to safeguard aquatic ecosystems. The use of low-cost, mineral-based industrial by-products with high Ca, Mg, Fe or Al content as a solid phase in constructed wetlands potentially offers a cost-effective wastewater treatment option in areas without centralised water treatment facilities. Our objective was to investigate use of water treatment residuals (WTRs), coal fly ash (CFA), and granular activated carbon (GAC) from biomass combustion in in-situ water treatment schemes to manage dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrients. Both CaO- and CaCO(3)-based WTRs effectively attenuated inorganic N species but exhibited little capacity for organic N removal. The CaO-based WTR demonstrated effective attenuation of DOC and P in column trials, and a high capacity for P sorption in batch experiments. Granular activated carbon proved effective for DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) removal in column trials, but was ineffective for P attenuation. Only CFA demonstrated effective removal of a broad suite of inorganic and organic nutrients and DOC; however, Se concentrations in column effluents exceeded Australian and New Zealand water quality guideline values. Water treated by filtering through the CaO-based WTR exhibited nutrient ratios characteristic of potential P-limitation with no potential N- or Si-limitation respective to growth of aquatic biota, indicating that treatment of nutrient-rich water using the CaO-based WTR may result in conditions less favourable for cyanobacterial growth and more favourable for growth of diatoms. Results show that selected industrial by-products may mitigate eutrophication through targeted use in nutrient intervention schemes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of liquid metals for the extraction of solid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid metals dissolve several solid metals in considerable amounts at moderate temperatures. The dissolution processes may be based upon simple physical solubility, formation of intermetallic phases. Even chemical reactions are often observed in which non-metallic elements might be involved. Thus, the capacity to dissolve metals and chemical properties of the liquid metals play a role in these processes. Besides the solubility also chemical properties and thermochemical data are of importance. The dissolution of metals in liquid metals can be applied to separate the solutes from other metals or non-metallic phases. Relatively noble metals can be chemically reduced by the liquid phases. Such solution processes can be applied in the extractive metallurgy, for instance to extract metals from metallic waste. The recycling of metals is of high economical and ecological importance. Examples of possible processes are discussed. (author)

  13. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  14. Applied mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, Allan F

    2009-01-01

    Modern computer simulations make stress analysis easy. As they continue to replace classical mathematical methods of analysis, these software programs require users to have a solid understanding of the fundamental principles on which they are based. Develop Intuitive Ability to Identify and Avoid Physically Meaningless Predictions Applied Mechanics of Solids is a powerful tool for understanding how to take advantage of these revolutionary computer advances in the field of solid mechanics. Beginning with a description of the physical and mathematical laws that govern deformation in solids, the text presents modern constitutive equations, as well as analytical and computational methods of stress analysis and fracture mechanics. It also addresses the nonlinear theory of deformable rods, membranes, plates, and shells, and solutions to important boundary and initial value problems in solid mechanics. The author uses the step-by-step manner of a blackboard lecture to explain problem solving methods, often providing...

  15. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % 235 U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 rods containing 4.31 wt % 235 U and 2 wt % PuO 2 in natural UO 2 respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in 235 U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel

  16. Multi-technical approach to characterize the dissolved organic matter from clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchart, Pascale; Michels, Raymond; Faure, Pierre; Parant, Stephane; Bruggeman, Christophe; De Craen, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Currently, different clay formations (Boom Clay, Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, Opalinus Clay, Toarcian shales...) are studied as reference host rocks for methodological studies on the geological disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. While a significant effort is being done on the characterization of the mineral composition and the reactivity of the clays as barriers, the occurrence of organic matter, even in low proportion cannot be neglected. The organic matter appears as gas (C 1 -C 4 as identified in the Bure underground facilities), as solid (kerogen), as hydrocarbon liquids (free hydrocarbons within the kerogen or adsorbed on minerals) as well as in the aqueous phase (Dissolved Organic Matter - DOM). DOM raises specific interest, as it may have complexation properties towards metals and rare earth elements and is potentially mobile. Therefore, it is important to characterize the DOM as part of a study of feasibility of geological disposal. In this study, four host rocks were studied: - The Callovo-Oxfordian shales of Bure Underground Research Laboratory (Meuse, France); - The Opalinus Clay of Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (Switzerland); - The Toarcian shales of Tournemire (Aveyron, France); - The Boom Clay formation studied in The HADES Underground Research Laboratory (Mol, Belgium). Organic matter characteristics vary upon formation in terms of (i) origin (mainly marine type II; mixtures of marine type II and higher plants type III organic matter often poorly preserved), (ii) TOC contents, (iii) thermal maturity (for instance, Opalinus Clay and Toarcian shales are more mature and have poor oxygen content compare to Callovo-Oxfordian shales and Boom Clay). These differences in organic matter quality may have an influence on the quantity and the quality of DOM. The DOM of the rocks was isolated by Soxhlet extraction using pure water. A quantitative and qualitative multi

  17. Production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in Arctic Ocean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Seung-Il; Niessen, Frank; Hong, Wei-Li; Kang, Moo-Hee; Hur, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in the anoxic oceanic sediments. In this study, sediment pore waters were sampled from four different sites in the Chukchi-East Siberian Seas area to examine the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and their optical properties. The production of FDOM, coupled with the increase of nutrients, was observed above the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ). The presence of FDOM was concurrent with sulfate reduction and increased alkalinity (R2 > 0.96, p  0.95, p CDOM and FDOM to the overlying water column, unearthing a channel of generally bio-refractory and pre-aged DOM to the oceans.

  18. Functional State Modelling of Cultivation Processes: Dissolved Oxygen Limitation State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Roeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new functional state, namely dissolved oxygen limitation state for both bacteria Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultivation processes is presented in this study. Functional state modelling approach is applied to cultivation processes in order to overcome the main disadvantages of using global process model, namely complex model structure and a big number of model parameters. Alongwith the newly introduced dissolved oxygen limitation state, second acetate production state and first acetate production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of E. coli, while mixed oxidative state and first ethanol production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of S. cerevisiae. For all mentioned above functional states both structural and parameter identification is here performed based on experimental data of E. coli and S. cerevisiae fed-batch cultivations.

  19. Isotope correlation verification of analytical measurements for dissolver materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satkowski, J.

    1988-01-01

    An independent verification of analytical results for accountability measurements of dissolver materials can be performed using the Iosotop Correlation Technique (ICT). ICT is based on the relationships that exist between the initial and final elemental concentration and isotopic abundances of the nuclear fuel. Linear correlation functions between isotopic ratios and plutonium/uranium ratios have been developed for specific reactor fuels. The application of these correlations to already existing analytical data provides a laboratory additional confidence in the reported results. Confirmation is done by a test of consistancy with historical data. ICT is being utilized with dissolver accountability measurements at the Savannah River Plant Laboratory. The application, implementation, and operating experience of this technique are presented

  20. The effect of dissolved oxygen on water radiolysis behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakabuskie, P.A.; Joseph, J.M.; Wren, J.C.; Stuart, C.R.

    2012-09-01

    A quantitative understanding of the chemical or redox environments generated in water by ionizing radiation is important for material selection, development of maintenance programs, and safety assessments for water-cooled nuclear power reactors. The highly reactive radicals (·OH, ·H, ·e aq - , ·HO 2 , and ·O 2 - ) and molecular species (H 2 and H 2 O 2 ) generated by water radiolysis can compete in reactions with other dissolved compounds and impose changes to the system chemistry by altering the steady-state concentrations of water radiolysis products, which could impact the degradation of materials in contact with the aqueous phase. Understanding in detail how a given chemical additive changes the long-term radiolysis kinetics can help us to determine what chemistry control steps may be required to return the system to an optimal redox condition, and in turn, enhance the lifetime of reactor components. This study outlines the effect of dissolved oxygen gas, which could be introduced due to air ingress, on long-term water radiolysis behaviour. The effects of solution pH and initial dissolved O 2 concentration on the radiolytic production of molecular H 2 and H 2 O 2 have been investigated by performing experiments with three different O 2 concentrations at pH 6.0 and 10.6 under steady-state radiolysis conditions. The aqueous and gas phase analyses were performed using UV-Vis spectrophotometry and gas-chromatography equipped with electron capture and thermal conductivity detectors. The experimental results were compared with kinetic model calculations of steady-state radiolysis and were found to be in good agreement. The concentrations of water radiolysis products, H 2 O 2 and H 2 , were found to increase in the presence of dissolved oxygen, but the degree of increase was shown to depend on the solution pH. Furthermore, the steady-state concentration of H 2 did not increase as greatly as that of H 2 O 2 at either pH studied. The kinetic analyses have shown

  1. Dissolvable tattoo sensors: from science fiction to a viable technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huanyu; Yi, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Early surrealistic painting and science fiction movies have envisioned dissolvable tattoo electronic devices. In this paper, we will review the recent advances that transform that vision into a viable technology, with extended capabilities even beyond the early vision. Specifically, we focus on the discussion of a stretchable design for tattoo sensors and degradable materials for dissolvable sensors, in the form of inorganic devices with a performance comparable to modern electronics. Integration of these two technologies as well as the future developments of bio-integrated devices is also discussed. Many of the appealing ideas behind developments of these devices are drawn from nature and especially biological systems. Thus, bio-inspiration is believed to continue playing a key role in future devices for bio-integration and beyond.

  2. Dissolving of Nb and Ti carbonitride precipitates in microalloyed steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjin Nie; Shanwu Yang; Shaoqiang Yuan; Xinlai He

    2003-01-01

    The dissolving behaviour of Nb and Ti carbonitride precipitates in microalloyed steels during isothermal holding at 1300℃ was investigated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum (EDX). It was found that all precipitates in Nb-Ti microalloyed steel are (Nb, Ti)(C,N). With holding time increasing, the atomic ratio of Nb/Ti in precipitates decrease gradually. These precipitates still existe even after holding for 48 h at 1300℃ while Nb(C,N) precipitates dissolve away in Nb microalloyed steel only after 4 h at the same temperature. These results show that formation and thermostability of precipitates are considerably influenced by interaction between Nb and Ti.

  3. Preparation of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Flynn, Peter F.; Wand, A. Joshua

    1999-01-01

    The majority of proteins are too large to be comprehensively examined by solution NMR methods, primarily because they tumble too slowly in solution. One potential approach to making the NMR relaxation properties of large proteins amenable to modern solution NMR techniques is to encapsulate them in a reverse micelle which is dissolved in a low viscosity fluid. Unfortunately, promising low viscosity fluids such as the short chain alkanes, supercritical carbon dioxide, and various halocarbon refrigerants all require the application of significant pressure to be kept liquefied at room temperature. Here we describe the design and use of a simple cost effective NMR tube suitable for the preparation of solutions of proteins encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in such fluids

  4. Dissolvable tattoo sensors: from science fiction to a viable technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Huanyu; Yi, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Early surrealistic painting and science fiction movies have envisioned dissolvable tattoo electronic devices. In this paper, we will review the recent advances that transform that vision into a viable technology, with extended capabilities even beyond the early vision. Specifically, we focus on the discussion of a stretchable design for tattoo sensors and degradable materials for dissolvable sensors, in the form of inorganic devices with a performance comparable to modern electronics. Integration of these two technologies as well as the future developments of bio-integrated devices is also discussed. Many of the appealing ideas behind developments of these devices are drawn from nature and especially biological systems. Thus, bio-inspiration is believed to continue playing a key role in future devices for bio-integration and beyond. (invited comment)

  5. Implicit analysis of the transient water flow with dissolved air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Twyman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The implicit finite-difference method (IFDM for solving a system that transports water with dissolved air using a fixed (or variable rectangular space-time mesh defined by the specified time step method is applied. The air content in the fluid modifies both the wave speed and the Courant number, which makes it inconvenient to apply the traditional Method of Characteristics (MOC and other explicit schemes due to their impossibility to simulate the changes in magnitude, shape and frequency of the pressures train. The conclusion is that the IFDM delivers an accurate and stable solution, with a good adjustment level with respect to a classical case reported in the literature, being a valid alternative for the transient solution in systems that transport water with dissolved air.

  6. Behaviour of fluoride and dissolved silicon in Gouthami Godavari estuarine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.; Sudhakar, U.; Varaprasad, S.J.D.

    The concentrations of fluoride and dissolved silicon in Gouthami-Godavari estuarine region (Andhra Pradesh, India) have been measured as a function of chlorinity during different seasons. Fluoride and dissolved silicon behave conservatively during...

  7. THE ROLE OF NITROGEN IN CHROMOPHORIC AND FLUORESCENT DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial and photochemical processes affect chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) dynamics in the ocean. Some evidence suggests that dissolved nitrogen plays a role in CDOM formation, although this has received little systematic attention in marine ecosystems. Coastal sea...

  8. An extensive study of the concentrations of particulate/dissolved radiocaesium derived from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in various river systems and their relationship with catchment inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Matsuura, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    An extensive investigation of particulate radiocaesium in suspended solids and dissolved radiocaesium in river water was undertaken at 30 sites in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures in December 2012, and their relationships with catchment inventory and the solid/liquid distribution coefficient (K d ) were evaluated. Rivers located in the coastal region on the north side of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant exhibited relatively higher particulate radiocaesium concentrations. Significant correlations were found between concentrations of particulate/dissolved radiocaesium and average catchment inventories, indicating that the concentrations of particulate/dissolved radiocaesium could be approximated from the catchment inventory. Particulate radiocaesium concentration was significantly correlated with dissolved radiocaesium concentration (with the exception of concentrations measured in estuaries), and the geometric mean K d was calculated as 3.6 × 10 5 with a 95% confidence interval of 2.6–5.1 × 10 5 . - Highlights: • Particulate radiocaesium concentration correlated with catchment inventory. • Particulate size can be an important factor of the correlation. • Solid/liquid distribution coefficients were obtained for extensive area

  9. Production of Dissolved Organic Matter During Doliolid Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellane, N. J.; Paffenhofer, G. A.; Stubbins, A.

    2016-02-01

    The biological carbon pump (BCP) draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and buries it at the seafloor. The efficiency of the BCP is determined in part by the sinking rates of particulate organic carbon (POC) from ocean surface waters. Zooplankton can package POC into fecal pellets with higher sinking rates than their food source (e.g. phytoplankton), increasing the efficiency of the BCP. However, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is also produced as zooplankton ingest and egest food, reducing the efficiency of BCP. The pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri (doliolid) is a gelatinous zooplankton found at high concentrations in shelf waters, including our study site: the South Atlantic Bight. Doliolids are efficient grazers capable of stripping large quantities of phytoplankton from the water column. To determine the balance between pellet formation and DOC production during feeding, doliolids (6-7 mm gonozooids) were placed in natural seawater amended with a live phytoplankton food source and incubated on a plankton wheel. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) released directly to the water as well as the water soluble fraction of pellet organic matter were quantified and optically characterized. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorbance and fluorescence spectra revealed that doliolid feeding produces DOM with optical properties that are commonly indicative of newly produced, highly biolabile DOM of microbial origin. Based upon these optical characteristics, doliolid-produced DOM is expected to be highly bio-labile in the environment and therefore rapidly degraded by surface ocean microbes shunting phytoplankton-derived organic carbon out of the BCP and back to dissolved inorganic carbon.

  10. Effect of dissolved air content on single bubble sonoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Arakeri, Vijay H

    1993-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that a single gas bubble in a liquid medium can be driven hard enough by an acoustic pressure field to make it emit light which is visible to the naked eye in a dark room. This phenomenon termed as single bubble sonoluminescence has shown some extraordinary physical properties. In the present investigation the author has shown that dissolved air content has a significant influence on this phenomenon.

  11. Optimization of fast dissolving etoricoxib tablets prepared by sublimation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Patel D; Patel M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 3 2 ...

  12. Development and characterization of nifedipine-amino methacrylate copolymer solid dispersion powders with various adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotsanan Weerapol

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid dispersions of nifedipine (NDP, a poorly water-soluble drug, and amino methacrylate copolymer (AMCP with aid of adsorbent, that is, fumed silica, talcum, calcium carbonate, titanium dioxide, and mesoporous silica from rice husks (SRH, were prepared by solvent method. The physicochemical properties of solid dispersions, compared to their physical mixtures, were determined using powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The surface morphology of the prepared solid dispersions was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The dissolution of NDP from solid dispersions was compared to NDP powders. The effect of adsorbent type on NDP dissolution was also examined. The dissolution of NDP increased with the ratio of NDP:AMCP:adsorbent of 1:4:1 when compared to the other formulations. As indicated from PXRD patterns, DSC thermograms and SEM images, NDP was molecularly dispersed within polymer carrier or in an amorphous form, which confirmed the better dissolution of solid dispersions. Solid dispersions containing SRH provided the highest NDP dissolution, due to a porous nature of SRH, allowing dissolved drug to fill in the pores and consequently dissolve in the medium. The results suggested that solid dispersions containing adsorbents (SRH in particular demonstrated improved dissolution of poorly water-soluble drug when compared to NDP powder.

  13. Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) Export from Watersheds to Coastal Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Gardner, G. B.; Peri, F.

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from terrestrial plants and soils is transported by surface waters and groundwaters to coastal ocean waters. Along the way, photochemical and biological degradation can remove DOM, and in situ processes such as phytoplankton leaching and sediment sources can add to the DOM in the river water. Wetlands, especially coastal wetlands can add significant amounts of DOM that is carried by rivers and is exported through estuaries to coastal systems. We will present observational data from a variety of coastal systems (San Francisco Bay, Boston Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, Hudson River, the Mississippi River, and a small salt marsh in the Gulf of Mexico). High resolution measurements of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) can be correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) so can be used to estimate DOC in specific systems and seasons. Gradients in CDOM/DOC combined with water fluxes can be used to estimate DOC fluxes from a variety of coastal watersheds to coastal systems. Influences of land use, system size, residence time, DOM quality, and photochemical and biological degradation will be discussed. The significance of coastal wetlands in the land-to-ocean export of DOC will be emphasized.

  14. Iron traps terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter at redox interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Zak, Dominik; Biester, Harald; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Reactive iron and organic carbon are intimately associated in soils and sediments. However, to date, the organic compounds involved are uncharacterized on the molecular level. At redox interfaces in peatlands, where the biogeochemical cycles of iron and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are coupled, this issue can readily be studied. We found that precipitation of iron hydroxides at the oxic surface layer of two rewetted fens removed a large fraction of DOM via coagulation. On aeration of anoxic fen pore waters, >90% of dissolved iron and 27 ± 7% (mean ± SD) of dissolved organic carbon were rapidly (within 24 h) removed. Using ultra-high-resolution MS, we show that vascular plant-derived aromatic and pyrogenic compounds were preferentially retained, whereas the majority of carboxyl-rich aliphatic acids remained in solution. We propose that redox interfaces, which are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial settings, are selective yet intermediate barriers that limit the flux of land-derived DOM to oceanic waters. PMID:23733946

  15. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Tausif Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing, in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets.

  16. The Dissolved Oxygen Prediction Method Based on Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissolved oxygen (DO is oxygen dissolved in water, which is an important factor for the aquaculture. Using BP neural network method with the combination of purelin, logsig, and tansig activation functions is proposed for the prediction of aquaculture’s dissolved oxygen. The input layer, hidden layer, and output layer are introduced in detail including the weight adjustment process. The breeding data of three ponds in actual 10 consecutive days were used for experiments; these ponds were located in Beihai, Guangxi, a traditional aquaculture base in southern China. The data of the first 7 days are used for training, and the data of the latter 3 days are used for the test. Compared with the common prediction models, curve fitting (CF, autoregression (AR, grey model (GM, and support vector machines (SVM, the experimental results show that the prediction accuracy of the neural network is the highest, and all the predicted values are less than 5% of the error limit, which can meet the needs of practical applications, followed by AR, GM, SVM, and CF. The prediction model can help to improve the water quality monitoring level of aquaculture which will prevent the deterioration of water quality and the outbreak of disease.

  17. ASP project. Dissolved oxygen issues in ASP project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. Bondar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the latest results of studies about the effect of dissolved oxygen on the efficiency of the ASP flooding project implemented by Salym Petroleum Development N.V.. Pilot project on experimental injection of anionic surfactant solutions, soda and polymer into the reservoir for enhanced oil recovery (ASP project has been implemented since 2016. The stability of one of the components of the ASP polymer is strongly dependent on the presence of iron, stiffness cations and dissolved oxygen in the water. Since the polymer is used for injection at two stages of the project, which are essential and the longest, at the design stage of ASP project a whole complex of polymer protection had been established against negative factors, in particular from the influence of oxygen, which causes not only oxygen corrosion but also irreversible destruction polymer chains. In the paper, studies on the stability of polymer solutions are described, an analysis of viscosity loss with time in the presence of iron and oxygen for polymer solutions is carried out. The choice of chemical deoxygenation method for the control of dissolved oxygen is substantiated. The program of laboratory studies of the ASP project and the analytical instruments used are described. The technological scheme of the ASP process is presented, and recommendations for the implementation of the technology are given.

  18. Solid Lithium Ion Conductors (SLIC) for Lithium Solid State Batteries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To identify the most lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes for lithium solid state batteries from the emerging types of solid electrolytes, based on a...

  19. FAST DISSOLVING THIN STRIPS: AN EMERGING WAY FOR ORAL DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Anjali Joshi* and Ganesh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Various pharmaceutical dosage form are present in the market but all of the dosage forms possess some drawback most common is patient incompliance which is seen in all age groups. So from last few years focus is done on developing such dosage form which enhances safety, efficacy and patient compliance. In this manner, in late 1970 fast-dissolving drug delivery system came in existence which includes Fast dissolving tablets and fast dissolving thin strips means those dosage form which dissolve...

  20. Risks of using membrane filtration for trace metal analysis and assessing the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media - A study on zinc, copper and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2011-01-01

    Membrane filtration is commonly performed for solid-liquid separation of aqueous solutions prior to trace metal analysis and when assessing 'dissolved' metal fractions. Potential artifacts induced by filtration such as contamination and/or adsorption of metals within the membrane have been investigated for different membrane materials, metals, applied pressures and pre-cleaning steps. Measurements have been conducted on aqueous solutions including well-defined metal standards, ultrapure water, and on runoff water from corroded samples. Filtration using both non-cleaned and pre-cleaned filters revealed contamination and adsorption effects, in particular pronounced for zinc, evident for copper but non-significant for nickel. The results clearly show these artifacts to be non-systematic both for non-cleaned and pre-cleaned membranes. The applied pressure was of minor importance. Measurements of the labile fraction by means of stripping voltammetry clearly elucidate that membrane filtration followed by total metal analysis cannot accurately assess the labile or the dissolved metal fraction. - Highlights: → Membrane filtration for trace metal analysis can introduce significant artifacts. → The dissolved metal fraction cannot be assessed by membrane filtration. → Non-specified filtration procedures are inadequate for scientific studies. → Artifacts caused by membrane filtration need to be addressed by regulators. - Membrane filtration cannot be used to assess the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media and needs to be defined in detail in standard tests.

  1. Dissolution of powdered spent fuel and U crystallization from actual dissolver solution for 'NEXT' process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Kazunori; Hinai, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Masaumi; Kaji, Naoya; Kamiya, Masayoshi; Ohyama, Koichi; Sano, Yuichi; Washiya, Tadahiro; Komaki, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The beaker-scale experiments on the effective powdered fuel dissolution and the U crystallization from dissolver solution with the irradiated MOX fuel from the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' were carried out. The powdered fuel was effectively dissolved into the nitric acid solution. In the U crystallization experiments, U crystal was obtained from the actual dissolver solution without any addition of reagent. (authors)

  2. Relationships between colored dissolved organic matter and dissolved organic carbon in different coastal gradients of the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, E Therese; Kratzer, Susanne; Andersson, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Due to high terrestrial runoff, the Baltic Sea is rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the light-absorbing fraction of which is referred to as colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Inputs of DOC and CDOM are predicted to increase with climate change, affecting coastal ecosystems. We found that the relationships between DOC, CDOM, salinity, and Secchi depth all differed between the two coastal areas studied; the W Gulf of Bothnia with high terrestrial input and the NW Baltic Proper with relatively little terrestrial input. The CDOM:DOC ratio was higher in the Gulf of Bothnia, where CDOM had a greater influence on the Secchi depth, which is used as an indicator of eutrophication and hence important for Baltic Sea management. Based on the results of this study, we recommend regular CDOM measurements in monitoring programmes, to increase the value of concurrent Secchi depth measurements.

  3. Riverine dissolved carbon concentration and yield in subtropical catchments, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Hao; Shih, Yu-ting; Huang, -Chuan, Jr.

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved carbon is not highly correlated to carbon cycle, but also a critical water quality indicator and affected by interaction of terrestrial and aquatic environment at catchment scale. However, the rates and extent of the dissolved carbon export are still poorly understood and scarcely quantified especially for typhoon events. In this study, regular and events' data of riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were monitored to estimate the export. Meanwhile, the hydrological model and mixing model were used for determination of DOC and DIC flow pathways at 3 sites of Tsengwen reservoir in southern Taiwan in 2014-2015. Results showed that the mean DOC concentration was 1.5 - 2.2 mg l-1 (flow weighted) without seasonal variation. The average DOC yield was 3.1 ton-C km-2 yr-1. On the other hand, DIC concentration ranged from 15 to 25.8 mg l-1, but DIC concentration in dry season was higher than wet season. Mean annual DIC yield was 51 ton-C km-2 yr-1. The export-ratio of DOC:DIC was 1:16.5, which was extremely lower than that of worldwide large rivers (DOC:DIC=1:4.5 in average) and other mountainous rivers (DOC:DIC=1:4.6 in average). Both DOC and DIC concentration showed the dramatically discrepant change in typhoon events. The DOC concentration increased to 4-8 folds rapidly before the flood peak. However, DIC concentration was diluted to one third with discharge simultaneously and returned slowly to base concentration in more than a week. According to the hydrological model, events contributed 14.6% of the annual discharge and 21.9% and 11.1% of DOC and DIC annual flux, respectively. Furthermore, 68.9% of events' discharge derived from surface runoff which carried out 91.3% of DOC flux and 51.1% of DIC flux. It implied that increases of surface runoff transported DOC form near soil surface, but diluted DIC concentration likely implied the contribution of groundwater. Our study characterized the specialty of dissolved carbon

  4. Geochemistry of dissolved and suspended loads of the Seine River, France: anthropogenic impact, carbonate and silicate weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Gaillardet, J.; Allègre, C. J.

    1999-05-01

    are transported in a solid form, the rest being transported in solution. CO 2 consumption by carbonate weathering approaches 400 × 10 3 mol/km 2/yr. In the Seine river at Paris, about 2-3 mg/l of dissolved cations are found to originate from the chemical weathering of silicates. By taking dissolved silica into accounts, the total dissolved load derived from silicate weathering is about 6-7 mg/l. This value is minimal because biological uptake of silica probably occur in the Seine river. The chemical weathering rate of aluminosilicates is estimated to be 2 t/km 2/yr . The ratio of physical over chemical weathering of silicates range between 1 and 3 and the total (chemical and physical) erosion rates of sedimentary silicates are about 2-3 mm/kyr. The CO 2 consumption by silicate weathering 15-24 × 10 3 mol/km 2/yr and is independent of dissolved silica concentration. Silicate consumption is thus 20 times less than carbonate consumption in the Paris basin. Compared to the neighboring granitic areas, the sedimentary region drained by the Seine river has 2 to 3 times lower CO 2 consumption rates. We attribute this difference to the cation-depleted nature of the Seine basin aluminosilicates, which are of sedimentary origin. At a world scale, the chemical denudation rates found for the Seine basin are very low and comparable to those given for tropical lowland rivers draining silicates, such as the rivers of the Congo and Amazon basins, in spite of huge climatic differences. We attribute this similarity to the low mechanical denudation that characterizes these two types of regions.

  5. Solid biomass barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    Primary energy production from solid biomass (wood, wood waste and other solid vegetal and animal materials) reached 62,4 million tons oil equivalent (Mtoe) in 2006, i-e 3,1 more than in 2005. The primary energy coming from the direct combustion of renewable origin solid urban waste in incineration unit scan also be added to this figure. In 2006 this represented a production of 5,3 Mtoe, i-e 0,1 Mtoe more than in 2005. (author)

  6. Applications in solid mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Kristian Breum; Wells, Garth N.

    2012-01-01

    Problems in solid mechanics constitute perhaps the largest field of application of finite element methods. The vast majority of solid mechanics problems involve the standard momentum balance equation, posed in a Lagrangian setting, with different models distinguished by the choice of nonlinear...... or linearized kinematics, and the constitutive model for determining the stress. For some common models, the constitutive relationships are rather complex. This chapter addresses a number of canonical solid mechanics models in the context of automated modeling, and focuses on some pertinent issues that arise...

  7. The solid state maser

    CERN Document Server

    Orton, J W; Walling, J C; Ter Haar, D

    1970-01-01

    The Solid State Maser presents readings related to solid state maser amplifier from the first tentative theoretical proposals that appeared in the early 1950s to the successful realization of practical devices and their application to satellite communications and radio astronomy almost exactly 10 years later. The book discusses a historical account of the early developments (including that of the ammonia maser) of solid state maser; the properties of paramagnetic ions in crystals; the development of practical low noise amplifiers; and the characteristics of maser devices designed for communica

  8. [Sources of dissolved organic carbon and the bioavailability of dissolved carbohydrates in the tributaries of Lake Taihu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Kong, Fan-Xiang; Liu, Bo; Yan, De-Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Surface water samples of Yincungang and Chendonggang Rivers were collected from September 2012 to August 2013 in Lake Taihu. Water temperature, Chlorophyll a and bacterial abundance were analyzed, as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, stable carbon isotope of DOC (Δ13C(DOC)), specific UV absorbance (SUVA254 ) and dissolved carbohydrates concentrations. Δ13C(DOC) ranged from -27.03% per thousand ± 0.30% per thousand to -23.38%per thousand ± 0.20% per thousand, indicating a terrestrial source. Both the autochthonous and allochthonous sources contributed to the carbohydrates pool in the tributaries. Significant differences in PCHO (polysaccharides) and MCHO (monosaccharides) concentrations were observed between spring-summer and autumn-winter (P carbohydrates. PCHO contributed a major fraction to TCHO (total dissolved carbohydrates) in autumn and winter, which could be explained by the accumulation of undegradable PCHO limited by the low water temperature; MCHO contributed a major fraction to TCHO in spring and summer, which might be caused by the transformation from PCHO by microbes at high water temperature.

  9. Predicting dissolved lignin phenol concentrations in the coastal ocean from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM absorption coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric G. Fichot

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved lignin is a well-established biomarker of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM in the ocean, and a chromophoric component of DOM. Although evidence suggests there is a strong linkage between lignin concentrations and chromophoric DOM (CDOM absorption coefficients in coastal waters, the characteristics of this linkage and the existence of a relationship that is applicable across coastal oceans remain unclear. Here, 421 paired measurements of dissolved lignin concentrations (sum of 9 lignin phenols and CDOM absorption coefficients (ag(λ were used to examine their relationship along the river-ocean continuum (0-37 salinity and across contrasting coastal oceans (sub-tropical, temperate, high-latitude. Overall, lignin concentrations spanned four orders of magnitude and revealed a strong, non-linear relationship with ag(λ. The characteristics of the relationship (shape, wavelength dependency, lignin-composition dependency and evidence from degradation indicators were all consistent with lignin being an important driver of CDOM variability in coastal oceans, and suggested physical mixing and long-term photodegradation were important in shaping the relationship. These observations were used to develop two simple empirical models for estimating lignin concentrations from ag(λ with a +/- 20% error relative to measured values. The models are expected to be applicable in most coastal oceans influenced by terrigenous inputs.

  10. Layered inorganic solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejka, Jiří; Morris, R. E.; Nachtigall, P.; Roth, Wieslaw Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10274-10275 ISSN 1477-9226 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : layered inorganic solids * physical chemistry * catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  11. Sheared solid materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ingredient, solving the equations yields formation of dislocation dipoles or slips. In plastic ... We expect that m is a key order parameter for amorphous solids or glasses. .... It satisfies the mechanical equilibrium condition and can be calculated ...

  12. Solid Waste Management Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Solid waste management districts layer is part of a dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. This dataset...

  13. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  14. Solid polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed; Choe, Hyoun S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  15. Organic Molecular Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the physical aspects of organic solids. All phenomena which are necessary in order to understand modern technical applications are being dealt with in a way which makes the concepts of the topics accessible for students. The chapters - from the basics, production and characterization of organic solids and layers to organic semiconductors, superconductors and opto-electronical applications - have been arranged in a logical and well thought-out order.

  16. Solid formation in piperazine rate-based simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    of view but also from a modeling perspective. The present work develops a rate-based model for CO2 absorption and desorption modeling for gas-liquid-solid systems and it is demonstrated for the piperazine CO2 capture process. This model is an extension of the DTU CAPCO2 model to precipitating systems....... It uses the extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model for phase equilibria and thermal properties estimation. The mass and heat transfer phenomena is implemented in a film model approach, based on second order reactions kinetics. The transfer fluxes are calculated using the concentration of the dissolved...

  17. Redeposition of electrochemically dissolved platinum as nanoparticles on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, C. F.; Stamatin, S. N.; Skou, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    communication reports a simple chemical method for reprecipitating platinum as nanoparticles of reasonable particle size on a carbon substrate without intermediary separation and handling of solid platinum salt. After electrochemical dissolution, platinum was reprecipitated using a polyol based method. Platinum...

  18. Production and Composition of Pyrogenic Dissolved Organic Matter From a Logical Series of Laboratory-Generated Chars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle W. Bostick

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Though pyrogenic carbon (pyC has been assumed to be predominantly stable, degradation and transfers of pyC between various pools have been found to influence its cycling and longevity in the environment. Dissolution via leaching may be the main control on loss processes such as microbial or abiotic oxidation, mineral sorption, or export to aquatic systems. Yet, little is known about the controls on pyrogenic dissolved organic matter (pyDOM generation or composition. Here, the yield and composition of pyDOM generated through batch leaching of a thermal series of oak and grass biochars, as well as several non-pyrogenic reference materials, was compared to that of their parent solids. Over 17 daily leaching cycles, biochars made from oak at 250–650°C released decreasing amounts of C on both a weight (16.9–0.3%, respectively and C yield basis (7.4–0.2% C, respectively. Aryl-C represented an estimated 32–82% of C in the parent solids (identified by 13C-NMR, but only 7–38% in the leachates (identified by 1H-NMR, though both increased with pyrolysis temperature. PyC, often operationally defined as condensed aromatic carbon (ConAC, was quantified using the benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA method. Tri- and tetra-carboxylated BPCAs were formed from non-pyrogenic reference materials, thus, only penta- and hexa-carboxylated BPCAs were used to derive a BPCA-C to ConAC conversion factor of 7.04. ConAC made up 24–57% of the pyrogenic solid C (excluding the 250°C biochar, but only about 9–23% of their respective leachates' DOC, though both proportions generally increased with pyrolysis temperature. Weighted BPCA compound distributions, or the BPCA Aromatic Condensation (BACon Index, indicate that ConAC cluster size increased in pyrogenic solids but not in leachates. Additional evidence presented suggests that both aromatic cluster size and O-containing functional group contents in the pyrogenic solid control pyC solubility. Overall, pyDOM was

  19. Laser cooling of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushkin, S V

    2009-01-01

    Laser cooling is an important emerging technology in such areas as the cooling of semiconductors. The book examines and suggests solutions for a range of problems in the development of miniature solid-state laser refrigerators, self-cooling solid-state lasers and optical echo-processors. It begins by looking at the basic theory of laser cooling before considering such topics as self-cooling of active elements of solid-state lasers, laser cooling of solid-state information media of optical echo-processors, and problems of cooling solid-state quantum processors. Laser Cooling of Solids is an important contribution to the development of compact laser-powered cryogenic refrigerators, both for the academic community and those in the microelectronics and other industries. Provides a timely review of this promising field of research and discusses the fundamentals and theory of laser cooling Particular attention is given to the physics of cooling processes and the mathematical description of these processes Reviews p...

  20. The source and distribution of thermogenic dissolved organic matter in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, T.; Suryaputra, I. G. N. A.; Paeng, J.

    2009-04-01

    Thermogenic organic matter (ThOM) is abundant in the environment. ThOM is produced at elevated temperature and pressure in deep sediments and earth's crust, and it is also a residue of fossil fuel and biomass burning ("black carbon"). Because of its refractory character, it accumulates in soils and sediments and, therefore, may sequester carbon from active cycles. It was hypothesized that a significant component of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) might be thermogenic. Here we present a detailed data set on the distribution of thermogenic DOM in major water masses of the deep and surface ocean. In addition, several potential sources of thermogenic DOM to the ocean were investigated: active seeps of brine fluids in the deep Gulf of Mexico, rivers, estuaries and submarine groundwaters. Studies on deep-sea hydrothermal vents and aerosol deposition are ongoing. All DOM samples were isolated from seawater via solid phase extraction (SPE-DOM). ThOM was quantified in the extracts as benzene-polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) after nitric acid oxidation via high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). BPCAs are produced exclusively from fused ring systems and are therefore unambiguous molecular tracers for ThOM. In addition to BPCA determination, the molecular composition and structure of ThOM was characterized in detail via ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). All marine and river DOM samples yielded significant amounts of BPCAs. The cold seep system in the deep Gulf of Mexico, but also black water rivers (like the Suwannee River) were particularly rich in ThOM. Up to 10% of total dissolved organic carbon was thermogenic in both systems. The most abundant BPCA was benzene-pentacarboxylic acid (B5CA). The molecular composition of BPCAs and the FT-ICR-MS data indicate a relatively small number (5-8) of fused aromatic rings per molecule. Overall, the molecular BPCA patterns were very similar independent of the source of Th

  1. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in Southwestern Greenland Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, C. L.; Giles, M. E.; Underwood, G. J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important property of Arctic lake ecosystems, originating from allochthonous inputs from catchments and autochthonous production by plankton in the water column. Little is known about the quality of DOM in Arctic lakes that lack substantial inputs from catchments and such lakes are abundant in southwestern Greenland. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), the fraction that absorbs ultraviolet (UV) and visible light, is the controlling factor for the optical properties of many surface waters and as well informs on the quality of DOM. We examined the quality of CDOM in 21 lakes in southwestern Greenland, from the ice sheet to the coast, as part of a larger study examining the role of DOM in regulating microbial communities in these lakes. DOM was size fractioned and absorbance and fluorescence was measured on each size fraction, as well as on bulk DOM. The specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) at 254 nm (SUVA254), computed by normalizing absorption (a254) to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, provided an estimate of the aromatic carbon content of DOM. SUVA values were generally CDOM fluorescence was used to determine the relative abundance of allochthonous and autochthonous DOM in all size fractions. Younger lakes near the ice sheet and lakes near the coast had lower amounts of CDOM and appeared more microbial in quality. However, lakes centrally located between the ice sheet and the coast had the highest CDOM concentrations and exhibited strong humic fluorescence. Overall distinct differences in CDOM quality were observed between lake locations and among DOM size fractions.

  2. Dissolved gaseous mercury formation and mercury volatilization in intertidal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesário, Rute; Poissant, Laurier; Pilote, Martin; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Mota, Ana M; Canário, João

    2017-12-15

    Intertidal sediments of Tagus estuary regularly experiences complex redistribution due to tidal forcing, which affects the cycling of mercury (Hg) between sediments and the water column. This study quantifies total mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MMHg) concentrations and fluxes in a flooded mudflat as well as the effects on water-level fluctuations on the air-surface exchange of mercury. A fast increase in dissolved Hg and MMHg concentrations was observed in overlying water in the first 10min of inundation and corresponded to a decrease in pore waters, suggesting a rapid export of Hg and MMHg from sediments to the water column. Estimations of daily advective transport exceeded the predicted diffusive fluxes by 5 orders of magnitude. A fast increase in dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) concentration was also observed in the first 20-30min of inundation (maximum of 40pg L -1 ). Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations were inversely correlated with DGM concentrations. Dissolved Hg variation suggested that biotic DGM production in pore waters is a significant factor in addition to the photochemical reduction of Hg. Mercury volatilization (ranged from 1.1 to 3.3ngm -2 h -1 ; average of 2.1ngm -2 h -1 ) and DGM production exhibited the same pattern with no significant time-lag suggesting a fast release of the produced DGM. These results indicate that Hg sediment/water exchanges in the physical dominated estuaries can be underestimated when the tidal effect is not considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (paluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated aluminium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Formulation and evaluation of aceclofenac mouth-dissolving tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Singh Solanki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aceclofenac has been shown to have potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities similar to indomethacin and diclofenac, and due to its preferential Cox-2 blockade, it has a better safety than conventional Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs with respect to adverse effect on gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Aceclofenac is superior from other NSAIDs as it has selectivity for Cox-2, a beneficial Cox inhibitor is well tolerated, has better Gastrointestinal (GI tolerability and improved cardiovascular safety when compared with other selective Cox-2 inhibitor. To provide the patient with the most convenient mode of administration, there is need to develop a fast-disintegrating dosage form, particularly one that disintegrates and dissolves/disperses in saliva and can be administered without water, anywhere, any time. Such tablets are also called as "melt in mouth tablet." Direct compression, freeze drying, sublimation, spray drying, tablet molding, disintegrant addition, and use of sugar-based excipients are technologies available for mouth-dissolving tablet. Mouth-dissolving tablets of aceclofenac were prepared with two different techniques, wet granulation and direct compression, in which different formulations were prepared with varying concentration of excipients. These tablets were evaluated for their friability, hardness, wetting time, and disintegration time; the drug release profile was studied in buffer Phosphate buffered Saline (PBS pH 7.4. Direct compression batch C3 gave far better dissolution than the wet granulation Batch F2, which released only 75.37% drug, and C3, which released 89.69% drug in 90 minutes.

  5. Development and Characterization of Mouth Dissolving Tablet of Zolmitriptan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Singh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To formulate and Characterize Mouth Dissolving Tablet of Zolmitriptan to produce the intended benefits. Methods: Tablets were prepared using a direct compression method employing superdisintegrants such as Kyron T-314, Crospovidone, Croscarmellose Sodium, and Sodium Starch Glycolate. Tablets of Zolmitriptan prepared using Kyron T-314 exhibited the least friability and disintegration time 35 seconds. To decrease the disintegration time further, a sublimation technique was used along with the superdisintegrants for the preparation of Mouth Dissolving Tablet (MDTs. The addition of camphor as a subliming agent lowered the disintegration time 10 seconds further, but the percent friability was increased. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the joint influence of the amount of superdisintegrant (Kyron T-314 and the amount of sublimating agent (Camphor on the percent of friability and the disintegration time. Results: The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that an effective MDT of Zolmitriptan requires higher percentages of Kyron T-314 and camphor should be used. The approach using the optimization technique helped to produce a detailed understanding effect of formulation parameters. An optimized formulation was found to have good hardness, wetting time, disintegration time. Release kinetic model study indicated that all the formulations follow zero order kinetics. It also indicated that batch F1, F2, F5 and F8 releases the drug at constant rate as well as fast rate as per the Weibull model which was also confirmed by HixsonCrowell model. Stability studies indicated that there are no significant changes in hardness, Percentage friability, drug content and in-vitro disintegration time and cumulative percentage drug release. Conclusions: Thus, it was concluded that by adopting a systematic formulation approach, Zolmitriptan Mouth dissolving tablet could be formulated using superdisintegrants in combination with

  6. DECREASE OF SOLIDS IN GRAY WATER BY AERATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alonso Torres-Avalos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The activated sludge process is a biological treatment consisting basically of agitation and aeration of a waste water mixture and a selected microorganisms sludge. The oxidation of organic matter was determined with several tests such as BOD5 (Biochemical Oxygen Demand, TSS (Total Sedimented Solids, SS (Sediment Solids, TDS (Total Dissolved Solids, FVS (fixed and volatile solids and finally a measurement of treated water turbidity. The results obtained for the reduction of the organic load during the first two days of treatment (samples 1, 2 and 3 are visible in each of the organic loading tests; during the last two days according to the samples 4 and 5 the solids showed an increase in organic load. The related organoleptic properties such as color showed a notable decrease. As for the tests performed at pH show a change, samples 1, 2 and 3 approaching a range where they are neutral and the last two samples (4 and 5 the pH has an elevation until it becomes alkaline. The efficiency of the method used for the treatment of residual water during the first days reduced the organic load with a variation of TS and TSS of 760, 569 ppm respectively. This is a viable alternative since this is a low cost method with short term results because organoleptic properties such as odor and color were lost during the first day of treatment.

  7. Bioavailability of autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Helle; Markager, Svend Stiig; Søndergaard, Morten

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) produced during a phytoplankton bloom. The experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities as batch growth experiments over approximately 30 days with nitrogen limitation. Five to six...... times during the exponential and stationary phases of each experimental bloom the bioavailability of DON was measured over 60 days together with DOC and oxygen consumption. The overall aim was to quantify remineralization of the added nitrate. The results showed that maximum 33 % of the added nitrate...

  8. Interfacial dynamics of dissolving objects in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft, Chris; Bazant, Martin

    2013-11-01

    An advection-diffusion-limited dissolution model of an object being eroded by a two-dimensional potential flow will be presented. By taking advantage of conformal invariance of the model, a numerical method will be introduced that tracks the evolution of the object boundary in terms of a time-dependent Laurent series. Simulations of several dissolving objects will be shown, all of which show collapse to a single point in finite time. The simulations reveal a surprising connection between the position of the collapse point and the initial Laurent coefficients, which was subsequently derived analytically using residue calculus.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Evaporation of Droplets with Dissolved Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Liang Xu; Min Chen; Xiao-Dong Wang; Bing-Bing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the evaporation of water droplets containing either dissolved LiCl, NaCl or KCl salt in a gaseous surrounding (nitrogen) with a constant high temperature of 600 K. The initial droplet has 298 K temperature and contains 1,120 water molecules, 0, 40, 80 or 120 salt molecules. The effects of the salt type and concentration on the evaporation rate are examined. Three stages with different evaporation rates are observed for all cases. In the initial...

  10. Advanced immobilization processes for fuel hulls and dissolver residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, W.; Boehme, G.; Findlay, J.R.; Sombret, C.

    1984-08-01

    Various research and development projects for the conditioning of cladding scraps and dissolver residues are pursued within the scope of the R and D programme on nuclear waste Management of the European Community. They include the characterization of the waste materials arising from industrial fuel reprocessing and the development of different waste immobilization techniques. These concern the embedment of scraps and residues into inert matrices like cement, metal alloys, compacted graphite and sintered ceramics as well as the treatment of the fuel hulls by melting or chemical conversion. The conditioned waste forms are tested as to their relevant properties for activity enclosure

  11. Advanced immobilization processes for fuel hulls and dissolver residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, W.; Boehme, G.; Findlay, J.R.; Sombert, C.

    1984-01-01

    Various research and development projects for the conditioning of cladding scraps and dissolver residues are pursued within the scope of the R and D programme on nuclear waste Management of the European Community. They include the characterization of the waste materials arising from industrial fuel reprocessing and the development of different waste immobilization techniques. These concern the embedment of the scraps and residues into inert matrices like cement, metal alloys, compacted graphite and sintered ceramics as well as the treatment of the fuel hulls by melting or chemical conversion. The conditioned waste forms are tested as to their relevant properties for activity enclosure

  12. Analysis of a slow-dissolving medicine by EPMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasayama, Tetsuaki; Kohara, Kiyohiro; Araki, Takeshi

    1995-01-01

    Along with a dissolution test of a slow-dissolving medicine, the change in distribution of the drug in solution can be observed by using EPMA, and the structual factors and dissolution mechanism which determine the bioavailability of medicine can be clarified. In the evaluation of physical, chemical and pharmaceutical qualities, it is concluded that EPMA is very effective in elemental and state analyses with observation of microscopic areas on the micrometer order. Especially, the color mapping method clarifies the distribution of a drug in the total image field and enables us to analyze the mechanism of a dissolution medicine. (author)

  13. Sea cucumbers reduce chromophoric dissolved organic matter in aquaculture tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Nassaj, Seyed Mohammad; Catalá, Teresa S; Álvarez, Pedro A; Reche, Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Mono-specific aquaculture effluents contain high concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which affect negatively the water quality of the recipient ecosystems. A fundamental feature of water quality is its transparency. The fraction of dissolved organic matter that absorbs light is named chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). A sustainable alternative to mono-specific aquaculture is the multitrophic aquaculture that includes species trophically complementary named "extractive" species that uptake the waste byproducts. Sea cucumbers are recognized as efficient extractive species due to the consumption of particulate organic matter (POM). However, the effects of sea cucumbers on CDOM are still unknown. During more than one year, we monitored CDOM in two big-volume tanks with different trophic structure. One of the tanks (-holothurian) only contained around 810 individuals of Anemonia sulcata , whereas the other tank (+holothurian) also included 90 individuals of Holothuria tubulosa and Holothuria forskali . We routinely analyzed CDOM absorption spectra and determined quantitative (absorption coefficients at 325 nm) and qualitative (spectral slopes) optical parameters in the inlet waters, within the tanks, and in their corresponding effluents. To confirm the time-series results, we also performed three experiments. Each experiment consisted of two treatments: +holothurians (+H) and -holothurians (-H). We set up three +H tanks with 80 individuals of A. sulcata and 10 individuals of H. tubulosa in each tank and four -H tanks that contained only 80 individuals of A. sulcata . In the time-series, absorption coefficients at 325 nm ( a 325 ) and spectral slopes from 275 to 295 nm ( S 275-295 ) were significantly lower in the effluent of the +holothurian tank (average: 0.33 m -1 and 16 µm -1 , respectively) than in the effluent of the -holothurian tank (average: 0.69 m -1 and 34 µm -1 , respectively), the former being similar to those found in the inlet

  14. Assessing dissolved methane patterns in central New York groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. McPhillips

    2014-07-01

    New hydrological insights for this region: There was no significant difference between methane concentrations in valleys versus upslope locations, in water wells less than or greater than 1 km from a conventional gas well, and across different geohydrologic units. Methane concentrations were significantly higher in groundwater dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate compared with groundwater dominated by calcium bicarbonate, indicating bedrock interactions and lengthy residence times as controls. A multivariate regression model of dissolved methane using only three variables (sodium, hardness, and barium explained 77% of methane variability, further emphasizing the dominance of geochemistry and hydrogeology as controls on baseline methane patterns.

  15. Dissolved organic carbon from sewage sludge and manure can affect estrogen sorption and mineralization in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, Britta, E-mail: britta.stumpe@rub.d [Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Geography, Department Soil Science/Soil Ecology, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Marschner, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.marschner@rub.d [Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Geography, Department Soil Science/Soil Ecology, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    In this study, effects of sewage sludge and manure borne dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on 17beta-estradiol (E2) and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) sorption and mineralization processes were investigated in three agricultural soils. Batch equilibrium techniques and equilibrium dialysis methods were used to determine sorption mechanisms between DOC, estrogens and the soil solid phase. It was found that that the presence of organic waste borne DOC decreased estrogen sorption in soils which seems to be controlled by DOC/estrogen complexes in solution and by exchange processes between organic waste derived and soil borne DOC. Incubation studies performed with {sup 14}C-estrogens showed that DOC addition decreased estrogen mineralization, probably due to reduced bioavailability of estrogens associated with DOC. This increased persistence combined with higher mobility could increase the risk of estrogen transport to ground and surface waters. - The effect of DOC on estrogen sorption and mineralization is influenced by exchange processes between organic waste borne and soil derived DOC.

  16. Optimization of the Determination Method for Dissolved Cyanobacterial Toxin BMAA in Natural Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Boyin; Liu, Zhiquan; Huang, Rui; Xu, Yongpeng; Liu, Dongmei; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Cui, Fuyi

    2017-10-17

    There is a serious dispute on the existence of β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in water, which is a neurotoxin that may cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson's disease (ALS/PDC) and Alzheimer' disease. It is believed that a reliable and sensitive analytical method for the determination of BMAA is urgently required to resolve this dispute. In the present study, the solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure and the analytical method for dissolved BMAA in water were investigated and optimized. The results showed both derivatized and underivatized methods were qualified for the measurement of BMAA and its isomer in natural water, and the limit of detection and the precision of the two methods were comparable. Cartridge characteristics and SPE conditions could greatly affect the SPE performance, and the competition of natural organic matter is the primary factor causing the low recovery of BMAA, which was reduced from approximately 90% in pure water to 38.11% in natural water. The optimized SPE method for BMAA was a combination of rinsed SPE cartridges, controlled loading/elution rates and elution solution, evaporation at 55 °C, reconstitution of a solution mixture, and filtration by polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. This optimized method achieved > 88% recovery of BMAA in both algal solution and river water. The developed method can provide an efficient way to evaluate the actual concentration levels of BMAA in actual water environments and drinking water systems.

  17. Selective Leaching of Dissolved Organic Matter From Alpine Permafrost Soils on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinghui; Xu, Yunping; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Zito, Phoebe; Kellerman, Anne; Podgorski, David; Xiao, Wenjie; Wei, Dandan; Rashid, Harunur; Yang, Yuanhe

    2018-03-01

    Ongoing global temperature rise has caused significant thaw and degradation of permafrost soils on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP). Leaching of organic matter from permafrost soils to aquatic systems is highly complex and difficult to reproduce in a laboratory setting. We collected samples from natural seeps of active and permafrost layers in an alpine swamp meadow on the QTP to shed light on the composition of mobilized dissolved organic matter (DOM) by combining optical measurements, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, radiocarbon (14C), and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our results show that even though the active layer soils contain large amounts of proteins and carbohydrates, there is a selective release of aromatic components, whereas in the deep permafrost layer, carbohydrate and protein components are preferentially leached during the thawing process. Given these different chemical characteristics of mobilized DOM, we hypothesize that photomineralization contributes significantly to the loss of DOM that is leached from the seasonally thawed surface layer. However, with continued warming, biodegradation will become more important since biolabile materials such as protein and carbohydrate are preferentially released from deep-layer permafrost soils. This transition in DOM leachate source and associated chemical composition has ramifications for downstream fluvial networks on the QTP particularly in terms of processing of carbon and associated fluxes.

  18. Characterization of biochars and dissolved organic matter phases obtained upon hydrothermal carbonization of Elodea nuttallii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Wedwitschka, H; Zehnsdorf, A; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    The invasive aquatic plant Elodea nuttallii was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization at 200 °C and 240 °C to produce biochar. About 58% w/w of the organic carbon of the pristine plant was translocated into the solid biochar irrespectively of the operating temperature. The process water rich in dissolved organic matter proved a good substrate for biogas production. The E. nuttallii plants showed a high capability of incorporating metals into the biomass. This large inorganic fraction which was mainly transferred into the biochar (except sodium and potassium) may hamper the prospective application of biochar as soil amendment. The high ash content in biochar (∼ 40% w/w) along with its relatively low content of organic carbon (∼ 36% w/w) is associated with low higher heating values. Fatty acids were completely hydrolyzed from lipids due to hydrothermal treatment. Low molecular-weight carboxylic acids (acetic and lactic acid), phenols and phenolic acids turned out major organic breakdown products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dissolved organic carbon from sewage sludge and manure can affect estrogen sorption and mineralization in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpe, Britta; Marschner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In this study, effects of sewage sludge and manure borne dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) sorption and mineralization processes were investigated in three agricultural soils. Batch equilibrium techniques and equilibrium dialysis methods were used to determine sorption mechanisms between DOC, estrogens and the soil solid phase. It was found that that the presence of organic waste borne DOC decreased estrogen sorption in soils which seems to be controlled by DOC/estrogen complexes in solution and by exchange processes between organic waste derived and soil borne DOC. Incubation studies performed with 14 C-estrogens showed that DOC addition decreased estrogen mineralization, probably due to reduced bioavailability of estrogens associated with DOC. This increased persistence combined with higher mobility could increase the risk of estrogen transport to ground and surface waters. - The effect of DOC on estrogen sorption and mineralization is influenced by exchange processes between organic waste borne and soil derived DOC.

  20. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Cui, Dong-Yu; Liu, Yong; Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol e− (g C) −1 and 57.1– 346.07 μmol e− (g C) −1 , respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting

  1. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiao-Song [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Xi, Bei-Dou, E-mail: hexs82@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Cui, Dong-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Yong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agro-Environmental Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1} and 57.1– 346.07 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1}, respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting.

  2. Remote sensing estimation of terrestrially derived colored dissolved organic matterinput to the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Yu, Q.; Tian, Y. Q.

    2017-12-01

    The DOC flux from land to the Arctic Ocean has remarkable implication on the carbon cycle, biogeochemical & ecological processes in the Arctic. This lateral carbon flux is required to be monitored with high spatial & temporal resolution. However, the current studies in the Arctic regions were obstructed by the factors of the low spatial coverages. The remote sensing could provide an alternative bio-optical approach to field sampling for DOC dynamics monitoring through the observation of the colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The DOC and CDOM were found highly correlated based on the analysis of the field sampling data from the Arctic-GRO. These provide the solid foundation of the remote sensing observation. In this study, six major Arctic Rivers (Yukon, Kolyma, Lena, Mackenzie, Ob', Yenisey) were selected to derive the CDOM dynamics along four years. Our newly developed SBOP algorithm was applied to the large Landsat-8 OLI image data (nearly 100 images) for getting the high spatial resolution results. The SBOP algorithm is the first approach developing for the Shallow Water Bio-optical properties estimation. The CDOM absorption derived from the satellite images were verified with the field sampling results with high accuracy (R2 = 0.87). The distinct CDOM dynamics were found in different Rivers. The CDOM absorptions were found highly related to the hydrological activities and the terrestrially environmental dynamics. Our study helps to build the reliable system for studying the carbon cycle at Arctic regions.

  3. Predicting biopharmaceutical performance of oral drug candidates - Extending the volume to dissolve applied dose concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenster, Uwe; Mueck, Wolfgang; van der Mey, Dorina; Schlemmer, Karl-Heinz; Greschat-Schade, Susanne; Haerter, Michael; Pelzetter, Christian; Pruemper, Christian; Verlage, Joerg; Göller, Andreas H; Ohm, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to experimentally deduce pH-dependent critical volumes to dissolve applied dose (VDAD) that determine whether a drug candidate can be developed as immediate release (IR) tablet containing crystalline API, or if solubilization technology is needed to allow for sufficient oral bioavailability. pH-dependent VDADs of 22 and 83 compounds were plotted vs. the relative oral bioavailability (AUC solid vs. AUC solution formulation, Frel) in humans and rats, respectively. Furthermore, in order to investigate to what extent Frel rat may predict issues with solubility limited absorption in human, Frel rat was plotted vs. Frel human. Additionally, the impact of bile salts and lecithin on in vitro dissolution of poorly soluble compounds was tested and data compared to Frel rat and human. Respective in vitro - in vivo and in vivo - in vivo correlations were generated and used to build developability criteria. As a result, based on pH-dependent VDAD, Frel rat and in vitro dissolution in simulated intestinal fluid the IR formulation strategy within Pharmaceutical Research and Development organizations can be already set at late stage of drug discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coupling between a geochemical model and a transport model of dissolved elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1988-10-01

    In order to assess the safety analysis of an underground repository, the transport of radioelements in groundwater and their interactions with the geological medium are modelled. The objective of this work is the setting up and experimental validation of the coupling of a geochemical model with a transport model of dissolved elements. A laboratory experiment was developed at the CEA center of Cadarache. Flow-through experiments were carried out on columns filled with crushed limestone, where several inflow conditions were taken into account as the temperature, the presence of a pollutant (strontium chloride) at different concentrations. The results consist of the evolution of the chemical composition of the water at the outlet of the column. The final aim of the study is to explain these results with a coupled model where geochemical and transport phenomena are modelled in a two-step procedure. This code, called STELE, was built by introducing a geochemical code, CHIMERE, into an existing transport code, METIS. At this stage, the code CHIMERE can take into account: any chemical reaction in aqueous phase (complexation, acid-base reaction, redox equilibrium), dissolution-precipitation of minerals and solid phases, dissolution-degassing of gas. The paper intends to describe the whole process leading to the coupling which can be forecasted over the next years between geochemical and transport models

  5. THE HYDROLOGIC CYCLE, UNIDIRECTIONAL CHARTER OF THE DISSOLVED SALTS AND SUSPENDED LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Florea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is underlined that the hydrologic cycle in nature, reversible and regenerating of fresh water, carries out also an unidirectional and irreversible circulation – by means of a fragment of the hydrologic cycle – of the dissolved salts and stream’s suspended load, entailed by the water drained from continents to ocean. The trend is to transfer soluble salts from land to ocean in the same time with the running water on land in the portion of the hydrologic cycle which refers to the water transfer from continents to ocean in order to equilibrate the annual water balance of the hydrologic cycle. But, one can realize here and there some local salt accumulations in salt soils or in salt lakes within areas without drainage in arid climate; these salts accumulations are cases of local hydrologic cycles „grafted” along the way of water on land (to ocean. The energy necessary to the hydrologic cycle in nature is delivered by the Sun, and the entropy remains at a low level as a consequence of the elimination in this cycle of water vapors with high entropy, and of the receiving of liquid or solid water with low entropy, so that the annual level of entropy is maintained at a low level.

  6. Carbon-13 fractionation observed in thermal decarboxylation of pure phenylpropiolic acid (PPA) dissolved in phenylacetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, A.; Zielinski, M.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.

    2003-01-01

    The determinations of the 13 C fractionation in the decarboxylation of pure phenylpropiolic acid (PPA) above its melting point has been extended to higher degrees of decomposition of PPA by carrying out two-step decarboxylations to establish the maximum possible yield of carbon dioxide in the temperature interval of 423-475 K (58%). The result was compared with the yields of CO 2 for decarboxylation of PPA in phenylacetylene solvent (PA) (much smaller, temperature dependent, and equal to 11% at 406 K). The ratios of carbon isotope ratios, R so /R pf , all smaller than 1.009 in the temperature interval 405-475 K, have been analyzed formally within the branched decomposition scheme of PPA, providing carbon dioxide and a decarboxylation resistant solid chemical compound enriched in 13 C with respect to CO 2 . A general discussion of the 13 C fractionation in the decarboxylation of pure PPA and PPA dissolved in PA is supplemented by the model calculation of the maximized skeletal 13 C KIEs, in the linear chain propagation of the acetylene polymerization process. Further studies of the 13 C fractionation in condensed phases and in different hydrogen deficient and hydrogen rich media have been suggested. (author)

  7. Oral fast-dissolving drug delivery membranes prepared from electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone ultrafine fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dengguang; Shen Xiaxia; Zhu Limin; Branford-White, Chris; White, Kenneth; Annie Bligh, S W

    2009-01-01

    Oral fast-dissolving drug delivery membranes (FDMs) for poorly water-soluble drugs were prepared via electrospinning technology with ibuprofen as the model drug and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30 as the filament-forming polymer and drug carrier. Results from differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, and morphological observations demonstrated that ibuprofen was distributed in the ultrafine fibers in the form of nanosolid dispersions and the physical status of drug was an amorphous or molecular form, different from that of the pure drug and a physical mixture of PVP and ibuprofen. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy results illustrated that the main interactions between PVP and ibuprofen were mediated through hydrogen bonding. Pharmacotechnical tests showed that FDMs with different drug contents had almost the same wetting and disintegrating times, about 15 and 8 s, respectively, but significantly different drug dissolution rates due to the different physical status of the drug and the different drug-release-controlled mechanisms. 84.9% and 58.7% of ibuprofen was released in the first 20 s for FDMs with a drug-to-PVP ratio of 1:4 and 1:2, respectively. Electrospun ultrafine fibers have the potential to be used as solid dispersions to improve the dissolution profiles of poorly water-soluble drugs or as oral fast disintegrating drug delivery systems.

  8. Influence of environmental factors on spectral characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in Inner Mongolia Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z. D.; Song, K. S.; Zhao, Y.; Du, J.; Ma, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were examined in conjunction with environmental factors in the waters of rivers and terminal lakes within the Hulun Buir plateau, northeast China. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP) were significantly higher in terminal lakes than rivers waters (p CDOM absorption in river waters was significantly lower than terminal lakes. Analysis of the ratio of absorption at 250 to 365 nm (E250 : 365), specific ultraviolet (UV) absorbance (SUVA254), and the spectral slope ratio (Sr) indicated that CDOM in river waters had higher aromaticity, molecular weight, and vascular plant contribution than in terminal lakes. Furthermore, results showed that DOC concentration, CDOM light absorption, and the proportion of autochthonous sources of CDOM in plateau waters were all higher than in other freshwater rivers reported in the literature. The strong evapoconcentration, intense ultraviolet irradiance, and landscape features of the Hulun Buir plateau may be responsible for the above phenomenon. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that the environmental variables total suspended matter (TSM), TN, and electrical conductivity (EC) had a strong correlation with light absorption characteristics, followed by total dissolved solid (TDS) and chlorophyll a. In most sampling locations, CDOM was the dominant non-water light-absorbing substance. Light absorption by non-algal particles often exceeded that by phytoplankton in the plateau waters. Study of these optical-physicochemical correlations is helpful in the evaluation of the potential influence of water quality factors on non-water light absorption in cold plateau water environments. The construction of a correlation between DOC concentration and water quality factors may help contribute to regional estimates of carbon sources and fate for catchment carbon budget assessments.

  9. The influence of forestry activity on the structure of dissolved organic matter in lakes: Implications for mercury photoreactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Driscoll, N.J.; Siciliano, S.D.; Peak, D.; Carignan, R.; Lean, D.R.S.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that dissolved organic matter (DOM) increases in lakes associated with forestry activity but characterization of the DOM structure is incomplete. Twenty-three lakes with a wide range of forestry activities located in central Quebec, Canada were sampled and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, DOC fluorescence, and ultra violet-visible (UV-VIS) absorption spectra. The results show that DOC increases (as does the associated DOC fluorescence) with increased logging (slope = 0.122, r 2 = 0.581, p 2 = 0.308, p -2 , r 2 = 0.331, p 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13 C NMR) analysis. XANES analysis of functional groups in the four concentrated samples shows that there are significant differences in reduced sulphur between the samples, however there was no clear relationship with forestry activity in the associated catchment. XRD data showed the presence of amorphous sulphide minerals associated with the DOM concentrate that may be important sites for mercury binding. The 13 C NMR spectra of these samples show that the percentage of carbon present in carboxylic functional groups increases with increasing logging. Such structures are important for binding photo-reducible mercury and their presence may limit mercury photo-reduction and volatilization. We propose a mechanism by which increased logging leads to increased carboxylic groups in DOM and thereby increased weak binding of photo-reducible mercury. These results, in part, explain the decrease in dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) production rates with increased logging found in our previous work

  10. Some ideas about the modeling of experimental data obtained during spent fuel leaching in the presence of dissolved hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahiu, K.

    2003-01-01

    Lately several experimental data have been collected or published on the dissolution of spent fuel in solutions saturated with dissolved hydrogen. In the SFS project there are also several planned experiments of this type with different solids (alpha-doped UO 2 , high burnup spent fuel or MOX) or solution compositions (distilled water, low ionic strength carbonated solutions, concentrated NaCl solutions). There have been already also different hypothesis forwarded to explain the data as well as full models proposed including the influence of the dissolved Fe(II) on the fuel dissolution. Some ideas towards the main lines of modeling spent fuel dissolution under such conditions will be presented. The hydrogen effect on spent fuel dissolution is relatively recent and experiments are still carried out to confirm or rule it out for different spent fuels and conditions. For this reason it would be too ambitious at the present level of knowledge to present a full modeling of such data. This is because a spent fuel dissolution model should be valid for predictions of geological time scales based on relatively short time experiments. This is possible only with a very good understanding of the dissolution process and of the mechanisms underlying the hydrogen effect, while a simple extrapolation of experimental data for repository time scales would not be reliable. (Author)

  11. Isotope dilution alpha spectrometry for the determination of plutonium concentration in irradiated fuel dissolver solution : IDAS and R-IDAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaniah, M.V.; Jain, H.C.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Almaula, A.I.; Shah, P.M.; Parab, A.R.; Sant, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    The report presents a new technique, Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (IDAS) and Reverse Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (R-IDAS) for determining the concentration of plutonium in the irradiated fuel dissolver solution. The method exploits sup(238)Pu in IDAS and sup(239)Pu in R-IDAS as a spike and provides an alternative method to Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) which requires enriched sup(242)Pu as a spike. Depending upon the burn-up of the fuel, sup(238)Pu or sup(239)Pu is used as a spike to change the sup(238)Pu/(sup(239)Pu+sup(240)Pu)α activity ratio in the sample by a factor of 10. This change is determined by α-spectrometry on electrodeposited sources using a solid state silicon surface barrier detector coupled to a multichannel analyser. The validity of a simple method based on the geometric progression (G.P.) decrease for the far tail of the spectrum to correct for the tail contribution of sup(238)Pu peak (5.50 MeV) to the low energy sup(239)Pu + sup(240)Pu peak (5.17 MeV) is established. Results for the plutonium concentration on different irradiated fuel dissolver solutions with burn-uo ranging from J,000 to 100,000 MWD/TU are presented and compared with those obtained by IDMS. The values obtained by IDAS or R-IDAS and IDMS agree within 0.5%. (auth.)

  12. Dynamics of dissolved organic matter in fjord ecosystems: Contributions of terrestrial dissolved organic matter in the deep layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Youhei; McCallister, S. Leigh; Koch, Boris P.; Gonsior, Michael; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    Annually, rivers and inland water systems deliver a significant amount of terrestrial organic matter (OM) to the adjacent coastal ocean in both particulate and dissolved forms; however, the metabolic and biogeochemical transformations of OM during its seaward transport remains one of the least understood components of the global carbon cycle. This transfer of terrestrial carbon to marine ecosystems is crucial in maintaining trophic dynamics in coastal areas and critical in global carbon cycling. Although coastal regions have been proposed as important sinks for exported terrestrial materials, most of the global carbon cycling data, have not included fjords in their budgets. Here we present distributional patterns on the quantity and quality of dissolved OM in Fiordland National Park, New Zealand. Specifically, we describe carbon dynamics under diverse environmental settings based on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) depth profiles, oxygen concentrations, optical properties (fluorescence) and stable carbon isotopes. We illustrate a distinct change in the character of DOC in deep waters compared to surface and mid-depth waters. Our results suggest that, both, microbial reworking of terrestrially derived plant detritus and subsequent desorption of DOC from its particulate counterpart (as verified in a desorption experiment) are the main sources of the humic-like enriched DOC in the deep basins of the studied fjords. While it has been suggested that short transit times and protection of OM by mineral sorption may ultimately result in significant terrestrial carbon burial and preservation in fjords, our data suggests the existence of an additional source of terrestrial OM in the form of DOC generated in deep, fjord water.

  13. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter export from U.S. rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Holmes, R. Max; Fiske, Greg; Mann, Paul J.; Stubbins, Aron

    2013-04-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. A robust relationship between CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads is established (e.g., a350 versus DOC; r2 = 0.96, p CDOM yields are also correlated to watershed percent wetland (e.g. a350; r2 = 0.81, p CDOM export from ungauged watersheds. A large variation in CDOM yields was found across the rivers. The two rivers in the north-eastern U.S. (Androscoggin and Penobscot), the Edisto draining into the South Atlantic Bight, and some rivers draining into the Gulf of Mexico (Atchafalaya and Mobile) exhibit the highest CDOM yields, linked to extensive wetlands in these watersheds. If the Edisto CDOM yield is representative of other rivers draining into the South Atlantic Bight, this would result in a CDOM load equivalent to that of the Mississippi from a region of approximately 10% of the Mississippi watershed, indicating the importance of certain regions with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets.

  14. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  15. Measuring and understanding total dissolved gas pressure in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C.; Roy, J. W.; Randell, J.; Castellon, L.

    2009-05-01

    Since dissolved gases are important to a number of aspects of groundwater (e.g. age dating, active or passive bioremediation, greenhouse gas fluxes, understanding biogeochemical processes involving gases, assessing potential impacts of coal bed methane activities), accurate concentration measurements, and understanding of their subsurface behaviour are important. Researchers have recently begun using total dissolved gas pressure (TGP) sensor measurements, more commonly applied for surface water monitoring, in concert with gas composition analyses to estimate more accurate groundwater gas concentrations in wells. We have used hydraulic packers to isolate the well screens where TDP is being measured, and pump tests to indicate that in-well degassing may reduce TDG below background groundwater levels. Thus, in gas-charged groundwater zones, TGPs can be considerably underestimated in the absence of pumping or screen isolation. We have also observed transient decreased TGPs during pumping that are thought to result from ebullition induced when the water table or water level in the well is lowered below a critical hydrostatic pressure.

  16. Experimental Evidence for Abiotic Sulfurization of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika M. Pohlabeln

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic sulfur (DOS is the largest pool of organic sulfur in the oceans, and as such it is an important component of the global sulfur cycle. DOS in the ocean is resistant against microbial degradation and turns over on a millennium time scale. However, sources and mechanisms behind its stability are largely unknown. Here, we hypothesize that in sulfate-reducing sediments sulfur is abiotically incorporated into dissolved organic matter (DOM and released to the ocean. We exposed natural seawater and the filtrate of a plankton culture to sulfidic conditions. Already after 1-h at 20°C, DOS concentrations had increased 4-fold in these experiments, and 14-fold after 4 weeks at 50°C, indicating that organic matter does not need long residence times in natural sulfidic environments to be affected by sulfurization. Molecular analysis via ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry showed that sulfur was covalently and unselectively bound to DOM. Experimentally produced and natural DOS from sediments were highly similar on a molecular and structural level. By combining our data with published benthic DOC fluxes we estimate that 30–200 Tg DOS are annually transported from anaerobic and sulfate reducing sediments to the oceans. Uncertainties in this first speculative assessment are large. However, this first attempt illustrates that benthic DOS flux is potentially one order of magnitude larger than that via rivers indicating that this could balance the estimated global net removal of refractory DOS.

  17. Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J.; Whitesides, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P IC method developed to treat this latter effect permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism to account for 238 U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. The benchmark exercise has resolved a potentially dangerous inadequacy in dissolver calculations. (author)

  18. The global distribution and dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Norman B; Siegel, David A

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a ubiquitous component of the open ocean dissolved matter pool, and is important owing to its influence on the optical properties of the water column, its role in photochemistry and photobiology, and its utility as a tracer of deep ocean biogeochemical processes and circulation. In this review, we discuss the global distribution and dynamics of CDOM in the ocean, concentrating on developments in the past 10 years and restricting our discussion to open ocean and deep ocean (below the main thermocline) environments. CDOM has been demonstrated to exert primary control on ocean color by its absorption of light energy, which matches or exceeds that of phytoplankton pigments in most cases. This has important implications for assessing the ocean biosphere via ocean color-based remote sensing and the evaluation of ocean photochemical and photobiological processes. The general distribution of CDOM in the global ocean is controlled by a balance between production (primarily microbial remineralization of organic matter) and photolysis, with vertical ventilation circulation playing an important role in transporting CDOM to and from intermediate water masses. Significant decadal-scale fluctuations in the abundance of global surface ocean CDOM have been observed using remote sensing, indicating a potentially important role for CDOM in ocean-climate connections through its impact on photochemistry and photobiology.

  19. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter export from U.S. rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Holmes, R. Max; Fiske, Greg; Mann, Paul J.; Stubbins, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. A robust relationship between CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads is established (e.g., a350 versus DOC; r2 = 0.96, p CDOM yields are also correlated to watershed percent wetland (e.g. a350; r2 = 0.81, p CDOM export from ungauged watersheds. A large variation in CDOM yields was found across the rivers. The two rivers in the north-eastern U.S. (Androscoggin and Penobscot), the Edisto draining into the South Atlantic Bight, and some rivers draining into the Gulf of Mexico (Atchafalaya and Mobile) exhibit the highest CDOM yields, linked to extensive wetlands in these watersheds. If the Edisto CDOM yield is representative of other rivers draining into the South Atlantic Bight, this would result in a CDOM load equivalent to that of the Mississippi from a region of approximately 10% of the Mississippi watershed, indicating the importance of certain regions with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets.

  20. Dissolving Microneedle Arrays for Transdermal Delivery of Amphiphilic Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Myunggi; Liu, Haipeng

    2017-07-01

    Amphiphilic vaccine based on lipid-polymer conjugates is a new type of vaccine capable of self-delivering to the immune system. When injected subcutaneously, amphiphilic vaccines efficiently target antigen presenting cells in the lymph nodes (LNs) via a unique albumin-mediated transport and uptake mechanism and induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses. However, whether this new type of vaccine can be administrated via a safe, convenient microneedle-based transdermal approach remains unstudied. For such skin barrier-disruption systems, a simple application of microneedle arrays (MNs) is desired to disrupt the stratum corneum, and for rapid and pain-free self-administration of vaccines into the skin, the anatomic place permeates with an intricate mesh of lymphatic vessels draining to LNs. Here the microneedle transdermal approach is combined with amphiphilic vaccines to create a simple delivery approach which efficiently traffic molecular vaccines into lymphatics and draining LNs. The rapid release of amphiphilic vaccines into epidermis upon application of dissolving MNs to the skin of mice generates potent cellular and humoral responses, comparable or superior to those elicited by traditional needle-based immunizations. The results suggest that the amphiphilic vaccines delivered by dissolving MNs can provide a simple and safer vaccination method with enhanced vaccine efficacy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Droplet-born air blowing: novel dissolving microneedle fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Dong; Kim, Miroo; Yang, Huisuk; Lee, Kwang; Jung, Hyungil

    2013-09-28

    The microneedle-mediated drug delivery system has been developed to provide painless self-administration of drugs in a patient-friendly manner. Current dissolving microneedle fabrication methods, however, require harsh conditions for biological drugs and also have problems standardizing the drug dose. Here, we suggested the droplet-born air blowing (DAB) method, which provides gentle (4-25 °C) and fast (≤10min) microneedle fabrication conditions without drug loss. The amount of drug in the microneedle can be controlled by the pressure and time of droplet dispenser and the air blowing shapes this droplet to the microneedle, providing a force sufficient to penetrate skin. Also, the introduction of a base structure of two layered DAB-microneedle could provide complete drug delivery without wasting of drug. The DAB-based insulin loaded microneedle shows similar bioavailability (96.6±2.4%) and down regulation of glucose level compared with subcutaneous injection. We anticipate that DAB described herein will be suitable to design dissolving microneedles for use in biological drug delivery to patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rabies vaccination in dogs using a dissolving microneedle patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Jaya M; Dewitt, Kristopher; Scott-Garrard, Maya; Chiang, Yu-Wei; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-10-10

    Because humans get rabies primarily through dog bites, stray dog population control and mass or mandatory vaccination of domestic dogs and other animals has virtually eliminated human rabies in industrialized countries. However, thousands of people in developing countries die of rabies each year due to the inability to control dog populations and implement mass vaccination because of financial, logistical and other challenges. The availability of an easier-to-administer and more cost-effective vaccine may help to address some of these issues. Here, we propose the use of dissolving microneedle patches for simple and potentially cost-effective rabies vaccination, and assess the safety and immunogenicity of microneedle patch vaccination using a rabies DNA vaccine in dogs. The vaccine was stable upon formulation and storage for at least 3weeks at 4°C in a microneedle patch. For vaccination, the patches were applied to the inner ear by hand without an applicator. Microneedle patches were well tolerated in the skin, with mild erythema, minimal wheal formation and complete resolution of skin reactions within 7days, and generated no systemic adverse events. Microneedle patches were at least as immunogenic as intramuscular injection at the same dose, as demonstrated by similar serum neutralizing antibody titers. A ten-fold lower vaccine dose administered by microneedle patch generated a weaker immune response compared to full-dose intramuscular vaccination. We conclude that dissolving microneedle patches may provide an innovative approach to mass vaccination of dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of dissolved species on radiolysis of diluted seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Kuniki; Hanawa, Satoshi; Kasahara, Shigeki; Motooka, Takafumi; Tsukada, Takashi; Muroya, Yusa; Yamashita, Shinichi; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) experienced seawater injection into the cores and fuel pools as an emergent measure after the accident. After the accident, retained water has been continuously desalinized, and subsequently the concentration of chloride ion (Cl"-) has been kept at a lower level these days. These ions in seawater are known to affect water radiolysis, which causes the production of radiolytic products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2), molecular hydrogen (H_2) and molecular oxygen (O_2). However, the effects of dissolved ions relating seawater on the production of the stable radiolytic products are not well understood in the diluted seawater. To understand of the production behavior in diluted seawater under radiation, radiolysis calculations were carried out. Production of H_2 is effectively suppressed by diluting by up to vol10%. The concentrations of oxidants (H_2O_2 and O_2) are also suppressed by dilution of dissolved species. The effect of oxidants on corrosion of materials is thought to be low when the seawater was diluted by less than 1 vol% by water. It is also shown that deaeration is one of the effective measure to suppress the concentrations of oxidants at a lower level for any dilution conditions. (author)

  4. Solid biomass barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The European (EU 25) wish to substitute solid biomass origin energy consumption (principally wood and wood waste, but also straw, crop harvest residues, vegetal and animal waste) for a part of that of fossil fuel origin (petrol, gas and coal) is beginning to pay off. 58,7 million tons oil equivalent (Mtoe) of solid biomass was produced in 2005, i.e. a 3.1 Mtoe increase with respect to 2004. Production of primary energy coming from direct combustion of renewable municipal solid waste in incineration plants should also be added on to this figure. The 0,2 Mtoe increase in this production with respect to 2004 brings valorization of this type of waste up to 5,3 Mtoe in 2005. (author)

  5. Solid electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, H. S.

    Progress in the development of functioning solid electrolyte fuel cells is summarized. The solid electrolyte cells perform at 1000 C, a temperature elevated enough to indicate high efficiencies are available, especially if the cell is combined with a steam generator/turbine system. The system is noted to be sulfur tolerant, so coal containing significant amounts of sulfur is expected to yield satisfactory performances with low parasitic losses for gasification and purification. Solid oxide systems are electrically reversible, and are usable in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Employing zirconium and yttrium in the electrolyte provides component stability with time, a feature not present with other fuel cells. The chemical reactions producing the cell current are reviewed, along with materials choices for the cathodes, anodes, and interconnections.

  6. Dissolved Organic Carbon Cycling and Transformation Dynamics in A Northern Forested Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfaily, M. M.; Lin, X.; Chanton, P. R.; Steinweg, J.; Esson, K.; Kostka, J. E.; Cooper, W. T.; Schadt, C. W.; Hanson, P. J.; Chanton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Peatlands sequester one-third of all soil carbon and currently act as major sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The ability to predict or simulate the fate of stored carbon in response to climatic disruption remains hampered by our limited understanding of the controls of carbon turnover and the composition and functioning of peatland microbial communities. A combination of advanced analytical chemistry and microbiology approaches revealed that organic matter reactivity and microbial community dynamics were closely coupled in an extensive field dataset compiled at the S1 bog site established for the SPRUCE program, Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The molecular composition and decomposition pathways of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were contrasted using parallel factor (PARAFAC)-modeled excitation emission fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMS) and FT-ICR MS. The specific UV absorbance (SUVA) at 254 nm was calculated as an indicator of aromaticity. Fluorescence intensity ratios (BIX and FI) were used to infer the relative contributions from solid phase decomposition and microbial production. Distributions of bulk DOC, its stable (δ13C) and radioactive (Δ14C) isotopic composition were also utilized to infer information on its dynamics and transformation processes. Strong vertical stratification was observed in organic matter composition, the distribution of mineralization products (CO2, CH4), respiration rates, and decomposition pathways, whereas smaller variations were observed between sites. A decline in the aromaticity of pore water DOC was accompanied by an increase in microbially-produced DOC. Solid phase peat, on the other hand, became more humified and highly aromatic with depth. These observations were consistent with radiocarbon data that showed that the radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in peat porewaters more closely resemble those of DOC rather than solid peat, indicating that carbon from recent photosynthesis is fueling the

  7. Photochemistry on solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuura, T

    1989-01-01

    The latest developments in photochemistry on solid surfaces, i.e. photochemistry in heterogeneous systems, including liquid crystallines, are brought together for the first time in a single volume. Distinguished photochemists from various fields have contributed to the book which covers a number of important applications: molecular photo-devices for super-memory, photochemical vapor deposition to produce thin-layered electronic semiconducting materials, sensitive optical media, the control of photochemical reactions pathways, etc. Photochemistry on solid surfaces is now a major field and this

  8. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  9. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun; Wu, Ying; Sheng, Ping; Zhang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  11. Solid phase assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, M.G.; Johnson, L.R.; Ransom, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    In a solid phase assay for quantitative determination of biological and other analytes, a sample such as serum is contacted with a receptor for the analyte being assayed, the receptor being supported on a solid support. No tracer for the analyte is added to the sample before contacting with the receptor; instead the tracer is contacted with the receptor after unbound analyte has been removed from the receptor. The assay can be otherwise performed in a conventional manner but can give greater sensitivity. (author)

  12. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  13. Solid-state circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, G J

    2013-01-01

    Solid-State Circuits provides an introduction to the theory and practice underlying solid-state circuits, laying particular emphasis on field effect transistors and integrated circuits. Topics range from construction and characteristics of semiconductor devices to rectification and power supplies, low-frequency amplifiers, sine- and square-wave oscillators, and high-frequency effects and circuits. Black-box equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, physical equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and equivalent circuits of field effect transistors are also covered. This volume is divided

  14. Solid state theory

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    ""A well-written text . . . should find a wide readership, especially among graduate students."" - Dr. J. I. Pankove, RCA.The field of solid state theory, including crystallography, semi-conductor physics, and various applications in chemistry and electrical engineering, is highly relevant to many areas of modern science and industry. Professor Harrison's well-known text offers an excellent one-year graduate course in this active and important area of research. While presenting a broad overview of the fundamental concepts and methods of solid state physics, including the basic quantum theory o

  15. Solid-State Nanopore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhishan Yuan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solid-state nanopore has captured the attention of many researchers due to its characteristic of nanoscale. Now, different fabrication methods have been reported, which can be summarized into two broad categories: “top-down” etching technology and “bottom-up” shrinkage technology. Ion track etching method, mask etching method chemical solution etching method, and high-energy particle etching and shrinkage method are exhibited in this report. Besides, we also discussed applications of solid-state nanopore fabrication technology in DNA sequencing, protein detection, and energy conversion.

  16. Optical properties of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Wooten, Frederick

    1972-01-01

    Optical Properties of Solids covers the important concepts of intrinsic optical properties and photoelectric emission. The book starts by providing an introduction to the fundamental optical spectra of solids. The text then discusses Maxwell's equations and the dielectric function; absorption and dispersion; and the theory of free-electron metals. The quantum mechanical theory of direct and indirect transitions between bands; the applications of dispersion relations; and the derivation of an expression for the dielectric function in the self-consistent field approximation are also encompassed.

  17. Solid-phase radioimmunoassay of immunoglobulins G, A and M: applicability in analysis of sucrose gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, E F; Danielsen, H [Aarhus Kommunehospital (Denmark). Medical Department C; Johansen, A S [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Institute of Medical Biochemistry; Larsson, L I [Unit of Histochemistry, University Institute of Pathology, Copenhagen, Denmark

    1984-01-01

    A simple and sensitive solid-phase radioimmunoassay for the detection of immunoglobulins G, A and M in sucrose gradients is described. The solid-phase consisted of immunoglobulins adsorbed to polystyrene tubes. Using buffers without detergent and /sup 125/I-labeled sheep anti-rabbit IgA as radioligand, the assay was able to detect 0.8 ng per tube in the IgG assay and 1.6 ng per tube in the IgA and IgM assays. Standard curves with antigen dissolved in 10% and 32% sucrose were superimposable and did not deviate from standard curves with antigen dissolved in buffer without sucrose. Using these techniques on ultracentrifugation samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Schoenlein-Henoch nephritis and IgA glorulonephritis is was possible to detect both immunoglobulin fragments and immunoglobulin aggregates at the same time without prior dialysis of the samples.

  18. Heat capacity and solid solubility of iron in scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.-W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The maximum solid solubility of iron in scandium was determined to be between 50 and 85 at.ppm in the as-cast condition. As the concentration of iron increases, it segregates along the grain boundary, as is evident from optical metallography and electron microprobe examinations. Annealing also causes the iron dissolved in scandium to separate out and cluster along the grain boundary. Heat capacity measurements show an anomaly in the C/T versus T 2 plots for iron concentrations of 19 at.ppm or greater. For iron dissolved in solid scandium the excess entropy due to the iron impurity is in agreement with the theoretical prediction of ck ln(2S + 1) for an impurity-conduction electron (Kondo) interaction, but is 4 - 8 times larger than the theoretical prediction when iron segregates along the grain boundary. Furthermore, our results suggest that most of the previously reported low temperature physical properties of scandium are probably in error because of either iron impurity-conduction electron interactions or Fe-Fe interactions in the precipitated second-phase Sc-Fe compound. (Auth.)

  19. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S. H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-04-15

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile (3H, 129 +131I) and gaseous (85Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 deg K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 deg K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 deg K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85krypton-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, e.g., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1/3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW(e) HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant.

  20. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S.H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile ( 3 H, 129+131 I) and gaseous ( 85 Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 0 K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 0 K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 0 K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85 Kr-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, i.e., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1 / 3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m 3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW/sub e/ HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant

  1. An intercomparison of three methods for the large-scale isolation of oceanic dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nelson W.; Perdue, E. Michael; Aiken, George R.; Butler, Kenna D.; Chen, Hongmei; Dittmar, Thorsten; Niggemann, Jutta; Stubbins, Aron

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) was isolated from large volumes of deep (674 m) and surface (21 m) ocean water via reverse osmosis/electrodialysis (RO/ED) and two solid-phase extraction (SPE) methods (XAD-8/4 and PPL) at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority (NELHA). By applying the three methods to common water samples, the efficiencies of XAD, PPL and RO/ED DOM isolation were compared. XAD recovered 42% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from deep water (25% with XAD-8; 17% with XAD-4) and 30% from surface water (16% with XAD-8; 14% with XAD-4). PPL recovered 61 ± 3% of DOC from deep water and 61% from surface water. RO/ED recovered 82 ± 3% of DOC from deep water, 14 ± 3% of which was recovered in a sodium hydroxide rinse, and 75 ± 5% of DOC from surface water, with 12 ± 2% in the sodium hydroxide rinse. The highest recoveries of all were achieved by the sequential isolation of DOC, first with PPL and then via RO/ED. This combined technique recovered 98% of DOC from a deep water sample and 101% of DOC from a surface water sample. In total, 1.9, 10.3 and 1.6 g-C of DOC were collected via XAD, PPL and RO/ED, respectively. Rates of DOC recovery using the XAD, PPL and RO/ED methods were 10, 33 and 10 mg-C h− 1, respectively. Based upon C/N ratios, XAD isolates were heavily C-enriched compared with water column DOM, whereas RO/ED and PPL ➔ RO/ED isolate C/N values were most representative of the original DOM. All techniques are suitable for the isolation of large amounts of DOM with purities suitable for most advanced analytical techniques. Coupling PPL and RO/ED techniques may provide substantial progress in the search for a method to quantitatively isolate oceanic DOC, bringing the entirety of the DOM pool within the marine chemist's analytical window.

  2. Isolation and characterization of dissolved organic matter from the Callovo-Oxfordian formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdouan, Amandine; Christl, Iso; Meylan, Sebastien; Wersin, Paul; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-01-01

    Characterizing dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the pore water of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, a potential host rock for the disposal of radioactive waste, is important to estimate its potential influence on the mobility of radionuclides in the rock. To isolate DOM, crushed rock material was extracted under anoxic conditions with deionized water, 0.1 M NaOH and synthetic pore water (SPW, water containing all major ions at pore water concentrations but no organic matter), respectively. The effects of extraction parameters on the extracted DOM including the solid-to-liquid ratio, extraction time, exposure to O 2 and acid pretreatment of the rock material prior to the anoxic extraction were evaluated. In addition, DOM in one of the first pore water samples collected in the underground rock laboratory at Bure (France) was characterized for comparison. The size distribution and the low molecular weight organic acid contents of the extracts and pore water DOM were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with an organic C detector (LC-OCD) and by ion chromatography. The results revealed that only a fraction of less than 1.2% of the total organic C present in the rock was extractable. Maximum dissolved organic C (DOC) concentrations in the anoxic extracts ranged from 5.5 ± 0.3 mg/L for SPW extracts to 14.2 ± 1.1 mg/L for 0.1 M NaOH extracts. The major portion of the DOC in the anoxic extracts consisted of hydrophilic compounds (48-78%) having a molecular weight of less than 500 Da. Up to 21% of DOC in the anoxic extracts was identified as acetate, formate, lactate and malate. The short-term exposure of rock material to O 2 during rock crushing strongly increased DOC concentrations and led to a shift towards smaller molecular weight compounds and to a higher low molecular weight organic acid (LMWOA) content as compared to the strictly anoxic extraction. The pore water sampled from a packed-off borehole exhibited a higher DOC concentration (56.7 mg/L) than the

  3. Retrogressive thaw slumps temper dissolved organic carbon delivery to streams of the Peel Plateau, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefair, Cara A.; Tank, Suzanne E.; Kokelj, Steven V.

    2017-12-01

    In Siberia and Alaska, permafrost thaw has been associated with significant increases in the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to recipient stream ecosystems. Here, we examine the effect of retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) on DOC concentration and transport, using data from eight RTS features on the Peel Plateau, NWT, Canada. Like extensive regions of northwestern Canada, the Peel Plateau is comprised of thick, ice-rich tills that were deposited at the margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. RTS features are now widespread in this region, with headwall exposures up to 30 m high and total disturbed areas often exceeding 20 ha. We find that intensive slumping on the Peel Plateau is universally associated with decreasing DOC concentrations downstream of slumps, even though the composition of slump-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM; assessed using specific UV absorbance and slope ratios) is similar to permafrost-derived DOM from other regions. Comparisons of upstream and downstream DOC flux relative to fluxes of total suspended solids suggest that the substantial fine-grained sediments released by RTS features may sequester DOC. Runoff obtained directly from slump rill water, above entry into recipient streams, indicates that the deepest RTS features, which thaw the greatest extent of buried, Pleistocene-aged glacial tills, release low-concentration DOC when compared to paired upstream, undisturbed locations, while shallower features, with exposures that are more limited to a relict Holocene active layer, have within-slump DOC concentrations more similar to upstream sites. Finally, fine-scale work at a single RTS site indicates that temperature and precipitation serve as primary environmental controls on above-slump and below-slump DOC flux, but it also shows that the relationship between climatic parameters and DOC flux is complex for these dynamic thermokarst features. These results demonstrate that we should expect clear variation in thermokarst

  4. Retrogressive thaw slumps temper dissolved organic carbon delivery to streams of the Peel Plateau, NWT, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Littlefair

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Siberia and Alaska, permafrost thaw has been associated with significant increases in the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC to recipient stream ecosystems. Here, we examine the effect of retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs on DOC concentration and transport, using data from eight RTS features on the Peel Plateau, NWT, Canada. Like extensive regions of northwestern Canada, the Peel Plateau is comprised of thick, ice-rich tills that were deposited at the margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. RTS features are now widespread in this region, with headwall exposures up to 30 m high and total disturbed areas often exceeding 20 ha. We find that intensive slumping on the Peel Plateau is universally associated with decreasing DOC concentrations downstream of slumps, even though the composition of slump-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM; assessed using specific UV absorbance and slope ratios is similar to permafrost-derived DOM from other regions. Comparisons of upstream and downstream DOC flux relative to fluxes of total suspended solids suggest that the substantial fine-grained sediments released by RTS features may sequester DOC. Runoff obtained directly from slump rill water, above entry into recipient streams, indicates that the deepest RTS features, which thaw the greatest extent of buried, Pleistocene-aged glacial tills, release low-concentration DOC when compared to paired upstream, undisturbed locations, while shallower features, with exposures that are more limited to a relict Holocene active layer, have within-slump DOC concentrations more similar to upstream sites. Finally, fine-scale work at a single RTS site indicates that temperature and precipitation serve as primary environmental controls on above-slump and below-slump DOC flux, but it also shows that the relationship between climatic parameters and DOC flux is complex for these dynamic thermokarst features. These results demonstrate that we should expect clear variation in

  5. An analysis of un-dissolved powders of instant powdered soup by using ultrasonographic image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaai, Yukinori; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kasamatsu, Chinatsu

    2008-11-01

    Nowadays, there are many instant powdered soups around us. When we make instant powdered soup, sometimes we cannot dissolve powders perfectly. Food manufacturers want to improve this problem in order to make better products. Therefore, they have to measure the state and volume of un-dissolved powders. Earlier methods for analyzing removed the un-dissolved powders from the container, the state of the un-dissolved power was changed. Our research using ultrasonographic image can measure the state of un-dissolved powders with no change by taking cross sections of the soup. We then make 3D soup model from these cross sections of soup. Therefore we can observe the inside of soup that we do not have ever seen. We construct accurate 3D model. We can visualize the state and volume of un-dissolved powders with analyzing the 3D soup models.

  6. Contribution to the study of the structure of silver krypton solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, V.; Tullairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Antolin-Baudier, J.; Adda, Y.

    1964-01-01

    The silver-krypton solid solutions formed by electrical discharge have been studied by X-rays, electrical resistivity and electronic transmission microscopy. The crystalline parameter and residual resistivity measurements have shown that the krypton atom behaves very differently to those of other elements of the periodic classification when dissolved in silver. The recovery of the crystalline parameter and of the electrical resistivity has been studied as a function of temperature. (authors) [fr

  7. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  8. Physical properties of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Research at ORNL into the physical properties of solids is described. Topics covered include: optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of magnesium oxide; ionic conductivity and superconductivity; surface physics and catalysis; defects and impurities in insulating crystals; photovoltaic conversion of solar energy; and fracture studies

  9. Current Solid Mechanics Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    About thirty years ago James Lighthill wrote an essay on “What is Mechanics?” With that he also included some examples of the applications of mechanics. While his emphasis was on fluid mechanics, his own research area, he also included examples from research activities in solid mechanics....

  10. Solid state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.

    1976-11-01

    This paper gives a survey of the present state of the development and the application of solid state track detectors. The fundamentals of the physical and chemical processes of the track formation and development are explained, the different detector materials and their registration characteristics are mentioned, the possibilities of the experimental practice and the most variable applications are discussed. (author)

  11. Solid biomass barometer 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The winter of 2011 was exceptionally mild, even in Northern Europe, with unusually warm temperatures. As a result the demand for firewood and solid biomass fuel was low. The European Union's primary energy production from solid biomass contracted by 2.9% slipping to 78.8 Mtoe. The first 4 countries are Germany (11.690 Mtoe), France (9.223 Mtoe), Sweden (8.165 Mtoe) and Finland (7.476 Mtoe) and when the production is relative to the population the first 4 countries become: Finland (1.391 toe/inhab.), Sweden (0.867 toe/inhab.), Latvia (0.784 toe/inhab.) and Estonia (0.644 toe/inhab.). Solid biomass electricity production continued to grow, driven by the additional take-up of biomass co-firing, to reach 72.800 TWh at the end of 2011, it means +2.6% compared to 2010. The energy policy of various states concerning solid biomass is analyzed

  12. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  13. Solid-Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

  14. Continuous mixing of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raouf, M.S.

    1963-01-01

    The most important literature on theoretical aspects of mixing solids was reviewed.

    Only when the mixed materials showed no segregation it was possible to analyse the mixing process quantitatively. In this case the mixture could be described by the 'χ' Square test. Longitudinal mixing could be

  15. Physical properties of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, M. K.; Young, Jr, F. W.

    1977-10-01

    Research at ORNL into the physical properties of solids is described. Topics covered include: optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of magnesium oxide; ionic conductivity and superconductivity; surface physics and catalysis; defects and impurities in insulating crystals; photovoltaic conversion of solar energy; and fracture studies. (GHT)

  16. Photochemical mineralization of terrigenous DOC to dissolved inorganic carbon in ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Aarnos, Hanna; Gélinas, Yves; Kasurinen, Ville; Gu, Yufei; Puupponen, Veli-Mikko; Vähätalo, Anssi

    2018-01-01

    When terrigenous dissolved organic carbon (tDOC) rich in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (tCDOM) enters the ocean, solar radiation mineralizes it partially into dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). This study addresses the amount and the rates of DIC photoproduction from tDOC and the area of ocean required to photomineralize tDOC. We collected water samples from 10 major rivers, mixed them with artificial seawater, and irradiated them with simulated solar radiation to measure DIC photoprod...

  17. Laboratory studies of dissolved radiolabelled microcystin-LR in lake water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyenstrand, Per; Rohrlack, Thomas; Beattie, Kenneth A

    2003-01-01

    The fate of dissolved microcystin-LR was studied in laboratory experiments using surface water taken from a eutrophic lake. Based on initial range finding, a concentration of 50 microg l(-1) dissolved 14C-microcystin-LR was selected for subsequent time-course experiments. The first was performed ...... fractions. The study demonstrated that biodegradation of dissolved microcystin-LR occurred in water collected at a lake surface with carbon dioxide as a major end-product....

  18. The marketing of dissolvable tobacco: social science and public policy research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Brian G; Kim, Annice E; Tessman, Greta K; MacMonegle, Anna J; Choiniere, Conrad J; Evans, Sarah E; Johnson, Robin D

    2012-01-01

    The latest generation of smokeless tobacco products encompasses a wide range of offerings, including what is commonly referred to as dissolvable tobacco. Designed to deliver nicotine upon dissolving or disintegrating in a user's mouth, dissolvable tobacco products currently appear in various United States markets as strips, orbs, sticks, and lozenges. The emergence of these new products poses distinct opportunities and challenges for social and behavioral science and public health research and raises important public policy questions.

  19. Retrofitting and operation solid radwaste system Dresden Station, Units 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, J.; Homer, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Units 2 and 3 at Dresden Station are twin 794 MW (net) BWR units that became operational in 1970 and 1971. The waste streams are typical of BWR stations, namely, bead resin and filter sludge (powdered resins and diatomaceous earth), evaporator concentrate containing approximately 25% dissolved solids and dry active waste. The original solid radwaste system utilized cement for solidification in open top 55 gallon drums. Remote handling was provided by means of a monorail with moving platforms supporting the drums. A relatively light-weight compactor was used to compact DAW into 55 gallon drums. Difficulties were experienced with this system

  20. Preparation and X-ray diffraction characterization of Th1-xBixO2-0.5x (where x= 0 to 0.5) solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanrar, Buddhadev; Misra, N.L.

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of ThO 2 and Bi 2 O 3 were prepared by solid state reactions of these oxides. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that Bi +3 up to 50 at% can be dissolved in ThO 2 lattice. Rietveld refinement of the XRD patterns indicated single phase solid solutions up to 50 atom% of Bi +3 in ThO 2 lattice. The cell parameters of the solid solutions were found to decrease with increasing amount of Bi +3 in the lattice. (author)

  1. Can an Evolutionary Analysis Dissolve the Paradox of Horror?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, Jens; Clasen, Mathias; Johnson, John

    The paradox of horror” is the problem of why so many people are motivated to experience the negative emotions induced by horror media. In this talk, we argue that an evolutionary analysis may dissolve the paradox of horror. From an evolutionary perspective, horror may be analyzed as a simulation...... technology that allows users to attain adaptive experience with perceived threat and negative emotion in a safe environment. The argument is supported by results from a comprehensive MTurk survey of American users of horror media (n=1,071). Results include findings on the personal details (e.g., sex......), supernatural beliefs (e.g., paranormal beliefs), personality traits (e.g., Big Five), horror genre preferences (e.g., supernatural versus natural horror), and horror-induced emotional responses of users of horror media. The strongest individual predictors of horror media enjoyment are sex (male preference...

  2. Dilution limits dissolved organic carbon utilization in the deep ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, Jesus

    2015-03-19

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the second largest reservoir of organic carbon in the biosphere. About 72% of the global DOC inventory is stored in deep oceanic layers for years to centuries, supporting the current view that it consists of materials resistant to microbial degradation. An alternative hypothesis is that deep-water DOC consists of many different, intrinsically labile compounds at concentrations too low to compensate for the metabolic costs associated to their utilization. Here, we present experimental evidence showing that low concentrations rather than recalcitrance preclude consumption of a substantial fraction of DOC, leading to slow microbial growth in the deep ocean. These findings demonstrate an alternative mechanism for the long-term storage of labile DOC in the deep ocean, which has been hitherto largely ignored. © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of dissolved cations in coffee extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon, Christopher H; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell

    2014-05-28

    The flavorsome compounds in coffee beans exist in the form of aprotic charge neutral species, as well as a collection of acids and conjugate salts. The dissolution and extraction of these organic molecules is a process dependent on the dissolved mineral content of the water. It is known that different rates and compositions of coffee extraction are achieved through the control of the water "impurities", Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), which coordinate to nucleophilic motifs in coffee. Using density functional theory, we quantify the thermodynamic binding energies of five familiar coffee-contained acids, caffeine, and a representative flavor component, eugenol. From this, we provide insight into the mechanism and ideal mineral composition of water for extraction of flavorsome compounds in coffee.

  4. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew; Ziervogel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    unknown, since the vast majority of marine bacteria have not been isolated in culture, and most measurements of DOC degradation rates have focused on uptake and metabolism of either bulk DOC or of simple model compounds (e.g. specific amino acids or sugars). Genomic investigations provide information......Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely...... about the potential capabilities of organisms and communities but not the extent to which such potential is expressed. We tested directly the capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in surface ocean waters at 32 stations spanning latitudes from 76 ºS to 79 ºN to hydrolyze a range of high...

  5. Dissolved strontium and calcium levels in the tropical Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Zvi; Sarkar, Amit; Turchyn, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Measurements of seawater alkalinity and dissolved calcium concentrations along oceanic transects are often used to calculate calcium carbonate precipitation and dissolution rates. Given that the distribution coefficient of strontium in CaCO3 varies greatly between different groups of organisms, adding precise measurements of dissolved strontium concentrations provides opportunities to also track relative contributions of these different groups to the regional CaCO3 cycle. However, there are several obstacles to this approach. These obstacles include unresolved systematic discrepancies between seawater calcium and alkalinity data, very large analytical noise around the calcium concentration measurements and the unconstrained role of acantharia (radiolarian precipitating SrSO4 skeletons) in the marine strontium cycle. During the first cruise of the second International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2) water samples were collected along 67°E from 9°N to 5°S to explore the dissolution rate of calcium carbonate in the water. The dissolution rate can be calculated by combining measurements of water column potential alkalinity with calcium and strontium concentrations measured by ICP-OES and calcium concentration measurements using isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). CaCO3 mineral saturation state calculated using pH and total alkalinity suggests that along 67°E, the aragonite saturation horizon lays at depth of 500 m on both sides of the equator. Across the cruise transect, dissolved strontium concentrations increase by 2-3% along the thermocline suggesting rapid recycling of strontium rich phases. This is particularly evident just below the thermocline at 8-9°N and below 1000 m water depth, south of the equator. The deep, southern enrichment in strontium does not involve a change in the Sr/Ca ratio, suggesting that this strontium enrichment is related to CaCO3 dissolution. In contrast, in the intermediate waters of the northern part of

  6. Methods of conditioning waste fuel decladding hulls and dissolver residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.; Loida, A.; Schmidt-Hansberg, T.; Sombret, C.

    1985-01-01

    Several methods for conditioning spent fuel decladding hulls or dissolver residues have been considered in various countries of the European Community. Five of these methods used embedding technique with or without prior compaction: they are based on incorporation in metallic alloys, glass, ceramics, cements and metals or graphite compounds. A sixth one consists in melting the decladding materials. The corresponding research programmes have been pursued to varying states of progress with regard to demonstrating their feasibility on an industrial scale and the use of genuine wastes in bench scale experiments. The properties of the conditioned wastes have been investigated. Special attention has been paid to the corrosion resistance to various aqueous media as tap water, brine or clayey water. Although no categorical conclusion can be drawn from the initial results, the available findings provide a basis for assessing the different processes

  7. Regime of the dissolved oxygen in Iron Gates lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruia, Emil; Marcoci, Simona

    1992-01-01

    During the period 1964-1987, in the dissolved oxygen regime of the Danube water elevate modifications occurred in the Iron Gates I and II area, in comparison with the relative stability of the previous period. The causes of this evolution were the water organic pollution, as a result of the socio-economical development of the riparian countries in the mentioned period, and the modifications of the water flow entailed by the building of the Iron Gates power system. As a result, physical, chemical and biological processes, different as intensity and manifestation from those in the previous period occurred. Consequently, the general ratio between demand and re-aeration processes has been modified. The paper has the following content: 1. Introduction; 2. Physico-chemical aspects; 3. Biological aspects; 4. Conclusions. (authors)

  8. Sea cucumbers reduce chromophoric dissolved organic matter in aquaculture tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Sadeghi-Nassaj

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Mono-specific aquaculture effluents contain high concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which affect negatively the water quality of the recipient ecosystems. A fundamental feature of water quality is its transparency. The fraction of dissolved organic matter that absorbs light is named chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM. A sustainable alternative to mono-specific aquaculture is the multitrophic aquaculture that includes species trophically complementary named “extractive” species that uptake the waste byproducts. Sea cucumbers are recognized as efficient extractive species due to the consumption of particulate organic matter (POM. However, the effects of sea cucumbers on CDOM are still unknown. Methods During more than one year, we monitored CDOM in two big-volume tanks with different trophic structure. One of the tanks (−holothurian only contained around 810 individuals of Anemonia sulcata, whereas the other tank (+holothurian also included 90 individuals of Holothuria tubulosa and Holothuria forskali. We routinely analyzed CDOM absorption spectra and determined quantitative (absorption coefficients at 325 nm and qualitative (spectral slopes optical parameters in the inlet waters, within the tanks, and in their corresponding effluents. To confirm the time-series results, we also performed three experiments. Each experiment consisted of two treatments: +holothurians (+H and –holothurians (−H. We set up three +H tanks with 80 individuals of A. sulcata and 10 individuals of H. tubulosa in each tank and four –H tanks that contained only 80 individuals of A. sulcata. Results In the time-series, absorption coefficients at 325 nm (a325 and spectral slopes from 275 to 295 nm (S275−295 were significantly lower in the effluent of the +holothurian tank (average: 0.33 m−1 and 16 µm−1, respectively than in the effluent of the −holothurian tank (average: 0.69 m−1 and 34 µm−1, respectively, the former

  9. Inner filter correction of dissolved organic matter fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothawala, D.N.,; Murphy, K.R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is suppressed by a phenomenon of self-quenching known as the inner filter effect (IFE). Despite widespread use of fluorescence to characterize DOM in surface waters, the advantages and constraints of IFE correction are poorly defined. We assessed...... the effectiveness of a commonly used absorbance-based approach (ABA), and a recently proposed controlled dilution approach (CDA) to correct for IFE. Linearity between corrected fluorescence and total absorbance (ATotal; the sum of absorbance at excitation and emission wavelengths) across the full excitation......-emission matrix (EEM) in dilution series of four samples indicated both ABA and CDA were effective to an absorbance of at least 1.5 in a 1 cm cell, regardless of wavelength positioning. In regions of the EEMs where signal to background noise (S/N) was low, CDA correction resulted in more variability than ABA...

  10. Effect of dissolved oxygen on IGSCC of Alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W.Y.; Choi, M.S.; Kim, U.C.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen on the SCC of Alloy 600 was studied by the slow strain rate test(SSRT) method. The SSRT tests were carried out in aerated and in deaerated pure water at 360 C at the strain rate of 2.5 x 10 -7 /s. Hump specimens were used to shorten test time. The SCC susceptibility was higher in the deaerated water environment than in aerated water environments. The shape of load-deformation curves of the tests in those two environments indicates that oxygen content in water significantly influences the SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600. It was considered that the increase of SCC resistance in aerated water is due to the high corrosion potential of the metal surface, and the according decrease of corrosion current due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. (authors)

  11. Carbon nanotubes: are they dispersed or dissolved in liquids?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premkumar Thathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes (CNTs constitute a novel class of nanomaterials with remarkable applications in diverse domains. However, the main intrincsic problem of CNTs is their insolubility or very poor solubility in most of the common solvents. The basic key question here is: are carbon nanotubes dissolved or dispersed in liquids, specifically in water? When analyzing the scientific research articles published in various leading journals, we found that many researchers confused between "dispersion" and "solubilization" and use the terms interchangeably, particularly when stating the interaction of CNTs with liquids. In this article, we address this fundamental issue to give basic insight specifically to the researchers who are working with CNTs as well asgenerally to scientists who deal with nano-related research domains.

  12. Dilution limits dissolved organic carbon utilization in the deep ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, J M; Mayol, Eva; Hansman, Roberta L.; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the second largest reservoir of organic carbon in the biosphere. About 72% of the global DOC inventory is stored in deep oceanic layers for years to centuries, supporting the current view that it consists of materials resistant to microbial degradation. An alternative hypothesis is that deep-water DOC consists of many different, intrinsically labile compounds at concentrations too low to compensate for the metabolic costs associated to their utilization. Here, we present experimental evidence showing that low concentrations rather than recalcitrance preclude consumption of a substantial fraction of DOC, leading to slow microbial growth in the deep ocean. These findings demonstrate an alternative mechanism for the long-term storage of labile DOC in the deep ocean, which has been hitherto largely ignored. © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.

  13. Removal of dissolved heavy metals and radionuclides by microbial spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revis, N.W.; Hadden, C.T.; Edenborn, H.

    1997-01-01

    Microbial systems have been shown to remove specific heavy metals from contaminated aqueous waste to levels acceptable to EPA for environmental release. However, systems capable of removing a variety of heavy metals from aqueous waste to environmentally acceptable levels remain to be reported. The present studies were performed to determine the specificity of spores of the bacterium Bacillus megaterium for the adsorption of dissolved metals and radionuclides from aqueous waste. The spores effectively adsorbed eight heavy metals from a prepared metal mix and from a plating rinse waste to EPA acceptable levels for waste water. These results suggest that spores have multiple binding sites for the adsorption of heavy metals. Spores were also effective in adsorbing the radionuclides 85 strontium and 197 cesium. The presence of multiple sites in spores for the adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides makes this biosorbent a good candidate for the treatment of aqueous wastes associated with the plating and nuclear industries. 17 refs., 4 tabs

  14. Low-head hydropower impacts on steam dissolved oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thene, J.R.; Stefan, H.G.; Daniil, E.I.

    1989-01-01

    A method to evaluate the effect of hydropower development on downstream dissolved oxygen (DO) is presented for a low head dam. Water, previously aerated during release over spillways and under gates, is diverted through the hydropower facility without further aeration. The oxygen transfer that occurs as a result of air entrainment at the various release points of a dam is measured. Oxygen transfer efficiencies are calculated and incorporated into an oxygen transfer model to predict average release DO concentrations. This model is used to systematically determine the effect of hydropower operation on downstream DO. Operational alternatives are investigated and a simple operational guide is developed to mitigate the effects of hydropower operation. Combinations of reduced generation and optimal releases from the dam allow the hydropower facility to operate within DO standards

  15. Experimental study on total dissolved gas supersaturation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Qu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available More and more high dams have been constructed and operated in China. The total dissolved gas (TDG supersaturation caused by dam discharge leads to gas bubble disease or even death of fish. Through a series of experiments, the conditions and requirements of supersaturated TDG generation were examined in this study. The results show that pressure (water depth, aeration, and bubble dissolution time are required for supersaturated TDG generation, and the air-water contact area and turbulence intensity are the main factors that affect the generation rate of supersaturated TDG. The TDG supersaturation levels can be reduced by discharging water to shallow shoals downstream of the dam or using negative pressure pipelines. Furthermore, the TDG supersaturation levels in stilling basins have no direct relationship with those in reservoirs. These results are of great importance for further research on the prediction of supersaturated TDG generation caused by dam discharge and aquatic protection.

  16. Terrestrial dissolved organic matter distribution in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stuart C; Lapworth, Dan J; Woodward, E Malcolm S; Kroeger, Silke; Evans, Chris D; Mayor, Daniel J; Sanders, Richard J

    2018-07-15

    The flow of terrestrial carbon to rivers and inland waters is a major term in the global carbon cycle. The organic fraction of this flux may be buried, remineralized or ultimately stored in the deep ocean. The latter can only occur if terrestrial organic carbon can pass through the coastal and estuarine filter, a process of unknown efficiency. Here, data are presented on the spatial distribution of terrestrial fluorescent and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (FDOM and CDOM, respectively) throughout the North Sea, which receives organic matter from multiple distinct sources. We use FDOM and CDOM as proxies for terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) to test the hypothesis that tDOM is quantitatively transferred through the North Sea to the open North Atlantic Ocean. Excitation emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) revealed a single terrestrial humic-like class of compounds whose distribution was restricted to the coastal margins and, via an inverse salinity relationship, to major riverine inputs. Two distinct sources of fluorescent humic-like material were observed associated with the combined outflows of the Rhine, Weser and Elbe rivers in the south-eastern North Sea and the Baltic Sea outflow to the eastern central North Sea. The flux of tDOM from the North Sea to the Atlantic Ocean appears insignificant, although tDOM export may occur through Norwegian coastal waters unsampled in our study. Our analysis suggests that the bulk of tDOM exported from the Northwest European and Scandinavian landmasses is buried or remineralized internally, with potential losses to the atmosphere. This interpretation implies that the residence time in estuarine and coastal systems exerts an important control over the fate of tDOM and needs to be considered when evaluating the role of terrestrial carbon losses in the global carbon cycle. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissolved organic carbon and its potential predictors in eutrophic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toming, Kaire; Kutser, Tiit; Tuvikene, Lea; Viik, Malle; Nõges, Tiina

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of the true role of lakes in the global carbon cycle requires reliable estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and there is a strong need to develop remote sensing methods for mapping lake carbon content at larger regional and global scales. Part of DOC is optically inactive. Therefore, lake DOC content cannot be mapped directly. The objectives of the current study were to estimate the relationships of DOC and other water and environmental variables in order to find the best proxy for remote sensing mapping of lake DOC. The Boosted Regression Trees approach was used to clarify in which relative proportions different water and environmental variables determine DOC. In a studied large and shallow eutrophic lake the concentrations of DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were rather high while the seasonal and interannual variability of DOC concentrations was small. The relationships between DOC and other water and environmental variables varied seasonally and interannually and it was challenging to find proxies for describing seasonal cycle of DOC. Chlorophyll a (Chl a), total suspended matter and Secchi depth were correlated with DOC and therefore are possible proxies for remote sensing of seasonal changes of DOC in ice free period, while for long term interannual changes transparency-related variables are relevant as DOC proxies. CDOM did not appear to be a good predictor of the seasonality of DOC concentration in Lake Võrtsjärv since the CDOM-DOC coupling varied seasonally. However, combining the data from Võrtsjärv with the published data from six other eutrophic lakes in the world showed that CDOM was the most powerful predictor of DOC and can be used in remote sensing of DOC concentrations in eutrophic lakes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anthropogenic inputs of dissolved organic matter in New York Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, G. B.; Chen, R. F.; Olavasen, J.; Peri, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Hudson River flows into the Atlantic Ocean through a highly urbanized region which includes New York City to the east and Newark, New Jersey to the west. As a result, the export of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from the Hudson to the Atlantic Ocean includes a significant anthropogenic component. A series of high resolution studies of the DOC dynamics of this system were conducted between 2003 and 2010. These included both the Hudson and adjacent large waterways (East River, Newark Bay, Kill Van Kull and Arthur Kill) using coastal research vessels and smaller tributaries (Hackensack, Pasaic and Raritan rivers) using a 25' boat. In both cases measurements were made using towed instrument packages which could be cycled from near surface to near bottom depths with horizontal resolution of approximately 20 to 200 meters depending on depth and deployment strategy. Sensors on the instrument packages included a CTD to provide depth and salinity information and a chromophoric dissolved organic matter(CDOM) fluorometer to measure the fluorescent fraction of the DOC. Discrete samples allowed calibration of the fluorometer and the CDOM data to be related to DOC. The combined data set from these cruises identified multiple scales of source and transport processes for DOC within the Hudson River/New York Harbor region. The Hudson carries a substantial amount of natural DOC from its 230 km inland stretch. Additional sources exist in fringing salt marshes adjacent to the Hackensack and Raritan rivers. However the lower Hudson/New Harbor region receives a large input of DOC from multiple publically owned treatment works (POTW) discharges. The high resolution surveys allowed us to elucidate the distribution of these sources and the manner in which they are rapidly mixed to create the total export. We estimate that anthropogenic sources account for up to 2.5 times the DOC flux contributed by natural processes.

  19. Dissolved Organic Matter Land-Ocean Linkages in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P. J.; Spencer, R. M.; Hernes, P. J.; Tank, S. E.; Striegl, R.; Dyda, R. Y.; Peterson, B. J.; McClelland, J. W.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Rivers draining into the Arctic Ocean exhibit high concentrations of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and recent studies indicate that DOC export is changing due to climatic warming and alteration in permafrost condition. The fate of exported DOC in the Arctic Ocean is important for understanding the regional carbon cycle and remains a point of discussion in the literature. As part of the NSF funded Arctic Great Rivers Observatory (Arctic-GRO) project, samples were collected for DOC, chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM & FDOM) and lignin phenols from the Ob', Yenisey, Lena, Kolyma, Mackenzie and Yukon rivers in 2009 - 2010. DOC and lignin concentrations were elevated during the spring freshet and measurements related to DOC composition indicated an increasing contribution from terrestrial vascular plant sources at this time of year (e.g. lignin carbon-normalized yield, CDOM spectral slope, SUVA254, humic-like fluorescence). CDOM absorption was found to correlate strongly with both DOC (r2=0.83) and lignin concentration (r2=0.92) across the major arctic rivers. Lignin composition was also successfully modeled using FDOM measurements decomposed using PARAFAC analysis. Utilizing these relationships we modeled loads for DOC and lignin export from high-resolution CDOM measurements (daily across the freshet) to derive improved flux estimates, particularly from the dynamic spring discharge maxima period when the majority of DOC and lignin export occurs. The new load estimates for DOC and lignin are higher than previous evaluations, emphasizing that if these are more representative of current arctic riverine export, terrigenous DOC is transiting through the Arctic Ocean at a faster rate than previously thought. It is apparent that higher resolution sampling of arctic rivers is exceptionally valuable with respect to deriving accurate fluxes and we highlight the potential of CDOM in this role for future studies and the applicability of in

  20. Origins and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuan; Chapelle, Francis H.; Strom, Eric W.; Benner, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in groundwater influences water quality and fuels microbial metabolism, but its origins, bioavailability and chemical composition are poorly understood. The origins and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and bioavailable DOM were monitored during a long-term (2-year) study of groundwater in a fractured-rock aquifer in the Carolina slate belt. Surface precipitation was significantly correlated with groundwater concentrations of DOC, bioavailable DOM and chromophoric DOM, indicating strong hydrological connections between surface and ground waters. The physicochemical and biological processes shaping the concentrations and compositions of DOM during its passage through the soil column to the saturated zone are conceptualized in the regional chromatography model. The model provides a framework for linking hydrology with the processes affecting the transformation, remineralization and microbial production of DOM during passage through the soil column. Lignin-derived phenols were relatively depleted in groundwater DOM indicating substantial removal in the unsaturated zone, and optical properties of chromophoric DOM indicated lower molecular weight DOM in groundwater relative to surface water. The prevalence of glycine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and d-enantiomers of amino acids indicated the DOM was highly diagenetically altered. Bioassay experiments were used to establish DOC-normalized yields of amino acids as molecular indicators of DOM bioavailability in groundwater. A relatively small fraction (8 ± 4 %) of DOC in groundwater was bioavailable. The relatively high yields of specific d-enantiomers of amino acids indicated a substantial fraction (15–34 %) of groundwater DOC was of bacterial origin.

  1. Acid-base properties of Baltic Sea dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations related to the marine CO2 system that are based on alkalinity data may be strongly biased if the contributions of organic compounds are ignored. In coastal seas, concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are frequently high and alkalinity from inorganic compounds is low. In this study, based on measurements of total alkalinity, total CO2, and pH, we determined the organic alkalinity, Aorg, in water from the central Baltic Sea. The maximum Aorg measured in the surface mixed layer during the spring bloom was > 50 μmol/kg-SW but the Aorg decreased with depth and approached zero below the permanent halocline. This behavior could be attributed to the decreased pH of deeper water layers. The data were used to calculate the bulk dissociation constant, KDOM, for marine DOM and the fraction f of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that acts as a carrier for acid-base functional groups. The p KDOM (7.27) agreed well with the value (7.34) previously estimated in a preliminary study of organic alkalinity in the Baltic Sea. The fraction of carbon atoms carrying acid-base groups was 17% and was somewhat higher than previously reported (12%). Spike experiments performed using artificial seawater and three different humic/fulvic substances tested whether the acid-base properties of these substances explain the results of our field study. Specifically, Aorg was determined at different concentrations (DOC) of the added humic/fulvic substances. The relationship between Aorg and the DOC concentrations indicated that humic/fulvic substances are more acidic (p KDOM < 6.5) than the bulk DOC natural occurring in the Baltic Sea.

  2. Total dissolved atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the anoxic Cariaco basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasse, R.; Pérez, T.; Giuliante, A.; Donoso, L.

    2018-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) is an important source of nitrogen for ocean primary productivity that has increased since the industrial revolution. Thus, understanding its role in the ocean nitrogen cycle will help assess recent changes in ocean biogeochemistry. In the anoxic Cariaco basin, the place of the CARIACO Ocean Time-Series Program, the influence of atmospherically-deposited TDN on marine biogeochemistry is unknown. In this study, we measured atmospheric TDN concentrations as dissolved organic (DON) and inorganic (DIN) nitrogen (TDN = DIN + DON) in atmospheric suspended particles and wet deposition samples at the northeast of the basin during periods of the wet (August-September 2008) and dry (March-April 2009) seasons. We evaluated the potential anthropogenic N influences by measuring wind velocity and direction, size-fractionated suspended particles, chemical traces and by performing back trajectories. We found DIN and DON concentration values that ranged between 0.11 and 0.58 μg-N m-3 and 0.11-0.56 μg-N m-3 in total suspended particles samples and between 0.08 and 0.54 mg-N l-1 and 0.02-1.3 mg-N l-1 in wet deposition samples, respectively. Continental air masses increased DON and DIN concentrations in atmospheric suspended particles during the wet season. We estimate an annual TDN atmospheric deposition (wet + particles) of 3.6 × 103 ton-N year-1 and concluded that: 1) Atmospheric supply of TDN plays a key role in the C and N budget of the basin because replaces a fraction of the C (20% by induced primary production) and N (40%) removed by sediment burial, 2) present anthropogenic N could contribute to 30% of TDN atmospheric deposition in the basin, and 3) reduced DON (gas + particles) should be a significant component of bulk N deposition.

  3. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Advances in water chemistry in the last decade have improved our knowledge about the genesis, composition, and structure of dissolved organic matter, and its effect on the environment. Improvements in analytical technology, for example Fourier-transform ion cyclotron (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS), homo and hetero-correlated multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and excitation emission matrix fluorimetry (EEMF) with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis for UV-fluorescence spectroscopy have resulted in these advances. Improved purification methods, for example ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, have enabled facile desalting and concentration of freshly collected DOM samples, thereby complementing the analytical process. Although its molecular weight (MW) remains undefined, DOM is described as a complex mixture of low-MW substances and larger-MW biomolecules, for example proteins, polysaccharides, and exocellular macromolecules. There is a general consensus that marine DOM originates from terrestrial and marine sources. A combination of diagenetic and microbial processes contributes to its origin, resulting in refractory organic matter which acts as carbon sink in the ocean. Ocean DOM is derived partially from humified products of plants decay dissolved in fresh water and transported to the ocean, and partially from proteinaceous and polysaccharide material from phytoplankton metabolism, which undergoes in-situ microbial processes, becoming refractory. Some of the DOM interacts with radiation and is, therefore, defined as chromophoric DOM (CDOM). CDOM is classified as terrestrial, marine, anthropogenic, or mixed, depending on its origin. Terrestrial CDOM reaches the oceans via estuaries, whereas autochthonous CDOM is formed in sea water by microbial activity; anthropogenic CDOM is a result of human activity. CDOM also affects the quality of water, by shielding it from solar radiation, and constitutes a carbon sink pool. Evidence in support

  4. Chemistry and physics at liquid alkali metal/solid metal interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the chemistry of processes which take place at the interface between liquid alkali metals and solid metal surfaces. A brief review of wetting data for liquid sodium is given and the significance of critical wetting temperatures discussed on the basis of an oxide-film reduction mechanism. The reactions of metal oxides with liquid metals are outlined and a correlation with wetting data established. The transfer of dissolved species from the liquid metal across the interface to form solid phases on the solid metal surface is well recognised. The principal features of such processes are described and a simple thermodynamic explanation is outlined. The reverse process, the removal of solid material into solution, is also considered. (author)

  5. SolidWorks Administration Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Lombard, Matt

    2009-01-01

    What you need to prepare, install, and maintain SolidWorks. It's not enough to know how to use SolidWorks, if your job also requires you to install or maintain it, train new users, and implement standards. This in-depth guide was written for those of you who have to actually manage your company's SolidWorks system. From hardware selection to helping users to licensing and more, this is the everyday, bread-and-butter SolidWorks administration resource that IT and CAD managers have been seeking.:; SolidWorks is a powerful 3D solid modeling system that is popular with CAD users everywhere, but of

  6. Luminescence and the solid state

    CERN Document Server

    Ropp, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the transistor in 1948, the study of the solid state has been burgeoning. Recently, cold fusion and the ceramic superconductor have given cause for excitement. There are two approaches possible to this area of science, namely, that of solid state physics and solid state chemistry, although both overlap extensively. The former is more concerned with electronic states in solids (including electromagnetics) whereas the latter is more concerned with interactions of atoms in solids. The area of solid state physics is well documented, however, there are very few texts which de

  7. Water Quality Assessment Simulation Program (WASP8): Upgrades to the Advanced Toxicant Module for Simulating Dissolved Chemicals, Nanomaterials, and Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) is a dynamic, spatially-resolved, differential mass balance fate and transport modeling framework. WASP is used to develop models to simulate concentrations of environmental contaminants in surface waters and sediments. As a mo...

  8. Influence of alkalinity, hardness and dissolved solids on drinking water taste: A case study of consumer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie-Chung; Lee, Wei-Li; Han, Jia-Yun

    2007-01-01

    Two surveys of consumer satisfaction with drinking water conducted by Taiwan Water Supply Corp. are presented in this study. The study results show that although a lot of money was invested to modify traditional treatment processes, over 60% of local residents still avoided drinking tap water. Over half of the respondents felt that sample TT (from the traditional treatment process) was not a good drinking water, whether in the first or second survey, whereas almost 60% of respondents felt that samples PA, PB, CCL and CT (from advanced treatment processes) were good to drink. For all drinking water samples, respondent satisfaction with a sample primarily depended on it having no unpleasant flavors. Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration plans to revise the drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS in the near future. The new standards require a lower TH concentration (from currently 400mg/L (as CaCO(3)) to 150mg/L (as CaCO(3))), and a lower TDS maximum admissible concentration from the current guideline of 600 to 250mg/L. Therefore, this study also evaluated the impacts on drinking water tastes caused by variations in TH and TDS concentrations, and assessed the need to issue more strict drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS. The research results showed that most respondents could not tell the difference in water taste among water samples with different TDS, TH and alkalinity. Furthermore, hardness was found to be inversely associated with cardiovascular diseases and cancers, and complying with more strict standards would lead most water facilities to invest billions of dollars to upgrade their treatment processes. Consequently, in terms of drinking water tastes alone, this study suggested that Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration should conduct more thorough reviews of the scientific literature that provides the rationale for setting standards and reconsider if it is necessary to revise drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS.

  9. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  10. Competition for spectral irradiance between epilimnetic optically active dissolved and suspended matter and phytoplankton in the metalimnion. Consequences for limnology and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracchini, Luca; Dattilo, Arduino Massimo; Falcucci, Margherita; Hull, Vincent; Tognazzi, Antonio; Rossi, Claudio; Loiselle, Steven Arthur

    2011-06-01

    In deep lakes, water column stratification isolates the surface water from the deeper bottom layers, creating a three dimensional differentiation of the chemical, physical, biological and optical characteristics of the waters. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and total suspended solids (TSS) play an important role in the attenuation of ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation. In the present analysis of spectral irradiance, we show that the wavelength composition of the metalimnetic visible irradiance was influenced by epilimnetic spatial distribution of CDOM. We found a low occurrence of blue-green photons in the metalimnion where epilimnetic concentrations of CDOM are high. In this field study, the spatial variation of the spectral irradiance in the metalimnion correlates with the observed metalimnetic concentrations of chlorophyll a as well as chlorophyll a : chlorophyll b/c ratios. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and nutrients trends suggest that chlorophyll a concentrations were representative of the phytoplankton biomass and primary production. Thus, metalimnetic changes of spectral irradiance may have a direct impact on primary production and an indirect effect on the spatial trends of pH, dissolved oxygen, and inorganic nutrients in the metalimnion.

  11. Solid residues; Os residuos solidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This chapter gives a general overview on the general effects of the solid waste pollution, the principal pollutants emitted by the oil refineries, control actions for the solid waste emissions, the minimization actions, and the effluent treatment.

  12. Acoustics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Beltzer, Abraham I

    1988-01-01

    Technological developments in composite materials, non-destructive testing, and signal processing as well as biomedical applications, have stimulated wide-ranging engineering investigations of heterogeneous, anisotropic media and surface waves of different types. Wave propagation in solids is now of considerable importance in a variety of applications. The book presents many of the key results in this field and interprets them from a unified engineering viewpoint. The conceptual importance and relevance for applications were the prevailing criteria in selecting the topics. Included are body and surface waves in elastic, viscoelastic, and piezoelectric media and waveguides, with emphasis on the effects of inhomogeneity and anisotropy. The book differs in many aspects from the other monographs dealing with wave propagation in solids. It focuses on physically meaningful theoretical models, a broad spectrum of which is covered, and not on mathematical techniques. Some of the results, particularly those dealing wi...

  13. Edge remap for solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  14. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  15. Probing solids and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    The wide application of scattering experiments in the study of the structures of solids and liquids is surveyed. Part 1 of the review (Martin. Contemp. Phys.;vol. 18, No. 1: Jan. 1977:pp. 81-98) showed how the angular distribution of a scattered beam of photons or neutrons is related by Fourier transform to the space and time-dependent distributions of electrons and nuclei in the scattering target. The use of x-rays and of neutrons in determining time-averaged density distributions was examined. In this part the time-dependent aspects of the distributions for solids and liquids, including helium, are discussed. The dynamical distributions of magnetism (or angular momentum) density are considered, and the present limitations and future possibilities of scattering experiments are examined. (U.K.)

  16. Solid propellant impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, E.C.

    1976-03-01

    Future space missions, as in the past, call for the continued use of radioisotopes as heat sources for thermoelectric power generators. In an effort to minimize the risk of radioactive contamination of the environment, a complete safety analysis of each such system is necessary. As a part of these analyses, the effects on such a system of a solid propellant fire environment resulting from a catastrophic launch pad abort must be considered. Several impact tests were conducted in which either a simulant MHW-FSA or a steel ball was dropped on the cold, unignited or the hot, burning surface of a block of UTP-3001 solid propellant. The rebound velocities were measured for both surface conditions of the propellant. The resulting coefficient of restitution, determined as the ratio of the components of the impact and rebound velocities perpendicular to the impact surface of the propellant, were not very dependent on whether the surface was cold or hot at the time of impact

  17. Diffusion in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, G.P.; Kale, G.B.; Patil, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    The article presents a brief survey of process of diffusion in solids. It is emphasised that the essence of diffusion is the mass transfer through the atomic jumps. To begin with formal equations for diffusion coefficient are presented. This is followed by discussions on mechanisms of diffusion. Except for solutes which form interstitial solid solution, diffusion in majority of cases is mediated through exchange of sites between an atom and its neighbouring vacancy. Various vacancy parameters such as activation volume, correlation factor, mass effect etc are discussed and their role in establishing the mode of diffusion is delineated. The contribution of dislocations and grain boundaries in diffusion process is brought out. The experimental determination of different types of diffusion coefficients are described. Finally, the pervasive nature of diffusion process in number of commercial processes is outlined to show the importance of diffusion studies in materials science and technology. (author)

  18. Solid phase extraction membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kurt C [Nashville, TN; Langer, Roger L [Hudson, WI

    2002-11-05

    A wet-laid, porous solid phase extraction sheet material that contains both active particles and binder and that possesses excellent wet strength is described. The binder is present in a relatively small amount while the particles are present in a relatively large amount. The sheet material is sufficiently strong and flexible so as to be pleatable so that, for example, it can be used in a cartridge device.

  19. Solid waste handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.)

  20. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno; Ahmad Rifai

    2010-01-01

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  1. Municipal Solid Waste Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a source of biomass material that can be utilized for bioenergy production with minimal additional inputs. MSW resources include mixed commercial and residential garbage such as yard trimmings, paper and paperboard, plastics, rubber, leather, textiles, and food wastes. Waste resources such as landfill gas, mill residues, and waste grease are already being utilized for cost-effective renewable energy generation. MSW for bioenergy also represents an opportunity to divert greater volumes of residential and commercial waste from landfills.

  2. Determination of solid angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, S.; Amano, H.; Kasai, A.

    1988-01-01

    The solid angle in extended alpha source measurement for a series of counting geometries has been obtained by two methods: (1) calculated by means of the Nelson Blachmen series; (2) interpolated from the data table given by Gardner. A particular consequence of the application of the Nelson Blachmen series was deduced which was different from that given by the original author. The applicability of these two methods, as well as an experimentally measured method, is also evaluated. (author)

  3. Solid biomass barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The economic and financial crisis has not brought solid biomass energy growth to a standstill. Primary energy production in the European Union member states increased in 2008 by 2,3%, which represents a gain of 1,5% million tonnes of oil equivalent over 2007. This growth was particularly marked in electricity production which increased output by 10,8% over 2007, an additional 5,6 TWh. (A.L.B.)

  4. Solid waste management: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayoub, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The source, effect and characterization of solid wastes are discussed. Constituents of municipal solid wastes and a comparative compositions of municipal solid waste with some data on Lebanon are given. Collection, transport and processing practices are next introduced. Finally treatment and disposal techniques are presented with emphasis on the solid waste as energy source and as material source. Methods of recycling are evaluated in respect with their environmental impact. 7 refs. 2 tabs

  5. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, f ow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  6. Solid waste study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Paul G.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to study the solid waste issues brought about by a Type C Investigation; ''Disposal of Inappropriate Material in the Los Alamos County Landfill'' (May 28, 1993). The study was completed in August 1995 by Coleman Research Corporation, under subcontract number 405810005-Y for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The study confirmed the issues identified in the Type C investigation, and also ascertained further issues or problems. During the course of this study two incidents involving hazardous waste resulted in the inappropriate disposal of the waste. An accidental spill, on June 8, 1995, at one of Laboratory buildings was not handled correctly, and ended up in the LAC Landfill. Hazardous waste was disposed of in a solid waste container and sent to the Los Alamos County Landfill. An attempt to locate the hazardous waste at the LAC Landfill was not successful. The second incident involving hazardous waste was discovered by the FSS-8, during a random dumpster surveillance. An interim dumpster program managed by FSS-8 discovered hazardous waste and copper chips in the solid waste, on August 9, 1995. The hazardous waste and copper chips would have been transported to the LAC Landfill if the audit team had not brought the problem to the awareness of the facility waste management personnel

  7. Conformal solids and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, A.; Garcia-Saenz, S.; Nicolis, A.; Penco, R.

    2017-12-01

    We argue that a SO( d) magnetic monopole in an asymptotically AdS space-time is dual to a d-dimensional strongly coupled system in a solid state. In light of this, it would be remiss of us not to dub such a field configuration solidon. In the presence of mixed boundary conditions, a solidon spontaneously breaks translations (among many other symmetries) and gives rise to Goldstone excitations on the boundary — the phonons of the solid. We derive the quadratic action for the boundary phonons in the probe limit and show that, when the mixed boundary conditions preserve conformal symmetry, the longitudinal and transverse sound speeds are related to each other as expected from effective field theory arguments. We then include backreaction and calculate the free energy of the solidon for a particular choice of mixed boundary conditions, corresponding to a relevant multi-trace deformation of the boundary theory. We find such free energy to be lower than that of thermal AdS. This suggests that our solidon undergoes a solid-to-liquid first order phase transition by melting into a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as the temperature is raised.

  8. Volatiles from solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughrey, C T

    1939-08-24

    To remove volatiles from solids, such as oil shale, gases, and/or vapours are passed through a mass of the materials, the vapours and gases separated, and the vapours condensed. The volatile-containing solid materials are fed to a retort, and a shaft is driven to rotate an impeller so as to displace the liquid and create a vortex tube, which draws in gas from the atmosphere through an intake, twyer, interstices in the material in the retort, a conduit, chamber, tubes, another chamber and cylinder. This gas is carried outwardly and upwardly by the vortices in the liquid and is carried to discharge through three conduits. The vapours entrained by the gas are part condensed in the liquid and the remainder directed to a condenser. Steam may be delivered to the twyer through a nozzle of a pipe, with or without air, and combustible hydrocarbon fuel may be fed through the burner nozzle or solid fuel may be directed from feeder and combusted in the twyer.

  9. Solid state magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Crangle, John

    1991-01-01

    Solid state magnetism is important and attempts to understand magnetic properties have led to an increasingly deep insight into the fundamental make up of solids. Both experimental and theoretical research into magnetism continue to be very active, yet there is still much ground to cover before there can be a full understanding. There is a strong interplay between the developments of materials science and of magnetism. Hundreds of new materials have been dis­ covered, often with previously unobserved and puzzling magnetic prop­ erties. A large and growing technology exists that is based on the magnetic properties of materials. Very many devices used in everyday life involve magnetism and new applications are being invented all the time. Under­ standing the fundamental background to the applications is vital to using and developing them. The aim of this book is to provide a simple, up-to-date introduction to the study of solid state magnetism, both intrinsic and technical. It is designed to meet the needs a...

  10. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  11. SOLID WASTE STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAUL G. ORTIZ - COLEMAN RESEARCH CORP/COMPA INDUSTRIES

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to study the solid waste issues brought about by a Type C Investigation; ``Disposal of Inappropriate Material in the Los Alamos County Landfill'' (May 28, 1993). The study was completed in August 1995 by Coleman Research Corporation, under subcontract number 405810005-Y for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The study confirmed the issues identified in the Type C investigation, and also ascertained further issues or problems. During the course of this study two incidents involving hazardous waste resulted in the inappropriate disposal of the waste. An accidental spill, on June 8, 1995, at one of Laboratory buildings was not handled correctly, and ended up in the LAC Landfill. Hazardous waste was disposed of in a solid waste container and sent to the Los Alamos County Landfill. An attempt to locate the hazardous waste at the LAC Landfill was not successful. The second incident involving hazardous waste was discovered by the FSS-8, during a random dumpster surveillance. An interim dumpster program managed by FSS-8 discovered hazardous waste and copper chips in the solid waste, on August 9, 1995. The hazardous waste and copper chips would have been transported to the LAC Landfill if the audit team had not brought the problem to the awareness of the facility waste management personnel.

  12. Solid targetry for compact cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comor, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present experimental results of solid targetry for compact cyclotrons. It is concluded: Solid targetry is not restricted to large accelerator centers anymore; Small and medium scale radioisotope production is feasible with compact cyclotrons; The availability of versatile solid target systems is expected to boost the radiochemistry of 'exotic' positron emitters

  13. Separation of oils from solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Slyke, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for cleaning oil-contaminated particulate solids. It comprises: contacting contaminated solids with a non-aqueous liquid composition comprising a carboxylic acid; then contacting the solids with an aqueous wash containing a reagent for converting the carboxylic acid to a water-soluble carboxylate salt; and removing an aqueous phase containing carboxylate salt and entrained oil

  14. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling water and dissolved gas chemistry at the Accesa sinkhole (southern Tuscany, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The 38.5 m deep Lake Accesa is a sinkhole located in southern Tuscany (Italy that shows a peculiar water composition, being characterized by relatively high total dissolved solids (TDS values (2 g L-1 and a Ca(Mg-SO4 geochemical facies. The presence of significant amounts of extra-atmospheric gases (CO2 and CH4, which increase their concentrations with depth, is also recognized. These chemical features, mimicking those commonly shown by volcanic lakes fed by hydrothermal-magmatic reservoirs, are consistent with those of mineral springs emerging in the study area whose chemistry is produced by the interaction of meteoric-derived waters with Mesozoic carbonates and Triassic evaporites. Although the lake has a pronounced thermocline, water chemistry does not show significant changes along the vertical profile. Lake water balance calculations demonstrate that Lake Accesa has >90% of its water supply from sublacustrine springs whose subterranean pathways are controlled by the local structural assessment that likely determined the sinking event, the resulting funnel-shape being then filled by the Accesa waters. Such a huge water inflow from the lake bottom (~9·106 m3 yr-1 feeds the lake effluent (Bruna River and promotes the formation of water currents, which are able to prevent the establishment of a vertical density gradient. Consequently, a continuous mixing along the whole vertical water column is established. Changes of the drainage system by the deep-originated waters in the nearby former mining district have strongly affected the outflow rates of the local mineral springs; thus, future intervention associated with the ongoing remediation activities should carefully be evaluated to preserve the peculiar chemical features of Lake Accesa.

  15. Chemical and optical changes in freshwater dissolved organic matter exposed to solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, C.L.; Morris, D.P.; Thorn, K.A.; Moeller, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the chemical and optical changes in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two freshwater lakes and a Sphagnum bog after exposure to solar radiation. Stable carbon isotopes and solid-state 13C-NMR spectra of DOM were used together with optical and chemical data to interpret results from experimental exposures of DOM to sunlight and from seasonal observations of two lakes in northeastern Pennsylvania. Solar photochemical oxidation of humic-rich bog DOM to smaller LMW compounds and to DIC was inferred from losses of UV absorbance, optical indices of molecular weight and changes in DOM chemistry. Experimentally, we observed a 1.2??? enrichment in ??13C and a 47% loss in aromatic C functionality in bog DOM samples exposed to solar UVR. Similar results were observed in the surface waters of both lakes. In late summer hypolimnetic water in humic Lake Lacawac, we observed 3 to 4.5??? enrichments in ??13C and a 30% increase in aromatic C relative to early spring values during spring mixing. These changes coincided with increases in molecular weight and UV absorbance. Anaerobic conditions of the hypolimnion in Lake Lacawac suggest that microbial metabolism may be turning over allochthonous C introduced during spring mixing, as well as autochthonous C. This metabolic activity produces HMW DOM during the summer, which is photochemically labile and isotopically distinct from allochthonous DOM or autochthonous DOM. These results suggest both photooxidation of allochthonous DOM in the epilimnion and autotrophic production of DOM by bacteria in the hypolimnion cause seasonal trends in the UV absorbance of lakes.

  16. Controls on the Origin and Cycling of Riverine Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in the Brazos River, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, F.; Masiello, C. A.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2008-12-01

    Rivers are generally supersaturated in CO2 with respect to the atmosphere. However, there is little agreement on the sources and turnover times of excess CO2 in river waters. This is likely due to varying dominant controls on carbon sources (e.g. geologic setting, climate, land use, or human activities). In this study, we measured carbon isotopic signatures (δ13C and Δ14C) of riverine dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), as well as solid state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of particulate organic carbon (POC), to determine carbon sources fuelling respiration of the Brazos River in Texas. We found that sources of riverine CO2 varied significantly along the length of the Brazos. In the middle Brazos (between Graham and Waco), which is partially underlain by limestone, riverine DIC had average Δ14C of 74 ‰ and δ13C of -7.5 ‰, suggesting that riverine CO2 is derived almost entirely from contemporary carbon (less than 5 years old) with little evidence of carbonate input, probably due to the damming upstream of Waco. In the lower Brazos (downstream of Bryan), riverine DIC was highly depleted in 14C (average Δ14C = -148.5 ‰) and enriched in 13C (average δ13C= -9.32 ‰), indicative of the presence of old carbonate. Since there is no carbonate bedrock in contact with the river in this area, the most likely source of old carbonate is the shell used in road and building construction throughout the 19th century. Our results suggest that the effect of human activities superimposes and even surpasses the effect of natural controls (e.g. geologic setting and climate) on C cycling in the Brazos.

  17. Solid waste containing method and solid waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Takeshi.

    1997-01-01

    Solid wastes are filled in a sealed vessel, and support spacers are inserted to the gap between the inner wall of a vessel main body and the solid wastes. The solid wastes comprise shorn pieces (crushed pieces) of spent fuel rod cladding tubes, radioactively contaminated metal pieces and miscellaneous solids pressed into a disk-like shape. The sealed vessel comprises, for example, a stainless steel. The solid wastes are filled while being stacked in a plurality of stages. A solidifying filler is filled into the gap between the inner wall and the solid wastes in the vessel main body by way of an upper opening, and the upper opening is closed by a closing lid to provide an entirely sealed state. Alumina particles having high heat conductivity and excellent heat durability are used for the solid filler. It is preferable to fill an inert gas such as a dried nitrogen gas in the sealed vessel. (I.N.)

  18. Effect of dissolved organic matter derived from waste amendments on the mobility of inorganic arsenic (III) in the Egyptian alluvial soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, Mohamed [Land and Water Technologies Department, Arid Lands Cultivation Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications (SRTA-City), New Borg El-Arab, 21934 Alexandria (Egypt); Assaad, Faiz F. [Soils and Water Use Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Shalaby, Elsayed A. [Environmental Studies Department, Institute of Graduate Studies and Research, Alexandria University (Egypt)

    2013-07-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the decisive factors affecting pollutants mobility in soils receiving waste amendments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DOM1 derived from agricultural solid waste (ASW) and DOM2 derived from municipal solid waste (MSW) on the mobility of inorganic arsenic (As) in two alluvial soils from the Nile River Delta. In column experiments, addition of DOM solutions significantly increased As concentration in the effluents. There was no significant difference between the two soils, the obtained results from soil2 columns revealed that DOM2 has stronger capability than DOM1 to facilitate As mobility. The pH of the studied soils is alkaline (8.1) which promoted the dissociation as well as deprotonation of DOM and as a consequence, humic substances in DOM become negatively charged organic anions, leading to their substantial competition with As for the adsorption sites on both soil surfaces. The results emphasized that in alkaline soils there is a risk of groundwater pollution in the long run by arsenic either naturally found in soil or originated at high soil pH when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released from various organic amendments ASW and/or MSW and leached through soil profile.

  19. Characterization Of Dissolved Organic Mattter In The Florida Keys Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. G.; Shank, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    Over the past few decades, Scleractinian coral populations in the Florida Keys have increasingly experienced mortality due to bleaching events as well as microbial mediated illnesses such as black band and white band disease. Such pathologies seem to be most correlated with elevated sea surface temperatures, increased UV exposures, and shifts in the microbial community living on the coral itself. Recent studies indicate that corals’ exposure to UV in the Florida Keys is primarily controlled by the concentration of CDOM (Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter) in the water column. Further, microbial community alterations may be linked to changes in concentration and chemical composition of the larger DOM (Dissolved Organic Matter) pool. Our research characterized the spatial and temporal properties of DOM in Florida Bay and along the Keys ecosystems using DOC analyses, in-situ water column optical measurements, and spectral analyses including absorbance and fluorescence measurements. We analyzed DOM characteristics along transects running from the mouth of the Shark River at the southwest base of the Everglades, through Florida Bay, and along near-shore Keys coastal waters. Two 12 hour time-series samplings were also performed at the Seven-Mile Bridge, the primary Florida Bay discharge channel to the lower Keys region. Photo-bleaching experiments showed that the chemical characteristics of the DOM pool are altered by exposure to solar radiation. Results also show that DOC (~0.8-5.8 mg C/L) and CDOM (~0.5-16.5 absorbance coefficient at 305nm) concentrations exhibit seasonal fluctuations in our study region. EEM analyses suggest seasonal transitions between primarily marine (summer) and terrestrial (winter) sources along the Keys. We are currently combining EEM-PARAFAC analysis with in-situ optical measurements to model changes in the spectral properties of DOM in the water column. Additionally, we are using stable δ13C isotopic analysis to further characterize DOM

  20. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: the effect of source on quantification

    OpenAIRE

    W. K. Oestreich; N. K. Ganju; J. W. Pohlman; S. E. Suttles

    2015-01-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM...

  1. Bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in wastewaters from animal feedlots and storage lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) transport from animal agriculture to surface waters can lead to eutrophication and dissolved oxygen depletion. Biodegradable DON (BDON) is a portion of DON that is mineralized by bacteria while bioavailable DON (ABDON) is utilized by bacteria and/or algae. This stu...

  2. Influence of Channel Geomorphology on Retention of Dissolved and Particulate Matter in a Cascade Mountain Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary A. Lamberti; Stan V. Gregory; Linda R. Ashkenas; Randall C. Wildman; Alan G. Steinman

    1989-01-01

    Retention of particulate and dissolved nutrients in streams is a major determinant of food avail-ability to stream biota. Retention of particulate matter (leaves) and dissolved nutrients (nitrogen) was studied experimentally during summer 1987 in four 300-500 m reaches of Lookout Creek, a fifth-order stream in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Constrained (narrow valley...

  3. Dissolved oxygen mapping: A powerful tool for site assessments and ground water monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, W.A.; Kimball, G.

    1992-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen concentration profiles often provide an excellent indication of the natural biological activity of microorganisms in ground water. The analysis of dissolved oxygen in ground water also provides a rapid, inexpensive method for determining the areal extent of contaminant plumes containing aerobically degraded compounds such as petroleum hydrocarbons. Indigenous hydrocarbon degrading organisms are present at most petroleum product spills giving this technique an almost universal application for dissolved hydrocarbons in ground water. Data from several sites will be presented to demonstrate the relationship between oxygen and dissolved contaminant concentrations. The inverse relationship between oxygen concentrations and dissolved contaminants can be used in many ways. During the initial site assessment, rapid on-site testing of ground water can provide real time data to direct drilling by identification of potentially contaminated locations. Several analytical techniques are available that allow field analysis to be performed in less than five minutes. Dissolved oxygen testing also provides an inexpensive way to monitor hydrocarbon migration without expensive gas chromatography. Often a plume of oxygen depleted ground water extends farther downgradient than the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. The depletion of oxygen in a well can provide an early warning system that detects upgradient contamination before the well is impacted by detectable levels of contaminants. Another application is the measurement of the natural degradation potential for aerobic remediation. If an aerobic in-situ remediation is used, dissolved oxygen monitoring provides an inexpensive method to monitor the progress of the remediation

  4. Determination of the Fate of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in the Three Wastewater Treatment Plants, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedyan, Mohammed; Al Harahsheh, Ahmed; Qnaisb, Esam

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the composition of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) species, particularly dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), over the traditional wastewater treatment operations in three biological nutrient removal (BNR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Jordan. It had been found that the DON percentage was up to 30% of TDN within…

  5. FACTORS INFLUENCING PHOTOREACTIONS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A COASTAL RIVER OF THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photoreactions of dissolved organic matter can affect the oxidizing capacity, nutrient dynamics, trace gas exchange, and color of surface waters. This study focuses on factors that affect the photoreactions of the colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Satilla River, a co...

  6. Dissolved Fe across the Weddell Sea and Drake Passage: impact of DFe on nutrient uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Middag, R.; Neven, I.; Van Ooijen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript reports the first full depth distributions of dissolved iron (DFe) over a high-resolution Weddell Sea and Drake Passage transect. Very low dissolved DFe concentrations (0.01-0.1 nM range) were observed in the surface waters of the Weddell Sea, and within the Drake Passage polar

  7. Dissolved Fe across the Weddell Sea and Drake Passage : Impact of DFe on nutrient uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M. B.; Laan, P.; De Baar, H. J. W.; Middag, R.; Neven, I.; Van Ooijen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript reports the first full depth distributions of dissolved iron (DFe) over a high-resolution Weddell Sea and Drake Passage transect. Very low dissolved DFe concentrations (0.01-0.1 nM range) were observed in the surface waters of the Weddell Sea, and within the Drake Passage polar

  8. Leaching of dissolved organic and inorganic nitrogen from legume-based grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusliene, Gedrime; Eriksen, Jørgen; Rasmussen, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Leaching of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a considerable loss pathway in grassland soils. We investigated the white clover (Trifolium repens) contribution to N transport and temporal N dynamics under a pure stand of white clover and white clover...

  9. More on the losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving: toward a multiparameter modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Parmentier, Maryline; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-11-28

    Pouring champagne into a glass is far from being inconsequential with regard to the dissolved CO(2) concentration found in champagne. Three distinct bottle types, namely, a magnum bottle, a standard bottle, and a half bottle, were examined with regard to their loss of dissolved CO(2) during the service of successively poured flutes. Whatever the bottle size, a decreasing trend is clearly observed with regard to the concentration of dissolved CO(2) found within a flute (from the first to the last one of a whole service). Moreover, when it comes to champagne serving, the bottle size definitely does matter. The higher the bottle volume, the better its buffering capacity with regard to dissolved CO(2) found within champagne during the pouring process. Actually, for a given flute number in a pouring data series, the concentration of dissolved CO(2) found within the flute was found to decrease as the bottle size decreases. The impact of champagne temperature (at 4, 12, and 20 °C) on the losses of dissolved CO(2) found in successively poured flutes for a given standard 75 cL bottle was also examined. Cold temperatures were found to limit the decreasing trend of dissolved CO(2) found within the successively poured flutes (from the first to the last one of a whole service). Our experimental results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model that accounts for the major physical parameters that influence the loss of dissolved CO(2) during the service of a whole bottle type.

  10. The dynamics of dissolved oxygen concentration for water quality monitoring and assessment in polder ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeningen, R.

    1983-01-01

    This study deals with the use of the dynamics of dissolved oxygen concentration for water quality assessment in polder ditches. The dynamics of the dissolved oxygen concentration, i.e. the temporal and spatial variations in a few polder ditches under a range of natural, pollution and management

  11. Occurrence and behaviour of dissolved, nano-particulate and micro-particulate iron in waste waters and treatment systems: new insights from electrochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, R; Aplin, A C; Horrocks, B R; Mudashiru, L K

    2012-04-01

    Cyclic-, Differential Pulse- and Steady-state Microdisc Voltammetry (CV, DPV, SMV) techniques have been used to quantify the occurrence and fate of dissolved Fe(ii)/Fe(iii), nano-particulate and micro-particulate iron over a 12 month period in a series of net-acidic and net-alkaline coal mine drainages and passive treatment systems. Total iron in the mine waters is typically 10-100 mg L(-1), with values up to 2100 mg L(-1). Between 30 and 80% of the total iron occurs as solid phase, of which 20 to 80% is nano-particulate. Nano-particulate iron comprises 20 to 70% of the nominally "dissolved" (i.e. sedimentation are the only processes required to remove solid phase iron, these data have important implications for the generation or consumption of acidity during water treatment. In most waters, the majority of truly dissolved iron occurs as Fe(ii) (average 64 ± 22%). Activities of Fe(ii) do not correlate with pH and geochemical modelling shows that no Fe(ii) mineral is supersaturated. Removal of Fe(ii) must proceed via oxidation and hydrolysis. Except in waters with pH waters are generally supersaturated with respect to ferrihydrite and schwertmannite, and are not at redox equilibrium, indicating the key role of oxidation and hydrolysis kinetics on water treatment. Typically 70-100% of iron is retained in the treatment systems. Oxidation, hydrolysis, precipitation, coagulation and sedimentation occur in all treatment systems and - independent of water chemistry and the type of treatment system - hydroxides and oxyhydroxysulfates are the main iron sinks. The electrochemical data thus reveal the rationale for incomplete iron retention in individual systems and can thus inform future design criteria. The successful application of this low cost and rapid electrochemical method demonstrates its significant potential for real-time, on-site monitoring of iron-enriched waters and may in future substitute traditional analytical methods.

  12. Effect of Dissolved gas on bubble behavior of subcooled boiling in narrow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shaodan; Tan Sichao; Xu Chao; Gao Puzhen; Xu Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of dissolved gas on bubble behavior in narrow rectangular channel under subcooled boiling condition. A high-speed digital video camera was applied to capture the dynamics of the bubble with or without dissolved gas in a narrow rectangular channel. It is found that the dissolved gas has great influence on bubble behavior in subcooled boiling condition. The dissolved gas slows down the rate of bubble growth and condensation and makes the variation of the bubble diameter present some oscillation characteristics. This phenomenon was discussed in the view of the vapor evaporation and condensation. The existence of the dissolved gas can facilitate the survival of the bubble and promote the aggregation of bubbles, and enhence heat transfer enhancement in some ways. (authors)

  13. Laser Calorimetry Spectroscopy for ppm-level Dissolved Gas Detection and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K S, Nagapriya; Sinha, Shashank; R, Prashanth; Poonacha, Samhitha; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Bhattacharya, Anandaroop; Choudhury, Niloy; Mahalik, Saroj; Maity, Sandip

    2017-02-20

    In this paper we report a newly developed technique - laser calorimetry spectroscopy (LCS), which is a combination of laser absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry - for the detection of gases dissolved in liquids. The technique involves determination of concentration of a dissolved gas by irradiating the liquid with light of a wavelength where the gas absorbs, and measuring the temperature change caused by the absorbance. Conventionally, detection of dissolved gases with sufficient sensitivity and specificity was done by first extracting the gases from the liquid and then analyzing the gases using techniques such as gas chromatography. Using LCS, we have been able to detect ppm levels of dissolved gases without extracting them from the liquid. In this paper, we show the detection of dissolved acetylene in transformer oil in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength (3021 nm) region.

  14. Research on Dynamic Dissolving Model and Experiment for Rock Salt under Different Flow Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinrong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing deep rock salt cavern is not only a widely recognized energy reserve method but also a key development direction for implementing the energy strategic reserve plan. And rock salt cavern adopts solution mining techniques to realize building cavity. In view of this, the paper, based on the dissolving properties of rock salt, being simplified and hypothesized the dynamic dissolving process of rock salt, combined conditions between dissolution effect and seepage effect in establishing dynamic dissolving models of rock salt under different flow quantities. Devices were also designed to test the dynamic dissolving process for rock salt samples under different flow quantities and then utilized the finite-difference method to find the numerical solution of the dynamic dissolving model. The artificial intelligence algorithm, Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (PSO, was finally introduced to conduct inverse analysis of parameters on the established model, whose calculation results coincide with the experimental data.

  15. Process automation using combinations of process and machine control technologies with application to a continuous dissolver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.; Yarbro, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    Operation of a continuous rotary dissolver, designed to leach uranium-plutonium fuel from chopped sections of reactor fuel cladding using nitric acid, has been automated. The dissolver is a partly continuous, partly batch process that interfaces at both ends with batchwise processes, thereby requiring synchronization of certain operations. Liquid acid is fed and flows through the dissolver continuously, whereas chopped fuel elements are fed to the dissolver in small batches and move through the compartments of the dissolver stagewise. Sequential logic (or machine control) techniques are used to control discrete activities such as the sequencing of isolation valves. Feedback control is used to control acid flowrates and temperatures. Expert systems technology is used for on-line material balances and diagnostics of process operation. 1 ref., 3 figs

  16. Dispersion of dissolved tracers released at the seafloor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupferman, S.L.; Moore, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present scenarios that describe the temporal and spatial development of a concentration field of a dissolved tracer released at the seafloor for one Pacific and two Atlantic study areas. The scenarios are closely tied to available data by means of simple analytical models, and they proceed in stages from short time and space scales in the immediate vicinity of a release point to those scales characteristic of entire ocean basins. They introduce and discuss the concepts of internal mixing time and residence time in the benthic mixed layer, which are useful for developing an intuitive feeling for the behavior of a tracer. They also introduce the concept of domain of occupation, which is useful in drawing distinctions between mixing and stirring in the ocean. From this study it is apparent that reliable estimation of mixing will require careful consideration of the dynamics of the eddy fields in the ocean. In addition they urgently need more information that relates isopycnal structure and bottom topography to local near-bottom circulation

  17. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  18. Remote repair robots for dissolvers in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Sen; Hirose, Yasuo; Kawamura, Hironobu; Minato, Akira; Ozaki, Norihiko.

    1984-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, for the purpose of the reduction of radiation exposure of workers, the shortening of working time and the improvement of capacity ratio of the facilities, the technical development of various devices for remote maintenance and inspection has been advanced so far. This time, an occasion came to inspect and repair the pinhole defects occurred in spent fuel dissolving tanks in the reprocessing plant of Tokai Establishment, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. However, since the radiation environmental condition and the restricting condition due to the object of repair were extremely severe, it was impossible to cope with them using conventional robot techniques. Consequently, a repair robot withstanding high level radiation has been developed anew, which can work by totally remote operation in the space of about 270 mm inside diameter and about 6 m length. The repair robot comprises a periscope reflecting mirror system, a combined underwater and atmospheric use television, a grinder, a welder, a liquid penetrant tester and an ultrasonic flaw detector. The key points of the development were the parts withstanding high level radiation and the selection of materials, to make the mechanism small size and the realization of totally remote operation. (Kako, I.)

  19. Biogeochemical modelling of dissolved oxygen in a changing ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Oliver; Buitenhuis, Erik; Le Quéré, Corinne; Suntharalingam, Parvadha

    2017-08-01

    Secular decreases in dissolved oxygen concentration have been observed within the tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and at mid- to high latitudes over the last approximately 50 years. Earth system model projections indicate that a reduction in the oxygen inventory of the global ocean, termed ocean deoxygenation, is a likely consequence of on-going anthropogenic warming. Current models are, however, unable to consistently reproduce the observed trends and variability of recent decades, particularly within the established tropical OMZs. Here, we conduct a series of targeted hindcast model simulations using a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemistry model in order to explore and review biases in model distributions of oceanic oxygen. We show that the largest magnitude of uncertainty is entrained into ocean oxygen response patterns due to model parametrization of pCO2-sensitive C : N ratios in carbon fixation and imposed atmospheric forcing data. Inclusion of a pCO2-sensitive C : N ratio drives historical oxygen depletion within the ocean interior due to increased organic carbon export and subsequent remineralization. Atmospheric forcing is shown to influence simulated interannual variability in ocean oxygen, particularly due to differences in imposed variability of wind stress and heat fluxes. This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'.

  20. Treatment of wastewater containing dissolved metals by extraction-flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Flavia Pereira

    2002-02-01

    In this work an alternative process for treating a wastewater containing dissolved metals (uranium and zirconium) is considered. In order to develop this work, a continuous separation unit, characterized by the association of solvent extraction and liquid-liquid flotation is used. Alamina 336 (a mixture of tri-octyl and tri-decyl amines) is used as extractant in the the extraction process, carried out inward the ejector. The splitting of the amine-water emulsion formed is carried out in a continuously operated flotation column (of approximately 2.5 L volume). The solvent extraction results showed that it is possible to reach an efficiency of about 95% for the uranium and zirconium extraction, for a metal in the feed concentration of 10 ppm and for a Q fa /Q fo ratio around 200. An efficiency of about 80% is reached in the flotation column when the liquid flowrate is equal 0.05 Lmin -1 and the air flowrate is equal 3.3 Lmin -1 . (author)